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Sample records for a318 a319 a320

  1. 76 FR 16582 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country...

  2. 75 FR 75878 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318-111 and A318-112 Airplanes and Model A319, A320, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2008-0670; Directorate Identifier 2007-NM...-111 and A318-112 Airplanes and Model A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and...

  3. 76 FR 42024 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2011-0257; Directorate Identifier 2010-NM..., A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Department of Transportation (DOT), Federal Aviation... information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an...

  4. 77 FR 64023 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Design Roll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov/ . Docket: Background... regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special..., A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes because of a novel or unusual design feature, special...

  5. 75 FR 8003 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... countries to provide adequate time for interested parties to submit comments. The comment period for...

  6. 75 FR 27414 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition...

  7. 75 FR 11439 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2009-0649; Directorate Identifier 2008-NM..., A320, and A321 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on...

  8. 75 FR 52246 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... corresponds to FAA AD 2007-20-05, Amendment 39- 15215 (72 FR 56262, October 3, 2007)]. This ALI task has been...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have... the ALS (Airworthiness Limitations Section) part 2 under ALI Document reference...

  9. 77 FR 64025 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Interaction of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... structural performance of the airplane. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or..., affect structural performance. These systems include flight control systems, autopilots,...

  10. 75 FR 68181 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... (75 FR 16689). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and ] 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive...-1570 D554 71001 000 00 TS-1573 D554 71001 000 00 TS-1575 D554 71001 000 00 TS-1578 D554 71001 000 00...

  11. 75 FR 78883 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... Sec. 39.13(c), in the second column, in the first column of the table, in the 30th entry, ``D554 71000... column, in the second column of the table, in the 19th entry, ``TS-Z072'', should read ``TS-2072''. 3. On page 68184, in the same section, in the first column, in the first column of the table, in the...

  12. 76 FR 56279 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... reference of certain other publications listed in the AD as of August 13, 2004 (69 FR 45243, July 29, 2004... issued AD 2004-15-14, Amendment 39-13748 (69 FR 45243, July 29, 2004), which corresponded to Direction G... provided in French AD F-2004- 074. Since we issued AD 2004-15-14, Amendment 39-13748 (69 FR 45243, July...

  13. 75 FR 68548 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... proposed AD. Discussion On August 7, 2009, we issued AD 2009-17-04, amendment 39-15995 (74 FR 41611, August... their substance. But we might have found it necessary to use different words from those in the MCAI to... 13132. This proposed AD would not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the...

  14. 76 FR 64854 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... proposed AD. Discussion On October 23, 1997, we issued AD 97-22-13, Amendment 39-10185 (62 FR 58891...), dated April 10, 1996, and which supersedes FAA AD 94-20-02, Amendment 39-9030 (59 FR 48563, September 22, 1994)); and on May 10, 2002, we issued AD 2002-10-06, Amendment 39-12752 (67 FR 35425, May 20,...

  15. 75 FR 16689 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic... manufacturer serial numbers (S/Ns), if equipped with carbon fiber reinforced plastic rudders having part.../N TS-1227, have a core density of 24 kilogram (kg)/meters cubed (m ). Subject (d) Air...

  16. 76 FR 37241 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ..., listed in the AD as of April 27, 2007 (72 FR 13681, March 23, 2007). We must receive comments on this AD... 39-14999 (72 FR 13681, March 23, 2007). That AD required actions intended to address an unsafe... Order 12866; 2. Is not a ''significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  17. 76 FR 57630 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... NPRM was published in the Federal Register on November 8, 2010 (75 FR 68548), and proposed to supersede AD 2009-17-04, Amendment 39-15995 (74 FR 41611, August 18, 2009). That NPRM proposed to correct an... response to each comment. Support for NPRM US Airways stated that the NPRM (75 FR 68548, November 8,...

  18. 75 FR 46873 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318-111 and A318-112 Airplanes and Model A319, A320, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ..., 2008 (73 FR 35601). That earlier NPRM proposed to require actions intended to address the unsafe... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model...

  19. 76 FR 1346 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300, A300-600, A310, A318, A319, A320, A321, A330-300...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... 5 61 93 44 51; e-mail account.airworth-eas@airbus.com ; Internet http://www.airbus.com . For service... 96; fax +33 5 61 93 44 51; e-mail account.airworth-eas@airbus.com ; Internet http://www.airbus.com... ; Internet http://www.airbus.com . Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet...

  20. 75 FR 12965 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Seats With Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ..., except Federal holidays, between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alan Sinclair, FAA... preamble between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. We will consider all... the postcard and mail it back to you. Background On January 15, 2010, Airbus Industrie, 1 Rond...

  1. 77 FR 64029 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Design Dive Speed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http: DocketsInfo.dot.gov/. Docket: Background... Series Airplanes; Design Dive Speed AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... airplanes. These design features include a high-speed protection system. The applicable...

  2. 76 FR 27863 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318-112, A319-111, A319-112, A319-115, A319-132, A319-133...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant... insufficient crimping of the female contacts on the shunt, caused by a wrong setting of the crimping tool... insufficient crimping of the female contacts on the shunt, caused by a wrong setting of the crimping tool....

  3. 64 FR 29607 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-06-02

    ... of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This document proposes the adoption of a new airworthiness... proposal would require modification of the 90VU electronics rack umbrellas, the 91VU upper shelf assembly, the cockpit drain circuit, and the electrical wire routing above the 90VU electronics rack....

  4. 76 FR 67625 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319 and A320 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as: One operator has reported a torn out... condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: One operator has reported a torn out...

  5. Classification and Prediction of RF Coupling inside A-320 and A-319 Airplanes using Feed Forward Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, Madiha; Ely, Jay; Vahala, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Neural Network Modeling is introduced in this paper to classify and predict Interference Path Loss measurements on Airbus 319 and 320 airplanes. Interference patterns inside the aircraft are classified and predicted based on the locations of the doors, windows, aircraft structures and the communication/navigation system-of-concern. Modeled results are compared with measured data and a plan is proposed to enhance the modeling for better prediction of electromagnetic coupling problems inside aircraft.

  6. 75 FR 31282 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319-100, A320-200, A321-100, and A321-200 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On April 26, 2006, the FAA issued AD 2006- 09-11, Amendment 39-14582 (71 FR 27595... repetitive inspections for corrosion in the inside and outside lower walls of each type A, D, E, and F lavatory wall that has at least one wall-mounted cabin attendant seat, and related investigative...

  7. 76 FR 61641 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319-111, -112, and -132 Airplanes; Model A320-111, -211...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... reported on the overwing refueling aperture (used to fill the fuel tank by gravity) on the wing top skin... reported on the overwing refueling aperture (used to fill the fuel tank by gravity) on the wing top...

  8. 14 CFR 125.509 - Flammability reduction means.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) The person complies with 14 CFR 26.35 by the applicable date stated in that section. (2) The person... operational. Table 1 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319, A320, A321 Series 737 Series A330, A340... comply with § 26.33(c) of this chapter. Table 2 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319,...

  9. 14 CFR 125.509 - Flammability reduction means.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) The person complies with 14 CFR 26.35 by the applicable date stated in that section. (2) The person... operational. Table 1 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319, A320, A321 Series 737 Series A330, A340... comply with § 26.33(c) of this chapter. Table 2 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319,...

  10. 14 CFR 125.509 - Flammability reduction means.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) The person complies with 14 CFR 26.35 by the applicable date stated in that section. (2) The person... operational. Table 1 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319, A320, A321 Series 737 Series A330, A340... comply with § 26.33(c) of this chapter. Table 2 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319,...

  11. 14 CFR 125.509 - Flammability reduction means.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) The person complies with 14 CFR 26.35 by the applicable date stated in that section. (2) The person... operational. Table 1 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319, A320, A321 Series 737 Series A330, A340... comply with § 26.33(c) of this chapter. Table 2 Model—Boeing Model—Airbus 747 Series A318, A319,...

  12. 78 FR 6198 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N 3238); Certification of Cooktops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ...These special conditions are issued for the Airbus Model A318- 112 airplane, serial number (S/N) 3238. This airplane, as modified by Fokker Services B.V., will have a novel or unusual design feature associated with a cooktop installation. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special conditions contain......

  13. 77 FR 32060 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... 2007-15-06 R1, Amendment 39- 16097 (74 FR 62219, November 27, 2009). That AD required actions intended..., Amendment 39-16097 (74 FR 62219, November 27, 2009), Airbus has issued A318/A319/A320/A321 Fuel... of the restated requirements of AD 2007-15-06 R1, Amendment 39-16097 (74 FR 62219, November 27,...

  14. 78 FR 25666 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... proposed AD. Discussion On December 27, 2012, we issued AD 2012-26-51, Amendment 39-17312 (78 FR 1723... A318, A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes. Since we issued AD 2012-26-51, Amendment 39-17312 (78 FR... [which corresponds to FAA AD 2012-26-51, Amendment 39-17312 (78 FR 1723, January 9, 2013)] to...

  15. 78 FR 78705 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...We are superseding Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2010-24-07 for all Airbus Model A318 series airplanes, Model A319 series airplanes, Model A320 series airplanes, and Model A321 series airplanes. AD 2010- 24-07 required repetitive inspections of the 80VU rack lower lateral fittings for damage, repetitive inspections of the 80VU rack lower central support for cracking, and corrective action if......

  16. Creep Properties of the As-Cast Al-A319 Alloy: T4 and T7 Heat Treatment Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanian-Naziftoosi, Hamid R.; Rincón, Ernesto J.; López, Hugo F.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the creep behavior of a commercial Al-A319 alloy was investigated in the temperature range of 413 K to 533 K (140 °C to 260 °C). Tensile creep specimens in the as-cast condition and after heat treating by solid solution (T4) and by aging (T7) were tested in a stress range varying from 60 to 170 MPa. It was found that steady-state creep strain rate was significantly low in the T7 condition when compared with either the T4 or as-cast alloy conditions. As a result, the time to failure behavior considerably increased. The experimentally determined creep exponents measured from the stress-strain curves were 4 for the as-cast alloy, 7.5 in the solid solution, and 9.5 after aging. In particular, after solid solution a grain substructure was found to develop which indicated that creep in a constant subgrain structure was active, thus accounting for the n exponent of 7.5. In the aged condition, a stress threshold is considered to account for the power law creep exponent n of 9.5. Moreover, It was found that the creep activation energy values were rather similar for the alloys in the as-cast (134 kJ/mol) and T4 (146 kJ/mol) conditions. These values are close to the one corresponding to pure Al self-diffusion (143 kJ/mol). In the aged alloy, the apparent creep activation energy (202 kJ/mol) exceeded that corresponding to Al self-diffusion. This deviation in activation energy is attributed to the effect of temperature on the alloy elastic modulus. Microstructural observations using transmission electron microscopy provided further support for the various dislocation-microstructure interactions exhibited by the alloy under the investigated creep conditions and implemented heat treatments.

  17. Creep Properties of the As-Cast Al-A319 Alloy: T4 and T7 Heat Treatment Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanian-Naziftoosi, Hamid R.; Rincón, Ernesto J.; López, Hugo F.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the creep behavior of a commercial Al-A319 alloy was investigated in the temperature range of 413 K to 533 K (140 °C to 260 °C). Tensile creep specimens in the as-cast condition and after heat treating by solid solution (T4) and by aging (T7) were tested in a stress range varying from 60 to 170 MPa. It was found that steady-state creep strain rate was significantly low in the T7 condition when compared with either the T4 or as-cast alloy conditions. As a result, the time to failure behavior considerably increased. The experimentally determined creep exponents measured from the stress-strain curves were 4 for the as-cast alloy, 7.5 in the solid solution, and 9.5 after aging. In particular, after solid solution a grain substructure was found to develop which indicated that creep in a constant subgrain structure was active, thus accounting for the n exponent of 7.5. In the aged condition, a stress threshold is considered to account for the power law creep exponent n of 9.5. Moreover, It was found that the creep activation energy values were rather similar for the alloys in the as-cast (134 kJ/mol) and T4 (146 kJ/mol) conditions. These values are close to the one corresponding to pure Al self-diffusion (143 kJ/mol). In the aged alloy, the apparent creep activation energy (202 kJ/mol) exceeded that corresponding to Al self-diffusion. This deviation in activation energy is attributed to the effect of temperature on the alloy elastic modulus. Microstructural observations using transmission electron microscopy provided further support for the various dislocation-microstructure interactions exhibited by the alloy under the investigated creep conditions and implemented heat treatments.

  18. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  19. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  20. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  1. Radiation Dose from Single-Heartbeat Coronary CT Angiography Performed with a 320–Detector Row Volume Scanner1

    PubMed Central

    Elliston, Carl D.; Arai, Andrew E.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Mather, Richard; Pearson, Gregory D. N.; DeLaPaz, Robert L.; Nickoloff, Edward; Dutta, Ajoy; Brenner, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine radiation doses from coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography performed by using a 320–detector row volume scanner and evaluate how the effective dose depends on scan mode and the calculation method used. Materials and Methods: Radiation doses from coronary CT angiography performed by using a volume scanner were determined by using metal-oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors positioned in an anthropomorphic phantom physically and radiographically simulating a male or female human. Organ and effective doses were determined for six scan modes, including both 64-row helical and 280-row volume scans. Effective doses were compared with estimates based on the method most commonly used in clinical literature: multiplying dose-length product (DLP) by a general conversion coefficient (0.017 or 0.014 mSv·mGy−1·cm−1), determined from Monte Carlo simulations of chest CT by using single-section scanners and previous tissue-weighting factors. Results: Effective dose was reduced by up to 91% with volume scanning relative to helical scanning, with similar image noise. Effective dose, determined by using International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, was 8.2 mSv, using volume scanning with exposure permitting a wide reconstruction window, 5.8 mSv with optimized exposure and 4.4 mSv for optimized 100-kVp scanning. Estimating effective dose with a chest conversion coefficient resulted in a dose as low as 1.8 mSv, substantially underestimating effective dose for both volume and helical coronary CT angiography. Conclusion: Volume scanning markedly decreases coronary CT angiography radiation doses compared with those at helical scanning. When conversion coefficients are used to estimate effective dose from DLP, they should be appropriate for the scanner and scan mode used and reflect current tissue-weighting factors. © RSNA, 2010 PMID:20177085

  2. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  3. Measurement of electron density and effective atomic number by dual-energy scan using a 320-detector computed tomography scanner with raw data-based analysis: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Kiguchi, Masao; Tsushima, So; Taniguchi, Akira; Kaichi, Yoko; Yamagami, Takuji; Awai, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of the electron densities and effective atomic numbers determined by raw data-based dual-energy analysis on a 320-detector computed tomography scanner. The mean (SD) errors between the measured and true electron densities and between the measured and true effective atomic numbers were 1.3% (1.5%) and 3.1% (3.2%), respectively. Electron densities and effective atomic numbers can be determined with high accuracy, which may help to improve accuracy in radiotherapy treatment planning. PMID:24983439

  4. Design and testing of a 320 MW pulsed power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Schillig, J.B.; Boenig, H.J.; Ferner, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    For a 60 Tesla, 100 millisecond long pulse magnet five 64 MW (87.6 MVA) power converter modules have been installed. Each module provides a no-load voltage of 4.18 kV and a full load voltage of 3.20 kV at the rated current of 20 kA. The modules are connected to a 1,430 MVA/650 MJ inertial energy storage generator set, which is operated at 21 kV and frequencies between 60 and 42 Hz. They are designed to provide the rated power output for 2 seconds once every hour. Each module consists of two 21 kV/3.1 kV cast coil transformers and two 6-pulse rectifiers connected in parallel without an interphase reactor, forming a 12-pulse converter module. As far as possible standard high power industrial converter components were used, operated closer to their allowable limits. The converters are controlled by three programmable high speed controllers. In this paper the design of the pulsed converters, including control and special considerations for protection schemes with the converters supplying a mutually coupled magnet system, is detailed. Test results of the converters driving an ohmic-inductive load for 2 seconds at 20 kA and 3.2 kV are presented.

  5. 77 FR 63716 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ..., Amendment 39-16097 (74 FR 62219, November 27, 2009). For Model A318-111 and -112 airplanes, and Model A319... this AD as of December 14, 2009 (74 FR 62219, November 27, 2009). The Director of the Federal Register..., 2007 (72 FR 40222, July 24, 2007). ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at...

  6. 78 FR 71992 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ..., Amendment 39-14523 (71 FR 15023, March 27, 2006). For Model A318-111 and -112 airplanes; Model ] A319-111... as of May 1, 2006 (71 FR 15023, March 27, 2006). ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the... published in the Federal Register on August 20, 2013 (78 FR 51117), and proposed to supersede AD...

  7. 75 FR 3983 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A318 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... NPRM was published in the Federal Register on August 13, 2009 (74 FR 40776). That NPRM proposed to... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of...

  8. 76 FR 72350 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ..., A319, A320, and A321 airplanes. Since we issued AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April..., Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April 14, 2008), With Revised Affected Airplanes Referenced Conditions (j... proposed AD. Discussion On March 31, 2008, we issued AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975,...

  9. Animal model for evaluation of topical photoprotection against ultraviolet A (320-380 nm) radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, S.; DeLeo, V.A.; Harber, L.C.

    1987-10-01

    Recent studies reporting UVA (ultraviolet A radiation 320-380 nm) as an integral part of the cumulative sun-induced damage in human skin have prompted an interest in developing effective UVA photoprotective agents. The development of such compounds has been impeded by the absence of a clinically relevant animal model for evaluating their efficacy. This report describes the development and use of such a laboratory animal system. Selected concentrations of oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone) in vehicle (0.1% to 6%) or vehicle alone were applied to the depilated dorsal skin of 30 Hartley strain female albino guinea pigs. The skin was irradiated with solar simulated UVA from a xenon light source. Acute radiation-induced damage was assayed by erythema grading and inhibition of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into epidermal DNA. Data from erythema grading studies indicated that a significant degree of photoprotection was achieved with 6%, 3%, and 1% solutions of benzophenone compared with the control vehicle; the 6% solution was significantly more photoprotective than the 3% and 1% solutions. A 6% solution afforded significant photoprotection when assayed by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation.

  10. 76 FR 19714 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A320-214, -232, and -233 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This proposed AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition...

  11. 76 FR 50113 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A320-214, -232, and -233 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition...

  12. A 320 mV, 6 kb subthreshold 10T SRAM employing voltage lowering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiangzheng, Cai; Sumin, Zhang; Jia, Yuan; Xinchao, Shang; Liming, Chen; Yong, Hei

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a 6 kb SRAM that uses a novel 10T cell to achieve a minimum operating voltage of 320 mV in a 130 nm CMOS process. A number of low power circuit techniques are included to enable the proposed SRAM to operate in the subthreshold region. The reverse short channel effect and the reverse narrow channel effect are utilized to improve the performance of the SRAM. A novel subthreshold pulse generation circuit produces an ideal pulse to make read operation stable. A floating write bit-line effectively reduces the standby leakage consumption. Finally, a short read bit-line makes the read operation fast and energy-saving. Measurements indicate that these techniques are effective, the SRAM can operate at 800 kHz and consume 1.94 μW at its lowest voltage (320 mV). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306039) and the Next Generation of Information Technology for Sensing China (No. XDA06020401).

  13. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  14. 75 FR 35 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N 3886); Certification of a Cooktop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... be a novel or unusual design feature. Discussion Currently, ovens are the prevailing means of heating food on airplanes. Ovens are characterized by an enclosure that contains both the heat source and the food being heated. The hazards presented by ovens are thus inherently limited, and are well...

  15. 77 FR 51944 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A318-112 Airplane (S/N 3238); Certification of Cooktops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov/ . Docket: Background... requirements for flexibility, heat, electrical resistance, and fire extinguishing including cooking oil fires... cooking oil in the cooktop. Applicability As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable...

  16. Interference Path Loss Prediction in A319/320 Airplanes Using Modulated Fuzzy Logic and Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, Madiha J.; Ely, Jay J.; Vahala, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, neural network (NN) modeling is combined with fuzzy logic to estimate Interference Path Loss measurements on Airbus 319 and 320 airplanes. Interference patterns inside the aircraft are classified and predicted based on the locations of the doors, windows, aircraft structures and the communication/navigation system-of-concern. Modeled results are compared with measured data. Combining fuzzy logic and NN modeling is shown to improve estimates of measured data over estimates obtained with NN alone. A plan is proposed to enhance the modeling for better prediction of electromagnetic coupling problems inside aircraft.

  17. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of a ∼320 Å long protein fiber generated by in-frame extension of its repeated helical coiled-coil core. Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  18. MT3250BA: a 320×256-50µm snapshot microbolometer ROIC for high-resistance detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Akin, Tayfun

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new microbolometer readout integrated circuit (MT3250BA) designed for high-resistance detector arrays. MT3250BA is the first microbolometer readout integrated circuit (ROIC) product from Mikro-Tasarim Ltd., which is a fabless IC design house specialized in the development of monolithic CMOS imaging sensors and ROICs for hybrid photonic imaging sensors and microbolometers. MT3250BA has a format of 320 × 256 and a pixel pitch of 50 µm, developed with a system-on-chip architecture in mind, where all the timing and biasing for this ROIC are generated on-chip without requiring any external inputs. MT3250BA is a highly configurable ROIC, where many of its features can be programmed through a 3-wire serial interface allowing on-the-fly configuration of many ROIC features. MT3250BA has 2 analog video outputs and 1 analog reference output for pseudo-differential operation, and the ROIC can be programmed to operate in the 1 or 2-output modes. A unique feature of MT3250BA is that it performs snapshot readout operation; therefore, the image quality will only be limited by the thermal time constant of the detector pixels, but not by the scanning speed of the ROIC, as commonly found in the conventional microbolometer ROICs performing line-by-line (rolling-line) readout operation. The signal integration is performed at the pixel level in parallel for the whole array, and signal integration time can be programmed from 0.1 µs up to 100 ms in steps of 0.1 µs. The ROIC is designed to work with high-resistance detector arrays with pixel resistance values higher than 250 kΩ. The detector bias voltage can be programmed on-chip over a 2 V range with a resolution of 1 mV. The ROIC has a measured input referred noise of 260 µV rms at 300 K. The ROIC can be used to build a microbolometer infrared sensor with an NETD value below 100 mK using a microbolometer detector array fabrication technology with a high detector resistance value (≥ 250 KΩ), a high TCR value (≥ 2.5 % / K), and a sufficiently low pixel thermal conductance (Gth ≤ 20 nW / K). The ROIC uses a single 3.3 V supply voltage and dissipates less than 75 mW in the 1-output mode at 60 fps. MT3250BA is fabricated using a mixed-signal CMOS process on 200 mm CMOS wafers, and tested wafers are available with test data and wafer map. A USB based compact test electronics and software are available for quick evaluation of this new microbolometer ROIC.

  19. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility. PMID:24531468

  20. A 320-year long series of Danube floods in Central Hungary (Budapest and Pest County): a frequency-magnitude-seasonality overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Andrea; Salinas, Jose; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2015-04-01

    The present paper is based on a recently developed database including contemporary original, administrative, legal and private source materials (published and archival) as well as media reports related to the floods occurred in the town of Budapest (historical towns of Pest, Buda) and Central Hungary (historical Pest-Pilis-Solt County). As for the archival evidence, main bases of investigation are the administrative sources such as town council protocols and county meeting protocols of Budapest and historical Pest-Pilis-Solt County: in these (legal-)administrative documents damaging events (natural/environmental hazards) were systematically recorded. Moreover, other source types such as taxation-related damage accounts as well as private and official reports, letters and correspondence (published, unpublished) were also included. Concerning published evidence, a most important source is flood reports in contemporary newspapers; however, other published sources (e.g. narratives, fund raising circulars etc.; both published and unpublished) also contained useful flood-related information. Beyond providing information on the strength and weaknesses of different sources types and the temporal and spatial distribution of evidence, a general background on the contemporary environmental and hydrological/hydromorphological conditions of the study area (and its changes during and after river regulations) are also provided. However, in the presentation the main focus is on the analysis of flood rich flood poor periods of the last more than 300 years; furthermore, the seasonality distribution as well as the magnitude of Danube flood events - and their spatial differences are discussed. In case of Budapest and Central Hungary, with respect to the greatest flood events, ice jam floods played a rather significant role before river regulation works. Due to this fact the main types of flood events (including their main causes), with special emphasis on ice jam floods, are discussed separate.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058, a probiotic strain with high conjugated linoleic acid production ability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei

    2015-11-20

    Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 was isolated from sauerkraut and identified to synthesize the beneficial metabolite conjugated linoleic acid. The genome contains a 319,7363-bp chromosome and three plasmids. The sequence will facilitate identification and characterization of the genetic determinants for its putative biological benefits. PMID:26439428

  2. 78 FR 28152 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ..., Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010), exempted airplanes on which Airbus Modification 34804..., Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). Except for Model A318-121 and -122 airplanes, and except...) of AD 2010-24-07, Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). Except for airplanes on...

  3. 78 FR 51117 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ...-06-14, Amendment 39-14523 (71 FR 15023, March 27, 2006). For Model A318-111 and -112 airplanes; Model...-06-14, Amendment 39-14523 (71 FR 15023, March 27, 2006), (``AD 2006-06-14''). That AD required... $680. Amendment 39-14523 (71 FR per hour = Between 15023, March 27, 2006)]. $85 and $680....

  4. Development, testing, and certification of life sciences engineering solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudle, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for the development of an air flat plate collector for use with solar heating, combined heating and cooling, and hot water systems. The contract was for final development, testing, and certification of the collector, and for delivery of a 320 square feet collector panel.

  5. 47 CFR 22.813 - Technical channel pair assignment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... location is at least 800 kilometers (497 miles) from the antenna location of the nearest co-channel ground transmitter in the United States, its territories and possessions; and 1000 kilometers (621 miles) from the... transmitters with antenna locations within a 320 kilometer (199 mile) radius of the proposed antenna location....

  6. 47 CFR 22.813 - Technical channel pair assignment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... location is at least 800 kilometers (497 miles) from the antenna location of the nearest co-channel ground transmitter in the United States, its territories and possessions; and 1000 kilometers (621 miles) from the... transmitters with antenna locations within a 320 kilometer (199 mile) radius of the proposed antenna location....

  7. 47 CFR 22.813 - Technical channel pair assignment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... location is at least 800 kilometers (497 miles) from the antenna location of the nearest co-channel ground transmitter in the United States, its territories and possessions; and 1000 kilometers (621 miles) from the... transmitters with antenna locations within a 320 kilometer (199 mile) radius of the proposed antenna location....

  8. 47 CFR 22.813 - Technical channel pair assignment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... location is at least 800 kilometers (497 miles) from the antenna location of the nearest co-channel ground transmitter in the United States, its territories and possessions; and 1000 kilometers (621 miles) from the... transmitters with antenna locations within a 320 kilometer (199 mile) radius of the proposed antenna location....

  9. 47 CFR 22.813 - Technical channel pair assignment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... location is at least 800 kilometers (497 miles) from the antenna location of the nearest co-channel ground transmitter in the United States, its territories and possessions; and 1000 kilometers (621 miles) from the... transmitters with antenna locations within a 320 kilometer (199 mile) radius of the proposed antenna location....

  10. 77 FR 63270 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... aluminum rivet, Part Number (P/N) ASNA2050DXJ040, is to connect the FR 24 to the FR 24 Tee. The hole where... of an A320 family aeroplane, it was discovered that a fastener was missing at FR 24 between stringer... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in...

  11. 78 FR 52414 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... aluminum rivet, Part Number (P/N) ASNA2050DXJ040, is to connect the FR 24 to the FR 24 Tee. The hole where... NPRM was published in the Federal Register on October 16, 2012 (77 FR 63270). The NPRM proposed to... of an A320 family aeroplane, it was discovered that a fastener was missing at FR 24 between...

  12. Best Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2005-01-01

    Brian Schaffer, now a 21-year-old college junior, spent prekindergarten through 7th grade at Green Acres School, a 320-student Rockville, Maryland, private school where his parents say he had the benefit of small class sizes and teachers who could accommodate his needs, which included attention deficit disorder, speech and language delays, and…

  13. Tractor Trailer Driver's Training Programs. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Hampshire Vocational Technical Coll., Nashua.

    This document describes a project to develop a 320-hour tractor trailer driver training program and a 20-hour commercial driver licensing upgrade training program. Of 34 graduates from the training program, 28 secured employment in the trucking industry. From August 1989 to June 1990, 725 students were trained in the upgrade training program with…

  14. 78 FR 22175 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... published in the Federal Register on October 4, 2012 (77 FR 60653), and proposed to supersede AD 2007-05-13... configuration, in accordance with Airbus SB A320-25-1294 Revision 01. It has recently been identified that for... intent that was proposed in the NPRM (77 FR 60653, October 4, 2012) for correcting the unsafe...

  15. Performance Evaluation of Thermographic Cameras for Photogrammetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastikli, N.; Guler, E.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research is the performance evaluation of the termographic cameras for possible use for photogrammetric documentation and deformation analyses caused by moisture and isolation problem of the historical and cultural heritage. To perform geometric calibration of the termographic camera, the 3D test object was designed with 77 control points which were distributed in different depths. For performance evaluation, Flir A320 termographic camera with 320 × 240 pixels and lens with 18 mm focal length was used. The Nikon D3X SLR digital camera with 6048 × 4032 pixels and lens with 20 mm focal length was used as reference for comparison. The size of pixel was 25 μm for the Flir A320 termographic camera and 6 μm for the Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The digital images of the 3D test object were recorded with the Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera and the image coordinate of the control points in the images were measured. The geometric calibration parameters, including the focal length, position of principal points, radial and tangential distortions were determined with introduced additional parameters in bundle block adjustments. The measurement of image coordinates and bundle block adjustments with additional parameters were performed using the PHIDIAS digital photogrammetric system. The bundle block adjustment was repeated with determined calibration parameter for both Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image coordinates was 9.6 μm and 10.5 μm for Flir A320 termographic camera and 8.3 μm and 7.7 μm for Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image points in Flir A320 termographic camera images almost same accuracy level with digital camera in comparison with 4 times bigger pixel size. The obtained results from this research, the interior geometry of the termographic cameras and lens distortion was modelled efficiently

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Uut-319 (Ununtrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uut-319 (Ununtrium, atomic number Z = 113, mass number A = 319).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-319 (Seaborgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-319 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 319).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-319 (Bohrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-319 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 319).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-319 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-319 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 319).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-319 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-319 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 319).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Uut-318 (Ununtrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uut-318 (Ununtrium, atomic number Z = 113, mass number A = 318).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-318 (Seaborgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-318 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 318).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-318 (Bohrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-318 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 318).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-318 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-318 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 318).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-318 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-318 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 318).

  6. Utilization of lasers for air data measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    1991-05-01

    The operating principles of the ALEV3 three axis laser Doppler anemometer, which was designed for flight tests with the A-320 and A-340 aircraft, are depicted. If mounted on the aircraft center of gravity, the ALEV-3 allows true flight velocity in three directions and angles of attack and sideslip to be directly measured with a very good accuracy, in particular flight areas such as limit buffeting, stall, high Mach numbers, or sideslip flights. Aircraft parameter estimation, calculation, and calibration results are presented. The accuracies of velocity, static pressure and aerodynamic angle measurements were compared with classical anemometers precisions. Flight tests results of the ALEV-1 one axis laser anemometer for A-320 are given as a reference.

  7. The electromagnetic environment in CFC structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardwick, C. J.; Haigh, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive measurements of induced voltages and currents were made using a CFC (carbon fiber composites) horizontal stabilizer from the A320 as a test bed. The work was done to investigate the efficacy of various protection schemes to reduce the magnitudes of the induced voltages and validate a computer program INDCAL. Results indicate that a good understanding of the various induced voltage mechanisms including the long wave effect due to current redistribution was obtained.

  8. List Models of Procedure Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matessa, Michael P.; Polson, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory of the initial stages of skill acquisition and then employs the theory to model current and future training programs for fight management systems (FMSs) in modern commercial airliners like the Boeing 777 and the Airbus A320. The theoretical foundations for the theory are a new synthesis of the literature on human memory and the latest version of the ACT-R theory of skill acquisition.

  9. Jeans instability criterion from the viewpoint of Kaniadakis' statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Everton M. C.; Ananias Neto, Jorge; Barboza, Edesio M., Jr.; Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-06-01

    In this letter we have derived the Jeans length in the context of the Kaniadakis statistics. We have compared this result with the Jeans length already obtained in the nonextensive Tsallis statistics (Jiulin D., Phys. Lett. A, 320 (2004) 347) and we discussed the main differences between these two models. We have also obtained the κ-sound velocity. Finally, we have applied the results obtained here to analyze an astrophysical system.

  10. 77 FR 26996 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A320-214 and-232 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports that medium-head fasteners were installed in lieu of shear-head fasteners on a certain upper panel which manufacturer fatigue and damage tolerance analyses demonstrated could have an affect on panel fatigue life. This proposed AD would require......

  11. Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Ting, D. Z.; Kurth, E.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2008-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024x1024 pixel InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs based quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes and a 320x256 pixel dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array have been demonstrated as pathfinders. In this paper, we discuss the development of 1024x1024 MWIR/LWIR dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array.

  12. CT angiography of neonates and infants: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated 320-MDCT and ungated helical 64-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Siddharth P; Golriz, Farahnaz; Atweh, Lamya A; Zhang, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric CT angiography (CTA) performed with a 320-MDCT scanner compared with the radiation dose and image quality of ungated helical CTA performed with a 64-MDCT scanner. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An experience with CTA for cardiovascular indications in neonates and infants 0-6 months old was retrospectively assessed. Radiation doses and quantitative and qualitative image quality scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 320-MDCT scanner and volumetric target mode prospective ECG gating plus iterative reconstruction (target mode) were compared with the doses and scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 64-MDCT scanner and ungated helical scanning plus filtered back projection reconstruction (ungated mode). All target mode studies were performed during free breathing. Seven ungated CTA examinations (25%) were performed with general endotracheal anesthesia. The findings of 17 preoperative CTA examinations performed in target mode were also compared with surgical reports for evaluation of diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS. All studies performed with target mode technique were diagnostic for the main clinical indication. Effective doses were significantly lower in the target mode group (0.51 ± 0.19 mSv) compared with the ungated mode group (4.8 ± 1.4 mSv) (p < 0.0001). Quantitative analysis revealed no statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (of pulmonary artery and aorta) and contrast-to-noise ratio. Subjective image quality was significantly better with target mode than with ungated mode (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION. Target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric scanning with iterative reconstruction performed with a 320-MDCT scanner has several benefits in cardiovascular imaging of neonates and infants, including low radiation dose, improved image quality, high diagnostic

  13. Swift detection of IGR16418-4532

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Kennea, J. A.; Esposito, P.; Evans, P. A.; Mangano, V.; Palmer, D. M.; Sakamoto, T.; Burrows, D. N.; Chester, M. M.; Krimm, H.; Vercellone, S.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-06-01

    Swift observed a new outburst from the SFXT IGR J16418-4532. The Swift/BAT triggered on it on 2012 Jun 03 at 18:08:48 UT (a 320-sec image trigger, 523489). This is the first detection using the new Sub-threshold Interesting Source BAT trigger criteria. Swift immediately slewed to the target. Using the BAT data set from T-221 to T+963 s from recent telemetry downlinks, we report that this is a very weak source in BAT, and as such a description of the mask-weighted light curve is problematic.

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Uut-320 (Ununtrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Uut-320 (Ununtrium, atomic number Z = 113, mass number A = 320).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Sg-320 (Seaborgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Sg-320 (Seaborgium, atomic number Z = 106, mass number A = 320).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bh-320 (Bohrium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bh-320 (Bohrium, atomic number Z = 107, mass number A = 320).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-320 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-320 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 320).

  18. Searching for SNPs with cloud computing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    As DNA sequencing outpaces improvements in computer speed, there is a critical need to accelerate tasks like alignment and SNP calling. Crossbow is a cloud-computing software tool that combines the aligner Bowtie and the SNP caller SOAPsnp. Executing in parallel using Hadoop, Crossbow analyzes data comprising 38-fold coverage of the human genome in three hours using a 320-CPU cluster rented from a cloud computing service for about $85. Crossbow is available from http://bowtie-bio.sourceforge.net/crossbow/. PMID:19930550

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Es-320 (Einsteinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Es-320 (Einsteinium, atomic number Z = 99, mass number A = 320).

  20. Photoreactivation and other ultraviolet/visible light effects on DNA in human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Blackett, A.D.; Feng, N.I.; Freeman, S.E.; Ogut, E.S.; Gange, R.W.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A computer-based system was devised for examining low levels (1 dimer/10/sup 8/ d) of DNA damage in human skin exposed to ultraviolet or visible radiation. The production of measurable levels of dimers was determined for light of wavelengths absorbed directly by DNA (290-320 nm). Exposure of skin to uv-A (320-380 nm) sources also produced significant numbers of endonuclease-sensitive sites. The immediate pigment darkening reaction (IPD) was tested to see whether IPD protects against uv-induced dimer formation. 29 references, 2 figures, 1 table. (ACR)

  1. 320x256 solar-blind focal plane arrays based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, R.; Mayes, K.; Yasan, A.; Shiell, D.; Kung, P.; Razeghi, M.

    2005-01-03

    We report AlGaN-based backilluminated solar-blind ultraviolet focal plane arrays operating at a wavelength of 280 nm. The electrical characteristics of the individual pixels are discussed, and the uniformity of the array is presented. The p-i-n photodiode array was hybridized to a 320x256 read-out integrated circuit entirely within our university research lab, and a working 320x256 camera was demonstrated. Several example solar-blind images from the camera are also provided.

