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Sample records for a318 a319 a320

  1. 76 FR 16582 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... A318/A319/A320/ A321 Airworthiness Limitation Items, Document AI/SE-M4/95A.0252/96, Issue 7, dated... ALI Document reference AI/SE-M4/95A.0252/ 96 and Airbus A319 Corporate Jet ALI Document reference AI... specified in Airbus A318/A319/A320/A321 ALI Document reference AI/ SE-M4/95A.0252/96 issue 10 and...

  2. 75 FR 52246 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... (Airworthiness Limitations Section) part 2 under ALI Document reference AI/SE-M4/95A.0252/96 at issue 7; approved... A318/A319/A320/A321 Airworthiness Limitation Items (ALI) AI/SE-M4/95A.0252/96, Issue 09, dated November... 552007-01-1 or 552007-01-3, which is defined in Airbus A318/A319/A320/A321 ALI AI/...

  3. 76 FR 42024 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    .../A319/A320/A321 ALI Document reference AI/SE-M4/95A.0252/ 96 and Airbus A319 Corporate Jet ALI Document reference AI/SE-M2/ 95A.1038/99, which are approved by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and... specified in Airbus A318/A319/A320/A321 ALI Document reference AI/ SE-M4/95A.0252/96 issue 10 and...

  4. 76 FR 37241 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... Bulletin (SB) A320-32-1338, which incorporate an improved retaining ring, located on the piston rod's extension end, and a new piston rod with machined shoulder to accommodate the thicker section of the...

  5. 75 FR 78883 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ...-148-AD; Amendment 39-16496; AD 2010-23-07] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318... column, in the second column of the table, in the 19th entry, ``TS-Z072'', should read ``TS-2072''. 3....

  6. 75 FR 27414 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    .... The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as: Several occurrences of loss of the AC BUS 1 have been reported which led in some instances to the loss of the AC ESS BUS and DC ESS BUS and connected systems... AC BUS 1 have been reported which led in some instances to the loss of the AC ESS BUS and DC ESS BUS...

  7. 75 FR 8003 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... [alternating current] BUS 1 have been reported which led in some instances to the loss of the AC ESS BUS and DC ESS BUS and connected systems. The affected systems include multiple flight deck Display Units... condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: Several occurrences of loss of the AC BUS 1 have been...

  8. 75 FR 31282 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319-100, A320-200, A321-100, and A321-200 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ...-100, A320-200, A321- 100, and A321-200 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... to certain Airbus Model A319-100, A320-200, A321-100, and A321-200 series airplanes. This AD requires repetitive inspections for corrosion in the inside and outside lower walls of each type A, D, E, and...

  9. 76 FR 57630 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... the same elevator could result in an uncontrolled surface, the elevator surface being neither actuated... result in an uncontrolled surface, the elevator surface being neither actuated nor damped, which could... in an uncontrolled surface. Request To Change Compliance Time Delta Air Lines (Delta)...

  10. 76 FR 56279 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... intermittent electrical power supply interruptions may not be detectable by the electrical power monitoring... intermittent electrical power supply interruptions. Analysis showed that these interruptions may fluctuate... aeroplanes systems. As a consequence, some intermittent electrical power supply interruptions may not be...

  11. 77 FR 64025 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Interaction of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Todd Martin, FAA, Airframe/Cabin Safety Branch, ANM-115, Transport... comply with the fuel vent and exhaust emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34 and the noise certification... two thirds of the ultimate loads defined in subparagraph 2(b)(1)(i). For pressurized cabins,...

  12. 77 FR 64023 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Design Roll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... modification 160023 (Sharklet). These airplanes will have novel or unusual design features when compared to the... 160023 on Model A321 series airplanes for the installation of a ``Sharklet,'' a large wingtip device. The... series airplanes with modification 160023 (Sharklet) and later derivatives because the existing special...

  13. 75 FR 68181 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... category, all manufacturer serial numbers (S/Ns), if equipped with carbon fiber reinforced plastic rudders... rudders in reinforced areas and other areas (splice/lower rib/upper edge/leading edge/other specified... hole restoration has been performed previously in the reinforced area. We agree that additional work...

  14. 75 FR 16689 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... investigation confirmed that the defects were a result of de-bonding between the skin and honeycomb core. An extended de-bonding, if not detected and corrected, may degrade the structural integrity of the rudder. The... reworked in production. The investigation confirmed that the defects were a result of de- bonding...

  15. 76 FR 64854 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... cockpit cues were conducted to assess the consequences of mismanagement of thrust levers during landing...-positioning and so providing further opportunity for the flight crew to identify an incorrect thrust lever configuration and to correct this. * * * In addition, the analysis of the thrust lever management issue shows...

  16. 75 FR 46873 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318-111 and A318-112 Airplanes and Model A319, A320, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... lateral fittings. Replacing the 80VU lower central support (i.e., replacing the pyramid fitting on the.... Replacing the pyramid fitting on the 80VU rack with a new, reinforced fitting, in accordance with the... required by paragraph (i) of this AD, before further flight, replace the pyramid fitting on the 80VU...

  17. 75 FR 75878 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318-111 and A318-112 Airplanes and Model A319, A320, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ...., replacing the pyramid fitting on the 80VU rack with a new, reinforced fitting) eliminates the need for the... March 18, 2010, both specify repairing or replacing the pyramid fitting in accordance with Airbus... by paragraph (j) of this AD. Doing the repair or replacement of the pyramid fitting in...

  18. 75 FR 12965 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Seats With Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ..., Airframe/Cabin Safety Branch, ANM-115, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 1601... required of large, non-metallic panels in the cabin interior. At the time the applicable rules were written... to meet Sec. 25.853, Appendix F, parts IV and V, if they are installed in cabins of airplanes...

  19. 77 FR 64029 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Design Dive Speed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... with modification 160023 (Sharklet). These airplanes will have novel or unusual design features when... 160023 on Model A321 series airplanes for the installation of a ``Sharklet,'' a large wingtip device. The... 160023 (Sharklet) and later derivatives because the existing special conditions have evolved over the...

  20. 76 FR 1346 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300, A300-600, A310, A318, A319, A320, A321, A330-300...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... category, identified in paragraphs (c)(1), (c)(2), (c)(3), (c)(4), and (c)(5) of this AD. (1) Model A300 B2... those on which Airbus modification 200446 has been embodied in production. (4) Model 340-211, A340-212...-258-AD; Amendment 39-16568; AD 2010-02-05] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300...

  1. 76 FR 27863 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318-112, A319-111, A319-112, A319-115, A319-132, A319-133...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... been detected on terminal modules Part Number (P/N) NSA 937901M1604, manufactured by Deutsch, due to an... on terminal modules Part Number (P/N) NSA 937901M1604, manufactured by Deutsch, due to an... Number (P/N) NSA 937901M1604, manufactured by Deutsch, due to an insufficient crimping of the...

  2. 76 FR 67625 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319 and A320 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... aspirator following scheduled (for on-ground testing purposes) deployment of the Left Hand (LH) OWS . Investigations have revealed that the aspirator of the off-wing ramp/slide system interferes with the extrusion... following scheduled (for on-ground testing purposes) deployment of the Left Hand (LH) OWS ....

  3. 75 FR 11439 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... standard V60 introduces modifications to the vertical speed indication to further improve the legibility in... specified in this AD includes a requirement to reprogram the erasable programmable read only memory (EPROM... modifications to the vertical speed indication to further improve the legibility in the case of TCAS Resolution...

  4. Classification and Prediction of RF Coupling inside A-320 and A-319 Airplanes using Feed Forward Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, Madiha; Ely, Jay; Vahala, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Neural Network Modeling is introduced in this paper to classify and predict Interference Path Loss measurements on Airbus 319 and 320 airplanes. Interference patterns inside the aircraft are classified and predicted based on the locations of the doors, windows, aircraft structures and the communication/navigation system-of-concern. Modeled results are compared with measured data and a plan is proposed to enhance the modeling for better prediction of electromagnetic coupling problems inside aircraft.

  5. 78 FR 65173 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... editorial changes. We have determined that these minor changes: Are consistent with the intent that was... Chapter 57, Wings, of the Airbus A318/A319/A320/A321 Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM), Revision 50, dated... 57, Wings, of the Airbus A318/A319/A320/A321 Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM), Revision 50,...

  6. 14 CFR 125.509 - Flammability reduction means.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... operational. Table 1 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319, A320, A321 Series 737 Series A330, A340... comply with § 26.33(c) of this chapter. Table 2 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319,...

  7. 76 FR 61641 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319-111, -112, and -132 Airplanes; Model A320-111, -211...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... milliOhms or less at the left- hand and right-hand wing, no further action is required. (2) If the resistance value is greater than 10 milliOhms at the left-hand or right-hand wing, before further flight do a...

  8. 78 FR 6198 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N 3238); Certification of Cooktops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N..., serial number (S/N) 3238. This airplane, as modified by Fokker Services B.V., will have a novel or... certificate for an interior conversion on an Airbus Model A318-112 airplane, S/N 3238. The Airbus Model A318...

  9. HRTEM and HAADF-STEM of precipitates at peak ageing of cast A319 aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Wiengmoon, Amporn; Pearce, John T H; Chairuangsri, Torranin; Isoda, Seiji; Saito, Hikaru; Kurata, Hiroki

    2013-02-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) were applied to investigate the precipitates formed during age hardening at 170±5°C for up to 48h of cast A319 aluminium alloy (Al-4.93wt%Si-3.47wt%Cu). The precipitates at the peak-aged condition have been identified as mainly θ" together with a smaller amount of θ'. It is proposed that the θ" is responsible for hardening at peak ageing at 170°C of the cast A319 aluminium alloy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 77 FR 51944 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N 3238); Certification of Cooktops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N 3238); Certification of Cooktops AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...

  11. 77 FR 64765 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ..., Operational Check of Centre Tank Fuel Pump GFI, of the Airbus A318/A319/A320 Aircraft Maintenance Manual. Note... requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in... proposed AD and placed it in the AD docket. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft...

  12. 77 FR 49705 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    .... SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A318-112 and -121 airplanes; Model A319-111, -112, -115, - 132, and -133 airplanes; Model A320-214, -232, and -233 airplanes; and Model A321-211, -212, -213, and -231 airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports that some...

  13. 78 FR 28152 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...: We propose to supersede an existing airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to certain Airbus Model A318-111 and -112 airplanes, Model A319 series airplanes, Model A320 series airplanes, and Model A321... relevant data, views, or arguments about this proposed AD. Send your comments to an address listed...

  14. Influences of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welded cast A319 aluminium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, M.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2009-04-01

    Fusion welding of cast A319 (Al-Si-Cu) alloy will lead to many problems including porosity, micro-fissuring, and hot cracking. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can be used to weld A319 alloy without these defects. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of FSW process parameters on the tensile strength of A319 alloy welded joints. Joints were made using different combinations of tool rotation speed, welding speed, and axial force, each at four levels. The quality of weld zone was analyzed using macrostructure and microstructure analysis. Tensile strength of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the weld zone microstructure. The joint fabricated with a 1200 rpm tool rotation speed, 40 mm/min welding speed, and 4 kN axial force showed superior tensile strength compared with the other joints.

  15. Narrowband Measurements in an Airbus A319 for In-Cabin Wireless Personal Communications via Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera Diaz, Nuria

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a measurement campaign conducted in February 2002 in an Airbus A319 aircraft in Hamburg, Germany. These measurements were performed in the framework of the WirelessCabin IST Project with a twofold goal: (i) to study the propagation characteristics inside an aircraft, and (ii) to evaluate the interference produced from the cabin network into terrestrial networks. The whole test campaign was focused in GSM, UMTS and ISM bands. The in-cabin results reveal that one single access point with a omnidirectional antenna transmitting 6 dBm is enough to provide coverage over the whole cabin, but that a leaky line cable gives more uniform coverage over it. On the other hand, out-cabin results show that countermeasures must be taken to reduce interference from the on-board wireless system to ground.

  16. Medico-legal investigations of the Airbus, A320 crash upon Mount Ste-Odile, France.

    PubMed

    Ludes, B; Tracqui, A; Pfitzinger, H; Kintz, P; Levy, F; Disteldorf, M; Hutt, J M; Kaess, B; Haag, R; Memheld, B

    1994-09-01

    The authors present the medico-legal investigations and identification after the aircrash of the Airbus A320 upon the Mount Sainte-Odile (France). The identification team comprising investigators from the gendarmerie, forensic pathologists, odontologists, and scientists of the Institute from Legal Medecine rapidly retrieved and identified 85 of the 87 victims, with 17 being identified through DNA typing, three through fingerprints and the remaining through dental records and specific physical or X-ray findings. Full autopsies were performed on all fatalities to determine patterns of injury and cause of death. Results lead us to point out the importance of a multidisciplinary team of forensic practitioners especially trained for managing medico-legal investigation in mass disaster and the ability of DNA technology to solve complex identification problems.

  17. A 320 Year Ice-Core Record of Atmospheric Hg Pollution in the Altai, Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Eyrikh, Stella; Eichler, Anja; Tobler, Leonhard; Malygina, Natalia; Papina, Tatyana; Schwikowski, Margit

    2017-10-03

    Anthropogenic emissions of the toxic heavy metal mercury (Hg) have substantially increased atmospheric Hg levels during the 20th century compared to preindustrial times. However, on a regional scale, atmospheric Hg concentration or deposition trends vary to such an extent during the industrial period that the consequences of recent Asian emissions on atmospheric Hg levels are still unclear. Here we present a 320 year Hg deposition history for Central Asia, based on a continuous high-resolution ice-core Hg record from the Belukha glacier in the Siberian Altai, covering the time period 1680-2001. Hg concentrations and deposition fluxes start rising above background levels at the beginning of the 19th century due to emissions from gold/silver mining and Hg production. A steep increase occurs after the 1940s culminating during the 1970s, at the same time as the maximum Hg use in consumer products in Europe and North America. After a distinct decrease in the 1980s, Hg levels in the 1990s and beginning of the 2000s return to their maximum values, which we attribute to increased Hg emissions from Asia. Thus, rising Hg emissions from coal combustion and artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Asian countries determine recent atmospheric Hg levels in Central Asia, counteracting emission reductions due to control measures in Europe and North America.

  18. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  19. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  20. Team play with a powerful and independent agent: operational experiences and automation surprises on the Airbus A-320.

    PubMed

    Sarter, N B; Woods, D D

    1997-12-01

    Research and operational experience have shown that one of the major problems with pilot-automation interaction is a lack of mode awareness (i.e., the current and future status and behavior of the automation). As a result, pilots sometimes experience so-called automation surprises when the automation takes an unexpected action or fails to behave as anticipated. A lack of mode awareness and automation surprises can he viewed as symptoms of a mismatch between human and machine properties and capabilities. Changes in automation design can therefore he expected to affect the likelihood and nature of problems encountered by pilots. Previous studies have focused exclusively on early generation "glass cockpit" aircraft that were designed based on a similar automation philosophy. To find out whether similar difficulties with maintaining mode awareness are encountered on more advanced aircraft, a corpus of automation surprises was gathered from pilots of the Airbus A-320, an aircraft characterized by high levels of autonomy, authority, and complexity. To understand the underlying reasons for reported breakdowns in human-automation coordination, we also asked pilots about their monitoring strategies and their experiences with and attitude toward the unique design of flight controls on this aircraft.

  1. Team play with a powerful and independent agent: operational experiences and automation surprises on the Airbus A-320

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, N. B.; Woods, D. D.

    1997-01-01

    Research and operational experience have shown that one of the major problems with pilot-automation interaction is a lack of mode awareness (i.e., the current and future status and behavior of the automation). As a result, pilots sometimes experience so-called automation surprises when the automation takes an unexpected action or fails to behave as anticipated. A lack of mode awareness and automation surprises can he viewed as symptoms of a mismatch between human and machine properties and capabilities. Changes in automation design can therefore he expected to affect the likelihood and nature of problems encountered by pilots. Previous studies have focused exclusively on early generation "glass cockpit" aircraft that were designed based on a similar automation philosophy. To find out whether similar difficulties with maintaining mode awareness are encountered on more advanced aircraft, a corpus of automation surprises was gathered from pilots of the Airbus A-320, an aircraft characterized by high levels of autonomy, authority, and complexity. To understand the underlying reasons for reported breakdowns in human-automation coordination, we also asked pilots about their monitoring strategies and their experiences with and attitude toward the unique design of flight controls on this aircraft.

  2. Construction and performance of a 320 X 244-element IR-CCD imager with PtSi Schottky-barrier detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, T. S.; Kosonocky, W. F.; Shallcross, F. V.; Groppe, J. V.; Meray, G. M.

    1989-10-01

    A 320 x 244-element IR CCD imager was developed with 40 x 40-micron pixels, 43-percent fill factor, and a saturation signal of 1.4 x 10 to the 6th electrons/pixel. Charge-transfer inefficiency of less that 0.0001 per transfer was achieved for operation of the imager at 77 K with horizontal clock frequency of 6.2 MHz using a 12-micron-wide horizontal output register with a 3-micron-wide trench. The device was operated at temperatures as low as 50 K with sufficiently low transfer losses to produce good quality video images. Excellent quality thermal imaging was demonstrated for operation at 30 frames/sec with a 100-mm f/1.4 lens, an f/1.3 cold shield, and a 3.4-micron long-pass filter at 77 K.

  3. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  4. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M S; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-07-17

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  5. Optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography using a 320-row MDCT volume scanner.

    PubMed

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kondo, Masatoshi; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Shimomiya, Yamato; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Funama, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    A 320-row multidetector CT (MDCT) is expected for a good artery-vein separation in terms of temporal resolution. However, a shortened scan duration may lead to insufficient vascular enhancement. We assessed the optimal scan timing for the artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography (CTA) when bolus tracking was used at 320-row MDCT. We analyzed 60 patients, who underwent whole-brain four-dimensional CTA. Difference in CT attenuation between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the superior sagittal sinus (Datt) was calculated in each phase. Using a visual evaluation score for the depiction of arteries and veins, we calculated the difference between the mean score for the intracranial arteries and the mean score for the veins (Dscore). We assessed the time at which the maximum Datt and Dscore were simultaneously observed. The maximum Datt was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s and 18.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the contrast media arrival time at the ICA (Taa). The maximum Dscore was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the Taa. There were no statistically significant differences in Datt (p = 0.375) or Dscore (p = 0.139) between these scan timings. The optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CTA was 6.0 s or 8.0 s for the arteries and 16.0 s for the veins after the Taa. Advances in knowledge: Optimal scan timing allowed us to visualize intracranial arteries or veins with minimal superimposition.

  6. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  7. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-02-01

    An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35-135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique.

  8. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Purpose Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Material and Methods Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35–135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. Results The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). Conclusion For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique. PMID:28321330

  9. Design and testing of a 320 MW pulsed power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Schillig, J.B.; Boenig, H.J.; Ferner, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    For a 60 Tesla, 100 millisecond long pulse magnet five 64 MW (87.6 MVA) power converter modules have been installed. Each module provides a no-load voltage of 4.18 kV and a full load voltage of 3.20 kV at the rated current of 20 kA. The modules are connected to a 1,430 MVA/650 MJ inertial energy storage generator set, which is operated at 21 kV and frequencies between 60 and 42 Hz. They are designed to provide the rated power output for 2 seconds once every hour. Each module consists of two 21 kV/3.1 kV cast coil transformers and two 6-pulse rectifiers connected in parallel without an interphase reactor, forming a 12-pulse converter module. As far as possible standard high power industrial converter components were used, operated closer to their allowable limits. The converters are controlled by three programmable high speed controllers. In this paper the design of the pulsed converters, including control and special considerations for protection schemes with the converters supplying a mutually coupled magnet system, is detailed. Test results of the converters driving an ohmic-inductive load for 2 seconds at 20 kA and 3.2 kV are presented.

  10. 75 FR 3983 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... condition as: Some operators have reported airframe vibration under specific flight conditions including gusts. Investigations have revealed that under such conditions, vibrations may occur when the hinge... is excessive vibration of the elevators, which could result in reduced structural integrity...

  11. 77 FR 63716 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...-180-AD; Amendment 39-17213; AD 2012-20-07] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... -112 airplanes; and all Model A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes. That AD currently requires... incorporate revised fuel maintenance and inspection tasks, and adds airplanes to the applicability. This...

  12. 77 FR 42952 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ...-139-AD; Amendment 39-17127; AD 2012-14-13] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes; Model A319-111, -112, -115, - 132, and -133 airplanes; Model A320-214, -232, and -233 airplanes; and Model A321-211, -212, -213, and -231 airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of some...

  13. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Coolens, C; Breen, S; Purdie, T G; Owrangi, A; Publicover, J; Bartolac, S; Jaffray, D A

    2009-11-01

    Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as "volume" and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE160 mm=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for routine CT simulation within radiation oncology and allows for future investigations into specialized dynamic volumetric imaging applications.

  14. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good agreement between the measured dose profile data and the fitted Gaussian functions. The solid-state detector had no energy dependence--within the energy range of interest--and the analytical model succeeded in reproducing the absolute dose values obtained with the pencil ion chamber. For the case of large cone-beam single axial scans, the quantity that better characterizes the total energy imparted to the patient is the weighted dose profile integral (DPI{sub w}). The DPI{sub w} can be easily determined from the two parameters that define the Gaussian functions: f(0) and {sigma}. The authors found that the DLP underestimated the total energy imparted to the patient by more than 20%. The authors also found that the calculated CT dosimetric quantities were higher than those displayed on the scanner console. Conclusions: The authors described and validated a method to assess radiation dose in large cone-beam single axial scans. This method offers a simple and more accurate estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient, thus offering the possibility to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose for cone-beam CT examinations in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy.

  15. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  16. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, C.; Breen, S.; Purdie, T. G.; Owrangi, A.; Publicover, J.; Bartolac, S.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods: The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as ''volume'' and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Results: Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE{sub 160mm}=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Conclusions: Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for routine CT simulation within radiation oncology and allows for future investigations into specialized dynamic volumetric imaging applications.

  17. 76 FR 19714 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A320-214, -232, and -233 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... case of emergency electrical configuration combined with a Green and Yellow hydraulic system loss... emergency electrical configuration combined with a Green and Yellow hydraulic system loss, during landing... aeroplanes only, in case of emergency electrical configuration combined with a Green and Yellow...

  18. 76 FR 50113 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A320-214, -232, and -233 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... case of emergency electrical configuration combined with a Green and Yellow hydraulic system loss... and Yellow hydraulic system loss, during landing phase (nose landing gear extended), the roll control... a Green and Yellow hydraulic system loss, during landing phase (nose landing gear extended),...

  19. 75 FR 35 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N 3886); Certification of a Cooktop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... Electrical Equipment,'' and those in AC 25-17, ``Transport Airplane Cabin Interiors Crashworthiness Handbook... Branch, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton... possibility of fire into the passenger-cabin environment. These potential hazards to the airplane and...

  20. Interference Path Loss Prediction in A319/320 Airplanes Using Modulated Fuzzy Logic and Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, Madiha J.; Ely, Jay J.; Vahala, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, neural network (NN) modeling is combined with fuzzy logic to estimate Interference Path Loss measurements on Airbus 319 and 320 airplanes. Interference patterns inside the aircraft are classified and predicted based on the locations of the doors, windows, aircraft structures and the communication/navigation system-of-concern. Modeled results are compared with measured data. Combining fuzzy logic and NN modeling is shown to improve estimates of measured data over estimates obtained with NN alone. A plan is proposed to enhance the modeling for better prediction of electromagnetic coupling problems inside aircraft.

  1. MT3250BA: a 320×256-50µm snapshot microbolometer ROIC for high-resistance detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Akin, Tayfun

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new microbolometer readout integrated circuit (MT3250BA) designed for high-resistance detector arrays. MT3250BA is the first microbolometer readout integrated circuit (ROIC) product from Mikro-Tasarim Ltd., which is a fabless IC design house specialized in the development of monolithic CMOS imaging sensors and ROICs for hybrid photonic imaging sensors and microbolometers. MT3250BA has a format of 320 × 256 and a pixel pitch of 50 µm, developed with a system-on-chip architecture in mind, where all the timing and biasing for this ROIC are generated on-chip without requiring any external inputs. MT3250BA is a highly configurable ROIC, where many of its features can be programmed through a 3-wire serial interface allowing on-the-fly configuration of many ROIC features. MT3250BA has 2 analog video outputs and 1 analog reference output for pseudo-differential operation, and the ROIC can be programmed to operate in the 1 or 2-output modes. A unique feature of MT3250BA is that it performs snapshot readout operation; therefore, the image quality will only be limited by the thermal time constant of the detector pixels, but not by the scanning speed of the ROIC, as commonly found in the conventional microbolometer ROICs performing line-by-line (rolling-line) readout operation. The signal integration is performed at the pixel level in parallel for the whole array, and signal integration time can be programmed from 0.1 µs up to 100 ms in steps of 0.1 µs. The ROIC is designed to work with high-resistance detector arrays with pixel resistance values higher than 250 kΩ. The detector bias voltage can be programmed on-chip over a 2 V range with a resolution of 1 mV. The ROIC has a measured input referred noise of 260 µV rms at 300 K. The ROIC can be used to build a microbolometer infrared sensor with an NETD value below 100 mK using a microbolometer detector array fabrication technology with a high detector resistance value (≥ 250 KΩ), a high TCR value (≥ 2.5 % / K), and a sufficiently low pixel thermal conductance (Gth ≤ 20 nW / K). The ROIC uses a single 3.3 V supply voltage and dissipates less than 75 mW in the 1-output mode at 60 fps. MT3250BA is fabricated using a mixed-signal CMOS process on 200 mm CMOS wafers, and tested wafers are available with test data and wafer map. A USB based compact test electronics and software are available for quick evaluation of this new microbolometer ROIC.

  2. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of a ∼320 Å long protein fiber generated by in-frame extension of its repeated helical coiled-coil core. Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  3. A 320-year long series of Danube floods in Central Hungary (Budapest and Pest County): a frequency-magnitude-seasonality overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Andrea; Salinas, Jose; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2015-04-01

    The present paper is based on a recently developed database including contemporary original, administrative, legal and private source materials (published and archival) as well as media reports related to the floods occurred in the town of Budapest (historical towns of Pest, Buda) and Central Hungary (historical Pest-Pilis-Solt County). As for the archival evidence, main bases of investigation are the administrative sources such as town council protocols and county meeting protocols of Budapest and historical Pest-Pilis-Solt County: in these (legal-)administrative documents damaging events (natural/environmental hazards) were systematically recorded. Moreover, other source types such as taxation-related damage accounts as well as private and official reports, letters and correspondence (published, unpublished) were also included. Concerning published evidence, a most important source is flood reports in contemporary newspapers; however, other published sources (e.g. narratives, fund raising circulars etc.; both published and unpublished) also contained useful flood-related information. Beyond providing information on the strength and weaknesses of different sources types and the temporal and spatial distribution of evidence, a general background on the contemporary environmental and hydrological/hydromorphological conditions of the study area (and its changes during and after river regulations) are also provided. However, in the presentation the main focus is on the analysis of flood rich flood poor periods of the last more than 300 years; furthermore, the seasonality distribution as well as the magnitude of Danube flood events - and their spatial differences are discussed. In case of Budapest and Central Hungary, with respect to the greatest flood events, ice jam floods played a rather significant role before river regulation works. Due to this fact the main types of flood events (including their main causes), with special emphasis on ice jam floods, are discussed separate.

  4. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility. PMID:24531468

  5. Characterization of a 320-kb region containing the HEXA gene on bovine chromosome 10 and analysis of its association with BSE susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Juling, K; Schwarzenbacher, H; Frankenberg, U; Ziegler, U; Groschup, M; Williams, J L; Fries, R

    2008-08-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) belongs to a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible prion diseases. Recently, variants in the promoter region of the prion protein (PRNP) gene have been shown to have a considerable effect on the susceptibility to BSE. However, a previous genome scan revealed other putative BSE-susceptibility loci. Here, we analysed such a region on BTA10, which contains the functional candidate gene HEXA. Three hundred and twenty kilobases that, besides HEXA, also contain ARIH1, BRUNOL6 and PARP6 were characterized and screened for polymorphisms. Genotyping of 38 SNPs in Holstein-Friesian animals from the UK (350 diseased and 270 controls) revealed two intronic SNPs that were associated with BSE incidence, with experiment-wise P-values of 3.5 x 10(-3) and 7.7 x 10(-3) respectively. Both SNPs were in strong linkage disequilibrium and the rare alleles had a protective effect. These alleles were contained in a haplotype dubbed 'UK-protective' that was significantly overrepresented in the controls with a permuted P-value of 2 x 10(-3). An association study in German Holstein animals (73 diseased and 627 controls) revealed an opposite effect of the 'UK-protective' haplotype in this population, i.e. it was overrepresented in the diseased animals, although not significant after correction for multiple testing. These findings indicate a causal variant for BSE susceptibility on BTA10 in linkage disequilibrium with the markers studied. Candidate gene analyses of the surrounding region and additional association studies will help to clarify the origin of the protective effects and to identify causal variants for BSE susceptibility on BTA10.

  6. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-02-01

    Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20-35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  7. 78 FR 40074 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ...-1055, dated June 15, 2011. Service Bulletin A320-35-1056, dated June 15, 2011. Service Bulletin A320-35... June 15, 2011; Airbus Service Bulletin A320-35-1055, dated June 15, 2011; Airbus Service Bulletin A320...; Airbus Service Bulletin A320-35-1054, dated June 15, 2011; Airbus Service Bulletin A320-35-1055, dated...

  8. 78 FR 64162 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... June 15, 2011; Airbus Service Bulletin A320-35-1055, dated June 15, 2011; Airbus Service Bulletin A320...-1054, dated June 15, 2011; Airbus Service Bulletin A320-35-1055, dated June 15, 2011; Airbus Service... Service Bulletin A320-35-1055, dated June 15, 2011; Airbus Service Bulletin A320-35-1056, dated June 15...

  9. Nonlocality without inequalities for two-qubit mixed states based on Cabello's nonlocality [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lin-mei; Li, Cheng-zu

    2005-02-01

    This Letter presents nonlocality without inequalities for two-qubit mixed states. This Letter was mainly sparked by Cabello's work [Phys. Rev. A 65 (2003) 032108] and is an extension of our recent work [Phys. Lett. A 318 (2003) 300].

  10. 77 FR 60064 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... by AOT A320-55- 1038), which is superseded, and requires: -- a local ultrasonic inspection for... estimate that any necessary follow-on actions would take about 12 work-hours and require parts costing $10...-55A1038, Revision 01, dated June 10, 2009; or Airbus AOT A320-55A1038, Revision 02, dated September 28...

  11. X-Ray Line-Broadening Investigation of Deformation During Hot Rolling of Ti-6A1-4V with a Colony-Alpha Microstructure (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Solids, 1993 , 41, 981. 28. Hill, R., J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 1967, 15, 79. 29. Schafler, E., Zehetbauer, M. and Ungdr, T., Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 2001, A319...N.E., Williams, J.C. and Rauscher , G.P., in Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Titanium Science and Technology, Plenum Press, New

  12. 77 FR 9260 - Establishment of Dakota Grassland Conservation Area, North Dakota and South Dakota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Establishment of Dakota Grassland Conservation Area, North Dakota and South... public that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has established the Dakota Grassland... Grassland Conservation Area on September 21, 2011, with the purchase of a 318.18-acre grassland easement in...

  13. Powered Back-Up Roll. New Technology for Peeling Veneer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    measured while peeling Douglasfir veneer of different medium density fiberboard ( MDF ), and hardboard thicknesses. Veneer quality was not adversely affected...psi). The stand Is fabricated from 6-inch square tubing Common Industrial applications of this material are with a 318.inch waill thickness. The normal

  14. The Role of Microstructural Variability on the Very High-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Discontinuously-Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites using Ultrasonic Fatigue (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Strength Controlled by Porosity Population in A 319- type cast Aluminum Alloy Part II: Monte - Carlo Simulation J.Z. Yi, X. Zhu, J.W. Jones and J.E. Allison...this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data...ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES USING ULTRASONIC FATIGUE (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  15. Design and Processing of Bimetallic Aluminum Alloys by Sequential Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karun, Akhil S.; Hari, S.; Ebhota, Williams S.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Pillai, U. T. S.; Pai, B. C.

    2017-01-01

    Sequential casting is a facile and fairly new technique to produce functionally graded materials (FGMs) and components by controlled mold filling process. In the present investigation, functionally graded bimetallic aluminum alloys are produced by sequential gravity casting using A390-A319 and A390-A6061 alloy combinations. The control in pouring time between two melts has shown a significant effect on the quality and nature of interface bonding. The microstructure reveals good interface miscibility achieved through diffusion bonding between the alloys. A higher hardness of 160 BHN in the A390 region is obtained in both sequential cast systems, and a minimum value of 105 and 91 BHN is observed in the A319 and A6061 regions, respectively. The tensile and compression strength for A390-A319 are 337 and 490 MPa, whereas for A390-A6061, they are 364 and 401 MPa, respectively, which are significantly higher compared with the standard values of the base alloys, which confirms strong interface bonding. The A390 region shows higher wear resistance compared with other regions of the sequential cast system. The process described in this study is a potential and efficient approach to create good bonding between two different aluminum alloys to develop advanced functional and structural materials.

  16. Artillery Systems Engineering Study (Concept Team Final Report)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    were the gas turbines currently being developed for long life operation in heavy-duty trucks. These engines are becoming competitive with diesels... hydrokinetic transmission with bias path hydrostatic steering. This combination with a 318 gallon fuel tank provides for a cruising range of 500 kilo...VTA-903 engine and driven by the AMX-1000 6-speed hydrokinetic trans- mission with bias path hydrostatic steering. Cooling of the engine is

  17. Integrating the Acquisition Team. Proceedings of the Conference Held in Arlington, Virginia on July 14-16, 1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-16

    Ruth Dewald) 2550 Huntington Ave. Uarren MI 48397-5000 Alexandria VA 22303-1499 (313) 574-8669 ET 786-8669 (703) 960-4900 ET AL mY Aldo Domenichini... Leopold , LTC, USAF Eli Lesser ESD/SCM OASD(A&L)IP&Q ESD/SCM Pentagon, Room 2A318 Hanscom AFB MA 01731 Uashington DC 20301- 617-271-6022 478-5980 (202

  18. 78 FR 49213 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... Part 4--Ageing Systems Maintenance, dated January 8, 2008. You may obtain further information by.../A321 ALS Part 4--Ageing Systems Maintenance, dated January 8, 2008. The actions described in this.../A320/A321 ALS Part 4--Ageing Systems Maintenance, dated January 8, 2008. This difference has been...

  19. Development, testing, and certification of life sciences engineering solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudle, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for the development of an air flat plate collector for use with solar heating, combined heating and cooling, and hot water systems. The contract was for final development, testing, and certification of the collector, and for delivery of a 320 square feet collector panel.

  20. 78 FR 21230 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... the airplane. Further, under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (Pub. L. 79- 404, 5 U.S.C. 551, et... cause to bypass those requirements. (The APA is a body of laws that, working together, provide minimum.../A320 Aircraft Maintenance Manual. Request To Correct Typographical Error Virgin America noted an error...

  1. 77 FR 60331 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of an uncommanded nose landing gear... the landing gear control interface unit (LGCIU). We are proposing this AD to prevent untimely... A320 aeroplane was preparing to initiate taxi, when an uncommanded nose landing gear (NLG)...

  2. IET. Control and equipment building (TAN620) floor plan. Schedule of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Control and equipment building (TAN-620) floor plan. Schedule of furniture and equipment. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-A 320. Date: February 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 035-0620-00-693-106905 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Best Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2005-01-01

    Brian Schaffer, now a 21-year-old college junior, spent prekindergarten through 7th grade at Green Acres School, a 320-student Rockville, Maryland, private school where his parents say he had the benefit of small class sizes and teachers who could accommodate his needs, which included attention deficit disorder, speech and language delays, and…

  4. 78 FR 12988 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... investigations have also concluded that A320 family THSA P/N 47145-XXX (where XXX stands for any numerical... lower splines of THSAs having P/N 47145-XXX to detect corrosion and, depending on findings, the...-rod splines on any THSA having P/N 47145-XXX (where XXX stands for any numerical value) to determine...

  5. 78 FR 67077 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Side Stick Controllers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ...; Side Stick Controllers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... controllers for pitch and roll control instead of conventional wheels and columns. The applicable... predecessors the A320, A330, A340 and A380, will use side stick controllers for pitch and roll control...

  6. Tractor Trailer Driver's Training Programs. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Hampshire Vocational Technical Coll., Nashua.

    This document describes a project to develop a 320-hour tractor trailer driver training program and a 20-hour commercial driver licensing upgrade training program. Of 34 graduates from the training program, 28 secured employment in the trucking industry. From August 1989 to June 1990, 725 students were trained in the upgrade training program with…

  7. Performance Evaluation of Thermographic Cameras for Photogrammetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastikli, N.; Guler, E.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research is the performance evaluation of the termographic cameras for possible use for photogrammetric documentation and deformation analyses caused by moisture and isolation problem of the historical and cultural heritage. To perform geometric calibration of the termographic camera, the 3D test object was designed with 77 control points which were distributed in different depths. For performance evaluation, Flir A320 termographic camera with 320 × 240 pixels and lens with 18 mm focal length was used. The Nikon D3X SLR digital camera with 6048 × 4032 pixels and lens with 20 mm focal length was used as reference for comparison. The size of pixel was 25 μm for the Flir A320 termographic camera and 6 μm for the Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The digital images of the 3D test object were recorded with the Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera and the image coordinate of the control points in the images were measured. The geometric calibration parameters, including the focal length, position of principal points, radial and tangential distortions were determined with introduced additional parameters in bundle block adjustments. The measurement of image coordinates and bundle block adjustments with additional parameters were performed using the PHIDIAS digital photogrammetric system. The bundle block adjustment was repeated with determined calibration parameter for both Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image coordinates was 9.6 μm and 10.5 μm for Flir A320 termographic camera and 8.3 μm and 7.7 μm for Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image points in Flir A320 termographic camera images almost same accuracy level with digital camera in comparison with 4 times bigger pixel size. The obtained results from this research, the interior geometry of the termographic cameras and lens distortion was modelled efficiently

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Db-319 (Dubnium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Db-319 (Dubnium, atomic number Z = 105, mass number A = 319).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-319 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-319 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 319).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-319 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-319 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 319).

  11. Coherence Solution for Bidirectional Reflectance of Surfaces with Wavelength-Scale Statistics (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Gamiz Vol. 23, No. 2 /February 2006 /J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 319B gr = GR = 0 rJ0Rrgrdr. 23 xpressing the Bessel function in its integral...current odel with global constraints such as Helmholtz eciprocity.90 Such an approach would effectively deter- ine the reflected emittance from surface...surface s assumed to be globally planar, and the surface S is aken as a phantom planar surface just above the actual urface, which implies that n̂1= n̂2

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Hs-319 (Hassium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Hs-319 (Hassium, atomic number Z = 108, mass number A = 319).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Lr-319 (Lawrencium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Lr-319 (Lawrencium, atomic number Z = 103, mass number A = 319).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-319 (Seaborgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-319 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 319).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-319 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-319 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 319).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-319 (Bohrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-319 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 319).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Grid of solar-metallicity wind models (Mattsson+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, L.; Wahlin, R.; Hoefner, S.

    2010-06-01

    The file online.dat contains all the data presented in the paper. The table include input parameters and the resulting mean mass loss rate, mean velocity at the outer boundary and mean degree of dust condensation at the outer boundary. The dust-to-gas mass ratio is calculated as described in Hofner & Dorfi (1997A&A...319..648H). A FORTRAN code representing a parametric mass-loss prescription for, e.g., stellar evolution modelling, is available at http://coolstars.astro.uu.se where also future updates will be posted. (1 data file).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-319 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-319 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 319).

  19. Bird Ingestion into Large Turbofan Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    292 04/06/90 B767 CF6 80C2 SEMB FOR LD 268 05/ 23 /90 A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR TR 247 05/31/90 A300 JT9D 59A INVOLUNTARY POWER LOSS FOR TR 273 06/14/90 A320...OR MORE 1 0 0 1 6 TO 17 0 2 .0 2 4 TO 5 1 0 0 1 UNKNOWN 7 44 4 55 TOTALS 38 347 12 397 23 TABLE 4.2. BIRD SPECIES SPECIES MODAL WEIGHT MULTIPLE SPECIES...Gov.ernm.nt Accistton No, 3, Rec.p.ent’s Catalog No. DOT/FAA/CT-91/1 7 4. Title and Subtitle 5 . Report fote May 1992 BIRD INGESTION INTO LARGE TURBOFAN

  20. Bird Ingestion into Large Turbofan Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR 292 04/06/90 B767 CF6 80C2 SEMB FOR LID 268 05/ 23 /90 A320 CFM56 5 SEMB FOR TR 247 05/31/90 A300 JT9D 59A INVOLUNTARY POWER LOSS FOR...Documentation Pog 1, Report No." 2. Government Accession No. 3. Rec•p-ent’s Catolog No. DOT/FAA/CT-911/17 4. Taide and Subtitle 5 . Report Oat* May...i 2 ENGINES, AIRCRAFT, AND OPERATIONS 2 3 INGESTION EVENTS AND RATES 7 4 CHARACTERISTICS OF INGESTED BIRDS 22 5 EFFECTS ON ENGINES AND FLIGHTS 35 5.1

  1. Automated DNA extraction from genetically modified maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hiroyuki; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2006-09-18

    A novel, automated system, PNE-1080, equipped with eight automated pestle units and a spectrophotometer was developed for genomic DNA extraction from maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs). The use of aminosilane-modified BMPs allowed highly accurate DNA recovery. The (A(260)-A(320)):(A(280)-A(320)) ratio of the extracted DNA was 1.9+/-0.1. The DNA quality was sufficiently pure for PCR analysis. The PNE-1080 offered rapid assay completion (30 min) with high accuracy. Furthermore, the results of real-time PCR confirmed that our proposed method permitted the accurate determination of genetically modified DNA composition and correlated well with results obtained by conventional cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-based methods.

  2. Marine Corps Dining Concepts in the 1990’s. Volume 4. Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    Corps (USMC) dining facilities for the years 1990-2005 was conducted by the u\\S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center. USMC... conduction with the dining hall schemes/ proposed kitchen and aervery layouts were done to complete the three models: A-320 seat, B-940 seat, and O1100...vertical channels. Straight upholstered crumb (sauple available at B3USMC CMantico, VA) friantity [_ Item [_ Item No. ( Booth 64

  3. Jeans instability criterion from the viewpoint of Kaniadakis' statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Everton M. C.; Ananias Neto, Jorge; Barboza, Edesio M., Jr.; Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-06-01

    In this letter we have derived the Jeans length in the context of the Kaniadakis statistics. We have compared this result with the Jeans length already obtained in the nonextensive Tsallis statistics (Jiulin D., Phys. Lett. A, 320 (2004) 347) and we discussed the main differences between these two models. We have also obtained the κ-sound velocity. Finally, we have applied the results obtained here to analyze an astrophysical system.

  4. List Models of Procedure Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matessa, Michael P.; Polson, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory of the initial stages of skill acquisition and then employs the theory to model current and future training programs for fight management systems (FMSs) in modern commercial airliners like the Boeing 777 and the Airbus A320. The theoretical foundations for the theory are a new synthesis of the literature on human memory and the latest version of the ACT-R theory of skill acquisition.

  5. Historical Research of 401 Sites at Fort Hood, Bell and Voryell Counties, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    encompassed certificate to Walter M. Booth of Travis County in 362.67 acres in four surveys and contained eight February 1854 for $65. On April 3...Herring, their respective spouses, and the Milam District, filed field notes describing other Homesley heirs sold the land to Cecil a 320-acre tract...preemption claim on 320 acres for acres rather than 310. 3 years. J. M Perryman and J. P. Hall cor- On January 28, 1954, Cecil McComas and roborated these

  6. The electromagnetic environment in CFC structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardwick, C. J.; Haigh, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive measurements of induced voltages and currents were made using a CFC (carbon fiber composites) horizontal stabilizer from the A320 as a test bed. The work was done to investigate the efficacy of various protection schemes to reduce the magnitudes of the induced voltages and validate a computer program INDCAL. Results indicate that a good understanding of the various induced voltage mechanisms including the long wave effect due to current redistribution was obtained.

  7. Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Ting, D. Z.; Kurth, E.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2008-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024x1024 pixel InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs based quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes and a 320x256 pixel dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array have been demonstrated as pathfinders. In this paper, we discuss the development of 1024x1024 MWIR/LWIR dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array.

  8. Development and Characterization of a Chromotomosynthetic Hyperspectral Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    SYSTEM DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology...cm -1 . It has a 320x256 pixel Stirling -cooled InSb FPA that can be windowed to improve temporal resolution with a smaller field-of-view. The...CTEx) is currently in development intended for operation on the International Space Station (ISS) as an engineering risk reduction enterprise for an

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Db-318 (Dubnium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Db-318 (Dubnium, atomic number Z = 105, mass number A = 318).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-318 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-318 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 318).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-318 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-318 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 318).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Hs-318 (Hassium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Hs-318 (Hassium, atomic number Z = 108, mass number A = 318).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Lr-318 (Lawrencium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Lr-318 (Lawrencium, atomic number Z = 103, mass number A = 318).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-318 (Seaborgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-318 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 318).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-318 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-318 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 318).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-318 (Bohrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-318 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 318).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-318 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-318 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 318).

  18. Conceptual Approach for Precise Relative Positioning with Miniaturized GPS Loggers and Experimental Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    where equipped with hardware comparable to the receiver presented in section 0. Power was supplied by three lithium - thionyl - Chloride AA-type primary... lithium -polymeric battery (7.1 g) increased weight of the construction up to 25.5 g. The power consumption is approximately 40 mA. The available...factor of the logger is as small as 44×21×4 mm3 at a weight of 4.25 g only without battery . Adding the patch antenna (14.15 g) and a 320 mAh 3.7 V

  19. Designing with advanced composites; Report on the European Core Conference, 1st, Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 20, 21, 1988, Conference Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The present conference discusses the development history of sandwich panel construction, production methods and quality assurance for Nomex sandwich panel core papers, the manufacture of honeycomb cores, state-of-the-art design methods for honeycomb-core panels, the Airbus A320 airliner's CFRP rudder structure, and the design tradeoffs encountered in honeycomb-core structures' design. Also discussed are sandwich-construction aircraft cabin interiors meeting new FAA regulations, the use of Nomex honeycomb cores in composite structures, a low-cost manufacturing technique for sandwich structures, and the Starship sandwich panel-incorporating airframe primary structure.

  20. Searching for SNPs with cloud computing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    As DNA sequencing outpaces improvements in computer speed, there is a critical need to accelerate tasks like alignment and SNP calling. Crossbow is a cloud-computing software tool that combines the aligner Bowtie and the SNP caller SOAPsnp. Executing in parallel using Hadoop, Crossbow analyzes data comprising 38-fold coverage of the human genome in three hours using a 320-CPU cluster rented from a cloud computing service for about $85. Crossbow is available from http://bowtie-bio.sourceforge.net/crossbow/. PMID:19930550

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Db-320 (Dubnium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Db-320 (Dubnium, atomic number Z = 105, mass number A = 320).

  2. Evolution of AbGRI2-0, the Progenitor of the AbGRI2 Resistance Island in Global Clone 2 of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Grace A.; Nigro, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    A320, isolated in the Netherlands in 1982 and also known as RUH134, is the earliest available multiply antibiotic-resistant (MAR) Acinetobacter baumannii isolate belonging to global clone 2 (GC2) and is the reference strain for this clone. The draft genome sequence of A320 was used to investigate the original location and configuration of the IS26-bounded AbGRI2 resistance island found in current GC2 isolates. PCR mapping and sequencing were used to order contigs composing the resistance islands. A320 contains two IS26-bounded resistance islands, AbGRI2-0a and AbGRI2-0b, of 7.8 kb and 25.4 kb, respectively. Together they contain blaTEM, aacC1, aadA1, sul1, catA1, and aphA1b genes, which confer resistance to antibiotics used clinically in the 1970s, as well as an incomplete mercury resistance module. Tracking the continuity of the chromosome and the target site duplications revealed that the two resistance islands were originally together as AbGRI2-0, an island of 32.4 kb, and were subsequently separated via an IS26-mediated intramolecular inversion that reversed the orientation of 1.54 Mb of the chromosome and duplicated an IS26. A320 contains an ancestral form of AbGRI2, and the original insertion site of the AbGRI2 island was identified. Many of the AbGRI2 versions present in the completed GC2 genomes can be derived from it via the variant AbGRI2-1. IS26-mediated inversions have also played a part in forming AbGRI2-0, and, upon reversal, large regions of AbGRI2-0 are identical to parts of AbaR0, the ancestral version of the AbaR islands present in GC1 isolates. This indicates a common source. PMID:26666934

  3. Parallelized control protocols for high-performance routers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shao-hua; Ji, Meng

    2005-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel parallelized architecture for control protocols in high-performance routers (HPRs). Unlike traditional centralized manner, this approach distributes the functionality of control plane protocols within a router and achieves scalability by selectively off-loading certain link-layer and interface operations to data plane processing components. This paper presents the design and implementation of this method on a 320Gbps distributed router. The experiment results show that the proposed scheme can yield better performance and faster response than the centralized approach.

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Fm-320 (Fermium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Fm-320 (Fermium, atomic number Z = 100, mass number A = 320).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-320 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-320 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 320).

  6. Isolation of novel non-HLA gene fragments from the hemochromatosis region (6p21. 3) by cDNA hybridization selection

    SciTech Connect

    Goei, V.L.; Capossela, A.; Gruen, J.R.; Parimoo, S.; Chu, T.W. )

    1994-02-01

    It has previously been shown that cDNA hybridization selection can identify and recover novel genes from large cloned genomic DNA such as cosmids or YACs. In an effort to identify candidate genes for hemochromatosis, this technique was applied to a 320-kb YAC containing the HLA-A gene. A short fragment cDNA library derived from human duodenum was selected with the YAC DNA. Ten novel gene fragments were isolated, characterized, and localized on the physical map of the YAC. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Hs-320 (Hassium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Hs-320 (Hassium, atomic number Z = 108, mass number A = 320).

  8. Photoreactivation and other ultraviolet/visible light effects on DNA in human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Blackett, A.D.; Feng, N.I.; Freeman, S.E.; Ogut, E.S.; Gange, R.W.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A computer-based system was devised for examining low levels (1 dimer/10/sup 8/ d) of DNA damage in human skin exposed to ultraviolet or visible radiation. The production of measurable levels of dimers was determined for light of wavelengths absorbed directly by DNA (290-320 nm). Exposure of skin to uv-A (320-380 nm) sources also produced significant numbers of endonuclease-sensitive sites. The immediate pigment darkening reaction (IPD) was tested to see whether IPD protects against uv-induced dimer formation. 29 references, 2 figures, 1 table. (ACR)

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Lr-320 (Lawrencium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Lr-320 (Lawrencium, atomic number Z = 103, mass number A = 320).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-320 (Seaborgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-320 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 320).

  11. Advanced aerospace hydraulic systems and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-07-01

    The present volume discusses the development of a viable hydraulic circuit breaker, the electromodulated control of supply pressure in hydraulic systems, the flight control actuation system for the B-2 advanced technology bomber, and the B747-400 upper rudder control system with triple tandem valve. Also discussed are a total-flexibility cartridge-valve porting via innovative sealing technology, the A320 pilots' autothrust survey, an all-digital electrohydrostatic servoactuator, and a concurrent design/analysis tool for aircraft hydraulic systems. (For individual items see A93-21841 to A93-21844)

  12. INM. Integrated Noise Model Version 4.11. User’s Guide - Supplement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    newer CFM56 -5-AI engine, and the B747 airplane with the older JT9D-7A engine. 2’ 3 The measured data for the A320 agree extremely well with INM...hwey ite 1S* ArtoV•):)•m:.LXI:)amdto te Ofic of • M~ t mid udet-,, Pngrwa-k No,,•rtt. rf t IO1-1 1 U~wa 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3 ...supplement to INN, Version 3 , User’s Guide - Revision 1 for the Version 3.10 computer software released in June, 1992. The Version 4.11 supplement, prepared

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-320 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-320 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 320).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-320 (Bohrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-320 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 320).

  15. Cost-Driven Design of a Large Scale X-Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welstead, Jason R.; Frederic, Peter C.; Frederick, Michael A.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    A conceptual design process focused on the development of a low-cost, large scale X-plane was developed as part of an internal research and development effort. One of the concepts considered for this process was the double-bubble configuration recently developed as an advanced single-aisle class commercial transport similar in size to a Boeing 737-800 or Airbus A320. The study objective was to reduce the contractor cost from contract award to first test flight to less than $100 million, and having the first flight within three years of contract award. Methods and strategies for reduced cost are discussed.

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-320 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-320 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 320).

  17. A Fractional Factorial Design Study of Reciprocating Wear Behavior of Al-Si-SiCp Composites at Lubricated Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, V. R.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Jain, S. C.

    2011-04-01

    The lubricated reciprocating wear behavior of two composites A319/15%SiCp and A390/15%SiCp produced by the liquid metallurgy route was investigated by means of an indigenously developed reciprocating friction wear test rig using a fractional factorial-design approach. The main purpose was to study the influence of wear and friction test parameters such as applied load, sliding distance, reciprocating velocity, counter surface temperature and silicon content in composites, as well as their interactions on the wear and friction characteristics of these composites. Two output responses (wear loss and coefficient of friction) were measured. The input parameter levels were fixed through pilot experiment conducted in the newly developed reciprocating friction and wear test rig. The counter surface material used for the wear study was cast iron having Vickers hardness of 244 HVN. It had been demonstrated through established equations that A390/15%SiCp composite is subjected to low wear compared to the A319/15%SiCp composite. The experimental results indicate that the proposed mathematical models suggested could adequately describe the performance indicators within the limits of the factors that are being investigated. The applied load, sliding distance, reciprocating velocity, counter surface temperature, and silicon content in composite are the five important factors controlling the friction and wear characteristics of the composite in lubricated condition. Moreover, the two factor interactions have a strong effect on the wear of composites. The results give a comprehensive insight into the wear of the composites.

  18. Opisthorchis viverrini and Haplorchis taichui: development of a multiplex PCR assay for their detection and differentiation using specific primers derived from HAT-RAPD.

    PubMed

    Wongsawad, Chalobol; Wongsawad, Pheravut

    2012-10-01

    Specific primers for the detection of Opisthorchis viverrini and Haplorchis taichui were investigated by using the HAT-RAPD PCR method. Fourteen arbitrary primers (Operon Technologies) were performed for the generation of polymorphic DNA profiles. The results showed that a 319 bp fragment generated from the OPA-04 primer was expected to be O. viverrini-specific while a 256 bp fragment generated from the OPP-11 primer was considered to be H. taichui-specific. Based on each sequence data, two pairs of specific primers were designed and sequences of each primer were as follows; H. taichui; Hapt_F5'-GGCCAACGCAATCGTCATCC-3'and Hapt_R1 5'-CTCTCGACCTCCTCTAGAAT-3' which yielded a 170 bp PCR product. For O. viverrini, OpV-1F: 5'-AATCGGGCTGCATATTGACCGAT-3' and OpV-1R: 5'-CGGTGTTGCTTATTTTGCAGACAA-3' which generated a 319 bp PCR product. These specific primers were tested for efficacy and specific detection for all parasites DNA samples. The results showed that 170 and 319 bp specific PCR products were generated as equivalent to positive result in H. taichui and O. viverrini, respectively by having no cross-reaction with any parasites tested. PCR conditions are recommended at 68°C annealing temperature and with 0.5 mM magnesium chloride (Mg Cl(2)). Additionally, specific primers developed in this study were effective to determine the presence of both parasites in fish and snail intermediate hosts, which the DNA of O. viverrini was artificially spiked since it is rarely found in northern Thailand. The H. taichui and O. viverrini-specific primers successfully developed in this study can be use for epidemiological monitoring, preventing management and control programs.

