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Sample records for a32 modular polyketide

  1. Clearing the skies over modular polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L

    2006-09-19

    Modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) are large multifunctional proteins that synthesize complex polyketide metabolites in microbial cells. A series of recent studies confirm the close protein structural relationship between catalytic domains in the type I mammalian fatty acid synthase (FAS) and the basic synthase unit of the modular PKS. They also establish a remarkable similarity in the overall organization of the type I FAS and the PKS module. This information provides important new conclusions about catalytic domain architecture, function, and molecular recognition that are essential for future efforts to engineer useful polyketide metabolites with valuable biological activities.

  2. Engineering modular polyketide synthases for production of biofuels and industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenlong; Zhang, Wenjun

    2018-04-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are one of the most profound biosynthetic factories for producing polyketides with diverse structures and biological activities. These enzymes have been historically studied and engineered to make un-natural polyketides for drug discovery, and have also recently been explored for synthesizing biofuels and industrial chemicals due to their versatility and customizability. Here, we review recent advances in the mechanistic understanding and engineering of modular PKSs for producing polyketide-derived chemicals, and provide perspectives on this relatively new application of PKSs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biochemical and Structural Basis for Controlling Chemical Modularity in Fungal Polyketide Biosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Winter, Jaclyn M.; Cascio, Duilio; Dietrich, David; ...

    2015-07-14

    Modular collaboration between iterative fungal polyketide synthases (IPKSs) is an important mechanism for generating structural diversity of polyketide natural products. Inter-PKS communication and substrate channeling are controlled in large by the starter unit acyl carrier protein transacylase (SAT) domain found in the accepting IPKS module. Here in this study, we reconstituted the modular biosynthesis of the benzaldehyde core of the chaetoviridin and chaetomugilin azaphilone natural products using the IPKSs CazF and CazM. Our studies revealed a critical role of CazM’s SAT domain in selectively transferring a highly reduced triketide product from CazF. In contrast, a more oxidized triketide that ismore » also produced by CazF and required in later stages of biosynthesis of the final product is not recognized by the SAT domain. The structural basis for the acyl unit selectivity was uncovered by the first X-ray structure of a fungal SAT domain, highlighted by a covalent hexanoyl thioester intermediate in the SAT active site. Finally, the crystal structure of SAT domain will enable protein engineering efforts aimed at mixing and matching different IPKS modules for the biosynthesis of new compounds.« less

  4. ClusterCAD: a computational platform for type I modular polyketide synthase design

    DOE PAGES

    Eng, Clara H.; Backman, Tyler W H; Bailey, Constance B.; ...

    2017-10-11

    Here, we present ClusterCAD, a web-based toolkit designed to leverage the collinear structure and deterministic logic of type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) for synthetic biology applications. The unique organization of these megasynthases, combined with the diversity of their catalytic domain building blocks, has fueled an interest in harnessing the biosynthetic potential of PKSs for the microbial production of both novel natural product analogs and industrially relevant small molecules. However, a limited theoretical understanding of the determinants of PKS fold and function poses a substantial barrier to the design of active variants, and identifying strategies to reliably construct functional PKSmore » chimeras remains an active area of research. In this work, we formalize a paradigm for the design of PKS chimeras and introduce ClusterCAD as a computational platform to streamline and simplify the process of designing experiments to test strategies for engineering PKS variants. ClusterCAD provides chemical structures with stereochemistry for the intermediates generated by each PKS module, as well as sequence- and structure-based search tools that allow users to identify modules based either on amino acid sequence or on the chemical structure of the cognate polyketide intermediate. ClusterCAD can be accessed at https://clustercad.jbei.org and at http://clustercad.igb.uci.edu.« less

  5. ClusterCAD: a computational platform for type I modular polyketide synthase design

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, Clara H.; Backman, Tyler W H; Bailey, Constance B.

    Here, we present ClusterCAD, a web-based toolkit designed to leverage the collinear structure and deterministic logic of type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) for synthetic biology applications. The unique organization of these megasynthases, combined with the diversity of their catalytic domain building blocks, has fueled an interest in harnessing the biosynthetic potential of PKSs for the microbial production of both novel natural product analogs and industrially relevant small molecules. However, a limited theoretical understanding of the determinants of PKS fold and function poses a substantial barrier to the design of active variants, and identifying strategies to reliably construct functional PKSmore » chimeras remains an active area of research. In this work, we formalize a paradigm for the design of PKS chimeras and introduce ClusterCAD as a computational platform to streamline and simplify the process of designing experiments to test strategies for engineering PKS variants. ClusterCAD provides chemical structures with stereochemistry for the intermediates generated by each PKS module, as well as sequence- and structure-based search tools that allow users to identify modules based either on amino acid sequence or on the chemical structure of the cognate polyketide intermediate. ClusterCAD can be accessed at https://clustercad.jbei.org and at http://clustercad.igb.uci.edu.« less

  6. Bio-based production of fuels and industrial chemicals by repurposing antibiotic-producing type I modular polyketide synthases: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Satoshi; Keasling, Jay D; Katz, Leonard

    2017-04-01

    Complex polyketides comprise a large number of natural products that have broad application in medicine and agriculture. They are produced in bacteria and fungi from large enzyme complexes named type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) that are composed of multifunctional polypeptides containing discrete enzymatic domains organized into modules. The modular nature of PKSs has enabled a multitude of efforts to engineer the PKS genes to produce novel polyketides of predicted structure. We have repurposed PKSs to produce a number of short-chain mono- and di-carboxylic acids and ketones that could have applications as fuels or industrial chemicals.

  7. Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis of Acyltransferase Domain Exchanges in Modular Polyketide Synthases and Its Application for Short-Chain Ketone Production

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, Satoshi; Deng, Kai; Wang, George

    2016-08-22

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) are polymerases that utilize acyl-CoAs as substrates. Each polyketide elongation reaction is catalyzed by a set of protein domains called a module. Each module usually contains an acyltransferase (AT) domain, which determines the specific acyl-CoA incorporated into each condensation reaction. Although a successful exchange of individual AT domains can lead to the biosynthesis of a large variety of novel compounds, hybrid PKS modules often show significantly decreased activities. Using monomodular PKSs as models, we have systematically analyzed in this paper the segments of AT domains and associated linkers in AT exchanges in vitro andmore » have identified the boundaries within a module that can be used to exchange AT domains while maintaining protein stability and enzyme activity. Importantly, the optimized domain boundary is highly conserved, which facilitates AT domain replacements in most type I PKS modules. To further demonstrate the utility of the optimized AT domain boundary, we have constructed hybrid PKSs to produce industrially important short-chain ketones. Our in vitro and in vivo analysis demonstrated production of predicted ketones without significant loss of activities of the hybrid enzymes. Finally, these results greatly enhance the mechanistic understanding of PKS modules and prove the benefit of using engineered PKSs as a synthetic biology tool for chemical production.« less

  8. Role of Modular Polyketide Synthases in the Production of Polyether Ladder Compounds in Ciguatoxin-Producing Gambierdiscus polynesiensis and G. excentricus (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Kohli, Gurjeet S; Campbell, Katrina; John, Uwe; Smith, Kirsty F; Fraga, Santiago; Rhodes, Lesley L; Murray, Shauna A

    2017-09-01

    Gambierdiscus, a benthic dinoflagellate, produces ciguatoxins that cause the human illness Ciguatera. Ciguatoxins are polyether ladder compounds that have a polyketide origin, indicating that polyketide synthases (PKS) are involved in their production. We sequenced transcriptomes of Gambierdiscus excentricus and Gambierdiscus polynesiensis and found 264 contigs encoding single domain ketoacyl synthases (KS; G. excentricus: 106, G. polynesiensis: 143) and ketoreductases (KR; G. excentricus: 7, G. polynesiensis: 8) with sequence similarity to type I PKSs, as reported in other dinoflagellates. In addition, 24 contigs (G. excentricus: 3, G. polynesiensis: 21) encoding multiple PKS domains (forming typical type I PKSs modules) were found. The proposed structure produced by one of these megasynthases resembles a partial carbon backbone of a polyether ladder compound. Seventeen contigs encoding single domain KS, KR, s-malonyltransacylase, dehydratase and enoyl reductase with sequence similarity to type II fatty acid synthases (FAS) in plants were found. Type I PKS and type II FAS genes were distinguished based on the arrangement of domains on the contigs and their sequence similarity and phylogenetic clustering with known PKS/FAS genes in other organisms. This differentiation of PKS and FAS pathways in Gambierdiscus is important, as it will facilitate approaches to investigating toxin biosynthesis pathways in dinoflagellates. © 2017 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2017 International Society of Protistologists.

  9. The type I fatty acid and polyketide synthases: a tale of two megasynthases

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    This review chronicles the synergistic growth of the fields of fatty acid and polyketide synthesis over the last century. In both animal fatty acid synthases and modular polyketide synthases, similar catalytic elements are covalently linked in the same order in megasynthases. Whereas in fatty acid synthases the basic elements of the design remain immutable, guaranteeing the faithful production of saturated fatty acids, in the modular polyketide synthases, the potential of the basic design has been exploited to the full for the elaboration of a wide range of secondary metabolites of extraordinary structural diversity. PMID:17898897

  10. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  11. The Structural Enzymology of Iterative Aromatic Polyketide Synthases: A Critical Comparison with Fatty Acid Synthases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shiou-Chuan Sheryl

    2018-06-20

    Polyketides are a large family of structurally complex natural products including compounds with important bioactivities. Polyketides are biosynthesized by polyketide synthases (PKSs), multienzyme complexes derived evolutionarily from fatty acid synthases (FASs). The focus of this review is to critically compare the properties of FASs with iterative aromatic PKSs, including type II PKSs and fungal type I nonreducing PKSs whose chemical logic is distinct from that of modular PKSs. This review focuses on structural and enzymological studies that reveal both similarities and striking differences between FASs and aromatic PKSs. The potential application of FAS and aromatic PKS structures for bioengineering future drugs and biofuels is highlighted.

  12. Toblerols: Cyclopropanol-Containing Polyketide Modulators of Antibiosis in Methylobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ueoka, Reiko; Bortfeld-Miller, Miriam; Morinaka, Brandon I; Vorholt, Julia A; Piel, Jörn

    2018-01-22

    Trans-AT polyketide synthases (PKSs) are a family of biosynthetically versatile modular type I PKSs that generate bioactive polyketides of impressive structural diversity. In this study, we detected, in the genome of several bacteria a cryptic, architecturally unusual trans-AT PKS gene cluster which eluded automated PKS prediction. Genomic mining of one of these strains, the model methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, revealed unique epoxide- and cyclopropanol-containing polyketides named toblerols. Relative and absolute stereochemistry were determined by NMR experiments, chemical derivatization, and the comparison of CD data between the derivatized natural product and a synthesized model compound. Biosynthetic data suggest that the cyclopropanol moiety is generated by carbon-carbon shortening of a more extended precursor. Surprisingly, a knock-out strain impaired in polyketide production showed strong inhibitory activity against other methylobacteria in contrast to the wild-type producer. The activity was inhibited by complementation with toblerols, thus suggesting that these compounds modulate an as-yet unknown methylobacterial antibiotic. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Steps towards the synthetic biology of polyketide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Matthew; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2014-02-01

    Nature is providing a bountiful pool of valuable secondary metabolites, many of which possess therapeutic properties. However, the discovery of new bioactive secondary metabolites is slowing down, at a time when the rise of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the realization of acute and long-term side effects of widely used drugs lead to an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Approaches such as synthetic biology are promising to deliver a much-needed boost to secondary metabolite drug development through plug-and-play optimized hosts and refactoring novel or cryptic bacterial gene clusters. Here, we discuss this prospect focusing on one comprehensively studied class of clinically relevant bioactive molecules, the polyketides. Extensive efforts towards optimization and derivatization of compounds via combinatorial biosynthesis and classical engineering have elucidated the modularity, flexibility and promiscuity of polyketide biosynthetic enzymes. Hence, a synthetic biology approach can build upon a solid basis of guidelines and principles, while providing a new perspective towards the discovery and generation of novel and new-to-nature compounds. We discuss the lessons learned from the classical engineering of polyketide synthases and indicate their importance when attempting to engineer biosynthetic pathways using synthetic biology approaches for the introduction of novelty and overexpression of products in a controllable manner. © 2013 The Authors FEMS Microbiology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. Diversity-oriented combinatorial biosynthesis of benzenediol lactone scaffolds by subunit shuffling of fungal polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuquan; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Shuwei; Espinosa-Artiles, Patricia; Wang, Luoyi; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Zhan, Jixun; Molnár, István

    2014-08-26

    Combinatorial biosynthesis aspires to exploit the promiscuity of microbial anabolic pathways to engineer the synthesis of new chemical entities. Fungal benzenediol lactone (BDL) polyketides are important pharmacophores with wide-ranging bioactivities, including heat shock response and immune system modulatory effects. Their biosynthesis on a pair of sequentially acting iterative polyketide synthases (iPKSs) offers a test case for the modularization of secondary metabolic pathways into "build-couple-pair" combinatorial synthetic schemes. Expression of random pairs of iPKS subunits from four BDL model systems in a yeast heterologous host created a diverse library of BDL congeners, including a polyketide with an unnatural skeleton and heat shock response-inducing activity. Pairwise heterocombinations of the iPKS subunits also helped to illuminate the innate, idiosyncratic programming of these enzymes. Even in combinatorial contexts, these biosynthetic programs remained largely unchanged, so that the iPKSs built their cognate biosynthons, coupled these building blocks into chimeric polyketide intermediates, and catalyzed intramolecular pairing to release macrocycles or α-pyrones. However, some heterocombinations also provoked stuttering, i.e., the relaxation of iPKSs chain length control to assemble larger homologous products. The success of such a plug and play approach to biosynthesize novel chemical diversity bodes well for bioprospecting unnatural polyketides for drug discovery.