  2. Searching for SNPs with cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Langmead, Ben; Schatz, Michael C; Lin, Jimmy; Pop, Mihai; Salzberg, Steven L

    2009-01-01

    As DNA sequencing outpaces improvements in computer speed, there is a critical need to accelerate tasks like alignment and SNP calling. Crossbow is a cloud-computing software tool that combines the aligner Bowtie and the SNP caller SOAPsnp. Executing in parallel using Hadoop, Crossbow analyzes data comprising 38-fold coverage of the human genome in three hours using a 320-CPU cluster rented from a cloud computing service for about $85. Crossbow is available from http://bowtie-bio.sourceforge.net/crossbow/. PMID:19930550

  3. Contrail ice particles in aircraft wakes and their climatic importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; JeßBerger, Philipp; Voigt, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of gaseous (NO, NOy, SO2, HONO) and ice particle concentrations in young contrails in primary and secondary wakes of aircraft of different sizes (B737, A319, A340, A380) are used to investigate ice particle formation behind aircraft. The gas concentrations are largest in the primary wake and decrease with increasing altitude in the secondary wake, as expected for passive trace gases and aircraft-dependent dilution. In contrast, the measured ice particle concentrations were found larger in the secondary wake than in the primary wake. The contrails contain more ice particles than expected for previous black carbon (soot) estimates. The ice concentrations may result from soot-induced ice nucleation for a soot number emission index of 1015 kg-1. For a doubled ice particle concentration in young contrails, a contrail cirrus model computes about 60% increases of global radiative forcing by contrail cirrus because of simultaneous increases in optical depth, age, and cover.

  4. Comparison of deaerator performance using experimental and numerical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majji, Sri Harsha

    Deaerator is a component of integrated drive generator (IDG), which is used to separate air from oil. Integrated drive generator is the main power generation unit used in aircrafts to generate electric-power and must be cooled to give maximum efficiency. Mob Jet Oil II is used in these IDGs as a lubricant and coolant. So, in order to get high-quality oil, a deaerator is used to remove trapped air from this Mob Jet Oil II using the centrifugal principle. The reason for entrapment of air may be due to operation of vacuum and high-pressure pumps. In this study, 75/90 IDG generic and A320 classic deaerator performance evaluation was done based on both experimental and numerical techniques. Experimental data was collected from deaerator test rig and numerical data was attained using CFD simulations (software used for CFD simulation is ANSYS CFX). Both experimental and numerical results were compared and also deaerator 75/90 generic and A320 classic was compared in this study. A parametric study on deaerators flow separation and inner geometry was also done in this study. This work also includes a comparison study of different multiphase models and different meshes applied on deaerator numerical test methodology.

  5. Scalable Climate Forcing Optical Indices: How Effective Are They in Alpine Lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C. E.; Overholt, E.; Fischer, J.; Olson, M.; Brentrup, J.; Saros, J. E.; Melack, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    As the world gets warmer and wetter, it is important to identify sentinel systems to resolve the response of ecosystems to climate change across drivers and complex landscapes. Recently developed climate forcing optical indices (CFOI) related to the quality and quantity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have been shown to be scalable from short-term storm events to interdecadal periods in diverse lakes in lowland landscapes. Are these CFOI metrics effective in alpine ecosystems, which are often viewed as more responsive sentinels of climate change than lowland ecosystems? DOC-related optical data from a series of alpine lakes in North America are used here to address this question. The response of these CFOI metrics followed the same tight relationship in alpine lakes as in lowland lakes, with a seasonal increase in spectral slope between 275 and 295 nm (S275-295) and a decrease in DOC-specific absorbance at 320 nm (a*320) as well as in the ratio of these two indices (a*320/S275-295, a composite climate forcing index, CF). These changes are likely driven largely by photobleaching of terrestrial DOC during the ice-free season. Closer analysis of five years of data for Lake Oesa in the Canadian Rockies revealed marginally significant relationships between precipitation and the CFOI metrics. Specifically, S275-295 decreased with increasing cumulative precipitation for the 15 day period preceding water sample collection. a*320 increased with cumulative precipitation for the 45 day period preceding water sample collection. Relationships between CFOI metrics and precipitation at other time scales were not significant. While the DOC-quality related CFOI metrics were responsive to precipitation, DOC concentration alone was not. The time scale of precipitation effects on CFOI metrics in Lake Oesa was shorter than those previously observed for lowland lakes. This contrasting response is likely related to differences in the characteristics of the hydrology and catchments of

  6. Use of infrared cameras for monitoring and research at Costa Rican volcanoes and thermal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, C. J.; Mora-Amador, R.; González, G.

    2012-12-01

    Since November 2010, the Costa Rican volcanoes and hot springs began monitored and research by 5 infrared cameras, 4 steady fixed FLIR A320 and 1 portable FLIR P660. All the A320's are located on different settings depending on the volcano or the constant use. At Turrialba volcano 2 of the cameras are set permanent at the crater rim, focused on the new vents formed on January 2010 and 2012, from there at ≈500m it is possible to monitor 24/7 the temperature of the gases from the new vents plus the direction and speed of the plumes, that data helps the improve of the use of equipment like Mini-DOAS, MultiGas or FTIR; at Poás volcano the camera is permanent fixed on a bunker structure located at ≈650m from the active hyperacid hot lagoon, from there it is possible to cover the complete crater with the use of a wide angle lens, that way is safely to track phreatic eruptions, observe convective cells from the lagoon, fumaroles activity, as well as temperature, direction and speed of the gas plume. Finally the last A320 is set for temporary set up, so far is being used on places like Arenal volcano because of the changing of the pattern of the lava flows and gas plume, also at Rincón de la Vieja crater rim because so far is difficult to set up a permanent camera, and finally to do over flights on active volcanoes. The FLIR P660, it has been used to carry out periodic measurements of specific thermal spots. At Turrialba and Poás volcanoes, it is possible to get closer views, measuring more precise inaccessible high temperature fumaroles like the new vents at Turrialba or the ones at Poás dome, places that can reach temperatures of more than 600°C, also is being a lot of support to track lagoon convection cells (61°C), fumaroles migration, lagoon phreatic eruptions (130°C), and better characterization of hot springs, small hot lagoons, and mud pools, with temperatures of ≈ 90C that allow the life of extreme organisms to survive. The use of the thermal cameras

  7. A Formal Methods Approach to the Analysis of Mode Confusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Miller, Steven P.; Potts, James N.; Carreno, Victor A.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the new NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) is to reduce the civil aviation fatal accident rate by 80% in ten years and 90% in twenty years. This program is being driven by the accident data with a focus on the most recent history. Pilot error is the most commonly cited cause for fatal accidents (up to 70%) and obviously must be given major consideration in this program. While the greatest source of pilot error is the loss of situation awareness , mode confusion is increasingly becoming a major contributor as well. The January 30, 1995 issue of Aviation Week lists 184 incidents and accidents involving mode awareness including the Bangalore A320 crash 2/14/90, the Strasbourg A320 crash 1/20/92, the Mulhouse-Habsheim A320 crash 6/26/88, and the Toulouse A330 crash 6/30/94. These incidents and accidents reveal that pilots sometimes become confused about what the cockpit automation is doing. Consequently, human factors research is an obvious investment area. However, even a cursory look at the accident data reveals that the mode confusion problem is much deeper than just training deficiencies and a lack of human-oriented design. This is readily acknowledged by human factors experts. It seems that further progress in human factors must come through a deeper scrutiny of the internals of the automation. It is in this arena that formal methods can contribute. Formal methods refers to the use of techniques from logic and discrete mathematics in the specification, design, and verification of computer systems, both hardware and software. The fundamental goal of formal methods is to capture requirements, designs and implementations in a mathematically based model that can be analyzed in a rigorous manner. Research in formal methods is aimed at automating this analysis as much as possible. By capturing the internal behavior of a flight deck in a rigorous and detailed formal model, the dark corners of a design can be analyzed. This paper will explore how formal

  8. HOTEYE: a novel thermal camera using higher operating temperature infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Gavin J.; Blenkinsop, Ian D.; Catchpole, Rose; Gordon, Neil T.; Harper, Mark A. C.; Haynes, Paul C.; Hipwood, Les; Hollier, Colin J.; Jones, Chris; Lees, David J.; Maxey, Chris D.; Milner, Daniel; Ordish, Mike; Philips, Tim S.; Price, Richard W.; Shaw, Chris; Southern, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Conventional high performance infrared (IR) sensors need to be cooled to around 80K in order to achieve a high level of thermal sensitivity. Cooling to this temperature requires the use of Joule-Thomson coolers (with bottled gas supply) or Stirling cycle cooling engines, both of which are bulky, expensive and can have low reliability. In contrast to this, higher operating temperature (HOT) detectors are designed to give high thermal performance at an operating temperature in the range 200K to 240K. These detectors are fabricated from multi-layer mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) structures that have been designed for this application. At higher temperatures, lower cost, smaller, lighter and more reliable thermoelectric (or Peltier) devices can be used to cool the detectors. The HOTEYE thermal imaging camera, which is based on a 320x256 pixel HOT focal plane array, is described in this paper and performance measurements reported.

  9. A new contact neodymium: YAG laser for cyclophotocoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Iwach, A.G.; Drake, M.V.; Hoskins, H.D. Jr.; Schuster, B.L.; Vassiliadis, A.; Crawford, J.B.; Hennings, D.R. )

    1991-06-01

    A newly developed compact (40 kg), self-contained contact Neodymium:YAG laser produces high-peak, high-energy (800 mJ/pulse), short (1.0 millisecond) pulses with 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy is delivered via a 320-microns cleaved quartz fiber optic probe. Cyclophotocoagulation was performed in five eyes of three medium-sized Dutch-pigmented rabbits. The eyes received exposures of 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy delivered ranged from 100 to 800 mJ/pulse. Histopathology revealed ciliary body disruption and hemorrhage with no damage to overlying sclera. When used for transscleral cyclodiathermy in the rabbit, the laser created significant ciliary body disruption with minimal scleral injury.

  10. Structural outer rim of Chesapeake Bay impact crater: Seismic and bore hole evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Nine seismic-reflection profiles and four continuous core holes define the gross structural and stratigraphic framework of the outer rim of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater. The rim is manifested as a 90 km diameter ring of terraced normal-fault blocks, which forms a ???320 m-1200 m high rim escarpment. The top of the rim escarpment is covered by a 20 m-30 m thick ejecta blanket. The escarpment encircles a flat-floored annular trough, which is partly filled with an ???250 m thick breccia lens (Exmore breccia). The Exmore breccia overlies a 200 m-800 m thick interval of slumped sedimentary megablocks, which, in turn, rests on crystalline basement rocks. All postimpact strata (upper Eocene to Quaternary) sag structurally into the annular trough, and most units also thicken as they cross the rim into the crater. Postimpact compaction and subsidence of the Exmore breccia have created extensive normal faulting in overlying strata.

  11. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 7, a potential cancer drug target

    PubMed Central

    Lountos, George T.; Austin, Brian P.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 7 (DUSP7/Pyst2) is a 320-residue protein that belongs to the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP) subfamily of dual-specificity phosphatases. Although its precise biological function is still not fully understood, previous reports have demonstrated that DUSP7 is overexpressed in myeloid leukemia and other malignancies. Therefore, there is interest in developing DUSP7 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents, especially for cancer. Here, the purification, crystallization and structure determination of the catalytic domain of DUSP7 (Ser141–Ser289/C232S) at 1.67 Å resolution are reported. The structure described here provides a starting point for structure-assisted inhibitor-design efforts and adds to the growing knowledge base of three-dimensional structures of the dual-specificity phosphatase family. PMID:26057789

  12. Airbus windshear warning and guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonafe, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    From its first designed airplane, Airbus considered mandatory a help in the crew's decision-making process to initiate an escape maneuver and help to successfully realize it. All the Airbus airplanes designed since 1975 included an alpha-floor function and a speed reference control law imbedded in the speed reference system (SRS) box for A 300 and FAC and FCC for A 310, A300/600 and the A 320. Alpha-Floor function takes into account the airplane energy situation considering angle of attack and observed longitudinal situation in order to apply immediately the full power without any pilot action. Speed reference managers control airspeed and/or ground speed in order to survive a maximum in shear situation. In order to comply with the new FAA regulation: Aerospatiale and Airbus developed more efficient systems. A comparison between 1975 and a newly developed system is given. It is explained how the new system improves the situation.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  14. Superdeformed and hyperdeformed states in Z=122 isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Bhuyan, M.; Mehta, M. S.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-09-15

    We calculate the binding energy, root-mean-square radius, and quadrupole deformation parameter for the recent, possibly discovered superheavy element Z=122, using the axially deformed relativistic mean-field (RMF) and nonrelativistic Skyrme Hartree-Fock (SHF) formalisms. The calculation is extended to include various isotopes of Z=122 element, starting from A=282 to A=320. We predict highly deformed structures in the ground state for all the isotopes. A shape transition appears at about A=290 from a highly oblate to a large prolate shape, which may be considered as the superdeformed and hyperdeformed structures of the Z=122 nucleus in the mean-field approaches. The most stable isotope (largest binding energy per nucleon) is found to be {sup 302}122, instead of the experimentally observed {sup 292}122.

  15. Thermal-infrared pedestrian ROI extraction through thermal and motion information fusion.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María T; Serrano-Cuerda, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness of a new thermal-infrared pedestrian detection system under different outdoor environmental conditions. In first place the algorithm for pedestrian ROI extraction in thermal-infrared video based on both thermal and motion information is introduced. Then, the evaluation of the proposal is detailed after describing the complete thermal and motion information fusion. In this sense, the environment chosen for evaluation is described, and the twelve test sequences are specified. For each of the sequences captured from a forward-looking infrared FLIR A-320 camera, the paper explains the weather and light conditions under which it was captured. The results allow us to draw firm conclusions about the conditions under which it can be affirmed that it is efficient to use our thermal-infrared proposal to robustly extract human ROIs. PMID:24727500

  16. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N+1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2009-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called 'N+1' aircraft - designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, 'N' airplanes - are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are analytically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  17. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N(+)1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2010-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called "N+1" aircraft--designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, "N" airplanes--are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are empirically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  18. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  19. Single photon counting pixel detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Kawase, M.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Sato, M.; Schmitt, B.; Suzuki, M.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.

    2010-11-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI an X-ray single photon counting pixel detector (PILATUS) based on the hybrid-pixel detector technology was developed in collaboration with SPring-8. The detection element is a 320 or 450 μm thick silicon sensor forming pixelated pn-diodes with a pitch of 172 μm×172 μm. An array of 2×8 custom CMOS readout chips are indium bump-bonded to the sensor, which leads to 33.5 mm×83.8 mm detective area. Each pixel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a single level discriminator and a 20 bit counter. This design realizes a high dynamic range, short readout time of less than 3 ms, a high framing rate of over 200 images per second and an excellent point-spread function. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2×10 6 X-rays/s/pixel.

  20. Visible and ultraviolet reflectance characteristics of arctic homeotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, P. S.; Lavigne, D. M.

    1981-12-01

    Reflectance characteristics of the epidermal coverings (hair, feathers) of several white birds and mammals were examined in the visible and ultraviolet regions of the solar spectrum. Non-white phases of the same species, and other non-white animals were examined for comparison. As expected, non-white animals exhibited lower reflectance values than white animals in the visible spectrum. Most species examined demonstrated reduced reflectance in the ultraviolet, reaching minimum values between 290 and 310 nm. In white animals, significant differences were found in the reflectance of UV-A (320 400 nm) and UV-B (280 320 nm) radiation. This accounts for the apparent differences in ultraviolet reflectance among various arctic mammals detected previously with ultraviolet photography. Reflectance patterns in the visible and ultraviolet were not obviously correlated with phylogenetic relationship, nor with the gross structure of hair or feathers.

  1. An efficient low- and moderate-resolution spectrograph for the Hale telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oke, J. B.; Gunn, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A new low-to-moderate resolution spectrograph has been designed and built for the Cassegrain focus of the Hale 5.08-meter telescope. To maximize efficiency, resolution, and wavelength coverage the light is divided into two spectra regions by a dichroic filter behind the entrance slit, after which there are two completely separate spectrographs. The blue spectrograph operates from 3200 A to 5200 A while the red one goes from 5200 A to 10,000 A. The red detector is an 800 x 800 TI CCD while the blue detector is a 320 x 512 RCA CCD or a Shectrograph image pulse-counting system. A Boksenberg IPCS can also be mounted on the blue camera. The overall efficiency of the Cassegrain telescope, spectrographs, and CCD's combined, ranges from 5 percent to 13 percent between 3600 A and 8200 A. The spectrograph is usable from 3200 A to 10,400 A.

  2. Results of test IA137 in the NASA/ARC 14 foot transonic wind tunnel of the 0.07 scale external tank forebody (model 68-T) to determine auxiliary aerodynamic data system feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a 14 foot transonic wind tunnel to examine the feasibility of the auxiliary aerodynamic data system (AADS) for determining angles of attack and sideslip during boost flight. The model used was a 0.07 scale replica of the external tank forebody consisting of the nose portion and a 60 inch (full scale) cylindrical section of the ogive cylinder tangency point. The model terminated in a blunt base with a 320.0 inch diameter at external tank (ET) station 1120.37. Pressure data were obtained from five pressure orifices (one total and four statics) on the nose probe, and sixteen surface static pressure orifices along the ET forebody.

  3. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  4. Nano-fabricated pixelated micropolarizer array for visible imaging polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhigang; Cheng, Teng; Qiu, Kang; Zhang, Qingchuan E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn; Wu, Xiaoping; Dong, Fengliang; Chu, Weiguo E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn

    2014-10-15

    Pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA) is a novel concept for real-time visible imaging polarimetry. A 320 × 240 aluminum PMA fabricated by electron beam lithography is described in this paper. The period, duty ratio, and depth of the grating are 140 nm, 0.5, and 100 nm, respectively. The units are standard square structures and the metal nanowires of the grating are collimating and uniformly thick. The extinction ratio of 75 and the maximum polarization transmittance of 78.8% demonstrate that the PMA is suitable for polarization imaging. When the PMA is applied to real-time polarization imaging, the degree of linear polarization image and the angle of linear polarization image are calculated from a single frame image. The polarized target object is highlighted from the unpolarized background, and the surface contour of the target object can be reflected by the polarization angle.

  5. Design of transmission-type phase holograms for a compact radar-cross-section measurement range at 650 GHz.

    PubMed

    Noponen, Eero; Tamminen, Aleksi; Vaaja, Matti

    2007-07-10

    A design formalism is presented for transmission-type phase holograms for use in a submillimeter-wave compact radar-cross-section (RCS) measurement range. The design method is based on rigorous electromagnetic grating theory combined with conventional hologram synthesis. Hologram structures consisting of a curved groove pattern on a 320 mmx280 mm Teflon plate are designed to transform an incoming spherical wave at 650 GHz into an output wave generating a 100 mm diameter planar field region (quiet zone) at a distance of 1 m. The reconstructed quiet-zone field is evaluated by a numerical simulation method. The uniformity of the quiet-zone field is further improved by reoptimizing the goal field. Measurement results are given for a test hologram fabricated on Teflon. PMID:17579673

  6. RFID Transponders' Radio Frequency Emissions in Aircraft Communication and Navigation Radio Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiated emissions in aircraft communication and navigation bands are measured from several active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The individual tags are different in design and operations. They may also operate in different frequency bands. The process for measuring the emissions is discussed, and includes tag interrogation, reverberation chamber testing, and instrument settings selection. The measurement results are described and compared against aircraft emission limits. In addition, interference path loss for the cargo bays of passenger aircraft is measured. Cargo bay path loss is more appropriate for RFID tags than passenger cabin path loss. The path loss data are reported for several aircraft radio systems on a Boeing 747 and an Airbus A320.

  7. Thermal-Infrared Pedestrian ROI Extraction through Thermal and Motion Information Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María T.; Serrano-Cuerda, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness of a new thermal-infrared pedestrian detection system under different outdoor environmental conditions. In first place the algorithm for pedestrian ROI extraction in thermal-infrared video based on both thermal and motion information is introduced. Then, the evaluation of the proposal is detailed after describing the complete thermal and motion information fusion. In this sense, the environment chosen for evaluation is described, and the twelve test sequences are specified. For each of the sequences captured from a forward-looking infrared FLIR A-320 camera, the paper explains the weather and light conditions under which it was captured. The results allow us to draw firm conclusions about the conditions under which it can be affirmed that it is efficient to use our thermal-infrared proposal to robustly extract human ROIs. PMID:24727500

  8. High-resolution digital readout for uncooled smart IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer; Liddiard, Kevin C.; Reinhold, Olaf

    1997-11-01

    This paper discusses the development of a high resolution digital readout from a 2D array of uncooled IR detectors. The need for a high resolution analogue to digital converter (ADC) is described and anew concept is presented. Experimental VLSI arrays have been designed using 0.8 micrometers CMOS technology and the pixel size is 40 micrometers X 40 micrometers . The concept has been demonstrated by using 320 parallel 16 bit ADCs in a 320 X 240 readout array with a frame rate of 30 Hz. High linearity and low noise is obtained and the power consumption for each ADC is 0.5 mW. The high digital resolution allows for digital offset correction off the local plane. A 16 X 16 version of the readout circuit has been postprocessed with uncooled IR detectors. These are currently under evaluation.

  9. Progress of the Swedish-Australian research collaboration on uncooled smart IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.; Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer; Reinhold, Olaf

    1998-10-01

    Progress is reported on the development of uncooled microbolometer IR focal plane detector arrays (IRFPDA) under a research collaboration between the Swedish Defence Research Establishment (FOA), and the Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO), Australia. The paper describes current focal plane detector arrays designed by Electro-optic Sensor Design (EOSD) for readout circuits developed by FOA. The readouts are fabricated in 0.8 micrometer CMOS, and have a novel signal conditioning and 16 bit parallel ADC design. The arrays are post-processed at DSTO on wafers supplied by FOA. During the past year array processing has been carried out at a new microengineering facility at DSTO, Salisbury, South Australia. A number of small format 16 X 16 arrays have been delivered to FOA for evaluation, and imaging has been demonstrated with these arrays. A 320 X 240 readout with 320 parallel 16 bit ADCs has been developed and IRFPDAs for this readout have been fabricated and are currently being evaluated.

  10. 2D SWIR image sensor with extended wavelength cutoff of 2.5 μm on InP/InGaAs epitaxial wafers with graded buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushini, Prabhu; Huang, Wei; Morales, Manuel; Brubaker, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc-Uyen; Dobies, Matt; Zhang, Wei; Gustus, William; Mathews, Gary; Endicter, Scott; Paik, Namwoong

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional photo detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of 2.5 μm were fabricated on InP/InGaAs epitaxial wafers with graded buffer layers in a 320x256 geometry on a 12.5μm pitch. Novel growth and fabrication techniques were employed to fabricate these arrays and optimize the performance. The dark current of the detector was investigated for a wide range of temperatures. The fabricated detector array was mated with a ROIC and packaged with a multi-stage TEC and investigated further at the FPA level. The effect of the graded buffer layers on the sensor performance was investigated and the results were compared to other methods used to develop and fabricate 2D image sensors on extended wavelength materials.

  11. Characterisation of strip silicon detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, L.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Fernandez-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Gallop, B.; Greenall, A.; Gregor, I.-M.; Hara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lohwasser, K.; Maneuski, D.; Nagorski, S.; Pape, I.; Phillips, P. W.; Sperlich, D.; Sawhney, K.; Soldevila, U.; Ullan, M.; Unno, Y.; Warren, M.

    2016-07-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity up to 6·1034 cm‑2s‑1. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb‑1 after ten years of operation, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand fluences to over 1·1016 1 MeV neq/cm2. In order to cope with the consequent increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (end-cap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). A resolution better than the inter strip pitch of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. The effect of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips was investigated in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stop regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch.

  12. Design conceptuel d'un avion blended wing body de 200 passagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, Sami

    The Blended Wing Body is built based on the flying wing concept and performance improvements compared to conventional aircraft. Contrariwise, most studies have focused on large aircraft and it is not sure whether the gains are the same for smaller aircraft. The main of objective is to perform the conceptual design of a BWB of 200 passengers and compare the performance obtained with a conventional aircraft equivalent in terms of payload and range. The design of the Blended Wing Body was carried out under the CEASIOM environment. This platform design suitable for conventional aircraft design has been modified and additional tools have been integrated in order to achieve the aerodynamic analysis, performance and stability of the aircraft fuselage built. A plane model is obtained in the geometric module AcBuilder CEASIOM from the design variables of a wing. Estimates of mass are made from semi- empirical formulas adapted to the geometry of the BWB and calculations centering and inertia are possible through BWB model developed in CATIA. Low fidelity methods, such as TORNADO and semi- empirical formulas are used to analyze the aerodynamic performance and stability of the aircraft. The aerodynamic results are validated using a high-fidelity analysis using FLUENT CFD software. An optimization process is implemented in order to obtain improved while maintaining a feasible design performance. It is an optimization of the plan form of the aircraft fuselage integrated with a number of passengers and equivalent to that of a A320.Les performance wing aircraft merged optimized maximum range are compared to A320 also optimized. Significant gains were observed. An analysis of the dynamics of longitudinal and lateral flight is carried out on the aircraft optimized BWB finesse and mass. This study identified the stable and unstable modes of the aircraft. Thus, this analysis has highlighted the stability problems associated with the oscillation of incidence and the Dutch roll for the

  13. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  14. Albany Hts Cable Project Long Term In-Grid Operation Status Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumura, H.; Masuda, T.; Watanabe, M.; Takigawa, H.; Ashibe, Y.; Ito, H.; Hirose, M.; Sato, K.

    2008-03-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems are expected to be a solution for improvement of the power grid and three demonstration projects in the real grid are under way in the United States. One of them is the Albany, NY Cable Project, involving the installation and operation of a 350 meter HTS cable system with a capacity of 34.5kV, 800A, connecting between two substations in National Grid's electric utility system. A 320 meter and a 30 meter cable are installed in underground conduit and connected together in a vault. The cables were fabricated with 70km of DI-BSCCO wire in a 3 core-in-one cryostat structure. The cable installation of a 320 meter and a 30 meter section was completed successfully using the same pulling method as a conventional underground cable. After the cable installation, the joint and two terminations were assembled at the Albany site. After the initial cooling of the system, the commissioning tests such as the critical current, heat loss measurement and DC withstand voltage test were conducted successfully. The in-grid operation began on July 20th, 2006 and operated successfully in unattended condition through May 1st, 2007. In the 2nd phase of the Albany project, the 30 meter section is to be replaced by a YBCO cable. The YBCO cable had been developed and a new 30 meter cable was manufactured by using SuperPower's YBCO coated conductors. This paper describes the latest status of the Albany cable project.

  15. Aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  16. LCX: Proposal for a low-cost commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Troy; Hayatdavoudi, Maziar; Hettinga, Joel; Hooper, Matt; Nguyen, Phong

    1994-01-01

    The LCX has been developed in response to a request for proposal for an aircraft with 153 passenger capacity and a range of 3000 nautical miles. The goals of the LCX are to provide an aircraft which will achieve the stated mission requirements at the lowest cost possible, both for the manufacturer and the operator. Low cost in this request is defined as short and long term profitability. To achieve this objective, modern technologies attributing to low-cost operation without greatly increasing the cost of manufacturing were employed. These technologies include hybrid laminar flow control and the use of developing new manufacturing processes and philosophies. The LCX will provide a competitive alternative to the use of the Airbus A319/320/321 and the Boeing 737 series of aircraft. The LCX has a maximum weight of 150,000 lb. carried by a wing of 1140 ft(exp 2) and an aspect ratio of 10. The selling price of the LCX is 31 million in 1994 US dollars.

  17. Phase diagram of a model of nanoparticles in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Lettieri, S; Wentzel, N; Gunton, J D

    2008-10-28

    We obtain accurate fluid-fluid coexistence curves for a recent simple model of interacting nanoparticles that includes the effects of ion-dispersion forces. It has been proposed that these ion-dispersion forces provide at least a partial explanation for the Hofmeister effect [M. Bostrom et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 168103 (2001)]. We study a model of aluminum oxide nanoparticle [Deniz et al., Colloids Surf. A 319, 98 (2008)] for three different electrolyte solutions with added salt type being sodium chloride, sodium iodide, and a nonpolarizable salt. We observe that the fluid-fluid coexistence curves depend substantially on the identity of added salt; this provides an efficient way of tuning the phase behavior of nanoparticles. The methods we employ include finite-size scaling (FSS), multicanonical histogram reweighting, and Gibbs ensemble methods. We show that, as expected, all three cases belong to the Ising universality class. The scaling fields and critical point parameters are obtained in the thermodynamic limit of infinite system size by extrapolation of our FSS results. PMID:19045253

  18. The effect of solidification rate on the growth of small fatigue cracks in a cast 319-type aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, M.J.; Jones, J.W.; Boileau, J.M.; Allison, J.E.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of solidification rate on the growth behavior of small fatigue cracks in a 319-type aluminum alloy, a common Al-Si-Cu alloy used in automotive castings. Fatigue specimens were taken from cast material that underwent a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process in order to eliminate shrinkage pores and to facilitate the observation of surface-initiated cracks by replication. Naturally initiated surface cracks ranging in length from 17 {micro}m to 2 mm were measured using a replication technique. Growth rates of the small cracks were calculated as a function of the elastic stress-intensity-factor range ({Delta}K). Long-crack growth-rate data (10 mm {le} length {le} 25 mm) were obtained from compact-tension (CT) specimens, and comparison to the small-crack data indicates the existence of a significant small-crack effect in this alloy. The solidification rate is shown to have a significant influence on small-crack growth behavior, with faster solidification rates resulting in slower growth rates at equivalent {Delta}K levels. A stress-level effect is also observed for both solidification rates, with faster growth rates occurring at higher applied-stress amplitudes at a given {Delta}K. A crack-growth relation proposed by Nisitani and others is modified to give reasonable correlation of small-crack growth data to different solidification rates and stress levels.

  19. Link the EOC4 catalog to the ICRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Cyril; Vondrak, Jan

    2012-08-01

    One of the method, used to link Hipparcos reference frame to the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) Kovalevsky e t al. 1997, A& A 323), was an indirect method using Celestial Pole Offsets (CPO) derived from optical astrometry observations in period 1900 - 1992 (Vondrak et al. 1997, A&A 319). The last solution of Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) including CPO from the Optical Astrometry observations in the period 1900 - 1992 was published recently (Vondrak et al. 2010). The solution is done in the reference system of the catalog EOC4 Vondrak, Stefka, 2010, A&A 509). The CPO show statistically significant linear trends (dX=29mas/cy, dY= 9mas/cy) although the latest precession/nutation model IAU2000/ was used for the reduction of observations. The trends are of the same order (+ - 0.25mas/yr) as the standard error of the spin of Hipparcos reference frame declared in Kovalevsky et al. (1997). The analysis of the trends and their possible implication to the slight rotation of the ICRS representation at the optical wavelengths will be discussed.

  20. Quantification of Microsegregation in Cast Al-Si-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, M.; Thuinet, L.; Dye, D.; Lee, P. D.

    2007-08-01

    The random sampling approach offers an elegant yet accurate way of validating microsegregation models. However, both instrumental errors and interference from secondary phases complicate the treatment of randomly sampled microprobe data. This study demonstrates that the normal procedure of sorting the data for each element independently can lead to inaccurate estimation of segregation profiles within multicomponent, multiphase, aluminum alloys. A recently proposed alloy-independent approach is shown to more reliably isolate these interferences, allowing more accurate validation of microsegregation models. Application of this approach to examine solidification segregation of a 319-type alloy demonstrated that, for these slowly cooled castings, neither Sr or TiB2 additions significantly affected coring of Cu within the primary α-Al dendrites. Comparison against predictions of CALPHAD-type Gulliver-Scheil models was less satisfactory. Consideration of back-diffusion and morphology effects through a one-dimensional (1-D) numerical model do not improve the agreement. Possible reasons for the lack of agreement are hypothesized.

  1. The effect of solidification rate on the growth of small fatigue cracks in a cast 319-type aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, M. J.; Jones, J. Wayne; Boileau, J. M.; Allison, J. E.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of solidification rate on the growth behavior of small fatigue cracks in a 319-type aluminum alloy, a common Al-Si-Cu alloy used in automotive castings. Fatigue specimens were taken from cast material that underwent a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process in order to eliminate shrinkage pores and to facilitate the observation of surface-initiated cracks by replication. Naturally initiated surface cracks ranging in length from 17 µm to 2 mm were measured using a replication technique. Growth rates of the small cracks were calculated as a function of the elastic stress-intensity-factor range (Δ K). Long-crack growth-rate data (10 mm≤length≤25 mm) were obtained from compact-tension (CT) specimens, and comparison to the small-crack data indicates the existence of a significant small-crack effect in this alloy. The solidification rate is shown to have a significant influence on small-crack growth behavior, with faster solidification rates resulting in slower growth rates at equivalent Δ K levels. A stress-level effect is also observed for both solidification rates, with faster growth rates occurring at higher applied-stress amplitudes at a given Δ K. A crack-growth relation proposed by Nisitani and others is modified to give reasonable correlation of small-crack growth data to different solidification rates and stress levels.

  2. Single-tube, noninterrupted reverse transcription-PCR for detection of infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, L H; Ting, L J; Shien, J H; Shieh, H K

    1994-01-01

    An assay protocol based on single-tube, noninterrupted reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the detection of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is described. After the conditions for RT-PCR had been optimized, a primer set framing a region within the gene coding for IBDV VP2 protein was used to amplify a 318-bp fragment of the IBDV genome. Amplified product was detected with three strains of IBDV, whereas none was obtained from uninfected bursal tissue or seven unrelated avian viruses. The sensitivity of this RT-PCR was tested with purified viral RNA from three strains of IBDV. The detection limit was 10 fg in an ethidium bromide-stained gel. In addition, this assay system was used to detect IBDV in bursal-tissue specimens from commercially reared chickens. The identity of the amplified products from the tissue specimen preparation was determined by using a rapid, simple procedure in which internally nested, end-labeled probes were used. Images PMID:8051255

  3. Simple Method to Genotype the ACTN3 r577x Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Schadock, Ines; Schneider, Augusto; Silva, Elton Dias; Buchweitz, Marcia Rubia Duarte; Correa, Marcio Nunes; Pesquero, Joao Bosco; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Araujo, Ronaldo Carvalho; Barros, Carlos Castilho

    2015-05-01

    The alpha-actinin-3 r577x polymorphism (rs1815739) is one of the most important polymorphisms associated with athletic performance. This single-nucleotide mutation leads to a premature stop codon, resulting in a nonfunctional protein product. The presence of the dominant R allele is associated with full power skeletal muscle contraction. Homozygosity for the X allele is correlated with more efficient energy disposure. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the standard methods used to genotype this polymorphism, but they are expensive and require special equipments. Here, we present a simple and cost-efficient method to genotype the ACTN3 r577x polymorphism by a single PCR. External primers yield a 690-bp product that indicates the template quality. Internal primers produce a 413-bp product if the R allele is present and a 318-bp product if the X allele is present. Our four-primer genotyping PCR was validated by the standard real-time PCR, generally used to genotype this single-nucleotide polymorphism, demonstrating the accuracy of this method. This protocol is perfect for small- or large-scale cohort genotyping of the ACTN3 r577x polymorphism. PMID:25831089

  4. Proof-of-principle measurement of beta-delayed neutron precursor 89Br using VANDLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulauskas, Stanley; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Padgett, S.; Vandle Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) uses the time of flight technique to measure the energy of neutrons from various nuclear processes. Beta delayed neutrons from fission fragments typically have an energy below 1 MeV, making measurements of their energy challenging. This has led to the use of a reliable off-the-shelf digital electronics system to instrument VANDLE. However, the timing resolution and neutron-energy threshold of the system required investigation. Timing resolutions better than 1 ns have been obtained. The digital system can be operated with low thresholds to obtain high detection efficiency for low energy neutrons (E >150 keV). A proof-of-principle experiment using 89Br was conducted at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). 89Br is produced in proton induced fission of 238U and was chosen because its neutron energy spectrum has been measured by G. Ewan et al. (Z. Phys. A. 318, 309-314, (1984)). This research was sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Co- operative Agreement No. DE-FG52-08NA28552.

  5. Onset of Deformation in ^60Ni.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weintraub, W. D.; Jin, H. Q.; Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L. L.; Baktash, C.; Brinkman, M. J.; Dean, D. J.; Yu, C.-H.; Devlin, M.; Lafosse, D. R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Leddy, M.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Rudolph, D.

    1998-04-01

    High-spin states in ^60Ni were populated using the ^28Si(^36Ar,4p) reaction with beam energy of 136 MeV. Gammasphere at LBNL was used in conjunction with Microball to measure gamma rays selected for the charged-particle exit channels of interest. A total of 2 billion events was recorded, with the 4p channel to ^60Ni representing approximately 11% of the data. In our analysis, the previously known level scheme(G. Moyat et al. al.), Nuclear Physics A318, 236 (1979). has been extended up to energy and spin of 20 MeV and 20 hbar. The multiplicity of levels up to I=10 are well explained by shell-model calculations including the g_9/2 single-particle orbital into the fp-shell configuration space. At higher spins, evidence for rotational-like behavior increases. Two apparently rotational structures have large M1 values and are perhaps shears bands, likely involving one g_9/2 particle. Furthermore, an E2 sequence with a larger moment of inertia is observed that could correspond to other deformed structures in the region, involving two g_9/2 particles. Comparisons to calculations will be given.