  19. Precision top-quark mass measurement in the lepton+jets topology in p p collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lee, Y J; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-01-20

    We report two measurements of the top-quark mass M(top) using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron in a 318 pb(-1) data sample of tt events in the lepton+jets final state. One method uses an event-based likelihood technique resulting in M(top) = 173.2(-2.4)(+2.6)(stat) +/- 3.2(syst) GeV/c2 or 173.2(-4.0)(+4.1) GeV/c2. The second method reconstructs a top-quark mass in each event using the measured invariant mass of the hadronically decaying W boson to constrain the jet energy scale to obtain a value for M(top)of 173.5(-3.6)(+3.7)(stat) +/- 1.3(syst) GeV/c2 or 173.5(-3.8)(+3.9) GeV/c2 . We take the latter, which is more precise, as our result.

  20. Radiation doses for pregnant women in the late pregnancy undergoing fetal-computed tomography: a comparison of dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yuta; Kawaguchi, Ai; Kobayashi, Masanao; Suzuki, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Shoichi; Chida, Koichi

    2016-09-19

    The purposes of this study were (1) to compare the radiation doses for 320- and 80-row fetal-computed tomography (CT), estimated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and the ImPACT Calculator (hereinafter referred to as the "CT dosimetry software"), for a woman in her late pregnancy and her fetus and (2) to estimate the overlapped fetal radiation dose from a 320-row CT examination using two different estimation methods of the CT dosimetry software. The direct TLD data in the present study were obtained from a previous study. The exposure parameters used for TLD measurements were entered into the CT dosimetry software, and the appropriate radiation dose for the pregnant woman and her fetus was estimated. When the whole organs (e.g., the colon, small intestine, and ovaries) and the fetus were included in the scan range, the difference in the estimated doses between the TLD measurement and the CT dosimetry software measurement was <1 mGy (<23 %) in both CT units. In addition, when the whole organs were within the scan range, the CT dosimetry software was used for evaluating the fetal radiation dose and organ-specific doses for the woman in the late pregnancy. The conventional method using the CT dosimetry software cannot take into account the overlap between volumetric sections. Therefore, the conventional method using a 320-row CT unit in a wide-volume mode might result in the underestimation of radiation doses for the fetus and the colon, small intestine, and ovaries.

  1. Cosmic radiation dose in aircraft--a neutron track etch detector.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Miklavcić, I; Poje, M; Varga, M; Planinić, J

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic radiation bombards us at high altitude by ionizing particles. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles produced in interaction of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the Earth. The radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard ATR 42 and A 320 aircrafts (flight level of 8 and 11 km, respectively) was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A 320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Other experiments, or dose rate measurements with the neutron dosimeter, consisting of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter, were performed on five intercontinental flights. Comparison of the dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level showed that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose. The dose rate measurements on the flights from the Middle Europe to the South and Middle America, then to Korea and Japan, showed that the flights over or near the equator region carried less dose rate; this was in accordance with the known geomagnetic latitude effect.

  2. Use of infrared cameras for monitoring and research at Costa Rican volcanoes and thermal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, C. J.; Mora-Amador, R.; González, G.

    2012-12-01

    Since November 2010, the Costa Rican volcanoes and hot springs began monitored and research by 5 infrared cameras, 4 steady fixed FLIR A320 and 1 portable FLIR P660. All the A320's are located on different settings depending on the volcano or the constant use. At Turrialba volcano 2 of the cameras are set permanent at the crater rim, focused on the new vents formed on January 2010 and 2012, from there at ≈500m it is possible to monitor 24/7 the temperature of the gases from the new vents plus the direction and speed of the plumes, that data helps the improve of the use of equipment like Mini-DOAS, MultiGas or FTIR; at Poás volcano the camera is permanent fixed on a bunker structure located at ≈650m from the active hyperacid hot lagoon, from there it is possible to cover the complete crater with the use of a wide angle lens, that way is safely to track phreatic eruptions, observe convective cells from the lagoon, fumaroles activity, as well as temperature, direction and speed of the gas plume. Finally the last A320 is set for temporary set up, so far is being used on places like Arenal volcano because of the changing of the pattern of the lava flows and gas plume, also at Rincón de la Vieja crater rim because so far is difficult to set up a permanent camera, and finally to do over flights on active volcanoes. The FLIR P660, it has been used to carry out periodic measurements of specific thermal spots. At Turrialba and Poás volcanoes, it is possible to get closer views, measuring more precise inaccessible high temperature fumaroles like the new vents at Turrialba or the ones at Poás dome, places that can reach temperatures of more than 600°C, also is being a lot of support to track lagoon convection cells (61°C), fumaroles migration, lagoon phreatic eruptions (130°C), and better characterization of hot springs, small hot lagoons, and mud pools, with temperatures of ≈ 90C that allow the life of extreme organisms to survive. The use of the thermal cameras

  3. Scalable Climate Forcing Optical Indices: How Effective Are They in Alpine Lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C. E.; Overholt, E.; Fischer, J.; Olson, M.; Brentrup, J.; Saros, J. E.; Melack, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    As the world gets warmer and wetter, it is important to identify sentinel systems to resolve the response of ecosystems to climate change across drivers and complex landscapes. Recently developed climate forcing optical indices (CFOI) related to the quality and quantity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have been shown to be scalable from short-term storm events to interdecadal periods in diverse lakes in lowland landscapes. Are these CFOI metrics effective in alpine ecosystems, which are often viewed as more responsive sentinels of climate change than lowland ecosystems? DOC-related optical data from a series of alpine lakes in North America are used here to address this question. The response of these CFOI metrics followed the same tight relationship in alpine lakes as in lowland lakes, with a seasonal increase in spectral slope between 275 and 295 nm (S275-295) and a decrease in DOC-specific absorbance at 320 nm (a*320) as well as in the ratio of these two indices (a*320/S275-295, a composite climate forcing index, CF). These changes are likely driven largely by photobleaching of terrestrial DOC during the ice-free season. Closer analysis of five years of data for Lake Oesa in the Canadian Rockies revealed marginally significant relationships between precipitation and the CFOI metrics. Specifically, S275-295 decreased with increasing cumulative precipitation for the 15 day period preceding water sample collection. a*320 increased with cumulative precipitation for the 45 day period preceding water sample collection. Relationships between CFOI metrics and precipitation at other time scales were not significant. While the DOC-quality related CFOI metrics were responsive to precipitation, DOC concentration alone was not. The time scale of precipitation effects on CFOI metrics in Lake Oesa was shorter than those previously observed for lowland lakes. This contrasting response is likely related to differences in the characteristics of the hydrology and catchments of

  4. A Formal Methods Approach to the Analysis of Mode Confusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Miller, Steven P.; Potts, James N.; Carreno, Victor A.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the new NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) is to reduce the civil aviation fatal accident rate by 80% in ten years and 90% in twenty years. This program is being driven by the accident data with a focus on the most recent history. Pilot error is the most commonly cited cause for fatal accidents (up to 70%) and obviously must be given major consideration in this program. While the greatest source of pilot error is the loss of situation awareness , mode confusion is increasingly becoming a major contributor as well. The January 30, 1995 issue of Aviation Week lists 184 incidents and accidents involving mode awareness including the Bangalore A320 crash 2/14/90, the Strasbourg A320 crash 1/20/92, the Mulhouse-Habsheim A320 crash 6/26/88, and the Toulouse A330 crash 6/30/94. These incidents and accidents reveal that pilots sometimes become confused about what the cockpit automation is doing. Consequently, human factors research is an obvious investment area. However, even a cursory look at the accident data reveals that the mode confusion problem is much deeper than just training deficiencies and a lack of human-oriented design. This is readily acknowledged by human factors experts. It seems that further progress in human factors must come through a deeper scrutiny of the internals of the automation. It is in this arena that formal methods can contribute. Formal methods refers to the use of techniques from logic and discrete mathematics in the specification, design, and verification of computer systems, both hardware and software. The fundamental goal of formal methods is to capture requirements, designs and implementations in a mathematically based model that can be analyzed in a rigorous manner. Research in formal methods is aimed at automating this analysis as much as possible. By capturing the internal behavior of a flight deck in a rigorous and detailed formal model, the dark corners of a design can be analyzed. This paper will explore how formal

  5. Thermal-infrared pedestrian ROI extraction through thermal and motion information fusion.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María T; Serrano-Cuerda, Juan

    2014-04-10

    This paper investigates the robustness of a new thermal-infrared pedestrian detection system under different outdoor environmental conditions. In first place the algorithm for pedestrian ROI extraction in thermal-infrared video based on both thermal and motion information is introduced. Then, the evaluation of the proposal is detailed after describing the complete thermal and motion information fusion. In this sense, the environment chosen for evaluation is described, and the twelve test sequences are specified. For each of the sequences captured from a forward-looking infrared FLIR A-320 camera, the paper explains the weather and light conditions under which it was captured. The results allow us to draw firm conclusions about the conditions under which it can be affirmed that it is efficient to use our thermal-infrared proposal to robustly extract human ROIs.

  6. Geodesic Acoustic Propagation and Ballooning Mode Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. B.; Diamond, P. H.; Young, G. G.; Arakawa, M.

    2005-10-01

    Relevance of ballooning formalism (BMF) in nonlinear interaction of toroidal electromagnetic drift waves in the presence of zonal flows and Geodesic Acoustic Oscillation (GAO) is critically examined from a physical argument of radial propagation of wave packets. To achieve the quasi-translational invariance of poloidal harmonics which is necessary for the BMF, the geodesic curvature induced transfer [1] of fluctuation energy in radial direction should occur faster than the time scale of physical interest. Of course, this does not happen necessarily in drift-Alfven (DALF) turbulence simulations [2]. This observation casts considerable doubts on the applicability of various codes based on the BMF concept to nonlinear electromagnetic problems. [1] B. Scott, Phys. Letters A 320 (2003) 53. [2] B. Scott, New J. Phys 7 (2005) 92.

  7. Team play with a powerful and independent agent: a full-mission simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sarter, N B; Woods, D D

    2000-01-01

    One major problem with pilot-automation interaction on modern flight decks is a lack of mode awareness; that is, a lack of knowledge and understanding of the current and future status and behavior of the automation. A lack of mode awareness is not simply a pilot problem; rather, it is a symptom of a coordination breakdown between humans and machines. Recent changes in automation design can therefore be expected to have an impact on the nature of problems related to mode awareness. To examine how new automation properties might affect pilot-automation coordination, we performed a full-mission simulation study on one of the most advanced automated aircraft, the Airbus A-320. The results of this work indicate that mode errors and "automation surprises" still occur on these advanced aircraft. However, there appear to be more opportunities for delayed or missing interventions with undesirable system activities, possibly because of higher system autonomy and coupling.

  8. Ecological assessment of the environmental impacts of the kerosene burning in jet turbines and its improvement assessment.

    PubMed

    Geldermann, J; Gabriel, R; Rentz, O

    1999-01-01

    The burning of kerosene in jet turbines is investigated for two reference flights with a Boeing 747-400 and an Airbus A320-200, representing the typical Lufthansa planes for long and middle distance. The ecological evaluation is performed by Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Formation of condensation trails, which is a specific environmental impact caused by air traffic, has to be considered in addition to established LCA impact categories. Based on the ecological assessment, an improvement assessment is performed. Environmental performance of diesel fuel during the combustion in car engines is analysed based on available publications. The relevant parameters for the environmental impact of the combustion of diesel (aromatics content, reduction of sulphur content, the reduction of the density and raising of the cetane number) are discussed with regard to improvements of the exhaust qualities of kerosene. A reduction of the aromatics content promises to improve the emission of soot which should be further investigated.

  9. Nano-fabricated pixelated micropolarizer array for visible imaging polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhigang; Cheng, Teng; Qiu, Kang; Zhang, Qingchuan E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn; Wu, Xiaoping; Dong, Fengliang; Chu, Weiguo E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn

    2014-10-15

    Pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA) is a novel concept for real-time visible imaging polarimetry. A 320 × 240 aluminum PMA fabricated by electron beam lithography is described in this paper. The period, duty ratio, and depth of the grating are 140 nm, 0.5, and 100 nm, respectively. The units are standard square structures and the metal nanowires of the grating are collimating and uniformly thick. The extinction ratio of 75 and the maximum polarization transmittance of 78.8% demonstrate that the PMA is suitable for polarization imaging. When the PMA is applied to real-time polarization imaging, the degree of linear polarization image and the angle of linear polarization image are calculated from a single frame image. The polarized target object is highlighted from the unpolarized background, and the surface contour of the target object can be reflected by the polarization angle.

  10. Nano-fabricated pixelated micropolarizer array for visible imaging polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Dong, Fengliang; Cheng, Teng; Qiu, Kang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Chu, Weiguo; Wu, Xiaoping

    2014-10-01

    Pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA) is a novel concept for real-time visible imaging polarimetry. A 320 × 240 aluminum PMA fabricated by electron beam lithography is described in this paper. The period, duty ratio, and depth of the grating are 140 nm, 0.5, and 100 nm, respectively. The units are standard square structures and the metal nanowires of the grating are collimating and uniformly thick. The extinction ratio of 75 and the maximum polarization transmittance of 78.8% demonstrate that the PMA is suitable for polarization imaging. When the PMA is applied to real-time polarization imaging, the degree of linear polarization image and the angle of linear polarization image are calculated from a single frame image. The polarized target object is highlighted from the unpolarized background, and the surface contour of the target object can be reflected by the polarization angle.

  11. RFID Transponders' Radio Frequency Emissions in Aircraft Communication and Navigation Radio Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiated emissions in aircraft communication and navigation bands are measured from several active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The individual tags are different in design and operations. They may also operate in different frequency bands. The process for measuring the emissions is discussed, and includes tag interrogation, reverberation chamber testing, and instrument settings selection. The measurement results are described and compared against aircraft emission limits. In addition, interference path loss for the cargo bays of passenger aircraft is measured. Cargo bay path loss is more appropriate for RFID tags than passenger cabin path loss. The path loss data are reported for several aircraft radio systems on a Boeing 747 and an Airbus A320.

  12. Single photon counting pixel detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Kawase, M.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Sato, M.; Schmitt, B.; Suzuki, M.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.

    2010-11-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI an X-ray single photon counting pixel detector (PILATUS) based on the hybrid-pixel detector technology was developed in collaboration with SPring-8. The detection element is a 320 or 450 μm thick silicon sensor forming pixelated pn-diodes with a pitch of 172 μm×172 μm. An array of 2×8 custom CMOS readout chips are indium bump-bonded to the sensor, which leads to 33.5 mm×83.8 mm detective area. Each pixel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a single level discriminator and a 20 bit counter. This design realizes a high dynamic range, short readout time of less than 3 ms, a high framing rate of over 200 images per second and an excellent point-spread function. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2×106 X-rays/s/pixel.

  13. Melanoma induction by ultraviolet A but not ultraviolet B radiation requires melanin pigment.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Frances P; Zaidi, M Raza; Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Anver, Miriam R; Bahn, Jesse; Wielgus, Albert; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mouret, Stephane; Tucker, Margaret A; Popratiloff, Anastas; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C

    2012-06-06

    Malignant melanoma of the skin (CMM) is associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure, but the mechanisms and even the wavelengths responsible are unclear. Here we use a mammalian model to investigate melanoma formed in response to precise spectrally defined ultraviolet wavelengths and biologically relevant doses. We show that melanoma induction by ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) requires the presence of melanin pigment and is associated with oxidative DNA damage within melanocytes. In contrast, ultraviolet B radiation (280-320 nm) initiates melanoma in a pigment-independent manner associated with direct ultraviolet B DNA damage. Thus, we identified two ultraviolet wavelength-dependent pathways for the induction of CMM and describe an unexpected and significant role for melanin within the melanocyte in melanomagenesis.

  14. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N(+)1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2010-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called "N+1" aircraft--designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, "N" airplanes--are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are empirically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  15. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N+1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2009-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called 'N+1' aircraft - designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, 'N' airplanes - are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are analytically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  16. A new contact neodymium: YAG laser for cyclophotocoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Iwach, A.G.; Drake, M.V.; Hoskins, H.D. Jr.; Schuster, B.L.; Vassiliadis, A.; Crawford, J.B.; Hennings, D.R. )

    1991-06-01

    A newly developed compact (40 kg), self-contained contact Neodymium:YAG laser produces high-peak, high-energy (800 mJ/pulse), short (1.0 millisecond) pulses with 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy is delivered via a 320-microns cleaved quartz fiber optic probe. Cyclophotocoagulation was performed in five eyes of three medium-sized Dutch-pigmented rabbits. The eyes received exposures of 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy delivered ranged from 100 to 800 mJ/pulse. Histopathology revealed ciliary body disruption and hemorrhage with no damage to overlying sclera. When used for transscleral cyclodiathermy in the rabbit, the laser created significant ciliary body disruption with minimal scleral injury.

  17. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  18. Structural outer rim of Chesapeake Bay impact crater: Seismic and bore hole evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Nine seismic-reflection profiles and four continuous core holes define the gross structural and stratigraphic framework of the outer rim of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater. The rim is manifested as a 90 km diameter ring of terraced normal-fault blocks, which forms a ???320 m-1200 m high rim escarpment. The top of the rim escarpment is covered by a 20 m-30 m thick ejecta blanket. The escarpment encircles a flat-floored annular trough, which is partly filled with an ???250 m thick breccia lens (Exmore breccia). The Exmore breccia overlies a 200 m-800 m thick interval of slumped sedimentary megablocks, which, in turn, rests on crystalline basement rocks. All postimpact strata (upper Eocene to Quaternary) sag structurally into the annular trough, and most units also thicken as they cross the rim into the crater. Postimpact compaction and subsidence of the Exmore breccia have created extensive normal faulting in overlying strata.

  19. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  20. AIV procedure for a CHEOPS demonstration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Dima, M.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Munari, M.; Pagano, I.; Scandariato, G.; Scuderi, S.; Beck, T.; Buxton, R.; Piazza, D.; Benz, W.; Broeg, C.; Cessa, V.; Piotto, G.

    2014-08-01

    The CHaracterizing ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) is an ESA Small Mission whose launch is planned for the end of 2017. It is a Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a 320 mm aperture providing a FoV of 0.32 degrees, which will target nearby bright stars already known to host planets, and measure, through ultrahigh precision photometry, the radius of exo-planets, allowing to determine their composition. This paper will present the details of the AIV plan for a demonstration model of the CHEOPS Telescope with equivalent structure but different CTEs. Alignment procedures, needed GSEs and devised verification tests will be described and a path for the AIV of the flight model, which will take place at industries premises, will be sketched.

  1. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S; Hänsch, Theodor W; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-12

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  2. Research of the effects of TEC on UFPA noise performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qiao; Xie, Guangzhong; Xiong, Lixia; Liao, Baobin; Que, Longcheng; Zhou, Yun; Lv, Jian

    2012-10-01

    Infrared detection technology plays a more and more important role in military and business. Uncooled infrared focal plane array (UFPA) is a kind of thermal detector, which detects the infrared radiation of target through the microbolometer's photoelectric conversion. Based on the thermal model of UFPA, stable and accordant substrate temperature of microbolometer array is extreme important to improve the UFPA's noise performance. After researching the effects of substrate temperature act on UFPA's noise performance and responsivity, a low noise data capture system with TEC controller for UFPA is designed. And a 320x240 microbolometer array's noise is tested with this system. With the TEC controller, the substrate temperature fluctuates at a margin of only 0.006 ºC. The test result shows that a 12.1% decrease in RMS noise, a 14.5% decrease in FPN noise and improvement of responsivity non-uniformity over time have been obtained after using TEC controller in UFPA.

  3. Differential effects of UV-B and UV-C components of solar radiation on MAP kinase signal transduction pathways in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dhanwada, K R; Dickens, M; Neades, R; Davis, R; Pelling, J C

    1995-11-16

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a major cause of skin cancer, the most common human neoplasm. The earth's upper atmosphere absorbs the high energy UV-C wavelengths (100-280 nm), while allowing transmission of UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-400 nm). It is therefore UV-B and to some extent UV-A, that contributes to most human skin malignancies. We report that the exposure of cultured keratinocytes or skin to UV-C radiation causes activation of MAP kinases (ERK and JNK). In contrast, the solar radiation associated with skin cancer (UV-B) was an ineffective activator of the ERK and JNK signal transduction pathways. Therefore, while exposure of epidermal cells to UV-C radiation under laboratory conditions causes marked activation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways, only a low level of MAP kinase signaling is involved in the response of skin to biologically relevant solar radiation.

  4. Laser-bar stack using ELF heat-sinks mounted kinematically for double-sided cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, A. K.; Manni, J. G.; Chin, R. H.; Levy, J.; Dogan, M.; Jacob, J. H.; Pathak, R.; Wessling, C.; Lang, K. D.; Eppich, H.; Fryer, J.; Haverkamp, T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a novel, high-power stack of 20% fill-factor, 976nm, laser-diode bars, each directly attached to an enhanced lateral-flow (ELF), copper-based, water-cooled heat-sink. The heat-sinks contain mounting screws that form a kinematic mount to minimize detrimental mechanical-stress on the diode bars while also providing beneficial, double-side cooling of the bars. A stack of 18-bars, emitting 2.54kW, was constructed to validate the technology. Using standard optics and a polarization multiplexer, a 320μm diameter, 0.3NA focus is achieved with a 6-bar stack that robustly couples 450W, with a ~67% coupling efficiency, from a passive, 400μm, 046NA doubleclad fiber.

  5. Noninvasive method of DNA isolation from fecal epithelial tissue of dairy animals.

    PubMed

    Chandra De, Bidhan; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Kumar, Sushil; Brahma, Biswajit; Goutam, Devika; Jaiswal, Latika; Sharma, Ashutosh; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    A novel noninvasive genomic DNA isolation protocol from fecal tissue, by the proteinase K digestion and guanidine hydrochloride extraction method, was assessed for the genotyping of cattle and buffalo. The epithelial tissues present on the surface of the feces were used as source for isolation of genomic DNA. The DNA isolated from fecal tissue was found to be similar as those obtained from other body tissues such as skin, brain, liver, kidney, and muscle. The quality of DNA was checked by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We successfully amplified a 320 bp MHC class II DRB gene and a 125 bp mt-DNA D-loop region from isolated genomic DNA of cattle. Thus, the DNA isolated using this method was suitable for common molecular biology methods, such as restriction enzyme digestion and genotyping of dairy animals through PCR.

  6. Effective in-device r33 of 735 pm/V on electro-optic polymer infiltrated silicon photonic crystal slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Lin, Che-Yun; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K-Y; Chen, Ray T

    2011-03-15

    We design and fabricate a 320 nm slot for an electro-optic (E-O) polymer infiltrated silicon photonic crystal waveguide. Because of the large slot width, the poling efficiency of the infiltrated E-O polymer (AJCKL1/amorphous polycarbonate) is significantly improved. When coupled with the slow light effect from the silicon photonic crystal waveguide, an effective in-device r(33) of 735 pm/V, which to our knowledge is a record high, is demonstrated, which is ten times higher than the E-O coefficient achieved in thin film material. Because of this ultrahigh E-O efficiency, the V(π)L of the device is only 0.44 V mm, which is to our knowledge the best result of all E-O polymer modulators.

  7. 320 Gbit/s, 20 Gsymbol/s 256 QAM coherent transmission over 160 km by using injection-locked local oscillator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixin; Kasai, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masato; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2016-09-19

    We demonstrate 20 Gsymbol/s, 256 QAM polarization multiplexed (pol-mux) 320 Gbit/s coherent transmission. By employing an LD-based injection locking circuit, we achieved low noise optical carrier-phase locking between the LO and the data signal. Furthermore, frequency domain equalization and digital back-propagation enabled us to realize precise compensation for transmitted waveform distortions. As a result, a 320 Gbit/s data was successfully transmitted over 160 km with a potential spectral efficiency of 10.9 bit/s/Hz. This is the highest symbol rate yet achieved in a pol-mux 256 QAM coherent transmission. In addition, we also describe a pol-mux 256 QAM transmission at a symbol rate of 10 Gsymbol/s.

  8. Thermal-Infrared Pedestrian ROI Extraction through Thermal and Motion Information Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María T.; Serrano-Cuerda, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness of a new thermal-infrared pedestrian detection system under different outdoor environmental conditions. In first place the algorithm for pedestrian ROI extraction in thermal-infrared video based on both thermal and motion information is introduced. Then, the evaluation of the proposal is detailed after describing the complete thermal and motion information fusion. In this sense, the environment chosen for evaluation is described, and the twelve test sequences are specified. For each of the sequences captured from a forward-looking infrared FLIR A-320 camera, the paper explains the weather and light conditions under which it was captured. The results allow us to draw firm conclusions about the conditions under which it can be affirmed that it is efficient to use our thermal-infrared proposal to robustly extract human ROIs. PMID:24727500

  9. Update of Aircraft Profile Data for the Integrated Noise Model Computer Program. Volume 1. Final Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    Dougtas DC8-50 JT3D-38 1I C 13 McDonn Douglas DC8-60 JT3D-7 1 C 17 McDonn Dougtas DC8-60 JT80-70N 1 C 14 McDonn Dougtas DC8-70 CFM56 -2C-5 3 CF 15 Br...34 Airbus A310-300 CF6-8OC2A2 3 a 97 Airbus A320-211 CFM56 -5A-1 3 B ...................... ------ ----i...narrow body 45 Boeing 8737 JT80-90N 2 C 47 Boeing s737-200 JT80-17 2 C 35 Boeing 8737-300 CFM56 -38-1 3 A 36 Boeing 8737-300 CFM56 -38-2 3 * A 85 Boeing

  10. Geoid improvement by optimal combination of GRAV-D and terrestrial gravity data in Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Ming; Holmes, Simon; Li, Xiaopeng; Ahlgren, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    The Geoid Slope Validation Survey of 2014 (GSVS14) consists of co-located GPS/leveling stations along a 320 km traverse running East to West in Iowa, USA. Some gravimetric geoid models were able to match the GPS/leveling data to 1-cm accuracy differentially along the eastern majority of the traverse, which ran across moderate topography but high gravity variation. However, for the western 50 km of the traverse, these same gravimetric geoid models exhibited a 9-cm slope mismatch against the GPS/leveling data. This occurred despite the inclusion, into the geoid models, of the GOCO05S satellite gravity model, and newly flown GRAV-D airborne data over the traverse. This paper examines possible causes for this, and tries to find remedies for the discrepancy. Candidate areas of investigation include: 1. errors in the terrestrial gravity data; 2. topographic and gravimetric reductions; 3. optimal weights (spectral/space) used to combine the different data types.

  11. An efficient low- and moderate-resolution spectrograph for the Hale telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oke, J. B.; Gunn, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A new low-to-moderate resolution spectrograph has been designed and built for the Cassegrain focus of the Hale 5.08-meter telescope. To maximize efficiency, resolution, and wavelength coverage the light is divided into two spectra regions by a dichroic filter behind the entrance slit, after which there are two completely separate spectrographs. The blue spectrograph operates from 3200 A to 5200 A while the red one goes from 5200 A to 10,000 A. The red detector is an 800 x 800 TI CCD while the blue detector is a 320 x 512 RCA CCD or a Shectrograph image pulse-counting system. A Boksenberg IPCS can also be mounted on the blue camera. The overall efficiency of the Cassegrain telescope, spectrographs, and CCD's combined, ranges from 5 percent to 13 percent between 3600 A and 8200 A. The spectrograph is usable from 3200 A to 10,400 A.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime biosensing with DNA microarrays and a CMOS-SPAD imager

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Gerard; Schulze, Holger; Li, Day-Uei; Bachmann, Till T.; Crain, Jason; Tyndall, David; Richardson, Justin; Walker, Richard; Stoppa, David; Charbon, Edoardo; Henderson, Robert; Arlt, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of dye molecules is a sensitive reporter on local microenvironment which is generally independent of fluorophores concentration and can be used as a means of discrimination between molecules with spectrally overlapping emission. It is therefore a potentially powerful multiplexed detection modality in biosensing but requires extremely low light level operation typical of biological analyte concentrations, long data acquisition periods and on-chip processing capability to realize these advantages. We report here fluorescence lifetime data obtained using a CMOS-SPAD imager in conjunction with DNA microarrays and TIRF excitation geometry. This enables acquisition of single photon arrival time histograms for a 320 pixel FLIM map within less than 26 seconds exposure time. From this, we resolve distinct lifetime signatures corresponding to dye-labelled HCV and quantum-dot-labelled HCMV nucleic acid targets at concentrations as low as 10 nM. PMID:21258550

  13. 2D SWIR image sensor with extended wavelength cutoff of 2.5 μm on InP/InGaAs epitaxial wafers with graded buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushini, Prabhu; Huang, Wei; Morales, Manuel; Brubaker, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc-Uyen; Dobies, Matt; Zhang, Wei; Gustus, William; Mathews, Gary; Endicter, Scott; Paik, Namwoong

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional photo detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of 2.5 μm were fabricated on InP/InGaAs epitaxial wafers with graded buffer layers in a 320x256 geometry on a 12.5μm pitch. Novel growth and fabrication techniques were employed to fabricate these arrays and optimize the performance. The dark current of the detector was investigated for a wide range of temperatures. The fabricated detector array was mated with a ROIC and packaged with a multi-stage TEC and investigated further at the FPA level. The effect of the graded buffer layers on the sensor performance was investigated and the results were compared to other methods used to develop and fabricate 2D image sensors on extended wavelength materials.

  14. Melanoma induction by ultraviolet A but not ultraviolet B radiation requires melanin pigment

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Frances P.; Zaidi, M. Raza; Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Anver, Miriam R.; Bahn, Jesse; Wielgus, Albert; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mouret, Stephane; Tucker, Margaret A.; Popratiloff, Anastas; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of the skin (CMM) is associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure, but the mechanisms and even the wavelengths responsible are unclear. Here we use a mammalian model to investigate melanoma formed in response to precise spectrally defined ultraviolet wavelengths and biologically relevant doses. We show that melanoma induction by ultraviolet A (320–400 nm) requires the presence of melanin pigment and is associated with oxidative DNA damage within melanocytes. In contrast, ultraviolet B radiation (280–320 nm) initiates melanoma in a pigment-independent manner associated with direct ultraviolet B DNA damage. Thus, we identified two ultraviolet wavelength-dependent pathways for the induction of CMM and describe an unexpected and significant role for melanin within the melanocyte in melanomagenesis. PMID:22673911

  15. The human genes for desmogleins (DSG1 and DSG3) are located in a small region on chromosome 18q12

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimin; Amagai, Masayuki; Minoshima, Shinsei; Sakai, Kosuke; Nishikawa, Takeji; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi ); Green, K.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Desmoglein is a transmembrane glycoprotein component of desmosomes in vertebrate epithelial cells. Two of the three currently known desmogleins are the autoantigens of autoimmune skin blistering diseases, pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus, in which autoantibodies cause the loss of cell adhesion of keratinocytes with resultant blister formation. In this study, the genes for two autoantigens (DSG1 for pemphigus foliaceus and DSG3 for pemphigus vulgaris) were mapped on band q12 of human chromosome 18 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Furthermore, both genes were localized on a 320-kb genomic fragment separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These results suggest the possibility of a cluster for the desmoglein gene family on chromosome 18. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Homoepitaxial growth of MOD-YBCO thick films on evaporated and MOD templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, D.; Yamaguchi, I.; Sohma, M.; Tsukada, K.; Matsui, M.; Kumagai, T.; Manabe, T.

    2011-11-01

    We have prepared metal organic deposition (MOD)-YBCO thick films by repeating the coating-pyrolysis-crystallization procedure onto ∼100-nm-thick evaporated and MOD templates. Surface morphology of the template was found to strongly affect the homoepitaxial growth of MOD-YBCO layers on the template; namely, the epitaxial growth of MOD-YBCO on the evaporated template was much easier than that on the MOD template. A 220-nm-thick epitaxial MOD-YBCO film was successfully prepared on the 100-nm-thick evaporated-YBCO template to obtain a 320-nm-thick YBCO film, which exhibited Jc = 2.44 MA/cm2 and Ic = 78 A/cm. The Ic value has significantly increased from 37 A/cm for the evaporated-template.

  17. Acoustic radiation patterns for a source in a hard-walled unflanged circular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic radiation patterns are measured over a 320 deg arc for a point source in a finite length, hard walled, unflanged circular duct. The measured results are compared with computed results which are based on the Wiener-Hopf solution for radiation from a semi-infinite unflanged duct. Measurements and computations are presented for frequencies slightly below and slightly above each of the first four higher order radial mode cutoff frequencies. It is found that the computed and measured patterns show better agreement below the mode cut-off frequencies than above and that the agreement is better at lower frequencies that at higher frequencies. The computed radiation patterns do not show fine lobes which are caused by diffraction from the back end of the duct.

  18. Results of test IA137 in the NASA/ARC 14 foot transonic wind tunnel of the 0.07 scale external tank forebody (model 68-T) to determine auxiliary aerodynamic data system feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a 14 foot transonic wind tunnel to examine the feasibility of the auxiliary aerodynamic data system (AADS) for determining angles of attack and sideslip during boost flight. The model used was a 0.07 scale replica of the external tank forebody consisting of the nose portion and a 60 inch (full scale) cylindrical section of the ogive cylinder tangency point. The model terminated in a blunt base with a 320.0 inch diameter at external tank (ET) station 1120.37. Pressure data were obtained from five pressure orifices (one total and four statics) on the nose probe, and sixteen surface static pressure orifices along the ET forebody.

  19. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  20. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  1. Design conceptuel d'un avion blended wing body de 200 passagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, Sami

    The Blended Wing Body is built based on the flying wing concept and performance improvements compared to conventional aircraft. Contrariwise, most studies have focused on large aircraft and it is not sure whether the gains are the same for smaller aircraft. The main of objective is to perform the conceptual design of a BWB of 200 passengers and compare the performance obtained with a conventional aircraft equivalent in terms of payload and range. The design of the Blended Wing Body was carried out under the CEASIOM environment. This platform design suitable for conventional aircraft design has been modified and additional tools have been integrated in order to achieve the aerodynamic analysis, performance and stability of the aircraft fuselage built. A plane model is obtained in the geometric module AcBuilder CEASIOM from the design variables of a wing. Estimates of mass are made from semi- empirical formulas adapted to the geometry of the BWB and calculations centering and inertia are possible through BWB model developed in CATIA. Low fidelity methods, such as TORNADO and semi- empirical formulas are used to analyze the aerodynamic performance and stability of the aircraft. The aerodynamic results are validated using a high-fidelity analysis using FLUENT CFD software. An optimization process is implemented in order to obtain improved while maintaining a feasible design performance. It is an optimization of the plan form of the aircraft fuselage integrated with a number of passengers and equivalent to that of a A320.Les performance wing aircraft merged optimized maximum range are compared to A320 also optimized. Significant gains were observed. An analysis of the dynamics of longitudinal and lateral flight is carried out on the aircraft optimized BWB finesse and mass. This study identified the stable and unstable modes of the aircraft. Thus, this analysis has highlighted the stability problems associated with the oscillation of incidence and the Dutch roll for the

  2. Use of 320-detector computed tomographic angiography for infants and young children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousily, Faris; Shifrin, Roger Y; Fricker, Frederick J; Feranec, Nicholas; Quinn, Nancy S; Chandran, Arun

    2011-04-01

    Pediatric patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) face a lifetime of treatment with interventional therapeutic and palliative procedures. Echocardiography remains the mainstay for noninvasive imaging of congenital heart lesions. This often is supplemented with diagnostic cardiac catheterization for additional anatomic and physiologic characterization. However, recent technological improvements in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to an increased focus on the use of these techniques given their better safety profile. This study aimed to review the authors' experience with a 320-slice multidetector CT scanner in the evaluation of CHD in children. This retrospective case study investigated 22 infants and young children with a provisional diagnosis of CHD. Their anatomic evaluation was performed using a 320-slice Aquilon ONE CT scanner. Of these 22 patients, 14 were examined without cardiac gating. This was subsequently modified to a prospective gated, targeted protocol to decrease the radiation dose. The images were interpreted by an experienced radiologist and a pediatric cardiologist. Continuous variables were expressed as mean and standard deviation or range, and the two imaging protocols were compared. A comparison of exposure rates with those from other pediatric studies that had used the 64-slice CT angiography also was performed. For the first group of patients, with nongated CT examinations, the mean effective whole-body radiation dose was 1.8 ± 0.71 millisieverts (mSv) (range, 0.96-3.2 mSv). For the second group, the mean was 0.8 ± 0.39 mSv (range, 0.4-1.5 mSv). Although the radiation dose was reduced dramatically, clinicians must be vigilant about the cumulative risk of radiation exposure.

  3. Characterisation of strip silicon detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, L.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Fernandez-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Gallop, B.; Greenall, A.; Gregor, I.-M.; Hara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lohwasser, K.; Maneuski, D.; Nagorski, S.; Pape, I.; Phillips, P. W.; Sperlich, D.; Sawhney, K.; Soldevila, U.; Ullan, M.; Unno, Y.; Warren, M.

    2016-07-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity up to 6·1034 cm-2s-1. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb-1 after ten years of operation, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand fluences to over 1·1016 1 MeV neq/cm2. In order to cope with the consequent increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (end-cap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). A resolution better than the inter strip pitch of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. The effect of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips was investigated in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stop regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch.

  4. Trace determination of peptides in water samples using packed capillary liquid chromatography with UV and MS detection and characterization of peptide oxidation products by MS.

    PubMed

    Bjellaas, Thomas; Holm, Anders; Molander, Paal; Tørnes, John Aasulf; Greibrokk, Tyge; Lundanes, Elsa

    2004-02-01

    A capillary liquid chromatographic column switching method has been developed for fast and sensitive determination of peptides in water samples. Sample volumes of 1 mL were loaded onto a (320 microm I.D. x30 mm) 10 microm Kromasil C(18) pre-column, providing on-line analyte enrichment, prior to back-flushed elution onto a (320 microm I.D. x150 mm) 3.5 microm Kromasil C(18) analytical column. Loading flow rates of 250 microL/min and a mobile phase composition of acetonitrile/water/trifluoroacetic acid (22/77.9/0.1, v/v) provided a total analysis time of less than 25 minutes for the test peptides angiotensin II, bombesin, bradykinin, corazonin, neurotensin and substance P, using temperature programmed elution. In addition, solvent gradient elution and combined solvent gradient elution and temperature programming were explored. Using on-capillary UV detection at 210 nm resulted in a concentration limit of detection (cLOD) of about 1 ng/mL. The method was validated over the concentration range 1-100 ng/mL, yielding a coefficient of correlation of 0.997 or better. The within-assay ( n=6) and between-assay ( n=6) precisions of peak areas were on average 6% RSD and 5% RSD, respectively. When the method was applied to spiked chlorinated tap water samples, it was found that peptides containing methionine, tryptophan and cystine were oxidized. Identification of the oxidation products of the peptides in hypochlorite-treated water was done with positive electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection.

  5. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Lisjak, I; Vekić, B; Poje, M; Planinić, J

    2008-02-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 microSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 microSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 microSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 microSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data.

  6. Aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  7. Improvement of the liquid segregation phenomena of semisolid aluminum alloys by the multistage strain rate control in the compression test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, C. G.; Jung, K. D.

    2001-08-01

    The deformation behavior of semisolid aluminum alloys in the range of solid fraction ( f s ) between 55 and 90% was investigated through compression tests for the variation of strain rate. In order to obtain the optimal conditions of the net shape forging process, the rheological behavior of aluminum alloy in the semisolid state has been examined by using parallel plate compression. The strain rate is the value of the strain rate corresponding to the stress to avoid the liquid segregation phenomena during compression tests. The material constants of semisolid material in the stress-strain curve are proposed to perform the numerical analysis for a die design of semisolid forging. The starting materials used in this experiment are A357, 86S (similar to A319), and A390 alloys, which are fabricated by the electromagnetic stirring process. The intelligent compression test with a controlled strain rate was performed. The liquid segregation in the overall cross-sectional areas is controlled as the multistage variation of the pressing velocity and variation of the solid fraction during the compression process. The characteristics of materials flow between solid and liquid phases, considering the liquid segregation, are discussed for various solid fractions and pressing velocities.

  8. Effect of heat treatments on mechanical properties and damage evolution of thixoformed aluminium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; Cerri, E.; Leo, P.

    2005-07-15

    In the present work, the effects of heat treatments on mechanical properties, microstructure evolution and damage resulting from plastic deformation of thixoformed A319 and A356 aluminium alloys, are studied. The thixoforming process can lead to the production of components that are characterized by very good mechanical properties and low porosity with a globular microstructure which is fine and uniform. The mechanical properties can be further improved through heat treatments such as T5 and T6. The prime factor influencing the damage in the alloys belonging to the Al-Si system is represented by decohesion of silicon particles resulting from the stress concentration at the particle-matrix interfaces. A statistical analysis of fractured particles after tensile tests in the as-cast and as-treated condition has been carried out in the present work; optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been used to characterize the microstructure and fracture surfaces of the specimens and the results are fully presented.

  9. Fatigue Life Prediction for Porosity-Containing Cast 319-T7 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Younghwan; Jeong, Youin; Yoon, Chongho; Kim, Sangshik

    2009-05-01

    In this study, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach, including use of the equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS) concept and fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates, da/ dN, as a function of either Δ K or Δ K eff, was used to predict the fatigue life of a porosity-containing 319-T7 specimen. The uniaxial fatigue tests were conducted on a 319-T7 specimen at a stress ratio ( R) of -1. For the LEFM-based fatigue life prediction, da/ dN-Δ K data were obtained for the 319-T7 specimen at R = 0.1. The shape and the size of the porosity were analyzed based on the fractographic and the micrographic analyses for each fatigued specimen. The LEFM concept, including the use of the EIFS value, back-calculated by using da/ dN-Δ K eff data, successfully predicts the porosity-affected stress vs the number of cycles to failure (S-N) fatigue behavior of cast 319-T7 specimens. The LEFM models presently available for predicting the fatigue life of porosity-containing alloys were evaluated and a simple modification was proposed based on extensive fractographic analysis results.

  10. Novel mutations in abetalipoproteinaemia and homozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Vongsuvanh, R; Hooper, A J; Coakley, J C; Macdessi, J S; O'Loughlin, E V; Burnett, J R; Gaskin, K J

    2007-11-01

    Abetalipoproteinaemia (ABL) and homozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia (FHBL) are rare inherited disorders associated with low or undetectable levels of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins. Patients present with the symptoms and sequelae of fat malabsorption, including fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies. We describe two novel mutations: one an APOB gene mutation causing FHBL and the other a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene mutation causing ABL. Two siblings of consanguineous parents were homozygous for an apoB mutation 4339delT causing an apoB-30.9 truncation. In another family, a boy born to consanguineous parents was homozygous for a 319 bp in-frame deletion of MTP exon 15 (c.2076-39_2303 + 52del319). All three children presented with malabsorption and liver dysfunction and had similar very low serum lipid, apoB, and fat-soluble vitamin levels. The FHBL parents had low serum lipid and apoB profiles distinguishing the disorder from the normal levels in ABL parents. Future patients presenting with FHBL or ABL should be genotyped to provide further insight into the varying clinical severity related to molecular heterogenicity in these two conditions.

  11. High temperature high cycle fatigue behavior of new aluminum alloy strengthened by (Co, Ni)3Al4 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Sik; Sung, Si-Young; Han, Bum-Suck; Jung, Chang-Yeol; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2014-03-01

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of a new heat-resistant aluminum alloy at elevated temperature was investigated. This alloy consists of an α-Al matrix, a small amount of precipitated Mg2Si, and distributed (Co, Ni)3Al4 strengthening particles. HCF tests were conducted with a stress ratio of (R)=0 and a frequency of (F)=30 Hz at 130 °C. The fatigue limit (maximum stress) of this alloy was 120 MPa at 107 cycles. This is a value superior to that of conventional heat-resistant aluminum alloys such as the A319 alloy. Furthermore, regardless of the stress conditions, the new heat-resistant Al alloy has an outstanding fatigue life at high temperatures. The results of fractography observation showed that second phases, especially (Co, Ni)3Al4 particles, were effective to the resistance of fatigue crack initiation and propagation. On the other hand, Mg2Si particles were more easily fractured by the fatigue crack. This study also clarifies the micromechanism of fatigue deformation behavior at elevated temperature related to its microstructure.

  12. Phase diagram of a model of nanoparticles in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Lettieri, S; Wentzel, N; Gunton, J D

    2008-10-28

    We obtain accurate fluid-fluid coexistence curves for a recent simple model of interacting nanoparticles that includes the effects of ion-dispersion forces. It has been proposed that these ion-dispersion forces provide at least a partial explanation for the Hofmeister effect [M. Bostrom et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 168103 (2001)]. We study a model of aluminum oxide nanoparticle [Deniz et al., Colloids Surf. A 319, 98 (2008)] for three different electrolyte solutions with added salt type being sodium chloride, sodium iodide, and a nonpolarizable salt. We observe that the fluid-fluid coexistence curves depend substantially on the identity of added salt; this provides an efficient way of tuning the phase behavior of nanoparticles. The methods we employ include finite-size scaling (FSS), multicanonical histogram reweighting, and Gibbs ensemble methods. We show that, as expected, all three cases belong to the Ising universality class. The scaling fields and critical point parameters are obtained in the thermodynamic limit of infinite system size by extrapolation of our FSS results.

  13. LCX: Proposal for a low-cost commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Troy; Hayatdavoudi, Maziar; Hettinga, Joel; Hooper, Matt; Nguyen, Phong

    1994-01-01

    The LCX has been developed in response to a request for proposal for an aircraft with 153 passenger capacity and a range of 3000 nautical miles. The goals of the LCX are to provide an aircraft which will achieve the stated mission requirements at the lowest cost possible, both for the manufacturer and the operator. Low cost in this request is defined as short and long term profitability. To achieve this objective, modern technologies attributing to low-cost operation without greatly increasing the cost of manufacturing were employed. These technologies include hybrid laminar flow control and the use of developing new manufacturing processes and philosophies. The LCX will provide a competitive alternative to the use of the Airbus A319/320/321 and the Boeing 737 series of aircraft. The LCX has a maximum weight of 150,000 lb. carried by a wing of 1140 ft(exp 2) and an aspect ratio of 10. The selling price of the LCX is 31 million in 1994 US dollars.

  14. Line formation in Be star envelopes. II. Disk oscillations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, W.; Hanuschik, R. W.

    1997-04-01

    We present numerical model calculations for an especially interesting class of Hα emission line profiles from Be star disks, those with asymmetric shape and long-term variability (so-called class 2 profiles). As an underlying model for the disk we investigate the hypothesis of Okazaki (1997A&A...318..548O) that these profiles are caused by a distortion of a quasi-Keplerian disk. The distortion has the form of a one-armed global disk oscillation (density and velocity wave). The radiation transfer in the disk is calculated with an improved version of the spatially implicit 3D radiative transfer code of Hummel (1994). The resulting sets of Hα emission line profiles reproduce well the observed structures of fully-resolved class 2 Hα emission lines, like double peaks and winebottle-type shoulders. For high inclinations, shell-type profiles result. It is shown that the full variety of observed profile shapes is caused by the interaction of kinematical and non-coherent scattering broadening. While this result has already been found by Hummel (1994) for the symmetric (class 1) Hα profiles, it is proven here for the second major profile class as well. The comparison between observed and theoretical emission shows that the model of global disk oscillations is in full agreement with the observed shapes and the cyclic long-term variability of class 2 profiles.

  15. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Adam Paul

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb-1 dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t$\\bar{t}$ and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb-1 dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 ± 2.6(stat) ± 3.3(syst) GeV/c2 from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 178 GTeV/c2 and 3.1 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 172.5 GeV/c2. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  16. Identification and characterization of inosine 5-monophosphate dehydrogenase in Streptococcus suis type 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-han; He, Kong-wang; Duan, Zhi-tao; Zhou, Jun-ming; Yu, Zheng-yu; Ni, Yan-xiu; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcus suis type 2 is a swine pathogen responsible for diverse diseases. Although many virulent factors have been identified and studied, relatively little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of type 2. The aim of the study was to identify and understand the characterization of Inosine 5-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). A 957-bp gene, impdh, was identified in the virulent S. suis serotype 2 (SS2), and analysis of the predicted IMPDH sequence revealed IMP dehydrogenase/GMP reductase domain. The gene encoding for the IMPDH of S. suis was cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence contained an open reading frame encoding for a 318 amino acid polypeptide exhibiting 23% sequence identity with the IMPDH from Streptococcus pyogenes (YP281355) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (ZP00404150). Using the pET(32) expression plasmid, the impdh gene was inducibly overexpressed in Escherichia coli to produce IMPDH with a hexahistidyl N-terminus to permit its purification. The (His)6 IMPDH protein was found to possess functional IMPDH enzymatic activity after the purification. The impdh-knockout SS2 mutant ( Delta IMPDH) constructed in this study was slower in growth and one pH unit higher than SS2-H after 6 h of culturing, and found to be attenuated in mouse models of infection for 2.5 times and not be capable of causing death in porcine models of infection in contrast with the parent SS2-H.

  17. Increased fitness and realized heritability in emamectin benzoate-resistant Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Abbas, Naeem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Pathan, Attaullah Khan; Razaq, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    The common green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea is a key biological control agent employed in integrated pest management (IPM) programs for managing various insect pests. A field collected population of C. carnea was selected for emamectin benzoate resistance in the laboratory and fitness costs and realized heritability were investigated. After five generations of selection with emamectin benzoate, C. carnea developed a 318-fold resistance to the insecticide. The resistant population had a relative fitness of 1.49, with substantially higher emergence rate of healthy adults, fecundity and hatchability and shorter larval duration, pupal duration, and development time compared to the susceptible population. Mean population growth rates; such as the intrinsic rate of natural population increase and biotic potential were higher for the emamectin benzoate selected population compared to the susceptible population. The realized heritability (h(2)) value of emamectin benzoate resistance was 0.34 in emamectin benzoate selected population of C. carnea. Chrysoperla species which show resistance to insecticides makes them compatible with those IPM systems where emamectin benzoate is employed.

  18. RNA polymerase II subunit RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    To improve our understanding of RNA polymerase II, the gene that encodes its third-largest subunit, RPB3, was isolated from a lambda gt11 DNA library by using antibody probes. The RPB3 DNA sequence predicts a 318-amino-acid protein whose sequence was confirmed, in part, by microsequence analysis of the gel-purified RNA polymerase II subunit. RPB3 was found to be an essential single-copy gene that is tightly linked to HIS6 on chromosome IX. An RPB3 temperature-sensitive mutant that arrested growth after three to four generations at the restrictive temperature was isolated. When the mutant was shifted to the restrictive temperature, RNA polymerase II could no longer assemble, previously assembled functional enzyme was depleted, and mRNA levels were consequently reduced. These results demonstrate that RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus. Finally, the RPB3 protein is similar in sequence and length to RPC5, a subunit common to RNA polymerases I and III, suggesting that these subunits may play similar roles in RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Images PMID:2685562

  19. Models for ionic contribution to the complex dielectric constant of nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Alexe-Ionescu, A L; Barbero, G; Lelidis, I

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the models that account the ionic contribution to the complex dielectric constant of a nematic liquid crystal. We compare the predictions of the model of [Sawada, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. Sci. Technol., Sect. A 318, 225 (1998)] based on the assumption that the electric field in the liquid coincides with the applied one, with the model of Macdonald where the electric field in the sample is determined in self-consistent manner by solving the equation of Poisson. We show that the model of Sawada , widely used to determine the bulk density of ions and their diffusion coefficient in liquid crystal cells, predicts a thickness dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant different from that predicted by the model of Macdonald. On the contrary, the predictions of the two models coincide for what concerns the frequency dependencies of the two components of the dielectric constant. By considering a typical case, we show that the numerical values of the ionic properties derived by means of the model of Sawada may differ even more than 1 order of magnitude by those predicted by the model of Macdonald. A rescaling procedure allowing to evaluate the bulk density of ions and the ionic diffusion coefficient determined by means of the model of Sawada in agreement with the one of Macdonald is proposed.

  20. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the polyunsaturated fatty acid elongase (ELOVL5) gene from sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxia; Feng, Zhengfu; Song, Xiaojun; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Yanjiang

    2016-11-15

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) are beneficial for maintaining the health, growth and development of an organism and could reduce the risk of some diseases. The ability to endogenously produce PUFA, especially in invertebrates, is largely unknown. To study the function of elongase genes in the PUFA biosynthesis of Apostichopus japonicus, we cloned an ELOVL5 homology gene from intestinal cDNA of A. japonicus (Aj-ELOVL5). The Aj-ELOVL5 gene encoded a 318 amino acid (AA) protein that exhibited all the characteristics of the ELOVL5 family, such as a histidine box motif and four putative transmembrane-spanning domains. The results of the tissue expression profile of Aj-ELOVL5 revealed that the body wall exhibited the highest expression level compared with other adult tissues. We also found that the Aj-ELOVL5 enzyme exhibited the ability to elongate γ-linolenic acid (18:3 n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) to dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (20:3 n-6) and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5 n-3), respectively. Our results indicated that the Aj-ELOVL5 enzyme had the capacity to biosynthesize PUFA from C18/C20 PUFA substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 320-row coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) with automatic exposure control (AEC): effect of 100 kV versus 120 kV on image quality and dose exposure.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gennarelli, Antonio; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Felli, Valentina; Perri, Marco; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Barile, Antonio; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    To compare the impact of a 100 kV tube voltage protocol to 120 kV in terms of image quality and radiation dose by a 320 row coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) with automatic exposure control (AEC). Using a propensity matched analysis we compared a group of 135 patients scanned using a 100 kV tube voltage protocol with a group of 135 subjects scanned employing a 120 kV tube voltage setting. In all subjects the heart rate (HR) was <65 bpm and all CT scans were acquired using a prospective ECG gating and AEC strategy. Mean effective radiation dose and subjective and objective (Noise or N, signal to noise ratio or SNR, contrast to noise ratio or CNR) image quality, were evaluated. Subjective quality was assessed by two experienced radiologists using a 5-point scale (0: non diagnostic-4: excellent) using the 15-segment American Heart Association (AHA) coronary artery classification. Mean effective dose and noise were non significantly different between the two groups: mean effective dose was 2.89 ± 0.7 mSv in the 100 kV group and 2.80 ± 0.57 mSv in the 120 kV group (p = 0.25) while noise was 28.9 ± 3.3 in the 120 kV group and 29.05 ± 3.6 in the 100 kV group (p = 0.72). Both SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the 100 kV group than in the 120 kV group. This data agrees with the evidence that subjective quality was significantly higher in the 100 kV group in the middle and distal segmental classes. Our study shows that, in using a 320 row CCTA with AEC strategy it is better to employ a 100 kV tube voltage protocol because compared to 120 kV tube voltage setting, it appears to significantly improve both subjective and objective image quality without decreasing the mean effective radiation dose.