  15. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  16. Structure and function of polyketide biosynthetic enzymes: various strategies for production of structurally diverse polyketides.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa

    2017-12-01

    Polyketides constitute a large family of natural products that display various biological activities. Polyketides exhibit a high degree of structural diversity, although they are synthesized from simple acyl building blocks. Recent biochemical and structural studies provide a better understanding of the biosynthetic logic of polyketide diversity. This review highlights the biosynthetic mechanisms of structurally unique polyketides, β-amino acid-containing macrolactams, enterocin, and phenolic lipids. Functional and structural studies of macrolactam biosynthetic enzymes have revealed the unique biosynthetic machinery used for selective incorporation of a rare β-amino acid starter unit into the polyketide skeleton. Biochemical and structural studies of cyclization enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of enterocin and phenolic lipids provide mechanistic insights into how these enzymes diversify the carbon skeletons of their products.

  17. Polyketides, toxins and pigments in Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Tam, Emily W T; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-30

    Penicillium marneffei (synonym: Talaromyces marneffei) is the most important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus in China and Southeastern Asia. The HIV/AIDS pandemic, particularly in China and other Southeast Asian countries, has led to the emergence of P. marneffei infection as an important AIDS-defining condition. Recently, we published the genome sequence of P. marneffei. In the P. marneffei genome, 23 polyketide synthase genes and two polyketide synthase-non-ribosomal peptide synthase hybrid genes were identified. This number is much higher than those of Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum, important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungi in the Western world. Phylogenetically, these polyketide synthase genes were distributed evenly with their counterparts found in Aspergillus species and other fungi, suggesting that polyketide synthases in P. marneffei did not diverge from lineage-specific gene duplication through a recent expansion. Gene knockdown experiments and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that at least four of the polyketide synthase genes were involved in the biosynthesis of various pigments in P. marneffei, including melanin, mitorubrinic acid, mitorubrinol, monascorubrin, rubropunctatin, citrinin and ankaflavin, some of which were mycotoxins and virulence factors of the fungus.

  18. Atlas of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthetic pathways reveals common occurrence of nonmodular enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Fewer, David P; Holm, Liisa; Rouhiainen, Leo; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-06-24

    Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides are a diverse group of natural products with complex chemical structures and enormous pharmaceutical potential. They are synthesized on modular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme complexes by a conserved thiotemplate mechanism. Here, we report the widespread occurrence of NRPS and PKS genetic machinery across the three domains of life with the discovery of 3,339 gene clusters from 991 organisms, by examining a total of 2,699 genomes. These gene clusters display extraordinarily diverse organizations, and a total of 1,147 hybrid NRPS/PKS clusters were found. Surprisingly, 10% of bacterial gene clusters lacked modular organization, and instead catalytic domains were mostly encoded as separate proteins. The finding of common occurrence of nonmodular NRPS differs substantially from the current classification. Sequence analysis indicates that the evolution of NRPS machineries was driven by a combination of common descent and horizontal gene transfer. We identified related siderophore NRPS gene clusters that encoded modular and nonmodular NRPS enzymes organized in a gradient. A higher frequency of the NRPS and PKS gene clusters was detected from bacteria compared with archaea or eukarya. They commonly occurred in the phyla of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria in bacteria and the phylum of Ascomycota in fungi. The majority of these NRPS and PKS gene clusters have unknown end products highlighting the power of genome mining in identifying novel genetic machinery for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.

  19. Lessons from 455 Fusarium polyketide synthases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In fungi, polyketide synthases (PKSs) synthesize a structurally diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs) with a range of biological activities. The most studied SMs are toxic to animals and/or plants, alter plant growth, have beneficial pharmaceutical activities, and/or are brightly colored pigm...

  20. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  1. Producing alpha-olefins using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Katz, Leonard; Steen, Eric J.

    2018-01-02

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an .alpha.-olefin, such as 1-hexene or butadiene. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the .alpha.-olefin.

  2. Evolution of polyketide synthesis in a Dothideomycete forest pathogen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungal secondary metabolites have many important biological roles and some, like the toxic polyketide aflatoxin, have been intensively studied at the genetic level. Complete sets of polyketide synthase (PKS) genes can now be identified in fungal pathogens by whole genome sequencing and studied in or...

  3. MCAT is not required for in vitro polyketide synthesis in a minimal actinorhodin polyketide synthase from Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Matharu, A L; Cox, R J; Crosby, J; Byrom, K J; Simpson, T J

    1998-12-01

    It has been proposed that Streptomyces malonyl CoA: holo acyl carrier protein transacylases (MCATs) provide a link between fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. Two recent studies have provided evidence that the presence of MCAT is essential for polyketide synthesis to proceed in reconstituted minimal polyketide synthases (PKSs). In contrast to this, we previously showed that the holo acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) from type II PKSs are capable of catalytic self-malonylation in the presence of malonyl CoA, which suggests that MCAT might not be necessary for polyketide biosynthesis. We reconstituted a homologous actinorhodin (act) type II minimal PKS in vitro. When act holo-ACP is present in limiting concentrations, MCAT is required by the synthase complex in order for polyketide biosynthesis to proceed. When holo-ACP is present in excess, however, efficient polyketide synthesis proceeds without MCAT. The rate of polyketide production increases with holo-ACP concentration, but at low ACP concentration or equimolar AC:KS:CLF (KS, ketosynthase; CLF, chain length determining factor) concentrations this rate is significantly lower than expected, indicating that free holo-ACP is sequestered by the KS/CLF complex. The rate of polyketide biosynthesis is dictated by the ratio of holo-ACP to KS and CLF, as well as by the total protein concentration. There is no absolute requirement for MCAT in polyketide biosynthesis in vitro, although the role of MCAT during polyketide synthesis in vivo remains an open question. MCAT might be responsible for the rate enhancement of malonyl transfer at very low free holo-ACP concentrations or it could be required to catalyse the transfer of malonyl groups from malonyl CoA to sequestered holo-ACP.

  4. Engineered fungal polyketide biosynthesis in Pichia pastoris: a potential excellent host for polyketide production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyketides are one of the most important classes of secondary metabolites and usually make good drugs. Currently, heterologous production of fungal polyketides for developing a high potential industrial application system with high production capacity and pharmacutical feasibility was still at its infancy. Pichia pastoris is a highly successful system for the high production of a variety of heterologous proteins. In this work, we aim to develop a P. pastoris based in vivo fungal polyketide production system for first time and evaluate its feasibility for future industrial application. Results A recombinant P. pastoris GS115-NpgA-ATX with Aspergillus nidulans phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase) gene npgA and Aspergillus terrus 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA) synthase (6-MSAS) gene atX was constructed. A specific compound was isolated and idenified as 6-MSA by HPLC, LC-MS and NMR. Transcription of both genes were detected. In 5-L bioreactor, the GS115-NpgA-ATX grew well and produced 6-MSA quickly until reached a high value of 2.2 g/L by methanol induction for 20 hours. Thereafter, the cells turned to death ascribing to high concentration of antimicrobial 6-MSA. The distribution of 6-MSA changed that during early and late induction phase it existed more in supernatant while during intermediate stage it mainly located intracellular. Different from 6-MSA production strain, recombinant M. purpureus pksCT expression strains for citrinin intermediate production, no matter PksCT located in cytoplasm or in peroxisomes, did not produce any specfic compound. However, both npgA and pksCT transcripted effectively in cells and western blot analysis proved the expression of PPtase. Then the PPTase was expressed and purified, marked by fluorescent probes, and reacted with purified ACP domain and its mutant ACPm of PksCT. Fluoresence was only observed in ACP but not ACPm, indicating that the PPTase worked well with ACP to make it bioactive holo-ACP. Thus, some

  5. Engineered fungal polyketide biosynthesis in Pichia pastoris: a potential excellent host for polyketide production.

    PubMed

    Gao, Limei; Cai, Menghao; Shen, Wei; Xiao, Siwei; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2013-09-08

    Polyketides are one of the most important classes of secondary metabolites and usually make good drugs. Currently, heterologous production of fungal polyketides for developing a high potential industrial application system with high production capacity and pharmaceutical feasibility was still at its infancy. Pichia pastoris is a highly successful system for the high production of a variety of heterologous proteins. In this work, we aim to develop a P. pastoris based in vivo fungal polyketide production system for first time and evaluate its feasibility for future industrial application. A recombinant P. pastoris GS115-NpgA-ATX with Aspergillus nidulans phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase) gene npgA and Aspergillus terrus 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA) synthase (6-MSAS) gene atX was constructed. A specific compound was isolated and identified as 6-MSA by HPLC, LC-MS and NMR. Transcription of both genes were detected. In 5-L bioreactor, the GS115-NpgA-ATX grew well and produced 6-MSA quickly until reached a high value of 2.2 g/L by methanol induction for 20 hours. Thereafter, the cells turned to death ascribing to high concentration of antimicrobial 6-MSA. The distribution of 6-MSA changed that during early and late induction phase it existed more in supernatant while during intermediate stage it mainly located intracellular. Different from 6-MSA production strain, recombinant M. purpureus pksCT expression strains for citrinin intermediate production, no matter PksCT located in cytoplasm or in peroxisomes, did not produce any specific compound. However, both npgA and pksCT transcripted effectively in cells and western blot analysis proved the expression of PPtase. Then the PPTase was expressed and purified, marked by fluorescent probes, and reacted with purified ACP domain and its mutant ACPm of PksCT. Fluoresence was only observed in ACP but not ACPm, indicating that the PPTase worked well with ACP to make it bioactive holo-ACP. Thus, some other factors may

  6. Chip-based polyketide biosynthesis and functionalization.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bosung; Cha, Junhoe; Srinivasan, Aravind; Kwon, Seok Joon; Jeong, Jae-Choel; Sherman, David H; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate construction and novel compound synthesis from a synthetic metabolic pathway consisting of a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) known as 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase (THNS) from Streptomyces coelicolor and soybean peroxidase (SBP) in a microfluidic platform. THNS immobilized to Ni-NTA agarose beads is prepacked into a microfluidic channel, while SBP is covalently attached to the walls of a second microfluidic channel precoated with a reactive poly(maleic anhydride) derivative. The result is a tandem, two-step biochip that enables the synthesis of novel polyketide derivatives. The first microchannel, consisting of THNS, results in the conversion of malonyl-CoA to flaviolin in yields up to 40% with a residence time of 6 min. This conversion is similar to that obtained in several-milliliter batch reactions after 2 h. Linking this microchannel to the SBP microchannel results in biflaviolin synthesis. During the course of this work, we discovered that the substrate specificity of THNS could be manipulated by simply changing the reaction pH. As a result, the starter acyl-CoA specificity can be broadened to yield a series of truncated pyrone products. When combined with variations in the ratio of acyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA (extender substrate) feed rates, high yields of the pyrone products could be achieved, which is further structurally diversified from self- and cross-coupling in the SBP microchannel. The ability to rapidly evaluate the effects of reaction conditions and synthetic multienzyme pathways on a microfludic platform provides a new paradigm for performing metabolic pathway engineering, namely, the reconstruction of pathways for use in new compound discovery.

  7. Chemical Probes for the Functionalization of Polyketide Intermediates**

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Elena; Wilkening, Ina; Gazzola, Silvia; Li, W M Ariel; Smith, Luke; Leadlay, Peter F; Tosin, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    A library of functionalized chemical probes capable of reacting with ketosynthase-bound biosynthetic intermediates was prepared and utilized to explore in vivo polyketide diversification. Fermentation of ACP mutants of S. lasaliensis in the presence of the probes generated a range of unnatural polyketide derivatives, including novel putative lasalocid A derivatives characterized by variable aryl ketone moieties and linear polyketide chains (bearing alkyne/azide handles and fluorine) flanking the polyether scaffold. By providing direct information on microorganism tolerance and enzyme processing of unnatural malonyl-ACP analogues, as well as on the amenability of unnatural polyketides to further structural modifications, the chemical probes constitute invaluable tools for the development of novel mutasynthesis and synthetic biology. PMID:25212788

  8. Antibacterial polyketides from the jellyfish-derived fungus Paecilomyces variotii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Li, Famei; Kim, Eun La; Li, Jian Lin; Hong, Jongki; Bae, Kyung Sook; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Hyung Sik; Jung, Jee H

    2011-08-26

    Four new polyketides (1-4) were isolated from the fungus Paecilomyces variotii, which was derived from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. The planar structures and relative configurations of these polyketides were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including 2D NMR experiments. The compounds showed inhibitory activity against pathogenic bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 3089 and multi-drug-resistant Vibrio parahemolyticus 7001 with MIC values in the range 5-40 μg/mL.

  9. A crotonyl-CoA reductase-carboxylase independent pathway for assembly of unusual alkylmalonyl-CoA polyketide synthase extender units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Lauren; Valentic, Timothy R.; Miyazawa, Takeshi; Withall, David M.; Song, Lijiang; Milligan, Jacob C.; Osada, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Shunji; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Challis, Gregory L.

    2016-12-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases assemble diverse bioactive natural products. Such multienzymes typically use malonyl and methylmalonyl-CoA building blocks for polyketide chain assembly. However, in several cases more exotic alkylmalonyl-CoA extender units are also known to be incorporated. In all examples studied to date, such unusual extender units are biosynthesized via reductive carboxylation of α, β-unsaturated thioesters catalysed by crotonyl-CoA reductase/carboxylase (CCRC) homologues. Here we show using a chemically-synthesized deuterium-labelled mechanistic probe, and heterologous gene expression experiments that the unusual alkylmalonyl-CoA extender units incorporated into the stambomycin family of polyketide antibiotics are assembled by direct carboxylation of medium chain acyl-CoA thioesters. X-ray crystal structures of the unusual β-subunit of the acyl-CoA carboxylase (YCC) responsible for this reaction, alone and in complex with hexanoyl-CoA, reveal the molecular basis for substrate recognition, inspiring the development of methodology for polyketide bio-orthogonal tagging via incorporation of 6-azidohexanoic acid and 8-nonynoic acid into novel stambomycin analogues.