  6. Molecular cloning, expression and antioxidant characterisation of a typical thioredoxin gene (AccTrx2) in Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pengbo; Hao, Lili; Wang, Fang; Chen, Xiaobo; Yan, Yan; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2013-09-15

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are a family of small, highly conserved and ubiquitous proteins that are involved in protecting organisms against toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, a typical thioredoxin 2 gene was isolated from Apis cerana cerana, AccTrx2. The full-length cDNA sequence of AccTrx2 was composed of 407 bp containing a 318 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a predicted protein of 105 amino acids, 11.974 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.45. Expression profile of AccTrx2 as determined by a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was higher in brain than in other tissues, with its highest transcript occurring on the 15day post-emergence adult and upregulated by such abiotic stresses as 4 °C, 16 °C, 25 °C, H2O2, cyhalothrin, acaricide, paraquat, phoxime and mercury (HgCl2) treatments. However, AccTrx2 was slightly repressed when exposed to 42 °C treatment. Characterisation of the recombinant protein showed that the purified AccTrx2 had insulin disulfide reductase activity and could protect DNA from ROS damage. These results indicate that AccTrx2 functions as an antioxidant that plays an important role in response to oxidative stress. PMID:23747404

  7. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Adam Paul; /UC, Berkeley

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb{sup -1} dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t{bar t} and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb{sup -1} dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 178 GTeV/c{sup 2} and 3.1 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  8. Increased fitness and realized heritability in emamectin benzoate-resistant Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Abbas, Naeem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Pathan, Attaullah Khan; Razaq, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    The common green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea is a key biological control agent employed in integrated pest management (IPM) programs for managing various insect pests. A field collected population of C. carnea was selected for emamectin benzoate resistance in the laboratory and fitness costs and realized heritability were investigated. After five generations of selection with emamectin benzoate, C. carnea developed a 318-fold resistance to the insecticide. The resistant population had a relative fitness of 1.49, with substantially higher emergence rate of healthy adults, fecundity and hatchability and shorter larval duration, pupal duration, and development time compared to the susceptible population. Mean population growth rates; such as the intrinsic rate of natural population increase and biotic potential were higher for the emamectin benzoate selected population compared to the susceptible population. The realized heritability (h(2)) value of emamectin benzoate resistance was 0.34 in emamectin benzoate selected population of C. carnea. Chrysoperla species which show resistance to insecticides makes them compatible with those IPM systems where emamectin benzoate is employed. PMID:23975538

  9. RNA polymerase II subunit RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    To improve our understanding of RNA polymerase II, the gene that encodes its third-largest subunit, RPB3, was isolated from a lambda gt11 DNA library by using antibody probes. The RPB3 DNA sequence predicts a 318-amino-acid protein whose sequence was confirmed, in part, by microsequence analysis of the gel-purified RNA polymerase II subunit. RPB3 was found to be an essential single-copy gene that is tightly linked to HIS6 on chromosome IX. An RPB3 temperature-sensitive mutant that arrested growth after three to four generations at the restrictive temperature was isolated. When the mutant was shifted to the restrictive temperature, RNA polymerase II could no longer assemble, previously assembled functional enzyme was depleted, and mRNA levels were consequently reduced. These results demonstrate that RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus. Finally, the RPB3 protein is similar in sequence and length to RPC5, a subunit common to RNA polymerases I and III, suggesting that these subunits may play similar roles in RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Images PMID:2685562

  10. Integrative genomics identifies candidate microRNAs for pathogenesis of experimental biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biliary atresia is a fibroinflammatory obstruction of extrahepatic bile duct that leads to end-stage liver disease in children. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis of biliary atresia, very little is known about the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in onset and progression of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the entire biliary transcriptome to identify miRNAs with potential role in the pathogenesis of bile duct obstruction. Results By profiling the expression levels of miRNA in extrahepatic bile ducts and gallbladder (EHBDs) from a murine model of biliary atresia, we identified 14 miRNAs whose expression was suppressed at the times of duct obstruction and atresia (≥2 fold suppression, P < 0.05, FDR 5%). Next, we obtained 2,216 putative target genes of the 14 miRNAs using in silico target prediction algorithms. By integrating this result with a genome-wide gene expression analysis of the same tissue (≥2 fold increase, P < 0.05, FDR 5%), we identified 26 potential target genes with coordinate expression by the 14 miRNAs. Functional analysis of these target genes revealed a significant relevance of miR-30b/c, -133a/b, -195, -200a, -320 and −365 based on increases in expression of at least 3 target genes in the same tissue and 1st-to-3rd tier links with genes and gene-groups regulating organogenesis and immune response. These miRNAs showed higher expression in EHBDs above livers, a unique expression in cholangiocytes and the subepithelial compartment, and were downregulated in a cholangiocyte cell line after RRV infection. Conclusions Integrative genomics reveals functional relevance of miR-30b/c, -133a/b, -195, -200a, -320 and −365. The coordinate expression of miRNAs and target genes in a temporal-spatial fashion suggests a regulatory role of these miRNAs in pathogenesis of experimental biliary atresia. PMID:24138927

  11. The Structure and Environmental Impacts of Protostellar Outflows in DR 21 and Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, J. J.; Ho, P. T. P.; Brown, R.

    1997-12-01

    Regions of high-mass star formation are considerably more complicated than their low-mass counterparts. Recent HST NICMOS images of Orion-KL (Thompson et al. 1997) as well as sensitive ground-based infrared images of H_2 shock emission in the Orion outflow region (Chrysostomou et al. 1997, McCaughrean & Mac Low 1997, Schild et al. 1997) reveal intricate clumpy shock structures extending in nearly all radial directions from the source. The one radial direction in which the shock emission is particularly diminished is to the northeast, and it is precisely here that a molecular gas filament is present and highly heated, as though blocking the path of outflowing material from Orion-KL. We present our latest NH_3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) VLA MEM mosaics of the Orion-KL region. We present evidence from temperature and chemical excitation gradients that the molecular gas cores along the filament extending to the northeast of Orion-KL are strongly heated by impacts from protostellar ejecta. These effects are seen in the core ``CS1'' 30'' northeast of IRc2 and also in cores at least twice as distant (1.5 pc). The DR 21 outflow region is also quite complex, with multiple molecular outflows extending from a multiple-component HII region. We present sensitive VLA maps of hydrogen recombination line emission, and we report the detection of bipolar ionized gas within the molecular outflow lobes. This detection gives observational evidence for the initial ionized inner structure of high mass protostellar outflows. Chrysostomou, A. et al. 1997, MNRAS, 289, 605 McCaughrean, M., & Mac Low, M.-M. 1997, AJ, 113, 391 Schild, H., Miller, S., & Tennyson, J. 1997, A&A, 319, 1037 Thompson, R., Rieke, M., Schneider, G., Stolovy, S., Erickson, E., & Axon, D. 1997, STSCI Early Release Observation PRC97-13

  12. Comparison of thermodynamic databases for 3xx and 6xxx aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, C.; Wolverton, C.

    2005-08-01

    Computational thermodynamics, or Calculation of Phase Diagram (CALPHAD) methods have proven useful in applications to modeling a variety of alloy properties. However, the methods are only as accurate as the thermodynamic databases they use, and two commercial thermodynamic databases exist for aluminum alloys: Thermotech and Computherm. In order to provide a critical comparison of these databases, we used both the databases to calculate equilibrium solid-state phase fractions and phase diagram isothermal sections of several industrial aluminum alloys: a 319-type and 356 cast alloys, as well as the wrought alloys 6022 and 6111. All of these alloys may be generically described as being based on the Al-Mg-Si-Cu quaternary with other additions such as Fe, Mn, and Zn. Although many of the results are consistent between the two databases, several qualitative and quantitative differences were observed. Many of these differences are found to be due to the intermetallic compounds involving Fe, Mn, Cr, and Zn. On the other hand, thermodynamics involving only phases from the Al-Mg-Si-Cu quaternary show good agreement between the databases, although some small differences still exist, particularly involving the quaternary Q phase. To understand and assess these differences, formation enthalpies and reaction energies from the databases were compared against density functional first-principles energetics. These comparisons indicate possible avenues for future improvements of Al-alloy thermodynamic databases. Finally, we demonstrate an interesting correlation between the calculated phase fractions and the measured yield strengths across this wide family of 3xx cast and 6xxx wrought alloys.

  13. A correlation linking the predicted mean vote and the mean thermal vote based on an investigation on the human thermal comfort in short-haul domestic flights.

    PubMed

    Giaconia, Carlo; Orioli, Aldo; Di Gangi, Alessandra

    2015-05-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the human thermal comfort inside the cabin of some Airbus A319 aircrafts during 14 short-haul domestic flights, linking various Italian cities, are presented and used to define a correlation among the predicted mean vote (PMV), a procedure which is commonly used to assess the thermal comfort in inhabited environments, and the equivalent temperature and mean thermal vote (MTV), which are the parameters suggested by the European Standard EN ISO 14505-2 for the evaluation of the thermal environment in vehicles. The measurements of the radiant temperature, air temperature and relative humidity during flights were performed. The air temperature varied between 22.2 °C and 26.0 °C; the relative humidity ranged from 8.7% to 59.2%. The calculated values of the PMV varied from -0.16 to 0.90 and were confirmed by the answers of the passengers. The equivalent temperature was evaluated using the equations of Fanger or on the basis of the values of the skin temperature measured on some volunteers. The correlation linking the thermal sensation scales and zones used by the PMV and the MTV resulted quite accurate because the minimum value of the absolute difference between such environmental indexes equalled 0.0073 and the maximum difference did not exceed the value of 0.0589. Even though the equivalent temperature and the MTV were specifically proposed to evaluate the thermal sensation in vehicles, their use may be effectively extended to the assessment of the thermal comfort in airplanes or other occupied places. PMID:25683547

  14. Aircraft type influence on contrail properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeßberger, P.; Voigt, C.; Schumann, U.; Sölch, I.; Schlager, H.; Kaufmann, S.; Petzold, A.; Schäuble, D.; Gayet, J.-F.

    2013-05-01

    The investigation of the impact of aircraft parameters on contrail properties helps to better understand the climate impact from aviation. Yet, in observations, it is a challenge to separate aircraft and meteorological influences on contrail formation. During the CONCERT campaign in November 2008, contrails from 3 Airbus passenger aircraft of type A319-111, A340-311 and A380-841 were probed at cruise under similar meteorological conditions with in-situ instruments on board the DLR research aircraft Falcon. Within the 2 min old contrails detected near ice saturation, we find similar effective diameters Deff (5.2-5.9 μm), but differences in particle number densities nice (162-235 cm-3) and in vertical contrail extensions (120-290 m), resulting in large differences in contrail optical depths τ (0.25-0.94). Hence larger aircraft produce optically thicker contrails. Based on the observations, we apply the EULAG-LCM model with explicit ice microphysics and in addition the Contrail and Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP to calculate the aircraft type impact on young contrails under identical meteorological conditions. The observed increase in τ for heavier aircraft is confirmed by the models, yet for generally smaller τ. An aircraft dependence of climate relevant contrail properties persists during contrail lifetime, adding importance to aircraft dependent model initialization. We finally derive an analytical relationship between contrail, aircraft and meteorological parameters. Near ice saturation, contrail width × τ scales linearly with fuel flow rate as confirmed by observations. For higher saturation ratios approximations from theory suggest a non-linear increase in the form (RHI-1)2/3. Summarized our combined results could help to more accurately assess the climate impact from aviation using an aircraft dependent contrail parameterization.

  15. Aircraft type influence on contrail properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeßberger, P.; Voigt, C.; Schumann, U.; Sölch, I.; Schlager, H.; Kaufmann, S.; Petzold, A.; Schäuble, D.; Gayet, J.-F.

    2013-12-01

    The investigation of the impact of aircraft parameters on contrail properties helps to better understand the climate impact from aviation. Yet, in observations, it is a challenge to separate aircraft and meteorological influences on contrail formation. During the CONCERT campaign in November 2008, contrails from 3 Airbus passenger aircraft of types A319-111, A340-311 and A380-841 were probed at cruise under similar meteorological conditions with in situ instruments on board DLR research aircraft Falcon. Within the 2 min-old contrails detected near ice saturation, we find similar effective diameters Deff (5.2-5.9 μm), but differences in particle number densities nice (162-235 cm-3) and in vertical contrail extensions (120-290 m), resulting in large differences in contrail optical depths τ at 550 nm (0.25-0.94). Hence larger aircraft produce optically thicker contrails. Based on the observations, we apply the EULAG-LCM model with explicit ice microphysics and, in addition, the Contrail and Cirrus Prediction (CoCiP) model to calculate the aircraft type impact on young contrails under identical meteorological conditions. The observed increase in τ for heavier aircraft is confirmed by the models, yet for generally smaller τ. CoCiP model results suggest that the aircraft dependence of climate-relevant contrail properties persists during contrail lifetime, adding importance to aircraft-dependent model initialization. We finally derive an analytical relationship between contrail, aircraft and meteorological parameters. Near ice saturation, contrail width × τ scales linearly with the fuel flow rate, as confirmed by observations. For higher relative humidity with respect to ice (RHI), the analytical relationship suggests a non-linear increase in the form (RHI-12/3. Summarized, our combined results could help to more accurately assess the climate impact from aviation using an aircraft-dependent contrail parameterization.

  16. Design of an undulator white beam profiler and test results on the Advanced Photon Source beamline (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Deming; Ramanathan, Mohan; Singh, Om; Decker, Glenn

    2002-03-01

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), each insertion device (ID) beamline front end has two x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) to monitor the x-ray beam position for both the vertical and horizontal directions. The XBPMs measure photoelectrons generated by the chemical vapor deposited-diamond-based sensory blades and deduce the beam position by comparison of the relative signals from the blades [D. Shu, B. Rodricks, J. Barraza, T. Sanchez, and T. M. Kuzay, Nucl. Instrum. Methods. Phys. Res. A 319, 56 (1992)]. Performance challenges for an undulator XBPM during operation are contamination of the signal from the neighboring bending-magnet sources and the sensitivity of the XBPM to the ID gap variations. Problems are exacerbated because users change the ID gap during their operations, and hence the percentage level of the contamination in the front-end XBPM signals varies. The smart XBPM system partially solved these problems [D. Shu, H. Ding, J. Barraza, T. M. Kuzay, and M. Ramanathan, J. Synchrotron Radia. 5, 632 (1998)], but it is still very difficult to eliminate the contamination of the signal from the storage ring orbit-corrector magnets. A method was proposed by G. Decker and O. Singh [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 112801 (1999)] that provides a solution to the long-standing problem of stray radiation-induced signals on photoemission-based XBPMs located on the ID beamline front end. The method involves the introduction of a chicane into the accelerator lattice that directs unwanted x rays away from the photosensitive XBPM blades. This technique has been implemented at the APS. In this paper, we present the design of an undulator white beam profiler that provides experimental confirmation of this technique.

  17. Tree-ring-based drought reconstruction in the Iberian Range (east of Spain) since 1694

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Ernesto; de Luis, Martín; Cuadrat, José María; Esper, Jan; Saz, Miguel Ángel

    2016-03-01

    Droughts are a recurrent phenomenon in the Mediterranean basin with negative consequences for society, economic activities, and natural systems. Nevertheless, the study of drought recurrence and severity in Spain has been limited so far due to the relatively short instrumental period. In this work, we present a reconstruction of the standardized precipitation index (SPI) for the Iberian Range. Growth variations and climatic signals within the network are assessed developing a correlation matrix and the data combined to a single chronology integrating 336 samples from 169 trees of five different pine species distributed throughout the province of Teruel. The new chronology, calibrated against regional instrumental climatic data, shows a high and stable correlation with the July SPI integrating moisture conditions over 12 months forming the basis for a 318-year drought reconstruction. The climate signal contained in this reconstruction is highly significant ( p < 0.05) and spatially robust over the interior areas of Spain located above 1000 meters above sea level (masl). According to our SPI reconstruction, seven substantially dry and five wet periods are identified since the late seventeenth century considering ≥±1.76 standard deviations. Besides these, 36 drought and 28 pluvial years were identified. Some of these years, such as 1725, 1741, 1803, and 1879, are also revealed in other drought reconstructions in Romania and Turkey, suggesting that coherent larger-scale synoptic patterns drove these extreme deviations. Since regional drought deviations are also retained in historical documents, the tree-ring-based reconstruction presented here will allow us to cross-validate drought frequency and magnitude in a highly vulnerable region.

  18. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems program (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. First quarterly report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Brushwood, J.

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally-superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability- Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase 1 of the ATS program, Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is re-configured with closed- loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to bum coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. Future Phase IV activities consist of manufacturing, constructing,

  19. Phylogeography and Post-Glacial Recolonization in Wolverines (Gulo gulo) from across Their Circumpolar Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zigouris, Joanna; Schaefer, James A.; Fortin, Clément; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Interglacial-glacial cycles of the Quaternary are widely recognized in shaping phylogeographic structure. Patterns from cold adapted species can be especially informative - in particular, uncovering additional glacial refugia, identifying likely recolonization patterns, and increasing our understanding of species’ responses to climate change. We investigated phylogenetic structure of the wolverine, a wide-ranging cold adapted carnivore, using a 318 bp of the mitochondrial DNA control region for 983 wolverines (n = 209 this study, n = 774 from GenBank) from across their full Holarctic distribution. Bayesian phylogenetic tree reconstruction and the distribution of observed pairwise haplotype differences (mismatch distribution) provided evidence of a single rapid population expansion across the wolverine’s Holarctic range. Even though molecular evidence corroborated a single refugium, significant subdivisions of population genetic structure (0.01< ΦST <0.99, P<0.05) were detected. Pairwise ΦST estimates separated Scandinavia from Russia and Mongolia, and identified five main divisions within North America - the Central Arctic, a western region, an eastern region consisting of Ontario and Quebec/Labrador, Manitoba, and California. These data are in contrast to the nearly panmictic structure observed in northwestern North America using nuclear microsatellites, but largely support the nuclear DNA separation of contemporary Manitoba and Ontario wolverines from northern populations. Historic samples (c. 1900) from the functionally extirpated eastern population of Quebec/Labrador displayed genetic similarities to contemporary Ontario wolverines. To understand these divergence patterns, four hypotheses were tested using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC). The most supported hypothesis was a single Beringia incursion during the last glacial maximum that established the northwestern population, followed by a west-to-east colonization during the Holocene. This

  20. Optimized thermal imaging with a singlet and pupil plane encoding: experimental realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyo, Gonzalo; Singh, Amritpal; Andersson, Mathias; Huckridge, David; Harvey, Andy

    2006-09-01

    Pupil plane encoding has shown to be a useful technique to extend the depth of field of optical systems. Recently, further studies have demonstrated its potential in reducing the impact of other common focus-related aberrations (such as thermally induced defocus, field curvature, etc) which enables to employ simple and low-cost optical systems while maintaining good optical performance. In this paper, we present for the first time an experimental application where pupil plane encoding alleviates aberrations across the field of view of an uncooled LWIR optical system formed by F/1, 75mm focal length germanium singlet and a 320x240 detector array with 38-micron pixel. The singlet was corrected from coma and spherical aberration but exhibited large amounts of astigmatism and field curvature even for small fields of view. A manufactured asymmetrical germanium phase mask was placed at the front of the singlet, which in combination with digital image processing enabled to increase significantly the performance across the entire field of view. This improvement is subject to the exceptionally challenging manufacturing of the asymmetrical phase mask and noise amplification in the digitally restored image. Future research will consider manufacturing of the phase mask in the front surface of the singlet and a real-time implementation of the image processing algorithms.

  1. [Evaluation of the impact on Aedes aegypti infestation in cement tanks of the municipal district of Canindé, Ceará, Brazil after using the Betta splendens fish as an alternative biological control].

    PubMed

    Pamplona, Luciano de Góes Cavalcanti; Lima, José Wellington de Oliveira; Cunha, Jane Cris de Lima; Santana, Eddie William de Pinho

    2004-01-01

    Canindé has a population of 71,235 inhabitants. In April 2001, the city started using larvivorous fish in cement water tanks, as a means of biological control of Aedes aegypti larvae. During house-to-house visits by health agents, instead of treating the water tank with larvicide, a Betta splendens fish was introduced into each tank. The number of houses and the number of tanks was estimated by monthly surveys. Then, the number of tanks per house was determined. Taking into account this estimated number and the number of houses visited, the infestation level for each kind of deposit was analyzed. In January 2001, 70.4% of the water tanks presented mosquitoes. Following the intervention, in January 2002 only 7.4% were positive and by December 2002 the rate had dropped to 0.2%. The efficacy of Betta splendens as a biological control agent in cement water tanks was clearly demonstrated, by achieving a 320 times reduction in the infestation level. PMID:15361957

  2. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  3. A column-based two-stage analog-to-digital converter for uncooled microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprak, Alperen; Tepegoz, Murat; Akin, Tayfun

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a column-based, two-stage, 12-bit analog-to-digital converter structure designed for uncooled microbolometer arrays. On-chip analog-to-digital converters prevent the degradation of sensitive analog output by external noise sources as well as providing a more integrated functionality. Despite these advantages, the area and power constraints limit the usage of high performance converters. This paper presents a new structure that provides a balance between area, power, and performance. The structure is composed of two stages: a tracking ADC stage running at each column during integration and a successive approximation ADC stage which is shared by a number of columns depending on the array size and operation frequency. The tracking ADC operates during the integration time, while the second ADC starts after the integration is completed. The converter includes self-calibration to lower the effect of process variations and digital correction mechanisms to eliminate the need for low-offset comparators. The simulations and theoretical calculations based on the simulation results show that the total power dissipation of the proposed structure will be approximately 73.7 mW and 88.4 mW on a 320x240 array operating at 60 Hz and 384x288 array operating at 50 Hz, respectively.

  4. Design and development of a Virtual Dolphinarium for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yiyu; Chia, Noel K H; Thalmann, Daniel; Kee, Norman K N; Zheng, Jianmin; Thalmann, Nadia M

    2013-03-01

    The recent proliferation of virtual reality (VR) technology applications in the autism therapy to promote learning and positive behavior among such children has produced optimistic results in developing a variety of skills and abilities in them. Dolphin-assisted therapy has also become a topic of public and research interest for autism intervention and treatment. This paper will present an innovative design and development of a Virtual Dolphinarium for potential autism intervention. Instead of emulating the swimming with dolphins, our virtual dolphin interaction program will allow children with autism to act as dolphin trainers at the poolside and to learn (nonverbal) communication through hand gestures with the virtual dolphins. Immersive visualization and gesture-based interaction are implemented to engage children with autism within an immersive room equipped with a curved screen spanning a 320(°) and a high-end five-panel projection system. This paper will also report a pilot study to establish trial protocol of autism screening to explore the participants' readiness for the virtual dolphin interaction. This research will have two potential benefits in the sense of helping children with autism and protecting the endangered species. PMID:23362251

  5. Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity by Diode Laser: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25–60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5 W PW (T on 100 m and T off 100 ms), fluence 62.2 J/cm2 in defocused mode with a 320 μ fiber. Each tooth received three 1′ applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel. PMID:22792109

  6. Portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for detection of biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Won; Lee, Kangjin; Millner, Patricia; Sharma, Manan; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2008-04-01

    A rapid nondestructive technology is needed to detect bacterial contamination on the surfaces of food processing equipment to reduce public health risks. A portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was used to evaluate potential detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel typically used in the manufacture of food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures, such as E. coli, Pseudomonas pertucinogena, Erwinia chrysanthemi, and Listeria innocula. Following a 1-week exposure, biofilm formations were assessed using fluorescence imaging. In addition, the effects on biofilm formation from both tryptic soy broth (TSB) and M9 medium with casamino acids (M9C) were examined. TSB grown cells enhance biofilm production compared with M9C-grown cells. Hyperspectral fluorescence images of the biofilm samples, in response to ultraviolet-A (320 to 400 nm) excitation, were acquired from approximately 416 to 700 nm. Visual evaluation of individual images at emission peak wavelengths in the blue revealed the most contrast between biofilms and stainless steel coupons. Two-band ratios compared with the single-band images increased the contrast between the biofilm forming area and stainless steel coupon surfaces. The 444/588 nm ratio images exhibited the greatest contrast between the biofilm formations and stainless coupon surfaces.

  7. Rapid thinning of the Welsh Ice Cap at 20-19 ka based on 10Be ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Philip D.; Glasser, Neil F.; Fink, David

    2016-01-01

    New 10Be ages from the summits of three mountain areas of North Wales reveal a very similar exposure timing as the Welsh Ice Cap thinned after the global Last Glacial Maximum. Eight bedrock and one boulder sample gave a combined arithmetic mean exposure age of 19.08 ± 0.80 ka (4.2%, 1σ). Similar exposure ages over a 320 m vertical range (824 to 581 m altitude) show that ice cap thinning was very rapid and spatially uniform. Using the same production rate and scaling scheme, we recalculated six published 10Be exposure ages from the nearby Arans, which also covered a similar elevation range from 608 to 901 m and obtained an arithmetic mean of 19.41 ± 1.45 ka (7.5%, 1σ). The average exposure age of all 15 accepted deglaciation ages is 19.21 ± 1.07 (5.6%, 1σ). The complete dataset from North Wales provides very strong evidence indicating that these summits became exposed as nunataks at 20-19 ka. This result provides important insight to the magnitude of ice surface lowering and behavior of the Welsh Ice Cap during the last deglaciation that can be compared to other ice masses that made up the British-Irish Ice Sheet.

  8. Determining the effects of alternative departure cutback altitudes and power settings: A case study, John Wayne Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestre, Vincent

    This paper provides only one example of the many aircraft and procedures evaluated as part of the JWA demonstration. Aircraft included in the analysis are the B757, B737, A320, MD-80, and the BAe-146. The measurement database provided an excellent basis for comparing departure procedures and for developing the departure profiles used in the noise contour model. The net result was that Noisemap generated CNEL contours matched measurement data to within 1 dBA (0.5 dBA for close in measurement points). It is somewhat obvious that cutbacks at altitudes lower than normal or to lower power settings than typical will produce noise benefits near the cutback point but that resulting lower altitudes associated with early and/or deep cutbacks will result in higher noise levels farther down the flight track. It is not obvious where the noise benefits and increases will occur. These in fact vary by aircraft type and by procedure and vary over a fairly large range. Given that noise sensitive areas are geographically fixed and departure cutback benefit areas vary by aircraft and procedure over a large area, there may be only very limited opportunities to use this technique for noise abatement procedures without concomitant noise increases in downstream neighborhoods.

  9. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics. PMID:27402165

  10. UV-B-induced synthesis of photoprotective pigments and extracellular polysaccharides in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune.

    PubMed Central

    Ehling-Schulz, M; Bilger, W; Scherer, S

    1997-01-01

    Liquid cultures of the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune derived from field material were treated with artificial UV-B and UV-A irradiation. We studied the induction of various pigments which are though to provide protection against damaging UV-B irradiation. First, UV-B irradiation induced an increase in carotenoids, especially echinenone and myxoxanthophyll, but did not influence production of chlorophyll a. Second, an increase of an extracellular, water-soluble UV-A/B-absorbing mycosporine occurred, which was associated with extracellular glycan synthesis. Finally, synthesis of scytonemin, a lipid-soluble, extracellular pigment known to function as a UV-A sunscreen, was observed. After long-time exposure, the UV-B effect on carotenoid and scytonemin synthesis ceased whereas the mycosporine content remained constantly high. The UV-B sunscreen mycosporine is exclusively induced by UV-B (< 315 nm). The UV-A sunscreen scytonemin is induced only slightly by UV-B (< 315 nm), very strongly by near UV-A (350 to 400 nm), and not at all by far UV-A (320 to 350 nm). These results may indicate that the syntheses of these UV sunscreens are triggered by different UV photoreceptors. PMID:9068639

  11. Comparison of the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the polymerase chain reaction to detect Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmon ovarian fluid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Chase, D.; McKibben, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from naturally infected chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum by the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT), an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the MF-FAT, 64% (66/103) samples contained detectable levels of R. salmoninarum cells. Among the positive fish, the R. salmoninarum concentrations ranged from 25 cells/ml to 4.3 3 109 cells/ml. A soluble antigenic fraction of R. salmoninarum was detected in 39% of the fish (40/103) by the ELISA. The ELISA is considered one of the most sensitive detection methods for bacterial kidney disease in tissues, yet it did not detect R. salmoninarum antigen consistently at bacterial cell concentrations below about 1.3 3 104 cells/ml according to the MF-FAT counts. When total DNA was extracted and tested in a nested PCR designed to amplify a 320-base-pair region of the gene encoding a soluble 57-kD protein of R. salmoninarum, 100% of the 100 samples tested were positive. The results provided strong evidence that R. salmoninarum may be present in ovarian fluids thought to be free of the bacterium on the basis of standard diagnostic methods.

  12. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction for amplification of a sequence of the p57 gene of Renibacterium salmoninarum that provides a highly sensitive method for detection of the bacterium in salmonid kidney

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Pascho, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based assays have shown promise for diagnosing Renibacterium salmoninarum in tissues and body fluids of salmonids. DeVelopment of a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to detect a 320 bp DNA segment of the gene encoding the p57 protein of R. salmoninarum is described. Whereas a conventional PCR for a 383 bp segment of the p57 gene reliably detected 1000 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue, the nested PCR detected as few as 10 R. salmoninarum per reaction in kidney tissue. Two DNA extraction methods for the nested PCR were compared and the correlation between replicate samples was generally higher in samples extracted by the QIAamp system compared with those extracted by the phenol/chloroform method. The specificity of the nested PCR was confirmed by testing DNA extracts of common bacterial fish pathogens and a panel of bacterial species reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for R. salmoninarum. Kidney samples from 74 naturally infected chinook Salmon were examined by the nested PCR, the ELISA, and the FAT, and the detected prevalences of R. salmoninarum were 61, 47, and 43%, respectively.

  13. Surveillance of Human Astrovirus Infection in Brazil: The First Report of MLB1 Astrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Maria da Penha Trindade Pinheiro; Carvalho Costa, Filipe Aníbal; Rocha, Mônica Simões; de Andrade, Juliana da Silva Ribeiro; Diniz, Fernanda Kreischer Bandeira; de Andrade, Thais Ramos; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) represents the third most common virus associated with acute diarrhea (AD). This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of HAstV infection in Brazilian children under 5 years of age with AD, investigate the presence of recently described HAstV strains, through extensive laboratory-based surveillance of enteric viral agents in three Brazilian coastal regions between 2005 and 2011. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the overall HAstV detection rate reached 7.1% (207/2.913) with percentage varying according to the geographic region: 3.9% (36/921) in the northeast, 7.9% in the south (71/903) and 9.2% in the southeast (100/1.089) (p < 0.001). HAstV were detected in cases of all age groups. Detection rates were slightly higher during the spring. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 320-bp ORF2 fragment revealed that HAstV-1 was the predominant genotype throughout the seven years of the study. The novel AstV-MLB1 was detected in two children with AD from a subset of 200 samples tested, demonstrating the circulation of this virus both the in northeastern and southeastern regions of Brazil. These results provide additional epidemiological and molecular data on HAstV circulation in three Brazilian coastal regions, highlighting its potential to cause infantile AD. PMID:26274322

  14. Spatial scanning for anomaly detection in acoustic emission testing of an aerospace structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensman, James; Worden, Keith; Eaton, Mark; Pullin, Rhys; Holford, Karen; Evans, Sam

    2011-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of engineering structures potentially provides a convenient, cost-effective means of performing structural health monitoring. Networks of AE sensors can be easily and unobtrusively installed upon structures, giving the ability to detect and locate damage-related strain releases ('events') in the structure. Use of the technique is not widespread due to the lack of a simple and effective method for detecting abnormal activity levels: the sensitivity of AE sensor networks is such that events unrelated to damage are prevalent in most applications. In this publication, we propose to monitor AE activity in a structure using a spatial scanning statistic, developed and used effectively in the field of epidemiology. The technique is demonstrated on an aerospace structure - an Airbus A320 main landing gear fitting - undergoing fatigue loading, and the method is compared to existing techniques. Despite its simplicity, the scanning statistic proves to be an extremely effective tool in detecting the onset of damage in the structure: it requires little to no user intervention or expertise, is inexpensive to compute and has an easily interpretable output. Furthermore, the generic nature of the method allows the technique to be used in a variety of monitoring scenarios, to detect damage in a wide range of structures.

  15. The internal bunch coordinate monitor (IBCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Yamin, S.P.

    1988-11-04

    An instrument has been developed and installed at the AGS for recording the transverse motion of each rf bunch. It can be operated from any node of the Apollo control system. A preliminary version of this report has appeared elsewhere. Appendix A is an instruction manual. Two digitizers, running off the same 100 MHz clock, sampled the output of either a horizontal or vertical pick-up electrode (PUE) pair. The coordinate of each rf bunch was calculated each time it passed the PUEs during a 320 microsecond interval. Thus, the motion of each bunch could be followed during this interval. Subsequent analysis computed the Fourier transform of this motion. Bunch motion has been studied at several times during the AGS cycle: the betatron oscillations induced by the tune meter's vertical kick have been seen, and their Fourier analysis gives results consistent with the tune meter; at transition, the effect of the radial kick on each bunch has been observed; coupled-bunch oscillations have been studied; and instabilities produced by high intensities have been observed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. User type certification for advanced flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, Richard D.; Abbott, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced avionics through flight management systems (FMS) coupled with autopilots can now precisely control aircraft from takeoff to landing. Clearly, this has been the most important improvement in aircraft since the jet engine. Regardless of the eventual capabilities of this technology, it is doubtful that society will soon accept pilotless airliners with the same aplomb they accept driverless passenger trains. Flight crews are still needed to deal with inputing clearances, taxiing, in-flight rerouting, unexpected weather decisions, and emergencies; yet it is well known that the contribution of human errors far exceed those of current hardware or software systems. Thus human errors remain, and are even increasing in percentage as the largest contributor to total system error. Currently, the flight crew is regulated by a layered system of certification: by operation, e.g., airline transport pilot versus private pilot; by category, e.g., airplane versus helicopter; by class, e.g., single engine land versus multi-engine land; and by type (for larger aircraft and jet powered aircraft), e.g., Boeing 767 or Airbus A320. Nothing in the certification process now requires an in-depth proficiency with specific types of avionics systems despite their prominent role in aircraft control and guidance.

  17. Structural characterization of the intra-membrane histidine kinase YbdK from Bacillus subtilis in DPC micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Pil; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Kim, Young-Chang; Jeon, Young Ho

    2010-01-15

    Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) play a critical role in signal transduction for cellular adaptation to environmental conditions and stresses. YbdK from Bacillus subtilis is a 320-residue intra-membrane sensing HK characterized by a short input domain consisting of two transmembrane helices without an extracytoplasmic domain. While the cytoplasmic domains of HKs have been studied in detail, the intra-membrane sensing domain systems are still uncharacterized due to difficulties in handling the transmembrane domain. Here, we successfully obtained pure recombinant transmembrane domain of YbdK (YbdK-TM) from E. coli and analyzed the characteristics of YbdK-TM using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other biophysical methods. YbdK-TM was found to form homo-dimers in DPC micelles based on cross-linking assays and analytical ultracentrifugation analyses. We estimated the size of the YbdK-TM DPC complex to be 46 kDa using solution state NMR T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} relaxation analyses in DPC micelles. These results provide information that will allow functional and structural studies of intra-membrane sensing HKs to begin.

  18. Heat loss analysis of a 10 kA warm dielectric HTS DC cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaotao; Xiao, Liye; Teng, Yuping; Song, Naihao; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhiqing; Liang, Xueming; Cao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Hongen; Lin, Liangzhen

    2014-09-01

    A 10 kA/360 m warm-dielectric high-temperature superconducting direct current (DC) power cable system (10 kA cable), supported jointly the Chinese government and industrial enterprise, was developed and has been operating as a branch circuit to transmit power for a 320 kA aluminum electrolyzing production line for more than 10 months at an industrial plant in central China. Both the 10 kA cable and its supporting system of the cable system are introduced. The cryogenic system for the 10 kA cable adopts closed loop and the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is forced to flow inside by a pump. The design of corrugated cryogenic envelope pipe is modularized and every independent module has two standardized joints, which makes it easy to integrate with the other pipes and the terminations. The heat loss sources and the structure including both the termination and the cryogenic envelope pipe of the 10 kA cable are discussed. The total heat loss of the 10 kA cable excluding the loss of cryogenic pipe for liquid nitrogen backward flowing is designed to be less than 1698 W at 10 kA, and the heat loss was compared and discussed with that of the aluminum bar. The field test and commissioning of the cable show that the 10 kA cable performs steadily and its heat loss is less than the expected value.

  19. Magnetic levitation assisted aircraft take-off and landing (feasibility study - GABRIEL concept)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohacs, Daniel; Rohacs, Jozsef

    2016-08-01

    The Technology Roadmap 2013 developed by the International Air Transport Association envisions the option of flying without an undercarriage to be in operation by 2032. Preliminary investigations clearly indicate that magnetic levitation technology (MagLev) might be an appealing solution to assist the aircraft take-off and landing. The EU supported research project, abbreviated as GABRIEL, was dealing with (i) the concept development, (ii) the identification, evaluation and selection of the deployable magnetic levitation technology, (iii) the definition of the core system elements (including the required aircraft modifications, the ground-based system and airport elements, and the rendezvous control system), (iv) the analysis of the safety and security aspects, (v) the concept validation and (vi) the estimation of the proposed concept impact in terms of aircraft weight, noise, emission, cost-benefit). All results introduced here are compared to a medium size hypothetic passenger aircraft (identical with an Airbus A320). This paper gives a systematic overview of (i) the applied methods, (ii) the investigation of the possible use of magnetic levitation technology to assist the commercial aircraft take-off and landing processes and (iii) the demonstrations, validations showing the feasibility of the radically new concept. All major results are outlined.