  2. Predicting Minimum Control Speed on the Ground (VMCG) and Minimum Control Airspeed (VMCA) of Engine Inoperative Flight Using Aerodynamic Database and Propulsion Database Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadder, Eric Michael

    There are many computer aided engineering tools and software used by aerospace engineers to design and predict specific parameters of an airplane. These tools help a design engineer predict and calculate such parameters such as lift, drag, pitching moment, takeoff range, maximum takeoff weight, maximum flight range and much more. However, there are very limited ways to predict and calculate the minimum control speeds of an airplane in engine inoperative flight. There are simple solutions, as well as complicated solutions, yet there is neither standard technique nor consistency throughout the aerospace industry. To further complicate this subject, airplane designers have the option of using an Automatic Thrust Control System (ATCS), which directly alters the minimum control speeds of an airplane. This work addresses this issue with a tool used to predict and calculate the Minimum Control Speed on the Ground (VMCG) as well as the Minimum Control Airspeed (VMCA) of any existing or design-stage airplane. With simple line art of an airplane, a program called VORLAX is used to generate an aerodynamic database used to calculate the stability derivatives of an airplane. Using another program called Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), a propulsion database is generated to use with the aerodynamic database to calculate both VMCG and VMCA. This tool was tested using two airplanes, the Airbus A320 and the Lockheed Martin C130J-30 Super Hercules. The A320 does not use an Automatic Thrust Control System (ATCS), whereas the C130J-30 does use an ATCS. The tool was able to properly calculate and match known values of VMCG and VMCA for both of the airplanes. The fact that this tool was able to calculate the known values of VMCG and VMCA for both airplanes means that this tool would be able to predict the VMCG and VMCA of an airplane in the preliminary stages of design. This would allow design engineers the ability to use an Automatic Thrust Control System (ATCS) as part

  3. Scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children using axial volumetric 320-detector row CT compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16- detector row CT acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Kroft, Lucia J M; Roelofs, Joost J H; Geleijns, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Recently a 320-detector-row CT (MDCT) scanner has become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range (50 cm field of view) in a single 0.35-s rotation. For imaging neonates and small children, volume scanning is potentially of great advantage as the entire scan range can be acquired in 0.35 s, which can reduce motion artefacts and may reduce the need for sedation in clinical CT imaging. Also, because there is no over-ranging associated with axial volumetric scanning, this may reduce patient radiation dose. To evaluate, by means of a phantom study, scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children by using axial cone-beam and helical fan-beam MDCT acquisitions. Paediatric imaging protocols were assessed for a 320-MDCT volumetric scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba, Otawara, Japan). The 320-MDCT scanner allows for cone-beam acquisitions with coverage up to 160 mm, but it also allows for helical fan-beam acquisitions in 64-, 32-, or 16-MDCT modes. The acquisition configurations that were evaluated were 320 x 0.5 mm, 240 x 0.5 mm, and 160 x 0.5 mm for axial volumetric scanning, and 64 x 0.5 mm, 32 x 0.5 mm, and 16 x 0.5 mm for helical scanning. Dose assessment was performed for clinically relevant paediatric angiographic or chest/mediastinum acquisition protocols with tube voltages of 80 or 100 kVp and tube currents between 40 and 80 mA. Scan time was 0.35 s for 320-MDCT acquisitions, scan times varied between 1.9 s and 8.3 s for helical acquisitions. Dose savings varying between 18% and 40% were achieved with axial volumetric scanning as compared to helical scanning (for 320- versus 64-MDCT at 160 mm and 80 kVp, and for 320- versus 16-MDCT at 80 mm and 100 kVp, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in radiation dose was found for axial 320-MDCT volumetric scanning compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16-MDCT scanning. Axial thoracic CT of neonates and small children with volumetric 320-MDCT can be performed

  4. A correlation linking the predicted mean vote and the mean thermal vote based on an investigation on the human thermal comfort in short-haul domestic flights.

    PubMed

    Giaconia, Carlo; Orioli, Aldo; Di Gangi, Alessandra

    2015-05-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the human thermal comfort inside the cabin of some Airbus A319 aircrafts during 14 short-haul domestic flights, linking various Italian cities, are presented and used to define a correlation among the predicted mean vote (PMV), a procedure which is commonly used to assess the thermal comfort in inhabited environments, and the equivalent temperature and mean thermal vote (MTV), which are the parameters suggested by the European Standard EN ISO 14505-2 for the evaluation of the thermal environment in vehicles. The measurements of the radiant temperature, air temperature and relative humidity during flights were performed. The air temperature varied between 22.2 °C and 26.0 °C; the relative humidity ranged from 8.7% to 59.2%. The calculated values of the PMV varied from -0.16 to 0.90 and were confirmed by the answers of the passengers. The equivalent temperature was evaluated using the equations of Fanger or on the basis of the values of the skin temperature measured on some volunteers. The correlation linking the thermal sensation scales and zones used by the PMV and the MTV resulted quite accurate because the minimum value of the absolute difference between such environmental indexes equalled 0.0073 and the maximum difference did not exceed the value of 0.0589. Even though the equivalent temperature and the MTV were specifically proposed to evaluate the thermal sensation in vehicles, their use may be effectively extended to the assessment of the thermal comfort in airplanes or other occupied places.

  5. Inverse correlation between level of professional education and rate of handwashing compliance in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Joan M; Hensley, Sandra; Khuder, Sadik; Papadimos, Thomas J; Jacobs, Lloyd

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate educational level as a contributing factor in handwashing compliance. Observation of hand washing opportunities was performed for approximately 12 weeks before an announced Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) visit and for approximately 10 weeks after the visit. Trained observers recorded the date, time, and location of the observation; the type of healthcare worker or hospital employee observed; and the type of hand hygiene opportunity observed. University of Toledo Medical Center, a 319-bed teaching hospital. A total of 2,373 observations were performed. The rate of hand washing compliance among nurses was 91.3% overall. Medical attending physicians had the lowest observed rate of compliance (72.4%; P<.001). Nurses showed statistically significant improvement in their rate of hand hygiene compliance after the JCAHO visit (P = .001), but no improvement was seen for attending physicians (P = .117). The compliance rate in the surgical intensive care unit was more than 90%, greater than that in other hospital units (P = .001). Statistically, the compliance rate was better during the first part of the week (Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday) than during the latter part of the week (Thursday and Friday) (P = .002), and the compliance rate was better during the 3 PM-11 PM shift, compared with the 7 AM-3 PM shift (P<.001). When evaluated by logistic regression analysis, non-physician healthcare worker status and observation after the JCAHO accreditation visit were associated with an increased rate of hand hygiene compliance. An inverse correlation existed between the level of professional educational and the rate of compliance. Future research initiatives may need to address the different motivating factors for hand hygiene among nurses and physicians to increase compliance.

  6. Subtotal Colectomy for Colon Cancer Reduces the Need for Subsequent Surgery in Lynch Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Seppälä, Toni T; Järvinen, Heikki J; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2017-08-01

    resection. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A319.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ROSAT detected quasars. II. (Yuan+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, W.; Brinkmann, W.; Siebert, J.; Voges, W.

    1997-11-01

    We have compiled a sample of all radio-quiet quasars or quasars without radio detection from the Veron-Cetty - Veron catalogue (1993, VV93, Cat. ) detected by ROSAT in the ALL-SKY SURVEY (RASS, Voges 1992, in Proc. of the ISY Conference `Space Science', ESA ISY-3, ESA Publications, p.9, See Cat. ), as targets of pointed observations, or as serendipitous sources from pointed observations publicly available from the ROSAT point source catalogue (ROSAT-SRC, Voges et al. 1995, Cat. ). For all sources we used the results of the Standard Analysis Software System (SASS, Voges et al. 1992, in Proc. of the ISY Conference `Space Science', ESA ISY-3, ESA Publications, p.223), employing the most recent processing for the Survey data (RASS-II, Voges et al. 1996, Cat. ). The total number of quasars is 846. 69 of the radio-quiet objects with radio detections have already been presented in a previous paper (Brinkmann, Yuan, & Siebert 1997, Cat. A/319/413>) using the RASS-I results. 17 objects were found to be radio-loud from recent radio surveys and were marked in the table. When available, the power law photon indices and the corresponding absorption column densities (NH) were estimated from the two hardness ratios given by the SASS, both with free fitted NH and for Galactic absorption. The unabsorbed X-ray flux densities in the ROSAT band (0.1-2.4keV) were calculated from the count rates using the energy to counts conversion factor for power law spectra and Galactic absorption. As the photon index we used the value obtained for the individual source if the estimated 1-σ error is smaller than 0.5, otherwise we used the redshift-dependent mean value (see the paper for details). (1 data file).

  8. Identification and characterization of the orf virus type I topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Klemperer, N; Lyttle, D J; Tauzin, D; Traktman, P; Robinson, A J

    1995-01-10

    Vaccinia virus (VV) and Shope fibroma virus (SFV), representatives of the orthopox and leporipox genera, respectively, encode type I DNA topoisomerases. Here we report that the 957-nt F4R open reading frame of orf virus (OV), a representative of the parapox genus, is predicted to encode a 318-aa protein with extensive homology to these enzymes. The deduced amino acid sequence of F4R has 54.7 and 50.6% identity with the VV and SFV enzymes, respectively. One hundred forty amino acids are predicted to be conserved in all three proteins. The F4R protein was expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of an inducible T7 promoter, partially purified, and shown to be a bona fide type I topoisomerase. Like the VV enzyme, the OV enzyme relaxed negatively supercoiled DNA in the absence of divalent cations or ATP and formed a transient covalent intermediate with cleaved DNA that could be visualized by SDS-PAGE. Both the noncovalent and covalent protein/DNA complexes could be detected in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The initial PCR used to prepare expression constructs yielded a mutant allele of the OV topoisomerase with a G-A transition at nt 677 that was predicted to replace a highly conserved Tyr residue with a Cys. This allele directed the expression of an enzyme which retained noncovalent DNA binding activity but was severely impaired in DNA cleavage and relaxation. Incubation of pUC19 DNA with the wild-type OV or VV enzyme yielded an indistinguishable set of DNA cleavage fragments, although the relative abundance of the fragments differed for the two enzymes. Using a duplex oligonucleotide substrate containing the consensus site for the VV enzyme, we demonstrated that the OV enzyme also cleaved efficiently immediately downstream of the sequence CCCTT.

  9. A pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) metacaspase 9 (Camc9) plays a role in pathogen-induced cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Min; Bae, Chungyun; Oh, Sang-Keun; Choi, Doil

    2013-08-01

    Metacaspases, which belong to the cysteine-type C14 protease family, are most structurally similar to mammalian caspases than any other caspase-like protease in plants. Atmc9 (Arabidopsis thaliana metacaspase 9) has a unique domain structure, and distinct biochemical characteristics, such as Ca²⁺ binding, pH, redox status, S-nitrosylation and specific protease inhibitors. However, the biological roles of Atmc9 in plant-pathogen interactions remain largely unknown. In this study, a metacaspase gene present as a single copy in the pepper genome, and sharing 54% amino acid sequence identity with Atmc9, was isolated and named Capsicum annuum metacaspase 9 (Camc9). Camc9 encodes a 318-amino-acid polypeptide with an estimated molecular weight of 34.6 kDa, and shares approximately 40% amino acid sequence identity with known type II metacaspases in plants. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of Camc9 was induced by infections of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria race 1 and race 3 and treatment with methyl jasmonate. Suppression of Camc9 expression using virus-induced gene silencing enhanced disease resistance and suppressed cell death symptom development following infection with virulent bacterial pathogens. By contrast, overexpression of Camc9 by transient or stable transformation enhanced disease susceptibility and pathogen-induced cell death by regulation of reactive oxygen species production and defence-related gene expression. These results suggest that Camc9 is a possible member of the metacaspase gene family and plays a role as a positive regulator of pathogen-induced cell death in the plant kingdom.

  10. Biogeochemical variability during the past 3.6 million years recorded by FTIR spectroscopy in the sediment record of Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Jacob, C.; Vogel, H.; Gebhardt, A. C.; Wennrich, V.; Melles, M.; Rosén, P.

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) can be applied to quantitatively assess lacustrine sediment constituents. In this study, we developed calibration models based on FTIRS for the quantitative determination of biogenic silica (BSi; n = 420; gradient: 0.9-56.5%), total organic carbon (TOC; n = 309; gradient: 0-2.9%), and total inorganic carbon (TIC; n= 152; gradient: 0-0.4%) in a 318 m-long sediment record with a basal age of 3.6 million years from Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic. The developed partial least squares (PLS) regression models yield high cross-validated (CV) R2CV = 0.86-0.91 and low root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) (3.1-7.0% of the gradient for the different properties). By applying these models to 6771 samples from the entire sediment record, we obtained detailed insight into bioproductivity variations in Lake El'gygytgyn throughout the middle to late Pliocene and Quaternary. High accumulation rates of BSi indicate a productivity maximum during the middle Pliocene (3.6-3.3 Ma), followed by gradually decreasing rates during the late Pliocene and Quaternary. The average BSi accumulation during the middle Pliocene was ~3 times higher than maximum accumulation rates during the past 1.5 million years. The indicated progressive deterioration of environmental and climatic conditions in the Siberian Arctic starting at ca. 3.3 Ma is consistent with the first occurrence of glacial periods and the finally complete establishment of glacial-interglacial cycles during the Quaternary.

  11. Biogeochemical properties and diagenetic changes during the past 3.6 Ma recorded by FTIR spectroscopy in the sediment record of Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Jacob, C.; Vogel, H.; Melles, M.; Rosén, P.

    2013-05-01

    A number of studies have shown that Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) can be applied to quantitatively assess lacustrine sediment constituents. In this study, we developed calibration models based on FTIRS for the quantitative determination of biogenic silica (BSi; n = 420; gradient: 0.9-56.5%), total organic carbon (TOC; n = 309; gradient: 0.02-2.89%), and total inorganic carbon (TIC; n = 153; gradient: 0.01-1.46%) in a 318 m long sediment record with a basal age of 3.6 Ma from Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic. The developed partial least squares regression (PLSR) models yield high cross-validated (CV) R2CV = 0.85-0.91 and low root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) (2.1-4.3% of the gradient for the different properties). The FTIRS-inferred concentrations of BSi, TOC, and TIC provide an initial insight into the climatic and environmental evolution at Lake El'gygytgyn throughout the late Pliocene and Quaternary showing a considerably high bioproductivity in the lake ecosystem between ~ 3.27-3.54 Ma during the early Pliocene warm period. Moreover, we found that the recorded FTIR spectra contain information on sample burial depth as a result of diagenetic changes (dehydration/dehydroxilation) of certain mineral phases. Despite the indicated post-depositional processes, the calibration models yield good statistical performances showing that general FTIRS models can be developed for several hundred meters long records extending several million years back in time. Our results highlight FTIRS to be a rapid, cost-effective alternative to conventional methods for quantification of biogeochemical properties.

  12. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems program (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. First quarterly report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Brushwood, J.

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally-superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability- Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase 1 of the ATS program, Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is re-configured with closed- loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to bum coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. Future Phase IV activities consist of manufacturing, constructing,

  13. Phylogeography and Post-Glacial Recolonization in Wolverines (Gulo gulo) from across Their Circumpolar Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zigouris, Joanna; Schaefer, James A.; Fortin, Clément; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Interglacial-glacial cycles of the Quaternary are widely recognized in shaping phylogeographic structure. Patterns from cold adapted species can be especially informative - in particular, uncovering additional glacial refugia, identifying likely recolonization patterns, and increasing our understanding of species’ responses to climate change. We investigated phylogenetic structure of the wolverine, a wide-ranging cold adapted carnivore, using a 318 bp of the mitochondrial DNA control region for 983 wolverines (n = 209 this study, n = 774 from GenBank) from across their full Holarctic distribution. Bayesian phylogenetic tree reconstruction and the distribution of observed pairwise haplotype differences (mismatch distribution) provided evidence of a single rapid population expansion across the wolverine’s Holarctic range. Even though molecular evidence corroborated a single refugium, significant subdivisions of population genetic structure (0.01< ΦST <0.99, P<0.05) were detected. Pairwise ΦST estimates separated Scandinavia from Russia and Mongolia, and identified five main divisions within North America - the Central Arctic, a western region, an eastern region consisting of Ontario and Quebec/Labrador, Manitoba, and California. These data are in contrast to the nearly panmictic structure observed in northwestern North America using nuclear microsatellites, but largely support the nuclear DNA separation of contemporary Manitoba and Ontario wolverines from northern populations. Historic samples (c. 1900) from the functionally extirpated eastern population of Quebec/Labrador displayed genetic similarities to contemporary Ontario wolverines. To understand these divergence patterns, four hypotheses were tested using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC). The most supported hypothesis was a single Beringia incursion during the last glacial maximum that established the northwestern population, followed by a west-to-east colonization during the Holocene. This

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Evolutionary models of Population II stars (Cariulo+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariulo, P.; Castellani, V.; degl'Innocenti, S.

    2004-02-01

    The models are calculated for different chemical compositions both without overshooting (standard models, including microscopic diffusion of He and heavy elements) and with different overshooting efficiency. Each set of models can be found in a different sub-directory. It is possible to get all the content for each chemical composition, the content of each selected sub-directory or just a given file. In each directory there are evolutionary tracks (TRACKS), isochrones (ISOCHRONES), horizontal branch models together with a table of the ZAHB characteristics (HB) and files with some relevant physical values of selected models (STRUCTURES). Models with overshooting are calculated for masses higher than 1M{sun} to avoid the unobserved presence of the overall contraction feature in 1M{sun} stars. Thus isochrones for ages higher than about 5Gyr are the same as in the standard case and thus are not included in the overshooting directories. Models with overshooting does not include microscopic diffusion because for masses higher than about 1M{sun} the effect of this mechanism is almost negligible. Models with overshooting are calculated for masses higher than 1M{sun} to avoid the unobserved presence of the overall contraction feature in 1M{sun} stars. Thus isochrones for ages higher than about 5Gyr are the same as in the standard case and thus are not included in the overshooting directories. Models with overshooting does not include microscopic diffusion because for masses higher than about 1M{sun} the effect of this mechanism is almost negligible. All the tracks and isochrones have been transformed in the observation plane by adopting the model atmospheres by Castelli (1999A&A...346..564C), see also Castelli, Gratton & Kurucz (1997A&A...318..841C). For convenience, all tracks and isochrones have been grouped in 4 tables tracks.dat, struct.dat, hb.dat and isochron.dat (8 data files).

  15. [Detection of pathogenic mutations in Marfan syndrome by targeted next-generation semiconductor sequencing].

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaoxia; Wu, Wei; Xiao, Jifang; Meng, Yan; Zhang, Shuyang; Zhang, Xue

    2013-06-01

    To detect pathogenic mutations in Marfan syndrome (MFS) using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) and to validate the result of targeted next-generation semiconductor sequencing for the diagnosis of genetic disorders. Peripheral blood samples were collected from three MFS patients and a normal control with informed consent. Genomic DNA was isolated by standard method and then subjected to targeted sequencing using an Ion Ampliseq(TM) Inherited Disease Panel. Three multiplex PCR reactions were carried out to amplify the coding exons of 328 genes including FBN1, TGFBR1 and TGFBR2. DNA fragments from different samples were ligated with barcoded sequencing adaptors. Template preparation and emulsion PCR, and Ion Sphere Particles enrichment were carried out using an Ion One Touch system. The ion sphere particles were sequenced on a 318 chip using the PGM platform. Data from the PGM runs were processed using an Ion Torrent Suite 3.2 software to generate sequence reads. After sequence alignment and extraction of SNPs and indels, all the variants were filtered against dbSNP137. DNA sequences were visualized with an Integrated Genomics Viewer. The most likely disease-causing variants were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The PGM sequencing has yielded an output of 855.80 Mb, with a > 100 × median sequencing depth and a coverage of > 98% for the targeted regions in all the four samples. After data analysis and database filtering, one known missense mutation (p.E1811K) and two novel premature termination mutations (p.E2264X and p.L871FfsX23) in the FBN1 gene were identified in the three MFS patients. All mutations were verified by conventional Sanger sequencing. Pathogenic FBN1 mutations have been identified in all patients with MFS, indicating that the targeted next-generation sequencing on the PGM sequencers can be applied for accurate and high-throughput testing of genetic disorders.

  16. Characterization of SNPs in the dopamine-β-hydroxylase gene providing new insights into its structure-function relationship.

    PubMed

    Punchaichira, Toyanji Joseph; Dey, Sanjay Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban; Kundu, Suman; Thelma, B K

    2017-07-01

    Dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH, EC 1.14.17.1), an oxido-reductase that catalyses the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, is largely expressed in sympathetic neurons and adrenal medulla. Several regulatory and structural variants in DBH associated with various neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular diseases and a few that may determine enzyme activity have also been identified. Due to paucity of studies on functional characterization of DBH variants, its structure-function relationship is poorly understood. The purpose of the study was to characterize five non-synonymous (ns) variants that were prioritized either based on previous association studies or Sorting Tolerant From Intolerant (SIFT) algorithm. The DBH ORF with wild type (WT) and site-directed mutagenized variants were transfected into HEK293 cells to generate transient and stable lines expressing these variant enzymes. Activity was determined by UPLC-PDA and corresponding quantity by MRM(HR) on a TripleTOF 5600 MS respectively of spent media from stable cell lines. Homospecific activity computed for the WT and variant proteins showed a marginal decrease in A318S, W544S and R549C variants. In transient cell lines, differential secretion was observed in the case of L317P, W544S and R549C. Secretory defect in L317P was confirmed by localization in ER. R549C exhibited both decreased homospecific activity and differential secretion. Of note, all the variants were seen to be destabilizing based on in silico folding analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, lending support to our experimental observations. These novel genotype-phenotype correlations in this gene of considerable pharmacological relevance have implications for dopamine-related disorders.

  17. Tree-ring-based drought reconstruction in the Iberian Range (east of Spain) since 1694.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Ernesto; de Luis, Martín; Cuadrat, José María; Esper, Jan; Saz, Miguel Ángel

    2016-03-01

    Droughts are a recurrent phenomenon in the Mediterranean basin with negative consequences for society, economic activities, and natural systems. Nevertheless, the study of drought recurrence and severity in Spain has been limited so far due to the relatively short instrumental period. In this work, we present a reconstruction of the standardized precipitation index (SPI) for the Iberian Range. Growth variations and climatic signals within the network are assessed developing a correlation matrix and the data combined to a single chronology integrating 336 samples from 169 trees of five different pine species distributed throughout the province of Teruel. The new chronology, calibrated against regional instrumental climatic data, shows a high and stable correlation with the July SPI integrating moisture conditions over 12 months forming the basis for a 318-year drought reconstruction. The climate signal contained in this reconstruction is highly significant (p < 0.05) and spatially robust over the interior areas of Spain located above 1000 meters above sea level (masl). According to our SPI reconstruction, seven substantially dry and five wet periods are identified since the late seventeenth century considering ≥±1.76 standard deviations. Besides these, 36 drought and 28 pluvial years were identified. Some of these years, such as 1725, 1741, 1803, and 1879, are also revealed in other drought reconstructions in Romania and Turkey, suggesting that coherent larger-scale synoptic patterns drove these extreme deviations. Since regional drought deviations are also retained in historical documents, the tree-ring-based reconstruction presented here will allow us to cross-validate drought frequency and magnitude in a highly vulnerable region.

  18. Phylogeography and post-glacial recolonization in wolverines (Gulo gulo) from across their circumpolar distribution.

    PubMed

    Zigouris, Joanna; Schaefer, James A; Fortin, Clément; Kyle, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Interglacial-glacial cycles of the Quaternary are widely recognized in shaping phylogeographic structure. Patterns from cold adapted species can be especially informative - in particular, uncovering additional glacial refugia, identifying likely recolonization patterns, and increasing our understanding of species' responses to climate change. We investigated phylogenetic structure of the wolverine, a wide-ranging cold adapted carnivore, using a 318 bp of the mitochondrial DNA control region for 983 wolverines (n=209 this study, n=774 from GenBank) from across their full Holarctic distribution. Bayesian phylogenetic tree reconstruction and the distribution of observed pairwise haplotype differences (mismatch distribution) provided evidence of a single rapid population expansion across the wolverine's Holarctic range. Even though molecular evidence corroborated a single refugium, significant subdivisions of population genetic structure (0.01< ΦST <0.99, P<0.05) were detected. Pairwise ΦST estimates separated Scandinavia from Russia and Mongolia, and identified five main divisions within North America - the Central Arctic, a western region, an eastern region consisting of Ontario and Quebec/Labrador, Manitoba, and California. These data are in contrast to the nearly panmictic structure observed in northwestern North America using nuclear microsatellites, but largely support the nuclear DNA separation of contemporary Manitoba and Ontario wolverines from northern populations. Historic samples (c. 1900) from the functionally extirpated eastern population of Quebec/Labrador displayed genetic similarities to contemporary Ontario wolverines. To understand these divergence patterns, four hypotheses were tested using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC). The most supported hypothesis was a single Beringia incursion during the last glacial maximum that established the northwestern population, followed by a west-to-east colonization during the Holocene. This pattern is

  19. Myocardial perfusion 320-row multidetector computed tomography-guided treatment strategy for the clinical management of patients with recent acute-onset chest pain: Design of the CArdiac cT in the treatment of acute CHest pain (CATCH)-2 randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Petersen, Jan R; Jørgensen, Tem B S; Abdulla, Jawdat; Heitmann, Merete; Kragelund, Charlotte; Hansen, Thomas Fritz; Udholm, Patricia M; Pihl, Christian; Kühl, J Tobias; Engstrøm, Thomas; Jensen, Jan Skov; Høfsten, Dan E; Kelbæk, Henning; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-09-01

    Patients admitted with chest pain are a diagnostic challenge because the majority does not have coronary artery disease (CAD). Assessment of CAD with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is safe, cost-effective, and accurate, albeit with a modest specificity. Stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has been shown to increase the specificity when added to CCTA, without lowering the sensitivity. This article describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, CATCH-2, comparing a clinical diagnostic management strategy of CCTA alone against CCTA in combination with CTP. Patients with acute-onset chest pain older than 50 years and with at least one cardiovascular risk factor for CAD are being prospectively enrolled to this study from 6 different clinical sites since October 2013. A total of 600 patients will be included. Patients are randomized 1:1 to clinical management based on CCTA or on CCTA in combination with CTP, determining the need for further testing with invasive coronary angiography including measurement of the fractional flow reserve in vessels with coronary artery lesions. Patients are scanned with a 320-row multidetector computed tomography scanner. Decisions to revascularize the patients are taken by the invasive cardiologist independently of the study allocation. The primary end point is the frequency of revascularization. Secondary end points of clinical outcome are also recorded. The CATCH-2 will determine whether CCTA in combination with CTP is diagnostically superior to CCTA alone in the management of patients with acute-onset chest pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Evaluation of the impact on Aedes aegypti infestation in cement tanks of the municipal district of Canindé, Ceará, Brazil after using the Betta splendens fish as an alternative biological control].

    PubMed

    Pamplona, Luciano de Góes Cavalcanti; Lima, José Wellington de Oliveira; Cunha, Jane Cris de Lima; Santana, Eddie William de Pinho

    2004-01-01

    Canindé has a population of 71,235 inhabitants. In April 2001, the city started using larvivorous fish in cement water tanks, as a means of biological control of Aedes aegypti larvae. During house-to-house visits by health agents, instead of treating the water tank with larvicide, a Betta splendens fish was introduced into each tank. The number of houses and the number of tanks was estimated by monthly surveys. Then, the number of tanks per house was determined. Taking into account this estimated number and the number of houses visited, the infestation level for each kind of deposit was analyzed. In January 2001, 70.4% of the water tanks presented mosquitoes. Following the intervention, in January 2002 only 7.4% were positive and by December 2002 the rate had dropped to 0.2%. The efficacy of Betta splendens as a biological control agent in cement water tanks was clearly demonstrated, by achieving a 320 times reduction in the infestation level.

  1. Analysis of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. It is possible that future designs will continue this trend, leading to very-high or ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. Regardless of the engine architecture chosen, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  2. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Garrett J.; Thompson, Scott M.; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  3. Comparison of the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the polymerase chain reaction to detect Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmon ovarian fluid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, Ronald J.; Chase, Dorothy M.; McKibben, Constance L.

    1998-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from naturally infected chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum by the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT), an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the MF-FAT, 64% (66/103) samples contained detectable levels of R. salmoninarum cells. Among the positive fish, the R. salmoninarum concentrations ranged from 25 cells/ml to 4.3 × 109cells/ml. A soluble antigenic fraction of R. salmoninarum was detected in 39% of the fish (40/103) by the ELISA. The ELISA is considered one of the most sensitive detection methods for bacterial kidney disease in tissues, yet it did not detect R. salmoninarum antigen consistently at bacterial cell concentrations below about 1.3 × 104cells/ml according to the MF-FAT counts. When total DNA was extracted and tested in a nested PCR designed to amplify a 320-base-pair region of the gene encoding a soluble 57-kD protein of R. salmoninarum, 100% of the 100 samples tested were positive. The results provided strong evidence that R. salmoninarum may be present in ovarian fluids thought to be free of the bacterium on the basis of standard diagnostic methods.

  4. Characterization of Citrus tristeza virus strains from southern China based on analysis of restriction patterns and sequences of their coat protein genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guo-Ping; Hu, John; Zhang, Jian-Kun; Wang, Cai-Xia; Liu, Yong; Fan, Xu-Dong

    2008-10-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from southern China were characterized by biological indexing on citrus indicators, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and bi-directional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (BD-PCR) analysis of their coat protein (CP) genes. Of the 30 isolates, only two isolates, N3 and N4, did not induce visible symptoms. Twenty-eight other isolates induced stem pitting and vein clearing, plant stunting, and leaf yellowing symptoms on Mexican lime, Duncan grapefruit, and sour orange seedlings. In BD-PCR analysis, a 392-bp fragment specific for the mild strains was amplified from isolates N3 and N4, and a 320-bp fragment specific for the severe strains was produced from the other 28 isolates. The RFLP analysis for RT-PCR products of the CP gene with restriction enzyme HinfI identified seven groups representing groups I-VI and a new group, which was not involved in the seven groups defined by Gillings (J Virol Methods 44:305-317, 1993). The sequences of the CP genes from 12 Chinese CTV isolates showed a high divergence, with 91.5-99.7% identities at the nucleotide level and 94.2-99.6% identities at the amino acid level. Our results suggest that the composition of CTV populations from China has a high genetic diversity in the CP gene.

  5. SWIR InGaAs focal plane arrays in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvié, A.; Huet, O.; Hamard, S.; Truffer, J. P.; Pozzi, M.; Decobert, J.; Costard, E.; Zécri, M.; Maillart, P.; Reibel, Y.; Pécheur, A.

    2013-06-01

    SWIR detection band benefits from natural (sun, night glow, thermal radiation) or artificial (eye safe lasers) photons sources combined to low atmospheric absorption and specific contrast compared to visible wavelengths. It gives the opportunity to address a large spectrum of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). InGaAs material appears as a good candidate to satisfy SWIR detection needs. The lattice matching with InP constitutes a double advantage to this material: attractive production capacity and uncooled operation thanks to low dark current level induced by high quality material. The study of InGaAs FPA has begun few years ago with III-VLab, gathering expertise in InGaAs material growth and imaging technology respectively from Alcatel-Lucent and Thales, its two mother companies. This work has led to put quickly on the market a 320x256 InGaAs module. The recent transfer of imagery activities from III-VLab to Sofradir allows developing new high performances products, satisfying customers' new requirements. Especially, a 640x512 InGaAs module with a pitch of 15µm is actually under development to fill the needs of low light level imaging.

  6. Emission analysis of large number of various passenger electronic devices in aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüür, Jens; Oppermann, Lukas; Enders, Achim; Nunes, Rafael R.; Oertel, Carl-Henrik

    2016-09-01

    The ever increasing use of PEDs (passenger or portable electronic devices) has put pressure on the aircraft industry as well as operators and administrations to reevaluate established restrictions in PED-use on airplanes in the last years. Any electronic device could cause electromagnetic interference to the electronics of the airplane, especially interference at receiving antennas of sensitive wireless navigation and communication (NAV/COM) systems. This paper presents a measurement campaign in an Airbus A320. 69 test passengers were asked to actively use a combination of about 150 electronic devices including many attached cables, preferentially with a high data load on their buses, to provoke maximal emissions. These emissions were analysed within the cabin as well as at the inputs of aircraft receiving antennas outside of the fuselage. The emissions of the electronic devices as well as the background noise are time-variant, so just comparing only one reference and one transmission measurement is not sufficient. Repeated measurements of both cases lead to a more reliable first analysis. Additional measurements of the absolute received power at the antennas of the airplane allow a good estimation of the real interference potential to aircraft NAV/COM systems. Although there were many measured emissions within the cabin, there were no disturbance signals detectable at the aircraft antennas.

  7. Molecular analyses of a repetitive DNA sequence in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Ueng, P P; Hang, A; Tsang, H; Vega, J M; Wang, L; Burton, C S; He, F T; Liu, B

    2000-06-01

    A repetitive sequence designated WE35 was isolated from wheat genomic DNA. This sequence consists of a 320-bp repeat unit and represents approximately 0.002% of the total wheat DNA. It is unidirectionally distributed either continuously or discretely in the genome. Ladder-like banding patterns were observed in Southern blots when the wheat genomic DNA was restricted with endonuclease enzymes EcoRI, HincII, NciI, and NdeI, which is characteristic for tandemly organized sequences. Two DNA fragments in p451 were frequently associated with the WE35 repetitive unit in a majority of lambda wheat genomic clones. A 475-bp fragment homologous to the 5'-end long terminal repeat (LTR) of cereal retroelements was also found in some lambda wheat genomic clones containing the repetitive unit. Physical mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that one pair of wheat chromosomes could be specifically detected with the WE35 positive probe p551. WE35 can be considered a chromosome-specific repetitive sequence. This repetitive unit could be used as a molecular marker for genetic, phylogenetic, and evolutionary studies in the tribe Triticeae.

  8. Refined Exploration of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the turbofan engine design space for an advanced technology single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) was conducted previously by the authors and is documented in a prior report. Through the course of that study and in a subsequent evaluation of the approach and results, a number of enhancements to the engine design ground rules and assumptions were identified. A follow-on effort was initiated to investigate the impacts of these changes on the original study results. The fundamental conclusions of the prior study were found to still be valid with the revised engine designs. The most significant impact of the design changes was a reduction in the aircraft weight and block fuel penalties incurred with low fan pressure ratio, ultra-high bypass ratio designs. This enables lower noise levels to be pursued (through lower fan pressure ratio) with minor negative impacts on aircraft weight and fuel efficiency. Regardless of the engine design selected, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  9. Enhancement of Real-Time THz Imaging System Based on 320 × 240 Uncooled Microbolometer Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xing; Wu, Zhiming; Gou, Jun; Liu, Ziji; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Jie; Luo, Zhenfei; Chen, Weiqing; Que, Longcheng; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    A real-time terahertz (THz) imaging system was demonstrated based on a 320 × 240 uncooled microbolometer detector combined with a 2.52 THz far-infrared CO2 laser. On the top of micro-bridge structure (35 × 35 μm2), a 10 nm nickel-chromium (NiCr) thin film was deposited to enhance THz absorption, which was fabricated by a combined process of magnetron sputtering and reactive ion etching (RIE). By mechanical simulation using design of experiment (DOE) method, the minimum deformation was optimized to 0.0385 μm, and a measured deformation of 0.097 μm was achieved in the fabrication. The fabricated micro-bridge pixel was used for THz detection, and a responsivity of 1235 V/W was achieved with a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 87.4 pW/Hz1/2. THz imaging of metal gasket covered by label paper, paper clip in an envelope, and watermark of a banknote was demonstrated by a combination of histogram equalization (HE) and linear enhancement algorithm.

  10. Testing the impact of climate variability on European plant diversity: 320,000 years of water-energy dynamics and its long-term influence on plant taxonomic richness.

    PubMed

    Willis, Katherine J; Kleczkowski, Adam; New, Mark; Whittaker, Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Models examining the present-day relationship between macro-scale patterns in terrestrial species richness and variables of water and energy demonstrate that a combined water-energy model is a good predictor of richness in mid-to-high latitude regions. However, the power of the individual water and energy variables to explain this richness through time has never been explored. Here, we assess how well energy and water can predict long-term variations in plant richness using a 320,000-year fossil pollen data set from Hungary. Results demonstrate that a combined water-energy model best explains the variation in plant diversity through time. However, this long temporal record also demonstrates that amplitude of energy variation appears to be a strong determinant of richness. Decreased richness correlates with increased climate variability and certain species appear to be more susceptible according to their ecological traits. These findings have important implications for predicting richness at times of increasing climate variability.

  11. Development of Custom 465® Corrosion-Resisting Steel for Landing Gear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daymond, Benjamin T.; Binot, Nicolas; Schmidt, Michael L.; Preston, Steve; Collins, Richard; Shepherd, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Existing high-strength low-alloy steels have been in place on landing gear for many years owing to their superior strength and cost performance. However, there have been major advances in improving the strength of high-performance corrosion-resisting steels. These materials have superior environmental robustness and remove the need for harmful protective coatings such as chromates and cadmium now on the list for removal under REACH legislation. A UK government-funded collaborative project is underway targeting a refined specification Custom 465® precipitation hardened stainless steel to replace the current material on Airbus A320 family aircraft main landing gear, a main fitting component developed by Messier-Bugatti-Dowty. This is a collaborative project between Airbus, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, and Carpenter Technology Corporation. An extensive series of coupon tests on four production Heats of the material have been conducted, to obtain a full range of mechanical, fatigue, and corrosion properties. Custom 465® is an excellent replacement to the current material, with comparable tensile strength and fracture toughness, better ductility, and very good general corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Fatigue performance is the only significant area of deficit with respect to incumbent materials, fatigue initiation being often related to carbo-titanium-nitride particles and cleavage zones.

  12. Performance of a MedArray silicone hollow fiber oxygenator.

    PubMed

    LaFayette, Nathan G; Schewe, Rebecca E; Montoya, J Patrick; Cook, Keith E

    2009-01-01

    A silicone hollow fiber oxygenator was evaluated to characterize gas transfer and biocompatibility. The device's fiber bundle was composed of MedArray's silicone hollow fibers with a 320 microm outside diameter, a 50 microm wall thickness, a surface area of 0.45 m, and a 0.49 void fraction. An in vitro gas exchange study was performed comparing the MedArray device (n = 9) with the Medtronic 0600 oxygenator (n = 6) using Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation standards and blood flow rates of 0.5-1.75 L/min, and an oxygen to blood flow ratio of two. Biocompatibility and resistance studies were performed in vivo using a swine venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation model (MedArray n = 5, Medtronic n = 5). Average O(2) transfer at 1 L/min was 86 ml/min/m in the MedArray device and 101.1 ml/min/m in the Medtronic device. At 0.5 L/min the MedArray and Medtronic device average resistance was 15.5 and 148.5 mm Hg/(L/min), respectively. Both devices had similar platelet consumption and hemolysis. Results indicate that the MedArray device has lower O(2) transfer efficiency, similar biocompatibility, and lower resistance than the Medtronic 0600 oxygenator. Optimization of the MedArray fiber bundle and housing design is necessary to improve O(2) transfer efficiency while maintaining lower device resistance than the Medtronic oxygenator.

  13. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light.

  14. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Turbofan for an Advanced, Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest surrounds the design of the next generation of single-aisle commercial transports in the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 class. Aircraft designers will depend on advanced, next-generation turbofan engines to power these airplanes. The focus of this study is to apply single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to the conceptual design of ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines for this class of aircraft, using NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project metrics as multidisciplinary objectives for optimization. The independent design variables investigated include three continuous variables: sea level static thrust, wing reference area, and aerodynamic design point fan pressure ratio, and four discrete variables: overall pressure ratio, fan drive system architecture (i.e., direct- or gear-driven), bypass nozzle architecture (i.e., fixed- or variable geometry), and the high- and low-pressure compressor work split. Ramp weight, fuel burn, noise, and emissions are the parameters treated as dependent objective functions. These optimized solutions provide insight to the ultrahigh bypass engine design process and provide information to NASA program management to help guide its technology development efforts.

  15. Development of the S-520 single stage sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Kohno, M.; Onoda, J.; Kawashima, T.; Murakami, T.; Onojima, N.

    1981-09-01

    The S-520 single stage sounding rocket was developed by ISAS in an attempt to replace the two stage system, thereby increasing safety and operational reliability as well as reducing launch costs. The S-520 has a 0.52 m diameter and a weight of 2100 kg. A reduction in inert mass was achieved by using FRP nose fairing and fins. The S-520 thrust profile consists of two phases to maximize summit altitude: an initial high thrust phase and a following sustaining phase. This was achieved by a grain design which combined a wagon wheel forward section and a tubular aft section. Two static firing tests (1981) showed stable combustion without the instabilities due to longitudinal waves. A twisted-fin spin helped to prevent the lock-in phenomena and to maintain the exo-atmospheric attitude stability. In the most recent experiment, the S-520 lifted 260 kg of gross payload to a 320 km altitude at an 80 deg launch elevation angle. The spin rate history was similar to those programmed, and the final coning angle was reasonably small.

  16. Effects of UV radiation on the taxonomic composition of natural bacterioplankton communities from Bahía Engaño (Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Manrique, Julieta M; Calvo, Andrea Y; Halac, Silvana R; Villafañe, Virginia E; Jones, Leandro R; Walter Helbling, E

    2012-12-05

    In order to gain insights into the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) on the composition of marine bacterioplankton communities from South Atlantic waters - Bahía Engaño (Patagonia, Argentina), we performed microcosms experiments during the Austral summer of 2010. Water samples were exposed to three solar radiation treatments in 25 L microcosms during 8 days: PAR+UV-A+UV-B (280-700 nm; PAB treatment), PAR+UV-A (320-700 nm; PA treatment), and PAR only (400-700 nm; P treatment). The taxonomic composition of the bacterial communities, at the beginning and at the end of the experiment, were studied by the analyses of 16S rDNA gene libraries. Multivariate and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated substantial differences in the community composition so that the samples exposed to PAR and PAR+UV-A presented more similar taxa assemblages among them than compared to the PAR+UV-A+UV-B exposed one. Our results indicate that overall, exposure to different radiation treatments can shape the taxonomic composition of marine bacterial populations, grown in microcosms, from this Patagonian area.

  17. Physiological responses of Acropora cervicornis to increased solar irradiance.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juan L; Armstrong, Roy A; Corredor, Jorge E; Gilbes, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The effects of increased UV radiation (UV-B [280-320 nm] + UV-A [320-400 nm]; hereafter UVR) on the growth, production of photosynthetic pigments and photoprotective mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) were studied in the threatened Caribbean coral Acropora cervicornis transplanted from 20 to 1 m depth in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. The UVR exposure by the transplanted colonies was significantly higher than that at 20 m, while photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) only increased by 9%. Photosynthetic pigments, quantified with HPLC, as well as linear extension rates and skeletal densities, were significantly reduced 1 month after transplantation to 1 m depth, while MAAs increased significantly despite immediate paling experienced by transplanted colonies. While these colonies showed a significant reduction in photosynthetic pigments, there were no significant reductions in zooxanthellae densities suggesting photoacclimation of the coral's symbionts to the new radiation conditions. The results suggest that while corals might be able to survive sudden increases in UVR and PAR, their skeletal structure can be greatly debilitated due to a reduction in the photosynthetic capacity of their symbionts and a possible relocation of resources.

  18. Evidence of Natural Selection Acting on a Polymorphic Hybrid Incompatibility Locus in Mimulus

    PubMed Central

    Sweigart, Andrea L.; Flagel, Lex E.

    2015-01-01

    As a common cause of reproductive isolation in diverse taxa, hybrid incompatibilities are fundamentally important to speciation. A key question is which evolutionary forces drive the initial substitutions within species that lead to hybrid dysfunction. Previously, we discovered a simple genetic incompatibility that causes nearly complete male sterility and partial female sterility in hybrids between the two closely related yellow monkeyflower species Mimulus guttatus and M. nasutus. In this report, we fine map the two major incompatibility loci—hybrid male sterility 1 (hms1) and hybrid male sterility 2 (hms2)—to small nuclear genomic regions (each <70 kb) that include strong candidate genes. With this improved genetic resolution, we also investigate the evolutionary dynamics of hms1 in a natural population of M. guttatus known to be polymorphic at this locus. Using classical genetic crosses and population genomics, we show that a 320-kb region containing the hms1 incompatibility allele has risen to intermediate frequency in this population by strong natural selection. This finding provides direct evidence that natural selection within plant species can lead to hybrid dysfunction between species. PMID:25428983

  19. Combining heterogeneous features for face detection using multiscale feature selection with binary particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hong; Xia, Si-Yu; Jin, Li-Zuo; Xia, Liang-Zheng

    2011-12-01

    We propose a fast multiscale face detector that boosts a set of SVM-based hierarchy classifiers constructed with two heterogeneous features, i.e. Multi-block Local Binary Patterns (MB-LBP) and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF), at different image resolutions. In this hierarchical architecture, simple and fast classifiers using efficient MB-LBP descriptors remove large parts of the background in low and intermediate scale layers, thus only a small percentage of background patches look similar to faces and require a more accurate but slower classifier that uses distinctive SURF descriptor to avoid false classifications in the finest scale. By propagating only those patterns that are not classified as background, we can quickly decrease the amount of data need to be processed. To lessen the training burden of the hierarchy classifier, in each scale layer, a feature selection scheme using Binary Particle Swarm Optimization (BPSO) searches the entire feature space and filters out the minimum number of discriminative features that give the highest classification rate on a validation set, then these selected distinctive features are fed into the SVM classifier. We compared detection performance of the proposed face detector with other state-of-the-art methods on the CMU+MIT face dataset. Our detector achieves the best overall detection performance. The training time of our algorithm is 60 times faster than the standard Adaboost algorithm. It takes about 70 ms for our face detector to process a 320×240 image, which is comparable to Viola and Jones' detector.

  20. The NH2-terminal php domain of the alpha subunit of the Escherichia coli replicase binds the epsilon proofreading subunit.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Anna; McHenry, Charles S

    2006-05-05

    The alpha subunit of the replicase of all bacteria contains a php domain, initially identified by its similarity to histidinol phosphatase but of otherwise unknown function (Aravind, L., and Koonin, E. V. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 3746-3752). Deletion of 60 residues from the NH2 terminus of the alpha php domain destroys epsilon binding. The minimal 255-residue php domain, estimated by sequence alignment with homolog YcdX, is insufficient for epsilon binding. However, a 320-residue segment including sequences that immediately precede the polymerase domain binds epsilon with the same affinity as the 1160-residue full-length alpha subunit. A subset of mutations of a conserved acidic residue (Asp43 in Escherichia coli alpha) present in the php domain of all bacterial replicases resulted in defects in epsilon binding. Using sequence alignments, we show that the prototypical gram+ Pol C, which contains the polymerase and proofreading activities within the same polypeptide chain, has an epsilon-like sequence inserted in a surface loop near the center of the homologous YcdX protein. These findings suggest that the php domain serves as a platform to enable coordination of proofreading and polymerase activities during chromosomal replication.

  1. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction for amplification of a sequence of the p57 gene of Renibacterium salmoninarum that provides a highly sensitive method for detection of the bacterium in salmonid kidney

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Pascho, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based assays have shown promise for diagnosing Renibacterium salmoninarum in tissues and body fluids of salmonids. DeVelopment of a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to detect a 320 bp DNA segment of the gene encoding the p57 protein of R. salmoninarum is described. Whereas a conventional PCR for a 383 bp segment of the p57 gene reliably detected 1000 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue, the nested PCR detected as few as 10 R. salmoninarum per reaction in kidney tissue. Two DNA extraction methods for the nested PCR were compared and the correlation between replicate samples was generally higher in samples extracted by the QIAamp system compared with those extracted by the phenol/chloroform method. The specificity of the nested PCR was confirmed by testing DNA extracts of common bacterial fish pathogens and a panel of bacterial species reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for R. salmoninarum. Kidney samples from 74 naturally infected chinook Salmon were examined by the nested PCR, the ELISA, and the FAT, and the detected prevalences of R. salmoninarum were 61, 47, and 43%, respectively.

  2. Commercialization of quantum well infrared photodetector QWIP focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, Carl A.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Liu, John K.; Llorens, Jorge

    1999-07-01

    Many commercial and government applications need high performance, large format, long-wavelength IR (LWIR) detector arrays in the range of 6-20 micrometers . NASA and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) have devoted a significant effort to develop highly sensitive IR detectors and large format focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on novel, 'artificial' low effective band-gap semiconductor material system such as GaAs/AlGaAs. Caltech's JPL under contract form NASA and BMDO has extensively pursued GaAs/AlGaAs based multi-quantum wells for IR radiation detection. Optimization of the detector design, light coupling schemes, large format focal plane array fabrication and packaging have culminated in the realization of portable IR cameras with a mid-format FPA of QWIP detectors and the demonstration of a TV format QWIP camera. QWIP Technologies under an agreement with Caltech is manufacturing the QWIP-Chip, a 320 X 256 element FPA, which will be available in the summer of 1999. In this paper we discuss the advantages of MQW technology and our experience in the commercialization of QWIP FPAs.

  3. Commercialization of quantum well infrared photodetector focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, C. A.; Sirangelo, M. N.; Chehayeb, R.; Kaufmann, M.; Liu, J. K.; Rafol, S. B.; Gunapala, S. D.

    2001-06-01

    Many commercial and government applications need high performance, large format, long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detector arrays in the range of 6-20 μm. NASA and the ballistic missile defense organization (BMDO) have devoted a significant effort to develop highly sensitive infrared (IR) detectors and large format focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on novel 'artificial' low effective bandgap semiconductor material systems such as GaAs/AlGaAs. Caltech's Jet propulsion laboratory (JPL) under contract from NASA and BMDO has extensively pursued GaAs/AlGaAs based multi-quantum wells (MQWs) for IR radiation detection. Optimization of the detector design, light coupling schemes, large format FPA fabrication and packaging techniques have culminated in the realization of portable LWIR cameras with a mid format (256×256 pixel) FPA of QWIP detectors and the demonstration of TV format (i.e., 640×486) QWIP camera. QWIP technologies LLC, under an exclusive agreement with Caltech is currently manufacturing the QWIP-Chip TM, a 320×256 element FPA. In this, presentation, we will discuss the advantages of MQW technology and our experience in the commercialization of QWIP FPAs.

  4. Control in the cockpit: crews vs. computers.

    PubMed

    Ropelewski, R

    1996-08-01

    In the no-holds-barred competition between Boeing and Europe's Airbus Industrie for dominance in the world's commercial jet airliner markets, the question of who--or what--is in charge in the cockpit has been a significant selling point. Airbus, which pioneered highly automated flight controls with its A320 narrow-body transport in the late 1980s, likes to emphasize the "protection" features built into the aircraft through those automated systems. Boeing, which employs many of the same concepts in its new 777 twin-engine widebody transport, tends to put more emphasis on crew involvement in the operation of that aircraft. Is there a difference? In fact, the question has broader implications than those involving the marketing battle between Boeing and Airbus. Airlines, aircraft manufacturers, flight training specialists, human factors gurus, and aviation authorities in various countries are struggling with the isse as automation becomes more and more prevalent on passenger and cargo-carrying aircraft around the world.

  5. Evaluation of Size Correction Factor for Size-specific Dose Estimates (SSDE) Calculation.

    PubMed

    Mizonobe, Kazufusa; Shiraishi, Yuta; Nakano, Satoshi; Fukuda, Chiaki; Asanuma, Osamu; Harada, Kohei; Date, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report No.204 recommends the size-specific dose estimates (SSDE), wherein SSDE=computed tomography dose index-volume (CTDIvol )×size correction factor (SCF), as an index of the CT dose to consider patient thickness. However, the study on SSDE has not been made yet for area detector CT (ADCT) device such as a 320-row CT scanner. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the SCF values for ADCT by means of a simulation technique to look into the differences in SCF values due to beam width. In the simulation, to construct the geometry of the Aquilion ONE X-ray CT system (120 kV), the dose ratio and the effective energies were measured in the cone angle and fan angle directions, and these were incorporated into the simulation code, Electron Gamma Shower Ver.5 (EGS5). By changing the thickness of a PMMA phantom from 8 cm to 40 cm, CTDIvol and SCF were determined. The SCF values for the beam widths in conventional and volume scans were calculated. The differences among the SCF values of conventional, volume scans, and AAPM were up to 23.0%. However, when SCF values were normalized in a phantom of 16 cm diameter, the error tended to decrease for the cases of thin body thickness, such as those of children. It was concluded that even if beam width and device are different, the SCF values recommended by AAPM are useful in clinical situations.

  6. Molecular screening in galactosemia

    SciTech Connect

    Elsas, L.J.; Singh, R.; Fernhoff, P.M.

    1994-09-01

    Classical galactosemia (G/G) is caused by the absence of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) activity while the Duarte allele produces partial impairment and a specific biochemical phenotype. Cloning and sequencing of the human GALT gene has enabled the identification of prevalent mutations for both Classical and Duarte alleles. The G allele is caused by a Q188R codon mutation in exon 6 in 70% of a Caucasian population while the D allele is caused by an N134D codon mutation in exon 10. Since the Q188R sequence creates a new Hpa II site and the N314D sequence creates a new Sin I site, it is relatively easy to screen for both mutations by multiplex PCR and restriction digest. Here we describe a method for detection of new mutations producing impaired GALT. Patient DNAs are subjected to SSCP (single strand conformational polymorphism) analysis of their 11 GALT exons. Direct sequencing of the exons targeted by SSCP has revealed many codon changes: IVSC 956 (a splice acceptor site loss), S135L, V151A, E203K, A320T, and Y323D. Two of these codon changes, V151A and S135L, have been confirmed as mutations by finding impaired GALT activity in a yeast expression system. We conclude that molecular screening of GALT DNA will clarify the structural biology of GALT and the pathophysiology of galactosemia.

  7. Rapid thinning of the Welsh Ice Cap at 20-19 ka based on 10Be ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Philip D.; Glasser, Neil F.; Fink, David

    2016-01-01

    New 10Be ages from the summits of three mountain areas of North Wales reveal a very similar exposure timing as the Welsh Ice Cap thinned after the global Last Glacial Maximum. Eight bedrock and one boulder sample gave a combined arithmetic mean exposure age of 19.08 ± 0.80 ka (4.2%, 1σ). Similar exposure ages over a 320 m vertical range (824 to 581 m altitude) show that ice cap thinning was very rapid and spatially uniform. Using the same production rate and scaling scheme, we recalculated six published 10Be exposure ages from the nearby Arans, which also covered a similar elevation range from 608 to 901 m and obtained an arithmetic mean of 19.41 ± 1.45 ka (7.5%, 1σ). The average exposure age of all 15 accepted deglaciation ages is 19.21 ± 1.07 (5.6%, 1σ). The complete dataset from North Wales provides very strong evidence indicating that these summits became exposed as nunataks at 20-19 ka. This result provides important insight to the magnitude of ice surface lowering and behavior of the Welsh Ice Cap during the last deglaciation that can be compared to other ice masses that made up the British-Irish Ice Sheet.