  10. Modular entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gualdi, Giulia; Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2011-02-04

    We introduce and discuss the concept of modular entanglement. This is the entanglement that is established between the end points of modular systems composed by sets of interacting moduli of arbitrarily fixed size. We show that end-to-end modular entanglement scales in the thermodynamic limit and rapidly saturates with the number of constituent moduli. We clarify the mechanisms underlying the onset of entanglement between distant and noninteracting quantum systems and its optimization for applications to quantum repeaters and entanglement distribution and sharing.

  11. Polyketide mimetics yield structural and mechanistic insights into product template domain function in nonreducing polyketide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Jesus F.; Shakya, Gaurav; Moreno, Gabriel; Rivera, Heriberto; Jackson, David R.; Topper, Caitlyn L.; Vagstad, Anna L.; La Clair, James J.; Townsend, Craig A.; Burkart, Michael D.; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Product template (PT) domains from fungal nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) are responsible for controlling the aldol cyclizations of poly-β-ketone intermediates assembled during the catalytic cycle. Our ability to understand the high regioselective control that PT domains exert is hindered by the inaccessibility of intrinsically unstable poly-β-ketones for in vitro studies. We describe here the crystallographic application of “atom replacement” mimetics in which isoxazole rings linked by thioethers mimic the alternating sites of carbonyls in the poly-β-ketone intermediates. We report the 1.8-Å cocrystal structure of the PksA PT domain from aflatoxin biosynthesis with a heptaketide mimetic tethered to a stably modified 4′-phosphopantetheine, which provides important empirical evidence for a previously proposed mechanism of PT-catalyzed cyclization. Key observations support the proposed deprotonation at C4 of the nascent polyketide by the catalytic His1345 and the role of a protein-coordinated water network to selectively activate the C9 carbonyl for nucleophilic addition. The importance of the 4′-phosphate at the distal end of the pantetheine arm is demonstrated to both facilitate delivery of the heptaketide mimetic deep into the PT active site and anchor one end of this linear array to precisely meter C4 into close proximity to the catalytic His1345. Additional structural features, docking simulations, and mutational experiments characterize protein–substrate mimic interactions, which likely play roles in orienting and stabilizing interactions during the native multistep catalytic cycle. These findings afford a view of a polyketide “atom-replaced” mimetic in a NR-PKS active site that could prove general for other PKS domains. PMID:28484029

  12. Synthetic biology approaches to fluorinated polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Thuronyi, Benjamin W.; Chang, Michelle C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus The catalytic diversity of living systems offers a broad range of opportunities for developing new methods to produce small molecule targets such as fuels, materials, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to providing cost-effective and renewable methods for large-scale commercial processes, the exploration of the unusual chemical phenotypes found in living organisms can also enable the expansion of chemical space for discovery of novel function by combining orthogonal attributes from both synthetic and biological chemistry. In this context, we have focused on the development of new fluorine chemistry using synthetic biology approaches. While fluorine has become an important feature in compounds of synthetic origin, the scope of biological fluorine chemistry in living systems is limited, with fewer than 20 organofluorine natural products identified to date. In order to expand the diversity of biosynthetically accessible organofluorines, we have begun to develop methods for the site-selective introduction of fluorine into complex natural products by engineering biosynthetic machinery to incorporate fluorinated building blocks. To gain insight into how both enzyme active sites and metabolic pathways can be evolved to manage and select for fluorinated compounds, we have studied one of the only characterized natural hosts for organofluorine biosynthesis, the soil microbe Streptomyces cattleya. This information provides a template for designing engineered organofluorine enzymes, pathways, and hosts and has allowed us to initiate construction of enzymatic and cellular pathways for the production of fluorinated polyketides. PMID:25719427

  13. Stalk cell differentiation without polyketides in the cellular slime mold.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukie G; Suarez, Teresa; Saito, Tamao

    2016-07-01

    Polyketides induce prestalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. In the double-knockout mutant of the SteelyA and B polyketide synthases, most of the pstA cells-the major part of the prestalk cells-are lost, and we show by whole mount in situ hybridization that expression of prestalk genes is also reduced. Treatment of the double-knockout mutant with the PKS inhibitor cerulenin gave a further reduction, but some pstA cells still remained in the tip region, suggesting the existence of a polyketide-independent subtype of pstA cells. The double-knockout mutant and cerulenin-treated parental Ax2 cells form fruiting bodies with fragile, single-cell layered stalks after cerulenin treatment. Our results indicate that most pstA cells are induced by polyketides, but the pstA cells at the very tip of the slug are induced in some other way. In addition, a fruiting body with a single-cell layered, vacuolated stalk can form without polyketides.

  14. Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides of Burkholderia: new compounds potentially implicated in biocontrol and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Pupin, Maude; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2017-05-25

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia live in various ecological niches and present a significant role in the environments through the excretion of a wide variety of secondary metabolites including modular nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). These metabolites represent a widely distributed biomedically and biocontrol important class of natural products including antibiotics, siderophores, and anticancers as well as biopesticides that are considered as a novel source that can be used to defend ecological niche from competitors and to promote plant growth. The aim of this review is to present all NRPs produced or potentially produced by strains of Burkholderia, as NRPs represent a major source of active compounds implicated in biocontrol. The review is a compilation of results from a large screening we have performed on 48 complete sequenced genomes available in NCBI to identify NRPS gene clusters, and data found in the literature mainly because some interesting compounds are produced by strains not yet sequenced. In addition to NRPs, hybrids NRPs/PKs are also included. Specific features about biosynthetic gene clusters and structures of the modular enzymes responsible for the synthesis, the biological activities, and the potential uses in agriculture and pharmaceutical of NRPs and hybrids NRPs/PKs will also be discussed.

  15. In vitro biosynthesis of unnatural enterocin and wailupemycin polyketides.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzis, John A; Cheng, Qian; Thomas, Paul M; Kelleher, Neil L; Moore, Bradley S

    2009-03-27

    Nature has evolved finely tuned strategies to synthesize rare and complex natural products such as the enterocin family of polyketides from the marine bacterium Streptomyces maritimus. Herein we report the directed ex vivo multienzyme syntheses of 24 unnatural 5-deoxyenterocin and wailupemycin F and G analogues, 18 of which are new. We have generated molecular diversity by priming the enterocin biosynthesis enzymes with unnatural substrates and have illustrated further the uniqueness of this type II polyketide synthase by way of exploiting its unusual starter unit biosynthesis pathways.

  16. Type III Polyketide Synthases: Discovery, Characterization, and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitel, Sheryl Beth Rubin

    2009-01-01

    The polyketides are a diverse group of natural products with important applications in medicine and industry. Industry, especially the pharmaceutical industry, is under pressure to deliver "greener" chemical syntheses that are less environmentally damaging and incorporate renewable resources. There exists potential to replace current…

  17. Evolutionary distinctiveness of fatty acid and polyketide synthesis in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Gurjeet S; John, Uwe; Van Dolah, Frances M; Murray, Shauna A

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids, which are essential cell membrane constituents and fuel storage molecules, are thought to share a common evolutionary origin with polyketide toxins in eukaryotes. While fatty acids are primary metabolic products, polyketide toxins are secondary metabolites that are involved in ecologically relevant processes, such as chemical defence, and produce the adverse effects of harmful algal blooms. Selection pressures on such compounds may be different, resulting in differing evolutionary histories. Surprisingly, some studies of dinoflagellates have suggested that the same enzymes may catalyse these processes. Here we show the presence and evolutionary distinctiveness of genes encoding six key enzymes essential for fatty acid production in 13 eukaryotic lineages for which no previous sequence data were available (alveolates: dinoflagellates, Vitrella, Chromera; stramenopiles: bolidophytes, chrysophytes, pelagophytes, raphidophytes, dictyochophytes, pinguiophytes, xanthophytes; Rhizaria: chlorarachniophytes, haplosporida; euglenids) and 8 other lineages (apicomplexans, bacillariophytes, synurophytes, cryptophytes, haptophytes, chlorophyceans, prasinophytes, trebouxiophytes). The phylogeny of fatty acid synthase genes reflects the evolutionary history of the organism, indicating selection to maintain conserved functionality. In contrast, polyketide synthase gene families are highly expanded in dinoflagellates and haptophytes, suggesting relaxed constraints in their evolutionary history, while completely absent from some protist lineages. This demonstrates a vast potential for the production of bioactive polyketide compounds in some lineages of microbial eukaryotes, indicating that the evolution of these compounds may have played an important role in their ecological success. PMID:26784357

  18. Engineered Biosynthesis of a Novel Amidated Polyketide, Using the Malonamyl-Specific Initiation Module from the Oxytetracycline Polyketide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Ames, Brian D.; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Tang, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Tetracyclines are aromatic polyketides biosynthesized by bacterial type II polyketide synthases (PKSs). Understanding the biochemistry of tetracycline PKSs is an important step toward the rational and combinatorial manipulation of tetracycline biosynthesis. To this end, we have sequenced the gene cluster of oxytetracycline (oxy and otc genes) PKS genes from Streptomyces rimosus. Sequence analysis revealed a total of 21 genes between the otrA and otrB resistance genes. We hypothesized that an amidotransferase, OxyD, synthesizes the malonamate starter unit that is a universal building block for tetracycline compounds. In vivo reconstitution using strain CH999 revealed that the minimal PKS and OxyD are necessary and sufficient for the biosynthesis of amidated polyketides. A novel alkaloid (WJ35, or compound 2) was synthesized as the major product when the oxy-encoded minimal PKS, the C-9 ketoreductase (OxyJ), and OxyD were coexpressed in CH999. WJ35 is an isoquinolone compound derived from an amidated decaketide backbone and cyclized with novel regioselectivity. The expression of OxyD with a heterologous minimal PKS did not afford similarly amidated polyketides, suggesting that the oxy-encoded minimal PKS possesses novel starter unit specificity. PMID:16597959

  19. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  20. The industrial anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum uses polyketides to regulate cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Herman, Nicolaus A; Kim, Seong Jong; Li, Jeffrey S; Cai, Wenlong; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Wenjun

    2017-11-15

    Polyketides are an important class of bioactive small molecules valued not only for their diverse therapeutic applications, but also for their role in controlling interesting biological phenotypes in their producing organisms. While numerous polyketides are known to be derived from aerobic organisms, only a single family of polyketides has been identified from anaerobic organisms. Here we uncover a family of polyketides native to the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum, an organism well-known for its historical use as an industrial producer of the organic solvents acetone, butanol, and ethanol. Through mutational analysis and chemical complementation assays, we demonstrate that these polyketides act as chemical triggers of sporulation and granulose accumulation in this strain. This study represents a significant addition to the body of work demonstrating the existence and importance of polyketides in anaerobes, and showcases a strategy of manipulating the secondary metabolism of an organism to improve traits relevant for industrial applications.

  1. Modular Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John; Miner, Paul S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Airplanes are certified as a whole: there is no established basis for separately certifying some components, particularly software-intensive ones, independently of their specific application in a given airplane. The absence of separate certification inhibits the development of modular components that could be largely "precertified" and used in several different contexts within a single airplane, or across many different airplanes. In this report, we examine the issues in modular certification of software components and propose an approach based on assume-guarantee reasoning. We extend the method from verification to certification by considering behavior in the presence of failures. This exposes the need for partitioning, and separation of assumptions and guarantees into normal and abnormal cases. We then identify three classes of property that must be verified within this framework: safe function, true guarantees, and controlled failure. We identify a particular assume-guarantee proof rule (due to McMillan) that is appropriate to the applications considered, and formally verify its soundness in PVS.

  2. Unexpected link between polyketide synthase and calcium carbonate biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Motoki; Omi, Ai; Hamanaka, Gen; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Shimada, Atsuko; Kondo, Mariko; Narita, Takanori; Kiyomoto, Masato; Katsuyama, Yohei; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Irie, Naoki; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate biominerals participate in diverse physiological functions. Despite intensive studies, little is known about how mineralization is initiated in organisms. We analyzed the medaka spontaneous mutant, ha, defective in otolith (calcareous ear stone) formation. ha lacks a trigger for otolith mineralization, and the causative gene was found to encode polyketide synthase (pks), a multifunctional enzyme mainly found in bacteria, fungi, and plant. Subsequent experiments demonstrate that the products of medaka PKS, most likely polyketides or their derivatives, act as nucleation facilitators in otolith mineralization. The generality of this novel PKS function is supported by the essential role of echinoderm PKS in calcareous skeleton formation together with the presence of PKSs in a much wider range of animals from coral to vertebrates. The present study first links PKS to biomineralization and provides a genetic cue for biogeochemistry of carbon and calcium cycles.

  3. Allergens/Antigens, toxins and polyketides of important Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Bhetariya, Preetida J; Madan, Taruna; Basir, Seemi Farhat; Varma, Anupam; Usha, Sarma P

    2011-04-01

    The medical, agricultural and biotechnological importance of the primitive eukaryotic microorganisms, the Fungi was recognized way back in 1920. Among various groups of fungi, the Aspergillus species are studied in great detail using advances in genomics and proteomics to unravel biological and molecular mechanisms in these fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus terreus are some of the important species relevant to human, agricultural and biotechnological applications. The potential of Aspergillus species to produce highly diversified complex biomolecules such as multifunctional proteins (allergens, antigens, enzymes) and polyketides is fascinating and demands greater insight into the understanding of these fungal species for application to human health. Recently a regulator gene for secondary metabolites, LaeA has been identified. Gene mining based on LaeA has facilitated new metabolites with antimicrobial activity such as emericellamides and antitumor activity such as terrequinone A from A. nidulans. Immunoproteomic approach was reported for identification of few novel allergens for A. fumigatus. In this context, the review is focused on recent developments in allergens, antigens, structural and functional diversity of the polyketide synthases that produce polyketides of pharmaceutical and biological importance. Possible antifungal drug targets for development of effective antifungal drugs and new strategies for development of molecular diagnostics are considered.