  20. Development of Custom 465® Corrosion-Resisting Steel for Landing Gear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daymond, Benjamin T.; Binot, Nicolas; Schmidt, Michael L.; Preston, Steve; Collins, Richard; Shepherd, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Existing high-strength low-alloy steels have been in place on landing gear for many years owing to their superior strength and cost performance. However, there have been major advances in improving the strength of high-performance corrosion-resisting steels. These materials have superior environmental robustness and remove the need for harmful protective coatings such as chromates and cadmium now on the list for removal under REACH legislation. A UK government-funded collaborative project is underway targeting a refined specification Custom 465® precipitation hardened stainless steel to replace the current material on Airbus A320 family aircraft main landing gear, a main fitting component developed by Messier-Bugatti-Dowty. This is a collaborative project between Airbus, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, and Carpenter Technology Corporation. An extensive series of coupon tests on four production Heats of the material have been conducted, to obtain a full range of mechanical, fatigue, and corrosion properties. Custom 465® is an excellent replacement to the current material, with comparable tensile strength and fracture toughness, better ductility, and very good general corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Fatigue performance is the only significant area of deficit with respect to incumbent materials, fatigue initiation being often related to carbo-titanium-nitride particles and cleavage zones.

  1. Operation and performance of the FAST detector at the AD machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascagna, V.; Bolognini, D.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Mozzanica, A.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.

    2007-10-01

    The FAST (Fiber Antiproton Scintillating Tracker) detector has been installed at the Antiproton Decelerator at the CERN PS. Its goal is the measurement of the annihilation cross section of slow antiprotons (around 5 MeV) in gaseous targets in the ASACUSA experiment. FAST has to reconstruct the charged pions tracks to identify the annihilation vertices. The detector consists of 2 axial and 4 stereo layers of scintillating fibers. Each layer is built with 1 mm 50 cm long BCF-10 fibers readout by 64 channel multianode PMTs for a total of 2688 readout channels. The anode outputs, amplified and discriminated, are sampled with a 320 MHz clock inside a Cyclone II FPGA by Altera, in order to retrieve the time information of each hit. The readout system is designed to cope with a spilled beam which lasts 250 ns every minute. The expected number of events per spill was around 10. This paper will describe the operation and the performance of the FAST detector during the tests with cosmic rays (August 2006) and during the data taking on the beam (September 2006).

  2. 45 years of rotation of the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyne, A. G.; Jordan, C. A.; Graham-Smith, F.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.

    2015-01-01

    The 30-Hz rotation rate of the Crab pulsar has been monitored at Jodrell Bank Observatory since 1984 and by other observatories before then. Since 1968, the rotation rate has decreased by about 0.5 Hz, interrupted only by sporadic and small spin-up events (glitches). 24 of these events have been observed, including a significant concentration of 15 occurring over an interval of 11 yr following MJD 50000. The monotonic decrease of the slowdown rate is partially reversed at glitches. This reversal comprises a step and an asymptotic exponential with a 320-d time constant, as determined in the three best-isolated glitches. The cumulative effect of all glitches is to reduce the decrease in slowdown rate by about 6 per cent. Overall, a low mean braking index of 2.342(1) is measured for the whole period, compared with values close to 2.5 in intervals between glitches. Removing the effects of individual glitches reveals an underlying power-law slowdown with the same braking index of 2.5. We interpret this value in terms of a braking torque due to a dipolar magnetic field in which the inclination angle between the dipole and rotation axes is increasing. There may also be further effects due to a monopolar particle wind or infalling supernova debris.

  3. Comparison of a pulsed dye laser and electrohydraulic lithotripsy on porcine gallbladder and common bile duct in vitro.

    PubMed

    Birkett, D H; Lamont, J S; O'Keane, J C; Babayan, R K

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of minimal access biliary procedures there is a need for a safe intracorporal lithotripsy technique that can be used through small flexible endoscopes. Currently, the two techniques available are electrohydraulic lithotripsy and laser induced shock wave lithotripsy. In this study we compare the effect of a 504 nm coumarin pulsed dye laser and electrohydraulic lithotripsy on in vitro porcine gallbladder and common bile duct. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy at the lowest energy the generator would deliver caused perforation of both tissues in only a few pulses when a 1.9-F probe was placed in direct contact with the tissue. Energy from a 504 nm coumarin pulsed dye laser delivered through a 320-microns fiber placed in light contact with the tissue caused an energy-dependent perforation after 50 pulses in from none to 44% of tissues. It was also found that there was a higher incidence of perforation in more vascular than non-vascular tissue. When the EHL probe and the laser fiber were held 1-2 mm from the tissue surface, discharge of each resulted in no perforation. On histological examination of the tissues, the perforations were found to be very small with laser lithotripsy and considerably larger with the electrohydraulic lithotripsy. It was felt that laser lithotripsy in the clinical situation was likely to be much safer than electrohydraulic lithotripsy. PMID:1349415

  4. Signal processing of microbolometer infrared focal-plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junju; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang; Xing, Suxia; Sun, Lianjun

    2005-01-01

    A 320×240-uncooled-microbolometer-based signal processing circuit for infrared focal-plane arrays is presented, and the software designs of this circuit system are also discussed in details. This signal processing circuit comprises such devices as FPGA, D/A, A/D, SRAM, Flash, DSP, etc., among which, FPGA is the crucial part, which realizing the generation of drive signals for infrared focal-plane, nonuniformity correction, image enhancement and video composition. The device of DSP, mainly offering auxiliary functions, carries out communication with PC and loads data when power-up. The phase locked loops (PLL) is used to generate high-quality clocks with low phase dithering and multiple clocks are to used satisfy the demands of focal-plane arrays, A/D, D/A and FPGA. The alternate structure is used to read or write SRAM in order to avoid the contradiction between different modules. FIFO embedded in FPGA not only makes full use of the resources of FPGA but acts as the channel between different modules which have different-speed clocks. What's more, working conditions, working process, physical design and management of the circuit are discussed. In software designing, all the function modules realized by FPGA and DSP devices, which are mentioned in the previous part, are discussed explicitly. Particularly to the nonuniformity correction module, the pipeline structure is designed to improve the working frequency and the ability to realize more complex algorithm.

  5. Ocular surface temperature in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sodi, Andrea; Matteoli, Sara; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Finocchio, Lucia; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  6. Assessing daily actual evapotranspiration through energy balance: an experiment to evaluate the selfpreservation hypothesis with acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.; Rallo, G.

    2013-10-01

    An operational use of the actual evapotranspiration estimates requires the integration from instantaneous to daily values. This can commonly be achieved under the hypothesis of daytime self-preservation of the evaporative fraction. In this study, it has been evaluated the effect of this assumption on the assessment of daily evapotranspiration from proximity sensing images acquired at hourly intervals over a homogeneous olive groove. Results have been validated by comparison with observations made by a micrometeorological (EC-flux tower) and an eco-physiological (sap flux) sensor. SEBAL model has been applied to thermal and multispectral images acquired during a clear day on August 2009 trough a FLIR A320G thermal camera and a Tetracam MCA II multispectral camera, installed on a tethered helium balloon. Thermal and multispectral images were characterized by very high spatial resolution. This experiment aims to analyze two effects: 1) the consistency of the self-preservation hypothesis for daily estimates of the actual evapotranspiration from hourly assessments at different times of the day; 2) the effects of the spatial resolution on the performances of the energy balance model. To evaluate the effects of the spatial resolution, semi-hourly observations made by a flux tower and sap-flow measures were compared to the evapotranspiration estimates performed using downscaled images at resolutions close to canopy sizes (2, 5 and 10 m). Results show that the best estimates are obtained with a spatial resolution comparable to the average size of the canopy with images taken approximately at 10 UTC.

  7. QWIP technology for both military and civilian applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Kukkonen, Carl A.; Sirangelo, Mark N.; McQuiston, Barbara K.; Chehayeb, Riad; Kaufmann, M.

    2001-10-01

    Advanced thermal imaging infrared cameras have been a cost effective and reliable method to obtain the temperature of objects. Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) based thermal imaging systems have advanced the state-of-the-art and are the most sensitive commercially available thermal systems. QWIP Technologies LLC, under exclusive agreement with Caltech University, is currently manufacturing the QWIP-ChipTM, a 320 X 256 element, bound-to-quasibound QWIP FPA. The camera performance falls within the long-wave IR band, spectrally peaked at 8.5 μm. The camera is equipped with a 32-bit floating-point digital signal processor combined with multi- tasking software, delivering a digital acquisition resolution of 12-bits using nominal power consumption of less than 50 Watts. With a variety of video interface options, remote control capability via an RS-232 connection, and an integrated control driver circuit to support motorized zoom and focus- compatible lenses, this camera design has excellent application in both the military and commercial sector. In the area of remote sensing, high-performance QWIP systems can be used for high-resolution, target recognition as part of a new system of airborne platforms (including UAVs). Such systems also have direct application in law enforcement, surveillance, industrial monitoring and road hazard detection systems. This presentation will cover the current performance of the commercial QWIP cameras, conceptual platform systems and advanced image processing for use in both military remote sensing and civilian applications currently being developed in road hazard monitoring.

  8. Multiple noise-like pulsing of a figure-eight fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiez, O.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Kuzin, E. A.; Hernández-García, J. C.; González-García, A.; Durán-Sánchez, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study multiple noise-like pulse generation in a 320 m long passively mode-locked erbium-doped figure-eight fibre laser in the normal net dispersion regime. The nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) that is used as a mode locker operates through polarization asymmetry, which allows us to control its switching power by birefringence adjustments at the NOLM input, using a half-wave retarder (HWR). Over some range of the HWR orientation, a single noise-like pulse is observed in the cavity. Its peak power is adjustable as it remains clamped to the variable switching power, and its duration varies inversely between ˜5 and ˜22 ps. Beyond the HWR position, corresponding to the longest duration, the pulse splits into several noise-like pulses. These multiple pulses usually present a walkoff, however they can be synchronized through slight birefringence adjustments, although they are not evenly spaced in time. Up to 12 simultaneous noise-like pulses were observed experimentally, with a duration of ˜2 ns. Multiple pulsing and synchronization of the pulses are interpreted in terms of mechanisms of interaction between pulses. Multiple pulsing appears to be indirectly related to the peak power limiting effect of the NOLM.

  9. Psoralen-containing sunscreen is tumorigenic in hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, L.E.; Walter, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    Sunscreens containing 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) are currently being marketed to promote tanning by inducing psoralen-mediated ultraviolet (UV) A (320-400 nm) melanogenesis. The rationale is that this may prevent UVB (290-320 nm) radiation-induced skin damage. However, mouse studies have shown that 5-MOP has the same cutaneous photocarcinogenic potential as 8-methoxypsoralen. In addition, the 5-MOP--containing sunscreen Sun System III (SS III), when combined with UVA, induces epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity, an enzyme associated with tumor promotion. Therefore, we investigated whether SS III had sufficient psoralen concentration to be tumorigenic in hairless mice exposed to chronic, intermittent UVA radiation. SS III was applied to hairless mice 5 days per week for 20 weeks. After each application the mice were exposed to 2.5 to 10 joules/cm2 UVA radiation. All test groups developed atypical squamous papillomas in direct proportion to the dosage of UVA radiation received. A shorter latency period for tumor development was seen with larger UVA doses. Test animals followed up to 1 year developed invasive squamous cell tumors. Control groups (SS III without UVA and UVA without SS III) remained free of tumors. Animals receiving SS III plus UVA developed persistent skin thickening and increased dermal cyst formation similar to that reported with chronic exposure to UVB, a known carcinogenic wavelength.

  10. Disposal of Energy by UV-B Sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Thomas; Krishnan, Rajagopal

    2008-03-01

    Ideal sunscreens absorb dangerous UV light and dispose of the energy safely. ``Safe disposal'' usually means conversion to heat. However, efficient absorption entails a high radiative rate, which implies high energy-transfer and other rates, unless some process intervenes to ``defuse'' the excited state. We studied the excited-state kinetics of three UV-B (290-320 nm) sunscreens by absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence. Excited-state rate analysis suggests that some sunscreens have low radiative-rate ``dark'' states, in addition to normal excited states.* We deduce dark states when sunscreens of high extinction coefficient do not show lifetimes and total emission consistent with such high radiative rates. A high radiative rate, accompanied by efficient fluorescence emission and/or transfer, may be unfavorable for a sunscreen. In spite of its dark excited state, padimate O shows significant re-emission of light in the UV-A (320-400 nm) and energy transfer to a natural component of excised skin, probably collagen. * Krishnan, R. and T.M. Nordlund (2007) J. Fluoresc. DOI 10.1007/s10895-007-0264-3.

  11. Hydrogen production through aqueous-phase reforming of ethylene glycol in a washcoated microchannel.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M Fernanda Neira; Ordomsky, Vitaly; Paunovic, Violeta; van der Schaaf, John; Schouten, Jaap C; Nijhuis, T Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of biocarbohydrates is conducted in a catalytically stable washcoated microreactor where multiphase hydrogen removal enhances hydrogen efficiency. Single microchannel experiments are conducted following a simplified model based on the microreactor concept. A coating method to deposit a Pt-based catalyst on the microchannel walls is selected and optimized. APR reactivity tests are performed by using ethylene glycol as the model compound. Optimum results are achieved with a static washcoating technique; a highly uniform and well adhered 5 μm layer is deposited on the walls of a 320 μm internal diameter (ID) microchannel in one single step. During APR of ethylene glycol, the catalyst layer exhibits high stability over 10 days after limited initial deactivation. The microchannel presents higher conversion and selectivity to hydrogen than a fixed-bed reactor. The benefits of using a microreactor for APR can be further enhanced by utilizing increased Pt loadings, higher reaction temperatures, and larger carbohydrates (e.g., glucose). The use of microtechnology for aqueous-phase reforming will allow for a great reduction in the reformer size, thus rendering it promising for distributed hydrogen production. PMID:23592593

  12. Direct measurement of 11B(p ,γ )12C astrophysical S factors at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Jia, B. L.; Xu, S. W.; Chen, S. Z.; Ma, S. B.; Hou, S. Q.; Hu, J.; Zhang, L. Y.; Yu, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    We directly measure the absolute cross section of 11B(p ,γ )12C in the energy region of Ec .m .=130 -257 keV by using a thin target for the first time. This work is performed on a 320-kV platform at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou. The astrophysical S factors of this reaction are obtained for capture to the ground and first excited states of 12C. The properties of the known resonance at ˜150 keV are derived and agree with the previous results. However, in the energy region of 170-240 keV, our S factors are about 15%-50% larger than the adopted values in NACRE II and are also larger than the upper limits of NACRE II by up to ˜20 % . This indicates that our new reaction rate is enhanced by about 15%-50% compared to the NACRE II adopted rate in the temperature region 0.32-0.62 GK.

  13. Comparing in situ removal strategies for improving styrene bioproduction.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Rebekah; Moya, Luis; McDaniel, Matthew; Nielsen, David R

    2015-01-01

    As an important conventional monomer compound, the biological production of styrene carries significant promise with respect to creating novel sustainable materials. Since end-product toxicity presently limits styrene production by previously engineered Escherichia coli, in situ product removal by both solvent extraction and gas stripping were explored as process-based strategies for circumventing its inhibitory effects. In solvent extraction, the addition of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate offered the greatest productivity enhancement, allowing net volumetric production of 836 ± 64 mg/L to be reached, representing a 320 % improvement over single-phase cultures. Gas stripping rates, meanwhile, were controlled by rates of bioreactor agitation and, to a greater extent, aeration. A periodic gas stripping protocol ultimately enabled up to 561 ± 15 mg/L styrene to be attained. Lastly, by relieving the effects of styrene toxicity, new insight was gained regarding subsequent factors limiting its biosynthesis in E. coli and strategies for future strain improvement are discussed. PMID:25034182

  14. Engine Concept Study for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which mission fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. The results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  15. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products. PMID:22313979

  16. Along-strike structure of the Costa Rican convergent margin from seismic a refraction/reflection survey: Evidence for underplating beneath the inner forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Clair, J.; Holbrook, W. S.; Van Avendonk, H. J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2016-02-01

    The convergent margin offshore Costa Rica shows evidence of subsidence due to subduction erosion along the outer forearc and relatively high rates of uplift (˜3-6 mm/yr) along the coast. Recently erupted arc lavas exhibit a low 10Be signal, suggesting that although nearly the entire package of incoming sediments enters the subduction zone, very little of that material is carried directly with the downgoing Cocos plate to the magma generating depths of the mantle wedge. One mechanism that would explain both the low 10Be and the coastal uplift is the underplating of sediments, tectonically eroded material, and seamounts beneath the inner forearc. We present results of a 320 km long, trench-parallel seismic reflection and refraction study of the Costa Rican forearc. The primary observations are (1) margin perpendicular faulting of the basement, (2) thickening of the Cocos plate to the northwest, and (3) two weak bands of reflections in the multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection image with travel times similar to the top of the subducting Cocos plate. The modeled depths to these reflections are consistent with an ˜40 km long, 1-3 km thick region of underplated material ˜15 km beneath some of the highest observed coastal uplift rates in Costa Rica.

  17. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20–40 THz and 60–100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The ‘THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25–50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel ‘THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10−6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  18. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-06-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20-40 THz and 60-100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The `THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25-50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel `THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10-6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links.

  19. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20-40 THz and 60-100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The 'THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25-50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel 'THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10(-6) are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  20. Automated exterior inspection of an aircraft with a pan-tilt-zoom camera mounted on a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, Igor; Larnier, Stanislas; Orteu, Jean-José; Sentenac, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with an automated preflight aircraft inspection using a pan-tilt-zoom camera mounted on a mobile robot moving autonomously around the aircraft. The general topic is image processing framework for detection and exterior inspection of different types of items, such as closed or unlatched door, mechanical defect on the engine, the integrity of the empennage, or damage caused by impacts or cracks. The detection step allows to focus on the regions of interest and point the camera toward the item to be checked. It is based on the detection of regular shapes, such as rounded corner rectangles, circles, and ellipses. The inspection task relies on clues, such as uniformity of isolated image regions, convexity of segmented shapes, and periodicity of the image intensity signal. The approach is applied to the inspection of four items of Airbus A320: oxygen bay handle, air-inlet vent, static ports, and fan blades. The results are promising and demonstrate the feasibility of an automated exterior inspection.

  1. Skin hydration imaging using a long-wavelength near-infrared digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attas, E. Michael; Posthumus, Trevor B.; Schattka, Bernhard J.; Sowa, Michael G.; Mantsch, Henry H.; Zhang, Shuliang L.

    2001-07-01

    Skin hydration is a key factor in skin health. Hydration measurements can provide diagnostic information on the condition of skin and can indicate the integrity of the skin barrier function. Near-infrared spectroscopy measures the water content of living tissue by its effect on tissue reflectance at a particular wavelength. Imaging has the important advantage of showing the degree of hydration as a function of location. Short-wavelength (650-1050 nm) near infrared spectroscopic reflectance imaging has previously been used in-vivo to determine the relative water content of skin under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. We have recently developed a novel spectroscopic imaging system to acquire image sets in the long-wavelength region of the near infrared (960 to 1700 nm), where the water absorption bands are more intense. The LW-NIR systems uses a liquid- crystal tunable filter in front of the objective lens and incorporates a 12-bit digital camera with a 320-by-240-pixel indium-gallium arsenide array sensor. Custom software controls the camera and tunable filter, allowing image sets to be acquired and displayed in near-real time. Forearm skin hydration was measured in a clinical context using the long- wavelength imaging system, a short-wavelength imaging system, and non-imaging instrumentation. Among these, the LW-NIR system appears to be the most sensitive at measuring dehydration of skin.

  2. Microwave modification of sugar cane to enhance juice extraction during milling.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Graham; Harris, Gerard; Jacob, Mohan V; Sheehan, Madoc; Yin, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Sugar extraction from cane requires shredding and crushing, both of which are energy intensive activities. Cane shredders account for almost 30% of the total power requirements for the juice extraction train in a sugar mill with four mills. Shredder hammers also wear quickly during the crushing season and need to be regularly maintained or replaced. Microwave pre-treatment of other plant based materials has resulted in significant reductions in total processing energy. This paper briefly reviews the underlying structure of sugar cane and how microwave pre-treatment may interact with sugar cane. Microwave treatment reduced the strength of sugar cane samples to 20% of its untreated value. This strength reduction makes it easier to crush the cane and leads to a 320% increase in juice yield compared with untreated cane when cane samples were crushed in a press. There was also a 68% increase in Brix %, a 58% increase in total dissolved solids, a 58% reduction in diffusion time, a 39% increase in Pol%, and a 7% increase in juice purity compared with the control samples after 60 minutes of diffusion in distilled water. PMID:24428107

  3. SWIR InGaAs focal plane arrays in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvié, A.; Huet, O.; Hamard, S.; Truffer, J. P.; Pozzi, M.; Decobert, J.; Costard, E.; Zécri, M.; Maillart, P.; Reibel, Y.; Pécheur, A.

    2013-06-01

    SWIR detection band benefits from natural (sun, night glow, thermal radiation) or artificial (eye safe lasers) photons sources combined to low atmospheric absorption and specific contrast compared to visible wavelengths. It gives the opportunity to address a large spectrum of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). InGaAs material appears as a good candidate to satisfy SWIR detection needs. The lattice matching with InP constitutes a double advantage to this material: attractive production capacity and uncooled operation thanks to low dark current level induced by high quality material. The study of InGaAs FPA has begun few years ago with III-VLab, gathering expertise in InGaAs material growth and imaging technology respectively from Alcatel-Lucent and Thales, its two mother companies. This work has led to put quickly on the market a 320x256 InGaAs module. The recent transfer of imagery activities from III-VLab to Sofradir allows developing new high performances products, satisfying customers' new requirements. Especially, a 640x512 InGaAs module with a pitch of 15µm is actually under development to fill the needs of low light level imaging.

  4. Concentrating-collector mass-production feasibility. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-02

    The Performance Prototype Trough (PPT) Concentrating Collector consists of four 80-foot modules in a 320-foot row. The collector was analyzed, including cost estimates and manufacturing processes to produce collectors in volumes from 100 to 100,000 modules per year. The four different reflector concepts considered were the sandwich reflector structure, sheet metal reflector structure, molded reflector structure, and glass laminate structure. The sheet metal and glass laminate structures are emphasized with their related structure concepts. A preliminary manufacturing plan is offered that includes: documentation of the manufacturing process with production flow diagrams; labor and material costs at various production levels; machinery and equipment requirements including preliminary design specifications; and capital investment costs for a new plant. Of five reflector designs considered, the two judged best and considered at length are thin annealed glass and steel laminate on steel frame panel and thermally sagged glass. Also discussed are market considerations, costing and selling price estimates, design cost analysis and make/buy analysis. (LEW)

  5. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Garrett J.; Thompson, Scott M.; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  6. A human homologue to the yeast omnipotent suppressor 45 maps 100 kb centromeric to HLA-A

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvel, B.; Dorval, I.; Fergelot, P.

    1995-04-01

    Idipathic hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The molecular defect is unknown. However, the gene responsible for the disease (HFE) has been localized on the short arm of chromosome 6. It is closely linked to the HLA class I genes and possibly within a 350 kilobase (kb) region around the HLA-A locus. In order to identify candidate genes for hemochromatosis, we applied a cDNA selection technique to isolate transcribed sequences encoded on yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC). At first, we screened a cDNA library derived from normal human duodenal mucosa with the YAC B30 H3. This YAC contains a 320 kb DNA insert including the HLA-A gene and spanning 150 kb of the 350 kb zone where the hemochromatosis gene is in linkage disequilibrium with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Preparation of the cDNA library of duodenal mucosa in Lambda Zap II phage and library screening with YAC B30 were carried out as previously described. In this way, we isolated seven non-HLA-A cDNAs corresponding to seven new genomic sequences. These potential genes were named hemochromatosis candidate gene (HCG) and numbered I to VII. The survey of all these cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences is in progress. In this work, we are especially interested in one of the seven non-HLA class I cDNA clones, named clone 58. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  7. A novel circadian phenotype based on firefly luciferase expression in transgenic plants.

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A J; Short, S R; Chua, N H; Kay, S A

    1992-01-01

    A 320-bp fragment of the Arabidopsis cab2 promoter is sufficient to mediate transcriptional regulation by both phytochrome and the circadian clock. We fused this promoter fragment to the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene to create a real-time reporter for regulated gene expression in intact plants. Cab2::Luc transcript accumulated in the expected patterns and luciferase activity was closely correlated to cab2::Luc mRNA abundance in both etiolated and green seedlings. The concentration of the bulk of luciferase protein did not reflect these patterns but maintained a relatively constant level, implying that a post-translational mechanism(s) leads to the high-amplitude regulation of luciferase activity. We used a low-light video imaging system to establish that luciferase bioluminescence in vivo accurately reports the temporal and spatial regulation of cab2 transcription in single seedlings. The unique qualities of the firefly luciferase system allowed us to monitor regulated gene expression in real time in individual multicellular organisms. This noninvasive marker for temporal regulation at the molecular level constitutes a circadian phenotype, which may be used to isolate mutants in the circadian clock. PMID:1392609

  8. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light. PMID:11886503

  9. Effects of Nd: YAG laser irradiation on the root canal wall dentin of human teeth: a SEM study.

    PubMed

    Kaitsas, V; Signore, A; Fonzi, L; Benedicenti, S; Barone, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological and histological changes on the root canal walls after Nd:YAG laser application. Twenty vital, recently extracted single-rooted human teeth were used for this study. Root canals were cleaned and shaped by a conventional step-back technique--by means of k files up to a 20 k-file type at working length--and subsequently shaped by Ni-Ti root-canal rotary instrumentation up to 30/06 and irrigated with 2.5% hypochlorite solution. Ten teeth (control group) were left unlased, while the other ten teeth were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser by means of a 320 microns fibre inserted in the root canal at 1 mm from the apex with a power of 1.5 Watt and a frequency of 15 pps for five seconds in retraction with rotating movements. The control specimen showed debris and smear layer on the root canal surface obscuring the dentin tubules. The root canal walls irradiated with Nd:YAG laser showed a clear glazed surface, some open dentinal tubules and some surface craters with cracks. Such results confirm that smear layer and debris are removable with Nd:YAG laser, however clearing all root canal walls is still difficult and, if the energy level and duration of application are inadequate, a certain degree of thermal damage and morphological changes in dentin structure are observable. PMID:11938590

  10. Enhancement of Real-Time THz Imaging System Based on 320 × 240 Uncooled Microbolometer Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xing; Wu, Zhiming; Gou, Jun; Liu, Ziji; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Jie; Luo, Zhenfei; Chen, Weiqing; Que, Longcheng; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-05-01

    A real-time terahertz (THz) imaging system was demonstrated based on a 320 × 240 uncooled microbolometer detector combined with a 2.52 THz far-infrared CO2 laser. On the top of micro-bridge structure (35 × 35 μm2), a 10 nm nickel-chromium (NiCr) thin film was deposited to enhance THz absorption, which was fabricated by a combined process of magnetron sputtering and reactive ion etching (RIE). By mechanical simulation using design of experiment (DOE) method, the minimum deformation was optimized to 0.0385 μm, and a measured deformation of 0.097 μm was achieved in the fabrication. The fabricated micro-bridge pixel was used for THz detection, and a responsivity of 1235 V/W was achieved with a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 87.4 pW/Hz1/2. THz imaging of metal gasket covered by label paper, paper clip in an envelope, and watermark of a banknote was demonstrated by a combination of histogram equalization (HE) and linear enhancement algorithm.

  11. Investigating the Electrical Resistivity Structure at the Creeping Segment of the North Anatolian Fault near Ismetpasa by Wide-band Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Bülent; Kandemir, Özgür; Akbayram, Kenan; Kanar, Fatih; Öztay, Erkan; Rıza Kılıç, Ali; Bakar, Levent; Tok, Turgut; Çobankaya, Mehmet; Aylan, Eşref; Karabulut, Gamze; Paker, Ercan

    2016-04-01

    More than hundred wide-band (360 Hz - 2000 sec.) magnetotelluric (MT) observations were performed and were utilized to decipher the electrical resistivity structure in two- and three- dimensions along a 320 km, northwest - southeast aligned profile that cuts through the Gerede - Ismetpasa segment of the North Anatolian Fault. Even though Gerede - Ismetpasa region has accommodated 1944, Gerede (Mw=7.2) and 1951, Kursunlu (Mw=6.9) events, seismically, this segment is considered as a relatively quiet portion of the North Anatolian Fault and is well known with its creeping behavior (approx. 7.6 mm/yr). In this study the aim is to compare electrical resistivity structure with the creep information. Several modeling attempts targeting different depths and portions of the profile were made for imaging different problems. Preliminary three-dimensional models that were developed by WSINV3DMT suggest that; (i) There is significant and deep extending fault zone conductor that might be related with the creeping segment and (ii) In the deeper levels high and low conductivity interfaces are present in and around the fault region, which might be related to the North Anatolian Fault and seldom earthquake activity.

  12. Al(x)Ga(1-x)N-based deep-ultraviolet 320×256 focal plane array.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; Huang, Edward Kwei-wei; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2012-03-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication, and testing of a 320×256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solar-blind, p-i-n, Al(x)Ga(1-x)N-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a pulse atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of thick, high-quality, crack-free, high Al composition Al(x)Ga(1-x)N layers. The FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit and operated in a SE-IR camera system. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower, and falling off three orders of magnitude by ~285 nm. By developing an opaque masking technology, the visible response of the ROIC is significantly reduced; thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allows the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE); at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated. PMID:22378430

  13. Absolute temperature measurements using a two-color QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundas, Jason; Dennis, Richard; Patnaude, Kelly; Burrows, Douglas; Faska, Ross; Sundaram, Mani; Reisinger, Axel; Manitakos, Dan

    2010-04-01

    The infrared photon flux emitted by an object depends not only on its temperature but also on a proportionality factor referred to as its emissivity. Since the latter parameter is usually not known quantitatively a priori, any temperature determination based on single-band radiometric measurements suffers from an inherent uncertainty. Recording photon fluxes in two separate spectral bands can in principle circumvent this limitation. The technique amounts to solving a system of two equations in two unknowns, namely, temperature and emissivity. The temperature derived in this manner can be considered absolute in the sense that it is independent of the emissivity, as long as that emissivity is the same in both bands. QmagiQ has previously developed a 320x256 midwave/longwave staring focal plane array which has been packaged into a dual-band laboratory camera. The camera in question constitutes a natural tool to generate simultaneous and independent emissivity maps and temperature maps of entire two-dimensional scenes, rather than at a single point on an object of interest. We describe a series of measurements we have performed on a variety of targets of different emissivities and temperatures. We examine various factors that affect the accuracy of the technique. They include the influence of the ambient radiation reflected off the target, which must be properly accounted for and subtracted from the collected signal in order to lead to the true target temperature. We also quantify the consequences of spectrally varying emissivities.

  14. Application of real-time single camera SLAM technology for image-guided targeting in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yau-Zen; Hou, Jung-Fu; Tsao, Yi Hsiang; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an application of augmented reality technology for targeting tumors or anatomical structures inside the skull. The application is a combination of the technologies of MonoSLAM (Single Camera Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) and computer graphics. A stereo vision system is developed to construct geometric data of human face for registration with CT images. Reliability and accuracy of the application is enhanced by the use of fiduciary markers fixed to the skull. The MonoSLAM keeps track of the current location of the camera with respect to an augmented reality (AR) marker using the extended Kalman filter. The fiduciary markers provide reference when the AR marker is invisible to the camera. Relationship between the markers on the face and the augmented reality marker is obtained by a registration procedure by the stereo vision system and is updated on-line. A commercially available Android based tablet PC equipped with a 320×240 front-facing camera was used for implementation. The system is able to provide a live view of the patient overlaid by the solid models of tumors or anatomical structures, as well as the missing part of the tool inside the skull.

  15. Control in the cockpit: crews vs. computers.

    PubMed

    Ropelewski, R

    1996-08-01

    In the no-holds-barred competition between Boeing and Europe's Airbus Industrie for dominance in the world's commercial jet airliner markets, the question of who--or what--is in charge in the cockpit has been a significant selling point. Airbus, which pioneered highly automated flight controls with its A320 narrow-body transport in the late 1980s, likes to emphasize the "protection" features built into the aircraft through those automated systems. Boeing, which employs many of the same concepts in its new 777 twin-engine widebody transport, tends to put more emphasis on crew involvement in the operation of that aircraft. Is there a difference? In fact, the question has broader implications than those involving the marketing battle between Boeing and Airbus. Airlines, aircraft manufacturers, flight training specialists, human factors gurus, and aviation authorities in various countries are struggling with the isse as automation becomes more and more prevalent on passenger and cargo-carrying aircraft around the world. PMID:11538995

  16. HOTLink rack monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Al R Franck et al.

    2001-12-03

    A remote data acquisition chassis, called a HOTLink Rack Monitor, HRM, has been developed for use in the Fermilab control system. This chassis provides for 64 analog input channels, 8 analog output channels, and 8 bytes of digital I/O. The interface to the host VMEbus crate is by way of a 320 MHz HOTLink serial connection to a PMC mezzanine module. With no processor intervention, all data sources in the remote chassis are read at 100 sec intervals, time stamped, and stored in a 2 MB circular buffer on the PMC module. In operation, the memory always contains the most recent 16 k samples of 10 kHz data from all 64 analog input channels. An expansion module that resides in the HRM chassis records snapshot data for 8 analog channels, each channel consisting of up to 16 k readings, digitized at rates up to 10 MHz. Snapshot data is also returned and stored in buffers on the PMC module. Because the HRM presents a memory-mapped interface to the host, it is independent of the operating system and may be used in any system that supports PMC mezzanine modules.

  17. PRIC320, a transcription coactivator, isolated from peroxisome proliferator-binding protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Surapureddi, Sailesh; Viswakarma, Navin; Yu Songtao; Guo Dongsheng; Rao, M. Sambasiva; Reddy, Janardan K. . E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

    2006-05-05

    Ciprofibrate, a potent peroxisome proliferator, induces pleiotropic responses in liver by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), a nuclear receptor. Transcriptional regulation by liganded nuclear receptors involves the participation of coregulators that form multiprotein complexes possibly to achieve cell and gene specific transcription. SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometric analyses of ciprofibrate-binding proteins from liver nuclear extracts obtained using ciprofibrate-Sepharose affinity matrix resulted in the identification of a new high molecular weight nuclear receptor coactivator, which we designated PRIC320. The full-length human cDNA encoding this protein has an open-reading frame that codes for a 320 kDa protein containing 2882 amino acids. PRIC320 contains five LXXLL signature motifs that mediate interaction with nuclear receptors. PRIC320 binds avidly to nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha}, CAR, ER{alpha}, and RXR, but only minimally with PPAR{gamma}. PRIC320 also interacts with transcription cofactors CBP, PRIP, and PBP. Immunoprecipitation-immunoblotting as well as cellular localization studies confirmed the interaction between PPAR{alpha} and PRIC320. PRIC320 acts as a transcription coactivator by stimulating PPAR{alpha}-mediated transcription. We conclude that ciprofibrate, a PPAR{alpha} ligand, binds a multiprotein complex and PRIC320 cloned from this complex functions as a nuclear receptor coactivator.

  18. The effects of ultraviolet radiation on growth and bleaching in three species of Hawaiian coral

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, G.D. )

    1990-01-09

    Long term exposure to ultraviolet radiation is harmful to many organisms, including hermatypic corals, which obtain much of their nutrition from photosynthetic zooxanthellae. Therefore, increased UV radiation from atmospheric ozone depletion could inhibit growth of such corals. Moreover, coral bleaching, which has been attributed to loss of pigment and/or expulsion of zooxanthellae, may be a specific response to UV light. Does UV-A reduce skeletal growth or influence population density and pigment content of zooxanthellae In addition, do zooxanthellae migrate to shaded areas of the colony to avoid ultraviolet light Using alizarin red stain and suitable filters, I compared the stain and suitable filters, I compared the effects of UV-A (320-400nm) and full-spectrum UV (280-400nm) on the skeletal growth of two Hawaiian corals, Montipora verrucosa, Pocillopora damicornis, in situ. In the perforate corals, M. Verrucosa and Porites compressa, I measured concentration of zooxanthellae and their chlorophyll content to quantify bleaching in response to UV light. Reduction in skeletal growth by the two corals in response to different ranges of UV light appears to be species specific. Bleaching by UV appears to be characterized by an initial loss of pigment followed by the expulsion and migration of the zooxanthellae to shaded areas of the colony. Differences in tolerance and adaptation to decreasing ozone levels and increasing UV light should confer a competitive advantage on various species and morphologies of reef-building corals.

  19. Prepare for Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiLisi, Gregory A.; Rarick, Richard A.

    2007-05-01

    The 2006 Winter Meeting of the AAPT Was Over … and the flight home from Anchorage to Cleveland was just about to end—eight hours in the air, only two complimentary beverages, no meals, a jump across four time zones, a one-year-old baby daughter, and a wife whose motto for the week was, "Why did they choose to have a winter meeting in Alaska?" made for a mentally and physically taxing airborne ordeal. As we entered the last hour of flight, my small family was exhausted and the pilot's decision to dim the interior cabin lights mixed with the soothing hum of the Airbus® A320's engines quickly put us to sleep. Fading in and out of my delirium, I eventually heard the pilot's voice crackle over the intercom with a seemingly innocent comment: "We are going to begin our final descent into Cleveland … we should have you on the ground in exactly eight minutes." Something about the pilot's use of the word "exactly" must have triggered a reaction in my brain, because his remarks initiated a series of calculations: So how fast are we flying? How high are we flying? What's our angle of descent? With only eight minutes until touchdown, my curiosity to determine the descending airplane's motion led me to conduct a hastily constructed experiment.