  8. Characterisation of the NA62 GigaTracker end of column readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noy, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Fiorini, M.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Martin, E.; Morel, M.; Perktold, L.; Riedler, P.

    2011-01-01

    The architecture and characterisation of the End Of Column demonstrator readout ASIC for the NA62 GigaTracker hybrid pixel detector is presented. This ASIC serves as a proof of principle for a pixel chip with 1800 pixels which must perform time stamping to better than 200 ps (RMS), provide 300 μm pitch position information and operate with a dead-time of 1% or less for 800 MHz-1 GHz beam rate. The demonstrator ASIC comprises a full test column with 45 pixels alongside other test structures. The timewalk correction mechanism employed is measurement of the time-over-threshold, coupled with an off-detector look-up table. The time to digital converter is a delay locked loop with 32 contributing delay cells fed with a 320 MHz to yield a nominal bin size of 97 ps. Recently, P-in-N sensors have been bump-bonded to the ASIC and characterisation of these assemblies has begun.

  9. The spectral distribution of biologically active solar radiation at Miami, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David W.; Downum, Kelsey R.

    1991-03-01

    The spectral distribution of solar radiation was studied under different sky conditions during a 15-month period in Miami, Florida (USA), and over a latitudinal gradient at solar maximum. Spectroradiometric scans were characterized for total irradiance (300 3000 nm) and the relative energetic and photon contributions of the following wavelength regions: UV-B (300 320 nm); UV-A (320 400 nm); B (400 500 nm); PAR (400 700 nm); R (600 700 nm); and FR (728 732 nm). Notable results include: (i) significantly higher UV-A energy fluxes than currently in use for laboratory experiments involving the biological effects of this band-width (values ranged from 33.6 to 55.4 W/m2 in Miami over the year); (ii) marked diurnal shifts in B:R and R:FR, with elevated R:FR values in early morning: (iii) a strong correlation between R:FR and atmospheric water content; and (iv) unusually high PAR values under direct sunlight with cloudy skies (2484 μmol/2 per s).

  10. The spectral distribution of biologically active solar radiation at Miami, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Lee, D W; Downum, K R

    1991-06-01

    The spectral distribution of solar radiation was studied under different sky conditions during a 15-month period in Miami, Florida (USA), and over a latitudinal gradient at solar maximum. Spectroradiometric scans were characterized for total irradiance (300-3000 nm) and the relative energetic and photon contributions of the following wavelength regions: UV-B (300-320 nm); UV-A (320-400 nm); B (400-500 nm); PAR (400-700 nm); R (600-700 nm); and FR (728-732 nm). Notable results include: (i) significantly higher UV-A energy fluxes than currently in use for laboratory experiments involving the biological effects of this bandwidth (values ranged from 33.6 to 55.4 W/m2 in Miami over the year); (ii) marked diurnal shifts in B:R and R:FR, with elevated R:FR values in early morning: (iii) a strong correlation between R:FR and atmospheric water content; and (iv) unusually high PAR values under direct sunlight with cloudy skies (2484 mumol/2 per s).

  11. Manual Throttles-Only Control Effectivity for Emergency Flight Control of Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Richard; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    If normal aircraft flight controls are lost, emergency flight control may be attempted using only the thrust of engines. Collective thrust is used to control flightpath, and differential thrust is used to control bank angle. One issue is whether a total loss of hydraulics (TLOH) leaves an airplane in a recoverable condition. Recoverability is a function of airspeed, altitude, flight phase, and configuration. If the airplane can be recovered, flight test and simulation results on several transport-class airplanes have shown that throttles-only control (TOC) is usually adequate to maintain up-and-away flight, but executing a safe landing is very difficult. There are favorable aircraft configurations, and also techniques that will improve recoverability and control and increase the chances of a survivable landing. The DHS and NASA have recently conducted a flight and simulator study to determine the effectivity of manual throttles-only control as a way to recover and safely land a range of transport airplanes. This paper discusses TLOH recoverability as a function of conditions, and TOC landability results for a range of transport airplanes, and some key techniques for flying with throttles and making a survivable landing. Airplanes evaluated include the B-747, B-767, B-777, B-757, A320, and B-737 airplanes.

  12. Design and development of a Virtual Dolphinarium for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yiyu; Chia, Noel K H; Thalmann, Daniel; Kee, Norman K N; Zheng, Jianmin; Thalmann, Nadia M

    2013-03-01

    The recent proliferation of virtual reality (VR) technology applications in the autism therapy to promote learning and positive behavior among such children has produced optimistic results in developing a variety of skills and abilities in them. Dolphin-assisted therapy has also become a topic of public and research interest for autism intervention and treatment. This paper will present an innovative design and development of a Virtual Dolphinarium for potential autism intervention. Instead of emulating the swimming with dolphins, our virtual dolphin interaction program will allow children with autism to act as dolphin trainers at the poolside and to learn (nonverbal) communication through hand gestures with the virtual dolphins. Immersive visualization and gesture-based interaction are implemented to engage children with autism within an immersive room equipped with a curved screen spanning a 320(°) and a high-end five-panel projection system. This paper will also report a pilot study to establish trial protocol of autism screening to explore the participants' readiness for the virtual dolphin interaction. This research will have two potential benefits in the sense of helping children with autism and protecting the endangered species.

  13. User type certification for advanced flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, Richard D.; Abbott, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced avionics through flight management systems (FMS) coupled with autopilots can now precisely control aircraft from takeoff to landing. Clearly, this has been the most important improvement in aircraft since the jet engine. Regardless of the eventual capabilities of this technology, it is doubtful that society will soon accept pilotless airliners with the same aplomb they accept driverless passenger trains. Flight crews are still needed to deal with inputing clearances, taxiing, in-flight rerouting, unexpected weather decisions, and emergencies; yet it is well known that the contribution of human errors far exceed those of current hardware or software systems. Thus human errors remain, and are even increasing in percentage as the largest contributor to total system error. Currently, the flight crew is regulated by a layered system of certification: by operation, e.g., airline transport pilot versus private pilot; by category, e.g., airplane versus helicopter; by class, e.g., single engine land versus multi-engine land; and by type (for larger aircraft and jet powered aircraft), e.g., Boeing 767 or Airbus A320. Nothing in the certification process now requires an in-depth proficiency with specific types of avionics systems despite their prominent role in aircraft control and guidance.

  14. The effects of ultraviolet radiation on growth and bleaching in three species of Hawaiian coral

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, G.D. )

    1990-01-09

    Long term exposure to ultraviolet radiation is harmful to many organisms, including hermatypic corals, which obtain much of their nutrition from photosynthetic zooxanthellae. Therefore, increased UV radiation from atmospheric ozone depletion could inhibit growth of such corals. Moreover, coral bleaching, which has been attributed to loss of pigment and/or expulsion of zooxanthellae, may be a specific response to UV light. Does UV-A reduce skeletal growth or influence population density and pigment content of zooxanthellae In addition, do zooxanthellae migrate to shaded areas of the colony to avoid ultraviolet light Using alizarin red stain and suitable filters, I compared the stain and suitable filters, I compared the effects of UV-A (320-400nm) and full-spectrum UV (280-400nm) on the skeletal growth of two Hawaiian corals, Montipora verrucosa, Pocillopora damicornis, in situ. In the perforate corals, M. Verrucosa and Porites compressa, I measured concentration of zooxanthellae and their chlorophyll content to quantify bleaching in response to UV light. Reduction in skeletal growth by the two corals in response to different ranges of UV light appears to be species specific. Bleaching by UV appears to be characterized by an initial loss of pigment followed by the expulsion and migration of the zooxanthellae to shaded areas of the colony. Differences in tolerance and adaptation to decreasing ozone levels and increasing UV light should confer a competitive advantage on various species and morphologies of reef-building corals.

  15. Prepare for Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiLisi, Gregory A.; Rarick, Richard A.

    2007-05-01

    The 2006 Winter Meeting of the AAPT Was Over … and the flight home from Anchorage to Cleveland was just about to end—eight hours in the air, only two complimentary beverages, no meals, a jump across four time zones, a one-year-old baby daughter, and a wife whose motto for the week was, "Why did they choose to have a winter meeting in Alaska?" made for a mentally and physically taxing airborne ordeal. As we entered the last hour of flight, my small family was exhausted and the pilot's decision to dim the interior cabin lights mixed with the soothing hum of the Airbus® A320's engines quickly put us to sleep. Fading in and out of my delirium, I eventually heard the pilot's voice crackle over the intercom with a seemingly innocent comment: "We are going to begin our final descent into Cleveland … we should have you on the ground in exactly eight minutes." Something about the pilot's use of the word "exactly" must have triggered a reaction in my brain, because his remarks initiated a series of calculations: So how fast are we flying? How high are we flying? What's our angle of descent? With only eight minutes until touchdown, my curiosity to determine the descending airplane's motion led me to conduct a hastily constructed experiment.

  16. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  17. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  18. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  19. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  20. Automated exterior inspection of an aircraft with a pan-tilt-zoom camera mounted on a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, Igor; Larnier, Stanislas; Orteu, Jean-José; Sentenac, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with an automated preflight aircraft inspection using a pan-tilt-zoom camera mounted on a mobile robot moving autonomously around the aircraft. The general topic is image processing framework for detection and exterior inspection of different types of items, such as closed or unlatched door, mechanical defect on the engine, the integrity of the empennage, or damage caused by impacts or cracks. The detection step allows to focus on the regions of interest and point the camera toward the item to be checked. It is based on the detection of regular shapes, such as rounded corner rectangles, circles, and ellipses. The inspection task relies on clues, such as uniformity of isolated image regions, convexity of segmented shapes, and periodicity of the image intensity signal. The approach is applied to the inspection of four items of Airbus A320: oxygen bay handle, air-inlet vent, static ports, and fan blades. The results are promising and demonstrate the feasibility of an automated exterior inspection.

  1. Skin hydration imaging using a long-wavelength near-infrared digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attas, E. Michael; Posthumus, Trevor B.; Schattka, Bernhard J.; Sowa, Michael G.; Mantsch, Henry H.; Zhang, Shuliang L.

    2001-07-01

    Skin hydration is a key factor in skin health. Hydration measurements can provide diagnostic information on the condition of skin and can indicate the integrity of the skin barrier function. Near-infrared spectroscopy measures the water content of living tissue by its effect on tissue reflectance at a particular wavelength. Imaging has the important advantage of showing the degree of hydration as a function of location. Short-wavelength (650-1050 nm) near infrared spectroscopic reflectance imaging has previously been used in-vivo to determine the relative water content of skin under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. We have recently developed a novel spectroscopic imaging system to acquire image sets in the long-wavelength region of the near infrared (960 to 1700 nm), where the water absorption bands are more intense. The LW-NIR systems uses a liquid- crystal tunable filter in front of the objective lens and incorporates a 12-bit digital camera with a 320-by-240-pixel indium-gallium arsenide array sensor. Custom software controls the camera and tunable filter, allowing image sets to be acquired and displayed in near-real time. Forearm skin hydration was measured in a clinical context using the long- wavelength imaging system, a short-wavelength imaging system, and non-imaging instrumentation. Among these, the LW-NIR system appears to be the most sensitive at measuring dehydration of skin.

  2. A human homologue to the yeast omnipotent suppressor 45 maps 100 kb centromeric to HLA-A

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvel, B.; Dorval, I.; Fergelot, P.

    1995-04-01

    Idipathic hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The molecular defect is unknown. However, the gene responsible for the disease (HFE) has been localized on the short arm of chromosome 6. It is closely linked to the HLA class I genes and possibly within a 350 kilobase (kb) region around the HLA-A locus. In order to identify candidate genes for hemochromatosis, we applied a cDNA selection technique to isolate transcribed sequences encoded on yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC). At first, we screened a cDNA library derived from normal human duodenal mucosa with the YAC B30 H3. This YAC contains a 320 kb DNA insert including the HLA-A gene and spanning 150 kb of the 350 kb zone where the hemochromatosis gene is in linkage disequilibrium with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Preparation of the cDNA library of duodenal mucosa in Lambda Zap II phage and library screening with YAC B30 were carried out as previously described. In this way, we isolated seven non-HLA-A cDNAs corresponding to seven new genomic sequences. These potential genes were named hemochromatosis candidate gene (HCG) and numbered I to VII. The survey of all these cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences is in progress. In this work, we are especially interested in one of the seven non-HLA class I cDNA clones, named clone 58. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Photocatalytic reactive oxygen species production and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles are dependent on the solar ultraviolet radiation spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongbo; Brennan, Amanda; Diamond, Stephen A

    2012-09-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO(2)) and its consequent phototoxicity to Daphnia magna were measured under different solar ultraviolet (UV) spectra by applying a series of optical filters in a solar simulator. Removing UV-B (280-320 nm) from solar radiation had no significant impact on photocatalytic ROS production of nano-TiO(2), whereas removal of UV-A (320-400 nm) decreased ROS production remarkably. Removal of wavelengths below 400 nm resulted in negligible ROS production. A linear correlation between ROS production and D. magna immobilization suggests that photocatalytic ROS production may be a predictor of phototoxicity for nano-TiO(2). Intracellular ROS production within D. magna was consistent with the immobilization of the organism under different solar UV spectra, indicating that oxidative stress was involved in phototoxicity. The dependence of nano-TiO(2) phototoxicity on environmentally realistic variations in solar radiation suggests that risk assessment of these nanomaterials requires careful evaluation of exposure conditions in the environment. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  4. Stochastic model of agent interaction with opinion leaders.

    PubMed

    Ellero, Andrea; Fasano, Giovanni; Sorato, Annamaria

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the problem of agents' interactions in a given population. The purpose of this paper is twofold. Starting from a scheme proposed by Galam [Physica A 320, 571 (2003)], which is based on a majority rule to treat the individuals' interactions, we first study some of its relevant properties. Then, we introduce special individuals, called opinion leaders, who play a key role in information spreading in several practical applications. Opinion leaders have the special feature of strongly interfering with the process based on the majority rule, speeding up the diffusion. We consider a model describing agents' interactions, which encompasses Galam's proposal, where opinion leaders are included as special agents. Then we study its specific properties which significantly recast and extend some conclusions drawn for the models given by Galam and Ellero, Fasano, and Sorato [Physica A 388, 3901 (2009)]. Finally, we provide theoretical and numerical results concerning the dynamics of our model, showing that a small percentage of opinion leaders may both accelerate and/or even reverse the overall consensus among all the agents.

  5. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. Methods As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Results Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = < .004). No significant differences were detected concerning the modalities’ specificities (with values between P = .98). Raters' confidence was higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography (P < .001). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT for wrist fractures proved to be similar and in some parts even higher compared to radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run. PMID:27788215

  6. Direct measurement of 11B(p ,γ )12C astrophysical S factors at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Jia, B. L.; Xu, S. W.; Chen, S. Z.; Ma, S. B.; Hou, S. Q.; Hu, J.; Zhang, L. Y.; Yu, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    We directly measure the absolute cross section of 11B(p ,γ )12C in the energy region of Ec .m .=130 -257 keV by using a thin target for the first time. This work is performed on a 320-kV platform at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou. The astrophysical S factors of this reaction are obtained for capture to the ground and first excited states of 12C. The properties of the known resonance at ˜150 keV are derived and agree with the previous results. However, in the energy region of 170-240 keV, our S factors are about 15%-50% larger than the adopted values in NACRE II and are also larger than the upper limits of NACRE II by up to ˜20 % . This indicates that our new reaction rate is enhanced by about 15%-50% compared to the NACRE II adopted rate in the temperature region 0.32-0.62 GK.

  7. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics. PMID:27402165

  8. Evidence of natural selection acting on a polymorphic hybrid incompatibility locus in Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Sweigart, Andrea L; Flagel, Lex E

    2015-02-01

    As a common cause of reproductive isolation in diverse taxa, hybrid incompatibilities are fundamentally important to speciation. A key question is which evolutionary forces drive the initial substitutions within species that lead to hybrid dysfunction. Previously, we discovered a simple genetic incompatibility that causes nearly complete male sterility and partial female sterility in hybrids between the two closely related yellow monkeyflower species Mimulus guttatus and M. nasutus. In this report, we fine map the two major incompatibility loci-hybrid male sterility 1 (hms1) and hybrid male sterility 2 (hms2)-to small nuclear genomic regions (each <70 kb) that include strong candidate genes. With this improved genetic resolution, we also investigate the evolutionary dynamics of hms1 in a natural population of M. guttatus known to be polymorphic at this locus. Using classical genetic crosses and population genomics, we show that a 320-kb region containing the hms1 incompatibility allele has risen to intermediate frequency in this population by strong natural selection. This finding provides direct evidence that natural selection within plant species can lead to hybrid dysfunction between species. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. Disposal of Energy by UV-B Sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Thomas; Krishnan, Rajagopal

    2008-03-01

    Ideal sunscreens absorb dangerous UV light and dispose of the energy safely. ``Safe disposal'' usually means conversion to heat. However, efficient absorption entails a high radiative rate, which implies high energy-transfer and other rates, unless some process intervenes to ``defuse'' the excited state. We studied the excited-state kinetics of three UV-B (290-320 nm) sunscreens by absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence. Excited-state rate analysis suggests that some sunscreens have low radiative-rate ``dark'' states, in addition to normal excited states.* We deduce dark states when sunscreens of high extinction coefficient do not show lifetimes and total emission consistent with such high radiative rates. A high radiative rate, accompanied by efficient fluorescence emission and/or transfer, may be unfavorable for a sunscreen. In spite of its dark excited state, padimate O shows significant re-emission of light in the UV-A (320-400 nm) and energy transfer to a natural component of excised skin, probably collagen. * Krishnan, R. and T.M. Nordlund (2007) J. Fluoresc. DOI 10.1007/s10895-007-0264-3.

  10. Polymorphisms in the 5' upstream region of the FSH receptor gene, and their association with superovulation traits in Chinese Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu-Cai; Li, Shu-Jing; Tang, Ke-Qiong; Hua, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Yu, Jun-Na; Han, Li; Yang, Li-Guo

    2010-06-01

    To identify a predictor to forecast superovulation response on the basis of associations between superovulation performance and gene polymorphism, variation in the bovine follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene was investigated using PCR-single-strand conformational (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing. One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of G-278A located in the 5' upstream region of bovine FSHR gene was found in 118 Chinese Holstein cows treated for superovulation. Two SNPs of G-278A (GU253337) and A-320T (rs43676359) were analyzed. In polymorphic locus -278, all cows without superovulation response were mutations with genotypes of CD and DD. Cows with CC genotype had a significant increase in the total number of ova (TNO) (P<0.01), and produced more transferable embryos (NTE) than those of the CD and DD genotypes (P<0.01). At this locus, the additive effects seemed to be highly significant (P<0.01) and allele C was associated with an increase in the TNO and NTE. These results indicated that the FSHR is a potential marker for superovulation response and can be used as a predictor for superovulation in Chinese Holstein cows. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectral and luminescent properties of sensitizers based on psoralen substitutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryantseva, N. G.; Sokolova, I. V.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Tyshkylova, A. V.; Garazd, Ya. L.; Khilya, V. P.

    2008-07-01

    Psoralens (furocoumarines) are photosensitizers of vegetative origin increasing the sensitivity of biological objects to near-ultraviolet radiation (UV-A, 320-400 nm). In the present work, the influence of substitution on the energy level diagram is considered for the first element of the series-psoralen. The absorption and fluorescence spectra are investigated with the use of an SM-2203 spectrofluorimeter, and theoretical calculations are carried out. In addition, the results obtained are compared with the calculated and experimental results of other authors. The employed method of intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) yields such parameters as an oscillator force, nature and energy of the transition, positions of triplets and singlets, etc. The geometry is optimized by the semi-empirical PM3 method of the program Hyperchem 6.03. A comparison of the calculated results for the examined compounds demonstrates that after the substitution, the absorption spectra are shifted toward the red range. The lower excited singlet of the 21,22-dimethyl-10,11-cyclohexylpsoralen compound lies higher than that of psoralen and 10,11-phenyl-21,22-cyclohexylpsoralen; it is located at 332 nm. The absorption spectra from the excited states undergo a bathochromic shift after the substitution. The most intensive T-T absorption bands are also indicated in this work.

  12. Data indicating temperature response of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Garrett J; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(™)) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti-6Al-4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials.

  13. Dust dynamics in the Encke Gap: Hill's equations and ion interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, M. M.; Burns, J. A.; Showalter, M.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Encke Gap is a 320-km-wide opening in Saturn's outer A ring centered on the orbit of the small moon Pan. In addition to Pan itself, this gap contains an array of dusty features composed primarily of particles less than 100 microns across. In particular, there are three narrow ringlets in this region that are not longitudinally homogeneous, but instead contain series of bright clumps. Using images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft, we have tracked the motions of these clumps and found that they do not follow the predicted trajectories of isolated ring particles moving under the influence of Saturn's and Pan's gravitational fields. We have also examined the orbital properties of the ringlets by comparing images taken at different longitudes and times. We find evidence that the particles' orbits have forced eccentricities induced by solar radiation pressure. In addition, the mean orbital radii of the particles in these ringlets appear to vary with the local co-rotating longitude. We suggest that these trends may be due to a combination of collisions among the ring particles and drag forces that may be due to interactions with the ambient magnetosphere plasma. Furthermore, we speculate that a combination of these same drag forces and Pan's gravitational perturbations may be responsible for maintaining at least two of the narrow ringlets in this gap.

  14. Of horseshoes and heliotropes: Dynamics of dust in the Encke Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, M. M.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.; Showalter, M. R.

    2013-03-01

    The Encke Gap is a 320-km-wide opening in Saturn’s outer A ring that contains the orbit of the small moon Pan and an array of dusty features composed of particles less than 100 μm across. In particular, there are three narrow ringlets in this region that are not longitudinally homogeneous, but instead contain series of bright clumps. Using images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft, we track the motions of these clumps and demonstrate that they do not follow the predicted trajectories of isolated ring particles moving under the influence of Saturn’s and Pan’s gravitational fields. We also examine the orbital properties of these ringlets by comparing images taken at different longitudes and times. We find evidence that the orbits of these particles have forced eccentricities induced by solar radiation pressure. In addition, the mean radial positions of the particles in these ringlets appear to vary with local co-rotating longitude, perhaps due to the combined action of drag forces, gravitational perturbations from Pan, and collisions among the ring particles. The dynamics of the dust within this gap therefore appears to be much more complex than previously appreciated.

  15. Dynamics of particles in central Encke ringlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.-L.; Spahn, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2012-09-01

    The Encke gap is a 320 km wide division in the Saturn A ring centered at 133,581 km. There are at least 3 ringlets in Encke gap, and the central one shares the orbit with Pan [1]. Observations suggest that these ringlets are mainly composed of micronsized particles [2]. The lifetime of these particles are restricted, mechanisms must be at work to replenish these ringlets. The kinetic balance of dust production, dynamical evolution, and loss of dust has been investigated in [3]. In this work, we focus on the particle dynamics in the Encke gap. Our results show that in the central Encke ringlet: (1) The solar radiation pressure provides a minimum particle radius of 7μm; (2) The plasma drag force pushes particle outward in a rate of ˜ 1km/yr; (3) Particles are in a 'modified' horseshoe orbit which is the result of horseshoe orbit plus plasma drag, this orbit prevent particles to reach large co-rotational longitudes of Pan.

  16. Photocatalytic antibacterial effects on TiO2-anatase upon UV-A and UV-A/VIS threshold irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanyun; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Scheideler, Lutz; Rupp, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photocatalysis mediated by the anatase modification of titanium dioxide (TiO2) has shown antibacterial effects in medical applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of expanding the excitation wavelengths for photocatalytic antibacterial effects from ultraviolet (UV) into the visible light range. After deposition of salivary pellicle and adhesion of Streptococcus gordonii on anatase, different irradiation protocols were applied to induce photocatalysis: ultraviolet A (UV-A) > 320 nm; ultraviolet/visible (UV-A/VIS) light > 380 nm and > 390 nm; and VIS light 400-410 nm. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) tests and microscopic examination were used to observe the photoinduced antibacterial effects. Salivary pellicle could be photocatalytically decomposed under all irradiation protocols. In contrast, effective photocatalytic attack of bacteria could be observed by UV-A as well as by UV-A/VIS at 380 nm < λ < 390 nm only. Wavelengths above 380 nm show promise for in situ therapeutic antifouling applications.

  17. EUV source collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böwering, Norbert R.; Ershov, Alex I.; Marx, William F.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Hansson, Björn A. M.; Vargas L., Ernesto; Chavez, Juan A.; Fomenkov, Igor V.; Myers, David W.; Brandt, David C.

    2006-03-01

    A collector subsystem has been designed, built, and tested. The subsystem consists of a 320mm diameter ellipsoidal collector coated with a graded multilayer, mounting mechanics, thermal management capability, and a collector protection system. The EUV light emission can be collected with a solid angle of 1.6 sr. Collector substrates have been developed with the goal of offering both optical surface quality to support high multilayer mirror (MLM) reflectivity and material compatibility for long-term operation in the EUV source system. An interface-engineered MLM coating capable of maintaining high normal-incidence peak reflectivity at 13.5 nm during continuous operation at 400 °C has been developed. The thermal management of the system has been engineered and tested to maintain uniform substrate temperature during operation. Lastly, protection techniques have been developed to provide the collector with a long operational lifetime. Performance data for the entire subsystem are presented. The collector was installed in the source chamber of a laser-produced-plasma EUV source during system integration experiments using a tin droplet target. First results of the collected EUV output at the intermediate focus measured with a power meter and a fluorescence-converter-based imaging system are discussed.

  18. Heat loss analysis of a 10 kA warm dielectric HTS DC cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaotao; Xiao, Liye; Teng, Yuping; Song, Naihao; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhiqing; Liang, Xueming; Cao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Hongen; Lin, Liangzhen

    2014-09-01

    A 10 kA/360 m warm-dielectric high-temperature superconducting direct current (DC) power cable system (10 kA cable), supported jointly the Chinese government and industrial enterprise, was developed and has been operating as a branch circuit to transmit power for a 320 kA aluminum electrolyzing production line for more than 10 months at an industrial plant in central China. Both the 10 kA cable and its supporting system of the cable system are introduced. The cryogenic system for the 10 kA cable adopts closed loop and the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is forced to flow inside by a pump. The design of corrugated cryogenic envelope pipe is modularized and every independent module has two standardized joints, which makes it easy to integrate with the other pipes and the terminations. The heat loss sources and the structure including both the termination and the cryogenic envelope pipe of the 10 kA cable are discussed. The total heat loss of the 10 kA cable excluding the loss of cryogenic pipe for liquid nitrogen backward flowing is designed to be less than 1698 W at 10 kA, and the heat loss was compared and discussed with that of the aluminum bar. The field test and commissioning of the cable show that the 10 kA cable performs steadily and its heat loss is less than the expected value.

  19. Micro-engineered remote palpation device for assessing tissue compliance.

    PubMed

    Hien, M; Yang, T H J; Leung, S K W; Reuben, R L; Habib, F K; McNeill, S A; Schneider, A; McBride, G; Stevens, R; Else, R W

    2008-01-01

    This paper concerns the operation of the actuator for a prototype micro-engineered mechanical palpation device for deployment via a cystoscope to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of the prostate gland in vivo. The subassembly consists of a 400x200 microm silicon (Si) piston manufactured using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) housed within an anodically bonded glass-Si-glass sandwiched housing. The micro-channel on the Si layer was formed by powder blasting and contains the micro-piston with one end pointing to the side of the housing and the other facing a via hole leading to a capillary tube. The opening on the side of the housing was sealed by a 5 microm thick silicone membrane which acts to retain the micro-piston and act as a return spring. A 320 microm diameter capillary forms the connection between the micro-channel and a micro-syringe which is operated by a programmable syringe pump to produce a reciprocating action. A pressure sensor is connected along the capillary tube to measure the dynamic pressure within the system. The micro-piston has already been used, separately actuated to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of known viscoelastic materials and prostate tissue. The purpose of the present work is to assess the functionality of the actuator assembly.

  20. 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector Focal Plane Array for Long-Wave Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 ?m observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 ?m. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE?T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 ?m test diodes and small 28 ?m FPA pixels are given.

  1. Magnetic levitation assisted aircraft take-off and landing (feasibility study - GABRIEL concept)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohacs, Daniel; Rohacs, Jozsef

    2016-08-01

    The Technology Roadmap 2013 developed by the International Air Transport Association envisions the option of flying without an undercarriage to be in operation by 2032. Preliminary investigations clearly indicate that magnetic levitation technology (MagLev) might be an appealing solution to assist the aircraft take-off and landing. The EU supported research project, abbreviated as GABRIEL, was dealing with (i) the concept development, (ii) the identification, evaluation and selection of the deployable magnetic levitation technology, (iii) the definition of the core system elements (including the required aircraft modifications, the ground-based system and airport elements, and the rendezvous control system), (iv) the analysis of the safety and security aspects, (v) the concept validation and (vi) the estimation of the proposed concept impact in terms of aircraft weight, noise, emission, cost-benefit). All results introduced here are compared to a medium size hypothetic passenger aircraft (identical with an Airbus A320). This paper gives a systematic overview of (i) the applied methods, (ii) the investigation of the possible use of magnetic levitation technology to assist the commercial aircraft take-off and landing processes and (iii) the demonstrations, validations showing the feasibility of the radically new concept. All major results are outlined.

  2. Structural characterization of the intra-membrane histidine kinase YbdK from Bacillus subtilis in DPC micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Pil; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Kim, Young-Chang; Jeon, Young Ho

    2010-01-15

    Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) play a critical role in signal transduction for cellular adaptation to environmental conditions and stresses. YbdK from Bacillus subtilis is a 320-residue intra-membrane sensing HK characterized by a short input domain consisting of two transmembrane helices without an extracytoplasmic domain. While the cytoplasmic domains of HKs have been studied in detail, the intra-membrane sensing domain systems are still uncharacterized due to difficulties in handling the transmembrane domain. Here, we successfully obtained pure recombinant transmembrane domain of YbdK (YbdK-TM) from E. coli and analyzed the characteristics of YbdK-TM using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other biophysical methods. YbdK-TM was found to form homo-dimers in DPC micelles based on cross-linking assays and analytical ultracentrifugation analyses. We estimated the size of the YbdK-TM DPC complex to be 46 kDa using solution state NMR T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} relaxation analyses in DPC micelles. These results provide information that will allow functional and structural studies of intra-membrane sensing HKs to begin.

  3. Concentrating-collector mass-production feasibility. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-02

    The Performance Prototype Trough (PPT) Concentrating Collector consists of four 80-foot modules in a 320-foot row. The collector was analyzed, including cost estimates and manufacturing processes to produce collectors in volumes from 100 to 100,000 modules per year. The four different reflector concepts considered were the sandwich reflector structure, sheet metal reflector structure, molded reflector structure, and glass laminate structure. The sheet metal and glass laminate structures are emphasized with their related structure concepts. A preliminary manufacturing plan is offered that includes: documentation of the manufacturing process with production flow diagrams; labor and material costs at various production levels; machinery and equipment requirements including preliminary design specifications; and capital investment costs for a new plant. Of five reflector designs considered, the two judged best and considered at length are thin annealed glass and steel laminate on steel frame panel and thermally sagged glass. Also discussed are market considerations, costing and selling price estimates, design cost analysis and make/buy analysis. (LEW)

  4. PRIC320, a transcription coactivator, isolated from peroxisome proliferator-binding protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Surapureddi, Sailesh; Viswakarma, Navin; Yu Songtao; Guo Dongsheng; Rao, M. Sambasiva; Reddy, Janardan K. . E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

    2006-05-05

    Ciprofibrate, a potent peroxisome proliferator, induces pleiotropic responses in liver by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), a nuclear receptor. Transcriptional regulation by liganded nuclear receptors involves the participation of coregulators that form multiprotein complexes possibly to achieve cell and gene specific transcription. SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometric analyses of ciprofibrate-binding proteins from liver nuclear extracts obtained using ciprofibrate-Sepharose affinity matrix resulted in the identification of a new high molecular weight nuclear receptor coactivator, which we designated PRIC320. The full-length human cDNA encoding this protein has an open-reading frame that codes for a 320 kDa protein containing 2882 amino acids. PRIC320 contains five LXXLL signature motifs that mediate interaction with nuclear receptors. PRIC320 binds avidly to nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha}, CAR, ER{alpha}, and RXR, but only minimally with PPAR{gamma}. PRIC320 also interacts with transcription cofactors CBP, PRIP, and PBP. Immunoprecipitation-immunoblotting as well as cellular localization studies confirmed the interaction between PPAR{alpha} and PRIC320. PRIC320 acts as a transcription coactivator by stimulating PPAR{alpha}-mediated transcription. We conclude that ciprofibrate, a PPAR{alpha} ligand, binds a multiprotein complex and PRIC320 cloned from this complex functions as a nuclear receptor coactivator.

  5. Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity by Diode Laser: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25–60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5 W PW (T on 100 m and T off 100 ms), fluence 62.2 J/cm2 in defocused mode with a 320 μ fiber. Each tooth received three 1′ applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel. PMID:22792109

  6. Treatment of dentine hypersensitivity by diode laser: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25-60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5 W PW (T on 100 m and T off 100 ms), fluence 62.2 J/cm(2) in defocused mode with a 320 μ fiber. Each tooth received three 1' applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel.

  7. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Hilbig, Andreas; Rogalla, Patrik

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences.

  8. High Methylmercury in Arctic and Subarctic Ponds is Related to Nutrient Levels in the Warming Eastern Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Gwyneth A; Girard, Catherine; Chételat, John; Laurion, Isabelle; Amyot, Marc

    2015-07-07

    Permafrost thaw ponds are ubiquitous in the eastern Canadian Arctic, yet little information exists on their potential as sources of methylmercury (MeHg) to freshwaters. They are microbially active and conducive to methylation of inorganic mercury, and are also affected by Arctic warming. This multiyear study investigated thaw ponds in a discontinuous permafrost region in the Subarctic taiga (Kuujjuarapik-Whapmagoostui, QC) and a continuous permafrost region in the Arctic tundra (Bylot Island, NU). MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were well above levels measured in most freshwater ecosystems in the Canadian Arctic (>0.1 ng L(-1)). On Bylot, ice-wedge trough ponds showed significantly higher MeHg (0.3-2.2 ng L(-1)) than polygonal ponds (0.1-0.3 ng L(-1)) or lakes (<0.1 ng L(-1)). High MeHg was measured in the bottom waters of Subarctic thaw ponds near Kuujjuarapik (0.1-3.1 ng L(-1)). High water MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were strongly correlated with variables associated with high inputs of organic matter (DOC, a320, Fe), nutrients (TP, TN), and microbial activity (dissolved CO2 and CH4). Thawing permafrost due to Arctic warming will continue to release nutrients and organic carbon into these systems and increase ponding in some regions, likely stimulating higher water concentrations of MeHg. Greater hydrological connectivity from permafrost thawing may potentially increase transport of MeHg from thaw ponds to neighboring aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Microwave modification of sugar cane to enhance juice extraction during milling.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Graham; Harris, Gerard; Jacob, Mohan V; Sheehan, Madoc; Yin, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Sugar extraction from cane requires shredding and crushing, both of which are energy intensive activities. Cane shredders account for almost 30% of the total power requirements for the juice extraction train in a sugar mill with four mills. Shredder hammers also wear quickly during the crushing season and need to be regularly maintained or replaced. Microwave pre-treatment of other plant based materials has resulted in significant reductions in total processing energy. This paper briefly reviews the underlying structure of sugar cane and how microwave pre-treatment may interact with sugar cane. Microwave treatment reduced the strength of sugar cane samples to 20% of its untreated value. This strength reduction makes it easier to crush the cane and leads to a 320% increase in juice yield compared with untreated cane when cane samples were crushed in a press. There was also a 68% increase in Brix %, a 58% increase in total dissolved solids, a 58% reduction in diffusion time, a 39% increase in Pol%, and a 7% increase in juice purity compared with the control samples after 60 minutes of diffusion in distilled water.

  10. At what time should one go out in the sun?

    PubMed

    Moan, Johan; Dahlback, Arne; Porojnicu, Alina Carmen

    2008-01-01

    To get an optimal vitamin D supplement from the sun at a minimal risk of getting cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), the best time of sun exposure is noon. Thus, common health recommendations given by authorities in many countries, that sun exposure should be avoided for three to five hours around noon and postponed to the afternoon, may be wrong and may even promote CMM. The reasons for this are (1) The action spectrum for CMM is likely to be centered at longer wavelengths (UVA, ultraviolet A, 320-400 nm) than that of vitamin D generation (UVB, ultraviolet B, 280-320 nm). (2) Scattering of solar radiation on clear days is caused by small scattering elements, Rayleigh dominated and increases with decreasing wavelengths. A larger fraction of UVA than of UVB comes directly and unscattered from the sun. (3) The human body can be more realistically represented by a vertical cylinder than by a horizontal, planar surface, as done in almost all calculations in the literature. With the cylinder model, high UVA fluence rates last about twice as long after noon as high UVB fluence rates do. In view of this, short, nonerythemogenic exposures around noon should be recommended rather than longer nonerythemogenic exposures in the afternoon. This would give a maximal yield of vitamin D at a minimal CMM risk.

  11. Identified antennular near-field receptors trigger reflex flicking in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Mellon, DeForest; Hamid, Omer A Abdul

    2012-05-01

    Near-field disturbances in the water column are known to trigger reflex antennular flicking in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii. We have identified the hydrodynamic sensors on the lateral antennular flagellum that constitute an afferent limb of this reflex and have measured the relative directionally dependent thresholds of the sensory neurons associated with these structures to hydrodynamic stimulation. Twenty-five individual standing feathered sensilla, comprising a sparse, linearly arrayed population of near-field sensors along the lateral and medial antennular flagella, were exposed to standardized pulsatile stimuli at 20 deg intervals along a 320 deg circular track. The results indicate that the sensilla are most sensitive to such stimulation in the plane of the flagellar axis. Identification and mechanical stimulation of single feathered sensilla in some preparations consistently evoked a flick reflex at maximal response latency, indicating that these sensors constitute at least one afferent limb for the reflex behavior. Experiments in which response latencies were measured following mechanical stimulation of truncated flagella, and were compared with the latencies in respective intact flagella, suggest that summation of inputs from the feathered sensillar pathways generates reflex flicking at minimal latencies. We discuss the possible central mechanisms that may underlie detection of critically important signals from this population of highly sensitive, inherently noisy sensors.

  12. Photobiological properties of the inhibition of etiolated Arabidopsis seedling growth by ultraviolet-B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Gary; Lin, Chentao; Tobin, Elaine M; Loehrer, Heather; Brinkman, Doug

    2009-11-01

    Alteration of 'normal' levels of ultraviolet-B light (UV-B, 280-320 nm) can affect plant chemical composition as well as growth; however, little is known about how plants perceive UV-B light. We have carried out fluence response curves, and demonstrated that the growth inhibition of etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings by low fluence UV light is specific to UV-B and not UV-A (320-390 nm). The response shows reciprocity between duration and intensity, at least over a limited range, and thus depends only on photon fluence and not on photon flux. The action spectrum for this response indicates a peak of maximum effectiveness at 290 nm, and response spectra at different fluences indicate that the most effective wavelength at 30,000 micromol m(-2) is 290 nm, whereas 300 nm light was the most effective at 100,000 micromol m(-2). This response occurs in mutant seedlings deficient in cryptochrome, phytochrome or phototropin, suggesting that none of the known photoreceptors is the major UV-B photoreceptor. Some null mutants in DNA repair enzymes show hypersensitivity to UV-B, suggesting that even at low fluence rates, direct damage to DNA may be one component of the response to UV-B.

  13. Visible light and risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, H R; Muñoz, B; West, S; Bressler, N M; Bressler, S B; Rosenthal, F S

    1990-01-01

    Sunlight exposure has been suggested as a cause of AMD. To examine this, we collected detailed histories of ocular sun exposure in 838 watermen who work on the Chesapeake Bay. The presence and severity of AMD was assessed in stereo macular photographs. Macular changes were classified into four grades of increasing severity ranging from the presence of 5 or more drusen (AMD-1) to extensive geographic atrophy or disciform scars (AMD-4). Previously, we found no association between AMD and ocular exposure to either UV-B (290 to 320 nm) or two bands of UV-A (320 to 340 nm and 340 to 400 nm). We have undertaken further analysis to determine whether ocular exposure to violet light (400 to 450 nm), blue light (400 to 500 nm), or all visible light (400 to 700 nm) was associated with AMD. Ocular exposure was estimated using model computations of ambient irradiance and estimates of the ratio of ocular to ambient exposure. Compared to age-matched controls, established cases (AMD-4), but not milder cases, had significantly higher exposure to both blue and visible light over the preceding 20 years (Wilcoxon sign rank test, P = 0.027). There was no difference in exposure at younger ages. These data suggest that high levels of exposure to blue and visible light late in life may be important in causing AMD. PMID:2095019

  14. Triple pulse shape discrimination and capture-gated spectroscopy in a composite heterogeneous scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Nattress, J.; Wilhelm, K.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an all-solid-state design for a composite heterogeneous scintillation detector sensitive to interactions with high-energy photons (gammas), fast neutrons, and thermal neutrons. The scintillator exhibits triple pulse shape discrimination, effectively separating electron recoils, fast neutron recoils, and neutron captures. This is accomplished by combining the properties of two distinct scintillators, whereby a 51-mm diameter, 51-mm tall cylinder of pulse shape discriminating plastic is wrapped by a 320-μm thick sheet of 6LiF:ZnS(Ag), optically coupling the scintillators to each other and to the photomultiplier tube. In this way, the sensitivity to neutron captures is achieved without the need to load the plastic scintillator with a capture agent. We demonstrate a figure of merit of up to 1.2 for fast neutrons/gammas and 5.7 for thermal neutrons/gammas. Intrinsic capture efficiency is found to be 0.46±0.05% and is in good agreement with simulation, while gamma rejection was 10-6 with respect to the capture region and 10-4 with respect to the recoil region using a 300 keVee threshold. Finally, we show an improvement in capture-gated neutron spectroscopy by rejecting accidental gamma coincidences using pulse shape discrimination in the plastic scintillator.

  15. Effect of UV radiation on the expulsion of Symbiodinium from the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hui; Beardall, John; Gao, Kunshan

    2017-01-01

    The variation in density of the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinum in coral is a basic indicator of coral bleaching, i.e. loss of the symbiotic algae or their photosynthetic pigments. However, in the field corals constantly release their symbiotic algae to surrounding water. To explore the underlying mechanism, the rate of expulsion of zooxanthellae from the coral Pocillopora damicornis was studied over a three-day period under ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400nm) stress. The results showed that the algal expulsion rate appeared 10-20% higher under exposure to UV-A (320-395nm) or UV-B (295-320nm), though the differences were not statistically significant. When corals were exposed to UV-A and UV-B radiation, the maximum expulsion of zooxanthellae occurred at noon (10:00-13:00), and this timing was 1h earlier than in the control without UVR. UVR stress led to obvious decreases in the concentrations of chl a and carotenoids in the coral nubbins after a three-day exposure. Therefore, our results suggested that although the UVR effect on algal expulsion rate was a chronic stress and was not significant within a time frame of only three days, the reduction in chl a and carotenoids may potentially enhance the possibility of coral bleaching over a longer period. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Multiple noise-like pulsing of a figure-eight fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiez, O.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Kuzin, E. A.; Hernández-García, J. C.; González-García, A.; Durán-Sánchez, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study multiple noise-like pulse generation in a 320 m long passively mode-locked erbium-doped figure-eight fibre laser in the normal net dispersion regime. The nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) that is used as a mode locker operates through polarization asymmetry, which allows us to control its switching power by birefringence adjustments at the NOLM input, using a half-wave retarder (HWR). Over some range of the HWR orientation, a single noise-like pulse is observed in the cavity. Its peak power is adjustable as it remains clamped to the variable switching power, and its duration varies inversely between ˜5 and ˜22 ps. Beyond the HWR position, corresponding to the longest duration, the pulse splits into several noise-like pulses. These multiple pulses usually present a walkoff, however they can be synchronized through slight birefringence adjustments, although they are not evenly spaced in time. Up to 12 simultaneous noise-like pulses were observed experimentally, with a duration of ˜2 ns. Multiple pulsing and synchronization of the pulses are interpreted in terms of mechanisms of interaction between pulses. Multiple pulsing appears to be indirectly related to the peak power limiting effect of the NOLM.

  17. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products.

  18. Selective laser ablation of venous thrombus: implications for a new approach in the treatment of pulmonary embolus

    SciTech Connect

    LaMuraglia, G.M.; Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.; Zhang, D.Y.; Prince, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Laser radiation was employed to ablate venous thrombus or emboli with parameters that would not injure endovascular tissues. Output from a 482-nm, 1-microsec pulsed dye laser was delivered through a 320-microns-diameter fiber to in vitro samples of fresh thrombus (T), venous or pulmonary emboli (VE), inferior vena cava (IVC), pulmonary artery (PA), pulmonary valve, and endocardium (atrial and ventricular). The mean threshold fluences for ablation of T and VE were 1.1 and 5.1 J/cm2, respectively. In contrast, the mean threshold fluences for IVC and PA were significantly higher (P less than 0.0001), at 120 and 124 J/cm2, respectively. Ablation efficiency of thrombus was in excess of 100 mg/J, under conditions that caused no histologic injury to the pulmonary artery. To correlate ablation studies with optical absorption by the tissues, optical properties of fresh T, VE, IVC, and PA were studied. Hemoglobin species accounted for the more than 10 times higher 482-nm absorption by T and VE compared to IVC and PA. This explains the differences in ablation thresholds and, thus, the selectivity encountered. These observations demonstrate, more than any other study in the vascular system, that with pulsed optical radiation, efficient laser ablation of venous thrombus is feasible with a wide margin of safety, and without damage to the surrounding vascular tissue.

  19. Determination of the {sup 51}Cr source strength at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Boger, J.; Hahn, R.L.; Chu, Y.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) and {gamma}-ray counting have been used to measure the activity of 24 samples removed from the GALLEX radioactive Cr neutrino source. In 9.86% of the disintegrations, {sup 51}Cr decays with the emission of a 320-keV {gamma}-ray. Counting this {gamma}-ray provides a direct means to obtain the disintegration rates of the Cr samples. Based upon these disintegration rates, the authors obtain a strength of 63.1 {+-} 1.0 PBq for the entire Cr source. The Cr source activity has also been obtained through measuring the {sup 51}V content of each sample by means of NAA. {sup 51}V is the decay daughter for all decay modes of {sup 51}Cr. Through neutron bombardment, radioactive {sup 52}V is produced, which decays with the emission of a 1,434-keV {gamma}-ray. By counting this {gamma}-ray from NAA, they obtain a disintegration rate of 62.1 {+-} 1.0 PBq for the entire source. These values are consistent with all other measurements of the source strength done at other GALLEX Laboratories.

  20. Psoralen-containing sunscreen is tumorigenic in hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, L.E.; Walter, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    Sunscreens containing 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) are currently being marketed to promote tanning by inducing psoralen-mediated ultraviolet (UV) A (320-400 nm) melanogenesis. The rationale is that this may prevent UVB (290-320 nm) radiation-induced skin damage. However, mouse studies have shown that 5-MOP has the same cutaneous photocarcinogenic potential as 8-methoxypsoralen. In addition, the 5-MOP--containing sunscreen Sun System III (SS III), when combined with UVA, induces epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity, an enzyme associated with tumor promotion. Therefore, we investigated whether SS III had sufficient psoralen concentration to be tumorigenic in hairless mice exposed to chronic, intermittent UVA radiation. SS III was applied to hairless mice 5 days per week for 20 weeks. After each application the mice were exposed to 2.5 to 10 joules/cm2 UVA radiation. All test groups developed atypical squamous papillomas in direct proportion to the dosage of UVA radiation received. A shorter latency period for tumor development was seen with larger UVA doses. Test animals followed up to 1 year developed invasive squamous cell tumors. Control groups (SS III without UVA and UVA without SS III) remained free of tumors. Animals receiving SS III plus UVA developed persistent skin thickening and increased dermal cyst formation similar to that reported with chronic exposure to UVB, a known carcinogenic wavelength.

  1. Assessing daily actual evapotranspiration through energy balance: an experiment to evaluate the selfpreservation hypothesis with acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.; Rallo, G.

    2013-10-01

    An operational use of the actual evapotranspiration estimates requires the integration from instantaneous to daily values. This can commonly be achieved under the hypothesis of daytime self-preservation of the evaporative fraction. In this study, it has been evaluated the effect of this assumption on the assessment of daily evapotranspiration from proximity sensing images acquired at hourly intervals over a homogeneous olive groove. Results have been validated by comparison with observations made by a micrometeorological (EC-flux tower) and an eco-physiological (sap flux) sensor. SEBAL model has been applied to thermal and multispectral images acquired during a clear day on August 2009 trough a FLIR A320G thermal camera and a Tetracam MCA II multispectral camera, installed on a tethered helium balloon. Thermal and multispectral images were characterized by very high spatial resolution. This experiment aims to analyze two effects: 1) the consistency of the self-preservation hypothesis for daily estimates of the actual evapotranspiration from hourly assessments at different times of the day; 2) the effects of the spatial resolution on the performances of the energy balance model. To evaluate the effects of the spatial resolution, semi-hourly observations made by a flux tower and sap-flow measures were compared to the evapotranspiration estimates performed using downscaled images at resolutions close to canopy sizes (2, 5 and 10 m). Results show that the best estimates are obtained with a spatial resolution comparable to the average size of the canopy with images taken approximately at 10 UTC.

  2. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii: cloning and heterologous expression of the native gene (Texr) and a double mutant (TexrK271R + N273D) with altered coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sara; Tuohy, Maria G; Murray, Patrick G

    2009-12-01

    Xylose reductase is involved in the first step of the fungal pentose catabolic pathway. The gene encoding xylose reductase (Texr) was isolated from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Texr encodes a 320 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa, which exhibited high sequence identity with other xylose reductase sequences and was shown to be a member of the aldoketoreductase (AKR) superfamily with a preference for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as coenzyme. Given the potential application of xylose reductase enzymes that preferentially utilize the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) rather than NADPH in the fermentation of five carbon sugars by genetically engineered microorganisms, the coenzyme selectivity of TeXR was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The TeXR K271R+N273D double mutant displayed an altered coenzyme preference with a 16-fold improvement in NADH utilization relative to the wild type and therefore has the potential to reduce redox imbalance of xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae strains. Expression of Texr was shown to be inducible by the same carbon sources responsible for the induction of genes encoding enzymes relevant to lignocellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a coordinated expression of intracellular and extracellular enzymes relevant to hydrolysis and metabolism of pentose sugars in T. emersonii in adaptation to its natural habitat. This indicates a potential advantage in survival and response to a nutrient-poor environment.

  3. Ocular surface temperature in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sodi, Andrea; Matteoli, Sara; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Finocchio, Lucia; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  4. Portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for detection of biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Won; Lee, Kangjin; Millner, Patricia; Sharma, Manan; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2008-04-01

    A rapid nondestructive technology is needed to detect bacterial contamination on the surfaces of food processing equipment to reduce public health risks. A portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was used to evaluate potential detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel typically used in the manufacture of food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures, such as E. coli, Pseudomonas pertucinogena, Erwinia chrysanthemi, and Listeria innocula. Following a 1-week exposure, biofilm formations were assessed using fluorescence imaging. In addition, the effects on biofilm formation from both tryptic soy broth (TSB) and M9 medium with casamino acids (M9C) were examined. TSB grown cells enhance biofilm production compared with M9C-grown cells. Hyperspectral fluorescence images of the biofilm samples, in response to ultraviolet-A (320 to 400 nm) excitation, were acquired from approximately 416 to 700 nm. Visual evaluation of individual images at emission peak wavelengths in the blue revealed the most contrast between biofilms and stainless steel coupons. Two-band ratios compared with the single-band images increased the contrast between the biofilm forming area and stainless steel coupon surfaces. The 444/588 nm ratio images exhibited the greatest contrast between the biofilm formations and stainless coupon surfaces.

  5. Range-gated imaging with an indium-gallium-arsenide-based focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, Robert M.; Ettenberg, Martin H.; O'Grady, Matthew T.; Blessinger, Michael A.; Dries, J. C.

    2004-08-01

    Range-gated imaging using indium gallium arsenide based focal plane arrays enables both depth and intensity imaging with eye-safe lasers while remaining covert to night vision goggles. We report on a focal plane array consisting of an indium gallium arsenide photodiode array hybrid-integrated with a CMOS readout circuit, resulting in an all solid state device. A 5 V supply avoids the complication of high voltage supplies and improves reliability, while also allowing the device to be small and lightweight. The spectral sensitivity of InGaAs extends from 0.9 microns to 1.7 microns, allowing the use of commercially available pulsed lasers with 1.5 micron wavelength, several millijoule pulse energies, and nanosecond scale pulse durations. SUI is developing a 320 x 256 pixel imager with the ability to conduct range gated imaging with sub-100 ns gates, while also allowing a 16 ms integration time for imaging in a staring mode. The pixels are fabricated on a 25 micron pitch for a compact device, and all pixels are gated simultaneously for "snapshot" exposure. High in-pixel gain with nearly noiseless amplification and low dark current enable high sensitivity imaging from ultra-short gates to video rate imaging.

  6. Molecular responses to photogenotoxic stress induced by the antibiotic lomefloxacin in human skin cells: from DNA damage to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Marrot, Laurent; Belaïdi, Jean Phillipe; Jones, Christophe; Perez, Phillipe; Riou, Lydia; Sarasin, Alain; Meunier, Jean Roch

    2003-09-01

    Photo-unstable chemicals sometimes behave as phototoxins in skin, inducing untoward clinical side-effects when exposed to sunlight. Some drugs, such as psoralens or fluoroquinolones, can damage genomic DNA, thus increasing the risk of photocarcinogenesis. Here, lomefloxacin, an antibiotic from the fluoroquinolone family known to be involved in skin tumor development in photoexposed mice, was studied using normal human skin cells in culture: fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and Caucasian melanocytes. When treated cells were exposed to simulated solar ultraviolet A (320-400 nm), lomefloxacin induced damage such as strand breaks and pyrimidine dimers in genomic DNA. Lomefloxacin also triggered various stress responses: heme-oxygenase-1 expression in fibroblasts, changes in p53 status as shown by the accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins or the induction of MDM2 and GADD45 genes, and stimulation of melanogenesis by increasing the tyrosinase activity in melanocytes. Lomefloxacin could also lead to apoptosis in keratinocytes exposed to ultraviolet A: caspase-3 was activated and FAS-L gene was induced. Moreover, keratinocytes were shown to be the most sensitive cell type to lomefloxacin phototoxic effects, in spite of the well-established effectiveness of their antioxidant equipment. These data show that the phototoxicity of a given drug can be driven by different mechanisms and that its biologic impact varies according to cell type.