  4. Modular robot

    DOEpatents

    Ferrante, T.A.

    1997-11-11

    A modular robot may comprise a main body having a structure defined by a plurality of stackable modules. The stackable modules may comprise a manifold, a valve module, and a control module. The manifold may comprise a top surface and a bottom surface having a plurality of fluid passages contained therein, at least one of the plurality of fluid passages terminating in a valve port located on the bottom surface of the manifold. The valve module is removably connected to the manifold and selectively fluidically connects the plurality of fluid passages contained in the manifold to a supply of pressurized fluid and to a vent. The control module is removably connected to the valve module and actuates the valve module to selectively control a flow of pressurized fluid through different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. The manifold, valve module, and control module are mounted together in a sandwich-like manner and comprise a main body. A plurality of leg assemblies are removably connected to the main body and are removably fluidically connected to the fluid passages in the manifold so that each of the leg assemblies can be selectively actuated by the flow of pressurized fluid in different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. 12 figs.

  5. Modular robot

    DOEpatents

    Ferrante, Todd A.

    1997-01-01

    A modular robot may comprise a main body having a structure defined by a plurality of stackable modules. The stackable modules may comprise a manifold, a valve module, and a control module. The manifold may comprise a top surface and a bottom surface having a plurality of fluid passages contained therein, at least one of the plurality of fluid passages terminating in a valve port located on the bottom surface of the manifold. The valve module is removably connected to the manifold and selectively fluidically connects the plurality of fluid passages contained in the manifold to a supply of pressurized fluid and to a vent. The control module is removably connected to the valve module and actuates the valve module to selectively control a flow of pressurized fluid through different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. The manifold, valve module, and control module are mounted together in a sandwich-like manner and comprise a main body. A plurality of leg assemblies are removably connected to the main body and are removably fluidically connected to the fluid passages in the manifold so that each of the leg assemblies can be selectively actuated by the flow of pressurized fluid in different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold.

  6. Algal carbohydrates affect polyketide synthesis of the lichen-forming fungus Cladonia rangiferina.

    PubMed

    Elshobary, Mostafa E; Osman, Mohamed E; Abo-Shady, Atef M; Komatsu, Emy; Perreault, Hélène; Sorensen, John; Piercey-Normore, Michele D

    2016-01-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites (polyketides) are produced by the fungal partner, but the role of algal carbohydrates in polyketide biosynthesis is not clear. This study examined whether the type and concentration of algal carbohydrate explained differences in polyketide production and gene transcription by a lichen fungus (Cladonia rangiferina). The carbohydrates identified from a free-living cyanobacterium (Spirulina platensis; glucose), a lichen-forming alga (Diplosphaera chodatii; sorbitol) and the lichen alga that associates with C. rangiferina (Asterochloris sp.; ribitol) were used in each of 1%, 5% and 10% concentrations to enrich malt yeast extract media for culturing the mycobiont. Polyketides were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene transcription was measured by quantitative PCR of the ketosynthase domain of four PKS genes. The lower concentrations of carbohydrates induced the PKS gene expression where ribitol up-regulated CrPKS1 and CrPKS16 gene transcription and sorbitol up-regulated CrPKS3 and CrPKS7 gene transcription. The HPLC results revealed that lower concentrations of carbon sources increased polyketide production for three carbohydrates. One polyketide from the natural lichen thallus (fumarprotocetraric acid) also was produced by the fungal culture in ribitol supplemented media only. This study provides a better understanding of the role of the type and concentration of the carbon source in fungal polyketide biosynthesis in the lichen Cladonia rangiferina. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  7. Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

  8. Biosynthesis of oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles in polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerling, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the biosynthesis of heterocycles in polyketide natural products with a focus on oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles with ring sizes between 3 and 6 atoms. Heterocycles are abundant structural elements of natural products from all classes and they often contribute significantly to their biological activity. Progress in recent years has led to a much better understanding of their biosynthesis. In this context, plenty of novel enzymology has been discovered, suggesting that these pathways are an attractive target for future studies. PMID:27559404

  9. The Distant Siblings-A Phylogenomic Roadmap Illuminates the Origins of Extant Diversity in Fungal Aromatic Polyketide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Koczyk, Grzegorz; Dawidziuk, Adam; Popiel, Delfina

    2015-11-03

    In recent years, the influx of newly sequenced fungal genomes has enabled sampling of secondary metabolite biosynthesis on an unprecedented scale. However, explanations of extant diversity which take into account both large-scale phylogeny reconstructions and knowledge gained from multiple genome projects are still lacking. We analyzed the evolutionary sources of genetic diversity in aromatic polyketide biosynthesis in over 100 model fungal genomes. By reconciling the history of over 400 nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) with corresponding species history, we demonstrate that extant fungal NR-PKSs are clades of distant siblings, originating from a burst of duplications in early Pezizomycotina and thinned by extensive losses. The capability of higher fungi to biosynthesize the simplest precursor molecule (orsellinic acid) is highlighted as an ancestral trait underlying biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. This base activity was modified during early evolution of filamentous fungi, toward divergent reaction schemes associated with biosynthesis of, for example, aflatoxins and fusarubins (C4-C9 cyclization) or various anthraquinone derivatives (C6-C11 cyclization). The functional plasticity is further shown to have been supplemented by modularization of domain architecture into discrete pieces (conserved splice junctions within product template domain), as well as tight linkage of key accessory enzyme families and divergence in employed transcriptional factors. Although the majority of discord between species and gene history is explained by ancient duplications, this landscape has been altered by more recent duplications, as well as multiple horizontal gene transfers. The 25 detected transfers include previously undescribed events leading to emergence of, for example, fusarubin biosynthesis in Fusarium genus. Both the underlying data and the results of present analysis (including alternative scenarios revealed by sampling multiple reconciliation optima) are

  10. Polyketide synthases from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.).

    PubMed

    Hotti, Hannu; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Arvas, Mikko; Teeri, Teemu H; Rischer, Heiko

    2015-11-01

    Coniine is a toxic alkaloid, the biosynthesis of which is not well understood. A possible route, supported by evidence from labelling experiments, involves a polyketide formed by the condensation of one acetyl-CoA and three malonyl-CoAs catalysed by a polyketide synthase (PKS). We isolated PKS genes or their fragments from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.) by using random amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and transcriptome analysis, and characterized three full-length enzymes by feeding different starter-CoAs in vitro. On the basis of our in vitro experiments, two of the three characterized PKS genes in poison hemlock encode chalcone synthases (CPKS1 and CPKS2), and one encodes a novel type of PKS (CPKS5). We show that CPKS5 kinetically favours butyryl-CoA as a starter-CoA in vitro. Our results suggest that CPKS5 is responsible for the initiation of coniine biosynthesis by catalysing the synthesis of the carbon backbone from one butyryl-CoA and two malonyl-CoAs. © 2015 FEBS.

  11. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  12. Modular Fixturing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin Anderson (Inventor); Street, Jon P. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The modular fixturing system of the present invention is modular, reusable and capable of significant customization, both in terms of system radius and system height, allowing it to be arranged and rearranged in numerous unique configurations. The system includes multiple modular stanchions having stanchion shafts and stanchion feet that removably attach to apertures in a table. Angle brackets attached to the modular stanchions support shelves. These shelves in turn provide support to work pieces during fabrication processes such as welding.

  13. Portable modular detection system

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, James S [Rodeo, CA; Singh, Anup [Danville, CA; Throckmorton, Daniel J [Tracy, CA; Stamps, James F [Livermore, CA

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  14. Biosynthesis and molecular genetics of polyketides in marine dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Kellmann, Ralf; Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J S; Svendsen, Helene M; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2010-03-31

    Marine dinoflagellates are the single most important group of algae that produce toxins, which have a global impact on human activities. The toxins are chemically diverse, and include macrolides, cyclic polyethers, spirolides and purine alkaloids. Whereas there is a multitude of studies describing the pharmacology of these toxins, there is limited or no knowledge regarding the biochemistry and molecular genetics involved in their biosynthesis. Recently, however, exciting advances have been made. Expressed sequence tag sequencing studies have revealed important insights into the transcriptomes of dinoflagellates, whereas other studies have implicated polyketide synthase genes in the biosynthesis of cyclic polyether toxins, and the molecular genetic basis for the biosynthesis of paralytic shellfish toxins has been elucidated in cyanobacteria. This review summarises the recent progress that has been made regarding the unusual genomes of dinoflagellates, the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of dinoflagellate toxins. In addition, the evolution of these metabolic pathways will be discussed, and an outlook for future research and possible applications is provided.

  15. Polyketide biosynthesis in dinoflagellates: what makes it different?

    PubMed

    Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Satake, Masayuki; Wright, Jeffrey L C

    2014-09-01

    Dinoflagellates produce unique polyketides characterized by their size and complexity. The biosynthesis of a limited number of such metabolites has been reported, with studies largely hampered by the low yield of compounds and the severe scrambling of label in the isotopically-labeled precursors. Nonetheless, of the successful biosynthetic experiments that have been reported, many surprising and unique processes have been discovered. This knowledge has been accessed through a series of biochemical labeling studies, and while limited molecular genetic data has been amassed, it is still in the early stages of development. In an attempt to meet this challenge, this review has compared some of the biosynthetic processes with similar ones identified in other microbes such as bacteria and myxobacteria, with the idea that similar genes and enzymes are employed by dinoflagellates.

  16. Kibdelones: novel anticancer polyketides from a rare Australian actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Ranjala; Lacey, Ernest; Tennant, Shaun; Gill, Jennifer H; Capon, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    The kibdelones are a novel family of bioactive heterocyclic polyketides produced by a rare soil actinomycete, Kibdelosporangium sp. (MST-108465). Complete relative stereostructures were assigned to kibdelones A-C (1-3), kibdelone B rhamnoside (5), 13-oxokibdelone A (7), and 25-methoxy-24-oxokibdelone C (8) on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis and chemical interconversion, as well as mechanistic and biosynthetic considerations. Under mild conditions, kibdelones B (2) and C (3) undergo a facile equilibration to kibdelones A-C (1-3), while kibdelone B rhamnoside (5) equilibrates to a mixture of kibdelone A-C rhamnosides (4-6). A plausible mechanism for this equilibration is proposed and involves air oxidation, quinone/hydroquinone redox transformations, and a choreographed sequence of keto/enol tautomerizations that aromatize ring C via a quinone methide intermediate. Kibdelones exhibit potent and selective cytotoxicity against a panel of human tumor cell lines and display significant antibacterial and nematocidal activity.

  17. Use of a biosynthetic intermediate to explore the chemical diversity of pseudo-natural fungal polyketides.

    PubMed

    Asai, Teigo; Tsukada, Kento; Ise, Satomi; Shirata, Naoki; Hashimoto, Makoto; Fujii, Isao; Gomi, Katsuya; Nakagawara, Kosuke; Kodama, Eiichi N; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-09-01

    The structural complexity and diversity of natural products make them attractive sources for potential drug discovery, with their characteristics being derived from the multi-step combination of enzymatic and non-enzymatic conversions of intermediates in each biosynthetic pathway. Intermediates that exhibit multipotent behaviour have great potential for use as starting points in diversity-oriented synthesis. Inspired by the biosynthetic pathways that form complex metabolites from simple intermediates, we developed a semi-synthetic process that combines heterologous biosynthesis and artificial diversification. The heterologous biosynthesis of fungal polyketide intermediates led to the isolation of novel oligomers and provided evidence for ortho-quinonemethide equivalency in their isochromene form. The intrinsic reactivity of the isochromene polyketide enabled us to access various new chemical entities by modifying and remodelling the polyketide core and through coupling with indole molecules. We thus succeeded in generating exceptionally diverse pseudo-natural polyketides through this process and demonstrated an advanced method of using biosynthetic intermediates.

  18. Fumonisin-nonproducing mutants exhibit differential expression of putative polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters in Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides produces a group of polyketide derived secondary metabolites called fumonisins. Fumonisins can cause diseases in animals, and have been correlated epidemiologically with esophageal cancer and birth defects in humans. The fumonisin biosynthetic gene clust...

  19. Differential Expression of Putative Polyketide Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides can produce a number of polyketide derived secondary metabolites, including fumonisins. Fumonisins cause diseases in animals, and show epidemiological correlation with esophageal cancer and birth defects in humans. The F. verticillioides genome contains ...

  20. Use of a biosynthetic intermediate to explore the chemical diversity of pseudo-natural fungal polyketides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Teigo; Tsukada, Kento; Ise, Satomi; Shirata, Naoki; Hashimoto, Makoto; Fujii, Isao; Gomi, Katsuya; Nakagawara, Kosuke; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-09-01

    The structural complexity and diversity of natural products make them attractive sources for potential drug discovery, with their characteristics being derived from the multi-step combination of enzymatic and non-enzymatic conversions of intermediates in each biosynthetic pathway. Intermediates that exhibit multipotent behaviour have great potential for use as starting points in diversity-oriented synthesis. Inspired by the biosynthetic pathways that form complex metabolites from simple intermediates, we developed a semi-synthetic process that combines heterologous biosynthesis and artificial diversification. The heterologous biosynthesis of fungal polyketide intermediates led to the isolation of novel oligomers and provided evidence for ortho-quinonemethide equivalency in their isochromene form. The intrinsic reactivity of the isochromene polyketide enabled us to access various new chemical entities by modifying and remodelling the polyketide core and through coupling with indole molecules. We thus succeeded in generating exceptionally diverse pseudo-natural polyketides through this process and demonstrated an advanced method of using biosynthetic intermediates.

  1. Structure and Absolute Configuration of Jurassic Polyketide-Derived Spiroborate Pigments Obtained from Microgram Quantities.