  20. 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector Focal Plane Array for Long-Wave Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 ?m observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 ?m. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE?T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 ?m test diodes and small 28 ?m FPA pixels are given.

  1. 320 x 256 complementary barrier infrared detector focal plane array for long-wave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, B., , Sir; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-06-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 μm observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 μm. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE▵T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 μm test diodes and small 28 μm FPA pixels are given.

  2. Sub-Surface Windscreen for the Measurement of Outdoor Infrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Comeaux, Toby; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Weistroffer, George R.

    2008-01-01

    A windscreen has been developed that features two advantages favorable for the measurement of outdoor infrasound. First, the sub-surface location, with the top of the windscreen flush with the ground surface, minimizes the mean velocity of the impinging wind. Secondly, the windscreen material (closed cell polyurethane foam) has a sufficiently low acoustic impedance (222 times that of air) and wall thickness (0.0127 m) to provide a transmission coefficient of nearly unity over the infrasonic frequency range (0-20 Hz). The windscreen, a tightly-sealed box having internal dimensions of 0.3048 x 0.3048 x 0.3556 m, contains a microphone, preamplifier, and a cable feed thru to an external power supply. Provisions are made for rain drainage and seismic isolation. A three-element array, configured as an equilateral triangle with 30.48 m spacing and operating continuously in the field, periodically receives highly coherent signals attributed to emissions from atmospheric turbulence. The time delays between infrasonic signals received at the microphones permit determination of the bearing and elevation of the sources, which correlate well with locations of pilot reports (PIREPS) within a 320 km radius about the array. The test results are interpreted to yield spectral information on infrasonic emissions from clear air turbulence.

  3. Standard format two-color CMOS ROIC for SLS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simolon, Brian; Aziz, Naseem; Hansen, Randy; Kurth, Eric; Lam, Simon; Petronio, Susan; Woolaway, James

    2011-05-01

    The ISC0903 is a 320 × 256, standard format, two-color CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) designed for strained-layer superlattice (SLS) detectors. The detector interface is supported through one input pad in each 30 micron pixel. One bit in the serial control word programs the chip to automatically adjust all biases and timing to allow for the integration of either electrons or holes. This feature allows users to easily operate this ROIC with a wide variety of p-on-n or n-on-p detectors. The ROIC has been specifically designed to allow for both polarities of detectors to be placed back-to-back and to connect to the ROIC through the one input pad to obtain a two-color image. The two-color image is achieved by switching the ROIC mode between the two colors on a per-frame basis. This paper will describe the interface, design, and features of the ISC0903 ROIC.

  4. Refined Exploration of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the turbofan engine design space for an advanced technology single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) was conducted previously by the authors and is documented in a prior report. Through the course of that study and in a subsequent evaluation of the approach and results, a number of enhancements to the engine design ground rules and assumptions were identified. A follow-on effort was initiated to investigate the impacts of these changes on the original study results. The fundamental conclusions of the prior study were found to still be valid with the revised engine designs. The most significant impact of the design changes was a reduction in the aircraft weight and block fuel penalties incurred with low fan pressure ratio, ultra-high bypass ratio designs. This enables lower noise levels to be pursued (through lower fan pressure ratio) with minor negative impacts on aircraft weight and fuel efficiency. Regardless of the engine design selected, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  5. Analysis of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. It is possible that future designs will continue this trend, leading to very-high or ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. Regardless of the engine architecture chosen, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  6. Manual Throttles-Only Control Effectivity for Emergency Flight Control of Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Richard; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    If normal aircraft flight controls are lost, emergency flight control may be attempted using only the thrust of engines. Collective thrust is used to control flightpath, and differential thrust is used to control bank angle. One issue is whether a total loss of hydraulics (TLOH) leaves an airplane in a recoverable condition. Recoverability is a function of airspeed, altitude, flight phase, and configuration. If the airplane can be recovered, flight test and simulation results on several transport-class airplanes have shown that throttles-only control (TOC) is usually adequate to maintain up-and-away flight, but executing a safe landing is very difficult. There are favorable aircraft configurations, and also techniques that will improve recoverability and control and increase the chances of a survivable landing. The DHS and NASA have recently conducted a flight and simulator study to determine the effectivity of manual throttles-only control as a way to recover and safely land a range of transport airplanes. This paper discusses TLOH recoverability as a function of conditions, and TOC landability results for a range of transport airplanes, and some key techniques for flying with throttles and making a survivable landing. Airplanes evaluated include the B-747, B-767, B-777, B-757, A320, and B-737 airplanes.

  7. Comparison of the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the polymerase chain reaction to detect Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmonid ovarian fluid.

    PubMed

    Pascho, R J; Chase, D; McKibben, C L

    1998-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from naturally infected chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum by the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT), an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the MF-FAT, 64% (66/103) samples contained detectable levels of R. salmoninarum cells. Among the positive fish, the R. salmoninarum concentrations ranged from 25 cells/ml to 4.3 x 10(9) cells/ml. A soluble antigenic fraction of R. salmoninarum was detected in 39% of the fish (40/103) by the ELISA. The ELISA is considered one of the most sensitive detection methods for bacterial kidney disease in tissues, yet it did not detect R. salmoninarum antigen consistently at bacterial cell concentrations below about 1.3 x 10(4) cells/ml according to the MF-FAT counts. When total DNA was extracted and tested in a nested PCR designed to amplify a 320-base-pair region of the gene encoding a soluble 57-kD protein of R. salmoninarum, 100% of the 100 samples tested were positive. The results provided strong evidence that R. salmoninarum may be present in ovarian fluids thought to be free of the bacterium on the basis of standard diagnostic methods. PMID:9526862

  8. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction for amplification of a sequence of the p57 gene of Renibacterium salmoninarum that provides a highly sensitive method for detection of the bacterium in salmonid kidney.

    PubMed

    Chase, D M; Pascho, R J

    1998-11-30

    Nucleic acid-based assays have shown promise for diagnosing Renibacterium salmoninarum in tissues and body fluids of salmonids. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to detect a 320 bp DNA segment of the gene encoding the p57 protein of R. salmoninarum is described. Whereas a conventional PCR for a 383 bp segment of the p57 gene reliably detected 1000 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue, the nested PCR detected as few as 10 R. salmoninarum per reaction in kidney tissue. Two DNA extraction methods for the nested PCR were compared and the correlation between replicate samples was generally higher in samples extracted by the QIAamp system compared with those extracted by the phenol/chloroform method. The specificity of the nested PCR was confirmed by testing DNA extracts of common bacterial fish pathogens and a panel of bacterial species reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for R. salmoninarum. Kidney samples from 74 naturally infected chinook salmon were examined by the nested PCR, the ELISA, and the FAT, and the detected prevalences of R. salmoninarum were 61, 47, and 43%, respectively. PMID:9925428

  9. Crustal structure of accreted terranes in southern Alaska, Chugach Mountains and Copper River Basin, from seismic refraction results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Ambos, E.L.; Mooney, W.D.; Christensen, N.I.; Geist, E.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic refraction data were collected along a 320-km-long "transect' line in southern Alaska, crossing the Prince William, Chugach, Peninsular, and Wrangellia terranes, and along several shorter lines within individual terranes. Velocity structure in the upper crust (less than 9-km depth) differs among the four terranes. In contrast, layers in the middle crust (9- to 25-km depth) in some case extend across projected terrane boundaries. The top of a gently north dipping sequence of low- and high-velocity layers (5.7-7.8 km/s), more than 10 km thick, extends from near the surface in the southern Chugach terrane to more than 20-km depth beneath the southern Peninsular terrane. This sequence, truncated by the suture between the Prince William and Chugach terranes, is interpreted to be an underplated "terrane' made up of fragments of the Kula plate and its sedimentary overburden that were accreted during subduction in the late Mesozoic and/or early Tertiary, during or between times of accretion of the Prince William and Chugach terranes. -from Authors

  10. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S; Hänsch, Theodor W; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics. PMID:27402165

  11. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Turbofan for an Advanced, Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest surrounds the design of the next generation of single-aisle commercial transports in the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 class. Aircraft designers will depend on advanced, next-generation turbofan engines to power these airplanes. The focus of this study is to apply single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to the conceptual design of ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines for this class of aircraft, using NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project metrics as multidisciplinary objectives for optimization. The independent design variables investigated include three continuous variables: sea level static thrust, wing reference area, and aerodynamic design point fan pressure ratio, and four discrete variables: overall pressure ratio, fan drive system architecture (i.e., direct- or gear-driven), bypass nozzle architecture (i.e., fixed- or variable geometry), and the high- and low-pressure compressor work split. Ramp weight, fuel burn, noise, and emissions are the parameters treated as dependent objective functions. These optimized solutions provide insight to the ultrahigh bypass engine design process and provide information to NASA program management to help guide its technology development efforts.

  12. Data indicating temperature response of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Garrett J; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(™)) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti-6Al-4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  13. Intrapulpal temperatures during pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment of dentin, in vitro.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Fagan, M C; Goodis, H E

    1994-03-01

    Lasers are being used for soft tissue removal, caries removal, and treatment of root surface sensitivity. One concern for laser safety is that the heat produced at the irradiated root surface may diffuse to the pulp causing irreversible pulpal damage. To test this heat diffusion, copper-constantan thermocouples were inserted into the radicular pulp canals of extracted teeth. Simulating direct exposure which might occur during gingival excision, superficial caries removal, and modification of the dentin surface for treatment of root surface sensitivity, a 2 mm2 area of the external root surface was uniformly irradiated with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser using a 320 microns diameter fiber optic contact probe. Power was varied from 0.3 to 3.0 W with frequencies of 10 and 20 Hz. Temperature changes during cavity preparations using a high speed handpiece with air coolant were also recorded. Repeated measures ANOVA (P < or = 0.05) indicated that intrapulpal temperatures increased as a function of power, frequency, and time. Intrapulpal temperatures decreased as remaining dentin thickness (0.2 to 2.0 mm) increased for each laser parameter. Irradiation of dentin using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, within the treatment times, powers, and frequencies with adequate remaining dentin thickness, as outlined in this paper, should not cause devitalizing intrapulpal temperature rises. PMID:8164119

  14. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  15. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  16. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  17. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  18. Effects of selenium on UVA-induced lipid peroxidation in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Moysan, A; Morlière, P; Marquis, I; Richard, A; Dubertret, L

    1995-01-01

    The effect of selenium on the lethal action of ultraviolet radiations and on the lipid peroxidation induced by exposures to ultraviolet A (320-400 nm; 360 kJ.m-2) and ultraviolet B (290-320 nm; 2 kJ.m-2) have been measured in cultured human skin fibroblasts. The experiments have been performed with either pure selenium or a spring water containing selenium and other trace elements (zinc and strontium). For cells cultured in a standard medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, no effect of selenium or spring water addition to the culture medium was observed on the lethality or on the peroxidative process induced by ultraviolet A and B radiations. Concurrently, there was no detectable increase of the seleno-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. For cells previously depleted in selenium by a culture in a medium containing only 2% serum, a protective effect of selenium can be detected. Depending on the fibroblast donor, we observed (1) a protective effect on lethality of dividing fibroblasts induced by ultraviolet A radiations, (2) a protective effect on lipid peroxidation induced by ultraviolet A radiations on dividing or quiescent fibroblasts and (3) an increase in glutathione peroxidase activity in fibroblasts. PMID:7632435

  19. A 25μm pitch LWIR focal plane array with pixel-level 15-bit ADC providing high well capacity and targeting 2mK NETD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guellec, Fabrice; Peizerat, Arnaud; Tchagaspanian, Michael; de Borniol, Eric; Bisotto, Sylvette; Mollard, Laurent; Castelein, Pierre; Zanatta, Jean-Paul; Maillart, Patrick; Zecri, Michel; Peyrard, Jean-Christophe

    2010-04-01

    CEA Leti has recently developed a new readout IC (ROIC) with pixel-level ADC for cooled infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). It operates at 50Hz frame rate in a snapshot Integrate-While-Read (IWR) mode. It targets applications that provide a large amount of integrated charge thanks to a long integration time. The pixel-level analog-to-digital conversion is based on charge packets counting. This technique offers a large well capacity that paves the way for a breakthrough in NETD performances. The 15 bits ADC resolution preserves the excellent detector SNR at full well (3Ge-). These characteristics are essential for LWIR FPAs as broad intra-scene dynamic range imaging requires high sensitivity. The ROIC, featuring a 320x256 array with 25μm pixel pitch, has been designed in a standard 0.18μm CMOS technology. The main design challenges for this digital pixel array (SNR, power consumption and layout density) are discussed. The IC has been hybridized to a LWIR detector fabricated using our in-house HgCdTe process. The first electro-optical test results of the detector dewar assembly are presented. They validate both the pixel-level ADC concept and its circuit implementation. Finally, the benefit of this LWIR FPA in terms of NETD performance is demonstrated.

  20. Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Causing Clinical and Subclinical Infections in Atlantic Salmon Have Different Genetic Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Mutoloki, Stephen; Jøssund, Trude B.; Ritchie, Gordon; Munang'andu, Hetron M.; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is the causative agent of IPN, an important disease of salmonids. IPNV infections result in either sub-clinical or overt disease and the basis of this difference is not well-understood. The objective of the present study was to determine the VP2 gene of the virus associated with the different forms of clinical manifestation. Groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) reared in farms located in different IPN disease pressures were monitored from brood stock until grow-out over a 3 year period. Hatcheries A1 and B1 as well as cooperating seawater farms were located in a low disease risk area while hatcheries A2 and B2 as well as their cooperating seawater farms were in high IPN risk areas. Samples including eggs, milt, whole fry, kidney depending on the stage of production were collected during outbreaks or in apparently healthy populations where no outbreaks occurred. The virus was re-isolated in CHSE cells and the VP2 gene amplified by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. During the freshwater stage, there were no disease outbreaks at hatcheries A1, A2, and B1 (except in one fish group that originated from hatchery B2), although IPNV was isolated from some of the fish groups at all 3 hatcheries. By contrast, all fish groups at hatchery B2 suffered IPN outbreaks. In seawater, only groups of fish originating from hatchery A1 had no IPN outbreaks albeit virus being isolated from the fish. On the other hand, fish originating from hatcheries A2, B1, and B2 experienced outbreaks in seawater. The VP2 amino acid fingerprint of the virus associated with subclinical infections from A1 and co-operating seawater sites was V64A137P217T221A247N252S281D282E319. By contrast, all virus isolates associated with clinical infections had the motif I64T137T217A221T247V252T281N282A319, where underlined amino acids represent the avirulent and highly virulent motif, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences showed 2 clades, one of

  1. Modeling of porosity formation and feeding flow during casting of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiping

    Porosity is one of the most important defects in metal casting. To quantitatively predict the porosity formation during casting two numerical models are developed for steel and aluminum alloys respectively. For steel, a multi-phase model is developed that predicts melt pressure, feeding flow, porosity (both microscopic and macroscopic), and riser pipe formation during casting. The phases included in the model are solid, liquid, porosity, and air. An energy equation is solved to determine solid fraction. A multi-phase momentum equation, which is valid everywhere in the solution domain, is derived. A pressure equation is then derived from this momentum equation and a mixture continuity equation developed that accounts for all phases. The partial pressure of a gas species dissolved in the melt is determined using the species concentration, which is found by solving a species conservation equation that accounts for convection. Porosity forms once the gas pressure exceeds the sum of the melt pressure and the capillary pressure. The amount of porosity that forms is determined from the mixture continuity equation. The riser pipe is determined from an air continuity equation. A pore size model, which considers the effects of the solidifying steel microstructure on pore size, is incorporated into the multi-phase model. The multi-phase model is applied to one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional simulations. The results clearly illustrate the basic physical phenomena involved and predict microporosity and macroporosity distributions, as well as a riser pipe. For aluminum alloys a gas microsegregation model is developed to quantitatively predict porosity, coupled with the calculations of the pressure field, feeding flow, and distribution of dissolved gas species throughout the casting. The effects of dendritic and eutectic microstructure on the pore shape and size are considered in a pore size model. The model is applied to one-dimensional simulations of A319

  2. Parameters and Kinematics of Carbon Enhanced Metal Poor (CEMP) Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi, Sivarani; Beers, T. C.; Lee, Y. S.; Kennedy, C.; Carollo, D.; Masseron, T.; Plez, B.; Norris, J. E.; Bessell, M.; Rossi, S.

    2007-12-01

    Several hundred CEMP stars have been selected from the Christlieb et al (2001, A&A 375, 366) catalog of carbon-rich stars, which is based on the Hamburg/ESO objective prism survey. Medium resolution (R = 2000) optical spectra were obtained for these stars covering a wavelength range of 3800-4800 A. The estimates of Teff, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for this sample is already available, based on application of the Rossi et al. (2005, AJ 130, 2804 ), which uses the strength of the CaII K line, the CH G-band, and J-K colors. Here we present an automated method to estimate the full set of atmospheric parameters for these data (including logg) based on synthetic spectra and photometry. For this purpose, we have generated a set of synthetic grids with carbon enhanced atmospheres with the MARCS code (Plez et al. 1992, A&A 256,551; Asplund et al. 1997, A&A 318, 521; Gustafsson et al. 2003, ASP Conf. Ser. 288, 331), which is particularly important for cool CEMP stars (for which the atmospheric structure changes with increasing carbon abundance (Masseron et al. 2006 A&A 455, 1059). More than one hundred stars of our prpogram stars have already been observed at high spectral resolution (R = 20000-25000), during the course of the HERES survey (Barklem et al. 2005, A&A 439,129; Lucatello et al. 2006 ApJ 652, 37L), which allow us to calibrate our methods. Here we describe our new methods for estimation and validation of Teff, logg, [Fe/H], [C/Fe]. We also comment on the possible origin of CEMP stars in this sample based on these derived parameters and on the inferred kinematics. TS, TCB, YSL, and CK acknowledge support from grant PHY 02-16783; Physics Frontier Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation and NSF grant AST 07-07776

  3. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2000-12-31

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be

  4. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-09-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the

  5. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-06-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be

  6. Mutation Profiling in Cholangiocarcinoma: Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Churi, Chaitanya R.; Shroff, Rachna; Wang, Ying; Rashid, Asif; Kang, HyunSeon C.; Weatherly, Jacqueline; Zuo, Mingxin; Zinner, Ralph; Hong, David; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Janku, Filip; Crane, Christopher H.; Mishra, Lopa; Vauthey, Jean-Nicholas; Wolff, Robert A.; Mills, Gordon; Javle, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is clinically heterogeneous; intra and extrahepatic CCA have diverse clinical presentations. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology may identify the genetic differences between these entities and identify molecular subgroups for targeted therapeutics. Methods We describe successful NGS-based testing of 75 CCA patients along with the prognostic and therapeutic implications of findings. Mutation profiling was performed using either a) NGS panel of hotspot regions in 46 cancer-related genes using a 318-chip on Ion PGM Sequencer or b) Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform for 3,769 exons of 236 cancer-related genes plus 47 introns from 19 genes to an average depth of 1000X. Clinical data was abstracted and correlated with clinical outcome. Patients with targetable mutations were referred to appropriate clinical trials. Results There were significant differences between intrahepatic (n = 55) and extrahepatic CCA (n = 20) in regard to the nature and frequency of the genetic aberrations (GAs). IDH1 and DNA repair gene alterations occurred more frequently in intrahepatic CCA, while ERBB2 GAs occurred in the extrahepatic group. Commonly occurring GAs in intrahepatic CCA were TP53 (35%), KRAS (24%), ARID1A (20%), IDH1 (18%), MCL1 (16%) and PBRM1 (11%). Most frequent GAs in extrahepatic CCA (n = 20) were TP53 (45%), KRAS (40%), ERBB2 (25%), SMAD4 (25%), FBXW7 (15%) and CDKN2A (15%). In intrahepatic CCA, KRAS, TP53 or MAPK/mTOR GAs were significantly associated with a worse prognosis while FGFR GAs correlated with a relatively indolent disease course. IDH1 GAs did not have any prognostic significance. GAs in the chromatin modulating genes, BAP1 and PBRM1 were associated with bone metastases and worse survival in extrahepatic CCA. Radiologic responses and clinical benefit was noted with EGFR, FGFR, C-met, B-RAF and MEK inhibitors. Conclusion There are significant genetic differences between intra and extrahepatic CCA. NGS

  7. Clinical diagnosis, treatment, and ALDH7A1 mutations in pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy in three Chinese infants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhixian; Yang, Xiaoling; Wu, Ye; Wang, Jingmin; Zhang, Yuehua; Xiong, Hui; Jiang, Yuwu; Qin, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that causes seizures in neonates and infants. Mutations of the ALDH7A1 gene are now recognized as the molecular basis PDE and help to define this disease. Three Chinese children with PDE were clinically analyzed, followed by treatment and examination of the ALDH7A1 mutations. The seizures of the 3 patients were all resistant to multiple anticonvulsants (2 to 7 types). For case 1, onset of seizures was at the age of 2 months. His seizures were well controlled by intravenous pyridoxine for several days at the age of 3 months 20 days and recurred at intervals of 13, 14 and 38 days after pyridoxine withdrawn for 3 times. At the age of 7 months, symptoms of PDE appeared and uninterrupted oral pyridoxine started. For case 2, her seizures occurred at 8 days after birth. After administration of multiple antiepileptic drugs observed ineffective, high-dose pyridoxine continuous therapy was taken at the age of 10 months and the significant treatment effect induced a diagnostic PDE. Seizure onset in case 3 was at the first day of birth. He experienced inadvertently pyridoxine therapy several times (first time at 2 days after birth) and achieved good therapeutic effect, which was confirmed by physicians until 4 months 10 days. The treatment process in our 3 patients suggested that pyridoxine should be early and purposefully used in patients with early onset seizures. ALDH7A1 gene mutation analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutations in each case: heterozygous c.410G>A (p.G137E) and IVS11+1G>A in case 1, heterozygous c.952G>C (p.A318P) and heterozygous c.965C>T (p.A322V) in case 2, and heterozygous c.902A>T (p.N301I) and IVS11+1G>A in case 3. Only p.N301I was reported previously, all other mutations were novel. This is the first time to report cases of Chinese patients diagnosed with PDE by molecular genetic analysis. PMID:24664145

  8. Clinical Diagnosis, Treatment, and ALDH7A1 Mutations in Pyridoxine-Dependent Epilepsy in Three Chinese Infants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhixian; Yang, Xiaoling; Wu, Ye; Wang, Jingmin; Zhang, Yuehua; Xiong, Hui; Jiang, Yuwu; Qin, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that causes seizures in neonates and infants. Mutations of the ALDH7A1 gene are now recognized as the molecular basis PDE and help to define this disease. Three Chinese children with PDE were clinically analyzed, followed by treatment and examination of the ALDH7A1 mutations. The seizures of the 3 patients were all resistant to multiple anticonvulsants (2 to 7 types). For case 1, onset of seizures was at the age of 2 months. His seizures were well controlled by intravenous pyridoxine for several days at the age of 3 months 20 days and recurred at intervals of 13, 14 and 38 days after pyridoxine withdrawn for 3 times. At the age of 7 months, symptoms of PDE appeared and uninterrupted oral pyridoxine started. For case 2, her seizures occurred at 8 days after birth. After administration of multiple antiepileptic drugs observed ineffective, high-dose pyridoxine continuous therapy was taken at the age of 10 months and the significant treatment effect induced a diagnostic PDE. Seizure onset in case 3 was at the first day of birth. He experienced inadvertently pyridoxine therapy several times (first time at 2 days after birth) and achieved good therapeutic effect, which was confirmed by physicians until 4 months 10 days. The treatment process in our 3 patients suggested that pyridoxine should be early and purposefully used in patients with early onset seizures. ALDH7A1 gene mutation analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutations in each case: heterozygous c.410G>A (p.G137E) and IVS11+1G>A in case 1, heterozygous c.952G>C (p.A318P) and heterozygous c.965C>T (p.A322V) in case 2, and heterozygous c.902A>T (p.N301I) and IVS11+1G>A in case 3. Only p.N301I was reported previously, all other mutations were novel. This is the first time to report cases of Chinese patients diagnosed with PDE by molecular genetic analysis. PMID:24664145

  9. Command and Data Handling Branch Internship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Rachel Mae

    2016-01-01

    Modular Integrated Stackable Layers (MISL) is a computer system designed for simple, fast, and cost effective flexible reconfiguration in space environments such as the ISS and Orion projects for various uses. Existing applications include wireless and wired communications, data acquisition and instrumentation, and camera systems, and potential applications include bus protocol converters and subsystem control. MISL is based on Texas Instruments (TI)' MSP430 16-bit ultra-low-power microcontroller device. The purpose of my project was to integrate the MISL system with a liquid crystal display (LCD) touchscreen. The LCD, manufactured by Crystalfontz and part number CFAF320240F-035T-TS, is a 320 by 240 RGB resistive color screen including an optional carrier board. The vast majority of the project was done with Altium Designer, a tool for printed circuit board (PCB) schematic capture, 3D design, and FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) development. The new PCB was to allow the LCD to directly stack to the rest of MISL. Research was done with datasheets for the TI microcontroller and touchscreen display in order to meet desired hardware specifications. Documentation on prior MISL projects was also utilized. The initial step was to create a schematic for the LCD, power bus, and data bus connections between components. A layout was then designed with the required physical dimensions, routed traces and vias, power and ground planes, layer stacks, and other specified design rules such as plane clearance and hole size. Multiple consultation sessions were held with Hester Yim, the technical discipline lead for the Command and Data Handling Branch, and Christy Herring, the lead PCB layout designer in the Electronic Design and Manufacturing Branch in order to ensure proper configuration. At the moment, the PCB is awaiting revision by the latter-mentioned branch. Afterwards, the board will begin to undergo the manufacturing and testing process. Throughout the internship at

  10. A review of the effects of agricultural and industrial contamination on the Ebro delta biota and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Mañosa, S; Mateo, R; Guitart, R

    2001-10-01

    The Ebro delta (NE Spain) is a 320 km2 wetland area of international importance for conservation. The area is devoted to rice farming and receives large amounts of pesticides. Industrial pollutants are also carried to the delta by the river. The information accumulated during the last 25 year on the effect of such pollution on the biota is reviewed in order to identify the existing gaps and needs for management. Organochlorine pesticides were legally used until 1977, which has resulted in the widespread presence of these compounds in the Ebro delta biota. Lethal, sublethal or other detrimental effects of these pesticides on wildlife in the area were poorly investigated, but negative effects on the reproduction of ducks and herons were reported. Nowadays, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the main responsible of organochlorine pollution in the area: concentrations in biota samples are higher than levels observed in nearby coastal areas, as a result of the significant PCB inputs by the river which, in 1990, were evaluated at 126 kg yr(-1). The massive use of herbicides is thought to have contributed to the elimation of macrophyte vegetation in the lagoons during the eighties, which had strong consequences on diving ducks and coot populations. Weed control is also related to the loss of biodiversity held by rice fields. The massive and inadequate use of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides (involving more than 20,000 t yr(-1) has produced some waterbird mortality events, and may have direct and indirect effects on other non-target organisms. The accumulation in the soil of lead pellets used in waterfowl shooting is estimated to kill some 16,300 waterbirds in the Ebro delta every year. PMID:11686200

  11. Instrument-quality digital camera that transitioned to low-cost high-volume production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.

    2002-12-01

    MOSAD(copyright), Multiplexed OverSample Analog to Digital conversion, is a low power on focal plane analog to digital, A/D, process that places an oversample A/D at each pixel site. Two full custom designs for a visible light staring array were developed with this approach. One design approach uses a silicon photo diode in combination with photo gates at the pixel and the other approach uses an all photo gate sensor for detection. Both arrays were designed with a 320x240 format with the pixels placed on 16 micron centers. The system includes the camera assembly, driver interface assembly, a frame grabber board with integrated decimator and Windows 2000 compatible software for real time image display. The camera includes the sensor, either photo gate or photo diode, mounted on a PC card with support electronics. A custom lens mount attaches the camera to C or CS mount lens. Testing was done with a Tamron 13VM2812 CCTV CS mount lens. Both an RS644 and an RS422 parallel interface card assembly was developed to attach to the frame grabber board. The final iteration cameras were tested at the Amain facility and pictures were taken. At 400 samples per second, measured on chip power consumption is under 10 milliwatts. Noise measurements at sample rates from 400 samples per second to 1,600 samples per second were taken for both parts. The photo diode worked and produced images but it had a sense amplifier problem that prevented adequate noise measurement. At 28 times oversample, the photo gate achieved typical 9 to 11 bits signal to noise with best case measured at 13 bits. Nonuniformity variation was below the noise floor.

  12. Ammonium Production off Central Chile (36°S) by Photodegradation of Phytoplankton-Derived and Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    PubMed Central

    Rain-Franco, Angel; Muñoz, Claudia; Fernandez, Camila

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the production of ammonium by the photodegradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the coastal upwelling system off central Chile (36°S). The mean penetration of solar radiation (Z1%) between April 2011 and February 2012 was 9.4 m, 4.4 m and 3.2 m for Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), UV-A (320–400 nm) and UV-B (280–320 nm), respectively. Ammonium photoproduction experiments were carried out using exudates of DOM obtained from cultured diatom species (Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira minuscule) as well as natural marine DOM. Diatom exudates showed net photoproduction of ammonium under exposure to UVR with a mean rate of 0.56±0.4 µmol L−1 h−1 and a maximum rate of 1.49 µmol L−1 h−1. Results from natural marine DOM showed net photoproduction of ammonium under exposure to PAR+UVR ranging between 0.06 and 0.2 µmol L−1 h−1. We estimated the potential contribution of photochemical ammonium production for phytoplankton ammonium demand. Photoammonification of diatom exudates could support between 117 and 453% of spring-summer NH4+ assimilation, while rates obtained from natural samples could contribute to 50–178% of spring-summer phytoplankton NH4+ requirements. These results have implications for local N budgets, as photochemical ammonium production can occur year-round in the first meters of the euphotic zone that are impacted by full sunlight. PMID:24968138

  13. Toward a single-chip TECless/NUCless InGaAs SWIR camera with 120-dB intrinsic operation dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y.; Arion, B.; Zhu, Y. M.; Potet, P.; Huet, Odile; Reverchon, Jean Luc; Truffer, Jean Patrick; Robo, Jean Alexandre; Costard, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a single-chip InGaAs SWIR camera with more than 120dB instant operational dynamic range with an innovative CMOS ROIC technology, so called MAGIC, invented and patented by New Imaging Technologies. A 320x256- pixel InGaAs 25μm pitch photodiode array, designed and fabricated by III-Vlab/Thales Research & Technology(TRT), has been hybridized on this new generation CMOS ROIC. With NIT's MAGIC technology, the sensor's output follows a precise logarithmic law in function of incoming photon flux and gives instant operational dynamic range (DR) better than 120 dB. The ROIC incorporates the entire video signal processing function including a CCIR TV encoder, so a complete SWIR InGaAs camera with standard video output has been realized on a single 30x30 mm2 PCB board with ¼ W power consumption. Neither TEC nor NUC is needed from room temperature operation. The camera can be switched on and off instantly, ideal for all the portable battery operated SWIR band observation applications. The measured RMS noise and FPN noise on the prototype sensor in dark conditions are 0.4 mV and 0.27 mV respectively. The signal excursion from pixel is about 300mV over the 120 dB dynamic range. The FPN remains almost constant over the whole operation dynamic range. The NEI has been measured to be 3,71E+09 ph/s/cm2 with 92 equivalent noise photons at 25Hz frame rate, better than the same architecture of InGaAs photodiode array hybridized on an Indigo ROIC ISC9809 with a pitch of 30 μm for which a readout noise of 120 electrons is observed.

  14. AET's new energy-efficient facility gears up for production

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, A.

    1993-01-01

    American Energy Technologies, Inc. (AET), a company based just north of Green Cove Springs, Florida, has become the largest manufacturer of solar thermal products in the U.S. Phase 1 of the construction of AET's new manufacturing facility, which commenced in October 1992, was completed in April 1993. It houses high-output tooling designed by AET to ensure affordable, high-quality solar thermal hardware which is rated among the most efficient in the world today. The AET facility has integrated a number of energy-efficient design considerations and conservation measures. The passive-solar design of the building minimizes direct solar gain in the summer and maximizes tropical winds for passive cooling. Strategically placed native landscaping requires minimal maintenance, thus reducing water consumption, and provides natural shading for the offices. The exterior walls are constructed of Poly Steel hollow-core styrofoam forms filled with pumped concrete. This design provides an insulation rate of R-22, a wind load of 160 mph, and a two-hour fire rating. The light-colored office and the plant's exterior skin assist in reducing the cooling load with the protection of Lomit, a spray-applied radiant barrier manufactured by SOLEC Corporation, which coats the office roof decks. Climate control for the manufacturing area is provided by an AET solar heating system which works in tandem with two LPG Amana Command Aire 80s for back up. Office space heating is supplied by a warm forced-air system by US Solar Corporation which utilizes a 320-square-foot solar array with a 1,000-gallon storage tank. Circulation is powered by a Siemens Solar Pro photovoltaic array and the thermal system also provides solar hot water for the manufacturing process.

  15. Line Pilots' Attitudes about and Experience with Flight Deck Automation: Results of an International Survey and Proposed Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudisill, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    A survey of line pilots' attitudes about flight deck automation was conducted by the Royal Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine (RAF IAM, Farnborough, UK) under the sponsorship of the United Kingdom s Civil Aviation Authority and in cooperation with IATA (the International Air Transport Association). Survey freehand comments given by pilots operating 13 types of commercial transports across five manufacturers (Airbus, Boeing, British Aerospace, Lockheed, and McDonnell-Douglas) and 57 air carriers/organizations were analyzed by NASA. These data provide a "lessons learned" knowledge base which may be used for the definition of guidelines for flight deck automation and its associated crew interface within the High Speed Research Program. The aircraft chosen for analysis represented a progression of levels of automation sophistication and complexity, from "Basic" types (e.g., B727, DC9), through "Transition" types (e.g., A300, Concorde), to two levels of glass cockpits (e.g., Glass 1: e.g., A310; Glass 2: e.g., B747-400). This paper reports the results of analyses of comments from pilots flying commercial transport types having the highest level of automation sophistication (B757/B767, B747-400, and A320). Comments were decomposed into five categories relating to: (1) general observations with regard to flight deck automation; comments concerning the (2) design and (3) crew understanding of automation and the crew interface; (4) crew operations with automation; and (5) personal factors affecting crew/automation interaction. The goal of these analyses is to contribute to the definition of guidelines which may be used during design of future aircraft flight decks.

  16. Automated continuous quantitative measurement of proximal airways on dynamic ventilation CT: initial experience using an ex vivo porcine lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Moriya, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Kotaro; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Teramoto, Ryuichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of continuous quantitative measurement of the proximal airways, using dynamic ventilation computed tomography (CT) and our research software. Methods A porcine lung that was removed during meat processing was ventilated inside a chest phantom by a negative pressure cylinder (eight times per minute). This chest phantom with imitated respiratory movement was scanned by a 320-row area-detector CT scanner for approximately 9 seconds as dynamic ventilatory scanning. Obtained volume data were reconstructed every 0.35 seconds (total 8.4 seconds with 24 frames) as three-dimensional images and stored in our research software. The software automatically traced a designated airway point in all frames and measured the cross-sectional luminal area and wall area percent (WA%). The cross-sectional luminal area and WA% of the trachea and right main bronchus (RMB) were measured for this study. Two radiologists evaluated the traceability of all measurable airway points of the trachea and RMB using a three-point scale. Results It was judged that the software satisfactorily traced airway points throughout the dynamic ventilation CT (mean score, 2.64 at the trachea and 2.84 at the RMB). From the maximum inspiratory frame to the maximum expiratory frame, the cross-sectional luminal area of the trachea decreased 17.7% and that of the RMB 29.0%, whereas the WA% of the trachea increased 6.6% and that of the RMB 11.1%. Conclusion It is feasible to measure airway dimensions automatically at designated points on dynamic ventilation CT using research software. This technique can be applied to various airway and obstructive diseases. PMID:26445535

  17. Power and thermal characterization of a lithium-ion battery pack for hybrid-electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kandler; Wang, Chao-Yang

    A 1D electrochemical, lumped thermal model is used to explore pulse power limitations and thermal behavior of a 6 Ah, 72 cell, 276 V nominal Li-ion hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) battery pack. Depleted/saturated active material Li surface concentrations in the negative/positive electrodes consistently cause end of high-rate (∼25 C) pulse discharge at the 2.7 V cell -1 minimum limit, indicating solid-state diffusion is the limiting mechanism. The 3.9 V cell -1 maximum limit, meant to protect the negative electrode from lithium deposition side reaction during charge, is overly conservative for high-rate (∼15 C) pulse charges initiated from states-of-charge (SOCs) less than 100%. Two-second maximum pulse charge rate from the 50% SOC initial condition can be increased by as much as 50% without risk of lithium deposition. Controlled to minimum/maximum voltage limits, the pack meets partnership for next generation vehicles (PNGV) power assist mode pulse power goals (at operating temperatures >16 °C), but falls short of the available energy goal. In a vehicle simulation, the pack generates heat at a 320 W rate on a US06 driving cycle at 25 °C, with more heat generated at lower temperatures. Less aggressive FUDS and HWFET cycles generate 6-12 times less heat. Contact resistance ohmic heating dominates all other mechanisms, followed by electrolyte phase ohmic heating. Reaction and electronic phase ohmic heats are negligible. A convective heat transfer coefficient of h = 10.1 W m -2 K -1 maintains cell temperature at or below the 52 °C PNGV operating limit under aggressive US06 driving.