  7. Nontranslational three-dimensional profilometry by chromatic confocal microscopy with dynamically configurable micromirror scanning.

    PubMed

    Cha, S; Lin, P C; Zhu, L; Sun, P C; Fainman, Y

    2000-06-01

    A confocal microscope profilometer, which incorporates chromatic depth scanning with a diffractive optical element and a digital micromirror device for configurable transverse scanning, provides three-dimensional (3D) quantitative measurements without mechanical translation of either the sample or the microscope. We used a microscope with various objective lenses (e.g., 40x, 60x, and 100x) to achieve different system characteristics. With a 100x objective, the microscope acquires stable measurements over a 320 microm x 240 microm surface area with a depth resolution of 0.39 microm at a 3-Hz scan rate. The total longitudinal field of view is 26.4 microm for a wavelength tuning range of 48.3 nm. The FWHM value of the longitudinal point-spread function is measured to be 0.99 microm. We present 3D measurements of a four-phase-level diffractive element and an integrated-circuit chip. The resolution and the accuracy are shown to be equivalent to those found with use of conventional mechanical scanning.

  8. Intracellular target for alpha-terthienyl photosensitization: involvement of lysosomal membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M; Koyama, S; Tokiwa, K; Fujita, H

    1993-05-01

    Intracellular targets for the photosensitizer alpha-terthienyl (alpha T) were examined by fluorescence microscopy and microfluorospectrometry using human nonkeratinized buccal cells. Intracellular distribution of alpha T was observed as fluorescent patches widely dispersed in the cytoplasm. The distribution of the fluorescent patches was compared with that of acid phosphatase activity visualized as an azo dye produced by the fast garnet 2-methyl-4-[(2-methyl-phenyl)azo]benzenediasonium sulfate reaction. Because both the distribution sites coincided, lysosomes were the likely sites of intracellular affinity of alpha T. However, because acid phosphatase is not a specific lysosomal marker, we tried to detect another lysosomal enzyme, beta-galactosidase, to confirm if the fluorescent patches were lysosomes, using fluorescein-di-(beta-D-galactopyranoside) (FDG) as a fluorogenic substrate. Without UV-A (320-400 nm) irradiation of the cells after uptake of alpha T and FDG, no significant fluorescence was observed. In contrast, with prior UV-A irradiation in the presence of alpha T and FDG, the bright yellow fluorescence of fluorescein, which is the digested product of FDG, was clearly detected in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. This observation implied that inflow of external FDG into the lysosomes is caused by lysosomal membrane damage on alpha T photosensitization. The present results indicated that lysosomes are the primary photosensitization site of alpha T.

  9. Multi-Probe Real-Time PCR Identification of Common Mycobacterium Species in Blood Culture Broth

    PubMed Central

    Foongladda, Suporn; Pholwat, Suporn; Eampokalap, Boonchuay; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Sutthent, Ruengpung

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium, and M. intracellulare are the most common causes of systemic bacterial infection in AIDS patients. To identify these mycobacterial isolates in primary blood culture broths, we developed a multiple hybridization probe-based real-time PCR assay using the LightCycler system. The primers were designed to amplify a 320-bp fragment of Mycobacterium 16S rRNA genes. Reaction specificity was evaluated using PCR amplification curves along with specific melting temperatures of probes on DNA extracted from 13 Mycobacterium species. In this study, results showed 100% accuracy for the selected bacterial panel. Detection limits were 350, 600, and 650 colony-forming unit (CFU)/ml blood culture broths for M. tuberculosis complex, M. avium, and M. intracellulare, respectively (1 to 2 CFU/reaction). To evaluate clinical applicability, 341 acid-fast bacilli in blood culture broths were analyzed. In total, 327 (96%) were positively identified: 54.5% M. tuberculosis complex, 37.5% M. avium, and 3.8% M. intracellulare. Results can be available within 3 hours of receiving a broth sample, which makes this rapid and simple assay an attractive diagnostic tool for clinical use. PMID:19095775

  10. Application of real-time single camera SLAM technology for image-guided targeting in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yau-Zen; Hou, Jung-Fu; Tsao, Yi Hsiang; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an application of augmented reality technology for targeting tumors or anatomical structures inside the skull. The application is a combination of the technologies of MonoSLAM (Single Camera Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) and computer graphics. A stereo vision system is developed to construct geometric data of human face for registration with CT images. Reliability and accuracy of the application is enhanced by the use of fiduciary markers fixed to the skull. The MonoSLAM keeps track of the current location of the camera with respect to an augmented reality (AR) marker using the extended Kalman filter. The fiduciary markers provide reference when the AR marker is invisible to the camera. Relationship between the markers on the face and the augmented reality marker is obtained by a registration procedure by the stereo vision system and is updated on-line. A commercially available Android based tablet PC equipped with a 320×240 front-facing camera was used for implementation. The system is able to provide a live view of the patient overlaid by the solid models of tumors or anatomical structures, as well as the missing part of the tool inside the skull.

  11. 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector Focal Plane Array for Long-Wave Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 ?m observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 ?m. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE?T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 ?m test diodes and small 28 ?m FPA pixels are given.

  12. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  13. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20–40 THz and 60–100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The ‘THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25–50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel ‘THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10−6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  14. Sub-Surface Windscreen for the Measurement of Outdoor Infrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Comeaux, Toby; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Weistroffer, George R.

    2008-01-01

    A windscreen has been developed that features two advantages favorable for the measurement of outdoor infrasound. First, the sub-surface location, with the top of the windscreen flush with the ground surface, minimizes the mean velocity of the impinging wind. Secondly, the windscreen material (closed cell polyurethane foam) has a sufficiently low acoustic impedance (222 times that of air) and wall thickness (0.0127 m) to provide a transmission coefficient of nearly unity over the infrasonic frequency range (0-20 Hz). The windscreen, a tightly-sealed box having internal dimensions of 0.3048 x 0.3048 x 0.3556 m, contains a microphone, preamplifier, and a cable feed thru to an external power supply. Provisions are made for rain drainage and seismic isolation. A three-element array, configured as an equilateral triangle with 30.48 m spacing and operating continuously in the field, periodically receives highly coherent signals attributed to emissions from atmospheric turbulence. The time delays between infrasonic signals received at the microphones permit determination of the bearing and elevation of the sources, which correlate well with locations of pilot reports (PIREPS) within a 320 km radius about the array. The test results are interpreted to yield spectral information on infrasonic emissions from clear air turbulence.

  15. Manual Throttles-Only Control Effectivity for Emergency Flight Control of Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Richard; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    If normal aircraft flight controls are lost, emergency flight control may be attempted using only the thrust of engines. Collective thrust is used to control flightpath, and differential thrust is used to control bank angle. One issue is whether a total loss of hydraulics (TLOH) leaves an airplane in a recoverable condition. Recoverability is a function of airspeed, altitude, flight phase, and configuration. If the airplane can be recovered, flight test and simulation results on several transport-class airplanes have shown that throttles-only control (TOC) is usually adequate to maintain up-and-away flight, but executing a safe landing is very difficult. There are favorable aircraft configurations, and also techniques that will improve recoverability and control and increase the chances of a survivable landing. The DHS and NASA have recently conducted a flight and simulator study to determine the effectivity of manual throttles-only control as a way to recover and safely land a range of transport airplanes. This paper discusses TLOH recoverability as a function of conditions, and TOC landability results for a range of transport airplanes, and some key techniques for flying with throttles and making a survivable landing. Airplanes evaluated include the B-747, B-767, B-777, B-757, A320, and B-737 airplanes.

  16. Engine Concept Study for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which mission fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. The results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  17. Surveillance of Human Astrovirus Infection in Brazil: The First Report of MLB1 Astrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Maria da Penha Trindade Pinheiro; Carvalho Costa, Filipe Aníbal; Rocha, Mônica Simões; de Andrade, Juliana da Silva Ribeiro; Diniz, Fernanda Kreischer Bandeira; de Andrade, Thais Ramos; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) represents the third most common virus associated with acute diarrhea (AD). This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of HAstV infection in Brazilian children under 5 years of age with AD, investigate the presence of recently described HAstV strains, through extensive laboratory-based surveillance of enteric viral agents in three Brazilian coastal regions between 2005 and 2011. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the overall HAstV detection rate reached 7.1% (207/2.913) with percentage varying according to the geographic region: 3.9% (36/921) in the northeast, 7.9% in the south (71/903) and 9.2% in the southeast (100/1.089) (p < 0.001). HAstV were detected in cases of all age groups. Detection rates were slightly higher during the spring. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 320-bp ORF2 fragment revealed that HAstV-1 was the predominant genotype throughout the seven years of the study. The novel AstV-MLB1 was detected in two children with AD from a subset of 200 samples tested, demonstrating the circulation of this virus both the in northeastern and southeastern regions of Brazil. These results provide additional epidemiological and molecular data on HAstV circulation in three Brazilian coastal regions, highlighting its potential to cause infantile AD. PMID:26274322

  18. Hydrogen production through aqueous-phase reforming of ethylene glycol in a washcoated microchannel.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M Fernanda Neira; Ordomsky, Vitaly; Paunovic, Violeta; van der Schaaf, John; Schouten, Jaap C; Nijhuis, T Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of biocarbohydrates is conducted in a catalytically stable washcoated microreactor where multiphase hydrogen removal enhances hydrogen efficiency. Single microchannel experiments are conducted following a simplified model based on the microreactor concept. A coating method to deposit a Pt-based catalyst on the microchannel walls is selected and optimized. APR reactivity tests are performed by using ethylene glycol as the model compound. Optimum results are achieved with a static washcoating technique; a highly uniform and well adhered 5 μm layer is deposited on the walls of a 320 μm internal diameter (ID) microchannel in one single step. During APR of ethylene glycol, the catalyst layer exhibits high stability over 10 days after limited initial deactivation. The microchannel presents higher conversion and selectivity to hydrogen than a fixed-bed reactor. The benefits of using a microreactor for APR can be further enhanced by utilizing increased Pt loadings, higher reaction temperatures, and larger carbohydrates (e.g., glucose). The use of microtechnology for aqueous-phase reforming will allow for a great reduction in the reformer size, thus rendering it promising for distributed hydrogen production. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Feasibility study of PDT light sources based on lasing action in strongly scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Pang, Gendi; Jonkman, James; Wilson, Brian C.

    1997-05-01

    Lasing action in strongly scattering media containing a fluorescent dye and pumped by a pulsed high peak power laser can be used to produce light sources which may be suitable for surface or intracavity light delivery in photodynamic therapy, eliminating the need for a dye laser to obtain selectable treatment wavelengths. The present study focuses on evaluating the effects, in cylindrical fiber tip sources for interstitial light delivery, of fluorophore concentration and scattering particle density on lasing peak power, emission wavelength and maximum deliverable, clinically useful fluence-rate and radiant exposure. The sources tested are comprised of Rhodamine 640 perchloride incorporated into a TiO2 based scattering matrix in either ethylene glycol or methanol. The cylindrical fiber tips, 10 mm long and 2 mm in diameter, were pumped via a 320 micrometers diameter multimode optical fiber, achieving line narrowing to approximately 7 nm FWHM at approximately 617 nm, using pulse energies of 1.7 mJ, delivered in 10 nsec from a Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The results showed the dependence of the total gain length in the pump volume and reabsorption effects in the remaining volume of the fiber tip. Sources capable of delivering sufficient radiant exposure for clinical use were achieved. While these sources are promising, for clinical use of these fiber sources pump lasers delivering MW pulses at high repetition rates are required to achieve acceptable total irradiation times.

  20. Development status of Type-II superlattice infrared detector in JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Michito; Murooka, Junpei; Kumeta, Ayaka; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro; Hiroe, Yuta; Kimata, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    One of JAXA's future missions, using an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), require the focal plane array (FPA) that has high sensitivity and a very long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR) cutoff wavelength. Since a Type-II superlattice (T2SL) is the only known infrared material to have a theoretically predicted performance superior to that of HgCdTe and the cutoff wavelength can be tailored in the wavelength region of 3-30 μm, we started the research and development of the T2SL detector in 2009. In order to confirm our final goal which is to realize an FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, we fabricated InAs/GaInSb T2SL infrared detectors with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm. We show the results of the dark current and responsivity measurement of single pixel detectors and the development status of FPAs including the image taken by a 320 × 256 InAs/GaInSb T2SL FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm.

  1. 320-Gb/s switch system to guarantee QoS of real-time traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjie; Liu, Bin; Xu, Yang

    2003-08-01

    To provide QoS control for real time traffic in core routers, this paper designs and evaluates a 320 Gb/s switch system, which supports 16 line cards, each operating at OC192c line rate (10 Gb/s). This switch system contains a high performance switch fabric and supports variable-length IP packet interface. These two characters provide advantages over traditional switch fabrics with a cell interface. This switch system supports eight priorities to both unicast and multicast traffic. The highest priority with strict QoS guarantee is for real time traffic, and other seven lower priorities with weighted round-robin (WRR) service discipline are for other common data traffic. Through simulation under multi-priority burst traffic model, we demonstrate this switch system not only can provide excellent performance for real time traffic, but also can efficiently allocate bandwidth among all kinds of traffic. As a result, this switch system can serve as a key node in high-speed networks, and it can also meet the challenge of multimedia traffic to the next generation Internet.

  2. Modeling of porosity formation and feeding flow during casting of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiping

    Porosity is one of the most important defects in metal casting. To quantitatively predict the porosity formation during casting two numerical models are developed for steel and aluminum alloys respectively. For steel, a multi-phase model is developed that predicts melt pressure, feeding flow, porosity (both microscopic and macroscopic), and riser pipe formation during casting. The phases included in the model are solid, liquid, porosity, and air. An energy equation is solved to determine solid fraction. A multi-phase momentum equation, which is valid everywhere in the solution domain, is derived. A pressure equation is then derived from this momentum equation and a mixture continuity equation developed that accounts for all phases. The partial pressure of a gas species dissolved in the melt is determined using the species concentration, which is found by solving a species conservation equation that accounts for convection. Porosity forms once the gas pressure exceeds the sum of the melt pressure and the capillary pressure. The amount of porosity that forms is determined from the mixture continuity equation. The riser pipe is determined from an air continuity equation. A pore size model, which considers the effects of the solidifying steel microstructure on pore size, is incorporated into the multi-phase model. The multi-phase model is applied to one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional simulations. The results clearly illustrate the basic physical phenomena involved and predict microporosity and macroporosity distributions, as well as a riser pipe. For aluminum alloys a gas microsegregation model is developed to quantitatively predict porosity, coupled with the calculations of the pressure field, feeding flow, and distribution of dissolved gas species throughout the casting. The effects of dendritic and eutectic microstructure on the pore shape and size are considered in a pore size model. The model is applied to one-dimensional simulations of A319

  3. Prediction of left ventricular contractile recovery using tissue Doppler strain and strain rate measurements at rest in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawwad, Ihab M; Al Hawary, Ahmed A; Kamal, Hanan M; Al Maghawry, Layla M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the ability of tissue Doppler (TD) deformation analysis at rest to predict left ventricular contractile recovery in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This prospective cohort enrolled 67 patients with segmental wall motion abnormality. Assessment of each segment was performed at rest and during low dose Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) using a 4 point scoring system, TD peak systolic strain (PSS) and peak systolic strain rate (PSSR). The study followed up the patients for contractile improvement after 6 months of successful PCI by echocardiography. Of a 319 dysfunctional segments, 155 (49%) showed contractile recovery and 164 (51%) did not. PSS and PSSR at rest were significantly higher in recovered segments compared to segments without recovery (PSS: -7.27 ± 0.8 Vs. -6.14 ± 0.7%, PSSR: -0.34 ± 0.13 Vs. -0.24 ± 0.1/s. p < 0.0001 both). Similarly, both parameters were significantly higher in the contractile recovery group at follow up (p 0.001). Resting PSSR as well as PSS and PSSR during DSE were significant independent predictors of contractile recovery (p < 0.001 each). For predicting segmental contractile recovery, resting PSSR with a -0.31/s cut-off point had 76% sensitivity and 59% specificity (AUC 0.74), DSE qualitative viability assessment had a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 77%, DSE PSS with a cut-off point of -9.1% had 74% sensitivity and 63% specificity (AUC 0.77) and DSE PSSR with a cut-off point of -0.72/s had 78% sensitivity and 77% specificity (AUC 0.81). Resting PSSR is a modest predictor of segmental contractile recovery after PCI while PSSR during DSE has a comparable diagnostic performance to subjective wall motion scoring. Recovered segments show improvement of deformation parameters after PCI.

  4. Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Causing Clinical and Subclinical Infections in Atlantic Salmon Have Different Genetic Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Mutoloki, Stephen; Jøssund, Trude B.; Ritchie, Gordon; Munang'andu, Hetron M.; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is the causative agent of IPN, an important disease of salmonids. IPNV infections result in either sub-clinical or overt disease and the basis of this difference is not well-understood. The objective of the present study was to determine the VP2 gene of the virus associated with the different forms of clinical manifestation. Groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) reared in farms located in different IPN disease pressures were monitored from brood stock until grow-out over a 3 year period. Hatcheries A1 and B1 as well as cooperating seawater farms were located in a low disease risk area while hatcheries A2 and B2 as well as their cooperating seawater farms were in high IPN risk areas. Samples including eggs, milt, whole fry, kidney depending on the stage of production were collected during outbreaks or in apparently healthy populations where no outbreaks occurred. The virus was re-isolated in CHSE cells and the VP2 gene amplified by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. During the freshwater stage, there were no disease outbreaks at hatcheries A1, A2, and B1 (except in one fish group that originated from hatchery B2), although IPNV was isolated from some of the fish groups at all 3 hatcheries. By contrast, all fish groups at hatchery B2 suffered IPN outbreaks. In seawater, only groups of fish originating from hatchery A1 had no IPN outbreaks albeit virus being isolated from the fish. On the other hand, fish originating from hatcheries A2, B1, and B2 experienced outbreaks in seawater. The VP2 amino acid fingerprint of the virus associated with subclinical infections from A1 and co-operating seawater sites was V64A137P217T221A247N252S281D282E319. By contrast, all virus isolates associated with clinical infections had the motif I64T137T217A221T247V252T281N282A319, where underlined amino acids represent the avirulent and highly virulent motif, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences showed 2 clades, one of

  5. Policy reform to shift the health and human rights environment for vulnerable groups: the case of Kyrgyzstan's Instruction 417.

    PubMed

    Beletsky, Leo; Thomas, Rachel; Smelyanskaya, Marina; Artamonova, Irina; Shumskaya, Natalya; Dooronbekova, Aijan; Mukambetov, Aibek; Doyle, Heather; Tolson, Rebecca

    2012-12-15

    Police activities shape behavior and health outcomes among drug users, sex workers, and other vulnerable groups. Interventions to change the policing of drug consumption and sex work in ways that facilitate public health programming and respect for human rights have included policy reforms, education, and litigation. In 2009, the Kyrgyz government promulgated "Instruction 417," prohibiting police interference with "harm reduction" programs, re-enforcing citizen rights, addressing police occupational safety concerns, and institutionalizing police-public health collaboration. Although ample evidence points to gaps between intended and actual impact of policy and other structural interventions, there is little research on the impact of initiatives designed to align policing, health, and human rights. We conducted a police officer survey to assess links between Instruction 417 knowledge and legal and public health knowledge, attitudes towards harm reduction programs, and intended practices targeting vulnerable groups. In a 319-officer sample, 79% understood key due process regulations, 71.1% correctly characterized law on sex work, 54.3% understood syringe possession law, while only 44.4% reported familiarity with Instruction 417. Most (72.9%) expressed positive attitudes toward condom distribution, while only 56% viewed syringe access favorably. Almost half (44%) agreed that police should refer vulnerable groups to disease prevention programs, but only 20% reported doing so. In multivariate analysis, knowledge of Instruction 417 was associated with significantly better knowledge about (aOR=1.84, 95%CI: 1.12-3.00) and attitudes towards harm reduction programs (aOR=3.81, 95%CI:1.35-10.75), and knowledge of due process for the detention of sex workers (aOR=2.53, 95%CI:1.33-4.80). Younger, junior officers and those in rural areas may not be well-informed about the policy. While reflecting positively on Instruction 417 as a structural approach to aligning policing and

  6. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that interferons-β and -γ Interact in a multiplicative manner to disrupt herpes simplex virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, William P.; Halford, Keith J.; Pierce, Amy T.

    2005-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the innate interferons (IFNs), IFN-α and IFN-β, can act in concert with IFN-γto synergistically inhibit the replication of cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The significance of this observation is not yet agreed upon in large part because the nature and magnitude of the interaction between IFN-α/β and IFN-γ is not well defined. In the current study, we resolve this issue by demonstrating three points. First, the hyperbolic tangent function, tanh (x  ), can be used to describe the individual effects of IFN-β or IFN-γ on HSV-1 replication over a 320,000-fold range of IFN concentration. Second, pharmacological methods prove that IFN-β and IFN-γ interact in a greater-than-additive manner to inhibit HSV-1 replication. Finally, the potency with which combinations of IFN-β and IFN-γ inhibit HSV-1 replication is accurately predicted by multiplying the individual inhibitory effects of each cytokine. Thus, IFN-β and IFN-γ interact in a multiplicative manner. We infer that a primary antiviral function of IFN-γ lies in its capacity to multiply the potency with which IFN-α/β restricts HSV-1 replication in vivo. This hypothesis has important ramifications for understanding how T lymphocyte-secreted cytokines such as IFN-γ can force herpesviruses into a latent state without destroying the neurons or leukocytes that continue to harbor these viral infections for the lifetime of the host.

  7. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280–320 nm) and UV-A (320–390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD). PMID:23344059

  8. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    DOE PAGES

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; ...

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch,more » yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.« less

  9. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  10. Gamma radiation-induced thermoluminescence, trace element and paramagnetic defect of quartz from the Sambagawa metamorphic belt, Central Shikoku, Japan.

    PubMed

    Chuenpee, T; Nishikawa, O; Kon, Y; Ninagawa, K; Toyoda, S; Ogata, T; Uchida, T; Takashima, I

    2017-02-01

    This study analyzes the Thermoluminescence (TL) emissions for five emission bands, trace element concentrations and defects in quartz grains extracted from metamorphic rocks and quartz veins in the Sambagawa metamorphic belt, central Shikoku. An emission of 500nm with 195, 245, and 320-325°C glow peaks are observed through the lowest to highest grade samples. A 450nm emission band with intense 195 and 245°C glow peaks and a 320-325°C shoulder peak is found in the higher grade samples. A 570nm emission band with a 170°C glow peak is observed in the samples derived from the lower grade zones. These characteristics of TL emissions of quartz suggest that they can be an indicator for the identification of rock derived from different metamorphic grades. The higher metamorphic grade samples with 450nm emission bands in particular show higher intensities of the E1' center. This relation indicates that the activation of the E1' center in higher metamorphic conditions possibly contributed to the 450nm emission band. Also, the 500nm emission band is generally observed in the samples with the signal intensities of the Aluminum hole center, suggesting that the center is the source of this emission band. We also observed that the lower metamorphic grade samples contain lower signal intensities of the Aluminum hole center, despite higher aluminum concentrations. This inconsistency indicates that the formation of interstitial aluminum ions cause local lattice distortion regions, where self-trapped excitons can be formed and presumably provide the 570nm emissions.

  11. Infrared transform spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Pajo; Lee, Jamine; Gregor, Brian; Goldstein, Neil; Panfili, Raphael; Fox, Marsha

    2012-10-01

    A dispersive transform spectral imager named FAROS (FAst Reconfigurable Optical Sensor) has been developed for high frame rate, moderate-to-high resolution hyperspectral imaging. A programmable digital micromirror array (DMA) modulator makes it possible to adjust spectral, temporal and spatial resolution in real time to achieve optimum tradeoff for dynamic monitoring requirements. The system's F/2.8 collection optics produces diffraction-limited images in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectral region. The optical system is based on a proprietary dual-pass Offner configuration with a single spherical mirror and a confocal spherical diffraction grating. FAROS fulfills two functions simultaneously: one output produces two-dimensional polychromatic imagery at the full focal plane array (FPA) frame rate for fast object acquisition and tracking, while the other output operates in parallel and produces variable-resolution spectral images via Hadamard transform encoding to assist in object discrimination and classification. The current version of the FAROS spectral imager is a multispectral technology demonstrator that operates in the MWIR with a 320 x 256 pixel InSb FPA running at 478 frames per second resulting in time resolution of several tens of milliseconds per hypercube. The instrument has been tested by monitoring small-scale rocket engine firings in outdoor environments. The instrument has no macro-scale moving parts, and conforms to a robust, small-volume and lightweight package, suitable for integration with small surveillance vehicles. The technology is also applicable to multispectral/hyperspectral imaging applications in diverse areas such as atmospheric contamination monitoring, agriculture, process control, and biomedical imaging, and can be adapted for use in any spectral domain from the ultraviolet (UV) to the LWIR region.

  12. A thermographic study on eyes affected by Age-related Macular Degeneration: Comparison among various forms of the pathology and analysis of risk factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteoli, Sara; Finocchio, Lucia; Biagini, Ilaria; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Sodi, Andrea; Corvi, Andrea; Virgili, Gianni; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the ocular thermographic profiles in eyes affected by Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, (2) whether any risk factors associated with the disease could affect the development of a form of AMD rather than another. Thirty-four eyes with Age-Related Maculopathy (ARM), 41 eyes with dry AMD, 60 eyes affected by wet AMD, and 74 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included in the study. The control group consisted of 48 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, systemic diseases and a body temperature higher than 37.5 °C. A total of 210 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The Ocular Surface Temperature (OST) of five ocular areas was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA test and multivariate analysis were used for statistical analyses. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P-value > 0.05), however, OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P-value < 0.0001). Smokers showed higher possibility (P-value = 0.012) of developing wet AMD instead of dry AMD. Infrared thermography may be a helpful, non-invasive and not time-consuming method to be used in the management of patients with this common degenerative maculopathy.

  13. SU-E-T-501: Initial Orthovoltage Beam Profile Analysis of a Small Brass MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Loughery, B; Snyder, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To create brass leaves for an orthovoltage MLC and take initial beam profile measurements. Methods The low-energy MLC was designed in previous work. Brass was chosen for its self-lubrication and low cost. Stock brass rectangles (30cm × 1.0cm × 0.5cm) were ordered with pre-cut gear rack along the topmost long edges. Leaf designs were translated into G-code, then cut with a Tormach CNC-1100 mill. Intense bowing was observed in the beam direction, which required straightening via an in-house jig. Straightened leaves were placed into MLC assembly and mounted to a 320 kVp orthovoltage tube. EDR2 film was irradiated in four situations: MLC open so one edge was isocentric, and MLC open more than isocentric, completely closed MLC, and an open field shot with the MLC removed. The first two scans tested penumbra for our rectangular edges due to unfocused design. The final two scans tested transmission and interleaf leakage. All four experiments were set to 120 kVp and 10 mA for two minutes. Results Transmission and interleaf leakage were found to be zero. Interleaf leakage is faintly visible on film, but undetected by our film scanner despite high spatial resolution. Penumbra at isocenter was found to be 0.72mm, which matched the penumbras of true field edges. Penumbra off-isocenter was 1.1mm. Mechanically, leaves are moving smoothly once straightened. Conclusion Beam profiles through our brass MLC are acceptable. Leaves attenuate and move as designed. Looking forward, we intend to animate our MLC to deliver more complicated treatment plans.

  14. A review of the effects of agricultural and industrial contamination on the Ebro delta biota and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Mañosa, S; Mateo, R; Guitart, R

    2001-10-01

    The Ebro delta (NE Spain) is a 320 km2 wetland area of international importance for conservation. The area is devoted to rice farming and receives large amounts of pesticides. Industrial pollutants are also carried to the delta by the river. The information accumulated during the last 25 year on the effect of such pollution on the biota is reviewed in order to identify the existing gaps and needs for management. Organochlorine pesticides were legally used until 1977, which has resulted in the widespread presence of these compounds in the Ebro delta biota. Lethal, sublethal or other detrimental effects of these pesticides on wildlife in the area were poorly investigated, but negative effects on the reproduction of ducks and herons were reported. Nowadays, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the main responsible of organochlorine pollution in the area: concentrations in biota samples are higher than levels observed in nearby coastal areas, as a result of the significant PCB inputs by the river which, in 1990, were evaluated at 126 kg yr(-1). The massive use of herbicides is thought to have contributed to the elimation of macrophyte vegetation in the lagoons during the eighties, which had strong consequences on diving ducks and coot populations. Weed control is also related to the loss of biodiversity held by rice fields. The massive and inadequate use of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides (involving more than 20,000 t yr(-1) has produced some waterbird mortality events, and may have direct and indirect effects on other non-target organisms. The accumulation in the soil of lead pellets used in waterfowl shooting is estimated to kill some 16,300 waterbirds in the Ebro delta every year.

  15. Etude de la stabilite d'un avion BWB (Blended Wing Body) de 200 passagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, Clement

    The Blended Wing Body (BWB) is a type of innovative aircraft, based on the flying wing concept. This new type of airplane shows several advantages compared to the conventional airplanes : economy of fuel, reduction of the weight of the structure, reduction of the noise and less impact on the environment, increased payload capacity. However, this kind of aircraft has a lack of stability due to the absence of vertical tail. Several studies of stability were already realized on reduced size models of BWB, but there is no study on a 200 passengers BWB. That's why, the main objective of this present study is to integrate the engines and theirs pylons into the existing conceptual design of the BWB to analyze of their impact on its static and dynamic stability over the flight envelope. The conception of the BWB was realized with the platform of design CEASIOM. The airplane, the engines and theirs pylons were obtained in the geometrical module AcBuilder of CEASIOM. The various aerodynamic coefficients are calculated thanks to Tornado program. These coefficients allow realizing the calculations of stability, in particular with the longitudinal and lateral matrices of stability. Afterward, the BWB flight envelope is created based on aeronautical data of a similar airplane, the Airbus A320. From this flight envelope, we get back several thousand possible points of flight. The last step is to check the static and dynamic stability, using the longitudinal and lateral matrices of stability and the Flying Qualities Requirements, for every point of flight. To validate our study of stability, the already existing studies of stability of the Boeing 747 will be used and compared with our model.

  16. Identifying Small Coronary Calcification in Non-Contrast 0.5-mm Slice Reconstruction to Diagnose Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with a Conventional Zero Coronary Artery Calcium Score

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, Yoji; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Awai, Kazuo; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In a new-generation computed tomography (CT) scanner, coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores were measured using 3.0-mm slice reconstruction images originally acquired with 0.5 mm thickness scans in a single beat. This study investigated the usefulness of thin-slice (0.5 mm) reconstruction for identifying small calcifications in coronary arteries and evaluated the association with coronary plaques and stenosis compared to conventional 3.0-mm reconstruction images. Methods: We evaluated 132 patients with zero CAC scores in conventional 3.0-mm Agatston method using a 320-slice CT. Then, 0.5-mm slice reconstruction was performed to identify small calcifications. The presence of stenosis and coronary plaques was assessed using coronary CT angiography. Results: In total, 22 small calcifications were identified in 18 patients. There were 28 (21%) patients with any (≥ 25%) stenosis (34 lesions). Forty-seven coronary plaques were found in 33 patients (25%), including 7 calcified plaques in 7 patients (5%), 34 noncalcified plaques in 27 patients (20%), and 6 partially calcified plaques in 5 patients (4%). Patients with small calcifications had a significantly higher prevalence of noncalcified or partially calcified plaques (83% vs 14%; p < 0.001) and obstructive stenosis (33% vs 5.2%; p < 0.001) compared to those without small calcifications. The addition of small calcifications to the coronary risk factors when diagnosing stenosis significantly improved the diagnostic value. Conclusion: Small calcifications detected by thin-slice 0.5-mm reconstruction are useful for distinguishing coronary atherosclerotic lesions in patients with zero CAC scores from conventional CT reconstruction. PMID:27397477

  17. Occupational exposure to organic solvents during paint stripping and painting operations in the aeronautical industry.

    PubMed

    Vincent, R; Poirot, P; Subra, I; Rieger, B; Cicolella, A

    1994-01-01

    The exposure of workers to methylene chloride and phenol in an aeronautical workshop was measured during stripping of paint from a Boeing B 747. Methylene chloride exposure was measured during two work days by personal air sampling, while area sampling was used for phenol. During paint stripping operations, methylene chloride air concentrations ranged from 299.2 mg/m3 (83.1 ppm) to 1888.9 mg/m3 (524.7 ppm). The exposures to methylene chloride calculated for an 8-h work day ranged from 86 mg/m3 (23.9 ppm) to 1239.5 mg/m3 (344.3 ppm). In another aeronautical workshop, exposure to organic solvents, especially ethylene glycol monoethylether acetate (EGEEA), was controlled during the painting of an Airbus A 320. The external exposure to solvents and EGEEA was measured by means of individual air sampling. The estimation of internal exposure to EGEEA was made by measuring its urinary metabolite, ethoxyacetic acid (EAA). Both measurements were made during the course of 3 days. The biological samples were taken pre- and post-shift. During painting operations, methyl ethyl ketone, ethyl acetate, n-butyl alcohol, methyl isobutyl ketone, toluene, n-butyl acetate, ethylbenzene, xylenes and EGEEA were detected in working atmospheres. For these solvents, air concentrations ranged from 0.1 ppm to 69.1 ppm. EGEEA concentrations ranged from 29.2 mg/m3 (5.4 ppm) to 150.1 mg/m3 (27.8 ppm). For biological samples, the average concentrations of EAA were 108.4 mg/g creatinine in pre-shift and 139.4 mg/g creatinine in post-shift samples. Despite the fact that workers wore protective respiratory equipment during paint spraying operations, EEA urinary concentrations are high and suggest that percutaneous uptake is the main route of exposure for EGEEA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Follow-up of multicentric HCC according to the mRECIST criteria: role of 320-Row CT with semi-automatic 3D analysis software for evaluating the response to systemic therapy

    PubMed Central

    TELEGRAFO, M.; DILORENZO, G.; DI GIOVANNI, G.; CORNACCHIA, I.; STABILE IANORA, A.A.; ANGELELLI, G.; MOSCHETTA, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of 320-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) with 3D analysis software in follow up of patients affected by multicentric hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with systemic therapy by using modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Patients and methods 38 patients affected by multicentric HCC underwent MDCT. All exams were performed before and after iodinate contrast material intravenous injection by using a 320-detection row CT device. CT images were analyzed by two radiologists using multi-planar reconstructions (MPR) in order to assess the response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria: complete response (CR), partial response (PR), progressive disease (PD), stable disease (SD). 30 days later, the same two radiologists evaluated target lesion response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria by using 3D analysis software. The difference between the two systems in assessing HCC response to therapy was assessed by the analysis of the variance (Anova Test). Interobserver agreement between the two radiologists by using MPR images and 3D analysis software was calculated by using Cohen’s Kappa test. Results PR occurred in 10/38 cases (26%), PD in 6/38 (16%), SD in 22/38 (58%). Anova Test showed no statistically significant difference between the two systems for assessing target lesion response to therapy (p >0.05). Inter-observer agreement (k) was respectively of 0.62 for MPR images measurements and 0.86 for 3D analysis ones. Conclusions 3D Analysis software provides a semiautomatic system for assessing target lesion response to therapy according to mRE-CIST criteria in patient affected by multifocal HCC treated with systemic therapy. The reliability of 3D analysis software makes it useful in the clinical practice. PMID:28098056

  19. Particle and gaseous emissions from commercial aircraft at each stage of the landing and takeoff cycle.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, M; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2009-01-15

    A novel technique was used to measure emission factors for commonly used commercial aircraft including a range of Boeing and Airbus airframes under real world conditions. Engine exhaust emission factors for particles in terms of particle number and mass (PM2.5), along with those for CO2 and NOx, were measured for over 280 individual aircraft during the various modes of landing/takeoff (LTO) cycle. Results from this study show that particle number, and NOx emission factors are dependent on aircraft engine thrust level. Minimum and maximum emissions factors for particle number, PM2.5, and NOx emissions were found to be in the range of 4.16 x 10(15)-5.42 x 10(16) kg(-1), 0.03-0.72 g.kg(-1), and 3.25-37.94 g.kg(-1), respectively, for all measured airframes and LTO cycle modes. Number size distributions of emitted particles for the naturally diluted aircraft plumes in each mode of LTO cycle showed that particles were predominantly in the range of 4-100 nm in diameter in all cases. In general, size distributions exhibit similar modality during all phases of the LTO cycle. A very distinct nucleation mode was observed in all particle size distributions, except for taxiing and landing of A320 aircraft. Accumulation modes were also observed in all particle size distributions. Analysis of aircraft engine emissions during LTO cycle showed that aircraft thrust level is considerably higher during taxiing than idling suggesting that International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards need to be modified as the thrust levels for taxi and idle are considered to be the same (7% of total thrust) (Environmental Protection, Annex 16, Vol. II, Aircraft Engine Emissions, 2nd ed.; ICAO--International Civil Aviation Organization: Montreal, 1993).

  20. Low-dose triple-rule-out using 320-row-detector volume MDCT--less contrast medium and lower radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Tahir; Rogalla, Patrik; Lembcke, Alexander; Mühler, Matthias R; Hamm, Bernd; Hein, Patrick A

    2011-07-01

    To investigate image quality of triple-rule-out (TRO) computed tomography (CT) using a 320-row-detector CT system with substantially reduced contrast medium volume at 100 kV. Forty-six consecutive patients with noncritical, acute chest pain underwent 320-row-detector CT using a two-step TRO protocol consisting of a non-spiral, non-gated chest CT acquisition (150 mA) followed by a non-spiral, electrocardiography-gated cardiac acquisition (200-500 mA based on body mass index (BMI)). Data were acquired using a biphasic injection protocol with a total iodinated contrast medium volume of 60 ml (370 mg/ml). Vessel attenuation and effective doses were recorded. Image quality was scored independently by two readers. Mean attenuation was 584 ± 114 Hounsfield units (HU) in the ascending aorta, 335 ± 63HU in the aortic arch, 658 ± 136HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 521 ± 97HU and 549 ± 102HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. In all but one patient, attenuation and image quality allowed accurate visualization of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries in a single examination. Ninety-six percent of all coronary artery segments were rated diagnostic. Radiation exposure ranged between 2.0 and 3.3 mSv. Using 320-row-detector CT the investigated low-dose TRO protocol resulted in excellent opacification and image quality with substantial reduction of contrast medium volume compared to recently published TRO protocols.

  1. Pathologically confirmed cryptic vascular malformation as a cause of convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Kobayashi, Shinya; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta; Miyata, Hajime; Suzuki, Akifumi; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    2012-05-01

    We report a rare case of pathologically confirmed cryptic vascular malformation as a cause of primary convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of unknown etiology. A 48-year-old woman presented with sudden severe headache. Localized right convexity SAH was observed on computed tomography (CT) scan, but the origin could not be detected despite extensive workup covering the entire head by using 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR angiography and CT angiography combined with venous-phase imaging with a 320-detector row CT scanner. Subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA) performed 2.5 hours after admission failed to reveal any cause of SAH; however, a right frontoparietal avascular region was suspected to be due to a newly developed intracerebral hematoma. The lesion was simultaneously confirmed by angiographic cone-beam CT imaging. Because she remained neurologically intact, we decided to perform a follow-up study later with medical management. However, she developed left hemiparesis 3 hours after DSA. CT scan demonstrated progression of the hematoma, and her symptoms gradually worsened. Emergent surgical exploration along the SAH superficial to the postcentral sulcus and hematoma evacuation were performed, with favorable functional outcome. Pathological examination confirmed cryptic vascular malformation with several abnormally dilated arterioles within the subarachnoid space surrounded by a thick SAH clot. It is important to consider the possibility of ruptured cryptic vascular malformation as a cause of nontraumatic nonaneurysmal convexity SAH when recurrent hemorrhage occurs despite thorough diagnostic workup, because surgical resection may be the only curative treatment option to eliminate the risk of rebleeding and disabling symptoms.

  2. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigning a single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs. PMID:24593746

  3. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs.

  4. Quantitative measurement of the efficacy of protein removal by cleaning formulations; comparative evaluation of prion-directed cleaning chemistries.

    PubMed

    Ungurs, M; Hesp, J R; Poolman, T; McLuckie, G; O'Brien, S; Murdoch, H; Wells, P; Raven, N D H; Walker, J T; Sutton, J M

    2010-02-01

    The stability of the infectious agent causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has highlighted the importance of cleaning surgical instruments for controlling potential spread of iatrogenic CJD. In this study, thermostable adenylate kinases (tAKs) in test soil were coated on to stainless steel and these surrogate agents used to evaluate the efficacy of a range of cleaning chemistries in a bench-top washer disinfector (btWD), or as a pre-soak either with or without subsequent treatment by btWD. Two tAKs were tested initially for ease of removal, the most persistent being Sulfolobus acidocaldarius-derived tAK which was used for evaluating the cleaning chemistries. Conventional chemistries were generally more effective when used in a btWD than as pre-soaks. Cleaning efficacy improved when pre-soaks were followed by treatment with intermediate performing enzymes, demonstrating greater than additive effect on residual tAK activity. Three of the four prion-directed chemistries reduced residual tAK activity to below the limit of quantification (LoQ) by more than 4.8 log(10); <175pg tAK remaining as a pre-soak alone. A conventional alkaline cleaning product also reduced residual tAK activity to below the LoQ but only when used in a btWD. tAK soil dried on to the device was removed less efficiently than tAK soil still moist on the device, with a 320-fold and 28-fold increase in residual tAK activity for pre-soak and btWD, respectively. The study demonstrated the potential for a tAK indicator to describe the effectiveness of protein removal using different chemistries or treatment processes.

  5. Multiple-pulse pumping for enhanced fluorescence detection and molecular imaging in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ryan M; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Stankowska, Dorota L; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R; Raut, Sangram; Maliwal, Badri P; Shumilov, Dmytro; Doan, Hung; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2014-03-15

    Applications of fluorescence based imaging techniques for detection in cellular and tissue environments are severely limited by autofluorescence of endogenous components of cells, tissue, and the fixatives used in sample processing. To achieve sufficient signal-to-background ratio, a high concentration of the probe needs to be used which is not always feasible. Since typically autofluorescence is in the nanosecond range, long-lived fluorescence probes in combination with time-gated detection can be used for suppression of unwanted autofluorescence. Unfortunately, this requires the sacrifice of the large portion the probe signal in order to sufficiently filter the background. We report a simple and practical approach to achieve a many-fold increase in the intensity of a long-lived probe without increasing the background fluorescence. Using controllable, well separated bursts of closely spaced laser excitation pulses, we are able to highly increase the fluorescence signal of a long-lived marker over the endogenous fluorescent background and scattering, thereby greatly increasing detection sensitivity. Using a commercially available confocal microscopy system equipped with a laser diode and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) detection, we are able to enhance the signal of a long-lived Ruthenium (Ru)-based probe by nearly an order of magnitude. We used 80 MHz bursts of pulses (12.5 ns pulse separation) repeated with a 320 kHz repetition rate as needed to adequately image a dye with a 380 ns lifetime. Just using 10 pulses in the burst increases the Ru signal almost 10-fold without any increase in the background signal.

  6. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  7. Paleoceanographic history of the Lower Bengal Fan during the last glacial cycle - IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Lantzsch, H.; Das, S. K.; Williams, T.; Adhikari, R. R.; Jia, G.; Fox, L. R.; Ge, J.; Manoj, M. C.; Savian, J. F.; Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.; Sharma, B.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 354 drilled a ~320 km long transect of seven sites on the Lower Bengal Fan at 8o N in the Northern Indian Ocean. The sediments cores recovered record a complex relationship between turbiditic and hemipelagic environments. This variability offers a unique opportunity to link our understanding of tectonic and terrestrial processes with climate and oceanography. With the exception the westernmost Site U1454, all sites show a several meter thick, hemipelagic top layer, usually representing Late Quaternary sediment. We present physical, geochemical and stable isotopic properties of this interval to establish a time frame and assess the paleoceanographic development of the region during the last glacial cycle. We sampled Site U1452C-1H continuously for the uppermost 480 cm of hemipelagic sediment in 2-cm increments. Preliminary results indicate the Toba Ash 1 (0.74 ka) is a distinct time marker in all physical properties. Furthermore, wet-bulk density as well as color reflectance b* (the red-green component) and L* (the lightness) show a dominant precession cyclicity. Hence, we are able to provide an insolation-tuned chronology for the last 200 ka (MIS1 - 7) as a preliminary age model. These records agree well with d18O records retrieved from Chinese caves. We will present a preliminary paleoceanographic proxy data to reconstruct sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface salinity (SSS), ice volume, marine biological productivity, nutrient supply, and deep-water circulation. These oceanographic and climate conditions are linked to changes in monsoonal strength and terrestrial input using sedimentary proxies to reconstruct chemical weathering and sediment sources and transport time. This work addresses one of the primary cruise objectives - linking monsoon variability, regional and global climate, and Bay of Bengal sediment deposition.

  8. Low-power, real-time digital video stabilization using the HyperX parallel processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Martin A.; Tong, Lin; Bindloss, Keith; Zhong, Shang; Lim, Steve; Schmid, Benjamin J.; Tidwell, J. D.; Willson, Paul D.

    2011-06-01

    Coherent Logix has implemented a digital video stabilization algorithm for use in soldier systems and small unmanned air / ground vehicles that focuses on significantly reducing the size, weight, and power as compared to current implementations. The stabilization application was implemented on the HyperX architecture using a dataflow programming methodology and the ANSI C programming language. The initial implementation is capable of stabilizing an 800 x 600, 30 fps, full color video stream with a 53ms frame latency using a single 100 DSP core HyperX hx3100TM processor running at less than 3 W power draw. By comparison an Intel Core2 Duo processor running the same base algorithm on a 320x240, 15 fps stream consumes on the order of 18W. The HyperX implementation is an overall 100x improvement in performance (processing bandwidth increase times power improvement) over the GPP based platform. In addition the implementation only requires a minimal number of components to interface directly to the imaging sensor and helmet mounted display or the same computing architecture can be used to generate software defined radio waveforms for communications links. In this application, the global motion due to the camera is measured using a feature based algorithm (11 x 11 Difference of Gaussian filter and Features from Accelerated Segment Test) and model fitting (Random Sample Consensus). Features are matched in consecutive frames and a control system determines the affine transform to apply to the captured frame that will remove or dampen the camera / platform motion on a frame-by-frame basis.

  9. Ultraviolet 320 nm laser excitation for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William; Stickland, Lynn; Koschorreck, Marco

    2017-02-27

    Although multiple lasers and high-dimensional analysis capability are now standard on advanced flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (usually 325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. This is primarily due to their cost, and the small number of applications that require this wavelength. The development of the Brilliant Ultraviolet (BUV fluorochromes, however, has increased the importance of this formerly niche excitation wavelength. Historically, UV excitation was usually provided by water-cooled argon- and krypton-ion lasers. Modern flow cytometers primary rely on diode pumped solid state lasers emitting at 355 nm. While useful for all UV-excited applications, DPSS UV lasers are still large by modern solid state laser standards, and remain very expensive. Smaller and cheaper near UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting at 375 nm make adequate substitutes for 355 nm sources in many situations, but do not work as well with very short wavelength probes like the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. In this study, we evaluate a newly available UV 320 nm laser for flow cytometry. While shorter in wavelength that conventional UV lasers, 320 is close to the 325 nm helium-cadmium wavelength used in the past on early benchtop cytometers. A UV 320 nm laser was found to excite almost all Brilliant Ultraviolet dyes to nearly the same level as 355 nm sources. Both 320 nm and 355 nm sources worked equally well for Hoechst and DyeCycle Violet side population analysis of stem cells in mouse hematopoetic tissue. The shorter wavelength UV source also showed excellent excitation of indo-1, a probe that is not compatible with NUVLD 375 nm sources. In summary, a 320 nm laser module made a suitable substitute for conventional 355 nm sources. This laser technology is available in a smaller form factor than current 355 nm units, making it useful for small cytometers with space constraints. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  10. A low-noise laser-gated imaging system for long-range target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ian M.; Duncan, Stuart S.; Copley, Jeremy W.

    2004-08-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has developed a laser-illuminated, gated imaging system for long range target identification which has generated bright images at ranges in excess of 10km from modest laser energies. The system is based on a short pulsewidth laser and a custom detector for sensing the return pulse. The source is a Nd YAG laser converted by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to 1571nm and producing 20ns pulses at 15Hz. The detector (named SWIFT) is a 320x256 array of HgCdTe photodiodes operating with high avalanche gain to achieve sensitivities as low as 10 photon rms. A custom silicon multiplexer performs the signal injection and temporal gating function, and adds additional electronic gain. Trials show that the current detectors have gate edges equivalent to 1.5m in range and complete extinction of signals outside of the gated range. The detector is encapsulated in an integrated-detector-cooler-assembly and utilises standard productionised thermal imaging electronics to perform non-uniformity correction and grey scale images. Imaging trials using the camera have shown little excess noise, crosstalk or non-uniformity due to the use of avalanching in the HgCdTe photodiodes up to gains of over 100. The images have shown high spatial resolution arising from the use of solid state focal plane array technology. The imagery, collected both in the laboratory and in field trials, has been used to explore the phenomenology unique to laser-illuminated targets and to verify system models.

  11. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  12. SU-E-I-28: Introduction and Investigation of Effective Diameter Ratios as a New Patient Size Metric for Use in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, R; Sinclair, L; Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Bidari, S; Cormack, B; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce and investigate effective diameter ratios as a new patient metric for use in computed tomography protocol selection as a supplement to patient-specific size parameter data. Methods: The metrics of outer effective diameter and inner effective diameter were measured for 7 post-mortem subjects scanned with a standardized chest/abdomen/pelvis (CAP) protocol on a 320-slice MDCT scanner. The outer effective diameter was calculated by obtaining the anterior/posterior and lateral dimensions of the imaged anatomy at the middle of the scan range using Effective Diameter= SQRT(AP height*Lat Width). The inner effective diameter was calculated with the same equation using the AP and Lat dimensions of the anatomy excluding the adipose tissue. The ratio of outer to inner effective diameter was calculated for each subject. A relationship to BMI, weight, and CTDI conversion coefficients was investigated. Results: For the largest subject with BMI of 43.85 kg/m2 and weight of 255 lbs the diameter ratio was calculated as 1.33. For the second largest subject with BMI of 33.5 kg/m2 and weight of 192.4 lbs the diameter ratio was measured as 1.43, indicating a larger percentage of adipose tissue in the second largest subject’s anatomical composition. For the smallest subject at BMI of 17.4 kg/m2 and weight of 86 lbs a similar tissue composition was indicated as a subject with BMI of 24.2 kg/m2 and weight of 136 lbs as they had the same diameter ratios of 1.11. Conclusion: The diameter ratio proves to contain information about anatomical composition that the BMI and weight alone do not. The utility of this metric is still being examined but could prove useful for determining MDCT techniques and for giving a more in depth detail of the composition of a patient’s body habitus.

  13. Systems Genetics Identifies a Novel Regulatory Domain of Amylose Synthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Sabiha; Samson, Irene; de Guzman, Krishna; Alhambra, Crisline Mae; Misra, Gopal

    2017-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the regulation of starch biosynthesis in rice (Oryza sativa) endosperm is crucial in tailoring digestibility without sacrificing grain quality. In this study, significant association peaks on chromosomes 6 and 7 were identified through a genomewide association study (GWAS) of debranched starch structure from grains of a 320 indica rice diversity panel using genotyping data from the high-density rice array. A systems genetics approach that interrelates starch structure data from GWAS to functional pathways from a gene regulatory network identified known genes with high correlation to the proportion of amylose and amylopectin. An SNP in the promoter region of Granule Bound Starch Synthase I was identified along with seven other SNPs to form haplotypes that discriminate samples into different phenotypic ranges of amylose. A GWAS peak on chromosome 7 between LOC_Os07g11020 and LOC_Os07g11520 indexed by a nonsynonymous SNP mutation on exon 5 of a bHLH transcription factor was found to elevate the proportion of amylose at the expense of reduced short-chain amylopectin. Linking starch structure with starch digestibility by determining the kinetics of cooked grain amylolysis of selected haplotypes revealed strong association of starch structure with estimated digestibility kinetics. Combining all results from grain quality genomics, systems genetics, and digestibility phenotyping, we propose target haplotypes for fine-tuning starch structure in rice through marker-assisted breeding that can be used to alter the digestibility of rice grain, thus offering rice consumers a new diet-based intervention to mitigate the impact of nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases. PMID:27881726

  14. Towards a high performing UV-A sensor based on Silicon Carbide and hydrogenated Silicon Nitride absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzillo, M.; Sciuto, A.; Mannino, G.; Renna, L.; Costa, N.; Badalà, P.

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major risk factor for most skin cancers. The sun is our primary natural source of UV radiation. The strength of the sun's ultraviolet radiation is expressed as Solar UV Index (UVI). UV-A (320-400 nm) and UV-B (290-320 nm) rays mostly contribute to UVI. UV-B is typically the most destructive form of UV radiation because it has enough energy to cause photochemical damage to cellular DNA. Also overexposure to UV-A rays, although these are less energetic than UV-B photons, has been associated with toughening of the skin, suppression of the immune system, and cataract formation. The use of preventive measures to decrease sunlight UV radiation absorption is fundamental to reduce acute and irreversible health diseases to skin, eyes and immune system. In this perspective UV sensors able to monitor in a monolithic and compact chip the UV Index and relative UV-A and UV-B components of solar spectrum can play a relevant role for prevention, especially in view of the integration of these detectors in close at hand portable devices. Here we present the preliminary results obtained on our UV-A sensor technology based on the use of hydrogenated Silicon Nitride (SiN:H) thin passivating layers deposited on the surface of thin continuous metal film Ni2Si/4H-SiC Schottky detectors, already used for UV-Index monitoring. The first UV-A detector prototypes exhibit a very low leakage current density of about 0.2 pA/mm2 and a peak responsivity value of 0.027 A/W at 330 nm, both measured at 0V bias.

  15. Low-tube-voltage selection for non-contrast-enhanced CT: Comparison of the radiation dose in pediatric and adult phantoms.