    PubMed

    Wolkenstein, Klaus; Sun, Han; Falk, Heinz; Griesinger, Christian

    2015-10-28

    Complete structural elucidation of natural products is often challenging due to structural complexity and limited availability. This is true for present-day secondary metabolites, but even more for exceptionally preserved secondary metabolites of ancient organisms that potentially provide insights into the evolutionary history of natural products. Here, we report the full structure and absolute configuration of the borolithochromes, enigmatic boron-containing pigments from a Jurassic putative red alga, from samples of less than 50 μg using microcryoprobe NMR, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations and reveal their polyketide origin. The pigments are identified as spiroborates with two pentacyclic sec-butyl-trihydroxy-methyl-benzo[gh]tetraphen-one ligands and less-substituted derivatives. The configuration of the sec-butyl group is found to be (S). Because the exceptional benzo[gh]tetraphene scaffold is otherwise only observed in the recently discovered polyketide clostrubin from a present-day Clostridium bacterium, the Jurassic borolithochromes now can be unambiguously linked to the modern polyketide, providing evidence that the fossil pigments are almost originally preserved secondary metabolites and suggesting that the pigments in fact may have been produced by an ancient bacterium. The borolithochromes differ fundamentally from previously described boronated polyketides and represent the first boronated aromatic polyketides found so far. Our results demonstrate the potential of microcryoprobe NMR in the analysis of previously little-explored secondary metabolites from ancient organisms and reveal the evolutionary significance of clostrubin-type polyketides.

  2. The LINKS motif zippers trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines into a biosynthetic megacomplex.

    PubMed

    Gay, Darren C; Wagner, Drew T; Meinke, Jessica L; Zogzas, Charles E; Gay, Glen R; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T

    2016-03-01

    Polyketides such as the clinically-valuable antibacterial agent mupirocin are constructed by architecturally-sophisticated assembly lines known as trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases. Organelle-sized megacomplexes composed of several copies of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines have been observed by others through transmission electron microscopy to be located at the Bacillus subtilis plasma membrane, where the synthesis and export of the antibacterial polyketide bacillaene takes place. In this work we analyze ten crystal structures of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases ketosynthase domains, seven of which are reported here for the first time, to characterize a motif capable of zippering assembly lines into a megacomplex. While each of the three-helix LINKS (Laterally-INteracting Ketosynthase Sequence) motifs is observed to similarly dock with a spatially-reversed copy of itself through hydrophobic and ionic interactions, the amino acid sequences of this motif are not conserved. Such a code is appropriate for mediating homotypic contacts between assembly lines to ensure the ordered self-assembly of a noncovalent, yet tightly-knit, enzymatic network. LINKS-mediated lateral interactions would also have the effect of bolstering the vertical association of the polypeptides that comprise a polyketide synthase assembly line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The LINKS motif zippers trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines into a biosynthetic megacomplex

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Darren C.; Wagner, Drew T.; Meinke, Jessica L.; Zogzas, Charles E.; Gay, Glen R.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.

    2016-01-01

    Polyketides such as the clinically-valuable antibacterial agent mupirocin are constructed by architecturally-sophisticated assembly lines known as trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases. Organelle-sized megacomplexes composed of several copies of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines have been observed by others through transmission electron microscopy to be located at the Bacillus subtilis plasma membrane, where the synthesis and export of the antibacterial polyketide bacillaene takes place. In this work we analyze ten crystal structures of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases ketosynthase domains, seven of which are reported here for the first time, to characterize a motif capable of zippering assembly lines into a megacomplex. While each of the three-helix LINKS (Laterally-INteracting Ketosynthase Sequence) motifs is observed to similarly dock with a spatially-reversed copy of itself through hydrophobic and ionic interactions, the amino acid sequences of this motif are not conserved. Such a code is appropriate for mediating homotypic contacts between assembly lines to ensure the ordered self-assembly of a noncovalent, yet tightly-knit, enzymatic network. LINKS-mediated lateral interactions would also have the effect of bolstering the vertical association of the polypeptides that comprise a polyketide synthase assembly line. PMID:26724270

  4. Inhibition Kinetics and Emodin Cocrystal Structure of a Type II Polyketide Ketoreductase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Tyler Paz; Tan, Yuhong; Wong, Justin; Luo, Rui; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    Type II polyketides are a class of natural products that include pharmaceutically important aromatic compounds such as the antibiotic tetracycline and antitumor compound doxorubicin. The type II polyketide synthase (PKS) is a complex consisting of 5–10 standalone domains homologous to fatty acid synthase (FAS). Polyketide ketoreductase (KR) provides regio- and stereochemical diversity during the reduction. How the type II polyketide KR specifically reduces only the C9 carbonyl group is not well understood. The cocrystal structures of actinorhodin polyketide ketoreductase (actKR) bound with NADPH or NADP+ and the inhibitor emodin were solved with the wild type and P94L mutant of actKR, revealing the first observation of a bent p-quinone in an enzyme active site. Molecular dynamics simulation help explain the origin of the bent geometry. Extensive screening for in vitro substrates shows that unlike FAS KR, the actKR prefers bicyclic substrates. Inhibition kinetics indicate that actKR follows an ordered Bi Bi mechanism. Together with docking simulations that identified a potential phosphopantetheine binding groove, the structural and functional studies reveal that the C9 specificity is a result of active site geometry and substrate ring constraints. The results lay the foundation for the design of novel aromatic polyketide natural products with different reduction patterns. PMID:18205400

  5. Inhibition Kinetics And Emodin Cocrystal Structure of a Type II Polyketide Ketoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Korman, T.P.; Tan, Y.-H.; Wong, J.

    Type II polyketides are a class of natural products that include pharmaceutically important aromatic compounds such as the antibiotic tetracycline and antitumor compound doxorubicin. The type II polyketide synthase (PKS) is a complex consisting of 5-10 standalone domains homologous to fatty acid synthase (FAS). Polyketide ketoreductase (KR) provides regio- and stereochemical diversity during the reduction. How the type II polyketide KR specifically reduces only the C9 carbonyl group is not well understood. The cocrystal structures of actinorhodin polyketide ketoreductase (actKR) bound with NADPH or NADP{sup +} and the inhibitor emodin were solved with the wild type and P94L mutant ofmore » actKR, revealing the first observation of a bent p-quinone in an enzyme active site. Molecular dynamics simulation help explain the origin of the bent geometry. Extensive screening for in vitro substrates shows that unlike FAS KR, the actKR prefers bicyclic substrates. Inhibition kinetics indicate that actKR follows an ordered Bi Bi mechanism. Together with docking simulations that identified a potential phosphopantetheine binding groove, the structural and functional studies reveal that the C9 specificity is a result of active site geometry and substrate ring constraints. The results lay the foundation for the design of novel aromatic polyketide natural products with different reduction patterns.« less

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a tool for mining, studying and engineering fungal polyketide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Carly; Tang, Yi; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule secondary metabolites produced by organisms such as plants, bacteria, and fungi form a fascinating and important group of natural products, many of which have shown promise as medicines. Fungi in particular have been important sources of natural product polyketide pharmaceuticals. While the structural complexity of these polyketides makes them interesting and useful bioactive compounds, these same features also make them difficult and expensive to prepare and scale-up using synthetic methods. Currently, nearly all commercial polyketides are prepared through fermentation or semi-synthesis. However, elucidation and engineering of polyketide pathways in the native filamentous fungi hosts are often hampered due to a lack of established genetic tools and of understanding of the regulation of fungal secondary metabolisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages beneficial to the study and development of polyketide pathways from filamentous fungi due to its extensive genetic toolbox and well-studied metabolism. This review highlights the benefits S. cerevisiae provides as a tool for mining, studying, and engineering fungal polyketide synthases (PKSs), as well as notable insights this versatile tool has given us into the mechanisms and products of fungal PKSs. PMID:26850128

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a tool for mining, studying and engineering fungal polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Bond, Carly; Tang, Yi; Li, Li

    2016-04-01

    Small molecule secondary metabolites produced by organisms such as plants, bacteria, and fungi form a fascinating and important group of natural products, many of which have shown promise as medicines. Fungi in particular have been important sources of natural product polyketide pharmaceuticals. While the structural complexity of these polyketides makes them interesting and useful bioactive compounds, these same features also make them difficult and expensive to prepare and scale-up using synthetic methods. Currently, nearly all commercial polyketides are prepared through fermentation or semi-synthesis. However, elucidation and engineering of polyketide pathways in the native filamentous fungi hosts are often hampered due to a lack of established genetic tools and of understanding of the regulation of fungal secondary metabolisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages beneficial to the study and development of polyketide pathways from filamentous fungi due to its extensive genetic toolbox and well-studied metabolism. This review highlights the benefits S. cerevisiae provides as a tool for mining, studying, and engineering fungal polyketide synthases (PKSs), as well as notable insights this versatile tool has given us into the mechanisms and products of fungal PKSs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic construction and functional analysis of hybrid polyketide synthases containing heterologous acyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, C; McDaniel, R; Ebert-Khosla, S; Torres, R; Sherman, D H; Bibb, M J; Hopwood, D A

    1993-01-01

    The gene that encodes the acyl carrier protein (ACP) of the actinorhodin polyketide synthase (PKS) of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) was replaced with homologs from the granaticin, oxytetracycline, tetracenomycin, and putative frenolicin polyketide synthase gene clusters. All of the replacements led to expression of functional synthases, and the recombinants synthesized aromatic polyketides similar in chromatographic properties to actinorhodin or to shunt products produced by mutants defective in the actinorhodin pathway. Some regions within the ACP were also shown to be interchangeable and allow production of a functional hybrid ACP. Structural analysis of the most abundant polyketide product of one of the recombinants by electrospray mass spectrometry suggested that it is identical to mutactin, a previously characterized shunt product of an actVII mutant (deficient in cyclase and dehydrase activities). Quantitative differences in the product profiles of strains that express the various hybrid synthases were observed. These can be explained, at least in part, by differences in ribosome-binding sites upstream of each ACP gene, implying either that the ACP concentration in some strains is rate limiting to overall PKS activity or that the level of ACP expression also influences the expression of another enzyme(s) encoded by a downstream gene(s) in the same operon as the actinorhodin ACP gene. These results reaffirm the idea that construction of hybrid polyketide synthases will be a useful approach for dissecting the molecular basis of the specificity of PKS-catalyzed reactions. However, they also point to the need for reducing the chemical complexity of the approach by minimizing the diversity of polyketide products synthesized in strains that produce recombinant polyketide synthases. Images PMID:8468280

  9. Implementing Modular A Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holding, Gordon

    This document, which is designed for curriculum managers at British further education (FE) colleges, presents basic information on the implementation and perceived benefits of the General Certificate of Education (GCE) modular A (Advanced) levels. The information was synthesized from a survey of 12 FE colleges that introduced the modular A levels…

  10. Modularization and Flexibilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meel, R. M.

    Publications in the fields of educational science, organization theory, and project management were analyzed to identify the possibilities that modularization offers to institutions of higher professional education and to obtain background information for use in developing a method for modularization in higher professional education. It was…

  11. Biosynthesis and Molecular Genetics of Polyketides in Marine Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Kellmann, Ralf; Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J. S.; Svendsen, Helene M.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2010-01-01

    Marine dinoflagellates are the single most important group of algae that produce toxins, which have a global impact on human activities. The toxins are chemically diverse, and include macrolides, cyclic polyethers, spirolides and purine alkaloids. Whereas there is a multitude of studies describing the pharmacology of these toxins, there is limited or no knowledge regarding the biochemistry and molecular genetics involved in their biosynthesis. Recently, however, exciting advances have been made. Expressed sequence tag sequencing studies have revealed important insights into the transcriptomes of dinoflagellates, whereas other studies have implicated polyketide synthase genes in the biosynthesis of cyclic polyether toxins, and the molecular genetic basis for the biosynthesis of paralytic shellfish toxins has been elucidated in cyanobacteria. This review summarises the recent progress that has been made regarding the unusual genomes of dinoflagellates, the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of dinoflagellate toxins. In addition, the evolution of these metabolic pathways will be discussed, and an outlook for future research and possible applications is provided. PMID:20479965

  12. A modular optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John Albert

    This dissertation presents the design of a modular, fiber-optic sensor and the results obtained from testing the modular sensor. The modular fiber-optic sensor is constructed in such manner that the sensor diaphragm can be replaced with different configurations to detect numerous physical phenomena. Additionally, different fiber-optic detection systems can be attached to the sensor. Initially, the modular sensor was developed to be used by university of students to investigate realistic optical sensors and detection systems to prepare for advance studies of micro-optical mechanical systems (MOMS). The design accomplishes this by doing two things. First, the design significantly lowers the costs associated with studying optical sensors by modularizing the sensor design. Second, the sensor broadens the number of physical phenomena that students can apply optical sensing techniques to in a fiber optics sensor course. The dissertation is divided into seven chapters covering the historical development of fiber-optic sensors, a theoretical overview of fiber-optic sensors, the design, fabrication, and the testing of the modular sensor developed in the course of this work. Chapter 1 discusses, in detail, how this dissertation is organized and states the purpose of the dissertation. Chapter 2 presents an historical overview of the development of optical fibers, optical pressure sensors, and fibers, optical pressure sensors, and optical microphones. Chapter 3 reviews the theory of multi-fiber optic detection systems, optical microphones, and pressure sensors. Chapter 4 presents the design details of the modular, optical sensor. Chapter 5 delves into how the modular sensor is fabricated and how the detection systems are constructed. Chapter 6 presents the data collected from the microphone and pressure sensor configurations of the modular sensor. Finally, Chapter 7 discusses the data collected and draws conclusions about the design based on the data collected. Chapter 7 also

  13. Polyketide synthesis genes associated with toxin production in two species of Gambierdiscus (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Kohli, Gurjeet S; John, Uwe; Figueroa, Rosa I; Rhodes, Lesley L; Harwood, D Tim; Groth, Marco; Bolch, Christopher J S; Murray, Shauna A

    2015-05-28

    Marine microbial protists, in particular, dinoflagellates, produce polyketide toxins with ecosystem-wide and human health impacts. Species of Gambierdiscus produce the polyether ladder compounds ciguatoxins and maitotoxins, which can lead to ciguatera fish poisoning, a serious human illness associated with reef fish consumption. Genes associated with the biosynthesis of polyether ladder compounds are yet to be elucidated, however, stable isotope feeding studies of such compounds consistently support their polyketide origin indicating that polyketide synthases are involved in their biosynthesis. Here, we report the toxicity, genome size, gene content and transcriptome of Gambierdiscus australes and G. belizeanus. G. australes produced maitotoxin-1 and maitotoxin-3, while G. belizeanus produced maitotoxin-3, for which cell extracts were toxic to mice by IP injection (LD50 = 3.8 mg kg(-1)). The gene catalogues comprised 83,353 and 84,870 unique contigs, with genome sizes of 32.5 ± 3.7 Gbp and 35 ± 0.88 Gbp, respectively, and are amongst the most comprehensive yet reported from a dinoflagellate. We found three hundred and six genes involved in polyketide biosynthesis, including one hundred and ninety-two ketoacyl synthase transcripts, which formed five unique phylogenetic clusters. Two clusters were unique to these maitotoxin-producing dinoflagellate species, suggesting that they may be associated with maitotoxin biosynthesis. This work represents a significant step forward in our understanding of the genetic basis of polyketide production in dinoflagellates, in particular, species responsible for ciguatera fish poisoning.