  18. Influence of temperature and UVR on photosynthesis and morphology of four species of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Giordanino, M Valeria Fiorda; Strauch, Sebastian M; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2011-04-01

    During the late austral spring of 2009 we carried out experiments (4days of duration) with four cyanobacteria species, Anabaena sp., Nostoc sp., Arthrospira platensis and Microcystis sp., to assess the combined effects of temperature and solar radiation on photosynthesis performance and morphology. Two experimental temperatures (18°C and 23°C, simulating a 5°C increase under a scenario of climate change) and three radiation treatments (by using different filters/materials) were implemented: (i) P (PAR, 400-700nm), (ii) PA (PAR+UV-A, 320-700nm) and, (iii) PAB (PAR+UV-A+UV-B, 280-700nm). In general, samples under the P treatment had less decrease/higher recovery rates of effective photochemical quantum yield (Y) than those receiving UV-A or UV-A+UV-B. The effects of increased temperature were species-specific: At the end of the experiments, it was seen that increased temperature benefited photosynthetic performance of Anabaena sp. and Nostoc sp. but not of Microcystis sp. and A. platensis. Higher temperature was also associated to an increase in the chain area of Anabaena sp., and to bigger trichomes in A. platensis; however, no morphological effects were observed in Microcystis sp. In addition, in Nostoc sp. the increase in temperature counteracted the UVR impact on the reduction of the chain area. How these effects and mechanisms will affect the trophodynamics and production of aquatic ecosystems is still uncertain, but the specificity of the responses suggests that not all cyanobacteria would be equally benefited by temperature increases therefore affecting the balance and interaction among species in the water column. PMID:21296589

  19. SST phases in the open-ocean and margins of the tropical Pacific; implication on tropical climate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, L.-J.; Clemens, S. C.; Chen, M.-T.; Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The tropical Pacific exerts a major effect on the global climate system and might have driven large extra-tropical climate change. We present a 320 kyr high resolution UK'37-sea surface temperature (SST) record from core MD052928 (11°17.26' S, 148°51.60' E, water depth 2250 m) located off southeastern Papua New Guinea (PNG), in the western tropical Pacific. The age model of the core is based on AMS 14C dating of planktic foraminifers and correlation of benthic to the LR04 stack. The UK'37-SST ranges from 26.5 to 29 °C, showing glacial-interglacial and millennial variations. We assess the phase of the MD052928 UK'37-SST as part of a synthesis of five other SST records from the tropical Pacific at the precession, obliquity, and eccentricity bands. The SST records can be separated into two groups when considering SST phase relative to changes in orbital forcing, ice volume and greenhouse gases (GHGs). SST maxima at open-ocean sites within primary equatorial current systems occur between obliquity maxima and methane (CH4) maxima but early relative to ice volume minima and CO2 maxima at the obliquity band. In contrast, SST maxima at continental margin sites change are in phase with ice minima and CO2 maxima, likely influenced by the slow response of continental ice sheets and GHGs. At the precession band, the early group located on the Warm Pool area indicates a direct influenced by the local insolation, and with the similar phase progress as the obliquity band. These results indicate that the decreased high-low latitudes insolation gradient and increasing low latitude local insolation resulting in tropical Pacific SST rise. Higher SST would supply more moisture resulting in increased CH4 in the tropical wetlands. This promotes increasing CO2 and deglaciation leading to increase continental and continental margin surface temperatures.

  20. Photooxidation of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taalba, A.; Xie, H.; Scarratt, M. G.; Bélanger, S.; Levasseur, M.

    2013-02-01

    Photolysis of dimethylsulfide (DMS), a secondary photochemical process mediated by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), has previously been demonstrated to be an important loss term of DMS in the surface layer of warm seas and the Southern Ocean. The role of photolysis in regulating the DMS dynamics in the Arctic Ocean, however, remains obscure. This study for the first time determined the apparent quantum yield (AQY) spectra of DMS photooxidation in northern polar marine milieus covering the Baffin Bay in the eastern Canadian Arctic and the Mackenzie River estuary, Mackenzie Shelf and Canada Basin in the western Canadian Arctic. The DMS AQY was fairly invariant at salinities < 25 but rose rapidly with further increasing salinity, which is well defined by a three-parameter exponential decay equation with a constant intercept. Salinity can therefore be used as a quantitative indicator of the DMS AQY. The DMS AQY in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths was linearly and positively correlated with the spectral slope coefficient (275-295 nm) of the CDOM absorption spectrum, suggesting that marine CDOM photosensitizes the degradation of DMS more efficiently than does terrestrial CDOM. High concentrations of nitrate (~12 μmol L-1) in deep water samples boosted DMS photooxidation by 70-80%, due likely to radical chemistry of nitrate photolysis. Coupled optical-photochemical modeling, based on the obtained DMS AQY spectra, shows that UV-A (320-400 nm) accounted for 60-75% of the DMS photolysis in the sunlit surface layer and that photochemistry degraded DMS on an e-folding time from 9 to 100 d (mean: 29 d). The photooxidation term on average accounted for 21% of the DMS gross loss rate and was comparable to the atmospheric DMS ventilation rate estimated for the same geographic regions.

  1. HuntIR thermal imagers for reconnaissance and targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Ihle, Tobias; Mauk, Karl-Heinz; Rode, Werner

    2004-08-01

    A new family of light handheld military thermal imagers for reconnaissance and targeting applications was developed based on AIM's IR components like IR detection modules, command and control electronics and image processing units. Three different types of imagers provide solutions for different requirements in identification ranges of targets. The highest performance device makes use of a FPA MCT 384x288 MWIR detector with a motorized double field of view optics. An identification range up to 2400m for the NATO standard target was proven according to the FGAN-FOM TRM3 range model. The device provides a mechanical adaptation to weapon systems and provides target markers for common hand weapons of the German army. A single field of view MCT device for 1000m ranges and an uncooled device on the lower performance end complete the imager family. Electronics for intelligent power management from batteries and display electronics were developed to provide stand alone operation. The modular concept allows the use of the same image processing unit for all devices providing special features for best performance like scene-based non-uniformity correction together with an optical calibration element and dynamic reduction including automatic histogram equalization for optimized scene display and text or graphics overlay. Due to the modular concept the components like the image processing unit are already used and validated in programs like the thermal sight for the self defense gun of the reconnaissance vehicle FENNEK together with a 320x240 LWIR uncooled microbolometer detector or with the MCT 384x288 MWIR detection module in a thermal imager for the German army UAV Luna.

  2. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26156231

  3. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigning a single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs. PMID:24593746

  4. Infrared thermography detects febrile and behavioural responses to vaccination of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Cook, N J; Chabot, B; Lui, T; Bench, C J; Schaefer, A L

    2015-02-01

    An automated, non-invasive system for monitoring of thermoregulation has the potential to mitigate swine diseases through earlier detection. Measurement of radiated temperature of groups of animals by infrared thermography (IRT) is an essential component of such a system. This study reports on the feasibility of monitoring the radiated temperature of groups of animals as a biomarker of immune response using vaccination as a model for febrile disease. In Study A, weaned pigs were either treated with an intramuscular vaccine (FarrowSure Gold), a sham injection of 0.9% saline or left as untreated controls. An infrared thermal camera (FLIR A320) was fixed to the ceiling directly above the pen of animals, and recorded infrared images of the treatment groups at 5 min intervals. The effect on temperature of the spatial distribution of pigs within the pen was significant, with higher temperatures recorded when pigs were grouped together into a single cluster. A higher frequency of clustering behaviour was observed in vaccinated animals compared with controls during a period of the afternoon ~4 to 7 h post-vaccination. The daily mean of the maximum image temperature was significantly higher in vaccinated animals compared with control and sham-treated animals. In the vaccination treated group, the 24 h mean of the maximum temperature was significantly higher during the post-vaccination period compared with the 24 h period before vaccination. Increased temperature in the vaccinated animals occurred from ~3 h, peaked at ~10 h, and remained elevated for up to 20 h post-vaccination. In Study B, the effect of prevalence was tested in terms of the difference in maximum temperature between control and vaccination days. A thermal response to vaccination was detected in a pen of 24 to 26 animals when <10% of the animals were vaccinated. The results support the concept of radiated temperature measurements of groups of animals by IRT as a screening tool for febrile diseases in pig

  5. A high-speed and small-volume IR zoom lens using root-exchange theory and DOE element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Sun, Xing; Zhang, Xin-de; Li, Rong-gang

    2013-09-01

    The high-speed and small-volume mid-wave IR zoom lens capable of 16× magnification using a 320×256 IR FPA detector has been described. The system magnification can be continuously adjusted by simply moving two lens groups, which uses the root-exchange theory. The object-image exchange theory and root-exchange theory are presented. The structure using root-exchange theory can get large zoom ratio with simple volume and the smooth zoom curve. Mechanically compensated IR zoom lens design has these questions: firstly, big volume caused by complex optical structure; secondly, limited IR material and obvious focus shift with temperature change. The zoom lens using mechanically compensated method has solved all the questions that existed in traditional system. The system also contains much less optical material and has a very simple structure by using DOE elements. The element of first moving group and the second element of the second moving group are both DOE. As the DOE has minus Abb number, which is opposite of refractive materials, it can minimize the higher order chromatic aberration. Based on the characteristics, the chromatic aberration was balanced. Research on the thermal analysis and compensation is considered. The passive athermalization is made by DOE elements. DOE elements make the zoom lens maintain its performance when it is operating between -20°C and 60°C.The results show the high magnification zoom lens design performance, with small volume and light weight. The aberration of the system were well corrected and diffraction limited performance was achieved in required temperature range.

  6. Hyperspectral and gated ICCD imagery for laser irradiated carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Charles D.; Acosta, Roberto A.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2013-02-01

    New optical diagnostics for studying laser ablation and induced combustion for carbon materials are key to monitoring the evolving, spatial distribution of the gas plume. We are developing high speed imaging FTIR and gated ICCD imagery for materials processing, manufacture process control, and high energy laser applications. The results from two projects will be discussed. First, an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a 320 x 256 InSb focal plane array frames at 1.9 kHz with a spatial resolution of 1 mm and spectral resolution of up to 0.25 cm-1. Gas phase plumes above the surface of laser-irradiated black plexiglass, fiberglass and painted thin metals have been spectrally resolved. Molecular emission from CO, CO2, H2O, and hydrocarbons is readily identified. A line-by-line radiative transfer model is used to derive movies for specie concentrations and temperatures. Second, excimer laser pulsed ablation of bulk graphite into low-pressure (0.05 - 1 Torr) argon generates highly ionized, high speed (M>40) plumes. A gated, intensified CCD camera with band pass filtering has been used to generate plume imagery with temporal resolution of 10ns. The Sedov-Taylor shock model characterizes the propagation of the shock front if the dimensionality of the plume is allowed to deviate from ideal spherical expansion. A drag model is more appropriate when the plume approaches extinction (~10 μs) and extends the characterization into the far field. Conversion of laser pulse energy to the shock is efficient.

  7. [Effect of irradiation with dental polymerized lamps on human Langerhans cells: a study made on human skin transplanted to nude mice].

    PubMed

    Bonding, N

    1992-04-01

    Light polymerized composite resin materials are now widely used in dentistry. Most resins are polymerized by light sources which have a powerful emission of visible light and a small emission in the ultraviolet light A spectrum (UV-A 320-400 mm). Possible eye damage, induced by such light, has been investigated, but the effects on the oral mucosa, which is directly exposed to the light, have been examined in only one animal study. Langerhans cells (LC) are dendritic non-epithelial cells which form a network within stratified epithelia. LC have features of macrophages, functions as antigen-presenting cells, and play an important role in the immune system associated with skin and oral mucosa. Pilot studies on human skin transplanted to nude mice showed that radiation with small therapeutic doses from a dental light curing unit (DLU) having only a small fraction of UV-light can reduce or deplete the OKT6 surface marker of LC in human epithelium. Further investigation of the photobiologic mechanisms involved spectral analyses of the emmission from the lamps and construction of a suitable light source for establishing an action spectrum for LC in the UV-A range. The action spectrum for LC in the UV-A range was obtained by exposing human skin, grafted to nude mice, to monochromatic light with a band pass of 5-10 nm. Criterion for threshold doses was total depletion of LC, visualized by staining with known LC-markers, monoclonal antibodies OKT6, DAKO-Vimentin, DAKO-HLA-DR and DAKO-S-100. The action spectrum for LC consisted of a biphasic curve, with a non-linear, strong wave-length dependency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1412043

  8. 3-D Crustal Velocity Structure Across the Vrancea Zone in Romania, Derived From Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, M.; Hauser, F.; Popa, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Vrancea zone in the south-eastern Carpathians is one of the most active seismic zones in Europe. In order to study the crustal and upper-mantle structure in this region, two seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection experiments were carried out in 1999 and 2001. The 1999 campaign comprised a 320 km long N-S profile and a 80 km long transverse profile (E-W). All shots were recorded simultaneously on both profiles. The profile conducted in 2001 extended in E-W direction from the Hungarian border across the Vrancea zone to the Black Sea. We present an application of a 3-D refraction and reflection tomography algorithm (Hole 1992, 1995), elaborating the crustal velocity and interface structure within a 115 x 235 km wide region around the Vrancea zone. In order to enhance the model resolution, first arrival data from local earthquakes of the CALIXTO-99 teleseismic project were also included. The results indicate a high-velocity structure beneath the northern part of the Vrancea zone extending from shallow levels to depths of about 11 km. This structure may be related to the Trotus and Capidava-Ovidiu faults, which converge to the north of it. The high-velocity region is surrounded by the lower velocity Focsani and Brasov basins. The sedimentary succession beneath the southern part of the model extends to 18 km depth, while in the north sediment thickness varies between 10 and 15 km. Further results of the interface modelling of prominent reflections show that the mid-crustal and Moho interfaces shallow northwards from 30 km to 22 km and from 42 km to 38 km, respectively. This correlates well with previous results of Hauser et al. (2001).

  9. A 3-D crustal velocity structure across the southeastern Carpathians of Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, M.; Hauser, F.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Fielitz, W.; Popa, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Vrancea zone in the southeastern Carpathians is one of the most active seismic regions in Europe. In order to study the crustal and upper-mantle structure in this region, two seismic refraction experiments were carried out in 1999 and 2001. The 1999 campaign comprised a 320 km long N-S profile and a 80 km long transverse profile. All shots were recorded simultaneously on both profiles. The profile conducted in 2001 extended in E-W direction from the Hungarian border across the Vrancea zone to the Black Sea. A first ever 3-D crustal velocity model of the south-eastern Carpathians within a 115 x 235 km wide region around the Vrancea zone is presented. This model was generated by application of a 3-D refraction and reflection tomography algorithm (Hole 1992, 1995). In order to enhance the model resolution, first arrival data from local earthquakes were also included. The results indicate a high-velocity structure above the Vrancea zone extending from shallow levels to depths of about 11 km. A possible relation to the Trotus and Capidava-Ovidiu faults, which converge to the north of it, is deemed unlikely. However,the existence of the outstanding high velocities may be explained by crystalline basement thrust onto the sub-Carpathian nappes. The high-velocity region is surrounded by the lower velocity Focsani and Brasov basins. The sedimentary succession beneath the southern part of the model area extends to 18 km depth, while in the north sediment thickness varies between 10 and 15 km. Further results of the interface modelling of prominent reflections show that the mid-crustal and Moho interfaces shallow northwards from 30 km to 22 km and from 42 km to 38 km, respectively.

  10. A thermographic study on eyes affected by Age-related Macular Degeneration: Comparison among various forms of the pathology and analysis of risk factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteoli, Sara; Finocchio, Lucia; Biagini, Ilaria; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Sodi, Andrea; Corvi, Andrea; Virgili, Gianni; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the ocular thermographic profiles in eyes affected by Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, (2) whether any risk factors associated with the disease could affect the development of a form of AMD rather than another. Thirty-four eyes with Age-Related Maculopathy (ARM), 41 eyes with dry AMD, 60 eyes affected by wet AMD, and 74 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included in the study. The control group consisted of 48 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, systemic diseases and a body temperature higher than 37.5 °C. A total of 210 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The Ocular Surface Temperature (OST) of five ocular areas was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA test and multivariate analysis were used for statistical analyses. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P-value > 0.05), however, OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P-value < 0.0001). Smokers showed higher possibility (P-value = 0.012) of developing wet AMD instead of dry AMD. Infrared thermography may be a helpful, non-invasive and not time-consuming method to be used in the management of patients with this common degenerative maculopathy.

  11. Row orientation effect on UV-B, UV-A and PAR solar irradiation components in vineyards at Tuscany, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoni, D.; Carreras, G.; Zipoli, G.; Sabatini, F.; Dalla Marta, A.; Orlandini, S.

    2008-11-01

    Besides playing an essential role in plant photosynthesis, solar radiation is also involved in many other important biological processes. In particular, it has been demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation plays a relevant role in grapevines ( Vitis vinifera) in the production of certain important chemical compounds directly responsible for yield and wine quality. Moreover, the exposure to UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) can affect plant-disease interaction by influencing the behaviour of both pathogen and host. The main objective of this research was to characterise the solar radiative regime of a vineyard, in terms of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and UV components. In this analysis, solar spectral UV irradiance components, broadband UV (280-400 nm), spectral UV-B and UV-A (320-400 nm), the biological effective UVBE, as well as the PAR (400-700 nm) component, were all considered. The diurnal patterns of these quantities and the UV-B/PAR and UV-B/UV-A ratios were analysed to investigate the effect of row orientation of the vineyard in combination with solar azimuth and elevation angles. The distribution of PAR and UV irradiance at various heights of the vertical sides of the rows was also studied. The results showed that the highest portion of plants received higher levels of daily radiation, especially the UV-B component. Row orientation of the vines had a pronounced effect on the global PAR received by the two sides of the rows and, to a lesser extent, UV-A and UV-B. When only the diffused component was considered, this geometrical effect was greatly attenuated. UV-B/PAR and UV-A/PAR ratios were also affected, with potential consequences on physiological processes. Because of the high diffusive capacity of the UV-B radiation, the UV-B/PAR ratio was significantly lower on the plant portions exposed to full sunlight than on those in the shade.

  12. Paleoceanographic history of the Lower Bengal Fan during the last glacial cycle - IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Lantzsch, H.; Das, S. K.; Williams, T.; Adhikari, R. R.; Jia, G.; Fox, L. R.; Ge, J.; Manoj, M. C.; Savian, J. F.; Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.; Sharma, B.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 354 drilled a ~320 km long transect of seven sites on the Lower Bengal Fan at 8o N in the Northern Indian Ocean. The sediments cores recovered record a complex relationship between turbiditic and hemipelagic environments. This variability offers a unique opportunity to link our understanding of tectonic and terrestrial processes with climate and oceanography. With the exception the westernmost Site U1454, all sites show a several meter thick, hemipelagic top layer, usually representing Late Quaternary sediment. We present physical, geochemical and stable isotopic properties of this interval to establish a time frame and assess the paleoceanographic development of the region during the last glacial cycle. We sampled Site U1452C-1H continuously for the uppermost 480 cm of hemipelagic sediment in 2-cm increments. Preliminary results indicate the Toba Ash 1 (0.74 ka) is a distinct time marker in all physical properties. Furthermore, wet-bulk density as well as color reflectance b* (the red-green component) and L* (the lightness) show a dominant precession cyclicity. Hence, we are able to provide an insolation-tuned chronology for the last 200 ka (MIS1 - 7) as a preliminary age model. These records agree well with d18O records retrieved from Chinese caves. We will present a preliminary paleoceanographic proxy data to reconstruct sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface salinity (SSS), ice volume, marine biological productivity, nutrient supply, and deep-water circulation. These oceanographic and climate conditions are linked to changes in monsoonal strength and terrestrial input using sedimentary proxies to reconstruct chemical weathering and sediment sources and transport time. This work addresses one of the primary cruise objectives - linking monsoon variability, regional and global climate, and Bay of Bengal sediment deposition.

  13. Effects of surface grinding conditions on the reciprocating friction and wear behavior of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Zanoria, E.S.

    1997-12-31

    The relationship between two significantly different surface grinding conditions and the reciprocating ball-on-flat friction and wear behavior of a high-quality, structural silicon nitride material (GS-44) was investigated. The slider materials were silicon nitride NBD 200 and 440C stainless steel. Two machining conditions were selected based on extensive machining and flexural strength test data obtained under the auspices of an international, interlaboratory grinding study. The condition categorized as {open_quotes}low strength{close_quote} grinding used a coarse 80 grit wheel and produced low flexure strength due to machining-induced flaws in the surface. The other condition, regarded as {open_quotes}high strength grinding,{close_quotes} utilized a 320 grit wheel and produced a flexural strength nearly 70% greater. Grinding wheel surface speeds were 35 and 47 m/s. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted following the procedure described in a newly-published ASTM standard (G- 133) for linearly-reciprocating wear. Tests were performed in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the grinding marks (lay) using a 25 N load, 5 Hz reciprocating frequency, 10 mm stroke length, and 100 m of sliding at room temperature. The effects of sliding direction relative to the lay were more pronounced for stainless steel than for silicon nitride sliders. The wear of stainless steel was less than the wear of the silicon nitride slider materials because of the formation of transfer particles which covered the sharp edges of the silicon nitride grinding grooves and reduced abrasive contact. The wear of the GS-44 material was much greater for the silicon nitride sliders than for the stainless steel sliders. The causes for the effects of surface-grinding severity and sliding direction on friction and wear of GS-44 and its counterface materials are explained.

  14. Impact of debris dams on hyporheic interaction along a semi-arid stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, Laura K.; Siegel, Donald I.; Bauer, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Hyporheic exchange increases the potential for solute retention in streams by slowing downstream transport and increasing solute contact with the substrate. Hyporheic exchange may be a major mechanism to remove nutrients in semi-arid watersheds, where livestock have damaged stream riparian zones and contributed nutrients to stream channels. Debris dams, such as beaver dams and anthropogenic log dams, may increase hyporheic interactions by slowing stream water velocity, increasing flow complexity and diverting water to the subsurface.Here, we report the results of chloride tracer injection experiments done to evaluate hyporheic interaction along a 320 m reach of Red Canyon Creek, a second order stream in the semi-arid Wind River Range of Wyoming. The study site is part of a rangeland watershed managed by The Nature Conservancy of Wyoming, and used as a hydrologic field site by the University of Missouri Branson Geologic Field Station. The creek reach we investigated has debris dams and tight meanders that hypothetically should enhance hyporheic interaction. Breakthrough curves of chloride measured during the field experiment were modelled with OTIS-P, a one-dimensional, surface-water, solute-transport model from which we extracted the storage exchange rate and cross-sectional area of the storage zone As for hyporheic exchange. Along gaining reaches of the stream reach, short-term hyporheic interactions associated with debris dams were comparable to those associated with severe meanders. In contrast, along the non-gaining reach, stream water was diverted to the subsurface by debris dams and captured by large-scale near-stream flow paths. Overall, hyporheic exchange rates along Red Canyon Creek during snowmelt recession equal or exceed exchange rates observed during baseflow at other streams.

  15. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that interferons-β and -γ Interact in a multiplicative manner to disrupt herpes simplex virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, William P.; Halford, Keith J.; Pierce, Amy T.

    2005-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the innate interferons (IFNs), IFN-α and IFN-β, can act in concert with IFN-γto synergistically inhibit the replication of cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The significance of this observation is not yet agreed upon in large part because the nature and magnitude of the interaction between IFN-α/β and IFN-γ is not well defined. In the current study, we resolve this issue by demonstrating three points. First, the hyperbolic tangent function, tanh (x  ), can be used to describe the individual effects of IFN-β or IFN-γ on HSV-1 replication over a 320,000-fold range of IFN concentration. Second, pharmacological methods prove that IFN-β and IFN-γ interact in a greater-than-additive manner to inhibit HSV-1 replication. Finally, the potency with which combinations of IFN-β and IFN-γ inhibit HSV-1 replication is accurately predicted by multiplying the individual inhibitory effects of each cytokine. Thus, IFN-β and IFN-γ interact in a multiplicative manner. We infer that a primary antiviral function of IFN-γ lies in its capacity to multiply the potency with which IFN-α/β restricts HSV-1 replication in vivo. This hypothesis has important ramifications for understanding how T lymphocyte-secreted cytokines such as IFN-γ can force herpesviruses into a latent state without destroying the neurons or leukocytes that continue to harbor these viral infections for the lifetime of the host.

  16. Uncooled SWIR InGaAs/GaAsSb type-II quantum well focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, H.; Miura, K.; Mori, H.; Nagai, Y.; Iguchi, Y.; Kawamura, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Low dark current photodiodes (PDs) in the short wavelength infrared (SWIR) upto 2.5μm region, are expected for many applications. HgCdTe (MCT) is predominantly used for infrared imaging applications. However, because of high dark current, MCT device requires a refrigerator such as stirling cooler, which increases power consumption, size and cost of the sensing system. Recently, InGaAs/GaAsSb type II quantum well structures were considered as attractive material system for realizing low dark current PDs owing to lattice-matching to InP substrate. Planar type PIN-PDs were successfully fabricated. The absorption layer with 250 pair-InGaAs(5nm)/GaAsSb(5nm) quantum well structures was grown on S-doped (100) InP substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy method. InP and InGaAs were used for cap layer and buffer layer, respectively. The p-n junctions were formed in the absorption layer by the selective diffusion of zinc. Diameter of light-receiving region was 140μm. Low dark current was obtained by improving GaAsSb crystalline quality. Dark current density was 0.92mA/cm2 which was smaller than that of a conventional MCT. Based on the same process as the discrete device, a 320x256 planar type focal plane array was also fabricated. Each PD has 15μm diameter and 30μm pitch and it was bonded to read-out IC by using indium bump flip chip process. Finally, we have successfully demonstrated the 320 x256 SWIR image at room temperature. This result means that planer type PD array with the type II InGaAs/GaAsSb quantum well structure is a promising candidate for uncooled applications.

  17. Low-power, real-time digital video stabilization using the HyperX parallel processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Martin A.; Tong, Lin; Bindloss, Keith; Zhong, Shang; Lim, Steve; Schmid, Benjamin J.; Tidwell, J. D.; Willson, Paul D.

    2011-06-01

    Coherent Logix has implemented a digital video stabilization algorithm for use in soldier systems and small unmanned air / ground vehicles that focuses on significantly reducing the size, weight, and power as compared to current implementations. The stabilization application was implemented on the HyperX architecture using a dataflow programming methodology and the ANSI C programming language. The initial implementation is capable of stabilizing an 800 x 600, 30 fps, full color video stream with a 53ms frame latency using a single 100 DSP core HyperX hx3100TM processor running at less than 3 W power draw. By comparison an Intel Core2 Duo processor running the same base algorithm on a 320x240, 15 fps stream consumes on the order of 18W. The HyperX implementation is an overall 100x improvement in performance (processing bandwidth increase times power improvement) over the GPP based platform. In addition the implementation only requires a minimal number of components to interface directly to the imaging sensor and helmet mounted display or the same computing architecture can be used to generate software defined radio waveforms for communications links. In this application, the global motion due to the camera is measured using a feature based algorithm (11 x 11 Difference of Gaussian filter and Features from Accelerated Segment Test) and model fitting (Random Sample Consensus). Features are matched in consecutive frames and a control system determines the affine transform to apply to the captured frame that will remove or dampen the camera / platform motion on a frame-by-frame basis.

  18. Oxytocin and vasopressin receptor gene variation as a proximate base for inter- and intraspecific behavioral differences in bonobos and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Staes, Nicky; Stevens, Jeroen M G; Helsen, Philippe; Hillyer, Mia; Korody, Marisa; Eens, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Recent literature has revealed the importance of variation in neuropeptide receptor gene sequences in the regulation of behavioral phenotypic variation. Here we focus on polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and vasopressin receptor gene 1a (Avpr1a) in chimpanzees and bonobos. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the third intron of OXTR (rs53576 SNP (A/G)) is linked with social behavior, with the risk allele (A) carriers showing reduced levels of empathy and prosociality. Bonobos and chimpanzees differ in these same traits, therefore we hypothesized that these differences might be reflected in variation at the rs53576 position. We sequenced a 320 bp region surrounding rs53576 but found no indications of this SNP in the genus Pan. However, we identified previously unreported SNP variation in the chimpanzee OXTR sequence that differs from both humans and bonobos. Humans and bonobos have previously been shown to have a more similar 5' promoter region of Avpr1a when compared to chimpanzees, who are polymorphic for the deletion of ∼ 360 bp in this region (+/- DupB) which includes a microsatellite (RS3). RS3 has been linked with variation in levels of social bonding, potentially explaining part of the interspecies behavioral differences found in bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. To date, results for bonobos have been based on small sample sizes. Our results confirmed that there is no DupB deletion in bonobos with a sample size comprising approximately 90% of the captive founder population, whereas in chimpanzees the deletion of DupB had the highest frequency. Because of the higher frequency of DupB alleles in our bonobo population, we suggest that the presence of this microsatellite may partly reflect documented differences in levels of sociability found in bonobos and chimpanzees. PMID:25405348

  19. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser and combined treatments on in vitro fibroblast attachment to root surfaces.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Rapley, J; Cobb, C; Spencer, P; Killoy, W

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of the Nd:YAG laser either alone or in combination with root planning or air-powder abrasive treatment on fibroblast attachment to non-diseased root surfaces. 28, 4 x 4 mm root specimens and four disc-shaped root specimens 6 mm in diameter were obtained from unerupted 3rd molars. The root segments were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: (1) control; (2) laser-only treated; (3) laser treated followed by root planning; (4) laser treated followed by air-powder abrasive treatment. Laser-treated root specimens were exposed for 1 min with the Nd:YAG laser calibrated at an energy setting of 75 mJ at 20 pulses/s using a 320 microns contact fiber. The contact fiber was held parallel to the root segments and the root segments were kept moist with distilled water. Following the prescribed treatments, the root specimens were incubated with fibroblast cultures and then prepared for SEM examination. Results of cell counts of fibroblasts attached to specimens within each treatment group yielded the following means and standard deviations: control groups, 181.64 +/- 44.74; lased only, 78.57 +/- 21.35; lased and root planed 125.35 +/- 26.13; and lased followed by an air-powder abrasive, 177.28 +/- 55.71. Application of ANOVA followed by the Dunn Multiple Comparison test revealed significant differences (p < 0.01) in the number of attached cells between the control and laser-only treated groups; and between the laser-only and laser/air-powder abrasive treated groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8126242

  20. High Methylmercury in Arctic and Subarctic Ponds is Related to Nutrient Levels in the Warming Eastern Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Gwyneth A; Girard, Catherine; Chételat, John; Laurion, Isabelle; Amyot, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Permafrost thaw ponds are ubiquitous in the eastern Canadian Arctic, yet little information exists on their potential as sources of methylmercury (MeHg) to freshwaters. They are microbially active and conducive to methylation of inorganic mercury, and are also affected by Arctic warming. This multiyear study investigated thaw ponds in a discontinuous permafrost region in the Subarctic taiga (Kuujjuarapik-Whapmagoostui, QC) and a continuous permafrost region in the Arctic tundra (Bylot Island, NU). MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were well above levels measured in most freshwater ecosystems in the Canadian Arctic (>0.1 ng L(-1)). On Bylot, ice-wedge trough ponds showed significantly higher MeHg (0.3-2.2 ng L(-1)) than polygonal ponds (0.1-0.3 ng L(-1)) or lakes (<0.1 ng L(-1)). High MeHg was measured in the bottom waters of Subarctic thaw ponds near Kuujjuarapik (0.1-3.1 ng L(-1)). High water MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were strongly correlated with variables associated with high inputs of organic matter (DOC, a320, Fe), nutrients (TP, TN), and microbial activity (dissolved CO2 and CH4). Thawing permafrost due to Arctic warming will continue to release nutrients and organic carbon into these systems and increase ponding in some regions, likely stimulating higher water concentrations of MeHg. Greater hydrological connectivity from permafrost thawing may potentially increase transport of MeHg from thaw ponds to neighboring aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26030209

  1. A third distinct tumor necrosis factor receptor of orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Loparev, V N; Parsons, J M; Knight, J C; Panus, J F; Ray, C A; Buller, R M; Pickup, D J; Esposito, J J

    1998-03-31

    Cowpox virus Brighton red strain (CPV) contains a gene, crmD, which encodes a 320-aa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) of 44% and 22% identity, respectively, to the CPV TNFR-like proteins, cytokine response modifiers (crm) CrmB and CrmC. The crmD gene was interrupted in three other cowpox strains examined and absent in various other orthopoxviruses; however, four strains of ectromelia virus (ECT) examined contained an intact crmD (97% identity to CPV crmD) and lacked cognates of crmB and crmC. The protein, CrmD, contains a transport signal; a 151-aa cysteine-rich region with 21 cysteines that align with human TNFRII ligand-binding region cysteines; and C-terminal region sequences that are highly diverged from cellular TNFR C-terminal region sequences involved in signal transduction. Bacterial maltose-binding proteins containing the CPV or ECT CrmD cysteine-rich region bound TNF and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTalpha) and blocked their in vitro cytolytic activity. Secreted viral CrmD bound TNF and LTalpha and was detectable after the early stage of replication, using nonreducing conditions, as 60- to 70-kDa predominant and 90- to 250-kDa minor disulfide-linked complexes that were able to be reduced to a 46-kDa form and deglycosylated to a 38-kDa protein. Cells infected with CPV produced extremely low amounts of CrmD compared with ECT. Possessing up to three TNFRs, including CrmD, which is secreted as disulfide-linked complexes in varied amounts by CPV and ECT, likely enhances the dynamics of the immune modulating mechanisms of orthopoxviruses. PMID:9520445

  2. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  3. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Receptor Gene Variation as a Proximate Base for Inter- and Intraspecific Behavioral Differences in Bonobos and Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Staes, Nicky; Stevens, Jeroen M. G.; Helsen, Philippe; Hillyer, Mia; Korody, Marisa; Eens, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Recent literature has revealed the importance of variation in neuropeptide receptor gene sequences in the regulation of behavioral phenotypic variation. Here we focus on polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and vasopressin receptor gene 1a (Avpr1a) in chimpanzees and bonobos. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the third intron of OXTR (rs53576 SNP (A/G)) is linked with social behavior, with the risk allele (A) carriers showing reduced levels of empathy and prosociality. Bonobos and chimpanzees differ in these same traits, therefore we hypothesized that these differences might be reflected in variation at the rs53576 position. We sequenced a 320 bp region surrounding rs53576 but found no indications of this SNP in the genus Pan. However, we identified previously unreported SNP variation in the chimpanzee OXTR sequence that differs from both humans and bonobos. Humans and bonobos have previously been shown to have a more similar 5′ promoter region of Avpr1a when compared to chimpanzees, who are polymorphic for the deletion of ∼360 bp in this region (+/− DupB) which includes a microsatellite (RS3). RS3 has been linked with variation in levels of social bonding, potentially explaining part of the interspecies behavioral differences found in bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. To date, results for bonobos have been based on small sample sizes. Our results confirmed that there is no DupB deletion in bonobos with a sample size comprising approximately 90% of the captive founder population, whereas in chimpanzees the deletion of DupB had the highest frequency. Because of the higher frequency of DupB alleles in our bonobo population, we suggest that the presence of this microsatellite may partly reflect documented differences in levels of sociability found in bonobos and chimpanzees. PMID:25405348

  4. Contribution of Clay mineralogy of Bengal Fan deposits at 8°N for understanding of Himalayan provenance and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyghe, Pascale; France-Lanord, Christian; IODP Expedition 354 Scientists

    2016-04-01

    The IODP 354 expedition (February-March 2015) focused on the middle part of the Bengal Fan (8°N). Seven sites were drilled along a 320 km- long transect and provided good recovery and excellent data to study both provenance of the material from the Himalayan orogeny and palaeoceanography linked to the Asian monsoon. Neogene sediments consist of an alternation of rapidly deposited, silty to muddy turbidites (10-100 cm/kyr) forming levees of channels intercalated with minor slowly deposited hemipelagic clays (1-2 cm/kyr), which may be found over the whole investigated area. Thick interlevee sand sheet units also occur between channel levees. The turbiditic sand, silt and clay have mineralogical signatures very similar to those of the modern Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers and are therefore relevant for reconstructing time series of erosion, weathering, and changes in Himalayan sources regions. Hemipelagic calcareous clays may provide additional information on environmental conditions throughout the Himalayan basin. Preliminar shipboard XRD analysis revealed that the clayey assemblages of sediments are relatively constant through the Neogene. Turbidite clay assemblages are dominated by detrital illite and chlorite as observed in the modern Himalayan rivers, suggesting that erosion conditions were relatively steady over the last 25 Ma. Hemipelagic clay assemblages vary from 1) identical to the illite-chlorite rich clays of turbidites, characteristic for Himalayan rivers, to 2) smectite rich assemblages enriched in iron and depleted in potassium, representing either more extreme sorting of the same material or input from another source. Further detailed investigation using decomposition of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns reveals much more complex clay assemblages, especially great quantities of mixed-layers, the quantity and mineralogy of which varies and differs in the three depositional units as determined by turbidites levees, hemipelagic clayey beds and interlevees

  5. SU-E-I-28: Introduction and Investigation of Effective Diameter Ratios as a New Patient Size Metric for Use in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, R; Sinclair, L; Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Bidari, S; Cormack, B; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce and investigate effective diameter ratios as a new patient metric for use in computed tomography protocol selection as a supplement to patient-specific size parameter data. Methods: The metrics of outer effective diameter and inner effective diameter were measured for 7 post-mortem subjects scanned with a standardized chest/abdomen/pelvis (CAP) protocol on a 320-slice MDCT scanner. The outer effective diameter was calculated by obtaining the anterior/posterior and lateral dimensions of the imaged anatomy at the middle of the scan range using Effective Diameter= SQRT(AP height*Lat Width). The inner effective diameter was calculated with the same equation using the AP and Lat dimensions of the anatomy excluding the adipose tissue. The ratio of outer to inner effective diameter was calculated for each subject. A relationship to BMI, weight, and CTDI conversion coefficients was investigated. Results: For the largest subject with BMI of 43.85 kg/m2 and weight of 255 lbs the diameter ratio was calculated as 1.33. For the second largest subject with BMI of 33.5 kg/m2 and weight of 192.4 lbs the diameter ratio was measured as 1.43, indicating a larger percentage of adipose tissue in the second largest subject’s anatomical composition. For the smallest subject at BMI of 17.4 kg/m2 and weight of 86 lbs a similar tissue composition was indicated as a subject with BMI of 24.2 kg/m2 and weight of 136 lbs as they had the same diameter ratios of 1.11. Conclusion: The diameter ratio proves to contain information about anatomical composition that the BMI and weight alone do not. The utility of this metric is still being examined but could prove useful for determining MDCT techniques and for giving a more in depth detail of the composition of a patient’s body habitus.