    PubMed

    Shimonobo, Toshiaki; Funama, Yoshinori; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Oda, Seitaro; Kiguchi, Masao; Masuda, Takanori; Sakabe, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We used pediatric and adult anthropomorphic phantoms to compare the radiation dose of low- and standard tube voltage chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans. We also discuss the optimal low tube voltage for non-contrast-enhanced CT. Using a female adult- and three differently-sized pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms we acquired chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced scans on a 320-multidetector CT volume scanner. The tube voltage was set at 80-, 100-, and 120 kVp. The tube current was automatically assigned on the CT scanner in response to the set image noise level. On each phantom and at each tube voltage we measured the surface and center dose using high-sensitivity metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. The mean surface dose of chest and abdominal CT scans in 5-year olds was 4.4 and 5.3 mGy at 80 kVp, 4.5 and 5.4 mGy at 100 kV, and 4.0 and 5.0 mGy at 120 kVp, respectively. These values were similar in our 3-pediatric phantoms (p > 0.05). The mean surface dose in the adult phantom increased from 14.7 to 19.4 mGy for chest- and from 18.7 to 24.8 mGy for abdominal CT as the tube voltage decreased from 120 to 80 kVp (p < 0.01). Compared to adults, the surface and center dose for pediatric patients is almost the same despite a decrease in the tube voltage and the low tube voltage technique can be used for non-contrast-enhanced chest- and abdominal scanning. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Line Pilots' Attitudes about and Experience with Flight Deck Automation: Results of an International Survey and Proposed Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudisill, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    A survey of line pilots' attitudes about flight deck automation was conducted by the Royal Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine (RAF IAM, Farnborough, UK) under the sponsorship of the United Kingdom s Civil Aviation Authority and in cooperation with IATA (the International Air Transport Association). Survey freehand comments given by pilots operating 13 types of commercial transports across five manufacturers (Airbus, Boeing, British Aerospace, Lockheed, and McDonnell-Douglas) and 57 air carriers/organizations were analyzed by NASA. These data provide a "lessons learned" knowledge base which may be used for the definition of guidelines for flight deck automation and its associated crew interface within the High Speed Research Program. The aircraft chosen for analysis represented a progression of levels of automation sophistication and complexity, from "Basic" types (e.g., B727, DC9), through "Transition" types (e.g., A300, Concorde), to two levels of glass cockpits (e.g., Glass 1: e.g., A310; Glass 2: e.g., B747-400). This paper reports the results of analyses of comments from pilots flying commercial transport types having the highest level of automation sophistication (B757/B767, B747-400, and A320). Comments were decomposed into five categories relating to: (1) general observations with regard to flight deck automation; comments concerning the (2) design and (3) crew understanding of automation and the crew interface; (4) crew operations with automation; and (5) personal factors affecting crew/automation interaction. The goal of these analyses is to contribute to the definition of guidelines which may be used during design of future aircraft flight decks.

  17. Clinical indications and utilization of 320-detector row CT in 2500 outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tabibian, Benjamin; Roach, Cayce J; Hanson, Eric H; Wynn, Brad L; Orrison, William W

    2011-06-01

    Clinical indications and utilization patterns for 3963 CT scans on 2500 consecutive patents on a 320-detector row CT in an outpatient setting were retrospectively analyzed and compared with previously reported CT studies. The impact of the latest generation CT technology, including whole organ perfusion, on indications and utilization patterns during the study period was also assessed. The top five requested CT scan types were abdomen/pelvis, chest, head, sinuses, and coronary CT angiography. Indication and utilization rates were similar to prior studies for abdomen/pelvis, non-cardiac chest, and head CT scans. Abdominal pain and headaches were the most frequent indications for abdomen/pelvis and head CTs, respectively. The 7.3% cardiac CT scan utilization rate was not comparable to rates of up to 72% in self-referral outpatient settings. Whole organ volume CT imaging was utilized in 100% of coronary CT angiography and 22.7% of head CTs. The 320-row CT had fewer negative head and body CT findings as compared to prior reports. The availability of new technology, such as whole organ dynamic scans, appears to have influenced CT indications, utilization and finding rates with a decrease in negative brain and body results. Comparisons with previous outpatient CT studies were similar for multiple categories with the exception of cardiac CT utilization, which is heavily influenced by self-referral. Further study of outpatient imaging indications and utilization rates from multiple centers may benefit from a standardized categorization to improve understanding of the disparate outpatient imaging environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Infrared thermography detects febrile and behavioural responses to vaccination of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Cook, N J; Chabot, B; Lui, T; Bench, C J; Schaefer, A L

    2015-02-01

    An automated, non-invasive system for monitoring of thermoregulation has the potential to mitigate swine diseases through earlier detection. Measurement of radiated temperature of groups of animals by infrared thermography (IRT) is an essential component of such a system. This study reports on the feasibility of monitoring the radiated temperature of groups of animals as a biomarker of immune response using vaccination as a model for febrile disease. In Study A, weaned pigs were either treated with an intramuscular vaccine (FarrowSure Gold), a sham injection of 0.9% saline or left as untreated controls. An infrared thermal camera (FLIR A320) was fixed to the ceiling directly above the pen of animals, and recorded infrared images of the treatment groups at 5 min intervals. The effect on temperature of the spatial distribution of pigs within the pen was significant, with higher temperatures recorded when pigs were grouped together into a single cluster. A higher frequency of clustering behaviour was observed in vaccinated animals compared with controls during a period of the afternoon ~4 to 7 h post-vaccination. The daily mean of the maximum image temperature was significantly higher in vaccinated animals compared with control and sham-treated animals. In the vaccination treated group, the 24 h mean of the maximum temperature was significantly higher during the post-vaccination period compared with the 24 h period before vaccination. Increased temperature in the vaccinated animals occurred from ~3 h, peaked at ~10 h, and remained elevated for up to 20 h post-vaccination. In Study B, the effect of prevalence was tested in terms of the difference in maximum temperature between control and vaccination days. A thermal response to vaccination was detected in a pen of 24 to 26 animals when <10% of the animals were vaccinated. The results support the concept of radiated temperature measurements of groups of animals by IRT as a screening tool for febrile diseases in pig

  19. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Receptor Gene Variation as a Proximate Base for Inter- and Intraspecific Behavioral Differences in Bonobos and Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Staes, Nicky; Stevens, Jeroen M. G.; Helsen, Philippe; Hillyer, Mia; Korody, Marisa; Eens, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Recent literature has revealed the importance of variation in neuropeptide receptor gene sequences in the regulation of behavioral phenotypic variation. Here we focus on polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and vasopressin receptor gene 1a (Avpr1a) in chimpanzees and bonobos. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the third intron of OXTR (rs53576 SNP (A/G)) is linked with social behavior, with the risk allele (A) carriers showing reduced levels of empathy and prosociality. Bonobos and chimpanzees differ in these same traits, therefore we hypothesized that these differences might be reflected in variation at the rs53576 position. We sequenced a 320 bp region surrounding rs53576 but found no indications of this SNP in the genus Pan. However, we identified previously unreported SNP variation in the chimpanzee OXTR sequence that differs from both humans and bonobos. Humans and bonobos have previously been shown to have a more similar 5′ promoter region of Avpr1a when compared to chimpanzees, who are polymorphic for the deletion of ∼360 bp in this region (+/− DupB) which includes a microsatellite (RS3). RS3 has been linked with variation in levels of social bonding, potentially explaining part of the interspecies behavioral differences found in bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. To date, results for bonobos have been based on small sample sizes. Our results confirmed that there is no DupB deletion in bonobos with a sample size comprising approximately 90% of the captive founder population, whereas in chimpanzees the deletion of DupB had the highest frequency. Because of the higher frequency of DupB alleles in our bonobo population, we suggest that the presence of this microsatellite may partly reflect documented differences in levels of sociability found in bonobos and chimpanzees. PMID:25405348

  20. Automated continuous quantitative measurement of proximal airways on dynamic ventilation CT: initial experience using an ex vivo porcine lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Moriya, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Kotaro; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Teramoto, Ryuichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of continuous quantitative measurement of the proximal airways, using dynamic ventilation computed tomography (CT) and our research software. Methods A porcine lung that was removed during meat processing was ventilated inside a chest phantom by a negative pressure cylinder (eight times per minute). This chest phantom with imitated respiratory movement was scanned by a 320-row area-detector CT scanner for approximately 9 seconds as dynamic ventilatory scanning. Obtained volume data were reconstructed every 0.35 seconds (total 8.4 seconds with 24 frames) as three-dimensional images and stored in our research software. The software automatically traced a designated airway point in all frames and measured the cross-sectional luminal area and wall area percent (WA%). The cross-sectional luminal area and WA% of the trachea and right main bronchus (RMB) were measured for this study. Two radiologists evaluated the traceability of all measurable airway points of the trachea and RMB using a three-point scale. Results It was judged that the software satisfactorily traced airway points throughout the dynamic ventilation CT (mean score, 2.64 at the trachea and 2.84 at the RMB). From the maximum inspiratory frame to the maximum expiratory frame, the cross-sectional luminal area of the trachea decreased 17.7% and that of the RMB 29.0%, whereas the WA% of the trachea increased 6.6% and that of the RMB 11.1%. Conclusion It is feasible to measure airway dimensions automatically at designated points on dynamic ventilation CT using research software. This technique can be applied to various airway and obstructive diseases. PMID:26445535

  1. Influence of temperature and UVR on photosynthesis and morphology of four species of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Giordanino, M Valeria Fiorda; Strauch, Sebastian M; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2011-04-04

    During the late austral spring of 2009 we carried out experiments (4days of duration) with four cyanobacteria species, Anabaena sp., Nostoc sp., Arthrospira platensis and Microcystis sp., to assess the combined effects of temperature and solar radiation on photosynthesis performance and morphology. Two experimental temperatures (18°C and 23°C, simulating a 5°C increase under a scenario of climate change) and three radiation treatments (by using different filters/materials) were implemented: (i) P (PAR, 400-700nm), (ii) PA (PAR+UV-A, 320-700nm) and, (iii) PAB (PAR+UV-A+UV-B, 280-700nm). In general, samples under the P treatment had less decrease/higher recovery rates of effective photochemical quantum yield (Y) than those receiving UV-A or UV-A+UV-B. The effects of increased temperature were species-specific: At the end of the experiments, it was seen that increased temperature benefited photosynthetic performance of Anabaena sp. and Nostoc sp. but not of Microcystis sp. and A. platensis. Higher temperature was also associated to an increase in the chain area of Anabaena sp., and to bigger trichomes in A. platensis; however, no morphological effects were observed in Microcystis sp. In addition, in Nostoc sp. the increase in temperature counteracted the UVR impact on the reduction of the chain area. How these effects and mechanisms will affect the trophodynamics and production of aquatic ecosystems is still uncertain, but the specificity of the responses suggests that not all cyanobacteria would be equally benefited by temperature increases therefore affecting the balance and interaction among species in the water column. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. TU-G-204-03: Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Measurement Using First Pass Analysis and Maximum Slope Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, L; Ziemer, B; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion measurement using first pass analysis (FPA) and maximum slope models. Methods: A swine animal model was prepared by percutaneous advancement of an angioplasty balloon into the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery to induce varying degrees of stenosis. Maximal hyperaemia was achieved in the LAD with an intracoronary adenosine drip (240 µg/min). Serial microsphere and contrast (370 mg/mL iodine, 30 mL, 5mL/s) injections were made over a range of induced stenoses, and dynamic imaging was performed using a 320-row CT scanner at 100 kVp and 200 mA. The FPA CT perfusion technique was used to make vessel-specific myocardial perfusion measurements. CT perfusion measurements using the FPA and maximum slope models were validated using colored microspheres as the reference gold standard. Results: Perfusion measurements using the FPA technique (P-FPA) showed good correlation with minimal offset when compared to perfusion measurements using microspheres (P- Micro) as the reference standard (P -FPA = 0.96 P-Micro + 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.97, RMSE = 0.19 mL/min/g). In contrast, the maximum slope model technique (P-MS) was shown to underestimate perfusion when compared to microsphere perfusion measurements (P-MS = 0.42 P -Micro −0.48, R{sup 2} = 0.94, RMSE = 3.3 mL/min/g). Conclusion: The results indicate the potential for significant improvements in accuracy of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion measurement using the first pass analysis technique as compared with the standard maximum slope model.

  3. Wide field of view CT and acromioclavicular joint instability: A technical innovation.

    PubMed

    Dyer, David R; Troupis, John M; Kamali Moaveni, Afshin

    2015-06-01

    A 21-year-old female with a traumatic shoulder injury is investigated and managed for symptoms relating to this injury. Pathology at the acromioclavicular joint is detected clinically; however, clinical examination and multiple imaging modalities do not reach a unified diagnosis on the grading of this acromioclavicular joint injury. When management appropriate to that suggested injury grading fail to help the patient's symptoms, further investigation methods were utilised. Wide field of view, dynamic CT (4D CT) is conducted on the patient's affected shoulder using a 320 × 0.5 mm detector multislice CT. Scans were conducted with a static table as the patient completed three movements of the affected shoulder. Capturing multiple data sets per second over a z-axis of 16 cm, measurements of the acromioclavicular joint were made, to show dynamic changes at the joint. Acromioclavicular (AC) joint translations were witnessed in three planes (a previously unrecognised pathology in the grading of acromioclavicular joint injuries). Translation in multiple planes was also not evident on careful clinical examination of this patient. AC joint width, anterior-posterior translation, superior-inferior translation and coracoclavicular width were measured with planar reconstructions while volume-rendered images and dynamic sequences aiding visual understanding of the pathology. Wide field of view dynamic CT (4D CT) is an accurate and quick modality to diagnose complex acromioclavicular joint injury. It provides dynamic information that no other modality can; 4D CT shows future benefits for clinical approach to diagnosis and management of acromioclavicular joint injury, and other musculoskeletal pathologies. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Hyperspectral and gated ICCD imagery for laser irradiated carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Charles D.; Acosta, Roberto A.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2013-02-01

    New optical diagnostics for studying laser ablation and induced combustion for carbon materials are key to monitoring the evolving, spatial distribution of the gas plume. We are developing high speed imaging FTIR and gated ICCD imagery for materials processing, manufacture process control, and high energy laser applications. The results from two projects will be discussed. First, an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a 320 x 256 InSb focal plane array frames at 1.9 kHz with a spatial resolution of 1 mm and spectral resolution of up to 0.25 cm-1. Gas phase plumes above the surface of laser-irradiated black plexiglass, fiberglass and painted thin metals have been spectrally resolved. Molecular emission from CO, CO2, H2O, and hydrocarbons is readily identified. A line-by-line radiative transfer model is used to derive movies for specie concentrations and temperatures. Second, excimer laser pulsed ablation of bulk graphite into low-pressure (0.05 - 1 Torr) argon generates highly ionized, high speed (M>40) plumes. A gated, intensified CCD camera with band pass filtering has been used to generate plume imagery with temporal resolution of 10ns. The Sedov-Taylor shock model characterizes the propagation of the shock front if the dimensionality of the plume is allowed to deviate from ideal spherical expansion. A drag model is more appropriate when the plume approaches extinction (~10 μs) and extends the characterization into the far field. Conversion of laser pulse energy to the shock is efficient.

  5. Physiologic pineal region, choroid plexus, and dural calcifications in the first decade of life.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, M T; Oh, C; Raju, A; Choudhri, A F

    2015-03-01

    Calcifications of the pineal, habenula, choroid plexus, and dura are often physiologic. In the modern CT era with thin-section images and multiplanar reformats, intracranial calcifications have become more conspicuous. We aimed to discover the CT prevalence of pineal region, choroid plexus, and dural calcifications in the first decade of life. Five hundred head CTs from different patients (age range, 0-9 years) encountered during a consecutive 6-month period at a single academic children's hospital were reviewed retrospectively after excluding examinations with artifacts and pineal region masses/hemorrhage. All studies were performed on a 320-detector CT, with 0.5-mm collimation and a 512 × 512 matrix. Five-millimeter reformatted axial, sagittal, and coronal images were analyzed for location and extent of intracranial calcifications. The mean age was 3.5 ± 5.7 years (range, 0-9 years). There were 285 males (57%) and 215 females (43%). Pineal calcifications were present in 5% (n = 25; age range, 3.2-8.9 years; median, 7 years). Habenular calcifications were found in 10% (n = 50; age range, 2.8-8.8 years; median, 7 years). Twelve percent (n = 58) had choroid plexus calcifications, (age range, 0.1-8.8 years). Dural calcifications were rare, present in 1% (n = 6; age range, 2.9-8.7 years). Physiologic intracranial calcifications may be found in the first decade, principally in children older than 5 years. Most epithalamic calcifications are habenular. Pineal and habenular calcifications were never present in children younger than 3 and 2 years, respectively. Choroid plexus calcifications may be present in the very young. Dural calcifications are rare. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Photon-to-digital photodiode imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.

    2001-10-01

    MOSAD©, Multiplexed OverSample Analog to Digital conversion, is a low power on focal plane analog to digital, A/D, process that places an oversample A/D at each pixel site. Two designs for a visible light staring array were developed with this approach. One used a silicon photo diode and the other used a photo gate for detection. The array was designed with a 320 X 240 format with the pixels placed on 16 micron centers. There are a total of 76,800 A/D's on the chip. The device is a monolithic integrated circuit that includes the sensors, A/D's and readout circuitry. A production 1.2 micron CCD/CMOS process was used in it construction. The A/D uses charge well switching at the pixel to convert the accumulated analog signal to digital data. There was negligible impact on the pixel area due to the A/D such that a fill factor of 73% was achieved with front side illumination for both approaches. At 400 samples per second, measured on chip power consumption is under 10 milliwatts. Noise measurements at sample rates from 400 samples per second to 1,600 samples per second were taken for both parts. It was found that the photo gate noise performance was four times better than the photo diode. At a nominal 28 times oversample, the photo diode obtained 8 to 9 bits performance and the photo gate achieved 10 to 11 bits. Nonuniformity variation was below the noise floor. No explanation for the difference in noise performance has yet been determined. This development was sponsored by NASA under a SBIR program.

  7. Visible light imaging sensor with A/D conversion at the pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.

    1999-04-01

    MOSAD, provides a low power on focal pane analog to digital, A/D, process. In this approach, an oversample A/D is placed at each pixel site, with resultant benefits to response linearity and noise performance. An architecture for a visible light imaging sensor using silicon charge well detection was developed for application into video conferencing. There are a total of 76,800 A/D's on the chip. The devise is a monolithic integrated circuit that includes the sensors, A/D's and readout circuitry. A production 1.2 micron CCD/CMOS process was used in it construction. The array was designed with a 320 X 240 format with the pixels placed on 16 micron centers. There was negligible impact on the pixel area due to the A/D such that a fill factor of 67 percent was achieved with front side illumination. On chip power consumption is under 15 milliwatts. Pixels are read in the same manner as accessing the bit locations of a DRAM. As each row of pixels are accessed, they put ones or zeros on the output column that are sensed and passed onto the output buss. The A/D design is based on the patented MOSAD technology, It uses charge well switching at the pixel to convert the accumulated analog signal to digital data. Because of its high noise immunity, no pixel buffer amplifier is required, thus preserving fill factor. Another unique characteristic is the output data format which is directly compatible with Stream Vision, a patented digital display method. This format was adopted to produce a low cost all digital system from camera to display.

  8. Instrument-quality digital camera that transitioned to low-cost high-volume production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.

    2002-12-01

    MOSAD(copyright), Multiplexed OverSample Analog to Digital conversion, is a low power on focal plane analog to digital, A/D, process that places an oversample A/D at each pixel site. Two full custom designs for a visible light staring array were developed with this approach. One design approach uses a silicon photo diode in combination with photo gates at the pixel and the other approach uses an all photo gate sensor for detection. Both arrays were designed with a 320x240 format with the pixels placed on 16 micron centers. The system includes the camera assembly, driver interface assembly, a frame grabber board with integrated decimator and Windows 2000 compatible software for real time image display. The camera includes the sensor, either photo gate or photo diode, mounted on a PC card with support electronics. A custom lens mount attaches the camera to C or CS mount lens. Testing was done with a Tamron 13VM2812 CCTV CS mount lens. Both an RS644 and an RS422 parallel interface card assembly was developed to attach to the frame grabber board. The final iteration cameras were tested at the Amain facility and pictures were taken. At 400 samples per second, measured on chip power consumption is under 10 milliwatts. Noise measurements at sample rates from 400 samples per second to 1,600 samples per second were taken for both parts. The photo diode worked and produced images but it had a sense amplifier problem that prevented adequate noise measurement. At 28 times oversample, the photo gate achieved typical 9 to 11 bits signal to noise with best case measured at 13 bits. Nonuniformity variation was below the noise floor.

  9. HuntIR thermal imagers for reconnaissance and targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Ihle, Tobias; Mauk, Karl-Heinz; Rode, Werner

    2004-08-01

    A new family of light handheld military thermal imagers for reconnaissance and targeting applications was developed based on AIM's IR components like IR detection modules, command and control electronics and image processing units. Three different types of imagers provide solutions for different requirements in identification ranges of targets. The highest performance device makes use of a FPA MCT 384x288 MWIR detector with a motorized double field of view optics. An identification range up to 2400m for the NATO standard target was proven according to the FGAN-FOM TRM3 range model. The device provides a mechanical adaptation to weapon systems and provides target markers for common hand weapons of the German army. A single field of view MCT device for 1000m ranges and an uncooled device on the lower performance end complete the imager family. Electronics for intelligent power management from batteries and display electronics were developed to provide stand alone operation. The modular concept allows the use of the same image processing unit for all devices providing special features for best performance like scene-based non-uniformity correction together with an optical calibration element and dynamic reduction including automatic histogram equalization for optimized scene display and text or graphics overlay. Due to the modular concept the components like the image processing unit are already used and validated in programs like the thermal sight for the self defense gun of the reconnaissance vehicle FENNEK together with a 320x240 LWIR uncooled microbolometer detector or with the MCT 384x288 MWIR detection module in a thermal imager for the German army UAV Luna.

  10. Effects of computing parameters and measurement locations on the estimation of 3D NPS in non-stationary MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Miéville, Frédéric A; Bolard, Gregory; Bulling, Shelley; Gudinchet, François; Bochud, François O; Verdun, François R

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of computing parameters and the location of volumes of interest (VOI) on the calculation of 3D noise power spectrum (NPS) in order to determine an optimal set of computing parameters and propose a robust method for evaluating the noise properties of imaging systems. Noise stationarity in noise volumes acquired with a water phantom on a 128-MDCT and a 320-MDCT scanner were analyzed in the spatial domain in order to define locally stationary VOIs. The influence of the computing parameters in the 3D NPS measurement: the sampling distances bx,y,z and the VOI lengths Lx,y,z, the number of VOIs NVOI and the structured noise were investigated to minimize measurement errors. The effect of the VOI locations on the NPS was also investigated. Results showed that the noise (standard deviation) varies more in the r-direction (phantom radius) than z-direction plane. A 25 × 25 × 40 mm(3) VOI associated with DFOV = 200 mm (Lx,y,z = 64, bx,y = 0.391 mm with 512 × 512 matrix) and a first-order detrending method to reduce structured noise led to an accurate NPS estimation. NPS estimated from off centered small VOIs had a directional dependency contrary to NPS obtained from large VOIs located in the center of the volume or from small VOIs located on a concentric circle. This showed that the VOI size and location play a major role in the determination of NPS when images are not stationary. This study emphasizes the need for consistent measurement methods to assess and compare image quality in CT.

  11. InGaAs focal plane array developments at III-V Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvié, Anne; Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Huet, Odile; Djedidi, Anis; Robo, Jean-Alexandre; Truffer, Jean-Patrick; Bria, Toufiq; Pires, Mauricio; Decobert, Jean; Costard, Eric

    2012-06-01

    SWIR detection band benefits from natural (sun, night glow, thermal radiation) or artificial (eye safe lasers) photons sources combined to low atmospheric absorption and specific contrast compared to visible wavelengths. It gives the opportunity to address a large spectrum of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). InGaAs material appears as a good candidate to satisfy SWIR detection needs. The lattice matching with InP constitutes a double advantage to this material: attractive production capacity and uncooled operation thanks to low dark current level induced by high quality material. For few years, III-VLab has been studying InGaAs imagery, gathering expertise in InGaAs material growth and imaging technology respectively from Alcatel-Lucent and Thales, its two mother companies. This work has lead to put quickly on the market a 320x256 InGaAs module, exhibiting high performances in terms of dark current, uniformity and quantum efficiency. In this paper, we present the last developments achieved in our laboratory, mainly focused on increasing the pixels number to VGA format associated to pixel pitch decrease (15μm) and broadening detection spectrum toward visible wavelengths. Depending on targeted applications, different Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROIC) have been used. Low noise ROIC have been developed by CEA LETI to fit the requirements of low light level imaging whereas logarithmic ROIC designed by NIT allows high dynamic imaging adapted for automotive safety.

  12. Analyzing the performance of the planning system by use of AAPM TG 119 test cases.

    PubMed

    Nithya, L; Raj, N Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar; Pandey, Manish Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to create AAPM TG 119 test plans for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the Monaco planning system. The results were compared with the published studies, and the performance of the Monaco planning system was analyzed. AAPM TG 119 proposed a set of test cases called multi-target, mock prostate, mock head and neck and C-shape to ascertain the overall accuracy of IMRT planning, measurement, and analysis. We used these test cases to investigate the performance of the Monaco planning system for the complex plans. For these test cases, we created IMRT plans with static multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and dynamic MLC by using 7-9 static beams as explained in TG-119. VMAT plans were also created with a 320° arc length and a single or double arc. The planning objectives and dose were set as described in TG 119. The dose prescriptions for multi-target, mock prostate, mock head and neck, and C-shape were taken as 50, 75.6, 50 and 50 Gy, respectively. All plans were compared with the results of TG 119 and the study done by Mynampati et al. Point dose and fluence measurements were done with a CC13 chamber and ArcCHECK phantom, respectively. Gamma analysis was done for the calculated and measured dose. Using the Monaco planning system, we achieved the goals mentioned in AAPM TG-119, and the plans were comparable to those of other studies. A comparison of point dose and fluence showed good results. From these results, we conclude that the performance of the Monaco planning system is good for complex plans.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of rat P-450 2C gene subfamily members by the sexually dimorphic pattern of growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Legraverend, C; Mode, A; Westin, S; Ström, A; Eguchi, H; Zaphiropoulos, P G; Gustafsson, J A

    1992-02-01

    The onset of the sexually dimorphic pattern of GH secretion and increased hepatic GH-binding capacity in rats at puberty is temporally correlated with the developmental induction of three hepatic cytochrome P-450s with steroid hydroxylase activity, P-450 IIC11, P-450 IIC12, and P-450 IIC13, and one cytochrome P-450 with vitamin A hydroxylase activity, P-450 IIC7. In this study we demonstrate that expression of the 2C11, 2C12, and 2C13 genes is modulated by GH at the level of transcriptional initiation both in vivo and in primary cultures of adult hepatocytes. In an effort to define the minimum sequence responsible for the inductive effects of GH, we have analyzed the ability of a 0.7-kilobase fragment isolated from the 5'-flank of the 2C12 gene, including the natural promoter, to drive transcription of a 320-basepair G-less cassette in vitro. We were unable to detect any substantial difference in RNA polymerase-II-dependent transcriptional efficiency toward the 2C12 promoter between liver nuclear extracts from normal and hypophysectomized rats of both sexes. This observation supports the assumption that the sequence information contained between bases -700 and 1 is sufficient to support basal transcription of the 2C12 gene. Sequence information residing 5' or 3' of the 0.7-kilobase 5'-flank or a higher ordered chromatin structure may be necessary for the sex-specific transcriptional activation of the 2C12 gene.

  14. Asymptomatic rectal colonization with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium difficile among residents of a long-term care facility in New York City.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nishant; Labaze, Georges; Kopacz, Joanna; Chwa, Sophie; Platis, Dimitris; Pan, Cynthia X; Russo, Daniel; LaBombardi, Vincent J; Osorio, Giuliana; Pollack, Simcha; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Chen, Liang; Urban, Carl; Segal-Maurer, Sorana

    2016-05-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are at increased risk for colonization and development of infections with multidrug-resistant organisms. This study was undertaken to determine prevalence of asymptomatic rectal colonization with Clostridium difficile (and proportion of 027/NAP1/BI ribotype) or carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in an LTCF population. Active surveillance was performed for C difficile and CRE rectal colonization of 301 residents in a 320-bed (80-bed ventilator unit), hospital-affiliated LTCF with retrospective chart review for patient demographics and potential risk factors. Over 40% of patients had airway ventilation and received enteral feeding. One-third of these patients had prior C difficile-associated infection (CDI). Asymptomatic rectal colonization with C difficile occurred in 58 patients (19.3%, one-half with NAP1+), CRE occurred in 57 patients (18.9%), and both occurred in 17 patients (5.7%). Recent CDI was significantly associated with increased risk of C difficile ± CRE colonization. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed presence of tracheostomy collar to be significant for C difficile colonization, mechanical ventilation to be significant for CRE colonization, and prior CDI to be significant for both C difficile and CRE colonization. The strong association of C difficile or CRE colonization with disruption of normal flora by mechanical ventilation, enteral feeds, and prior CDI carries important implications for infection control intervention in this population. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiative properties of hardwood leaves to ultraviolet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiusheng; Heisler, Gordon M.; Montgomery, Michael E.; Sullivan, Joseph H.; Whereat, Edward B.; Miller, David R.

    1995-06-01

    Spectral reflectance and transmittance of leaves to ultraviolet irradiation were determined under laboratory conditions for seven species of hardwood trees, namely red oak ( Quercus rubra, L), black oak ( Q. velutina, Lamarch), white oak ( Q. alba, L.), sugar maple ( Acer saccharum), Norway maple ( A. plantanoides), hickory ( Carya tomemtosa), sweetgum ( Liquidambar styraciflua), and black oak litter. The experimental system consisted of a solar simulator, an integrating sphere, and a spectroradiometer. Experiments were repeated three to five times for both adaxial and abaxial surfaces of fresh leaves chosen at randomly. The spectral distributions and simple averages of the radiative properties in the wavelength ranges of ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280 320 nm) and ultraviolet-A (UV-A, 320 400 nm) were determined. The spectral distributions of reflectance were similar between adaxial and abaxial surfaces, although the magnitude varied among tree species. Leaf reflectance was very low for the ultraviolet spectrum in general and varied among species and between adaxial and abaxial surfaces. It was generally higher over the UV-A waveband compared to UV-B, and higher on the abaxial than adaxial surface. The broadband reflectance in the UV-A range (over all species) was 5.0 and 3.9% for abaxial and adaxial surface, respectively, compared to 3.5 and 2.8% in UV-B. The transmittance through leaves was extremely small in the UV-B (<0.1%) and nearly zero in the UV-A spectral range. Consequently, the absorptance of ultraviolet radiation by leaves, as determined from the measured reflectance and transmittance, was quite high, being more than 90% for all the combinations of species and wavebands examined. The reported results are useful for studies requiring spectral radiative properties of the examined leaves with respect to ultraviolet irradiation.

  16. Diode laser to treat small oral vascular malformations: A prospective case series study.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Christian; Sacchetto, Luca; Zanette, Gastone; Sivolella, Stefano

    2017-09-14

    The current work examined a consecutive series of patients presenting vascular malformations (VMs) and venous lakes (VLs) of the lip and oral mucosa who were treated with transmucosal diode laser applications and assessed over a 1 year period. Fifty-nine patients (31 males and 28 females) presenting low-flow VMs or VLs of the oral cavity were treated transmucosally using a diode laser (with an 830 nm operating wavelength and 1.6 W output power) with a 320 µm diameter flexible fiber. All the lesions were assessed 7 days, 30 days, and 1 year after the laser treatment, and the lesion reduction percentage was scored on a one to five scale. The patients were also asked to assess their pain perception daily during the 7 days following the treatment using a visual analog scale (VAS). There were no procedure-related intra- or post-operative complications; only modest pain intensity was reported. Thirty days after the treatment, lesion reduction was described as excellent or good in 52 cases; it was fair or poor in 7. Six patients (F:M ratio 2:4) required a second diode laser application. At the 1 year follow-up, volume reduction was complete in 48 out of 59 patients; there were five recurrences (F:M ratio 3:2). No relevant gender-related differences were noted. The use of diode laser application to treat small oral VMs and VLs was associated to shorter operating times and fewer postoperative complications with respect to the scapel surgery approach. More than one session may nevertheless be required if the anomaly is larger than 10 mm. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of solar ultraviolet radiation on growth in the marine macroalga Dictyota dichotoma (Phaeophyceae) at Helgoland and its ecological consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlenkamp, R.; Franklin, L. A.; Lüning, K.

    2001-03-01

    At Helgoland, in the North Sea, growth of the high sublittoral brown macroalga Dictyota dichotoma (Hudson) Lamoroux was examined in October (the time of tetraspore release) in an outdoor tank by exposing 2-day-old germlings to four solar radiation treatments achieved with different filter materials or an additional artificial light source: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 395-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet (UV)-A (320-700 nm), full solar spectrum, or solar spectrum plus artificial UV radiation (UVR). Based on length measurements over a period of 3 weeks, the growth rate in germlings strongly decreased in conditions with UVR compared to PAR: by 14% under PAR+UV-A, by 31% under the full solar spectrum and by 65% with additional UVR. Although growth rates of germlings under UVR were reduced mainly in the first week, the plants did not regain the size of the untreated plants even after 9 weeks. Regardless of the exposure, no defects in morphology or anatomy including the exposed apical meristem were detected, except for a reduction in cell division rates perhaps due to additional cost for photoprotective or repair mechanisms. Depending on the actual position of D. dichotoma plants in the natural habitat, individuals in high positions receive substantial amounts of the more harmful UV-B while those lower down might only receive UV-A during part of the day, thus the effect of UV-B on the growth of D. dichotoma will depend on its position in the field. The effects of tidal variation of the light climate and the implications of our results for the zonation of D. dichotoma are discussed.

  18. Initial simulated FFR investigation using flow measurements in patient-specific 3D printed coronary phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Lauren; Sommer, Kelsey; Izzo, Richard; Podgorsak, Alexander; Wilson, Michael; Said, Zaid; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Rudin, Stephen; Angel, Erin; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific phantoms for device testing or endovascular treatment planning can be 3D printed. We expand the applicability of this approach for cardiovascular disease, in particular, for CT-geometry derived benchtop measurements of Fractional Flow Reserve, the reference standard for determination of significant individual coronary artery atherosclerotic lesions. Materials and Methods: Coronary CT Angiography (CTA) images during a single heartbeat were acquired with a 320x0.5mm detector row scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE). These coronary CTA images were used to create 4 patientspecific cardiovascular models with various grades of stenosis: severe, <75% (n=1); moderate, 50-70% (n=1); and mild, <50% (n=2). DICOM volumetric images were segmented using a 3D workstation (Vitrea, Vital Images); the output was used to generate STL files (using AutoDesk Meshmixer), and further processed to create 3D printable geometries for flow experiments. Multi-material printed models (Stratasys Connex3) were connected to a programmable pulsatile pump, and the pressure was measured proximal and distal to the stenosis using pressure transducers. Compliance chambers were used before and after the model to modulate the pressure wave. A flow sensor was used to ensure flow rates within physiological reported values. Results: 3D model based FFR measurements correlated well with stenosis severity. FFR measurements for each stenosis grade were: 0.8 severe, 0.7 moderate and 0.88 mild. Conclusions: 3D printed models of patient-specific coronary arteries allows for accurate benchtop diagnosis of FFR. This approach can be used as a future diagnostic tool or for testing CT image-based FFR methods.

  19. The relationship between serum hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis, is a heterodimer consisting of HIF-1α and HIF-1β subunits, and is implicated in calcification of cartilage and vasculature. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between serum HIF-1α with coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods The subjects were 405 (262 males, 143 females, age 51.3 ± 6.4 years) asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serum HIF-1α and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured by ELISA. CAC scores were assessed by a 320-slice CT scanner. The subjects were divided into 4 quartiles depending on serum HIF-1α levels. Results Average serum HIF-1α was 184.4 ± 66.7 pg/ml. Among patients with higher CAC scores, HIF-1α levels were also significantly increased (p <0.001). HIF-1α levels positively correlated with CRP, IL-6, UKPDS risk score, HbA1c, FBG, and CACS, but did not correlate with diabetes duration, age, and LDL. According to the multivariate analysis, HIF-1α levels significantly and independently predict the presence of CAC. ROC curve analysis showed that the serum HIF-1α level can predict the extent of CAC, but the specificity was lower than the traditional risk factors UKPDS and HbA1c. Conclusion As a marker of hypoxia, serum HIF-1α level may be an independent risk factor for the presence of CAC. These findings indicate that elevated serum HIF-1α may be involved in vascular calcification in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24564828

  20. Effects of surface grinding conditions on the reciprocating friction and wear behavior of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Zanoria, E.S.

    1997-12-31

    The relationship between two significantly different surface grinding conditions and the reciprocating ball-on-flat friction and wear behavior of a high-quality, structural silicon nitride material (GS-44) was investigated. The slider materials were silicon nitride NBD 200 and 440C stainless steel. Two machining conditions were selected based on extensive machining and flexural strength test data obtained under the auspices of an international, interlaboratory grinding study. The condition categorized as {open_quotes}low strength{close_quote} grinding used a coarse 80 grit wheel and produced low flexure strength due to machining-induced flaws in the surface. The other condition, regarded as {open_quotes}high strength grinding,{close_quotes} utilized a 320 grit wheel and produced a flexural strength nearly 70% greater. Grinding wheel surface speeds were 35 and 47 m/s. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted following the procedure described in a newly-published ASTM standard (G- 133) for linearly-reciprocating wear. Tests were performed in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the grinding marks (lay) using a 25 N load, 5 Hz reciprocating frequency, 10 mm stroke length, and 100 m of sliding at room temperature. The effects of sliding direction relative to the lay were more pronounced for stainless steel than for silicon nitride sliders. The wear of stainless steel was less than the wear of the silicon nitride slider materials because of the formation of transfer particles which covered the sharp edges of the silicon nitride grinding grooves and reduced abrasive contact. The wear of the GS-44 material was much greater for the silicon nitride sliders than for the stainless steel sliders. The causes for the effects of surface-grinding severity and sliding direction on friction and wear of GS-44 and its counterface materials are explained.

  1. Mid-infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometry for high power fiber laser irradiated fiberglass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, R. I.; Gross, K. C.; Perram, G. P.

    2012-03-01

    New measurement techniques to study continuous wave (CW) laser-material interactions are emerging with the ability to monitor the evolving, spatial distribution of the state of the surface-gas boundary layer. A qualitative analysis of gas phase combustion plumes above the surface of laser irradiated fiberglass composites is developed from fast framing hyperspectral imagery observations. An imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) operating in the mid-infrared (MWIR) with high framing rate has recently been developed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) in collaboration with Telops Inc. A 320 x 256 indium antimonide (InSb) focal plane array with spectral response from 1.5 - 5.5 μm is mated with a Michelson interferometer to achieve spectral resolutions as high as 0.25 cm-1. The very fast 16- tap InSb array frames at 1.9 kHz for the full 320 x 256 frame size. The single pixel field of view of 0.3 mrad provides a spatial resolution of 1 mm at the minimum focal distance of 3 m. Painted and unpainted fiberglass composites are irradiated with a 1064 nm CW Nd:YAG laser for 60 s at 100 W in air at atmospheric pressure. Selective emission in the region of 2100 - 3200 cm-1 is readily evident and is used to develop a time-dependent spatial map of both temperature and plume constituents. The time evolution of gas phase combustion products such as CO and CO2 molecules are monitored, with a spectral resolution of 2 cm-1. High-speed imagery is obtained using a low-pass filter for the interferograms, illustrating significant turbulent behavior during laser irradiation. Spatial brightness temperature maps exceed 600 K. Spatial variation in the ratio of [CO2]/[CO] indicates an interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous kinetics.

  2. Power and thermal characterization of a lithium-ion battery pack for hybrid-electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kandler; Wang, Chao-Yang

    A 1D electrochemical, lumped thermal model is used to explore pulse power limitations and thermal behavior of a 6 Ah, 72 cell, 276 V nominal Li-ion hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) battery pack. Depleted/saturated active material Li surface concentrations in the negative/positive electrodes consistently cause end of high-rate (∼25 C) pulse discharge at the 2.7 V cell -1 minimum limit, indicating solid-state diffusion is the limiting mechanism. The 3.9 V cell -1 maximum limit, meant to protect the negative electrode from lithium deposition side reaction during charge, is overly conservative for high-rate (∼15 C) pulse charges initiated from states-of-charge (SOCs) less than 100%. Two-second maximum pulse charge rate from the 50% SOC initial condition can be increased by as much as 50% without risk of lithium deposition. Controlled to minimum/maximum voltage limits, the pack meets partnership for next generation vehicles (PNGV) power assist mode pulse power goals (at operating temperatures >16 °C), but falls short of the available energy goal. In a vehicle simulation, the pack generates heat at a 320 W rate on a US06 driving cycle at 25 °C, with more heat generated at lower temperatures. Less aggressive FUDS and HWFET cycles generate 6-12 times less heat. Contact resistance ohmic heating dominates all other mechanisms, followed by electrolyte phase ohmic heating. Reaction and electronic phase ohmic heats are negligible. A convective heat transfer coefficient of h = 10.1 W m -2 K -1 maintains cell temperature at or below the 52 °C PNGV operating limit under aggressive US06 driving.

  3. Field Determination Of Ground Water Contamination Using Laser Fluorescence And Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Pohlig, Kenneth; Wolf, Lisa; Fordiani, Rita

    1990-02-01

    Experience at over sixteen sites containing over one hundred wells has shown the feasibility of using fiber optic systems for in situ measurement of aromatic ground water contaminants. Aromatic solvents, as well as the benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTEX) fraction of gasoline, have been detected using a prototype field instrument. Well depths have varied from 5 m to 30 m, and limits of detection at 10 m have been in the ppb range. We are routinely using two separate clear tefzel-coated optical fibers bound in a black teflon tubing for in situ sensing of aromatic organic ground water contaminants via laser-induced fluorescence. One fiber, the excitation fiber, carries the 266 nm, 15 nanosecond, laser pulse down to the sensor. The other fiber, used for detection, carries collected fluorescence plus scattered laser light back up to the surface to the detector. Optical crosstalk has been observed to occur along the entire length of the sensor tubing. This may be due to fiber fluorescence. The fiber crosstalk is eliminated by use of a 320 nm cutoff filter in the detector optics. Black tefzel-coated fibers are also commercially available which could eliminate this potential problem. Evaluation of fluorescence emission versus concentration using serial dilution of standards shows that fluorescence lifetimes are important when evaluating different concentrations as well as in evaluation of mixtures. Minimization of signal-to-noise ratios in the detector electronics involves tuning the gate width used in measuring the fluorescent pulse, in order to include the full fluorescent signal returning from the contaminants. Field tests of the modular prototype instrument have been successful in their demonstration of the feasibility of this new technology. Results at a variety of types of sites are presented, showing the flexibility of the modular approach used in the design and operation of this new instrument.

  4. Row orientation effect on UV-B, UV-A and PAR solar irradiation components in vineyards at Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Grifoni, D; Carreras, G; Zipoli, G; Sabatini, F; Dalla Marta, A; Orlandini, S

    2008-11-01

    Besides playing an essential role in plant photosynthesis, solar radiation is also involved in many other important biological processes. In particular, it has been demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation plays a relevant role in grapevines (Vitis vinifera) in the production of certain important chemical compounds directly responsible for yield and wine quality. Moreover, the exposure to UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) can affect plant-disease interaction by influencing the behaviour of both pathogen and host. The main objective of this research was to characterise the solar radiative regime of a vineyard, in terms of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and UV components. In this analysis, solar spectral UV irradiance components, broadband UV (280-400 nm), spectral UV-B and UV-A (320-400 nm), the biological effective UVBE, as well as the PAR (400-700 nm) component, were all considered. The diurnal patterns of these quantities and the UV-B/PAR and UV-B/UV-A ratios were analysed to investigate the effect of row orientation of the vineyard in combination with solar azimuth and elevation angles. The distribution of PAR and UV irradiance at various heights of the vertical sides of the rows was also studied. The results showed that the highest portion of plants received higher levels of daily radiation, especially the UV-B component. Row orientation of the vines had a pronounced effect on the global PAR received by the two sides of the rows and, to a lesser extent, UV-A and UV-B. When only the diffused component was considered, this geometrical effect was greatly attenuated. UV-B/PAR and UV-A/PAR ratios were also affected, with potential consequences on physiological processes. Because of the high diffusive capacity of the UV-B radiation, the UV-B/PAR ratio was significantly lower on the plant portions exposed to full sunlight than on those in the shade.

  5. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification.

  6. Feasibility of low radiation dose retrospectively-gated cardiac CT for functional analysis in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Groves, Daniel W; Olivieri, Laura J; Shanbhag, Sujata M; Bronson, Kathie C; Yu, Jeannie H; Nelson, Evan A; Rollison, Shirley F; Stagliano, Michael S; John, Anitha S; Kuehl, Karen; Chen, Marcus Y

    2017-02-01

    The use of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of adult congenital heart disease patients is limited due to concerns of high radiation doses. The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess whether low radiation dose cardiac CT is feasible to evaluate ventricular systolic function in adults with congenital heart disease. The study group included 30 consecutive patients with significant congenital heart disease who underwent a total of 35 ECG-gated cardiac CT scans utilizing a 320-detector row CT scanner. Each study included a non-contrast scan and subsequent contrast-enhanced retrospectively-gated acquisition. Effective radiation dose was estimated by multiplying the dose length product by a k-factor of 0.014mSv/mGycm. The mean age of the patients was 34.4±8.9years, 60% were men, and mean body mass index was 24.2±4.3kg/m(2). A majority of patients (n=28, 93.3%) had contraindications to cardiac MRI. A tube potential of 80kV was used in 27 (77.1%) of the contrast-enhanced scans. The mean signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were 11.5±3.9 and 10.3±3.7, respectively. The median radiation dose for non-contrast and contrast-enhanced images were 0.1mSv (0.07-0.2mSv) and 0.94mSv (0.5-2.1mSv), respectively. All 35 CT scans were successfully analyzed for ventricular systolic function. A low radiation contrast-enhanced, retrospectively-gated cardiac CT with a median radiation dose of less than 1mSv was successful in evaluating ventricular systolic function in 30 consecutive adult congenital heart disease patients who underwent a total of 35 scans. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. X-ray diffraction in temporally and spatially resolved biomolecular science.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, John R; Brink, Alice; Kaenket, Surasak; Starkey, Victoria Laurina; Tanley, Simon W M

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved Laue protein crystallography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) opened up the field of sub-nanosecond protein crystal structure analyses. There are a limited number of such time-resolved studies in the literature. Why is this? The X-ray laser now gives us femtosecond (fs) duration pulses, typically 10 fs up to ∼50 fs. Their use is attractive for the fastest time-resolved protein crystallography studies. It has been proposed that single molecules could even be studied with the advantage of being able to measure X-ray diffraction from a 'crystal lattice free' single molecule, with or without temporal resolved structural changes. This is altogether very challenging R&D. So as to assist this effort we have undertaken studies of metal clusters that bind to proteins, both 'fresh' and after repeated X-ray irradiation to assess their X-ray-photo-dynamics, namely Ta6Br12, K2PtI6 and K2PtBr6 bound to a test protein, hen egg white lysozyme. These metal complexes have the major advantage of being very recognisable shapes (pseudo spherical or octahedral) and thereby offer a start to (probably very difficult) single molecule electron density map interpretations, both static and dynamic. A further approach is to investigate the X-ray laser beam diffraction strength of a well scattering nano-cluster; an example from nature being the iron containing ferritin. Electron crystallography and single particle electron microscopy imaging offers alternatives to X-ray structural studies; our structural studies of crustacyanin, a 320 kDa protein carotenoid complex, can be extended either by electron based techniques or with the X-ray laser representing a fascinating range of options. General outlook remarks concerning X-ray, electron and neutron macromolecular crystallography as well as 'NMR crystallography' conclude the article.

  8. [Novel method of noise power spectrum measurement for computed tomography images with adaptive iterative reconstruction method].

    PubMed

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Hara, Takanori; Terakawa, Shoichi; Yokomachi, Kazushi; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Ishifuro, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive iterative reconstruction techniques (IRs) can decrease image noise in computed tomography (CT) and are expected to contribute to reduction of the radiation dose. To evaluate the performance of IRs, the conventional two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) is widely used. However, when an IR provides an NPS value drop at all spatial frequency (which is similar to NPS changes by dose increase), the conventional method cannot evaluate the correct noise property because the conventional method does not correspond to the volume data natures of CT images. The purpose of our study was to develop a new method for NPS measurements that can be adapted to IRs. Our method utilized thick multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images. The thick images are generally made by averaging CT volume data in a direction perpendicular to a MPR plane (e.g. z-direction for axial MPR plane). By using this averaging technique as a cutter for 3D-NPS, we can obtain adequate 2D-extracted NPS (eNPS) from 3D NPS. We applied this method to IR images generated with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR-3D, Toshiba) to investigate the validity of our method. A water phantom with 24 cm-diameters was scanned at 120 kV and 200 mAs with a 320-row CT (Acquilion One, Toshiba). From the results of study, the adequate thickness of MPR images for eNPS was more than 25.0 mm. Our new NPS measurement method utilizing thick MPR images was accurate and effective for evaluating noise reduction effects of IRs.

  9. Influence of the adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D algorithm on the detectability of low-contrast lesions and radiation dose repeatability in abdominal computed tomography: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Hur, Bo Yun; Baek, Jeehyun; Shim, Hackjoon; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the influence of the adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) algorithm on the detectability of low-contrast focal liver lesions (FLLs) and the radiation dose repeatability of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) in abdominal CT scans using anthropomorphic phantoms. Three different sizes of anthropomorphic phantoms, each with 4 low-contrast FLLs, were scanned on a 320-channel CT scanner using the ATCM technique and AIDR 3D, at different radiation doses: full-dose, half-dose, and quarter-dose. Scans were repeated three times and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR 3D. Radiation dose repeatability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Image noise, quality, and lesion conspicuity were assessed by four reviewers and the number of invisible FLLs was compared among different radiation doses and reconstruction methods. ICCs of radiation dose among the three CT scans were excellent in all phantoms (0.99). Image noise, quality, and lesion conspicuity in the half-dose group were comparable with full-dose FBP after applying AIDR 3D in all phantoms. In small phantoms, the half-dose group reconstructed with AIDR 3D showed similar sensitivity in visualizing low-contrast FLLs compared to full-dose FBP (P = 0.77-0.84). In medium and large phantoms, AIDR 3D reduced the number of missing low-contrast FLLs [3.1% (9/288), 11.5% (33/288), respectively], compared to FBP [10.4% (30/288), 21.9% (63/288), respectively] in the full-dose group. By applying AIDR 3D, half-dose CT scans may be achievable in small-sized patients without hampering diagnostic performance, while it may improve diagnostic performance in medium- and large-sized patients without increasing the radiation dose.

  10. Defining acute ischemic stroke tissue pathophysiology with whole brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bivard, A; Levi, C; Krishnamurthy, V; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Salazar, P; Jackson, B; Davis, S; Parsons, M

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and validate whole brain perfusion computed tomography (CTP) thresholds for ischemic core and salvageable penumbra in acute stroke patients and develop a probability based model to increase the accuracy of tissue pathophysiology measurements. One hundred and eighty-three patients underwent multimodal stroke CT using a 320-slice scanner within 6hours of acute stroke onset, followed by 24hour MRI that included diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic susceptibility weighted perfusion imaging (PWI). Coregistered acute CTP and 24hour DWI was used to identify the optimum single perfusion parameter thresholds to define penumbra (in patients without reperfusion), and ischemic core (in patients with reperfusion), using a pixel based receiver operator curve analysis. Then, these results were used to develop a sigma curve fitted probability based model incorporating multiple perfusion parameter thresholds. For single perfusion thresholds, a time to peak (TTP) of +5seconds best defined the penumbra (area under the curve, AUC 0.79 CI 0.74-0.83) while a cerebral blood flow (CBF) of < 50% best defined the acute ischemic core (AUC 0.73, CI 0.69-0.77). The probability model was more accurate at detecting the ischemic core (AUC 0.80 SD 0.75-0.83) and penumbra (0.85 SD 0.83-0.87) and was significantly closer in volume to the corresponding reference DWI (P=0.031). Whole brain CTP can accurately identify penumbra and ischemic core using similar thresholds to previously validated 16 or 64 slice CTP. Additionally, a novel probability based model was closer to defining the ischemic core and penumbra than single thresholds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Iterative reconstruction and individualized automatic tube current selection reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in 320-multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Williams, M C; Weir, N W; Mirsadraee, S; Millar, F; Baird, A; Minns, F; Uren, N G; McKillop, G; Bull, R K; van Beek, E J R; Reid, J H; Newby, D E

    2013-11-01

    To assess the effect of two iterative reconstruction algorithms (AIDR and AIDR3D) and individualized automatic tube current selection on radiation dose and image quality in computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). In a single-centre cohort study, 942 patients underwent electrocardiogram-gated CTCA using a 320-multidetector CT system. Images from group 1 (n = 228) were reconstructed with a filtered back projection algorithm (Quantum Denoising Software, QDS+). Iterative reconstruction was used for group 2 (AIDR, n = 379) and group 3 (AIDR3D, n = 335). Tube current was selected based on body mass index (BMI) for groups 1 and 2, and selected automatically based on scout image attenuation for group 3. Subjective image quality was graded on a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 4 = non-diagnostic). There were no differences in age (p = 0.975), body mass index (p = 0.435), or heart rate (p = 0.746) between the groups. Image quality improved with iterative reconstruction and automatic tube current selection [1.3 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.2-1.4), 1.2 (1.1-1.2) and 1.1 (1-1.2) respectively; p < 0.001] and radiation dose decreased [274 (260-290), 242 (230-253) and 168 (156-180) mGy cm, respectively; p < 0.001]. The application of the latest iterative reconstruction algorithm and individualized automatic tube current selection can substantially reduce radiation dose whilst improving image quality in CTCA. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Uplift and a possible moho offset across the Dead Sea transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, U. S.; Schoenberg, N.; Kovach, R. L.; Ben-Avraham, Z.

    1990-08-01

    The East Africa rifts and the Red Sea spreading center are characterized by uplifted shoulders and sunken median valleys. The Dead Sea transform, on the northern extension of the Arabian-African plate boundary, has a similar morphological character despite its well-documented strike-slip motion. To understand the "rift" morphology and the crustal structure beneath the transform we compiled a 320 km long gravity and topography profile perpendicular to the Dead Sea transform. The gravity field and the topography in the region surrounding the profile are generally parallel to the trend of the Dead Sea transform, justifying the two-dimensional approximation of the analysis. The gravity profile was modeled using constraints from seismic refraction, borehole and surface geology data. The observed gravity anomaly can be explained by the juxtaposition of two different sedimentary and crustal sections which have been offset by a 105 km left-lateral displacement across the transform boundary, suggesting a step in the depth to Moho. The existence of a significant density anomaly under the median valley is not required by the model. The current elevation of the transform shoulders appears not to be compensated locally. Assuming a state of local isostasy prior to the development of the transform, the magnitude of the uplift in the vicinity of the profile is estimated at 700-900 m, with a half width of 100-125 km. This topography (uplift) can be fitted equally well by models which assume either dynamic support or regional compensation. It is suggested that if the source of the uplift is thermal, it is located within the upper mantle, since there is no requirement for a shallow density anomaly under the rift itself or in the crust nearby.