  14. Antibacterial polyketides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens associated with edible red seaweed Laurenciae papillosa.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Thilakan, Bini; Raola, Vamshi Krishna; Joy, Minju

    2017-03-01

    Heterotrophic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens associated with edible red seaweed, Laurenciae papillosa was used to isolate antibacterial polyketide compounds. Antibacterial activity studies integrated with the outcome obtained by polyketide synthetase (pks) coding genes established that seaweed-affiliated bacterial flora had a wide-ranging antibacterial activities and potential natural product diversity, which proved that the bacterium is valuable reservoir of novel bioactive metabolites. Bioactivity-guided isolation of 3-(octahydro-9-isopropyl-2H-benzo[h]chromen-4-yl)-2-methylpropyl benzoate and methyl 8-(2-(benzoyloxy)-ethyl)-hexahydro-4-((E)-pent-2-enyl)-2H-chromene-6-carboxylate of polyketide origin, with activity against human opportunistic food pathogenic microbes, have been isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of B. amyloliquefaciens. Structure-activity relationship analysis revealed that hydrophobic descriptor of the polyketide compounds significantly contribute towards its antibacterial activity. Seaweed-associated microorganisms were shown to represent a potential source of antimicrobial compounds for food and health benefits. The antibacterial polyketide compounds described in the present study may find potential applications in the food industry to reduce food-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discovery, biosynthesis, and rational engineering of novel enterocin and wailupemycin polyketide analogues.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzis, John A

    2013-01-01

    The marine actinomycete Streptomyces maritimus produces a structurally diverse set of unusual polyketide natural products including the major metabolite enterocin. Investigations of enterocin biosynthesis revealed that the unique carbon skeleton is derived from an aromatic polyketide pathway which is genetically coded by the 21.3 kb enc gene cluster in S. maritimus. Characterization of the enc biosynthesis gene cluster and subsequent manipulation of it via heterologous expression and/or mutagenesis enabled the discovery of other enc-based metabolites that were produced in only very minor amounts in the wild type. Also described are techniques used to harness the enterocin biosynthetic machinery in order to generate unnatural enc-derived polyketide analogues. This review focuses upon the molecular methods used in combination with classical natural products detection and isolation techniques to access minor metabolites of the S. maritimus secondary metabolome.

  16. Improved pestalotiollide B production by deleting competing polyketide synthase genes in Pestalotiopsis microspora.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longfei; Li, Yingying; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Dan; Akhberdi, Oren; Wei, Dongsheng; Pan, Jiao; Zhu, Xudong

    2017-02-01

    Pestalotiollide B, an analog of dibenzodioxocinones which are inhibitors of cholesterol ester transfer proteins, is produced by Pestalotiopsis microspora NK17. To increase the production of pestalotiollide B, we attempted to eliminate competing polyketide products by deleting the genes responsible for their biosynthesis. We successfully deleted 41 out of 48 putative polyketide synthases (PKSs) in the genome of NK17. Nine of the 41 PKS deleted strains had significant increased production of pestalotiollide B (P < 0.05). For instance, deletion of pks35, led to an increase of pestalotiollide B by 887%. We inferred that these nine PKSs possibly lead to branch pathways that compete for precursors with pestalotiollide B, or that convert the product. Deletion of some other PKS genes such as pks8 led to a significant decrease of pestalotiollide B, suggesting they are responsible for its biosynthesis. Our data demonstrated that improvement of pestalotiollide B production can be achieved by eliminating competing polyketides.

  17. Discriminating the reaction types of plant type III polyketide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yugo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Goto, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motivation: Functional prediction of paralogs is challenging in bioinformatics because of rapid functional diversification after gene duplication events combined with parallel acquisitions of similar functions by different paralogs. Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), producing various secondary metabolites, represent a paralogous family that has undergone gene duplication and functional alteration. Currently, there is no computational method available for the functional prediction of type III PKSs. Results: We developed a plant type III PKS reaction predictor, pPAP, based on the recently proposed classification of type III PKSs. pPAP combines two kinds of similarity measures: one calculated by profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs) built from functionally and structurally important partial sequence regions, and the other based on mutual information between residue positions. pPAP targets PKSs acting on ring-type starter substrates, and classifies their functions into four reaction types. The pHMM approach discriminated two reaction types with high accuracy (97.5%, 39/40), but its accuracy decreased when discriminating three reaction types (87.8%, 43/49). When combined with a correlation-based approach, all 49 PKSs were correctly discriminated, and pPAP was still highly accurate (91.4%, 64/70) even after adding other reaction types. These results suggest pPAP, which is based on linear discriminant analyses of similarity measures, is effective for plant type III PKS function prediction. Availability and Implementation: pPAP is freely available at ftp://ftp.genome.jp/pub/tools/ppap/ Contact: goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:28334262

  18. In Vitro Biosynthesis of Unnatural Enterocin and Wailupemycin Polyketides¥

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzis, John A.; Cheng, Qian; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    Nature has evolved finely tuned strategies to synthesize rare and complex natural products such as the enterocin family of polyketides from the marine bacterium Streptomyces maritimus. Herein we report the directed ex vivo multienzyme syntheses of 24 unnatural 5-deoxyenterocin and wailupemycin F and G analogues, 18 of which are new. We have generated molecular diversity by priming the enterocin biosynthesis enzymes with unnatural substrates and have illustrated further the uniqueness of this type II polyketide synthase by way of exploiting its unusual starter unit biosynthesis pathways. PMID:19215142

  19. Plant pathogenic anaerobic bacteria use aromatic polyketides to access aerobic territory.

    PubMed

    Shabuer, Gulimila; Ishida, Keishi; Pidot, Sacha J; Roth, Martin; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-06

    Around 25% of vegetable food is lost worldwide because of infectious plant diseases, including microbe-induced decay of harvested crops. In wet seasons and under humid storage conditions, potato tubers are readily infected and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium puniceum). We found that these anaerobic plant pathogens harbor a gene locus (type II polyketide synthase) to produce unusual polyketide metabolites (clostrubins) with dual functions. The clostrubins, which act as antibiotics against other microbial plant pathogens, enable the anaerobic bacteria to survive an oxygen-rich plant environment. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Modular avionics packaging standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, M.; McNichols, J. K.

    The Modular Avionics Packaging (MAP) Program for packaging future military avionics systems with the objective of improving reliability, maintainability, and supportability, and reducing equipment life cycle costs is addressed. The basic MAP packaging concepts called the Standard Avionics Module, the Standard Enclosure, and the Integrated Rack are summarized, and the benefits of modular avionics packaging, including low risk design, technology independence with common functions, improved maintainability and life cycle costs are discussed. Progress made in MAP is briefly reviewed.

  1. Cloning, Sequencing, and Functional Analysis of an Iterative Type I Polyketide Synthase Gene Cluster for Biosynthesis of the Antitumor Chlorinated Polyenone Neocarzilin in “Streptomyces carzinostaticus”

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Miyuki; Ichinose, Koji; Fujii, Isao; Ebizuka, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    Neocarzilins (NCZs) are antitumor chlorinated polyenones produced by “Streptomyces carzinostaticus” var. F-41. The gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of NCZs was cloned and characterized. DNA sequence analysis of a 33-kb region revealed a cluster of 14 open reading frames (ORFs), three of which (ORF4, ORF5, and ORF6) encode type I polyketide synthase (PKS), which consists of four modules. Unusual features of the modular organization is the lack of an obvious acyltransferase domain on modules 2 and 4 and the presence of longer interdomain regions more than 200 amino acids in length on each module. Involvement of the PKS genes in NCZ biosynthesis was demonstrated by heterologous expression of the cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor CH999, which produced the apparent NCZ biosynthetic intermediates dechloroneocarzillin A and dechloroneocarzilin B. Disruption of ORF5 resulted in a failure of NCZ production, providing further evidence that the cluster is essential for NCZ biosynthesis. Mechanistic consideration of NCZ formation indicates the iterative use of at least one module of the PKS, which subsequently releases its product by decarboxylation to generate an NCZ skeleton, possibly catalyzed by a type II thioesterase encoded by ORF7. This is a novel type I PKS system of bacterial origin for the biosynthesis of a reduced polyketide chain. Additionally, the protein encoded by ORF3, located upstream of the PKS genes, closely resembles the FADH2-dependent halogenases involved in the formation of halometabolites. The ORF3 protein could be responsible for the halogenation of NCZs, presenting a unique example of a halogenase involved in the biosynthesis of an aliphatic halometabolite. PMID:15328113

  2. Insights into natural products biosynthesis from analysis of 490 polyketide synthases from Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daren W; Proctor, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Species of the fungus Fusarium collectively cause disease on almost all crop plants and produce numerous natural products (NPs), including some of the mycotoxins of greatest concern to agriculture. Many Fusarium NPs are derived from polyketide synthases (PKSs), large multi-domain enzymes that catalyze sequential condensation of simple carboxylic acids to form polyketides. To gain insight into the biosynthesis of polyketide-derived NPs in Fusarium, we retrieved 488 PKS gene sequences from genome sequences of 31 species of the fungus. In addition to these apparently functional PKS genes, the genomes collectively included 81 pseudogenized PKS genes. Phylogenetic analysis resolved the PKS genes into 67 clades, and based on multiple lines of evidence, we propose that homologs in each clade are responsible for synthesis of a polyketide that is distinct from those synthesized by PKSs in other clades. The presence and absence of PKS genes among the species examined indicated marked differences in distribution of PKS homologs. Comparisons of Fusarium PKS genes and genes flanking them to those from other Ascomycetes provided evidence that Fusarium has the genetic potential to synthesize multiple NPs that are the same or similar to those reported in other fungi, but that have not yet been reported in Fusarium. The results also highlight ways in which such analyses can help guide identification of novel Fusarium NPs and differences in NP biosynthetic capabilities that exist among fungi. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Polyketides from Pestalotiopsis zonata and structure revision of pestalrones A and B.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Liu, Chang; Dong, Ya-Jing; Liu, Fang-Ru; Xu, Xiu-Mei; Li, De-Sheng; Li, Dan-Yi; Li, Zhan-Lin

    2017-11-23

    The structures of pestalrones A-B were revised via reinterpretation of the NMR data and a brief chemical transformation from the co-occurring polyketides, in our investigation on the secondary metabolites of Pestalotiopsis zonata, which also afforded a new α-pyrone derivative, pestazonatic acid, and four known analogs.

  4. Altered expression of polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters in fumonisin-deficient mutants of Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize and produces fumonisins, a group of polyketide derived secondary metabolites. Fumonisins cause diseases in animals, and they have been correlated epidemiologically with esophageal cancer and birth defects in humans. Fumonisin biosynthetic genes are c...

  5. Aromatic polyketide synthases from 127 Fusarium: pas de deux for chemical diversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium species collectively cause disease on almost all crop plants and produce numerous natural products (NPs), including mycotoxins, of great concern. Many Fusarium NPs are derived from polyketide synthases (PKSs), large enzymes that catalyze the condensation of simple carboxylic acids. To gain ...

  6. Expression, purification and crystallization of a plant polyketide cyclase from Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinmei; Matsui, Takashi; Mori, Takahiro; Taura, Futoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plant polyketides are a structurally diverse family of natural products. In the biosynthesis of plant polyketides, the construction of the carbocyclic scaffold is a key step in diversifying the polyketide structure. Olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC) from Cannabis sativa L. is the only known plant polyketide cyclase that catalyzes the C2–C7 intramolecular aldol cyclization of linear pentyl tetra-β-ketide-CoA to generate olivetolic acid in the biosynthesis of cannabinoids. The enzyme is also thought to belong to the dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein family. However, because of a lack of functional analysis of other plant DABB proteins and low sequence identity with the functionally distinct bacterial DABB proteins, the catalytic mechanism of OAC has remained unclear. To clarify the intimate catalytic mechanism of OAC, the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 1.40 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 47.3, c = 176.0 Å. Further crystallographic analysis will provide valuable insights into the structure–function relationship and catalytic mechanism of OAC. PMID:26625288

  7. Expression, purification and crystallization of a plant polyketide cyclase from Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmei; Matsui, Takashi; Mori, Takahiro; Taura, Futoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Plant polyketides are a structurally diverse family of natural products. In the biosynthesis of plant polyketides, the construction of the carbocyclic scaffold is a key step in diversifying the polyketide structure. Olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC) from Cannabis sativa L. is the only known plant polyketide cyclase that catalyzes the C2-C7 intramolecular aldol cyclization of linear pentyl tetra-β-ketide-CoA to generate olivetolic acid in the biosynthesis of cannabinoids. The enzyme is also thought to belong to the dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein family. However, because of a lack of functional analysis of other plant DABB proteins and low sequence identity with the functionally distinct bacterial DABB proteins, the catalytic mechanism of OAC has remained unclear. To clarify the intimate catalytic mechanism of OAC, the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 1.40 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 47.3, c = 176.0 Å. Further crystallographic analysis will provide valuable insights into the structure-function relationship and catalytic mechanism of OAC.