  6. Purification and cDNA cloning of HeLa cell p54nrb, a nuclear protein with two RNA recognition motifs and extensive homology to human splicing factor PSF and Drosophila NONA/BJ6.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, B; Horowitz, D S; Kobayashi, R; Krainer, A R

    1993-01-01

    While searching for a human homolog of the S.cerevisiae splicing factor PRP18, we found a polypeptide that reacted strongly with antibodies against PRP18. We purified this polypeptide from HeLa cells using a Western blot assay, and named it p54nrb (for nuclear RNA-binding protein, 54 kDa). cDNAs encoding p54nrb were cloned with probes derived from partial sequence of the purified protein. These cDNAs have identical coding sequences but differ as a result of alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated region. The cDNAs encode a 471 aa polypeptide that contains two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs). Human p54nrb has no homology to yeast PRP18, except for a common epitope, but is instead 71% identical to human splicing factor PSF within a 320 aa region that includes both RRMs. In addition, both p54nrb and PSF are rich in Pro and Gln residues outside the main homology region. The Drosophila puff-specific protein BJ6, one of three products encoded by the alternatively spliced no-on-transient A gene (nonA), which is required for normal vision and courtship song, is 42% identical to p54nrb in the same 320 aa region. The striking homology between p54nrb, PSF, and NONA/BJ6 defines a novel phylogenetically conserved protein segment, termed DBHS domain (for Drosophila behavior, human splicing), which may be involved in regulating diverse pathways at the level of pre-mRNA splicing. Images PMID:8371983

  7. Sulfamic Acid-Catalyzed Lead Perovskite Formation for Solar Cell Fabrication on Glass or Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunlong; Sato, Wataru; Shoyama, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-04-27

    Lead perovskite materials such as methylammonium triiodoplumbate(II) (CH3NH3PbI3, PV) are promising materials for printable solar cell (SC) applications. The preparation of PV involves a series of energetically costly cleavages of the μ-iodo bridges via conversion of a mixture of PbI2 (PI) and methylammonium iodide (CH3NH3I, MAI) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) into a precursor solution containing a polymeric strip of a plumbate(II) dimer [(MA(+))2(PbI3(-))2·(DMF)2]m, which then produces a perovskite film with loss of DMF upon spin-coating and heating of the substrate. We report here that the PI-to-PV conversion and the PV crystal growth to micrometer size can be accelerated by a small amount of zwitterionic sulfamic acid (NH3SO3, SA) and that sulfamic acid facilitates electron transfer to a neighboring electron-accepting layer in an SC device. As a result, an SC device on indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass made of a 320 nm thick PV film using 0.7 wt % SA showed a higher short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, and fill factor and hence a 22.5% higher power conversion efficiency of 16.02% compared with the device made without SA. The power conversion efficiency value was reproducible (±0.3% for 25 devices), and the device showed very small hysteresis. The device without any encapsulation showed a respectable longevity on a shelf under nitrogen under ambient light. A flexible device similarly fabricated on ITO/poly(ethylene naphthalate) showed an efficiency of 12.4%. PMID:27054265

  8. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs.

  9. Validity of the size-specific dose estimate in adults undergoing coronary CT angiography: comparison with the volume CT dose index.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Nakaura, Takeshi; Kai, Noriyuki; Nozaki, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) takes into account the patient size but remains to be fully validated for adult coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We investigated the appropriateness of SSDE for accurate estimation of patient dose by comparing the SSDE and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) in adult CCTA. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and informed consent was obtained from each patient. We enrolled 37 adults who underwent CCTA with a 320-row CT. High-sensitivity metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor dosimeters were placed on the anterior chest. CTDIvol reported by the scanner based on a 32-cm phantom was recorded. We measured chest diameter to convert CTDIvol to SSDE. Using linear regression, we then correlated SSDE with the mean measured skin dose. We also performed linear regression analyses between the skin dose/CTDIvol and the body mass index (BMI), and the skin dose/SSDE and BMI. There was a strong linear correlation (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) between SSDE (mean 37 ± 22 mGy) and mean skin dose (mean 17.7 ± 10 mGy). There was a moderate negative correlation between the skin dose/CTDIvol and BMI (r = 0.45, P < 0.01). The skin dose/SSDE was not affected by BMI (r = 0.06, P > 0.76). SSDE yields a more accurate estimation of the radiation dose without estimation errors attributable to the body size of adult patients undergoing CCTA. PMID:26440660

  10. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  11. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  12. InGaAs focal plane array developments at III-V Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvié, Anne; Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Huet, Odile; Djedidi, Anis; Robo, Jean-Alexandre; Truffer, Jean-Patrick; Bria, Toufiq; Pires, Mauricio; Decobert, Jean; Costard, Eric

    2012-06-01

    SWIR detection band benefits from natural (sun, night glow, thermal radiation) or artificial (eye safe lasers) photons sources combined to low atmospheric absorption and specific contrast compared to visible wavelengths. It gives the opportunity to address a large spectrum of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). InGaAs material appears as a good candidate to satisfy SWIR detection needs. The lattice matching with InP constitutes a double advantage to this material: attractive production capacity and uncooled operation thanks to low dark current level induced by high quality material. For few years, III-VLab has been studying InGaAs imagery, gathering expertise in InGaAs material growth and imaging technology respectively from Alcatel-Lucent and Thales, its two mother companies. This work has lead to put quickly on the market a 320x256 InGaAs module, exhibiting high performances in terms of dark current, uniformity and quantum efficiency. In this paper, we present the last developments achieved in our laboratory, mainly focused on increasing the pixels number to VGA format associated to pixel pitch decrease (15μm) and broadening detection spectrum toward visible wavelengths. Depending on targeted applications, different Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROIC) have been used. Low noise ROIC have been developed by CEA LETI to fit the requirements of low light level imaging whereas logarithmic ROIC designed by NIT allows high dynamic imaging adapted for automotive safety.

  13. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification. PMID:25754302

  14. Enhanced joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography for quantitative flow velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Julia; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a new method called joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography (STdOCT) for flow velocity measurement in spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) was presented. This method analyzes the detected timeresolved interference fringe spectra by using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation (2D FFT) to determine directly the Doppler frequency shift instead of calculating the phase difference at each depth position of adjacent A-scans. There, it was found that STdOCT is more robust for measurements with low signal to noise ratio than the classic phase-resolved Doppler OCT (DOCT) making it attractive first for imaging fast flow velocities at which a strong Doppler angle dependent signal damping occurs due to interference fringe washout and second for investigating large blood vessels with a big diameter and a highly damped signal of blood with increasing depth due to strong scattering and absorption in the near-infrared wavelength range. In the present study, we would like to introduce an enhanced algorithm for STdOCT permitting a more precise flow velocity measurement in comparison to the conventional STdOCT. The new method determines the amplitude of the broadened Doppler frequency shift by calculating the center of gravity via the complex analytical signal as a result of the second FFT instead of detecting the maximum intensity signal. Furthermore, the comparison with phase-resolved DOCT was done experimentally by using a flow phantom consisting of a 1% Intralipid emulsion and a 320 μm glass capillary. As a result, the enhanced STdOCT and DOCT processed data are completely equivalent.

  15. Effect of solar ultraviolet radiation on growth in the marine macroalga Dictyota dichotoma (Phaeophyceae) at Helgoland and its ecological consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlenkamp, R.; Franklin, L. A.; Lüning, K.

    2001-03-01

    At Helgoland, in the North Sea, growth of the high sublittoral brown macroalga Dictyota dichotoma (Hudson) Lamoroux was examined in October (the time of tetraspore release) in an outdoor tank by exposing 2-day-old germlings to four solar radiation treatments achieved with different filter materials or an additional artificial light source: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 395-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet (UV)-A (320-700 nm), full solar spectrum, or solar spectrum plus artificial UV radiation (UVR). Based on length measurements over a period of 3 weeks, the growth rate in germlings strongly decreased in conditions with UVR compared to PAR: by 14% under PAR+UV-A, by 31% under the full solar spectrum and by 65% with additional UVR. Although growth rates of germlings under UVR were reduced mainly in the first week, the plants did not regain the size of the untreated plants even after 9 weeks. Regardless of the exposure, no defects in morphology or anatomy including the exposed apical meristem were detected, except for a reduction in cell division rates perhaps due to additional cost for photoprotective or repair mechanisms. Depending on the actual position of D. dichotoma plants in the natural habitat, individuals in high positions receive substantial amounts of the more harmful UV-B while those lower down might only receive UV-A during part of the day, thus the effect of UV-B on the growth of D. dichotoma will depend on its position in the field. The effects of tidal variation of the light climate and the implications of our results for the zonation of D. dichotoma are discussed.

  16. The Integrated Mode Management Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Mode management is the processes of understanding the character and consequences of autoflight modes, planning and selecting the engagement, disengagement and transitions between modes, and anticipating automatic mode transitions made by the autoflight system itself. The state of the art is represented by the latest designs produced by each of the major airframe manufacturers, the Boeing 747-400, the Boeing 777, the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and the Airbus A320/A340 family of airplanes. In these airplanes autoflight modes are selected by manipulating switches on the control panel. The state of the autoflight system is displayed on the flight mode annunciators. The integrated mode management interface (IMMI) is a graphical interface to autoflight mode management systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The interface consists of a vertical mode manager and a lateral mode manager. Autoflight modes are depicted by icons on a graphical display. Mode selection is accomplished by touching (or mousing) the appropriate icon. The IMMI provides flight crews with an integrated interface to autoflight systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The current version is modeled on the Boeing glass-cockpit airplanes (747-400, 757/767). It runs on the SGI Indigo workstation. A working prototype of this graphics-based crew interface to the autoflight mode management tasks of glass cockpit airplanes has been installed in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator of the CSSRF of NASA Ames Research Center. This IMMI replaces the devices in FMCS equipped airplanes currently known as mode control panel (Boeing), flight guidance control panel (McDonnell Douglas), and flight control unit (Airbus). It also augments the functions of the flight mode annunciators. All glass cockpit airplanes are sufficiently similar that the IMMI could be tailored to the mode management system of any modern cockpit. The IMMI does not replace the

  17. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320–400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280–320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  18. Evolution of the Middle Bengal Fan at 8°N in the Oligocene to Pliocene - Preliminary Results from IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkhard, Spiess; Tilmann, Schwenk; Fenna, Bergmann; Christian, France-Lanord; Adam, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Three deep penetration and additional four shallow sites were drilled during IODP Expedition 354 in the Bay of Bengal at 8°N in February-March 2015 across a 320 km-long transect to study Neogene Bengal fan deposition. The three deeper sites located on top of the elevated crustal features of the Ninetyeast Ridge (Site U1451) and 85°Ridge (Site U1455/DSDP Site 218) as well as central between them (Site U1450) shall provide the stratigraphic framework for the Oligocene to Pliocene reconstruction of fan deposition and sedimentary fluxes driven by monsoon evolution and Himalayan erosion and weathering. Based on shipboard biostratigraphy, drilled material reach back in geologic time to the late Miocene (Site U1450), middle Miocene (Site U1455) and Oligocene (Site U1451). While core recovery was generally severely reduced due to the presence of unconsolidated sand and silt units, half-length APC coring technology provided valuable sand samples/recovery down to ~800 meters below seafloor. Increased compaction/diagenesis of units indicating the temporary absence of fan deposition due to major depocenter shifts, comprising of calcarous clay units of mostly pelagic origin, required a change to rotary coring between 600 and 800 mbsf, and thus the presence of sand is mostly uncertain for those deeper sections. However, derived from penetration rates, a high proportion of sand is anticipated back to early Miocene or Oligocene times. The calcareous clay units serve as stratigraphic marker horizons, which turned out to be suitable for seismic correlation across the drilling transect. This in turn allows to determine sedimentary budgets and overall fan growth for numerous time slices. Recovered sediments have Himalayan mineralogical and geochemical signatures suitable to analyze time series of erosion, weathering and changes in source regions as well as impacts on the global carbon cycle. Miocene shifts in terrestrial vegetation, in sediment budget and in style of sediment

  19. Description of various test scenarios for temporary blinding of pilots by means of bright optical radiation during darkness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Hans-Dieter

    2011-06-01

    Up to now the knowledge is limited as far as adverse effects are concerned which are the result of temporary blinding from high brightness optical products, like laser pointers, but it is mandatory to be aware of the degree and influence on various visual functions of persons performing challenging activities, especially under mesopic or even scotopic conditions. Therefore various test scenarios have been designed in the laboratory and bright optical radiation from highbrightness LEDs and laser products applied as light sources in order to simulate the temporary blinding of pilots during a night-flight, especially during landing. As an important realistic test object the primary flight display (PFD) of a commercial aircraft has been integrated in the respective test set-up and various alignments on the PFD could be adjusted in order to measure the time duration which is needed to regain the ability to read the respective data on the PFD after an exposure. The pilot's flight deck lighting situation from a full flight simulator A 320 has been incorporated in the test scenarios. The level of exposure of the subjects has been limited well below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) and the exposure duration was chosen up to a maximum of 10 s. A total of 28 subjects have been included in various tests. As a critical value especially the visual search time (VST) was determined. A significant increase of VST between 2.5 s and 8 s after foveal irradiation has been determined in a specially designed test with a primary flight display (PFD) whereas an increase of 9.1 s for peripheral and 9.9 s for frontal irradiation resulted in an exercise (flight maneuver) with a Microsoft flight-simulator. Various pupil diameters and aversion responses of the subjects during the irradiation might be responsible for the relatively large spread of data, but on the other hand a simple mean value would not comply with the spectrum of functional relationships and possible individual inherent

  20. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  1. Investigation of lung nodule detectability in low-dose 320-slice computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, J. D.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose imaging protocols in chest CT are important in the screening and surveillance of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules. Techniques that maintain nodule detectability yet permit dose reduction, particularly for large body habitus, were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which radiation dose can be minimized while maintaining diagnostic performance through knowledgeable selection of reconstruction techniques. A 320-slice volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion ONE™, Toshiba Medical Systems) was used to scan an anthropomorphic phantom at doses ranging from ∼0.1 mGy up to that typical of low-dose CT (LDCT, ∼5 mGy) and diagnostic CT (∼10 mGy). Radiation dose was measured via Farmer chamber and MOSFET dosimetry. The phantom presented simulated nodules of varying size and contrast within a heterogeneous background, and chest thickness was varied through addition of tissue-equivalent bolus about the chest. Detectability of a small solid lung nodule (3.2 mm diameter, −37 HU, typically the smallest nodule of clinical significance in screening and surveillance) was evaluated as a function of dose, patient size, reconstruction filter, and slice thickness by means of nine-alternative forced-choice (9AFC) observer tests to quantify nodule detectability. For a given reconstruction filter, nodule detectability decreased sharply below a threshold dose level due to increased image noise, especially for large body size. However, nodule detectability could be maintained at lower doses through knowledgeable selection of (smoother) reconstruction filters. For large body habitus, optimal filter selection reduced the dose required for nodule detection by up to a factor of ∼3 (from ∼3.3 mGy for sharp filters to ∼1.0 mGy for the optimal filter). The results indicate that radiation dose can be reduced below the current low-dose (5 mGy) and ultralow-dose (1 mGy) levels with knowledgeable selection of reconstruction parameters. Image

  2. Microfabricated Instrumentation for Chemical Sensing in Industrial Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    }m wide coated with a C18 phase, and elution was achieved under isocratic, step, or linear gradient conditions. For the solid phase extraction signal enhancement factors of 400 over a standard injection of 1.0 s were observed for a 320 s injection. Four polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) were resolved by open channel electrochromatography in under 50 s. Chip operation was unaffected by the presence of the 5 {micro}m silica particles at the filter entrance.

  3. Expanded applications for high performance VOx microbolometer FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D.; Ray, M.; Kennedy, A.; Wyles, J.; Hewitt, C.; Wyles, R.; Gordon, E.; Sessler, T.; Baur, S.; Van Lue, D.; Anderson, S.; Chin, R.; Gonzalez, H.; Le Pere, C.; Ton, S.; Kostrzewa, T.

    2005-05-01

    RVS is producing high-quality microbolometer FPAs with 25 μm pixels. We have developed formats in both 320 x 240 and 640 x 480 array formats. These FPAs have demonstrated sensitivities that are comparable to microbolometer FPAs with 50 μm pixels with the best measured NETD value for these FPAs now <25mK with an f/1 aperture and operating at 30 Hz frame rates. Pixel operability is greater than 99.9% on most FPAs, and uncorrected responsivity nonuniformity is less than 3% (sigma/mean). These 25 μm microbolometer detectors also have a relatively fast thermal time constant of approximately 10 msec. These arrays have produced excellent image quality, and are currently fielded in a variety of systems. We will report on our latest performance data and IR captive flight test imagery. We will also show data on 25μm arrays that have been designed for faster time constants (5 msec), while maintaining high performance. RVS is also developing a 320 x 240 50μm mid-wave responding FPA. We will review the MWIR sensitivity improvements with this array and provide IR imagery. RVS is developing a 640 x 480 25μm uncooled FPA for a countermine detection application using a two-band assembly designed to be sensitive in both the Restrahlen and Thermal spectral bands. We will provide IR image data on these arrays. RVS has made a significant breakthrough in the development of a 640 x 512 array with a unit cell size of 20 μm x 20 μm, and performance approaching that of the 25μm arrays. The successful development of this array is the first step in achieving mega-pixel formats. This FPA is designed to ultimately achieve performance near the temperature fluxuation limited NETD (<20mK, f/1, 30 Hz). We will show updated performance and imagery on these arrays, which is currently being measured at <45mK, f/1, 30 Hz.

  4. Yazoo River Basin (Lower Mississippi River) Hydrologic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A.; Davidson, G.; Altinakar, M.; Holt, R.

    2004-12-01

    The proposed Yazoo River Basin Hydrologic Observatory consists of the 34,000 square km Yazoo River watershed in northwestern Mississippi and a 320 km segment of the Mississippi River separated from the watershed by a manmade levee. Discharge from the basin flows from the Yazoo River into the Mississippi River north of Vicksburg, MS. Major streams within the basin include the Yazoo, Tallahatchie, Yalobusha, Coldwater, Yocona, and Big Sunflower Rivers. Four large flood control reservoirs (Arkabutla, Enid, Sardis, and Grenada) and two national forests (Delta and Holly Springs) are also located within the basin. The watershed is divided between upland forested hills and intensively cultivated lowlands. The lowland area, locally known as the "Delta", lies on the ancestral floodplain of the Mississippi River. Flooding by the Mississippi River was once a common event, but is now limited by the levee system. Abundant wetlands occupy abandoned stream channels throughout the Delta. The Yazoo River Basin has many unique features that make it an attractive site for an Hydrologic Observatory. Example features and issues of scientific interest include: 1) Extensive system of levees which have altered recharge to the regional aquifer, shifted population centers, and created backwater flooding areas. 2) Abundant wetlands with a century-long history of response to agricultural sediment and chemical fluxes. 3) Erosion of upland streams, and stream sediment loads that are the highest in the nation. 4) Groundwater mining in spite of abundant precipitation due to a regional surface clay layer that limits infiltration. 5) A history of agricultural Best Management Practices enabling evaluation of the effectiveness of such measures. 6) Large scale catfish farming with heavy reliance on groundwater. 7) Near enough to the Gulf coast to be impacted by hurricane events. 8) Already existing network of monitoring stations for stream flow, sediment-load, and weather, including complete coverage

  5. Automated Voxel-Based Analysis of Volumetric Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Data Improves Measurement of Serial Changes in Tumor Vascular Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Driscoll, Brandon; Chung, Caroline; Shek, Tina; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Development of perfusion imaging as a biomarker requires more robust methodologies for quantification of tumor physiology that allow assessment of volumetric tumor heterogeneity over time. This study proposes a parametric method for automatically analyzing perfused tissue from volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) scans and assesses whether this 4-dimensional (4D) DCE approach is more robust and accurate than conventional, region-of-interest (ROI)-based CT methods in quantifying tumor perfusion with preliminary evaluation in metastatic brain cancer. Methods and Materials: Functional parameter reproducibility and analysis of sensitivity to imaging resolution and arterial input function were evaluated in image sets acquired from a 320-slice CT with a controlled flow phantom and patients with brain metastases, whose treatments were planned for stereotactic radiation surgery and who consented to a research ethics board-approved prospective imaging biomarker study. A voxel-based temporal dynamic analysis (TDA) methodology was used at baseline, at day 7, and at day 20 after treatment. The ability to detect changes in kinetic parameter maps in clinical data sets was investigated for both 4D TDA and conventional 2D ROI-based analysis methods. Results: A total of 7 brain metastases in 3 patients were evaluated over the 3 time points. The 4D TDA method showed improved spatial efficacy and accuracy of perfusion parameters compared to ROI-based DCE analysis (P<.005), with a reproducibility error of less than 2% when tested with DCE phantom data. Clinically, changes in transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K{sub trans}) were seen when using TDA, with substantially smaller errors than the 2D method on both day 7 post radiation surgery (±13%; P<.05) and by day 20 (±12%; P<.04). Standard methods showed a decrease in K{sub trans} but with large uncertainty (111.6 ± 150.5) %. Conclusions

  6. Visible and Infrared Wavefront Sensing detectors review in Europe - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-luc

    2013-12-01

    using ultra low noise Avalanche Photodiode (APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter offers a 320x240 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3 microns, with 2 e readout noise at 1500 Hz frame rate. The 2e readout noise of RAPID will be first shown in this conference. The high QE response is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using liquid nitrogen free pulse tube.

  7. Photooxidation of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taalba, A.; Xie, H.; Scarratt, M. G.; Bélanger, S.; Levasseur, M.

    2013-11-01

    Photolysis of dimethylsulfide (DMS), a secondary photochemical process mediated by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), has previously been demonstrated to be an important loss term of DMS in the surface layer of warm seas and the Southern Ocean. The role of photolysis in regulating the DMS dynamics in northern polar seas remains, however, less clear. This study for the first time determined the apparent quantum yield (AQY) spectra of DMS photooxidation in Canadian Arctic seas covering Baffin Bay, the Mackenzie estuary and shelf, and the Canada Basin. The DMS AQY was fairly invariant at salinities < 25 but rose rapidly with further increasing salinity in an exponential manner. Salinity can therefore be used as a quantitative indicator of the DMS AQY. The DMS AQY in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths was linearly and positively correlated with the spectral slope coefficient (275-295 nm) of the CDOM absorption spectrum, suggesting that marine CDOM photosensitizes the degradation of DMS more efficiently than does terrestrial CDOM or that coastal waters contain higher concentrations of substrates (most likely dissolved organic matter and redox metals) that compete for DMS-oxidizing radical intermediates. High concentrations of nitrate (~ 12 μmol L-1) in deep water samples boosted DMS photooxidation by 70-80%, due likely to radical chemistry of nitrate photolysis. Coupled optical-photochemical modeling, based on the obtained DMS AQY spectra, shows that UV-A (320-400 nm) accounted for 60-75% of the DMS photolysis in the sunlit surface layer and that photochemistry degraded DMS on an e-folding time from 9 to 100 d (mean: 29 d). The photooxidation term on average accounted for 21% of the DMS gross loss rate and was comparable to the atmospheric DMS ventilation rate estimated for the same geographic regions. The methodology adopted here to study the relationship between CDOM quality/origin and DMS AQYs, if applicable to other ocean areas, may bring results of global

  8. Measurement and analysis of aircraft engine PM emissions downwind of an active runway at the Oakland International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of commercial aviation has fueled concerns over air quality around airports and the surrounding communities. Airports must expand their operations to meet the increase in air traffic, but expansion plans have been delayed or canceled due to concerns over local air quality. This paper presents the methodology for real-time measurements of aircraft engine specific Particulate Matter (PM) emissions and analysis of the associated high resolution data acquired during normal Landing and Take-Off (LTO) operations 100-300 m downwind of an active taxi-/runway at the Oakland International Airport. The airframe-engine combinations studied included B737-300 with CFM56-3B engines, B737-700/800 with CFM56-7B engines, A320 with V2500-A5 engines, MD-80 with JT-8D engines, A300 with CF6-80 engines, DC-10 with CF6-50 engines, and CRJ-100/200 with CF34-3B engines. For all engine types studied, the size distributions were typically bimodal in nature with a nucleation mode comprised of freshly nucleated PM and an accumulation mode comprised mostly of PM soot with some condensed volatile material. The PM number-based emission index observed ranged between 7 × 1015-3 × 1017 particles kg-1 fuel burned at idle/taxi and between 4 × 1015-2 × 1017 particles kg-1 fuel burned at take-off, and the associated PM mass-based emission index (EIm) ranged between 0.1 and 0.7 g kg-1 fuel burned at both the idle/taxi and take-off conditions. Older technology engines such as the CFM56-3B and JT8D engines were observed to have as much as 3× higher PM EIm values at take-off compared to newer engine technology such as the CFM56-7B engine. The results from this study provide information for better characterizing evolving PM emissions from in-service commercial aircraft under normal LTO operations and assessing their impact on local and regional air quality and health related impacts.

  9. Coal log pipeline research at University of Missouri. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1996-06-01

    During this quarter, significant progress has been made in the following, fronts of coal log pipeline research, development and technology transfer: 1. Design of the special 300-ton coal log compaction machine was completed, Furthermore, much progress has been made in the design of the system needed to feed coal into the coal log compaction machine, and the design of the system to remove logs automatically as soon as they are compacted. 2. Coal mixtures containing different amounts of moisture were compacted into 1.91- inch-diameter coal logs rapidly (in 6 seconds). It was found that for the Mettiki coal tested, the optimum moisture is around 8%. Under the test conditions (room temperature and 3% binders), the rapidly compacted coal logs with 8% moisture had less than 4% weight loss in 350 cycles of circulation. 3. Completed evaluation of the effectiveness of using wall lubricants to enhance coal log quality. Both calcium sterarate and MoS{sub 2} were found to be effective. 4. It was found that when the interior of a mold is not cleaned after coal log has been compacted, the coal mixture film clinging to the wall hardens in time and form a hard crust which affects the quality of the next log to be produced. But, if the second log is produced immediately after the first, no hard crust is formed and the quality of the second log, is not affected. 5. Coal logs made with the coal crushed by the Gundlach Company were found to be better than coal logs made with the coal crushed by the CPRC`s hammer mill. 7. A 320-ft-long, 6-inch-diameter coal log pipeline test facility was constructed in Rolla during this period. 8. Completed the simulation of an 8-inch-diameter, 20-mile-long coal log pipeline recirculating loop driven by a pump bypass. 9. Continued improvement was accomplished in the hydraulic model of HCP and CLP to predict pressure drop and capsule velocity for both single capsules and capsule train. Also, work has started to extend the analysis to sloped pipelines.

  10. Latitudinal UVR-PAR measurements in Argentina: extent of the 'ozone hole'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis Orce, V.; Walter Helbling, E.

    1997-10-01

    The UVR-PAR Argentinean Monitoring Network started its operation in September 1994 recording ultraviolet (UVR) and Photosynthetic Available Radiation (PAR) at a frequency of once per minute, at four sites, throughout the entire year. Four spectroradiometers (GUV-511, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.) were installed at research centers separated by about 8-12 degrees of latitude, extending from the Subantarctic-Fueguian region to the Tropic of Capricorn. The instruments are located in populated areas ranging from 30,000 to 11 million people and with extremely different climate regimes and conditions of tropospheric pollution. Our ground-based data indicated that the irradiance increased steadily from south to north. This increase was also observed in the calculated daily doses of UV-B (280-320 nm); however, daily integrated values for UV-A (320-400 nm) and PAR (400-700 nm) were higher at mid-latitudes (Puerto Madryn, 42°47'S). A similar south-to-north increase was evident in the ratio of the energy at 305 nm and 340 nm wavelengths (with low 305/340 ratios indicating high total ozone column concentration), with low values at Ushuaia (55°01'S) and high values at Jujuy (24°10'S). However, the 305/340 ratios increased significantly over their normal spring values at two sites, Ushuaia and Puerto Madryn, for variable time periods during October-December. Our data suggest that the ozone hole was over South America extending to about 38°S for at least a week during October and about two weeks during November-December of the years of 1994 and 1995. However, it should be noted that the erythemal irradiance, in the area influenced by the ozone hole, was at all times lower than that in Buenos Aires and well below the value at Jujuy (tropical station). This study also indicates that when assessing the impact of solar UVR upon organisms, other variables such as cloud cover, solar zenith angle, day length, latitude, and atmospheric pollution should be considered in addition to

  11. Mechanical Design of High Lift Systems for High Aspect Ratio Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center is working to develop a methodology for the optimization and design of the high lift system for future subsonic airliners with the involvement of two partners. Aerodynamic analysis methods for two dimensional and three dimensional wing performance with flaps and slats deployed are being developed through a grant with the aeronautical department of the University of California Davis, and a flap and slat mechanism design procedure is being developed through a contract with PKCR, Inc., of Seattle, WA. This report documents the work that has been completed in the contract with PKCR on mechanism design. Flap mechanism designs have been completed for seven (7) different mechanisms with a total of twelve (12) different layouts all for a common single slotted flap configuration. The seven mechanisms are as follows: Simple Hinge, Upside Down/Upright Four Bar Linkage (two layouts), Upside Down Four Bar Linkages (three versions), Airbus A330/340 Link/Track Mechanism, Airbus A320 Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), Boeing Link/Track Mechanism (two layouts), and Boeing 767 Hinged Beam Four Bar Linkage. In addition, a single layout has been made to investigate the growth potential from a single slotted flap to a vane/main double slotted flap using the Boeing Link/Track Mechanism. All layouts show Fowler motion and gap progression of the flap from stowed to a fully deployed position, and evaluations based on spanwise continuity, fairing size and number, complexity, reliability and maintainability and weight as well as Fowler motion and gap progression are presented. For slat design, the options have been limited to mechanisms for a shallow leading edge slat. Three (3) different layouts are presented for maximum slat angles of 20 deg, 15 deg and 1O deg all mechanized with a rack and pinion drive similar to that on the Boeing 757 airplane. Based on the work of Ljungstroem in Sweden, this type of slat design appears to shift the lift curve so that

  12. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280-320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  13. Mid-latitude ionospheric perturbation associated with the Spacelab-2 plasma depletion experiment at Millstone Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Holt, J. M.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2000-01-01

    Elevation scans across geomagnetic mid latitudes by the incoherent scatter radar at Millstone Hill captured the ionospheric response to the firing of the Space Shuttle Challenger OMS thrusters near the peak of the F layer on July 30, 1985. Details of the excitation of airglow and the formation of an ionospheric hole during this event have been reported in an earlier paper by Mendillo et al.. The depletion (factor sim2) near the 320 km Shuttle orbital altitude persisted for sim35 min and then recovered to near normal levels, while at 265 km the density was reduced by a factor of sim6; this significant reduction in the bottomside F-region density persisted for more than 3 hours. Total electron content in the vicinity of the hole was reduced by more than a factor of 2, and an oscillation of the F-region densities with 40-min period ensued and persisted for several hours. Plasma vertical Doppler velocity varied quasi-periodically with a sim80-min period, while magnetic field variations observed on the field line through the Shuttle-burn position exhibited a similar sim80-min periodicity. An interval of magnetic field variations at hydromagnetic frequencies (sim95 s period) accompanied the ionospheric perturbations on this field line. Radar observations revealed a downward phase progression of the 40-min period density enhancements of -1.12° km-1, corresponding to a 320-km vertical wavelength. An auroral-latitude geomagnetic disturbance began near the time of the Spacelab-2 experiment and was associated with the imposition of a strong southward IMF Bz across the magnetosphere. This created an additional complication in the interpretation of the active ionospheric experiment. It cannot be determined uniquely whether the ionospheric oscillations, which followed the Spacelab-2 experiment, were related to the active experiment or were the result of a propagating ionospheric disturbance (TID) launched by the enhanced auroral activity. The most reasonable conclusion is that

  14. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding OmpL1, a transmembrane outer membrane protein of pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Haake, D A; Champion, C I; Martinich, C; Shang, E S; Blanco, D R; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1993-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are spirochetes that have a low transmembrane outer membrane protein content relative to that of enteric gram-negative bacteria. In a previous study we identified a 31-kDa surface protein that was present in strains of Leptospira alstoni in amounts which correlated with the outer membrane particle density observed by freeze fracture electron microscopy (D. A. Haake, E. M. Walker, D. R. Blanco, C. A. Bolin, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, Infect. Immun. 59:1131-1140, 1991). The N-terminal amino acid sequence was used to design a pair of oligonucleotides which were utilized to screen a lambda ZAP II library containing EcoRI fragments of L. alstoni DNA. A 2.5-kb DNA fragment which contained the entire structural ompL1 gene was identified. The structural gene deduced from the sequence of this DNA fragment would encode a 320-amino-acid polypeptide with a 24-amino-acid leader peptide and a leader peptidase I cleavage site. Processing of OmpL1 results in a mature protein with a predicted molecular mass of 31,113 Da. Secondary-structure prediction identified repeated stretches of amphipathic beta-sheets typical of outer membrane protein membrane-spanning sequences. A topological model of OmpL1 containing 10 transmembrane segments is suggested. A recombinant OmpL1 fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli in order to immunize rabbits with the purified protein. Upon Triton X-114 extraction of L. alstoni and phase separation, anti-OmpL1 antiserum recognized a single band on immunoblots of the hydrophobic detergent fraction which was not present in the hydrophilic aqueous fraction. Immunoelectron microscopy with anti-OmpL1 antiserum demonstrates binding to the surface of intact L. alstoni. DNA hybridization studies indicate that the ompL1 gene is present in a single copy in all pathogenic Leptospira species that have been tested and is absent in nonpathogenic Leptospira species. OmpL1 may be the first spirochetal transmembrane outer membrane

  15. Kilovoltage Rotational External Beam Radiotherapy on a Breast Computed Tomography Platform: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) platform to deliver rotational kilovoltage (kV) external beam radiotherapy (RT) for partial breast irradiation, whole breast irradiation, and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Rotational kV-external beam RT using the geometry of a prototype bCT platform was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulator. A point source emitting 178 keV photons (approximating a 320-kVp spectrum with 4-mm copper filtration) was rotated around a 14-cm voxelized polyethylene disk (0.1 cm tall) or cylinder (9 cm tall) to simulate primary and primary plus scattered photon interactions, respectively. Simulations were also performed using voxelized bCT patient images. Beam collimation was varied in the x-y plane (1-14 cm) and in the z-direction (0.1-10 cm). Dose painting for multiple foci, line, and ring distributions was demonstrated using multiple rotations with varying beam collimation. Simulations using the scanner's native hardware (120 kVp filtered by 0.2-mm copper) were validated experimentally. Results: As the x-y collimator was narrowed, the two-dimensional dose profiles shifted from a cupped profile with a high edge dose to an increasingly peaked central dose distribution with a sharp dose falloff. Using a 1-cm beam, the cylinder edge dose was <7% of the dose deposition at the cylinder center. Simulations using 120-kVp X-rays showed distributions similar to the experimental measurements. A homogeneous dose distribution (<2.5% dose fluctuation) with a 20% decrease in dose deposition at the cylinder edge (i.e., skin sparing) was demonstrated by weighted summation of four dose profiles using different collimation widths. Simulations using patient bCT images demonstrated the potential for treatment planning and image-guided RT. Conclusions: Rotational kV-external beam RT for partial breast irradiation, dose painting, and whole breast irradiation with skin sparing is feasible on a bCT platform with

  16. 3D left ventricular extracellular volume fraction by low-radiation dose cardiac CT: Assessment of interstitial myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Yixun; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Summers, Ronald M.; Bluemke, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial fibrosis leads to impaired cardiac function and events. Extracellular volume fraction (ECV) assessed with an iodinated contrast agent and measured by cardiac CT may be a useful noninvasive marker of fibrosis. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a 3-dimensional (3D) ECV calculation toolkit (ECVTK) for ECV determination by cardiac CT. Methods Twenty-four subjects (10 systolic heart failure, age, 60 ± 17 years; 5 diastolic failure, age 56 ± 20 years; 9 matched healthy subjects, age 59 ± 7 years) were evaluated. Cardiac CT examinations were done on a 320-multidetector CT scanner before and after 130 mL of iopamidol (Isovue-370; Bracco Diagnostics, Plainsboro, NJ, USA) was administered. A calcium score type sequence was performed before and 7 minutes after contrast with single gantry rotation during 1 breath hold and single cardiac phase acquisition. ECV was calculated as (ΔHUmyocardium/ΔHUblood) × (1 − Hct) where Hct is the hematocrit, and ΔHU is the change in Hounsfield unit attenuation = HUafter iodine − HUbefore iodine. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to assess myocardial structure and function. Results Mean 3D ECV values were significantly higher in the subjects with systolic heart failure than in healthy subjects and subjects with diastolic heart failure (mean, 41% ± 6%, 33% ± 2%, and 35% ± 5%, respectively; P = 0.02). Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were excellent for myocardial, blood pool, and ECV (intraclass correlation coefficient, >0.90 for all). Higher 3D ECV by cardiac CT was associated with reduced systolic circumferential strain, greater end-diastolic and -systolic volumes, and lower ejection fraction (r = 0.70, r = 0.60, r = 0.73, and r = −0.68, respectively; all P < 0.001). Conclusion 3D ECV by cardiac CT can be performed with ECVTK. We demonstrated increased ECV in subjects with systolic heart failure compared with healthy subjects. Cardiac CT results also

  17. Hantaan Virus Surveillance Targeting Small Mammals at Nightmare Range, a High Elevation Military Training Area, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Terry A.; Kim, Heung-Chul; Chong, Sung-Tae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Won-Keun; Nunn, Peter V.; Song, Jin-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rodent-borne disease surveillance was conducted at Nightmare Range (NM-R), near the demilitarized zone in northeast Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea, to identify hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) risks for a mountainous high-elevation (500 m) military training site. Monthly surveys were conducted from January 2008-December 2009. A total of 1,720 small mammals were captured belonging to the Orders Rodentia [Families, Sciuridae (1 species) and Muridae (7 species)] and Soricomorpha [Family, Soricidae (1species)]. Apodemus agrarius, the primary reservoir for Hantaan virus (HTNV), accounted for 89.9% (1,546) of all small mammals captured, followed by Myodes regulus (4.0%), Crocidura lasiura (3.9%), Micromys minutus (1.4%), Mus musculus (0.3%), Microtus fortis (0.2%), Apodemus peninsulae (0.2%), Tamias sibiricus (0.1%), and Rattus norvegicus (<0.1%). Three species were antibody-positive (Ab+) for hantaviruses: A. agrarius (8.2%), M. minutus (4.2%), and C. lasiura (1.5%). HTNV specific RNA was detected in 93/127 Ab+ A. agrarius, while Imjin virus specific RNA was detected in 1/1 Ab+ C. lasiura. Overall, hantavirus Ab+ rates for A. agrarius increased with weight (age) and were significantly higher among males (10.9%) than females (5.1%) (P<0.0001). High A. agrarius gravid rates during the fall (August-September) were associated with peak numbers of HFRS cases in Korea that followed high gravid rates. From 79 RT-PCR positive A. agrarius, 12 HTNV RNA samples were sequenced and compared phylogenetically based on a 320 nt sequence from the GC glycoprotein-encoding M segment. These results demonstrate that the HTNV isolates from NM-R are distinctly separated from HTNV isolated from the People’s Republic of China. These studies provide for improved disease risk assessments that identify military activities, rodent HTNV rates, and other factors associated with the transmission of hantaviruses during field training exercises. PMID:25874643

  18. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines. PMID:26724009

  19. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  20. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  1. Impact of ultraviolet radiation on cell structure, UV-absorbing compounds, photosynthesis, DNA damage, and germination in zoospores of Arctic Saccorhiza dermatodea.