  13. microRNA-320/RUNX2 axis regulates adipocytic differentiation of human mesenchymal (skeletal) stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamam, D; Ali, D; Vishnubalaji, R; Hamam, R; Al-Nbaheen, M; Chen, L; Kassem, M; Aldahmash, A; Alajez, N M

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms promoting lineage-specific commitment of human mesenchymal (skeletal or stromal) stem cells (hMSCs) into adipocytes (ADs) are not fully understood. Thus, we performed global microRNA (miRNA) and gene expression profiling during adipocytic differentiation of hMSC, and utilized bioinformatics as well as functional and biochemical assays, and identified several novel miRNAs differentially expressed during adipogenesis. Among these, miR-320 family (miR-320a, 320b, 320c, 320d and 320e) were ~2.2–3.0-fold upregulated. Overexpression of miR-320c in hMSC enhanced adipocytic differentiation and accelerated formation of mature ADs in ex vivo cultures. Integrated analysis of bioinformatics and global gene expression profiling in miR-320c overexpressing cells and during adipocytic differentiation of hMSC identified several biologically relevant gene targets for miR-320c including RUNX2, MIB1 (mindbomb E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1), PAX6 (paired box 6), YWHAH and ZWILCH. siRNA-mediated silencing of those genes enhanced adipocytic differentiation of hMSC, thus corroborating an important role for those genes in miR-320c-mediated adipogenesis. Concordant with that, lentiviral-mediated stable expression of miR-320c at physiological levels (~1.5-fold) promoted adipocytic and suppressed osteogenic differentiation of hMSC. Luciferase assay validated RUNX2 (Runt-related transcription factor 2) as a bona fide target for miR-320 family. Therefore, our data suggest miR-320 family as possible molecular switch promoting adipocytic differentiation of hMSC. Targeting miR-320 may have therapeutic potential in vivo through regulation of bone marrow adipogenesis. PMID:25356868

  14. A third distinct tumor necrosis factor receptor of orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Loparev, Vladimir N.; Parsons, Joseph M.; Knight, Janice C.; Panus, Joanne Fanelli; Ray, Caroline A.; Buller, R. Mark L.; Pickup, David J.; Esposito, Joseph J.

    1998-01-01

    Cowpox virus Brighton red strain (CPV) contains a gene, crmD, which encodes a 320-aa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) of 44% and 22% identity, respectively, to the CPV TNFR-like proteins, cytokine response modifiers (crm) CrmB and CrmC. The crmD gene was interrupted in three other cowpox strains examined and absent in various other orthopoxviruses; however, four strains of ectromelia virus (ECT) examined contained an intact crmD (97% identity to CPV crmD) and lacked cognates of crmB and crmC. The protein, CrmD, contains a transport signal; a 151-aa cysteine-rich region with 21 cysteines that align with human TNFRII ligand-binding region cysteines; and C-terminal region sequences that are highly diverged from cellular TNFR C-terminal region sequences involved in signal transduction. Bacterial maltose-binding proteins containing the CPV or ECT CrmD cysteine-rich region bound TNF and lymphotoxin-α (LTα) and blocked their in vitro cytolytic activity. Secreted viral CrmD bound TNF and LTα and was detectable after the early stage of replication, using nonreducing conditions, as 60- to 70-kDa predominant and 90- to 250-kDa minor disulfide-linked complexes that were able to be reduced to a 46-kDa form and deglycosylated to a 38-kDa protein. Cells infected with CPV produced extremely low amounts of CrmD compared with ECT. Possessing up to three TNFRs, including CrmD, which is secreted as disulfide-linked complexes in varied amounts by CPV and ECT, likely enhances the dynamics of the immune modulating mechanisms of orthopoxviruses. PMID:9520445

  15. Neogene record of Himalayan exhumation from detrital Apatite Fission-Track thermochronology, Middle Bengal Fan (IODP Expedition 354)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, H.; Bernet, M.; van Der Beek, P.; France-Lanord, C.; Spiess, V.; Schwenk, T.; Klaus, A.

    2016-12-01

    The IODP 354 expedition (February-March 2015) focused on the middle part of the Bengal Fan (8°N). Seven sites were drilled along a 320 km-long transect and provided good recovery and excellent data to study the evolution of both the Himalayan orogen and the Asian monsoon. Neogene sediments consist of an alternation of rapidly deposited, silty to muddy turbidites (sedimentation rate 10-100 cm/kyr) forming levees of channels, intercalated with minor slowly deposited hemipelagic clays (sedimentation rate 1-2 cm/kyr), which may be found over the entire investigated area and permit good time correlations. Thick interlevee sand sheet units also occur between channel levees. The easternmost drilling site is located close to the Ninety-east Ridge, which permitted to recover the oldest fan deposits (1200 mbsf). Therefore, the new drillcores will allow the record of Himalayan exhumation to be extended to at least to the Late Oligocene, which will greatly increase our knowledge of the early development of the range. Apatite of good quality has been found in turbiditic sands and silts. Their analysis will reveal variations in exhumation rates, linked to major tectonic pulses and potentially also climatic variations. Moreover, since in-situ apatite fission-track age in the Himalaya are as young as a few Ma, these data may detect short-term variations in exhumation rates at 1-2 Ma temporal resolution. Our first results show a wide range of ages up to 50-60 Ma. Two to three main populations may be distinguished with in particular an important (30% to 75% of grains) young age peak with very short (<1 My) lag-time. We discuss the potential source of this major and apparently persistent population.

  16. Shallow seismic study of the geothermal areas in the Gülbahçe Bay and İzmir Gulf (Aegean Sea, Western Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, Zehra; Ocakoğlu, Neslihan

    2016-12-01

    The two seismic units, i.e., the basement and the basin sediments are interpreted as Miocene and Plio-Quaternary deposits, respectively. The basin sediments of approximately 255 m thickness are risen and compressed through the active strike-slip faults, GF1-GF3 extending in N-S direction towards the outer Gülbahçe Bay. These compressed sediments are interpreted as upwelling zones with weak reflection character and internal frequency attenuation. The most significant one is marked as a possible mud diaper zone with a 320 m width and the approximately 500 m. A synthetic model of the field data gathered from the diaper indicates that the top of the diapir is characterised by a strong positive reflection character while the internal diaper is represented by polarity reversals and weak reflections due to a velocity decrease with depth. Moreover, phase changes are observed at the border of the diapiric structure. A relatively thicker basin sediment unit of approximately 700 m was observed on the pro-delta sediments of the Gediz River and the sediments below in the İzmir Gulf. The active strike-slip faults, İF1-İF5 deform the basement and basin deposits. Moreover, two active normal faults, İF6 and İF7 are marked from inner to outer part of the gulf. The seismic attribute sections indicate weak reflection zones and frequency attenuation particularly both inside the pro-delta sediments and the sediments below. Observations suggest to us the existence of possible fluid and/or gas discharges and saturations in the Gülbahçe Bay and İzmir Gulf.

  17. Identification of the rate-limiting step of the peroxygenase reactions catalyzed by the thermophilic cytochrome P450 from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Shohei; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Yohda, Masafumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 from the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 (P450st) is a thermophilic cytochrome P450 that shows high tolerance of harsh conditions and is capable of catalyzing some peroxygenase reactions. Here, we investigated the pH dependence of the peroxygenase reactions catalyzed by wild-type P450st and a mutant in which the residues located close to the proximal heme ligand are mutated. Both hydrogen peroxide-driven ethylbenzene hydroxylation and styrene epoxidation by wild-type P450st were found to be activated in weak acidic and weak basic solutions. Under these conditions, the Michaelis constant for hydrogen peroxide (KmH2O2 ) was decreased. The turnover rate (kcat ) of ethylbenzene hydroxylation was increased and followed an S-shaped curve, with an increase in the pH value. The apparent acid dissociation constant (pKa (app) ) of the kcat was 7.0, which suggests that the rate-limiting step of this reaction is deprotonation of the Fe(III) -H2 O2 complex. By introducing a double mutation around the proximal heme ligand, the peroxygenase activity was increased over a wide pH range, and was dramatically increased at pH 5. The spectroscopic properties of this F310A/A320Q mutant indicated that the Lewis acidity of the heme was increased by this mutation. Kinetic investigations showed that the increase in the Lewis acidity of the heme facilitates the reaction rate of the rate-limiting step of peroxygenase reactions and decreases the KmH2O2 value. Differences in the pH dependence of the kcat value between wild-type P450st and the mutant suggest that the rate-limiting step switches to protonation of the ferric-hydroperoxo species (compound 0) under alkaline conditions. © 2014 FEBS.

  18. TU-G-204-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Measurement and Its Comparison to Fractional Flow Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Groves, E; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a first pass analysis (FPA) technique for CT perfusion measurement in a swine animal and its validation using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as a reference standard. Methods: Swine were placed under anesthesia and relevant physiologic parameters were continuously recorded. Intra-coronary adenosine was administered to induce maximum hyperemia. A pressure wire was advanced distal to the first diagonal branch of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery for FFR measurements and a balloon dilation catheter was inserted over the pressure wire into the proximal LAD to create varying levels of stenosis. Images were acquired with a 320-row wide volume CT scanner. Three main coronary perfusion beds were delineated in the myocardium using arteries extracted from CT angiography images using a minimum energy hypothesis. The integrated density in the perfusion bed was used to calculate perfusion using the FPA technique. The perfusion in the LAD bed over a range of stenosis severity was measured. The measured fractional perfusion was compared to FFR and linear regression was performed. Results: The measured fractional perfusion using the FPA technique (P-FPA) and FFR were related as P-FPA = 1.06FFR – 0.06 (r{sup 2} = 0.86). The perfusion measurements were calculated with only three to five total CT volume scans, which drastically reduces the radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques requiring 15–20 volume scans. Conclusion: The measured perfusion using the first pass analysis technique showed good correlation with FFR measurements as a reference standard. The technique for perfusion measurement can potentially make a substantial reduction in radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques.

  19. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  20. Very Low Intravenous Contrast Volume Protocol for Computed Tomography Angiography Providing Comprehensive Cardiac and Vascular Assessment Prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulerwitz, Todd C.; Khalique, Omar K.; Nazif, Tamim N.; Rozenshtein, Anna; Pearson, Gregory D.N.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Vahl, Torsten P.; Kodali, Susheel K.; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B.; D'Souza, Belinda; Po, Ming Jack; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a lifesaving procedure for many patients high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high in this population, and thus a very low contrast volume (VLCV) computed tomography angiography (CTA) protocol providing comprehensive cardiac and vascular imaging would be valuable. Methods 52 patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve disease, undergoing pre-TAVR CTA assessment from 2013-4 at Columbia University Medical Center were studied, including all 26 patients with CKD (eGFR<30mL/min) who underwent a novel VLCV protocol (20mL of iohexol at 2.5mL/s), and 26 standard-contrast-volume (SCV) protocol patients. Using a 320-slice volumetric scanner, the protocol included ECG-gated volume scanning of the aortic root followed by medium-pitch helical vascular scanning through the femoral arteries. Two experienced cardiologists performed aortic annulus and root measurements. Vascular image quality was assessed by two radiologists using a 4-point scale. Results VLCV patients had mean(±SD) age 86±6.5, BMI 23.9±3.4 kg/m2 with 54% men; SCV patients age 83±8.8, BMI 28.7±5.3 kg/m2, 65% men. There was excellent intra- and inter-observer agreement for annular and root measurements, and excellent agreement with 3D-transesophageal echocardiographic measurements. Both radiologists found diagnostic-quality vascular imaging in 96% of VLCV and 100% of SCV cases, with excellent inter-observer agreement. Conclusions This study is the first of its kind to report the feasibility and reproducibility of measurements for a VLCV protocol for comprehensive pre-TAVR CTA. There was excellent agreement of cardiac measurements and almost all studies were diagnostic quality for vascular access assessment. PMID:27061253

  1. Uncooled SWIR InGaAs/GaAsSb type-II quantum well focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, H.; Miura, K.; Mori, H.; Nagai, Y.; Iguchi, Y.; Kawamura, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Low dark current photodiodes (PDs) in the short wavelength infrared (SWIR) upto 2.5μm region, are expected for many applications. HgCdTe (MCT) is predominantly used for infrared imaging applications. However, because of high dark current, MCT device requires a refrigerator such as stirling cooler, which increases power consumption, size and cost of the sensing system. Recently, InGaAs/GaAsSb type II quantum well structures were considered as attractive material system for realizing low dark current PDs owing to lattice-matching to InP substrate. Planar type PIN-PDs were successfully fabricated. The absorption layer with 250 pair-InGaAs(5nm)/GaAsSb(5nm) quantum well structures was grown on S-doped (100) InP substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy method. InP and InGaAs were used for cap layer and buffer layer, respectively. The p-n junctions were formed in the absorption layer by the selective diffusion of zinc. Diameter of light-receiving region was 140μm. Low dark current was obtained by improving GaAsSb crystalline quality. Dark current density was 0.92mA/cm2 which was smaller than that of a conventional MCT. Based on the same process as the discrete device, a 320x256 planar type focal plane array was also fabricated. Each PD has 15μm diameter and 30μm pitch and it was bonded to read-out IC by using indium bump flip chip process. Finally, we have successfully demonstrated the 320 x256 SWIR image at room temperature. This result means that planer type PD array with the type II InGaAs/GaAsSb quantum well structure is a promising candidate for uncooled applications.

  2. Design of a mid-wavelength infrared dual field of view zoom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jing; Li, Gang; Jiang, Kai; Liu, Kai; Yan, Peipei; Shan, Qiusha

    2016-10-01

    In order to effectively improve the target detection and recognition ability of IR imagers, based on a 320×256 cooled staring focal plane array(FPA) detector, pixel size 30μm×30μm, a mid-wavelength infrared dual field of view zoom system was designed. In this paper, the working wavelength is 3μm~5μm, the temperature range is -40°C +50°C, this system can realize 200mm and 400mm dual focal length, the F-number is 2, the full field of view of short focal length is 3.44° and long focal length is 1.72° respectively, satisfy 100% cold shield efficiency. A re-imaging refractive system was adopted in this designed optical system consists of main optics and projection components. First of all, the structural selection and the initial parameter calculation were introduced in detail. Secondly, on the basis of variety of the distance and temperature, a focusing lens was presented in this system to adjust to produce a clear image. Last but not the least, to improve image quality and environment adaptability, the analysis of temperature change and narcissus effect were described particularly. The design results prove that at the spatial frequency of 17 lp/mm, the MTF of the optical system is greater than 0.5(the axis MTF of the optical is greater than 0.6), the system can offer a high resolution and excellent images in whole range of the focal length, and it has the advantages of good adaptability, compact structure, high optical transmission and small size.

  3. Toward a single-chip TECless/NUCless InGaAs SWIR camera with 120-dB intrinsic operation dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y.; Arion, B.; Zhu, Y. M.; Potet, P.; Huet, Odile; Reverchon, Jean Luc; Truffer, Jean Patrick; Robo, Jean Alexandre; Costard, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a single-chip InGaAs SWIR camera with more than 120dB instant operational dynamic range with an innovative CMOS ROIC technology, so called MAGIC, invented and patented by New Imaging Technologies. A 320x256- pixel InGaAs 25μm pitch photodiode array, designed and fabricated by III-Vlab/Thales Research & Technology(TRT), has been hybridized on this new generation CMOS ROIC. With NIT's MAGIC technology, the sensor's output follows a precise logarithmic law in function of incoming photon flux and gives instant operational dynamic range (DR) better than 120 dB. The ROIC incorporates the entire video signal processing function including a CCIR TV encoder, so a complete SWIR InGaAs camera with standard video output has been realized on a single 30x30 mm2 PCB board with ¼ W power consumption. Neither TEC nor NUC is needed from room temperature operation. The camera can be switched on and off instantly, ideal for all the portable battery operated SWIR band observation applications. The measured RMS noise and FPN noise on the prototype sensor in dark conditions are 0.4 mV and 0.27 mV respectively. The signal excursion from pixel is about 300mV over the 120 dB dynamic range. The FPN remains almost constant over the whole operation dynamic range. The NEI has been measured to be 3,71E+09 ph/s/cm2 with 92 equivalent noise photons at 25Hz frame rate, better than the same architecture of InGaAs photodiode array hybridized on an Indigo ROIC ISC9809 with a pitch of 30 μm for which a readout noise of 120 electrons is observed.

  4. Row orientation effect on UV-B, UV-A and PAR solar irradiation components in vineyards at Tuscany, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoni, D.; Carreras, G.; Zipoli, G.; Sabatini, F.; Dalla Marta, A.; Orlandini, S.

    2008-11-01

    Besides playing an essential role in plant photosynthesis, solar radiation is also involved in many other important biological processes. In particular, it has been demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation plays a relevant role in grapevines ( Vitis vinifera) in the production of certain important chemical compounds directly responsible for yield and wine quality. Moreover, the exposure to UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) can affect plant-disease interaction by influencing the behaviour of both pathogen and host. The main objective of this research was to characterise the solar radiative regime of a vineyard, in terms of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and UV components. In this analysis, solar spectral UV irradiance components, broadband UV (280-400 nm), spectral UV-B and UV-A (320-400 nm), the biological effective UVBE, as well as the PAR (400-700 nm) component, were all considered. The diurnal patterns of these quantities and the UV-B/PAR and UV-B/UV-A ratios were analysed to investigate the effect of row orientation of the vineyard in combination with solar azimuth and elevation angles. The distribution of PAR and UV irradiance at various heights of the vertical sides of the rows was also studied. The results showed that the highest portion of plants received higher levels of daily radiation, especially the UV-B component. Row orientation of the vines had a pronounced effect on the global PAR received by the two sides of the rows and, to a lesser extent, UV-A and UV-B. When only the diffused component was considered, this geometrical effect was greatly attenuated. UV-B/PAR and UV-A/PAR ratios were also affected, with potential consequences on physiological processes. Because of the high diffusive capacity of the UV-B radiation, the UV-B/PAR ratio was significantly lower on the plant portions exposed to full sunlight than on those in the shade.

  5. The bactericidal effect of Ho:YAG laser irradiation within contaminated root dentinal samples.

    PubMed

    Gouw-Soares, S; Gutknecht, N; Conrads, G; Lampert, F; Matson, E; Eduardo, C P

    2000-04-01

    This in vitro study investigates the bactericidal effect of pulsed Ho:YAG laser irradiation in the depth of contaminated dentin specimens. Previous studies have shown the effectiveness of laser irradiation in bacterial reduction of infected root canal. Root dentin of bovine teeth were sliced longitudinally in 180 samples of 100 microm, 300 microm, and 500 microm thickness, sterilized, dried, and inoculated on one side, with 1 microL of Enterococcus faecalis suspension. The opposite side's were irradiated four times for 5 seconds each with Ho:YAG laser irradiation, a wavelength of 2.10 microm, using four different energy settings: 1 W/5 Hz; 1 W/10 Hz; 1.5 W/5 Hz, and 2.0 W/5 Hz through a 320-microm quartz fiber at an angle of approximately 5 degrees. In addition, two control groups were investigated, the first was inoculated and not submitted to any treatment, the second was inoculated and treated with NaOCl and H2O2. The remaining bacteria from each dentin sample in a transport media were removed by vibration, serially diluted, and plated out on culture dishes selective for Enterococcus faecalis. When compared with the untreated control group or even with the group treated with NaOCl plus H2O2, counting of colonies forming units (CFU) from the laser-treated samples revealed a high significant bacterial elimination with a maximum of 98.46% and a minimum of 83.65%. Our findings demonstrate a significant decrease of the bacterial population in depth, suggesting that the Ho:YAG laser irradiation could be effective to eliminate the microorganisms harbored within dentin or contaminated canals.

  6. High-efficiency selective boron emitter formed by wet chemical etch-back for n-type screen-printed Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuguo; Madani, Keeya; Cho, Eunhwan; Rounsaville, Brian; Upadhyaya, Vijaykumar; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    2017-01-01

    Front metal contact induced recombination and resistance are major efficiency limiting factors of large-area screen-printed n-type front junction Si solar cells with homogeneous emitter and tunnel oxide passivated back contact (TOPCON). This paper shows the development of a selective boron emitter (p+/p++) formed by a screen-printed resist masking and wet chemical etch-back process, which first grows a porous Si layer and subsequently removes it. Various wet-chemical solutions for forming porous Si layer are investigated. An industrial compatible process with sodium nitrite (NaNO2) catalyst is developed to uniformly etch-back the ˜47 Ω/◻ atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposited heavily doped boron emitter to ˜135 Ω/◻ by growing a 320 nm porous Si layer within 3 min and subsequently removing it. After etching back, the boron emitter was subjected to a thermal oxidation to lower the surface concentration and the emitter saturation current density J0e. Various etched-back emitters were evaluated by measuring J0e on symmetric test structures with atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide (Al2O3) passivation. Very low J0e of 21, 14, and 9 fA/cm2 were obtained for the 120, 150, and 180 Ω/◻ etched-back emitters, respectively. A solar cell with a selective emitter (65/180 Ω/◻) formed by this etch-back technology and with an Al/Ag contact on the front and TOPCON on the back gave an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 682.8 mV and efficiency of 21.04% on n-type Czochralski Si wafer. This demonstrates the potential of this technology for next generation high-efficiency industrial n-type Si solar cells.

  7. Growth and characterization of In1-xGaxAs/InAs0.65Sb0.35 strained layer superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, G.; Duran, J. M.; Reyner, C. J.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Yoon, N.; Wasserman, D.; Scheihing, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    Type-II strained layer superlattices (SLS) are an active research topic in the infrared detector community and applications for SLS detectors continue to grow. SLS detector technology has already reached the commercial market due to improvements in material quality, device design, and device fabrication. Despite this progress, the optimal superlattice design has not been established, and at various times has been believed to be InAs/GaSb, InAs/InGaSb, or InAs/InAsSb. Building on these, we investigate the properties of a new mid-wave infrared SLS material: InGaAs/InAsSb SLS. The ternary InGaAs/InAsSb SLS has three main advantages over other SLS designs: greater support for strain compensation, enhanced absorption due to increased electron-hole wavefunction overlap, and improved vertical hole mobility due to reduced hole effective mass. Here, we compare three ternary SLSs, with approximately the same bandgap (0.240 eV at 150 K), comprised of Ga fractions of 5%, 10%, and 20% to a reference sample with 0% Ga. Enhanced absorption is both theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. Furthermore, the characteristics of ternary SLS infrared detectors based on an nBn architecture are reported and exhibit nearly state-of-the-art dark current performance with minimal growth optimization. We report standard material and device characterization information, including dark current and external quantum efficiency, and provide further analysis that indicates improved quantum efficiency and vertical hole mobility. Finally, a 320×256 focal plane array built based on the In0.8Ga0.2As/InAs0.65Sb0.35 SLS design is demonstrated with promising performance.

  8. Contrasting effects of UV-A and UV-B on photosynthesis and photoprotection of beta-carotene in two Dunaliella spp.

    PubMed

    White, Andrea L; Jahnke, Leland S

    2002-08-01

    Photosynthetic and antioxidant responses following exposure to either ultraviolet-A or ultraviolet-B were contrasted in two species of the unicellular green alga, DUNALIELLA: Species selection was based on the ability of Dunaliella bardawil (UTEX 2538) to accumulate inter-thylakoid beta-carotene when subjected to environmental stress while Dunaliella salina (UTEX 200) lacks this ability. Cells were cultured in high and low levels of visible light (150 and 35 micro mol photons m(-2 )s(-1), respectively) and then either ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm) or ultraviolet-B (290-320 nm) was added to visible light for 24-h exposure. A potassium chromate solution was found to be an ideal screen for removal of ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-C from ultraviolet-B radiation. There were no significant changes in photosynthetic or antioxidant parameters following exposure to ultraviolet-B. Ultraviolet-A exposure significantly decreased photosynthetic parameters (>70% decrease in Fv/Fm and the ratio of light-limited to light-saturated photosynthesis in low beta-carotene cells) and resulted in 50% increases in ascorbate peroxidase activity and ascorbate concentrations. The results suggest exposure to ultraviolet-A (but not ultraviolet-B) directly affects photosynthesis, observed as a loss of photosystem II electron transport efficiency and increased radical formation. This research indicates that the accumulated beta-carotene in D. bardawil prevents UV-related photosynthetic damage through blue-light/ultraviolet-A absorption (supported by trends observed for antioxidant enzyme responses).

  9. Rapid Evolutionary Rates and Unique Genomic Signatures Discovered in the First Reference Genome for the Southern Ocean Salp, Salpa thompsoni (Urochordata, Thaliacea).

    PubMed

    Jue, Nathaniel K; Batta-Lona, Paola G; Trusiak, Sarah; Obergfell, Craig; Bucklin, Ann; O'Neill, Michael J; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2016-10-30

    A preliminary genome sequence has been assembled for the Southern Ocean salp, Salpa thompsoni (Urochordata, Thaliacea). Despite the ecological importance of this species in Antarctic pelagic food webs and its potential role as an indicator of changing Southern Ocean ecosystems in response to climate change, no genomic resources are available for S. thompsoni or any closely related urochordate species. Using a multiple-platform, multiple-individual approach, we have produced a 318,767,936-bp genome sequence, covering >50% of the estimated 602 Mb (±173 Mb) genome size for S. thompsoni Using a nonredundant set of predicted proteins, >50% (16,823) of sequences showed significant homology to known proteins and ∼38% (12,151) of the total protein predictions were associated with Gene Ontology functional information. We have generated 109,958 SNP variant and 9,782 indel predictions for this species, serving as a resource for future phylogenomic and population genetic studies. Comparing the salp genome to available assemblies for four other urochordates, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Ciona savignyi and Oikopleura dioica, we found that S. thompsoni shares the previously estimated rapid rates of evolution for these species. High mutation rates are thus independent of genome size, suggesting that rates of evolution >1.5 times that observed for vertebrates are a broad taxonomic characteristic of urochordates. Tests for positive selection implemented in PAML revealed a small number of genes with sites undergoing rapid evolution, including genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and metabolic and immune process that may be reflective of both adaptation to polar, planktonic environments as well as the complex life history of the salps. Finally, we performed an initial survey of small RNAs, revealing the presence of known, conserved miRNAs, as well as novel miRNA genes; unique piRNAs; and mature miRNA signatures for varying developmental stages. Collectively, these

  10. Rapid Evolutionary Rates and Unique Genomic Signatures Discovered in the First Reference Genome for the Southern Ocean Salp, Salpa thompsoni (Urochordata, Thaliacea)

    PubMed Central

    Jue, Nathaniel K.; Batta-Lona, Paola G.; Trusiak, Sarah; Obergfell, Craig; Bucklin, Ann; O’Neill, Michael J.; O’Neill, Rachel J.

    2016-01-01

    A preliminary genome sequence has been assembled for the Southern Ocean salp, Salpa thompsoni (Urochordata, Thaliacea). Despite the ecological importance of this species in Antarctic pelagic food webs and its potential role as an indicator of changing Southern Ocean ecosystems in response to climate change, no genomic resources are available for S. thompsoni or any closely related urochordate species. Using a multiple-platform, multiple-individual approach, we have produced a 318,767,936-bp genome sequence, covering >50% of the estimated 602 Mb (±173 Mb) genome size for S. thompsoni. Using a nonredundant set of predicted proteins, >50% (16,823) of sequences showed significant homology to known proteins and ∼38% (12,151) of the total protein predictions were associated with Gene Ontology functional information. We have generated 109,958 SNP variant and 9,782 indel predictions for this species, serving as a resource for future phylogenomic and population genetic studies. Comparing the salp genome to available assemblies for four other urochordates, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Ciona savignyi and Oikopleura dioica, we found that S. thompsoni shares the previously estimated rapid rates of evolution for these species. High mutation rates are thus independent of genome size, suggesting that rates of evolution >1.5 times that observed for vertebrates are a broad taxonomic characteristic of urochordates. Tests for positive selection implemented in PAML revealed a small number of genes with sites undergoing rapid evolution, including genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and metabolic and immune process that may be reflective of both adaptation to polar, planktonic environments as well as the complex life history of the salps. Finally, we performed an initial survey of small RNAs, revealing the presence of known, conserved miRNAs, as well as novel miRNA genes; unique piRNAs; and mature miRNA signatures for varying developmental stages. Collectively, these

  11. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-09-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the

  12. VOSED: a tool for the characterization of developing planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, E.; Gutiérrez, R.; Delgado, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Merín, B.

    2007-08-01

    The transition phase from optically thick disks around young pre-main sequence stars to optically thin debris disks around Vega type stars is not well understood and plays an important role in the theory of planet formation. One of the most promising methods to characterize this process is the fitting of the observed SED with disk models. However, despite its potential, this technique is affected by two major problems if a non-VO methodology is used: on the one hand, SEDs building requires accessing to a variety of astronomical services which provide, in most of the cases, heterogeneous information. On the other hand, model fitting demands a tremendous amount of work and time which makes it very inefficient even for a modest dataset. This is an important issue considering the large volume of data that missions like Spitzer is producing. In the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory (SVO) we have developed VOSED an application that permits to characterize the protoplanetary disks around young stars taking advantage of the already existing VO standards and tools. The application allows the user to gather photometric and spectroscopic information from a number of VO services, trace the SED, and fit the photospheric contribution with a stellar model and the IR excess with a disk model. The Kurucz models described in Castelli et al. (1997, A&A, 318, 841) are used to reproduce the photospheric contribution whereas the grid of models of accretion disks irradiated by their central stars developed by D'Alessio et al. (2005, ) is used for the disk contribution. In both cases, the models are retrieved from the SVO Theoretical Model Web Server using the TSAP protocol. As pointed out before, model fitting constitutes a fundamental step in the analysis process. VOSED includes a tool to estimate the model parameters (both stellar and disk) based on bayesian inference. The main aim of the tool

  13. Parameters and Kinematics of Carbon Enhanced Metal Poor (CEMP) Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi, Sivarani; Beers, T. C.; Lee, Y. S.; Kennedy, C.; Carollo, D.; Masseron, T.; Plez, B.; Norris, J. E.; Bessell, M.; Rossi, S.

    2007-12-01

    Several hundred CEMP stars have been selected from the Christlieb et al (2001, A&A 375, 366) catalog of carbon-rich stars, which is based on the Hamburg/ESO objective prism survey. Medium resolution (R = 2000) optical spectra were obtained for these stars covering a wavelength range of 3800-4800 A. The estimates of Teff, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for this sample is already available, based on application of the Rossi et al. (2005, AJ 130, 2804 ), which uses the strength of the CaII K line, the CH G-band, and J-K colors. Here we present an automated method to estimate the full set of atmospheric parameters for these data (including logg) based on synthetic spectra and photometry. For this purpose, we have generated a set of synthetic grids with carbon enhanced atmospheres with the MARCS code (Plez et al. 1992, A&A 256,551; Asplund et al. 1997, A&A 318, 521; Gustafsson et al. 2003, ASP Conf. Ser. 288, 331), which is particularly important for cool CEMP stars (for which the atmospheric structure changes with increasing carbon abundance (Masseron et al. 2006 A&A 455, 1059). More than one hundred stars of our prpogram stars have already been observed at high spectral resolution (R = 20000-25000), during the course of the HERES survey (Barklem et al. 2005, A&A 439,129; Lucatello et al. 2006 ApJ 652, 37L), which allow us to calibrate our methods. Here we describe our new methods for estimation and validation of Teff, logg, [Fe/H], [C/Fe]. We also comment on the possible origin of CEMP stars in this sample based on these derived parameters and on the inferred kinematics. TS, TCB, YSL, and CK acknowledge support from grant PHY 02-16783; Physics Frontier Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation and NSF grant AST 07-07776

  14. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-06-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be

  15. A modified vitamin regimen for vitamin B2, A, and E administration in very-low-birth-weight infants.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Peter J; Greene, Harry; Adcock, Eugene

    2004-04-01

    Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW; birth weight, <1,500 g) infants receive preterm infant formulas and parenteral multivitamin preparations that provide more riboflavin (vitamin B2) than does human milk and more than that recommended by the American Society of Clinical Nutrition. VLBW infants who are not breast-fed may have plasma riboflavin concentrations up to 50 times higher than those in cord blood. The authors examined a vitamin regimen designed to reduce daily riboflavin intake, with the hypothesis that this new regimen would result in lower plasma riboflavin concentrations while maintaining lipid-soluble vitamin levels. Preterm infants with birth weight < or =1,000 g received either standard preterm infant nutrition providing 0.42 to 0.75 mg riboflavin/kg/day (standard group), or a modified regimen providing 0.19 to 0.35 mg/kg/day (modified group). The modified group parenteral vitamin infusion was premixed in Intralipid. Enteral feedings were selected to meet daily riboflavin administration guidelines. Plasma riboflavin, vitamin A, and vitamin E concentrations were measured weekly by high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were analyzed with the independent t test, chi, and analysis of variance. The 36 infants (17 standard group, 19 modified group) had birth weight and gestational age of 779 +/- 29 g and 25.5 +/- 0.3 weeks (mean +/- SEM) with no differences between groups. Modified group infants received 38% less riboflavin (0.281 +/- 0.009 mg/kg/day), 35% more vitamin A (318.3 +/- 11.4 microg/kg/day), and 14% more vitamin E (3.17 +/- 0.14 mg/kg/day) than standard group infants. Plasma riboflavin rose from baseline in both groups but was 37% lower in the modified group during the first postnatal month (133.3 +/- 9.9 ng/mL). Riboflavin intake and plasma riboflavin concentrations were directly correlated. Plasma vitamin A (0.222 +/- 0.022 microg/mL) and vitamin E (22.26 +/- 1.61 /mL) concentrations were greater in the modified group. The modified vitamin

  16. Description of various test scenarios for temporary blinding of pilots by means of bright optical radiation during darkness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Hans-Dieter

    2011-06-01

    Up to now the knowledge is limited as far as adverse effects are concerned which are the result of temporary blinding from high brightness optical products, like laser pointers, but it is mandatory to be aware of the degree and influence on various visual functions of persons performing challenging activities, especially under mesopic or even scotopic conditions. Therefore various test scenarios have been designed in the laboratory and bright optical radiation from highbrightness LEDs and laser products applied as light sources in order to simulate the temporary blinding of pilots during a night-flight, especially during landing. As an important realistic test object the primary flight display (PFD) of a commercial aircraft has been integrated in the respective test set-up and various alignments on the PFD could be adjusted in order to measure the time duration which is needed to regain the ability to read the respective data on the PFD after an exposure. The pilot's flight deck lighting situation from a full flight simulator A 320 has been incorporated in the test scenarios. The level of exposure of the subjects has been limited well below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) and the exposure duration was chosen up to a maximum of 10 s. A total of 28 subjects have been included in various tests. As a critical value especially the visual search time (VST) was determined. A significant increase of VST between 2.5 s and 8 s after foveal irradiation has been determined in a specially designed test with a primary flight display (PFD) whereas an increase of 9.1 s for peripheral and 9.9 s for frontal irradiation resulted in an exercise (flight maneuver) with a Microsoft flight-simulator. Various pupil diameters and aversion responses of the subjects during the irradiation might be responsible for the relatively large spread of data, but on the other hand a simple mean value would not comply with the spectrum of functional relationships and possible individual inherent

  17. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  18. Hantaan Virus Surveillance Targeting Small Mammals at Nightmare Range, a High Elevation Military Training Area, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Terry A.; Kim, Heung-Chul; Chong, Sung-Tae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Won-Keun; Nunn, Peter V.; Song, Jin-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rodent-borne disease surveillance was conducted at Nightmare Range (NM-R), near the demilitarized zone in northeast Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea, to identify hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) risks for a mountainous high-elevation (500 m) military training site. Monthly surveys were conducted from January 2008-December 2009. A total of 1,720 small mammals were captured belonging to the Orders Rodentia [Families, Sciuridae (1 species) and Muridae (7 species)] and Soricomorpha [Family, Soricidae (1species)]. Apodemus agrarius, the primary reservoir for Hantaan virus (HTNV), accounted for 89.9% (1,546) of all small mammals captured, followed by Myodes regulus (4.0%), Crocidura lasiura (3.9%), Micromys minutus (1.4%), Mus musculus (0.3%), Microtus fortis (0.2%), Apodemus peninsulae (0.2%), Tamias sibiricus (0.1%), and Rattus norvegicus (<0.1%). Three species were antibody-positive (Ab+) for hantaviruses: A. agrarius (8.2%), M. minutus (4.2%), and C. lasiura (1.5%). HTNV specific RNA was detected in 93/127 Ab+ A. agrarius, while Imjin virus specific RNA was detected in 1/1 Ab+ C. lasiura. Overall, hantavirus Ab+ rates for A. agrarius increased with weight (age) and were significantly higher among males (10.9%) than females (5.1%) (P<0.0001). High A. agrarius gravid rates during the fall (August-September) were associated with peak numbers of HFRS cases in Korea that followed high gravid rates. From 79 RT-PCR positive A. agrarius, 12 HTNV RNA samples were sequenced and compared phylogenetically based on a 320 nt sequence from the GC glycoprotein-encoding M segment. These results demonstrate that the HTNV isolates from NM-R are distinctly separated from HTNV isolated from the People’s Republic of China. These studies provide for improved disease risk assessments that identify military activities, rodent HTNV rates, and other factors associated with the transmission of hantaviruses during field training exercises. PMID:25874643

  19. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  20. Mechanical Design of High Lift Systems for High Aspect Ratio Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center is working to develop a methodology for the optimization and design of the high lift system for future subsonic airliners with the involvement of two partners. Aerodynamic analysis methods for two dimensional and three dimensional wing performance with flaps and slats deployed are being developed through a grant with the aeronautical department of the University of California Davis, and a flap and slat mechanism design procedure is being developed through a contract with PKCR, Inc., of Seattle, WA. This report documents the work that has been completed in the contract with PKCR on mechanism design. Flap mechanism designs have been completed for seven (7) different mechanisms with a total of twelve (12) different layouts all for a common single slotted flap configuration. The seven mechanisms are as follows: Simple Hinge, Upside Down/Upright Four Bar Linkage (two layouts), Upside Down Four Bar Linkages (three versions), Airbus A330/340 Link/Track Mechanism, Airbus A320 Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), Boeing Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), and Boeing 767 Hinged Beam Four Bar Linkage. In addition, a single layout has been made to investigate the growth potential from a single slotted flap to a vane/main double slotted flap using the Boeing Link/Track Mechanism. All layouts show Fowler motion and gap progression of the flap from stowed to a fully deployed position, and evaluations based on spanwise continuity, fairing size and number, complexity, reliability and maintainability and weight as well as Fowler motion and gap progression are presented. For slat design, the options have been limited to mechanisms for a shallow leading edge slat. Three (3) different layouts are presented for maximum slat angles of 20 deg, 15 deg and 1O deg all mechanized with a rack and pinion drive similar to that on the Boeing 757 airplane. Based on the work of Ljungstroem in Sweden, this type of slat design appears to shift the lift curve so that

  1. The Integrated Mode Management Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Mode management is the processes of understanding the character and consequences of autoflight modes, planning and selecting the engagement, disengagement and transitions between modes, and anticipating automatic mode transitions made by the autoflight system itself. The state of the art is represented by the latest designs produced by each of the major airframe manufacturers, the Boeing 747-400, the Boeing 777, the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and the Airbus A320/A340 family of airplanes. In these airplanes autoflight modes are selected by manipulating switches on the control panel. The state of the autoflight system is displayed on the flight mode annunciators. The integrated mode management interface (IMMI) is a graphical interface to autoflight mode management systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The interface consists of a vertical mode manager and a lateral mode manager. Autoflight modes are depicted by icons on a graphical display. Mode selection is accomplished by touching (or mousing) the appropriate icon. The IMMI provides flight crews with an integrated interface to autoflight systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The current version is modeled on the Boeing glass-cockpit airplanes (747-400, 757/767). It runs on the SGI Indigo workstation. A working prototype of this graphics-based crew interface to the autoflight mode management tasks of glass cockpit airplanes has been installed in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator of the CSSRF of NASA Ames Research Center. This IMMI replaces the devices in FMCS equipped airplanes currently known as mode control panel (Boeing), flight guidance control panel (McDonnell Douglas), and flight control unit (Airbus). It also augments the functions of the flight mode annunciators. All glass cockpit airplanes are sufficiently similar that the IMMI could be tailored to the mode management system of any modern cockpit. The IMMI does not replace the

  2. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320–400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280–320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  3. Structure and builtup of the Middle Bengal Fan at 8°N from multichannel seismic surveys and the IODP Expedition 354 drilling transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, V.; Bergmann, F.; Schwenk, T.; Lantzsch, H.; Bahk, J. J.; Weber, M. E.; France-Lanord, C.; Klaus, A.

    2016-12-01

    IODP Expedition 354 to the Bengal Fan drilled a 320 km long e-W transect at 8°N with 7 drill sites, fully covering the uppermost 150-200 meters of fan deposits at distances of 50 km, originating from Himalayan mountain ranges and the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system. A major goal of this transect approach was to ensure a continuous record of turbiditic material delivered over the last appx. 1 million year, considering frequent longitudinal depocenter shifts of the active channel. By extensively utilizing the new half-APC coring technique, high quality and high recovery cores could be retrieved representing a wide range of grain sizes from hemipelagic deposits through clay rich turbidites to coarse silt and sandy units. Up to medium sand grain sizes were retrieved within the basal units of levees, which correspond to high-reflectivity units in high-resolution multichannel seismic profiles. Finely laminated sections with mm to cm-thick turbidites represents levee formations. At Site U1453 for example, core logging and downhole logging data confirm the representative sampling based on a very good match of several physical property data sets. An expanded section was cored at Site U1454, where the presumably currently active channel has built a levee, which likely represents major sediment supply within the last 30 kyr. A spatial grid of seismic and echosounder data in the vicinity of the active channel reveals a high spatial variability in sedimentation rates and distinct depocenter shifts in response to changes in channel geometry. Site U1452 has provided a full record a levee growth including interlevee sedimentation, sandy basal units characterized by a lobe formation, and a pronounced fining upward trend following the phase of channel erosion and levee builtup. From all sites, detailed comparisons of physical and sedimentological shipboard results with seismic data will be presented. Expedition 354 has provided a unique sample and data set to better understand fan

  4. Coal log pipeline research at University of Missouri. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1996-06-01

    During this quarter, significant progress has been made in the following, fronts of coal log pipeline research, development and technology transfer: 1. Design of the special 300-ton coal log compaction machine was completed, Furthermore, much progress has been made in the design of the system needed to feed coal into the coal log compaction machine, and the design of the system to remove logs automatically as soon as they are compacted. 2. Coal mixtures containing different amounts of moisture were compacted into 1.91- inch-diameter coal logs rapidly (in 6 seconds). It was found that for the Mettiki coal tested, the optimum moisture is around 8%. Under the test conditions (room temperature and 3% binders), the rapidly compacted coal logs with 8% moisture had less than 4% weight loss in 350 cycles of circulation. 3. Completed evaluation of the effectiveness of using wall lubricants to enhance coal log quality. Both calcium sterarate and MoS{sub 2} were found to be effective. 4. It was found that when the interior of a mold is not cleaned after coal log has been compacted, the coal mixture film clinging to the wall hardens in time and form a hard crust which affects the quality of the next log to be produced. But, if the second log is produced immediately after the first, no hard crust is formed and the quality of the second log, is not affected. 5. Coal logs made with the coal crushed by the Gundlach Company were found to be better than coal logs made with the coal crushed by the CPRC`s hammer mill. 7. A 320-ft-long, 6-inch-diameter coal log pipeline test facility was constructed in Rolla during this period. 8. Completed the simulation of an 8-inch-diameter, 20-mile-long coal log pipeline recirculating loop driven by a pump bypass. 9. Continued improvement was accomplished in the hydraulic model of HCP and CLP to predict pressure drop and capsule velocity for both single capsules and capsule train. Also, work has started to extend the analysis to sloped pipelines.

  5. Kilovoltage Rotational External Beam Radiotherapy on a Breast Computed Tomography Platform: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) platform to deliver rotational kilovoltage (kV) external beam radiotherapy (RT) for partial breast irradiation, whole breast irradiation, and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Rotational kV-external beam RT using the geometry of a prototype bCT platform was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulator. A point source emitting 178 keV photons (approximating a 320-kVp spectrum with 4-mm copper filtration) was rotated around a 14-cm voxelized polyethylene disk (0.1 cm tall) or cylinder (9 cm tall) to simulate primary and primary plus scattered photon interactions, respectively. Simulations were also performed using voxelized bCT patient images. Beam collimation was varied in the x-y plane (1-14 cm) and in the z-direction (0.1-10 cm). Dose painting for multiple foci, line, and ring distributions was demonstrated using multiple rotations with varying beam collimation. Simulations using the scanner's native hardware (120 kVp filtered by 0.2-mm copper) were validated experimentally. Results: As the x-y collimator was narrowed, the two-dimensional dose profiles shifted from a cupped profile with a high edge dose to an increasingly peaked central dose distribution with a sharp dose falloff. Using a 1-cm beam, the cylinder edge dose was <7% of the dose deposition at the cylinder center. Simulations using 120-kVp X-rays showed distributions similar to the experimental measurements. A homogeneous dose distribution (<2.5% dose fluctuation) with a 20% decrease in dose deposition at the cylinder edge (i.e., skin sparing) was demonstrated by weighted summation of four dose profiles using different collimation widths. Simulations using patient bCT images demonstrated the potential for treatment planning and image-guided RT. Conclusions: Rotational kV-external beam RT for partial breast irradiation, dose painting, and whole breast irradiation with skin sparing is feasible on a bCT platform with

  6. Automated Voxel-Based Analysis of Volumetric Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Data Improves Measurement of Serial Changes in Tumor Vascular Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Driscoll, Brandon; Chung, Caroline; Shek, Tina; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Development of perfusion imaging as a biomarker requires more robust methodologies for quantification of tumor physiology that allow assessment of volumetric tumor heterogeneity over time. This study proposes a parametric method for automatically analyzing perfused tissue from volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) scans and assesses whether this 4-dimensional (4D) DCE approach is more robust and accurate than conventional, region-of-interest (ROI)-based CT methods in quantifying tumor perfusion with preliminary evaluation in metastatic brain cancer. Methods and Materials: Functional parameter reproducibility and analysis of sensitivity to imaging resolution and arterial input function were evaluated in image sets acquired from a 320-slice CT with a controlled flow phantom and patients with brain metastases, whose treatments were planned for stereotactic radiation surgery and who consented to a research ethics board-approved prospective imaging biomarker study. A voxel-based temporal dynamic analysis (TDA) methodology was used at baseline, at day 7, and at day 20 after treatment. The ability to detect changes in kinetic parameter maps in clinical data sets was investigated for both 4D TDA and conventional 2D ROI-based analysis methods. Results: A total of 7 brain metastases in 3 patients were evaluated over the 3 time points. The 4D TDA method showed improved spatial efficacy and accuracy of perfusion parameters compared to ROI-based DCE analysis (P<.005), with a reproducibility error of less than 2% when tested with DCE phantom data. Clinically, changes in transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K{sub trans}) were seen when using TDA, with substantially smaller errors than the 2D method on both day 7 post radiation surgery (±13%; P<.05) and by day 20 (±12%; P<.04). Standard methods showed a decrease in K{sub trans} but with large uncertainty (111.6 ± 150.5) %. Conclusions

  7. Evolution of the Middle Bengal Fan at 8°N in the Oligocene to Pliocene - Preliminary Results from IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkhard, Spiess; Tilmann, Schwenk; Fenna, Bergmann; Christian, France-Lanord; Adam, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Three deep penetration and additional four shallow sites were drilled during IODP Expedition 354 in the Bay of Bengal at 8°N in February-March 2015 across a 320 km-long transect to study Neogene Bengal fan deposition. The three deeper sites located on top of the elevated crustal features of the Ninetyeast Ridge (Site U1451) and 85°Ridge (Site U1455/DSDP Site 218) as well as central between them (Site U1450) shall provide the stratigraphic framework for the Oligocene to Pliocene reconstruction of fan deposition and sedimentary fluxes driven by monsoon evolution and Himalayan erosion and weathering. Based on shipboard biostratigraphy, drilled material reach back in geologic time to the late Miocene (Site U1450), middle Miocene (Site U1455) and Oligocene (Site U1451). While core recovery was generally severely reduced due to the presence of unconsolidated sand and silt units, half-length APC coring technology provided valuable sand samples/recovery down to ~800 meters below seafloor. Increased compaction/diagenesis of units indicating the temporary absence of fan deposition due to major depocenter shifts, comprising of calcarous clay units of mostly pelagic origin, required a change to rotary coring between 600 and 800 mbsf, and thus the presence of sand is mostly uncertain for those deeper sections. However, derived from penetration rates, a high proportion of sand is anticipated back to early Miocene or Oligocene times. The calcareous clay units serve as stratigraphic marker horizons, which turned out to be suitable for seismic correlation across the drilling transect. This in turn allows to determine sedimentary budgets and overall fan growth for numerous time slices. Recovered sediments have Himalayan mineralogical and geochemical signatures suitable to analyze time series of erosion, weathering and changes in source regions as well as impacts on the global carbon cycle. Miocene shifts in terrestrial vegetation, in sediment budget and in style of sediment

  8. Calcium score of small coronary calcifications on multidetector computed tomography: results from a static phantom study.

    PubMed

    Groen, J M; Kofoed, K F; Zacho, M; Vliegenthart, R; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W

    2013-02-01

    Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) underestimates the coronary calcium score as compared to electron beam tomography (EBT). Therefore clinical risk stratification based on MDCT calcium scoring may be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a new phantom which enables establishment of a calcium scoring protocol for MDCT that yields a calcium score comparable to the EBT values and to the physical mass. A phantom containing 100 small calcifications ranging from 0.5 to 2.0mm was scanned on EBT using a standard coronary calcium protocol. In addition, the phantom was scanned on a 320-row MDCT scanner using different scanning, reconstruction and scoring parameters (tube voltage 80-135 kV, slice thickness 0.5-3.0mm, reconstruction kernel FC11-FC15 and threshold 110-150 HU). The Agatston and mass score of both modalities was compared and the influence of the parameters was assessed. On EBT the Agatston and mass scores were between 0 and 20, and 0 and 3mg, respectively. On MDCT the Agatston and mass scores were between 0 and 20, and 0 and 4 mg, respectively. All parameters showed an influence on the calcium score. The Agatston score on MDCT differed 52% between the 80 and 135kV, 65% between 0.5 and 3.0mm and 48% between FC11 and FC15. More calcifications were detected with a lower tube voltage, a smaller slice thickness, a sharper kernel and a lower threshold. Based on these observations an acquisition protocol with a tube voltage of 100 kV and two reconstructions protocols were defined with a FC12 reconstruction kernel; one with a slice thickness of 3.0mm and a one with a slice thickness of 0.5mm. This protocol yielded an Agatston score as close to the EBT as possible, but also a mass score as close to the physical phantom value as possible, respectively. With the new phantom one acquisition protocol and two reconstruction protocols can be defined which produces Agatston scores comparable to EBT values and to the physical mass. Copyright

  9. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation delays photosynthetic recovery in Arctic kelp zoospores.

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Hanelt, Dieter; Wiencke, Christian

    2006-06-01

    Seasonal reproduction in some Arctic Laminariales coincides with increased UV-B radiation due to stratospheric ozone depletion and relatively high water temperatures during polar spring. To find out the capacity to cope with different spectral irradiance, the kinetics of photosynthetic recovery was investigated in zoospores of four Arctic species of the order Laminariales, the kelps Saccorhiza dermatodea, Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata, and Laminaria saccharina. The physiology of light harvesting, changes in photosynthetic efficiency and kinetics of photosynthetic recovery were measured by in vivo fluorescence changes of Photosystem II (PSII). Saturation irradiance of freshly released spores showed minimal I ( k ) values (photon fluence rate where initial slope intersects horizontal asymptote of the curve) values ranging from 13 to 18 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) among species collected at different depths, confirming that spores are low-light adapted. Exposure to different radiation spectra consisting of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR+UV-A radiation (UV-A; 320-400 nm), and PAR+ UV-A+UV-B radiation (UV-B; 280-320 nm) showed that the cumulative effects of increasing PAR fluence and the additional effect of UV-A and UV-B radiations on photoinhibition of photosynthesis are species specific. After long exposures, Laminaria saccharina was more sensitive to the different light treatments than the other three species investigated. Kinetics of recovery in zoospores showed a fast phase in S. dermatodea, which indicates a reduction of the photoprotective process while a slow phase in L. saccharina indicates recovery from severe photodamage. This first attempt to study photoinhibition and kinetics of recovery in zoospores showed that zoospores are the stage in the life history of seaweeds most susceptible to light stress and that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) effectively delays photosynthetic recovery. The viability of spores is important on

  10. Changes in activation energy and kinetics of heat-activated persulfate oxidation of phenol in response to changes in pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Li, Haiyan; Chi, Liping; Chen, Hongkun; Chen, Changzhao

    2017-09-13

    Persulfate (peroxydisulfate, S2O8(2-)) is the newest oxidant used for the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) remediation of soil and groundwater. The present study investigated impacts of solution pH, temperature, and persulfate concentration on the reaction rate constant (k1), activation energy (Ea), and reaction order of the heat-activated persulfate process. Phenol was chosen as the model organic contaminant. As temperature increased from 30 °C to 70 °C, k1 exhibited a significant increase from 0.003 h(-1)∼0.962 h(-1) (pH 1.3-13.9) to 1.184 h(-1)∼9.91 h(-1) (pH 1.3-13.9), which corroborated with the activation of persulfate using heat. As pH increased from 1.3 to 13.9, k1 exhibited a 4.3-fold increase at 70 °C and a 320-fold increase at 30 °C, thereby suggesting that: 1) the phenol oxidation rate increased under alkaline conditions, and 2) the enhancement of reaction rate due to alkaline activation was more pronounced at a lower temperature. Increasing pH significantly reduced Ea from 139.7 ± 1.3 kJ/mol at pH 1.3 to 52.0 ± 3.3 kJ/mol at pH 13.9. In contrast to changing pH, increasing persulfate concentration from 20 to 320 mM significantly increased k1 but did not affect Ea. Changes in Ea suggest that persulfate oxidation of phenol experienced different reaction pathways or elementary reaction sequences as the pH changed from 1.3 to 13.9. In addition, the k1 and Ea data also suggest that a minimal pH threshold of ∼11 was required for the effective alkaline activation of persulfate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding OmpL1, a transmembrane outer membrane protein of pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Haake, D A; Champion, C I; Martinich, C; Shang, E S; Blanco, D R; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1993-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are spirochetes that have a low transmembrane outer membrane protein content relative to that of enteric gram-negative bacteria. In a previous study we identified a 31-kDa surface protein that was present in strains of Leptospira alstoni in amounts which correlated with the outer membrane particle density observed by freeze fracture electron microscopy (D. A. Haake, E. M. Walker, D. R. Blanco, C. A. Bolin, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, Infect. Immun. 59:1131-1140, 1991). The N-terminal amino acid sequence was used to design a pair of oligonucleotides which were utilized to screen a lambda ZAP II library containing EcoRI fragments of L. alstoni DNA. A 2.5-kb DNA fragment which contained the entire structural ompL1 gene was identified. The structural gene deduced from the sequence of this DNA fragment would encode a 320-amino-acid polypeptide with a 24-amino-acid leader peptide and a leader peptidase I cleavage site. Processing of OmpL1 results in a mature protein with a predicted molecular mass of 31,113 Da. Secondary-structure prediction identified repeated stretches of amphipathic beta-sheets typical of outer membrane protein membrane-spanning sequences. A topological model of OmpL1 containing 10 transmembrane segments is suggested. A recombinant OmpL1 fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli in order to immunize rabbits with the purified protein. Upon Triton X-114 extraction of L. alstoni and phase separation, anti-OmpL1 antiserum recognized a single band on immunoblots of the hydrophobic detergent fraction which was not present in the hydrophilic aqueous fraction. Immunoelectron microscopy with anti-OmpL1 antiserum demonstrates binding to the surface of intact L. alstoni. DNA hybridization studies indicate that the ompL1 gene is present in a single copy in all pathogenic Leptospira species that have been tested and is absent in nonpathogenic Leptospira species. OmpL1 may be the first spirochetal transmembrane outer membrane

  12. Yazoo River Basin (Lower Mississippi River) Hydrologic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A.; Davidson, G.; Altinakar, M.; Holt, R.