  8. A proteomic survey of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthesis in actinobacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Actinobacteria such as streptomycetes are renowned for their ability to produce bioactive natural products including nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). The advent of genome sequencing has revealed an even larger genetic repertoire for secondary metabolism with most of the small mole...

  9. Antimicrobial polyketide furanoterpenoids from seaweed-associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Thilakan, Bini; Raola, Vamshi Krishna

    2017-10-01

    Brown seaweed Anthophycus longifolius (Turner) Kützing (family Sargassaceae) associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403 was found to be a potent isolate with broad range of antibacterial activity against important perceptive food pathogens Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. This bacterium was positive for polyketide synthetase gene (KC589397), and therefore, was selected to bioprospect specialized metabolites bearing polyketide backbone. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract of the seaweed-associated bacterium segregated four homologous polyketide furanoterpenoids with potential antibacterial activities against clinically important pathogens. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay showed that the referral antibiotics tetracycline and ampicillin were active at 25 μg/mL against the test pathogens, whereas the previously undescribed (4E)-methyl 13-((16-(furan-2-yl) ethyl)-octahydro-7-hydroxy-4-((E)-23-methylbut-21-enyl)-2H-chromen-6-yl)-4-methylpent-4-enoate (compound 1) and methyl 3-(hexahydro-9-((E)-3-methylpent-1-enyl)-4H-furo[3,2-g]isochromen-6-yl) propanoate (compound 3) displayed antibacterial activities against the test pathogens at a lesser concentration (MIC < 7 μg/mL). The title compounds were characterized by comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopic experiments. Polyketide synthase catalyzed putative biosynthetic mechanism additionally corroborated the structural ascriptions of the hitherto undescribed furanoterpenoids from seaweed-associated bacterial symbiont. The electronic and hydrophobic parameters appeared to hold a conspicuous part in directing the antibacterial properties of the compounds. Seaweed-associated B. subtilis MTCC 10403 demonstrated to represent a potential source of antimicrobial polyketides for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modular optical detector system

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Brent A [Livermore, CA; Renzi, Ronald F [Tracy, CA

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  11. Symmetric modular torsatron

    DOEpatents

    Rome, J.A.; Harris, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    A fusion reactor device is provided in which the magnetic fields for plasma confinement in a toroidal configuration is produced by a plurality of symmetrical modular coils arranged to form a symmetric modular torsatron referred to as a symmotron. Each of the identical modular coils is helically deformed and comprise one field period of the torsatron. Helical segments of each coil are connected by means of toroidally directed windbacks which may also provide part of the vertical field required for positioning the plasma. The stray fields of the windback segments may be compensated by toroidal coils. A variety of magnetic confinement flux surface configurations may be produced by proper modulation of the winding pitch of the helical segments of the coils, as in a conventional torsatron, winding the helix on a noncircular cross section and varying the poloidal and radial location of the windbacks and the compensating toroidal ring coils.

  12. Modular biowaste monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the Modular Biowaste Monitoring System Program was to generate and evaluate hardware for supporting shuttle life science experimental and diagnostic programs. An initial conceptual design effort established requirements and defined an overall modular system for the collection, measurement, sampling and storage of urine and feces biowastes. This conceptual design effort was followed by the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of a flight prototype model urine collection, volume measurement and sampling capability. No operational or performance deficiencies were uncovered as a result of the performance evaluation tests.

  13. Criteria for software modularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, David N.; Page, Gerald T.; Mcgarry, Frank E.

    1985-01-01

    A central issue in programming practice involves determining the appropriate size and information content of a software module. This study attempted to determine the effectiveness of two widely used criteria for software modularization, strength and size, in reducing fault rate and development cost. Data from 453 FORTRAN modules developed by professional programmers were analyzed. The results indicated that module strength is a good criterion with respect to fault rate, whereas arbitrary module size limitations inhibit programmer productivity. This analysis is a first step toward defining empirically based standards for software modularization.

  14. Modular survivable satellite support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. E.

    The development of a highly mobile, survivable satellite system from the Transportable Mobile Ground Station (T/MGS) is proposed. The addition of advanced capabilities to the T/MGS such as telemetry processing equipment, and the flexibility of a modularly designed system are examined. The need to increase survivability and mobility while reducing life cycle costs is discussed. A modular survivable satellite support system which consists of a 40-foot van, a diesel tractor, and a multimedia communications subsystem is described. The use of planar and phased arrays to improve transportability and new materials and structural designs to enhance hardness are discussed. Diagrams of the system are provided.

  15. Modular High Voltage Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, Matthew R.

    The goal of this project is to develop a modular high voltage power supply that will meet the needs of safeguards applications and provide a modular plug and play supply for use with standard electronic racks.

  16. Modular invariant inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Nitta, Daisuke; Urakawa, Yuko

    2016-08-08

    Modular invariance is a striking symmetry in string theory, which may keep stringy corrections under control. In this paper, we investigate a phenomenological consequence of the modular invariance, assuming that this symmetry is preserved as well as in a four dimensional (4D) low energy effective field theory. As a concrete setup, we consider a modulus field T whose contribution in the 4D effective field theory remains invariant under the modular transformation and study inflation drived by T. The modular invariance restricts a possible form of the scalar potenntial. As a result, large field models of inflation are hardly realized. Meanwhile,more » a small field model of inflation can be still accomodated in this restricted setup. The scalar potential traced during the slow-roll inflation mimics the hilltop potential V{sub ht}, but it also has a non-negligible deviation from V{sub ht}. Detecting the primordial gravitational waves predicted in this model is rather challenging. Yet, we argue that it may be still possible to falsify this model by combining the information in the reheating process which can be determined self-completely in this setup.« less

  17. Modularity in robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert; Butler, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Most robotic systems today are designed one at a time, at a high cost of time and money. This wasteful approach has been necessary because the industry has not established a foundation for the continued evolution of intelligent machines. The next generation of robots will have to be generic, versatile machines capable of absorbing new technology rapidly and economically. This approach is demonstrated in the success of the personal computer, which can be upgraded or expanded with new software and hardware at virtually every level. Modularity is perceived as a major opportunity to reduce the 6 to 7 year design cycle time now required for new robotic manipulators, greatly increasing the breadth and speed of diffusion of robotic systems in manufacturing. Modularity and its crucial role in the next generation of intelligent machines are the focus of interest. The main advantages that modularity provides are examined; types of modules needed to create a generic robot are discussed. Structural modules designed by the robotics group at the University of Texas at Austin are examined to demonstrate the advantages of modular design.

  18. The Challenges of Modularization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally; Saunders, Danny

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the movement towards credit accumulation and transfer in higher education institutions based on experiences at two universities in the United Kingdom, the University of Northumbria and the University of Glamorgan. Modularization, or unitization, and semesterization are considered, and three key areas are addressed: management, student…

  19. Modularization of Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Arizona Coll., Thatcher.

    Eastern Arizona College has developed a modularized system of instruction for five vocational and vocationally related courses--Introduction to Business, Business Mathematics, English, Drafting, and Electronics. Each course is divided into independent segments of instruction and students have open-entry and exit options. This document reviews the…

  20. MRV - Modular Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, Justin; Bluethmann, Bill

    2015-01-01

    The Modular Robotic Vehicle, or MRV, completed in 2013, was developed at the Johnson Space Center in order to advance technologies which have applications for future vehicles both in space and on Earth. With seating for two people, MRV is a fully electric vehicle modeled as a "city car", suited for busy urban environments.

  1. Multifarenes: new modular cavitands.

    PubMed

    Parvari, Galit; Annamalai, Senthilmurugan; Borovoi, Iris; Chechik, Helena; Botoshansky, Mark; Pappo, Doron; Keinan, Ehud

    2014-03-07

    Multifarenes, a new class of macrocycles, which are constructed of alternating building blocks, are conveniently accessible by three complementary syntheses that provide modularity and scalability. In addition to metal-ion coordination, these cavitands show increased flexibility with increasing ring size, offering opportunities for induced fit to guest molecules.

  2. Biosynthesis of the salinosporamide A polyketide synthase substrate chloroethylmalonyl-coenzyme A from S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Eustáquio, Alessandra S; McGlinchey, Ryan P; Liu, Yuan; Hazzard, Christopher; Beer, Laura L; Florova, Galina; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun M; Lechner, Anna; Kale, Andrew J; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Reynolds, Kevin A; Moore, Bradley S

    2009-07-28

    Polyketides are among the major classes of bioactive natural products used to treat microbial infections, cancer, and other diseases. Here we describe a pathway to chloroethylmalonyl-CoA as a polyketide synthase building block in the biosynthesis of salinosporamide A, a marine microbial metabolite whose chlorine atom is crucial for potent proteasome inhibition and anticancer activity. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is converted to 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-ClDA) in a reaction catalyzed by a SAM-dependent chlorinase as previously reported. By using a combination of gene deletions, biochemical analyses, and chemical complementation experiments with putative intermediates, we now provide evidence that 5'-ClDA is converted to chloroethylmalonyl-CoA in a 7-step route via the penultimate intermediate 4-chlorocrotonyl-CoA. Because halogenation often increases the bioactivity of drugs, the availability of a halogenated polyketide building block may be useful in molecular engineering approaches toward polyketide scaffolds.

  3. The marine sponge-derived polyketide endoperoxide plakortide F acid mediates its antifungal activity by interfering with calcium homeostasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plakortide F acid (PFA) is a marine-derived polyketide endoperoxide exhibiting strong inhibitory activity against several clinically important fungal pathogens. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses were conducted using the model organism Sacch...

  4. 8 CFR 245a.32 - Ineligible aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ineligible aliens. 245a.32 Section 245a.32 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS TO... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.32 Ineligible aliens. The...

  5. 8 CFR 245a.32 - Ineligible aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ineligible aliens. 245a.32 Section 245a.32 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS TO... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.32 Ineligible aliens. The...

  6. 8 CFR 245a.32 - Ineligible aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ineligible aliens. 245a.32 Section 245a.32 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS TO... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.32 Ineligible aliens. The...

  7. 8 CFR 245a.32 - Ineligible aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ineligible aliens. 245a.32 Section 245a.32 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS TO... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.32 Ineligible aliens. The...

  8. 8 CFR 245a.32 - Ineligible aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ineligible aliens. 245a.32 Section 245a.32 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS TO... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.32 Ineligible aliens. The...

  9. Structural and Biochemical Analyses of Regio- and Stereo-Specificities Observed in a Type II Polyketide Ketoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Javidpour, Pouya; Korman, Tyler Paz; Shakya, Gaurav; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2011-01-01

    Type II polyketides include antibiotics such as tetracycline, and chemotherapeutics such as daunorubicin. Type II polyketides are biosynthesized by the type II polyketide synthase (PKS) that consists of 5 – 10 stand-alone domains. In many type II PKSs, the type II ketoreductase (KR) specifically reduce the C9-carbonyl group. How the type II KR achieves such a high regio-specificity, and the nature of stereo-specificity, are not well understood. Sequence alignment of KRs led to a hypothesis that a well-conserved 94-XGG-96 motif may be involved in controlling the stereochemistry. The stereo-specificity of single, double and triple mutant combinations of P94L, G95D and G96D were analyzed in vitro and in vivo for the actinorhodin KR (actKR). The P94L mutation is sufficient to change the stereospecificity of actKR. Binary and ternary crystal structures of both wild type and P94L actKR were solved. Together with assay results, docking simulations, and co-crystal structures, a model for stereochemical control is presented herein that elucidates how type II polyketides are introduced into the substrate pocket such that the C9-carbonyl can be reduced with high regio- and stereo-specificities. The molecular features of actKR important for regio- and stereo-specificities can potentially be applied to biosynthesize new polyketides via protein engineering that rationally controls polyketide ketoreduction. PMID:21506596

  10. Functional Analysis of the Polyketide Synthase Genes in the Filamentous Fungus Gibberella zeae (Anamorph Fusarium graminearum)

    PubMed Central

    Gaffoor, Iffa; Brown, Daren W.; Plattner, Ron; Proctor, Robert H.; Qi, Weihong; Trail, Frances

    2005-01-01

    Polyketides are a class of secondary metabolites that exhibit a vast diversity of form and function. In fungi, these compounds are produced by large, multidomain enzymes classified as type I polyketide synthases (PKSs). In this study we identified and functionally disrupted 15 PKS genes from the genome of the filamentous fungus Gibberella zeae. Five of these genes are responsible for producing the mycotoxins zearalenone, aurofusarin, and fusarin C and the black perithecial pigment. A comprehensive expression analysis of the 15 genes revealed diverse expression patterns during grain colonization, plant colonization, sexual development, and mycelial growth. Expression of one of the PKS genes was not detected under any of 18 conditions tested. This is the first study to genetically characterize a complete set of PKS genes from a single organism. PMID:16278459

  11. Synthesis of polyketide stereoarrays enabled by a traceless oxonia-Cope rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; He, Guoli; Yin, Ruifeng; Zhu, Lili; Wang, Xiaoxia; Hong, Ran