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Wiencke, Christian; Lüder, Ulrike H

    2006-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion leads to enhanced UV-B radiation. Therefore, the capacity of reproductive cells to cope with different spectral irradiance was investigated in the laboratory. Zoospores of the upper sublittoral kelp Saccorhiza dermatodea were exposed to varying fluence of spectral irradiance consisting of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm; =P), PAR+UV-A radiation (UV-A, 320-400 nm; =PA), and PAR+UV-A+UV-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm; =PAB). Structural changes, localization of phlorotannin-containing physodes, accumulation of UV-absorbing phlorotannins, and physiological responses of zoospores were measured after exposure treatments as well as after 2-6 d recovery in dim white light (8 mumol photon m(-2) s(-1)). Physodes increased in size under PAB treatment. Extrusion of phlorotannins into the medium and accumulation of physodes was induced not only under UVR treatment but also under PAR. UV-B radiation caused photodestruction indicated by a loss of pigmentation. Photosynthetic efficiency of spores was photoinhibited after 8 h exposure to 22 and 30 mumol photon m(-2) s(-1) of PAR, while supplement of UVR had a significant additional effect on photoinhibition. A relatively low recovery of photosystem II function was observed after 2 d recovery in spores exposed to 1.7 x 10(4) J m(-2) of UV-B, with a germination rate of only 49% of P treatment after 6 d recovery. The amount of UV-B-induced DNA damage measured as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) increased with the biologically effective UV-B dose (BED(DNA)). Significant removal of CPDs indicating repair of DNA damage was observed after 2 d in low white light. The protective function of phlorotannins has restricted efficiency for a single cell. Within a plume of zoospores, however, each cell can buffer each other and protect the lower layer of spores from excessive radiation. Exudation of phlorotannins into the water can also reduce the impact of UV-B radiation on UV-sensitive spores

  2. Core Noise: Implications of Emerging N+3 Designs and Acoustic Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a summary of the core-noise implications of NASA's primary N+3 aircraft concepts. These concepts are the MIT/P&W D8.5 Double Bubble design, the Boeing/GE SUGAR Volt hybrid gas-turbine/electric engine concept, the NASA N3-X Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion aircraft, and the NASA TBW-XN Truss-Braced Wing concept. The first two are future concepts for the Boeing 737/Airbus A320 US transcontinental mission of 180 passengers and a maximum range of 3000 nm. The last two are future concepts for the Boeing 777 transpacific mission of 350 passengers and a 7500 nm range. Sections of the presentation cover: turbofan design trends on the N+1.5 time frame and the already emerging importance of core noise; the NASA N+3 concepts and associated core-noise challenges; the historical trends for the engine bypass ratio (BPR), overall pressure ratio (OPR), and combustor exit temperature; and brief discussion of a noise research roadmap being developed to address the core-noise challenges identified for the N+3 concepts. The N+3 conceptual aircraft have (i) ultra-high bypass ratios, in the rage of 18 - 30, accomplished by either having a small-size, high-power-density core, an hybrid design which allows for an increased fan size, or by utilizing a turboelectric distributed propulsion design; and (ii) very high OPR in the 50 - 70 range. These trends will elevate the overall importance of turbomachinery core noise. The N+3 conceptual designs specify the need for the development and application of advanced liners and passive and active control strategies to reduce the core noise. Current engineering prediction of core noise uses semi-empirical methods based on older turbofan engines, with (at best) updates for more recent designs. The models have not seen the same level of development and maturity as those for fan and jet noise and are grossly inadequate for the designs considered for the N+3 time frame. An aggressive program for the development of updated noise

  3. Contrail ice particle formation in the wakes of airliners - insights from in-situ measurements and modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Jeßberger, Philipp; Voigt, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    The role of soot and volatile aerosol in controlling ice particle formation in cirrus clouds is of global importance for climate. In particular, contrail studies may help to better understand the role of various aerosols in ice formation. Recent results suggest that contrails may contribute a large share to the climate impact of aviation. Hence, better knowledge on contrails is needed for developing a sustainable air transport system. So far, contrail models either specify the initial number of ice particles per flight distance or assume that the initial number of ice particles is determined by the number of soot particles emitted. Previous measurements were unable to decide conclusively whether the number of ice particles is directly related to the number of soot particles. Also information on the relative distribution of the mean ice particle concentration in the primary and secondary wakes is missing. Here, we analyze particle concentrations and trace gas mixing ratios, their dilution and their correlations in 2 min old contrails from four airliners of types A319, A340, B737, and A380 under similar meteorological conditions. The measurements were performed with the research aircraft Falcon above northern Germany during the CONCERT campaign in November 2008. The instrumentation and observation methods were described before (Voigt et al., 2010). The number of ice particles in contrails of the four airliners at cruise is determined from the measurements and a dilution model, and compared with estimated soot emissions. Dilution is derived from measured concentrations of NO, NOy, SO2 and HONO. The trace gas concentrations are largest in the primary wake and decrease with altitude in the secondary wake, consistent with emissions and aircraft-dependent dilution. In contrast, ice particle concentrations are slightly larger in the secondary wake than in the primary wake, and significantly larger than expected from dilution and emissions. The total particle concentration

  4. Technetium Sorption By Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Estes, Shanna L.; Arai, Yuji; Powell, Brian A.

    2013-07-18

    conditions are established to permit measuring more representative K{sub d} and solubility values under these experimental conditions. The purpose of this revision is to correct K{sub d} values reported in the original document. This document reports results for the first 56 days of a 319 day experiment. After the experiment had finished and all the data were compiled for QA/QC analysis, a mistake in the K{sub d} calculations was found. The K{sub d} values reported in revision 0 of this report were essentially one order of magnitude higher than the actual values. In this revision, the text references to K{sub d} values have been updated along with the data in Figure 2 and Appendix B. Between the time the original document was issued, Janurary 2012, and this document was issued, a final report (Estes et al. 2012; SRNL-STI-2012-00596, Rev. 0) describing all the corrected data for the 319 day experiment was issued. This document does not contain any data that is not already reported in the final report (SRNL-STI-2012-00596, Rev. 0).

  5. Spatial Structure of Turbulent Heat Exchange at the Snow-Atmosphere Interface Inferred from Time-sequential Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, A.; Oldroyd, H. J.; Diebold, M.; Huwald, H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Land surfaces with a low thermal admittance, such as snow, experience fluctuations in their surface temperature (Ts) not only due to the diurnal course of the energy balance, but also on much shorter time-scales as the consequence of turbulent heat exchange between the surface and the atmospheric surface layer. High-frequency fluctuations in Ts, as reported for selected land-surfaces in the literature, are the imprint of coherent turbulent structures transporting heat away or towards the surface in the atmospheric surface layer. Our hypothesis is that spatially coherent perturbations in Ts on a snowpack can be mapped using time-sequential thermography (TST) - time series of thermal images sampled using state-of-the-art thermal cameras. The low thermal admittance of fresh snow implies that snow should respond with higher amplitudes in Ts to atmospheric forcing than many other land-surfaces, where fluctuations in Ts can be below the radiometric resolution of common thermal camera systems. On February 13 and 14, 2013 we operated an uncooled thermal camera (A320, FLIR, Wilsonville, OR, USA) over a snow covered glacier (';Glacier de la Plaine Morte', 46°22'37"N, 7°29'16" E, 2720 m a.s.l.). The thermal camera was mounted on a short 3 m mast to provide an oblique view of a uniform and flat part of the glacier upstream of the tower, with a filed of view (FOV) of 25 x 19° at 320 x 240 pixel resolution. Thermal images of the apparent surface temperature were acquired with ~5Hz and complemented by 20 Hz measurements of the atmospheric flow with three ultrasonic anemometer-thermometers (CSAT-3, CSI, Logan, UT, USA), of which one was installed in the FOV of the thermal camera. During the measurement campaign, the atmospheric surface layer was stably stratified (clear skies, air temperatures -15 to -10°C), and Ts ranged between -21 and -10°C. The snow-surface exhibited quite large fluctuations in Ts up to ×3 K over short time (within ~10-30 seconds). The extracted spatio

  6. Dynamic volume vs respiratory correlated 4DCT for motion assessment in radiation therapy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Bracken, John; Driscoll, Brandon; Hope, Andrew; Jaffray, David

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Conventional (i.e., respiratory-correlated) 4DCT exploits the repetitive nature of breathing to provide an estimate of motion; however, it has limitations due to binning artifacts and irregular breathing in actual patient breathing patterns. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and image quality of a dynamic volume, CT approach (4D{sub vol}) using a 320-slice CT scanner to minimize these limitations, wherein entire image volumes are acquired dynamically without couch movement. This will be compared to the conventional respiratory-correlated 4DCT approach (RCCT). Methods: 4D{sub vol} CT was performed and characterized on an in-house, programmable respiratory motion phantom containing multiple geometric and morphological ''tumor'' objects over a range of regular and irregular patient breathing traces obtained from 3D fluoroscopy and compared to RCCT. The accuracy of volumetric capture and breathing displacement were evaluated and compared with the ground truth values and with the results reported using RCCT. A motion model was investigated to validate the number of motion samples needed to obtain accurate motion probability density functions (PDF). The impact of 4D image quality on this accuracy was then investigated. Dose measurements using volumetric and conventional scan techniques were also performed and compared. Results: Both conventional and dynamic volume 4DCT methods were capable of estimating the programmed displacement of sinusoidal motion, but patient breathing is known to not be regular, and obvious differences were seen for realistic, irregular motion. The mean RCCT amplitude error averaged at 4 mm (max. 7.8 mm) whereas the 4D{sub vol} CT error stayed below 0.5 mm. Similarly, the average absolute volume error was lower with 4D{sub vol} CT. Under irregular breathing, the 4D{sub vol} CT method provides a close description of the motion PDF (cross-correlation 0.99) and is able to track each object, whereas the RCCT method results in a

  7. IrLaW an OGC compliant infrared thermography measurement system developed on mini PC with real time computing capabilities for long term monitoring of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, J.; Averty, R.

    2012-04-01

    One of the objectives of ISTIMES project is to evaluate the potentialities offered by the integration of different electromagnetic techniques able to perform non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of transport infrastructures. Among the EM methods investigated, uncooled infrared camera is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its relative low cost on the market. Infrared thermography, when it is used in quantitative mode (not in laboratory conditions) and not in qualitative mode (vision applied to survey), requires to process in real time thermal radiative corrections on raw data acquired to take into account influences of natural environment evolution with time. But, camera sensor has to be enough smart to apply in real time calibration law and radiometric corrections in a varying atmosphere. So, a complete measurement system was studied and developed with low cost infrared cameras available on the market. In the system developed, infrared camera is coupled with other sensors to feed simplified radiative models running, in real time, on GPU available on small PC. The system studied and developed uses a fast Ethernet camera FLIR A320 [1] coupled with a VAISALA WXT520 [2] weather station and a light GPS unit [3] for positioning and dating. It can be used with other Ethernet infrared cameras (i.e. visible ones) but requires to be able to access measured data at raw level. In the present study, it has been made possible thanks to a specific agreement signed with FLIR Company. The prototype system studied and developed is implemented on low cost small computer that integrates a GPU card to allow real time parallel computing [4] of simplified radiometric [5] heat balance using information measured with the weather station. An HMI was developed under Linux using OpenSource and complementary pieces of software developed at IFSTTAR. This new HMI called "IrLaW" has various functionalities that let it compliant to be use in

  8. Advances in detector technologies for visible and infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Kolb, Johann; Rothman, Johan; Fusco, Thierry; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Destefanis, Gérard; Lhermet, Nicolas; Pacaud, Olivier; Vuillermet, Michel; Kerlain, Alexandre; Hubin, Norbert; Reyes, Javier; Kasper, Markus; Ivert, Olaf; Suske, Wolfgang; Walker, Andrew; Skegg, Michael; Derelle, Sophie; Deschamps, Joel; Robert, Clélia; Vedrenne, Nicolas; Chazalet, Frédéric; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Preis, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. The LGSD is a scaling of the NGSD with 1760x1680 pixels and 3 e readout noise (goal 1e) at 700 Hz (goal 1000 Hz) frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: advanced CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS back thinned and back illuminated device for very high QE, full digital outputs with signal digital conversion on chip. In addition, the CMOS technology is extremely robust in a telescope environment. Both detectors will be used on the European ELT but also interest potentially all giant telescopes under development. Additional developments also started for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on a new technological breakthrough using ultra low noise Avalanche Photodiode (APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter will offer a 320x240 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3.2 microns, with 2 e readout noise at 1500 Hz frame rate. The high QE response is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using liquid nitrogen free pulse tube cryocoolers is currently developed for this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. First results of this project are detailed here. These programs are held with several partners, among them are the French astronomical laboratories (LAM, OHP, IPAG), the detector manufacturers (e2v technologies, Sofradir, CEA/LETI) and other partners (ESO, ONERA, IAC, GTC). Funding is: Opticon FP6 and FP7 from European Commission, ESO, CNRS and Université de Provence, Sofradir, ONERA, CEA/LETI and the French FUI (DGCIS).

  9. Absorbed Radiation Dose in Radiosensitive Organs During Coronary CT Angiography Using 320-MDCT: Effect of Maximum Tube Voltage and Heart Rate Variations

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Boris; Khosa, Faisal; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Khan, Atif N.; Sarwar, Sheryar; Yam, Chun-Shan; Court, Laurence E.; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Clouse, Melvin E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to estimate the absorbed radiation dose in radiosensitive organs during coronary MDCT angiography using 320-MDCT and to determine the effects of tube voltage variation and heart rate (HR) control on absorbed radiation dose. MATERIALS AND METHODS Semiconductor field effect transistor detectors were used to measure absorbed radiation doses for the thyroid, midbreast, breast, and midlung in an anthropomorphic phantom at 100, 120, and 135 kVp at two different HRs of 60 and 75 beats per minute (bpm) with a scan field of view of 320 mm, 400 mA, 320 × 0.5 mm detectors, and 160 mm collimator width (160 mm range). The paired Student’s t test was used for data evaluation. RESULTS At 60 bpm, absorbed radiation doses for 100, 120, and 135 kVp were 13.41 ± 3.59, 21.7 ± 4.12, and 29.28 ± 5.17 mGy, respectively, for midbreast; 11.76 ± 0.58, 18.86 ± 1.06, and 24.82 ± 1.45 mGy, respectively, for breast; 12.19 ± 2.59, 19.09 ± 3.12, and 26.48 ± 5.0 mGy, respectively, for lung; and 0.37 ± 0.14, 0.69 ± 0.14, and 0.92 ± 0.2 mGy, respectively, for thyroid. Corresponding absorbed radiation doses for 75 bpm were 38.34 ± 2.02, 59.72 ± 3.13, and 77.8 ± 3.67 mGy for midbreast; 26.2 ± 1.74, 44 ± 1.11, and 52.84 ± 4.07 mGy for breast; 38.02 ± 1.58, 58.89 ± 1.68, and 78 ± 2.93 mGy for lung; and 0.79 ± 0.233, 1.04 ± 0.18, and 2.24 ± 0.52 mGy for thyroid. Absorbed radiation dose changes were significant for all organs for both tube voltage reductions as well as for HR control from 75 to 60 bpm at all tube voltage settings (p < 0.05). The absorbed radiation doses for the calcium score protocol were 11.2 ± 1.4 mGy for midbreast, 9.12 ± 0.48 mGy for breast, 10.36 ± 1.3 mGy for lung, and 0.4 ± 0.05 mGy for thyroid. CONCLUSION CT angiography with 320-MDCT scanners results in absorbed radiation doses in radiosensitive organs that compare favorably to those previously reported. Significant dose reductions can be achieved by tube

  10. PBS Plus Facebook: The Old And New Communication Of Climate Science (Please "Like" And "Share" This Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R. B.; Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional and innovative communications strategies were combined in "Earth: The Operators' Manual" (ETOM; writer & director Geoff Haines-Stiles, producer Erna Akuginow, presenter Richard Alley). We attempted both a clear and accessible presentation of some key essentials of current climate science and an experiment in new messaging and new media for outreach and education. ETOM is a 3-part TV series broadcast by PBS ("…one of the more interesting documentary series to come along in years", said the New York Times) and a 320 plus page tradebook, with 110 pages of footnotes referencing peer-reviewed science, published by Norton. But it's also a lively and growing Facebook page with a clear voice sharing positive examples of how renewable energy can reduce polluting emissions here in the US and worldwide, alongside headlines of climate science, and a website—relaunched for the 2012 Earth Day PBS broadcasts—where all three programs can be streamed, and teachers can register to download HD segments for classroom use. The TV programs were designed to offer a highly accessible statement of core climate science, literally explaining how ice cores show us today's climate is changing in ways not seen in the last 800,000 thousand years and why physics and chemistry let us know "It's Us" who are changing CO2 levels in the atmosphere through burning fossil fuels. But the project's outreach components also includes a "Science Pub" in a converted theater in Portland, where the audience consumes food, drink and climate science, and "Adventures of a Climate Scientist in the Age of Politics and Punditry," a dynamic live performance recorded for TV and the web. Messaging includes a Navy Rear Admiral in dress whites explaining why the Pentagon believes climate change is real, and scenes showing Marines and Army implementing solar technologies to enhance mission security and reduce their carbon bootprint. Similarly, outreach events at the North Carolina Museum of Natural

  11. Multi-Sensing system for outdoor thermal monitoring: Application to large scale civil engineering components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Manceau, Jean-Luc; Perez, Laetitia; Bourquin, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Aging of transport infrastructures combined with traffic and climatic solicitations contribute to the reduction of their performances. To address and quantify the resilience of civil engineering structure, investigations on robust, fast and efficient methods are required. Among research works carried out at IFSTTAR, methods for long term monitoring face an increasing demand. Such works take benefits of this last decade technological progresses in ICT domain. The present study follows the ISTIMES European project [1], which aimed at demonstrate the ability of different electromagnetic sensing techniques, processing methods and ICT architecture, to be used for long term monitoring of critical transport infrastructures. Thanks to this project a multi-sensing techniques system, able to date and synchronize measurements carried out by infrared thermography coupled with various measurements data (i.e. weather parameters), have been designed, developed and implemented on real site [2]. Among experiments carried out on real transport infrastructure, it has been shown, for the "Musmesci" bridge deck (Italy), that by using infrared thermal image sequence with weather measurements during sevral days it was possible to develop analysis methods able to produce qualitative and quantitative data [3]. In the present study, added functionalities were designed and added to the "IrLAW" system in order to reach full autonomy in term of power supply, very long term measurement capability (at least 1 year) and automated data base feeding. The surveyed civil engineering structures consist in two concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T weight each. One of the two beams was damage by high energy mechanical impact at the IFSTTAR falling rocks test station facilities located in the French Alpes [4]. The system is composed of one IR uncooled microbolometric camera (FLIR SC325) with a 320X240 Focal Plane Array detector in band III, a weather station VAISALA WXT520, a GPS, a failover power supply

  12. The Himalaya-Bengal Fan source to sink system - new insights by correlation of re-processed seismic data and IODP Expedition 354 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Fenna; Schwenk, Tilmann; Spiess, Volkard; France-Lanord, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The Bengal Fan, hosted in the northern Indian Ocean, is the largest submarine fan on Earth. Fan evolution started in the Early Eocene as a direct response to the collision of India with the Asian continent in Middle Paleocene times. Subsequently the Himalayan plateau uplift was initiated. Thereby generated interactions with the regional climate caused the evolution of the Indian monsoonal system. Drained by the rivers Ganges and Brahmaputra, ~ 80% of eroded Himalayan sediments are deposited in the Bengal Fan. Hence, the Fan provides the most complete record of the Himalayan history and is well suited to investigate the direct link between the tectonic uplift and the climate evolution of the region. Sediments are transported onto the deep sea fan by turbidity currents building up chan-nel-levee systems. These channel-levee systems are the main architectural elements of the Bengal Fan and are suspected to have their onset in Late Miocene times. Frequent channel avulsion on the upper fan led to the abandonment of old channels and formation of new channel-levee systems or even channel-reoccupation. This complex erosional/depositional system involves lateral depocenter migration, probably on millennial timescales. Conse-quently, investigations of the Himalaya as sediment source begins with a comprehensive understanding of transport, deposition and modification within the Bengal Fan sediment sink. In February/March 2015 the IODP Expedition 354 drilled at 7 sites along a ~320 km long E-W transect at 8° N. Aiming at the recovery of pre-fan deposits and deposits of the Pliocene and Upper Miocene Fan evolution, three deep sites (900 - 1200 mbsf) were realized. These where complemented by four shallow sites (200-300 mbsf) for a detailed study of the depos-its of the last 1-2 million years, including the latest known channel activities (Holocene times). Several channel-levee systems and inter-channel deposits were drilled, active at different times of Fan evolution. To

  13. Revolutionary visible and infrared sensor detectors for the most advanced astronomical AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guieu, Sylvain; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric D.; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Coussement, Jérome; Kolb, Johann; Hubin, Norbert; Derelle, Sophie; Robert, Clélia; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Rochat, Sylvain; Delpoulbé, Alain; Lebouqun, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    We report in this paper decisive advance on the detector development for the astronomical applications that require very fast operation. Since the CCD220 and OCAM2 major success, new detector developments started in Europe either for visible and IR wavelengths. Funded by ESO and the FP7 Opticon European network, the NGSD CMOS device is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with strong ESO involvement. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate and providing digital outputs. A camera development, based on this CMOS device and also funded by the Opticon European network, is ongoing. Another major AO wavefront sensing detector development concerns IR detectors based on Avalanche Photodiode (e- APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter offers a 320x255 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3 microns, with less than 2 e readout noise at 1600 fps. A rectangular window can also be programmed to speed up even more the frame rate when the full frame readout is not required. The high QE response, in the range of 70%, is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using pulse tube cryocoolers was developed in the frame of this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. The characterization results of this device are presented here. Readout noise as low as 1.7 e at 1600 fps has been measured with a 3 microns wavelength cut-off chip and a multiplication gain of 14 obtained with a limited photodiode polarization of 8V. This device also exhibits excellent linearity, lower than 1%. The pulse tube cooling allows smart and easy cooling down to 55 K. Vibrations investigations using centroiding and FFT measurements were performed proving that the miniature pulse tube does not induce measurable vibrations to the optical bench, allowing use of this

  14. Assessing vulnerability to vegetation growth on earth dikes using geophysical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Benjamin; Saracco, Ginette; Peyras, Laurent; Vennetier, Michel; Mériaux, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Basin is prone to a plethora of natural hazards including floods. Vegetation growth in hydraulic earth structures, such as flood protections or channel levees and dams, may induce several degradation mechanisms leading to a risk of failure. Typically, trees' rooting generates two types of risks: internal erosion from root development in earth embankments, and external erosion (slopes and crest) which is often related to trees uprooting. To better assess how woody vegetation can compromise levee integrity, we designed a methodology using acoustical and complex electrical tomography as non destructives methods to spot dangerous roots in the embankment. Our work has been first initiated during laboratory experiments; we performed soundings in controlled conditions to determine both acoustical and electrical intrinsic behavior of our root samples. By comparison with soil samples we expected to point out specific signatures that would be useful for the roots anomaly identification in real conditions. Measurements were repeated on several samples to ensure statistical interpretation. With help of an ultrasonic transmission device, we identified significant relative velocity differences of compressional waves propagation between soil and root samples. We also studied spectral properties using wavelet processing method as an additional parameter of root distinction with the surrounding soil. In the case of electrical soundings, complex resistivity was measured and we computed resistivity spectra. Amplitude of resistivity term showed us that root material behaves as an insulator compared to the soil. With the phase resistivity term information, root can also be seen as an electric power capacitance and reveals maximum polarization effect located around 1Hz. Then, as experimental device for the field measurements, we selected a 320 cm high poplar (Populus) planted in a homogeneous loamy-clayed soil, which is the same soil used in laboratory experiment to

  15. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.

    2004-12-01

    the sensor and not to any film-based process. We have also shown that it is possible to regenerate the film by flushing with 1M KNO3 solution. Response curves were prepared from a single sensor by injecting different concentrations of ferrocyanide, monitoring the uptake, then regenerating the film and injecting the next concentration. To check reproducibility, a film was regenerated 10 times with almost no change in response. Film selectivity was demonstrated by adding a model cationic species, Ru(bipy)32+ to the ferrocyanide sample. Even at 10 times the ferrocyanide concentration, only a very small electrochemical signal and no optical signal due to the cation were observed. Additionally a competitive anion Ru(CN)64- could be distinguished from Fe(CN)64- based on the redox potential and absorbance spectrum differences between the two anions. Both species were preconcentrated into the film, and both could be electrochemically modulated simultaneously or individually. The films exhibited a linear absorbance response to ferrocyanide over the range 0.008-0.2mM. From 0.1mM ferrocyanide solution, the analyte was concentrated in a 320 nm thick film by a factor of {approx}6,000. The films have recently been used at PNNL to repeat cyclic voltammetry experiments with pertechnetate (TcO4) as previously performed with other candidate films. The results showed that the new films performed very well and better than films previously used, and showed reversible waves in the voltammogram with the film present where none appeared when a bare ITO-glass substrate was used. Our results clearly show that cross-linked quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) films made this way are superior materials for preconcentrating pertechnetate.

  16. Fullerenes, Organics and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    The status of DIB research has strongly advanced since 20 years [1], as well as the quest for fullerenes, PAHs and large organics in space. In 1994 we reported the discovery of two near IR diffuse bands coincident with C60+, confirmed in subsequent years [2-6] and now by latest laboratory experiments. A number of DIB observational studies have been published, dealing with: DIB surveys [1,7-10]; measurements of DIB families, correlations and environment dependences [11-14]; extragalactic DIBs [15, 16]. Resolved substructures were detected [17,18] and compared to predicted rotational contours by large molecules [19]. Polarisation studies provided upper limits constraints [20, 21]. DIBs carriers have been linked with organic molecules observed in the interstellar medium [22-25] such as IR bands (assigned to PAHs), Extended Red Emission or recently detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME, assigned to spinning dust) and with spectroscopic IR emission bands measured with ISO or Spitzer. Fullerenes and PAHs have been proposed to explain some DIBs and specific molecules were searched in DIB spectra [eg 2-6, 26-31]. These could be present in various dehydrogenation and ionisation conditions [32,33]. Experiments in the laboratory and in space [eg 34-36] allow to measure the survival and by-products of these molecules. We review DIB observational results and their interpretation, and discuss the presence of large organics, fullerenes, PAHs, graphenes in space. References [1] Herbig, G. 1995 ARA&A33, 19; [2] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1994 Natur 369, 296; [3] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1997 A&A317, L59; [4] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1995 ASSL202, 65; [5] Ehrenfreund, P., Foing, B. H. 1997 AdSpR19, 1033; [6] Galazutdinov, G. A. et al. 2000 MNRAS317, 750; [7] Jenniskens, P., Desert, F.-X. 1994 A&AS106, 39; [8] Ehrenfreund, P. et al. 1997 A&A318, L28; [9] Tuairisg, S. Ó. et al. 2000 A&AS142, 225; [10] Cox, N. et al. 2005 A&A438, 187; [11] Cami, J. et al. 1997A&A.326, 822

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of Cepheids in Magellanic Clouds (Moffett+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, T. J.; Gieren, W. P.; Barnes, T. G., III; Gomez, M.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper we present the new photometric data, demonstrate the consistency among the data obtained from CCD and aperture photometry, and determine improved periods for all of the variables. In follow-up papers we will use these observations to determine individual Cepheid distances and radii from the visual surface brightness technique and also from the infrared surface brightness technique (Welch 1994AJ....108.1421W; Fouque & Gieren 1997A&A...320..799F). Table 1 gives our final photometric results. All entries in Table 1 having B magnitudes are CCD observations (CTIO), and the ones lacking B magnitudes are photoelectric observations (ESO). The uncertainties in the CCD results are dominated by the uncertainty in the aperture correction. The standard deviation in the comparison stars on a particular image is typically +/-0.004 mag and always less than +/-0.01 mag. The aperture correction to the zero point of each frame is estimated to be better than +/-0.01 mag. We adopt +/-0.01 mag as the typical uncertainty in all magnitudes. For the photoelectric observations, we inferred the uncertainties from scatter in the observations of the Cepheids themselves, finding +/-0.010 mag in V and +/-0.012 mag in R and I. We combined our new photometry with existing photoelectric photometry from the literature to determine a new period for each Cepheid. This was greatly aided by the McMaster Cepheid Data Archive maintained by Doug Welch at http://www.physics.mcmaster.ca/Cepheid/. (The data reported here will be added to the McMaster archive.) Periods were found using an algorithm due to T. Deeming given in Bopp et al. (1970MNRAS.147..355B) and are listed in Table 2. The uncertainty of each period is reflected in the number of digits given in the table. For most of the Cepheids in our sample, the new periods lead to excellent light curves of very low scatter, which indicates that the periods for these variables are both correct and stable over the time of our observations. For

  18. Dryden F-8 Research Aircraft Fleet 1973 in flight, DFBW and SCW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (left) and F-8 Supercritical Wing in flight. These two aircraft fundamentally changed the nature of aircraft design. The F-8 DFBW pioneered digital flight controls and led to such computer-controlled airacrft as the F-117A, X-29, and X-31. Airliners such as the Boeing 777 and Airbus A320 also use digital fly-by-wire systems. The other aircraft is a highly modified F-8A fitted with a supercritical wing. Dr. Richard T. Whitcomb of Langley Research Center originated the supercritical wing concept in the late 1960s. (Dr. Whitcomb also developed the concept of the 'area rule' in the early 1950s. It singificantly reduced transonic drag.) The F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) flight research project validated the principal concepts of all-electric flight control systems now used on nearly all modern high-performance aircraft and on military and civilian transports. The first flight of the 13-year project was on May 25, 1972, with research pilot Gary E. Krier at the controls of a modified F-8C Crusader that served as the testbed for the fly-by-wire technologies. The project was a joint effort between the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) and Langley Research Center. It included a total of 211 flights. The last flight was December 16, 1985, with Dryden research pilot Ed Schneider at the controls. The F-8 DFBW system was the forerunner of current fly-by-wire systems used in the space shuttles and on today's military and civil aircraft to make them safer, more maneuverable, and more efficient. Electronic fly-by-wire systems replaced older hydraulic control systems, freeing designers to design aircraft with reduced in-flight stability. Fly-by-wire systems are safer because of their redundancies. They are more maneuverable because computers can command more frequent adjustments than a human pilot can. For airliners, computerized control ensures a smoother ride than a human pilot alone can provide

  19. Water-level altitudes 2010 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2009 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    -foot rise (2009-10), from a 25-foot decline to a 35-foot rise (2005-10), from a 40-foot decline to an 80-foot rise (1990-2010), and from a 140-foot decline to a 200-foot rise (1977-2010). In 2010, water-level-altitude contours for the Evangeline aquifer ranged from 300 feet below datum in north-central Harris County to 200 feet above datum at the boundary of Waller, Montgomery, and Grimes Counties. Water-level-altitude changes in the Evangeline aquifer ranged from a 58-foot decline to a 69-foot rise (2009-10), from an 80-foot decline to an 80-foot rise (2005-10), from a 200-foot decline to a 220-foot rise (1990-2010), and from a 320-foot decline to a 220-foot rise (1977-2010). In 2010, water-level-altitude contours for the Jasper aquifer ranged from 200 feet below datum in south-central Montgomery County to 250 feet above datum in eastern-central Grimes County. Water-level-altitude changes in the Jasper aquifer ranged from a 39-foot decline to a 39-foot rise (2009-10), from a 110-foot decline to no change (2005-10), and from a 180-foot decline to no change (2000-10). Compaction of subsurface materials (mostly in the clay layers) composing the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers was recorded continuously at 13 borehole extensometers at 11 sites. For the period of record beginning in 1973, or later, and ending in December 2009, cumulative clay compaction data measured by 12 extensometers ranged from 0.088 foot at the Texas City-Moses Lake site to 3.559 foot at the Addicks site. The rate of compaction varies from site to site because of differences in groundwater withdrawals near each site and differences among sites in the clay-to-sand ratio in the subsurface materials. Therefore, it is not possible to extrapolate or infer a rate of clay compaction for an area based on the rate of compaction measured at a nearby extensometer.

  20. Dryden F-8 Research Aircraft Fleet 1973 in flight, DFBW and SCW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (left) and F-8 Supercritical Wing in flight. These two aircraft fundamentally changed the nature of aircraft design. The F-8 DFBW pioneered digital flight controls and led to such computer-controlled airacrft as the F-117A, X-29, and X-31. Airliners such as the Boeing 777 and Airbus A320 also use digital fly-by-wire systems. The other aircraft is a highly modified F-8A fitted with a supercritical wing. Dr. Richard T. Whitcomb of Langley Research Center originated the supercritical wing concept in the late 1960s. (Dr. Whitcomb also developed the concept of the 'area rule' in the early 1950s. It singificantly reduced transonic drag.) The F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) flight research project validated the principal concepts of all-electric flight control systems now used on nearly all modern high-performance aircraft and on military and civilian transports. The first flight of the 13-year project was on May 25, 1972, with research pilot Gary E. Krier at the controls of a modified F-8C Crusader that served as the testbed for the fly-by-wire technologies. The project was a joint effort between the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) and Langley Research Center. It included a total of 211 flights. The last flight was December 16, 1985, with Dryden research pilot Ed Schneider at the controls. The F-8 DFBW system was the forerunner of current fly-by-wire systems used in the space shuttles and on today's military and civil aircraft to make them safer, more maneuverable, and more efficient. Electronic fly-by-wire systems replaced older hydraulic control systems, freeing designers to design aircraft with reduced in-flight stability. Fly-by-wire systems are safer because of their redundancies. They are more maneuverable because computers can command more frequent adjustments than a human pilot can. For airliners, computerized control ensures a smoother ride than a human pilot alone can provide