    2004-12-01

    The proposed Yazoo River Basin Hydrologic Observatory consists of the 34,000 square km Yazoo River watershed in northwestern Mississippi and a 320 km segment of the Mississippi River separated from the watershed by a manmade levee. Discharge from the basin flows from the Yazoo River into the Mississippi River north of Vicksburg, MS. Major streams within the basin include the Yazoo, Tallahatchie, Yalobusha, Coldwater, Yocona, and Big Sunflower Rivers. Four large flood control reservoirs (Arkabutla, Enid, Sardis, and Grenada) and two national forests (Delta and Holly Springs) are also located within the basin. The watershed is divided between upland forested hills and intensively cultivated lowlands. The lowland area, locally known as the "Delta", lies on the ancestral floodplain of the Mississippi River. Flooding by the Mississippi River was once a common event, but is now limited by the levee system. Abundant wetlands occupy abandoned stream channels throughout the Delta. The Yazoo River Basin has many unique features that make it an attractive site for an Hydrologic Observatory. Example features and issues of scientific interest include: 1) Extensive system of levees which have altered recharge to the regional aquifer, shifted population centers, and created backwater flooding areas. 2) Abundant wetlands with a century-long history of response to agricultural sediment and chemical fluxes. 3) Erosion of upland streams, and stream sediment loads that are the highest in the nation. 4) Groundwater mining in spite of abundant precipitation due to a regional surface clay layer that limits infiltration. 5) A history of agricultural Best Management Practices enabling evaluation of the effectiveness of such measures. 6) Large scale catfish farming with heavy reliance on groundwater. 7) Near enough to the Gulf coast to be impacted by hurricane events. 8) Already existing network of monitoring stations for stream flow, sediment-load, and weather, including complete coverage

  13. Hemodynamic stress distribution reflects ischemic clinical symptoms of patients with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-11-01

    Currently, the probability of diagnosing asymptomatic moyamoya disease is increasing. In this study, we consider a less invasive method for predicting future ischemic symptoms in patients with moyamoya disease. We reviewed cerebral blood flow (CBF)-related data obtained by xenon CT imaging (XeCT) in six patients with ischemic-type or asymptomatic moyamoya disease. The data were obtained as volume data using a 320-row CT, and applied to the automated region-of-interest-determining software (3DSRT) and converted to standardized images. Eight CBF-related parameters, including CBF value, cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC), and hemodynamic distribution (hdSD), were compared between asymptomatic hemispheres and ischemic symptomatic hemispheres. A significant difference was determined by a two-sample t test. A difference with p<0.05 was considered significant. When statistically significant differences between parameters of asymptomatic hemispheres and ischemic symptomatic hemispheres were identified, cut-off points were calculated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Change in the parameters before and after bypass surgery was also assessed. Of the eight CBF-related parameters evaluated, statistically significant differences between the asymptomatic hemispheres and ischemic hemispheres were observed in the CBF value of the MCA region (CBF-MCA), both at rest and after acetazolamide loading, and in the hdSD, also both at rest and after acetazolamide loading. Of the four statistically significant parameters, ROC analysis revealed that the hdSD at rest and CBF-MCA after acetazolamide loading were the most sensitive and specific parameters (threshold 1.2, sensitivity 1, specificity 1 for hdSD at rest, and threshold 26.44mL/100g/min, sensitivity 1, specificity 1 for CBF-MCA after acetazolamide loading). From the CBF data obtained both before and after surgery from the three patients who had undergone direct bypass surgeries, the hdSD was higher than the

  14. Paleomagnetic and Environmental Magnetic Insights into the Middle to Late Pleistocene Stratigraphy of the 8o North Bengal Fan Transect, IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Savian, J. F.; Weber, M. E.; Schwenk, T.; Spiess, V.; Stoner, J. S.; France-Lanord, C.; Klaus, A.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 354 cored seven sites along a ~320 km transect of the Bengal Fan at 8o N. Assessing the Pleistocene fan development and depocenter migration in the upper 150-220 m of the Bengal Fan was a primary goal of this expedition. Because any one site includes local variations in depositional processes, the transect approach and accurate stratigraphic correlation of sites is essential to understand overall fan development. Within this transect framework, integrating sediment fluxes across the fan allows for reconstruction of regional climate and tectonic signals through time. A hemipelagic unit deposited at ~1-2.5 cm/ka late in the Matuyama Chron, recording both the Cobb Mountain (1.173 - 1.185 Ma) and Jaramillo (0.988 - 1.072 Ma) Subchrons, was observed at all sites across the transect. This hemipelagic unit provides robust correlation between core derived chronologies and seismic imaging in the Middle Pleistocene. Correlation and orbital tuning of distinctive variations in physical properties (e.g. sediment lightness, wet-bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility) relative to paleomagnetic reversals indicate that turbidite deposition immediately below the base of this unit ceased relatively synchronously across the transect and turbidite deposition likely occurred elsewhere on the fan. The upper bound of the unit, however, is diachronous, with the timing of the onset of turbidite deposition in this part of the fan likely related to the infilling of accommodation space on the Middle Pleistocene fan surface. Stratigraphic constraints on the resumption of turbidite deposition to transect sites include the upper Jaramillo (0.988 Ma) and Matuyama-Bruhnes (0.780 Ma) polarity boundaries and the Oldest Toba Tephra (~0.800 ± 0.020 Ma). The Middle Pleistocene hemipelagic layer and directly overlying turbidites were continuously sampled (u-channels) during Expedition 354. We present initial u-channel magnetic and XRF results to refine the middle to late Pleistocene

  15. A thermal inertia model for soil water content retrieval using thermal and multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Minacapilli, M.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; D'Asaro, F.

    2010-10-01

    Soil moisture is difficult to quantify because of its high spatial variability. Consequently, great efforts have been undertaken by the research community to develop practical remote sensing approaches to estimate the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture over large areas and with high spatial detail. Many methodologies have been developed using remote sensing data acquiring information in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conventional field measurement techniques (including gravimetric and time-domain reflectometry) are point-based, involve on-site operators, are time expensive and, in any case, do not provide exhaustive information on the spatial distribution of soil moisture because it strongly depends on pedology, soil roughness and vegetation cover. The technological development of imaging sensors acquiring in the visible (VIS), near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR), renewed the research interest in setting up remote sensed based techniques aimed to retrieve soil water content variability in the soil-plant-atmosphere system (SPA). In this context different approaches have been widely applied at regional scale throughout synthetic indexes based on VIS, NIR and TIR spectral bands. A laboratory experiment has been carried out to verify a physically based model based on the remote estimation of the soil thermal inertia, P, to indirectly retrieve the soil surface water content, θ. The paper shows laboratory retrievals using simultaneously a FLIR A320G thermal camera, a six bands customized TETRACAM MCA II (Multiple Camera Array) multispectral camera working in the VIS/NIR part of the spectrum. Using these two type of sensors a set of VIS/NIR and TIR images were acquired as the main input dataset to retrieve the spatial variability of the thermal inertia values. Moreover, given that the accuracy of the proposed approach strongly depends on the accurate estimation of the soil thermal conductivity, a Decagon Device KD2 PRO thermal

  16. Surface temperature and thermal penetration depth of Nd:YAG laser applied to enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel M.; Neev, Joseph; Goodis, Harold E.; Berns, Michael W.

    1992-06-01

    The determination of the thermal effects of Nd:YAG laser energy on enamel and dentin is critical in understanding the clinical applications of caries removal and surface modification. Recently extracted non-carious third molars were sterilized with gamma irradiation. Calculus and cementum were removed using scaling instruments and 600 grit sand paper. The smear layer produced by sanding was removed with a solution of 0.5 M EDTA (pH 7.4) for two minutes. Enamel and dentin surfaces were exposed to a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 150 microsecond(s) pulse duration. Laser energy was delivered to the teeth with a 320 micrometers diameter fiberoptic delivery system, for exposure times of 1, 10 and 30 seconds. Laser parameters varied from 0.3 to 3.0 W, 10 to 30 Hz and 30 to 150 mJ/pulse. Other conditions included applications of hot coffee, carbide bur in a dental air-cooled turbine drill and soldering iron. Infrared thermography was used to measure the maximum surface temperature on, and thermal penetration distance into enamel and dentin. Thermographic data were analyzed with a video image processor to determine the diameter of maximum surface temperature and thermal penetration distance of each treatment. Between/within statistical analysis of variance (p

  17. Microfabricated Instrumentation for Chemical Sensing in Industrial Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    }m wide coated with a C18 phase, and elution was achieved under isocratic, step, or linear gradient conditions. For the solid phase extraction signal enhancement factors of 400 over a standard injection of 1.0 s were observed for a 320 s injection. Four polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) were resolved by open channel electrochromatography in under 50 s. Chip operation was unaffected by the presence of the 5 {micro}m silica particles at the filter entrance.

  18. Lightweight uncooled TWS equipped with catadioptric optics and microscan mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, A.; Jerominek, H.; Doucet, M.; Lagacé, F.; Desnoyers, N.; Bernier, S.; Mercier, L.; Boucher, M.-A.; Jacob, M.; Alain, C.; Pope, T. D.; Laou, P.

    2006-05-01

    A rugged lightweight thermal weapon sight (TWS) prototype was developed at INO in collaboration with DRDC-Valcartier. This TWS model is based on uncooled bolometer technology, ultralight catadioptric optics, ruggedized mechanics and electronics, and extensive onboard processing capabilities. The TWS prototype operates in a single 8-12 μm infrared (IR) band. It is equipped with a unique lightweight athermalized catadioptric objective and a bolometric IR imager with an INO focal plane array (FPA). Microscan technology allows the use of a 160 x 120 pixel FPA with a pitch of 50 μm to achieve a 320 × 240 pixel resolution image thereby avoiding the size (larger optics) and cost (expensive IR optical components) penalties associated with the use of larger format arrays. The TWS is equipped with a miniature shutter for automatic offset calibration. Based on the operation of the FPA at 100 frames per second (fps), real-time imaging with 320 x 240 pixel resolution at 25 fps is available. This TWS is also equipped with a high resolution (857 x 600 pixels) OLED color microdisplay and an integrated wireless digital RF link. The sight has an adjustable and selectable electronic reticule or crosshair (five possible reticules) and a manual focus from 5 m to infinity standoff distance. Processing capabilities are added to introduce specific functionalities such as image inversion (black hot and white hot), image enhancement, and pixel smoothing. This TWS prototype is very lightweight (~ 1100 grams) and compact (volume of 93 cubic inches). It offers human size target detection at 800 m and recognition at 200 m (Johnson criteria). With 6 Li AA batteries, it operates continuously for 5 hours and 20 minutes at room temperature. It can operate over the temperature range of -30 °C to +40 °C and its housing is completely sealed. The TWS is adapted to weaver or Picatinny rail mounting. The overall design of the TWS prototype is based on feedbacks of users to achieve improved user

  19. Hantaan virus surveillance targeting small mammals at nightmare range, a high elevation military training area, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Chong, Sung-Tae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Won-Keun; Nunn, Peter V; Song, Jin-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rodent-borne disease surveillance was conducted at Nightmare Range (NM-R), near the demilitarized zone in northeast Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea, to identify hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) risks for a mountainous high-elevation (500 m) military training site. Monthly surveys were conducted from January 2008-December 2009. A total of 1,720 small mammals were captured belonging to the Orders Rodentia [Families, Sciuridae (1 species) and Muridae (7 species)] and Soricomorpha [Family, Soricidae (1species)]. Apodemus agrarius, the primary reservoir for Hantaan virus (HTNV), accounted for 89.9% (1,546) of all small mammals captured, followed by Myodes regulus (4.0%), Crocidura lasiura (3.9%), Micromys minutus (1.4%), Mus musculus (0.3%), Microtus fortis (0.2%), Apodemus peninsulae (0.2%), Tamias sibiricus (0.1%), and Rattus norvegicus (<0.1%). Three species were antibody-positive (Ab+) for hantaviruses: A. agrarius (8.2%), M. minutus (4.2%), and C. lasiura (1.5%). HTNV specific RNA was detected in 93/127 Ab+ A. agrarius, while Imjin virus specific RNA was detected in 1/1 Ab+ C. lasiura. Overall, hantavirus Ab+ rates for A. agrarius increased with weight (age) and were significantly higher among males (10.9%) than females (5.1%) (P<0.0001). High A. agrarius gravid rates during the fall (August-September) were associated with peak numbers of HFRS cases in Korea that followed high gravid rates. From 79 RT-PCR positive A. agrarius, 12 HTNV RNA samples were sequenced and compared phylogenetically based on a 320 nt sequence from the GC glycoprotein-encoding M segment. These results demonstrate that the HTNV isolates from NM-R are distinctly separated from HTNV isolated from the People's Republic of China. These studies provide for improved disease risk assessments that identify military activities, rodent HTNV rates, and other factors associated with the transmission of hantaviruses during field training exercises.

  20. Measurement and analysis of aircraft engine PM emissions downwind of an active runway at the Oakland International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of commercial aviation has fueled concerns over air quality around airports and the surrounding communities. Airports must expand their operations to meet the increase in air traffic, but expansion plans have been delayed or canceled due to concerns over local air quality. This paper presents the methodology for real-time measurements of aircraft engine specific Particulate Matter (PM) emissions and analysis of the associated high resolution data acquired during normal Landing and Take-Off (LTO) operations 100-300 m downwind of an active taxi-/runway at the Oakland International Airport. The airframe-engine combinations studied included B737-300 with CFM56-3B engines, B737-700/800 with CFM56-7B engines, A320 with V2500-A5 engines, MD-80 with JT-8D engines, A300 with CF6-80 engines, DC-10 with CF6-50 engines, and CRJ-100/200 with CF34-3B engines. For all engine types studied, the size distributions were typically bimodal in nature with a nucleation mode comprised of freshly nucleated PM and an accumulation mode comprised mostly of PM soot with some condensed volatile material. The PM number-based emission index observed ranged between 7 × 1015-3 × 1017 particles kg-1 fuel burned at idle/taxi and between 4 × 1015-2 × 1017 particles kg-1 fuel burned at take-off, and the associated PM mass-based emission index (EIm) ranged between 0.1 and 0.7 g kg-1 fuel burned at both the idle/taxi and take-off conditions. Older technology engines such as the CFM56-3B and JT8D engines were observed to have as much as 3× higher PM EIm values at take-off compared to newer engine technology such as the CFM56-7B engine. The results from this study provide information for better characterizing evolving PM emissions from in-service commercial aircraft under normal LTO operations and assessing their impact on local and regional air quality and health related impacts.

  1. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  2. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  3. Core Noise: Implications of Emerging N+3 Designs and Acoustic Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a summary of the core-noise implications of NASA's primary N+3 aircraft concepts. These concepts are the MIT/P&W D8.5 Double Bubble design, the Boeing/GE SUGAR Volt hybrid gas-turbine/electric engine concept, the NASA N3-X Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion aircraft, and the NASA TBW-XN Truss-Braced Wing concept. The first two are future concepts for the Boeing 737/Airbus A320 US transcontinental mission of 180 passengers and a maximum range of 3000 nm. The last two are future concepts for the Boeing 777 transpacific mission of 350 passengers and a 7500 nm range. Sections of the presentation cover: turbofan design trends on the N+1.5 time frame and the already emerging importance of core noise; the NASA N+3 concepts and associated core-noise challenges; the historical trends for the engine bypass ratio (BPR), overall pressure ratio (OPR), and combustor exit temperature; and brief discussion of a noise research roadmap being developed to address the core-noise challenges identified for the N+3 concepts. The N+3 conceptual aircraft have (i) ultra-high bypass ratios, in the rage of 18 - 30, accomplished by either having a small-size, high-power-density core, an hybrid design which allows for an increased fan size, or by utilizing a turboelectric distributed propulsion design; and (ii) very high OPR in the 50 - 70 range. These trends will elevate the overall importance of turbomachinery core noise. The N+3 conceptual designs specify the need for the development and application of advanced liners and passive and active control strategies to reduce the core noise. Current engineering prediction of core noise uses semi-empirical methods based on older turbofan engines, with (at best) updates for more recent designs. The models have not seen the same level of development and maturity as those for fan and jet noise and are grossly inadequate for the designs considered for the N+3 time frame. An aggressive program for the development of updated noise

  4. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280-320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  5. Contrail ice particle formation in the wakes of airliners - insights from in-situ measurements and modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Jeßberger, Philipp; Voigt, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    The role of soot and volatile aerosol in controlling ice particle formation in cirrus clouds is of global importance for climate. In particular, contrail studies may help to better understand the role of various aerosols in ice formation. Recent results suggest that contrails may contribute a large share to the climate impact of aviation. Hence, better knowledge on contrails is needed for developing a sustainable air transport system. So far, contrail models either specify the initial number of ice particles per flight distance or assume that the initial number of ice particles is determined by the number of soot particles emitted. Previous measurements were unable to decide conclusively whether the number of ice particles is directly related to the number of soot particles. Also information on the relative distribution of the mean ice particle concentration in the primary and secondary wakes is missing. Here, we analyze particle concentrations and trace gas mixing ratios, their dilution and their correlations in 2 min old contrails from four airliners of types A319, A340, B737, and A380 under similar meteorological conditions. The measurements were performed with the research aircraft Falcon above northern Germany during the CONCERT campaign in November 2008. The instrumentation and observation methods were described before (Voigt et al., 2010). The number of ice particles in contrails of the four airliners at cruise is determined from the measurements and a dilution model, and compared with estimated soot emissions. Dilution is derived from measured concentrations of NO, NOy, SO2 and HONO. The trace gas concentrations are largest in the primary wake and decrease with altitude in the secondary wake, consistent with emissions and aircraft-dependent dilution. In contrast, ice particle concentrations are slightly larger in the secondary wake than in the primary wake, and significantly larger than expected from dilution and emissions. The total particle concentration

  6. Negative refraction in anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, S. T.

    2004-03-01

    (1968). [3] D.R.Smith, W.J.Padilla, D.C.Vier, S.C.Nemet-Nasser, S.Schultz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 3578 (2000). [4] S. T. Chui and L. B. Hu, Phys. Rev. B 65, 144407 (2002), [5] S. T. Chui, L. B. Hu and Z. F. Lin, Phys. Lett. A319, 85 (2003). [6] L. B. Hu, S. T. Chui and Z. F. Lin, Phys. Rev. B66, 085108 (2002). [7] V. Lindell and coworkers, Microwave and Opt. Tech Lett. 31, 129 (2001). [8] D. R. Smith and D. Schurig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 077405-1 (2003); D. Schurig and D. R. Smith, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2215 (2003). [9] Y. Zhang, B. Fluegel and A. Mascarenhas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 157404, (2003). [10] Z. F. Lin and S. T. Chui, unpublished.

  7. Technetium Sorption By Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Estes, Shanna L.; Arai, Yuji; Powell, Brian A.

    2013-07-18

    conditions are established to permit measuring more representative K{sub d} and solubility values under these experimental conditions. The purpose of this revision is to correct K{sub d} values reported in the original document. This document reports results for the first 56 days of a 319 day experiment. After the experiment had finished and all the data were compiled for QA/QC analysis, a mistake in the K{sub d} calculations was found. The K{sub d} values reported in revision 0 of this report were essentially one order of magnitude higher than the actual values. In this revision, the text references to K{sub d} values have been updated along with the data in Figure 2 and Appendix B. Between the time the original document was issued, Janurary 2012, and this document was issued, a final report (Estes et al. 2012; SRNL-STI-2012-00596, Rev. 0) describing all the corrected data for the 319 day experiment was issued. This document does not contain any data that is not already reported in the final report (SRNL-STI-2012-00596, Rev. 0).

  8. Command and Data Handling Branch Internship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Rachel Mae

    2016-01-01

    Modular Integrated Stackable Layers (MISL) is a computer system designed for simple, fast, and cost effective flexible reconfiguration in space environments such as the ISS and Orion projects for various uses. Existing applications include wireless and wired communications, data acquisition and instrumentation, and camera systems, and potential applications include bus protocol converters and subsystem control. MISL is based on Texas Instruments (TI)' MSP430 16-bit ultra-low-power microcontroller device. The purpose of my project was to integrate the MISL system with a liquid crystal display (LCD) touchscreen. The LCD, manufactured by Crystalfontz and part number CFAF320240F-035T-TS, is a 320 by 240 RGB resistive color screen including an optional carrier board. The vast majority of the project was done with Altium Designer, a tool for printed circuit board (PCB) schematic capture, 3D design, and FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) development. The new PCB was to allow the LCD to directly stack to the rest of MISL. Research was done with datasheets for the TI microcontroller and touchscreen display in order to meet desired hardware specifications. Documentation on prior MISL projects was also utilized. The initial step was to create a schematic for the LCD, power bus, and data bus connections between components. A layout was then designed with the required physical dimensions, routed traces and vias, power and ground planes, layer stacks, and other specified design rules such as plane clearance and hole size. Multiple consultation sessions were held with Hester Yim, the technical discipline lead for the Command and Data Handling Branch, and Christy Herring, the lead PCB layout designer in the Electronic Design and Manufacturing Branch in order to ensure proper configuration. At the moment, the PCB is awaiting revision by the latter-mentioned branch. Afterwards, the board will begin to undergo the manufacturing and testing process. Throughout the internship at

  9. A decadal survey of AO wavefront sensing detector developments in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    back thinned and back illuminated device, full digital outputs. In addition, the CMOS technology is extremely robust in a telescope environment. Both detectors will be used on the ELT, depending on the AO system considered. Additional developments also started for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on new breakthrough in Avalanche Photodiode (APD) arrays. A 256x256 array is currently developed by ESO and Selex while a similar development started in France with the RAPID project. The latter should offer a 320x240 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3.2 microns, with 2 e readout noise at 1500 Hz frame rate.

  10. Tasmante cruise: Swath-mapping and underway geophysics south and west of Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exon, N. F.; Royer, J.-Y.; Hill, P. J.

    1996-06-01

    characterised by basement blocks and intervening strike-slip basins trending 300° 340°. Recent dredging of basement rocks suggests that the western terrain has Antarctic affinities, whereas the eastern terrain has Tasmanian affinities. Stretching and slow spreading between Australia and Antarctica was in a NW direction from 130 45 Ma, and fast spreading was in a N-S direction thereafter. The western STR terrain was attached to Antarctica during the early movement, and moved down the west coast of Tasmania along a 320° shear zone, forming the landward-dipping continental blocks along the present COB. The eastern terrain either moved with the western terrain, or was welded to it along the 146°15' E fracture zone in the Early Tertiary. At 45 Ma, fast spreading started in a N-S direction, and after some probable movement along the 146°15'E fracture zone, the west and east STR terrains were welded together and became part of Australia.

  11. Assessing vulnerability to vegetation growth on earth dikes using geophysical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Benjamin; Saracco, Ginette; Peyras, Laurent; Vennetier, Michel; Mériaux, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Basin is prone to a plethora of natural hazards including floods. Vegetation growth in hydraulic earth structures, such as flood protections or channel levees and dams, may induce several degradation mechanisms leading to a risk of failure. Typically, trees' rooting generates two types of risks: internal erosion from root development in earth embankments, and external erosion (slopes and crest) which is often related to trees uprooting. To better assess how woody vegetation can compromise levee integrity, we designed a methodology using acoustical and complex electrical tomography as non destructives methods to spot dangerous roots in the embankment. Our work has been first initiated during laboratory experiments; we performed soundings in controlled conditions to determine both acoustical and electrical intrinsic behavior of our root samples. By comparison with soil samples we expected to point out specific signatures that would be useful for the roots anomaly identification in real conditions. Measurements were repeated on several samples to ensure statistical interpretation. With help of an ultrasonic transmission device, we identified significant relative velocity differences of compressional waves propagation between soil and root samples. We also studied spectral properties using wavelet processing method as an additional parameter of root distinction with the surrounding soil. In the case of electrical soundings, complex resistivity was measured and we computed resistivity spectra. Amplitude of resistivity term showed us that root material behaves as an insulator compared to the soil. With the phase resistivity term information, root can also be seen as an electric power capacitance and reveals maximum polarization effect located around 1Hz. Then, as experimental device for the field measurements, we selected a 320 cm high poplar (Populus) planted in a homogeneous loamy-clayed soil, which is the same soil used in laboratory experiment to

  12. PBS Plus Facebook: The Old And New Communication Of Climate Science (Please "Like" And "Share" This Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R. B.; Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional and innovative communications strategies were combined in "Earth: The Operators' Manual" (ETOM; writer & director Geoff Haines-Stiles, producer Erna Akuginow, presenter Richard Alley). We attempted both a clear and accessible presentation of some key essentials of current climate science and an experiment in new messaging and new media for outreach and education. ETOM is a 3-part TV series broadcast by PBS ("…one of the more interesting documentary series to come along in years", said the New York Times) and a 320 plus page tradebook, with 110 pages of footnotes referencing peer-reviewed science, published by Norton. But it's also a lively and growing Facebook page with a clear voice sharing positive examples of how renewable energy can reduce polluting emissions here in the US and worldwide, alongside headlines of climate science, and a website—relaunched for the 2012 Earth Day PBS broadcasts—where all three programs can be streamed, and teachers can register to download HD segments for classroom use. The TV programs were designed to offer a highly accessible statement of core climate science, literally explaining how ice cores show us today's climate is changing in ways not seen in the last 800,000 thousand years and why physics and chemistry let us know "It's Us" who are changing CO2 levels in the atmosphere through burning fossil fuels. But the project's outreach components also includes a "Science Pub" in a converted theater in Portland, where the audience consumes food, drink and climate science, and "Adventures of a Climate Scientist in the Age of Politics and Punditry," a dynamic live performance recorded for TV and the web. Messaging includes a Navy Rear Admiral in dress whites explaining why the Pentagon believes climate change is real, and scenes showing Marines and Army implementing solar technologies to enhance mission security and reduce their carbon bootprint. Similarly, outreach events at the North Carolina Museum of Natural

  13. Advances in detector technologies for visible and infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Kolb, Johann; Rothman, Johan; Fusco, Thierry; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Destefanis, Gérard; Lhermet, Nicolas; Pacaud, Olivier; Vuillermet, Michel; Kerlain, Alexandre; Hubin, Norbert; Reyes, Javier; Kasper, Markus; Ivert, Olaf; Suske, Wolfgang; Walker, Andrew; Skegg, Michael; Derelle, Sophie; Deschamps, Joel; Robert, Clélia; Vedrenne, Nicolas; Chazalet, Frédéric; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Preis, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. The LGSD is a scaling of the NGSD with 1760x1680 pixels and 3 e readout noise (goal 1e) at 700 Hz (goal 1000 Hz) frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: advanced CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS back thinned and back illuminated device for very high QE, full digital outputs with signal digital conversion on chip. In addition, the CMOS technology is extremely robust in a telescope environment. Both detectors will be used on the European ELT but also interest potentially all giant telescopes under development. Additional developments also started for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on a new technological breakthrough using ultra low noise Avalanche Photodiode (APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter will offer a 320x240 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3.2 microns, with 2 e readout noise at 1500 Hz frame rate. The high QE response is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using liquid nitrogen free pulse tube cryocoolers is currently developed for this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. First results of this project are detailed here. These programs are held with several partners, among them are the French astronomical laboratories (LAM, OHP, IPAG), the detector manufacturers (e2v technologies, Sofradir, CEA/LETI) and other partners (ESO, ONERA, IAC, GTC). Funding is: Opticon FP6 and FP7 from European Commission, ESO, CNRS and Université de Provence, Sofradir, ONERA, CEA/LETI and the French FUI (DGCIS).

  14. The active Moresby Seamount Detachment Fault, Woodlark Basin: insights into structure and mechanics from high-resolution submarine mapping and sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jan H.; Speckbacher, Romed; Nagel, Thorsten; Klaucke, Ingo; Devey, Colin W.

    2010-05-01

    Moresby Seamount Detachment, located east of Papua New Guinea in the Woodlark Basin, is arguably the best-exposed active extensional detachment fault in the world. It forms the northern slopes of Moresby Seamount, a 3000 meter high east-west trending tectonic horst separating two extensional basins. Fault zone dip is about 30°, and total horizontal stretch accumulated in the past 3.5 Ma is about 8 km. The detachment surface is exposed on the sea floor over an area of about 30 square kilometers. Denudation is almost absent, and sedimentation is apparently suppressed by strong bottom water currents, providing a unique opportunity to analyze the tectonic geomorphology and structure of the fault zone, and sample the fault rocks. R/V SONNE Expedition 203 first mapped the area with about 20 m spatial resolution by ship-based multibeam bathymetry operating at 12 kHz. Most of the detachment surface was subsequently surveyed by AUV fitted with a 200 kHz multibeam echosounder, a CTD and a water column turbidity sensor. Map resolution is about 2 m. Samples were dredged from the detachment, and in basement and sediment sites in the footwall block. In the uppermost part the detachment zone cuts through an approximately 500 m thick sequence of Pliocene clastic sediments. Topography there is rugged, with erosional gullies, and areas of slope failure. Below, an upper smooth zone of the detachment is made up by a slope-parallel belt of cataclasites, generated from metamorphic basement rocks of Paleogene or older age, mainly gabbro, metadiabase and psammo-pelitic schists. Structurally and topographically below the cataclasites is a lower rugged zone mainly exposing cataclasites and mylonites. Topography is due to localized slope failure and a major sinistral strike slip fault scarp transecting the detachment with a 320° azimuth. Below the rugged zone is a lower smooth zone of cataclasites and mylonites. The most spectacular feature here are several north-south trending, extremely

  15. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.

    2004-12-01

    the sensor and not to any film-based process. We have also shown that it is possible to regenerate the film by flushing with 1M KNO3 solution. Response curves were prepared from a single sensor by injecting different concentrations of ferrocyanide, monitoring the uptake, then regenerating the film and injecting the next concentration. To check reproducibility, a film was regenerated 10 times with almost no change in response. Film selectivity was demonstrated by adding a model cationic species, Ru(bipy)32+ to the ferrocyanide sample. Even at 10 times the ferrocyanide concentration, only a very small electrochemical signal and no optical signal due to the cation were observed. Additionally a competitive anion Ru(CN)64- could be distinguished from Fe(CN)64- based on the redox potential and absorbance spectrum differences between the two anions. Both species were preconcentrated into the film, and both could be electrochemically modulated simultaneously or individually. The films exhibited a linear absorbance response to ferrocyanide over the range 0.008-0.2mM. From 0.1mM ferrocyanide solution, the analyte was concentrated in a 320 nm thick film by a factor of {approx}6,000. The films have recently been used at PNNL to repeat cyclic voltammetry experiments with pertechnetate (TcO4) as previously performed with other candidate films. The results showed that the new films performed very well and better than films previously used, and showed reversible waves in the voltammogram with the film present where none appeared when a bare ITO-glass substrate was used. Our results clearly show that cross-linked quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) films made this way are superior materials for preconcentrating pertechnetate.

  16. The Himalaya-Bengal Fan source to sink system - new insights by correlation of re-processed seismic data and IODP Expedition 354 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Fenna; Schwenk, Tilmann; Spiess, Volkard; France-Lanord, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The Bengal Fan, hosted in the northern Indian Ocean, is the largest submarine fan on Earth. Fan evolution started in the Early Eocene as a direct response to the collision of India with the Asian continent in Middle Paleocene times. Subsequently the Himalayan plateau uplift was initiated. Thereby generated interactions with the regional climate caused the evolution of the Indian monsoonal system. Drained by the rivers Ganges and Brahmaputra, ~ 80% of eroded Himalayan sediments are deposited in the Bengal Fan. Hence, the Fan provides the most complete record of the Himalayan history and is well suited to investigate the direct link between the tectonic uplift and the climate evolution of the region. Sediments are transported onto the deep sea fan by turbidity currents building up chan-nel-levee systems. These channel-levee systems are the main architectural elements of the Bengal Fan and are suspected to have their onset in Late Miocene times. Frequent channel avulsion on the upper fan led to the abandonment of old channels and formation of new channel-levee systems or even channel-reoccupation. This complex erosional/depositional system involves lateral depocenter migration, probably on millennial timescales. Conse-quently, investigations of the Himalaya as sediment source begins with a comprehensive understanding of transport, deposition and modification within the Bengal Fan sediment sink. In February/March 2015 the IODP Expedition 354 drilled at 7 sites along a ~320 km long E-W transect at 8° N. Aiming at the recovery of pre-fan deposits and deposits of the Pliocene and Upper Miocene Fan evolution, three deep sites (900 - 1200 mbsf) were realized. These where complemented by four shallow sites (200-300 mbsf) for a detailed study of the depos-its of the last 1-2 million years, including the latest known channel activities (Holocene times). Several channel-levee systems and inter-channel deposits were drilled, active at different times of Fan evolution. To

  17. Dynamic volume vs respiratory correlated 4DCT for motion assessment in radiation therapy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Bracken, John; Driscoll, Brandon; Hope, Andrew; Jaffray, David

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Conventional (i.e., respiratory-correlated) 4DCT exploits the repetitive nature of breathing to provide an estimate of motion; however, it has limitations due to binning artifacts and irregular breathing in actual patient breathing patterns. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and image quality of a dynamic volume, CT approach (4D{sub vol}) using a 320-slice CT scanner to minimize these limitations, wherein entire image volumes are acquired dynamically without couch movement. This will be compared to the conventional respiratory-correlated 4DCT approach (RCCT). Methods: 4D{sub vol} CT was performed and characterized on an in-house, programmable respiratory motion phantom containing multiple geometric and morphological ''tumor'' objects over a range of regular and irregular patient breathing traces obtained from 3D fluoroscopy and compared to RCCT. The accuracy of volumetric capture and breathing displacement were evaluated and compared with the ground truth values and with the results reported using RCCT. A motion model was investigated to validate the number of motion samples needed to obtain accurate motion probability density functions (PDF). The impact of 4D image quality on this accuracy was then investigated. Dose measurements using volumetric and conventional scan techniques were also performed and compared. Results: Both conventional and dynamic volume 4DCT methods were capable of estimating the programmed displacement of sinusoidal motion, but patient breathing is known to not be regular, and obvious differences were seen for realistic, irregular motion. The mean RCCT amplitude error averaged at 4 mm (max. 7.8 mm) whereas the 4D{sub vol} CT error stayed below 0.5 mm. Similarly, the average absolute volume error was lower with 4D{sub vol} CT. Under irregular breathing, the 4D{sub vol} CT method provides a close description of the motion PDF (cross-correlation 0.99) and is able to track each object, whereas the RCCT method results in a

  18. IrLaW an OGC compliant infrared thermography measurement system developed on mini PC with real time computing capabilities for long term monitoring of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, J.; Averty, R.

    2012-04-01

    One of the objectives of ISTIMES project is to evaluate the potentialities offered by the integration of different electromagnetic techniques able to perform non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of transport infrastructures. Among the EM methods investigated, uncooled infrared camera is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its relative low cost on the market. Infrared thermography, when it is used in quantitative mode (not in laboratory conditions) and not in qualitative mode (vision applied to survey), requires to process in real time thermal radiative corrections on raw data acquired to take into account influences of natural environment evolution with time. But, camera sensor has to be enough smart to apply in real time calibration law and radiometric corrections in a varying atmosphere. So, a complete measurement system was studied and developed with low cost infrared cameras available on the market. In the system developed, infrared camera is coupled with other sensors to feed simplified radiative models running, in real time, on GPU available on small PC. The system studied and developed uses a fast Ethernet camera FLIR A320 [1] coupled with a VAISALA WXT520 [2] weather station and a light GPS unit [3] for positioning and dating. It can be used with other Ethernet infrared cameras (i.e. visible ones) but requires to be able to access measured data at raw level. In the present study, it has been made possible thanks to a specific agreement signed with FLIR Company. The prototype system studied and developed is implemented on low cost small computer that integrates a GPU card to allow real time parallel computing [4] of simplified radiometric [5] heat balance using information measured with the weather station. An HMI was developed under Linux using OpenSource and complementary pieces of software developed at IFSTTAR. This new HMI called "IrLaW" has various functionalities that let it compliant to be use in

  19. Revolutionary visible and infrared sensor detectors for the most advanced astronomical AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guieu, Sylvain; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric D.; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Coussement, Jérome; Kolb, Johann; Hubin, Norbert; Derelle, Sophie; Robert, Clélia; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Rochat, Sylvain; Delpoulbé, Alain; Lebouqun, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    We report in this paper decisive advance on the detector development for the astronomical applications that require very fast operation. Since the CCD220 and OCAM2 major success, new detector developments started in Europe either for visible and IR wavelengths. Funded by ESO and the FP7 Opticon European network, the NGSD CMOS device is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with strong ESO involvement. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate and providing digital outputs. A camera development, based on this CMOS device and also funded by the Opticon European network, is ongoing. Another major AO wavefront sensing detector development concerns IR detectors based on Avalanche Photodiode (e- APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter offers a 320x255 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3 microns, with less than 2 e readout noise at 1600 fps. A rectangular window can also be programmed to speed up even more the frame rate when the full frame readout is not required. The high QE response, in the range of 70%, is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using pulse tube cryocoolers was developed in the frame of this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. The characterization results of this device are presented here. Readout noise as low as 1.7 e at 1600 fps has been measured with a 3 microns wavelength cut-off chip and a multiplication gain of 14 obtained with a limited photodiode polarization of 8V. This device also exhibits excellent linearity, lower than 1%. The pulse tube cooling allows smart and easy cooling down to 55 K. Vibrations investigations using centroiding and FFT measurements were performed proving that the miniature pulse tube does not induce measurable vibrations to the optical bench, allowing use of this

  20. Spatial Structure of Turbulent Heat Exchange at the Snow-Atmosphere Interface Inferred from Time-sequential Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, A.; Oldroyd, H. J.; Diebold, M.; Huwald, H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Land surfaces with a low thermal admittance, such as snow, experience fluctuations in their surface temperature (Ts) not only due to the diurnal course of the energy balance, but also on much shorter time-scales as the consequence of turbulent heat exchange between the surface and the atmospheric surface layer. High-frequency fluctuations in Ts, as reported for selected land-surfaces in the literature, are the imprint of coherent turbulent structures transporting heat away or towards the surface in the atmospheric surface layer. Our hypothesis is that spatially coherent perturbations in Ts on a snowpack can be mapped using time-sequential thermography (TST) - time series of thermal images sampled using state-of-the-art thermal cameras. The low thermal admittance of fresh snow implies that snow should respond with higher amplitudes in Ts to atmospheric forcing than many other land-surfaces, where fluctuations in Ts can be below the radiometric resolution of common thermal camera systems. On February 13 and 14, 2013 we operated an uncooled thermal camera (A320, FLIR, Wilsonville, OR, USA) over a snow covered glacier (';Glacier de la Plaine Morte', 46°22'37"N, 7°29'16" E, 2720 m a.s.l.). The thermal camera was mounted on a short 3 m mast to provide an oblique view of a uniform and flat part of the glacier upstream of the tower, with a filed of view (FOV) of 25 x 19° at 320 x 240 pixel resolution. Thermal images of the apparent surface temperature were acquired with ~5Hz and complemented by 20 Hz measurements of the atmospheric flow with three ultrasonic anemometer-thermometers (CSAT-3, CSI, Logan, UT, USA), of which one was installed in the FOV of the thermal camera. During the measurement campaign, the atmospheric surface layer was stably stratified (clear skies, air temperatures -15 to -10°C), and Ts ranged between -21 and -10°C. The snow-surface exhibited quite large fluctuations in Ts up to ×3 K over short time (within ~10-30 seconds). The extracted spatio

  1. Calibration of coronary calcium scores determined using iterative image reconstruction (AIDR 3D) at 120, 100, and 80 kVp

    SciTech Connect

    Blobel, Joerg Mews, Juergen; Schuijf, Joanne D.; Overlaet, Willem; Goatman, Keith A.

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) radiation dose reduction is frequently achieved by applying lower tube voltages and using iterative reconstruction (IR). For calcium scoring, the reference protocol at 120 kVp with filtered back projection (FBP) is still used, because kVp and IR may influence the Agatston score (AS) and volume score (VS). The authors present a two-step method to optimize dose: first, to determine the lowest feasible exposure and highest noise thresholds; second, to define a calibration method that ensures that the AS and VS are similar to the reference protocol. Methods: AS and VS were measured for an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom that includes a calcium calibration module. The phantom was scanned on a 320-row CT scanner, at tube voltages of 120 kVp using FBP, and 120, 100, and 80 kVp using adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) reconstruction. The minimum CTDIs were determined based on three objective quality criteria. Calibration was performed to estimate adjusted CT number thresholds for the lower kVp acquisitions. Finally, the accuracies of the total and individual insert scores at dose level close to the minimum CTDI level were investigated and compared to low (FBP{sub LD} − 120) and high (FBP{sub HD} − 120) dose reference protocols (based on ten repeated acquisitions for each group). Results: IR allows the exposure to be reduced by 69% at 120 kVp, with no significant effect on the total scores when averaged over all included dose steps and compared to FBP-120 (AS: 693 vs 699, p = 0.182; VS: 588 vs 587 mm{sup 3}, p = 0.569). Also when averaged over ten repeated scans and compared to FBP{sub HD} − 120 (AS: 709 vs 704, p = 0.435; VS: 604 vs 601 mm{sup 3}, p = 0.479), there is no statistical significant effect. Reducing the peak tube voltage allows even greater dose reductions: 73% at 100 kVp and 76% at 80 kVp. The calibrated CT number thresholds for analysis at 120, 100, and 80 kVp were, respectively, 130, 133, and 160 HU for the

  2. Multi-Sensing system for outdoor thermal monitoring: Application to large scale civil engineering components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Manceau, Jean-Luc; Perez, Laetitia; Bourquin, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Aging of transport infrastructures combined with traffic and climatic solicitations contribute to the reduction of their performances. To address and quantify the resilience of civil engineering structure, investigations on robust, fast and efficient methods are required. Among research works carried out at IFSTTAR, methods for long term monitoring face an increasing demand. Such works take benefits of this last decade technological progresses in ICT domain. The present study follows the ISTIMES European project [1], which aimed at demonstrate the ability of different electromagnetic sensing techniques, processing methods and ICT architecture, to be used for long term monitoring of critical transport infrastructures. Thanks to this project a multi-sensing techniques system, able to date and synchronize measurements carried out by infrared thermography coupled with various measurements data (i.e. weather parameters), have been designed, developed and implemented on real site [2]. Among experiments carried out on real transport infrastructure, it has been shown, for the "Musmesci" bridge deck (Italy), that by using infrared thermal image sequence with weather measurements during sevral days it was possible to develop analysis methods able to produce qualitative and quantitative data [3]. In the present study, added functionalities were designed and added to the "IrLAW" system in order to reach full autonomy in term of power supply, very long term measurement capability (at least 1 year) and automated data base feeding. The surveyed civil engineering structures consist in two concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T weight each. One of the two beams was damage by high energy mechanical impact at the IFSTTAR falling rocks test station facilities located in the French Alpes [4]. The system is composed of one IR uncooled microbolometric camera (FLIR SC325) with a 320X240 Focal Plane Array detector in band III, a weather station VAISALA WXT520, a GPS, a failover power supply

  3. A study of power cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide as the working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroder, Andrew Urban

    A real fluid heat engine power cycle analysis code has been developed for analyzing the zero dimensional performance of a general recuperated, recompression, precompression supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle with reheat and a unique shaft configuration. With the proposed shaft configuration, several smaller compressor-turbine pairs could be placed inside of a pressure vessel in order to avoid high speed, high pressure rotating seals. The small compressor-turbine pairs would share some resemblance with a turbocharger assembly. Variation in fluid properties within the heat exchangers is taken into account by discretizing zero dimensional heat exchangers. The cycle analysis code allows for multiple reheat stages, as well as an option for the main compressor to be powered by a dedicated turbine or an electrical motor. Variation in performance with respect to design heat exchanger pressure drops and minimum temperature differences, precompressor pressure ratio, main compressor pressure ratio, recompression mass fraction, main compressor inlet pressure, and low temperature recuperator mass fraction have been explored throughout a range of each design parameter. Turbomachinery isentropic efficiencies are implemented and the sensitivity of the cycle performance and the optimal design parameters is explored. Sensitivity of the cycle performance and optimal design parameters is studied with respect to the minimum heat rejection temperature and the maximum heat addition temperature. A hybrid stochastic and gradient based optimization technique has been used to optimize critical design parameters for maximum engine thermal efficiency. A parallel design exploration mode was also developed in order to rapidly conduct the parameter sweeps in this design space exploration. A cycle thermal efficiency of 49.6% is predicted with a 320K [47°C] minimum temperature and 923K [650°C] maximum temperature. The real fluid heat engine power cycle analysis code was expanded to study a

  4. [Lipid-lowering therapy and patient adherence in the MULTI GAP 2013 trial].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor

    2014-04-27

    Bevezetés: A dyslipidaemia ismert cardiovascularis kockázati tényező. A lipidterápiában a célértékek elérésének fontos tényezője a megfelelő betegadherencia. Célkitűzés: A MULTI GAP (MULTI Goal Attainment Problem) 2013-as vizsgálatban atheroscleroticus betegségben szenvedő betegek esetében a statinterápia adherenciájának és perzisztenciájának felmérése, amely részben a vizsgálatban részt vevő orvosok becslésén, illetve 319, a megelőző évben elvégzett MULTI GAP vizsgálatban részt vett beteg esetében az Országos Egészségbiztosítási Pénztár vénykiváltási adatbázisán alapult. Módszer: A MULTI GAP 2013 vizsgálatban standard, strukturált kérdőívek segítségével 1519 beteg adatai kerültek feldolgozásra. Az elemzésben kiértékelésre kerültek az egyes ellátási szinteken elért lipidértékek, a kezelőorvos által vélt betegadherencia, a 319 beteg Országos Egészségbiztosítási Pénztár vénykiváltási adataira támaszkodó valós adherencia, a kezelőorvosok elégedettsége a statinterápia eredményeivel, illetve az adherencia és a lipideredmények összevetése. Eredmények: Az elmúlt 7 év felméréseinek adatait is figyelembe véve előtérbe kerültek a hatékonyabb statinok; az atorvastatin és rozuvastatin alkalmazásának összesített aránya 49%-ról 83%-ra, azaz mintegy 70%-kal nőtt. A betegadherencia vonatkozásában kimutatták, hogy a 2,5 mmol/l alatti LDL-koleszterin-értékeket elért betegeknél az 1 év alatt kiváltott receptek száma mintegy nyolc gyógyszertári beváltást jelentett. Ehhez képest a 2,5 mmol/l feletti LDL-koleszterin-értékű csoportban a gyógyszerkiváltás lényegesen alacsonyabb volt (5,3 és 6,3 közötti). Éves szinten a 10–12 és a 7–9 gyógyszerkiváltás szignifikánsan alacsonyabb LDL-koleszterin-szintet jelentett a semennyit (0), illetve az 1–3 receptet éves szinten kiváltók csoportjaihoz képest. A kezelőorvosok által 100%-os

  5. Fullerenes, Organics and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    The status of DIB research has strongly advanced since 20 years [1], as well as the quest for fullerenes, PAHs and large organics in space. In 1994 we reported the discovery of two near IR diffuse bands coincident with C60+, confirmed in subsequent years [2-6] and now by latest laboratory experiments. A number of DIB observational studies have been published, dealing with: DIB surveys [1,7-10]; measurements of DIB families, correlations and environment dependences [11-14]; extragalactic DIBs [15, 16]. Resolved substructures were detected [17,18] and compared to predicted rotational contours by large molecules [19]. Polarisation studies provided upper limits constraints [20, 21]. DIBs carriers have been linked with organic molecules observed in the interstellar medium [22-25] such as IR bands (assigned to PAHs), Extended Red Emission or recently detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME, assigned to spinning dust) and with spectroscopic IR emission bands measured with ISO or Spitzer. Fullerenes and PAHs have been proposed to explain some DIBs and specific molecules were searched in DIB spectra [eg 2-6, 26-31]. These could be present in various dehydrogenation and ionisation conditions [32,33]. Experiments in the laboratory and in space [eg 34-36] allow to measure the survival and by-products of these molecules. We review DIB observational results and their interpretation, and discuss the presence of large organics, fullerenes, PAHs, graphenes in space. References [1] Herbig, G. 1995 ARA&A33, 19; [2] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1994 Natur 369, 296; [3] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1997 A&A317, L59; [4] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1995 ASSL202, 65; [5] Ehrenfreund, P., Foing, B. H. 1997 AdSpR19, 1033; [6] Galazutdinov, G. A. et al. 2000 MNRAS317, 750; [7] Jenniskens, P., Desert, F.-X. 1994 A&AS106, 39; [8] Ehrenfreund, P. et al. 1997 A&A318, L28; [9] Tuairisg, S. Ó. et al. 2000 A&AS142, 225; [10] Cox, N. et al. 2005 A&A438, 187; [11] Cami, J. et al. 1997A&A.326, 822

  6. Silicon Photonics for All-Optical Processing and High-Bandwidth-Density Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ophir, Noam

    nonlinear processing in communication applications and focuses on recent achievements in non-silicon and silicon FWM platforms. Chapter five describes some of the author's contributions on parametric processing of high speed data in silicon nonlinear devices, with first of a kind demonstrations of wavelength conversion of 160-Gb/s optically time division multiplexed (OTDM) data as well as the wavelength-multicasting of a 320-Gb/s OTDM stream. The chapter then details a methodical characterization and demonstration of several record wavelength conversion experiments of data in silicon with 40-Gb/s data wavelength-converted across more than 100 nm with only 1.4-dB of power penalties as well as the wavelength and format conversion of 10-Gb/s data across up to 168 nm with sensitivity gains stemming from the format conversion of about 2 dB and a residual conversion penalty of only 0.1 dB, achieved by implementing an improved experimental setup. Both experiments highlight the performance uniformity of the conversion process for a wide range of probe-idler detuning settings, showcasing the silicon platform's unique broadband phase matching properties. The sixth chapter presents a slight shift in motivation for parametric processing from traditional telecom-wavelength applications to functionalities developed targeting mid-IR operation. The contributions detail the experimental demonstration of the first silicon optical processing functionalities achieved at such long wavelengths including the wavelength conversion and unicast of 10-Gb/s signals with up to 700 nm of probe-idler detuning, the combined two-stage 10-Gb/s FWM-link in which both data generation and detection at 1900 nm is facilitated by parametric processing in silicon with only 2.1-dB overall penalty, the first ever 40-Gb/s receiver at 1900 nm based on a FWM stage for simultaneous temporal demultiplexing and wavelength conversion, and lastly, the demonstration of a 40-Gb/s FWM-link operation with only 3.6 dB of penalty

  7. Water-level altitudes 2010 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2009 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    -foot rise (2009-10), from a 25-foot decline to a 35-foot rise (2005-10), from a 40-foot decline to an 80-foot rise (1990-2010), and from a 140-foot decline to a 200-foot rise (1977-2010). In 2010, water-level-altitude contours for the Evangeline aquifer ranged from 300 feet below datum in north-central Harris County to 200 feet above datum at the boundary of Waller, Montgomery, and Grimes Counties. Water-level-altitude changes in the Evangeline aquifer ranged from a 58-foot decline to a 69-foot rise (2009-10), from an 80-foot decline to an 80-foot rise (2005-10), from a 200-foot decline to a 220-foot rise (1990-2010), and from a 320-foot decline to a 220-foot rise (1977-2010). In 2010, water-level-altitude contours for the Jasper aquifer ranged from 200 feet below datum in south-central Montgomery County to 250 feet above datum in eastern-central Grimes County. Water-level-altitude changes in the Jasper aquifer ranged from a 39-foot decline to a 39-foot rise (2009-10), from a 110-foot decline to no change (2005-10), and from a 180-foot decline to no change (2000-10). Compaction of subsurface materials (mostly in the clay layers) composing the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers was recorded continuously at 13 borehole extensometers at 11 sites. For the period of record beginning in 1973, or later, and ending in December 2009, cumulative clay compaction data measured by 12 extensometers ranged from 0.088 foot at the Texas City-Moses Lake site to 3.559 foot at the Addicks site. The rate of compaction varies from site to site because of differences in groundwater withdrawals near each site and differences among sites in the clay-to-sand ratio in the subsurface materials. Therefore, it is not possible to extrapolate or infer a rate of clay compaction for an area based on the rate of compaction measured at a nearby extensometer.

  8. Water-level altitudes 2016 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973–2015 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Ramage, Jason K.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2016-10-07

    changes in effective stress caused by changes in groundwater withdrawal from the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers.In 2016, water-level-altitude contours for the Chicot aquifer ranged from 200 feet (ft) below the vertical datum (North American Vertical Datum of 1988; hereinafter, datum) in a localized area in northwestern Harris County to 200 ft above datum in west-central Montgomery County. Water-level changes during 2015–16 in the Chicot aquifer ranged from a 39-ft decline to a 26-ft rise. Contoured 5-year and long-term changes in water-level altitudes of the Chicot aquifer ranged from a 30-ft decline to a 20-ft rise (2011–16), from a 140-ft decline to a 160-ft rise (1990–2016), and from a 120-ft decline to a 200-ft rise (1977–2016). In 2016, water-level-altitude contours for the Evangeline aquifer ranged from 250 ft below datum in three separate areas in south-central Montgomery County and extending into north-central Harris County, in west-central Harris County, and in southwestern Harris County to 200 ft above datum in southeastern Grimes and northwestern Montgomery Counties. Water-level changes during 2015–16 in the Evangeline aquifer ranged from a 65-ft decline to a 61-ft rise. Contoured 5-year and long-term changes in water-level altitudes of the Evangeline aquifer ranged from a 60-ft decline to a 40-ft rise (2011–16), from a 160-ft decline to a 160-ft rise (1990–2016), and from a 320-ft decline to a 240-ft rise (1977–2016). In 2016, water-level-altitude contours for the Jasper aquifer ranged from 200 ft below datum in south-central Montgomery County extending into north-central Harris County to 250 ft above datum in northwestern Montgomery County and extending into eastern Grimes County and southwestern Walker County. Water-level changes during 2015–16 in the Jasper aquifer ranged from a 38-ft decline to a 51-ft rise. Contoured 5-year and long-term changes in water-level altitudes of the Jasper aquifer ranged from a 60-ft decline to a 40-ft rise