    2014-10-20

    Polyketide antibiotics bearing skipped polyols represent a synthetic challenge. A SiCl4-promoted oxonia-Cope rearrangement of syn,syn-2-vinyl-1,3-diols was developed to forge an array of 1,5-pentenediols, thus providing versatile motifs for the preparation of 1,2,3,5-stereoarrays in a highly stereoselective manner. Further exploration with Sn(OTf)2 realized the rearrangement of a cross-aldehyde which tactically warrants the utility of the current approach to access complex polyketides. The origin of high stereoselectivity is attributed to a chairlike anti-conformation of the oxonium ion intermediate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Phylogenomic and Domain Analysis of Iterative Polyketide Synthases in Aspergillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Hsi; Yoshimoto, Miwa; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Arita, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus species are industrially and agriculturally important as fermentors and as producers of various secondary metabolites. Among them, fungal polyketides such as lovastatin and melanin are considered a gold mine for bioactive compounds. We used a phylogenomic approach to investigate the distribution of iterative polyketide synthases (PKS) in eight sequenced Aspergilli and classified over 250 fungal genes. Their genealogy by the conserved ketosynthase (KS) domain revealed three large groups of nonreducing PKS, one group inside bacterial PKS, and more than 9 small groups of reducing PKS. Polyphyly of nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS)-PKS genes raised questions regarding the recruitment of the elegant conjugation machinery. High rates of gene duplication and divergence were frequent. All data are accessible through our web database at http://metabolomics.jp/wiki/Category:PK. PMID:22844193

  13. Allelopathic Polyketides from an Endolichenic Fungus Myxotrichum SP. by Using OSMAC Strategy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Guo, Yu-Hua; Wang, Hai-Ying; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Jun-Ling; Zou, Zhong-Mei; Ding, Gang

    2016-02-03

    Three new polyketides myxotritones A-C (2-4), together with a new natural product 7,8-dihydro-7R,8S-dihydroxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-benzopyran-6-one (1) were obtained from the endolichenic fungus Myxotrichum sp. by using OMSAC (One Strain, Many Compounds) method. The planar structures of these new compounds were determined by NMR experiment and HRESIMS data, and the absolute configuration of 1 was established by X-ray diffraction, and the stereochemistry of the new compounds 2-4 were determined by same biosynthesis origin, and similar CD spectra with 1. Allelopathic test showed that compound 4 significantly retarded root elongation of Arabidopsis thaliana seed, indicating that this fungus might contribute to the defense of its host lichen. From the view of biosynthetic pathway, all four compounds 1-4 might be originated from Non-Reduced Polyketide synthase (NR-PKS).

  14. HSQC-TOCSY Fingerprinting for Prioritization of Polyketide- and Peptide-Producing Microbial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Buedenbender, Larissa; Habener, Leesa J; Grkovic, Tanja; Kurtböke, D İpek; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Carroll, Anthony R

    2018-04-27

    Microbial products are a promising source for drug leads as a result of their unique structural diversity. However, reisolation of already known natural products significantly hampers the discovery process, and it is therefore important to incorporate effective microbial isolate selection and dereplication protocols early in microbial natural product studies. We have developed a systematic approach for prioritization of microbial isolates for natural product discovery based on heteronuclear single-quantum correlation-total correlation spectroscopy (HSQC-TOCSY) nuclear magnetic resonance profiles in combination with antiplasmodial activity of extracts. The HSQC-TOCSY experiments allowed for unfractionated microbial extracts containing polyketide and peptidic natural products to be rapidly identified. Here, we highlight how this approach was used to prioritize extracts derived from a library of 119 ascidian-associated actinomycetes that possess a higher potential to produce bioactive polyketides and peptides.

  15. Engineering Biosynthesis of Non-ribosomal Peptides and Polyketides by Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Rui, Zhe; Zhang, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) play key roles in pharmaceutical industry due to their promising biological activities. The structural complexity of NRPs and PKs, however, creates significant synthetic challenges for producing these natural products and their analogues by purely chemical means. Alternatively, difficult syntheses can be achieved by using biosynthetic enzymes with improved efficiency and altered selectivity that are acquired from directed evolution. Key to the successful directed evolution is the methodology of screening/selection. This review summarizes the screening/selection strategies that have been employed to improve or modify the functions of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), in the hope of triggering the wide adoption of the directed evolution approaches in the engineered biosynthesis of NRPs and PKs for drug discovery.

  16. Modular chemiresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Maksudul M.; Sampathkumaran, Uma

    The present invention relates to a modular chemiresistive sensor. In particular, a modular chemiresistive sensor for hypergolic fuel and oxidizer leak detection, carbon dioxide monitoring and detection of disease biomarkers. The sensor preferably has two gold or platinum electrodes mounted on a silicon substrate where the electrodes are connected to a power source and are separated by a gap of 0.5 to 4.0 .mu.M. A polymer nanowire or carbon nanotube spans the gap between the electrodes and connects the electrodes electrically. The electrodes are further connected to a circuit board having a processor and data storage, where the processor canmore » measure current and voltage values between the electrodes and compare the current and voltage values with current and voltage values stored in the data storage and assigned to particular concentrations of a pre-determined substance such as those listed above or a variety of other substances.« less

  17. Modular space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The modular space station comprising small, shuttle-launched modules, and characterized by low initial cost and incremental manning, is described. The initial space station is designed to be delivered into orbit by three space shuttles and assembled in space. The three sections are the power/subsystems module, the crew/operations module, and the general purpose laboratory module. It provides for a crew of six. Subsequently duplicate/crew/operations and power/subsystems modules will be mated to the original modules, and provide for an additional six crewmen. A total of 17 research and applications modules is planned, three of which will be free-flying modules. Details are given on the program plan, modular characteristics, logistics, experiment support capability and requirements, operations analysis, design support analyses, and shuttle interfaces.

  18. Polyketides with Immunosuppressive Activities from Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. ZJ-SY₂.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongju; Chen, Senhua; Liu, Weiyang; Liu, Yayue; Huang, Xishan; She, Zhigang

    2016-11-25

    Nine polyketides, including two new benzophenone derivatives, peniphenone ( 1 ) and methyl peniphenone ( 2 ), along with seven known xanthones ( 3 - 9 ) were obtained from mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. ZJ-SY₂ isolated from the leaves of Sonneratia apetala . Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, 1D, and 2D NMR data. Compounds 1 , 3 , 5 , and 7 showed potent immunosuppressive activity with IC 50 values ranging from 5.9 to 9.3 μg/mL.

  19. Curvularides A-E: antifungal hybrid peptide-polyketides from the endophytic fungus Curvularia geniculata.

    PubMed

    Chomcheon, Porntep; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; Aree, Thammarat; Sriubolmas, Nongluksna; Ngamrojanavanich, Nattaya; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Kittakoop, Prasat

    2010-09-24

    Five new hybrid peptide-polyketides, curvularides A-E (1-5), were isolated from the endophytic fungus Curvularia geniculata, which was obtained from the limbs of Catunaregam tomentosa. Structure elucidation for curvularides A-E (1-5) was accomplished by analysis of spectroscopic data, as well as by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Curvularide B (2) exhibited antifungal activity against Candida albicans, and it also showed synergistic activity with a fluconazole drug.

  20. Modular Engine Instrumentation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, W. J.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    System that provides information and measurements never obtained before in real time has been developed. System shows not only real-time measurements but also results of computations of key combustion parameters in meaningful and easily understood display. Standard commercially-available shaft encoder plus data from pressure transducer act as principal drivers to device. Eventually, modular system could be developed into onboard controller for automobile engines.

  1. Pseudomonas syringae Phytotoxins: Mode of Action, Regulation, and Biosynthesis by Peptide and Polyketide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carol L.; Alarcón-Chaidez, Francisco; Gross, Dennis C.

    1999-01-01

    Coronatine, syringomycin, syringopeptin, tabtoxin, and phaseolotoxin are the most intensively studied phytotoxins of Pseudomonas syringae, and each contributes significantly to bacterial virulence in plants. Coronatine functions partly as a mimic of methyl jasmonate, a hormone synthesized by plants undergoing biological stress. Syringomycin and syringopeptin form pores in plasma membranes, a process that leads to electrolyte leakage. Tabtoxin and phaseolotoxin are strongly antimicrobial and function by inhibiting glutamine synthetase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase, respectively. Genetic analysis has revealed the mechanisms responsible for toxin biosynthesis. Coronatine biosynthesis requires the cooperation of polyketide and peptide synthetases for the assembly of the coronafacic and coronamic acid moieties, respectively. Tabtoxin is derived from the lysine biosynthetic pathway, whereas syringomycin, syringopeptin, and phaseolotoxin biosynthesis requires peptide synthetases. Activation of phytotoxin synthesis is controlled by diverse environmental factors including plant signal molecules and temperature. Genes involved in the regulation of phytotoxin synthesis have been located within the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters; however, additional regulatory genes are required for the synthesis of these and other phytotoxins. Global regulatory genes such as gacS modulate phytotoxin production in certain pathovars, indicating the complexity of the regulatory circuits controlling phytotoxin synthesis. The coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters have been intensively characterized and show potential for constructing modified polyketides and peptides. Genetic reprogramming of peptide and polyketide synthetases has been successful, and portions of the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters could be valuable resources in developing new antimicrobial agents. PMID:10357851

  2. Recognition of Acyl Carrier Proteins by Ketoreductases in Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Matthew P.; Cane, David E.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-01-01

    Ketoreductases (KRs) are the most widespread tailoring domains found in individual modules of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs), and are responsible for controlling the configurations of both the α-methyl and β-hydroxyl stereogenic centers in the growing polyketide chain. Because they recognize substrates that are covalently bound to acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) within the same PKS module, we sought to quantify the extent to which protein-protein recognition contributes to the turnover of these oxidoreductive enzymes using stand-alone domains from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). Reduced 2-methyl-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP substrates derived from two enantiomeric acyl chains and four distinct ACP domains were synthesized and presented to four distinct KR domains. Two KRs, from DEBS modules 2 and 5, displayed little preference for oxidation of substrates tethered to their cognate ACP domains over those attached to the other ACP domains tested. In contrast, the KR from DEBS module 1 showed a ca. 10-50-fold preference for substrate attached to its native ACP domain, whereas the KR from DEBS module 6 actually displayed a ca. 10-fold preference for the ACP from DEBS module 5. Our findings suggest that recognition of the ACP by a KR domain is unlikely to affect the rate of native assembly line polyketide biosynthesis. In some cases, however, unfavorable KR-ACP interactions may suppress the rate of substrate processing when KR domains are swapped to construct hybrid PKS modules. PMID:27118242

  3. [Modular enteral nutrition in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Murillo Sanchís, S; Prenafeta Ferré, M T; Sempere Luque, M D

    1991-01-01

    Modular Enteral Nutrition may be a substitute for Parenteral Nutrition in children with different pathologies. Study of 4 children with different pathologies selected from a group of 40 admitted to the Maternal-Childrens Hospital "Valle de Hebrón" in Barcelona, who received modular enteral nutrition. They were monitored on a daily basis by the Dietician Service. Modular enteral nutrition consists of modules of proteins, peptides, lipids, glucids and mineral salts-vitamins. 1.--Craneo-encephalic traumatisms with loss of consciousness, Feeding with a combination of parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition for 7 days. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended and modular enteral nutrition alone used up to a total of 43 days. 2.--55% burns with 36 days of hyperproteic modular enteral nutrition together with normal feeding. A more rapid recovery was achieved with an increase in total proteins and albumin. 3.--Persistent diarrhoea with 31 days of modular enteral nutrition, 5 days on parenteral nutrition alone and 8 days on combined parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended. 4.--Mucoviscidosis with a total of 19 days on modular enteral nutrition, 12 of which were exclusively on modular enteral nutrition and 7 as a night supplement to normal feeding. We administered proteic intakes of up to 20% of the total calorific intake and in concentrations of up to 1.2 calories/ml of the final preparation, always with a good tolerance. Modular enteral nutrition can and should be used as a substitute for parenteral nutrition in children with different pathologies, thus preventing the complications inherent in parenteral nutrition.

  4. Structural basis for olivetolic acid formation by a polyketide cyclase from Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmei; Matsui, Takashi; Kodama, Takeshi; Mori, Takahiro; Zhou, Xiaoxi; Taura, Futoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    In polyketide biosynthesis, ring formation is one of the key diversification steps. Olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC) from Cannabis sativa, involved in cannabinoid biosynthesis, is the only known plant polyketide cyclase. In addition, it is the only functionally characterized plant α+β barrel (DABB) protein that catalyzes the C2-C7 aldol cyclization of the linear pentyl tetra-β-ketide CoA as the substrate, to generate olivetolic acid (OA). Herein, we solved the OAC apo and OAC-OA complex binary crystal structures at 1.32 and 1.70 Å resolutions, respectively. The crystal structures revealed that the enzyme indeed belongs to the DABB superfamily, as previously proposed, and possesses a unique active-site cavity containing the pentyl-binding hydrophobic pocket and the polyketide binding site, which have never been observed among the functionally and structurally characterized bacterial polyketide cyclases. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis studies indicated that Tyr72 and His78 function as acid/base catalysts at the catalytic center. Structural and/or functional studies of OAC suggested that the enzyme lacks thioesterase and aromatase activities. These observations demonstrated that OAC employs unique catalytic machinery utilizing acid/base catalytic chemistry for the formation of the precursor of OA. The structural and functional insights obtained in this work thus provide the foundation for analyses of the plant polyketide cyclases that will be discovered in the future. Structural data reported in this paper are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession numbers 5B08 for the OAC apo, 5B09 for the OAC-OA binary complex and 5B0A, 5B0B, 5B0C, 5B0D, 5B0E, 5B0F and 5B0G for the OAC His5Q, Ile7F, Tyr27F, Tyr27W, Val59M, Tyr72F and His78S mutant enzymes, respectively. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Robotic hand with modular extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Quigley, Morgan

    A robotic device is described herein. The robotic device includes a frame that comprises a plurality of receiving regions that are configured to receive a respective plurality of modular robotic extensions. The modular robotic extensions are removably attachable to the frame at the respective receiving regions by way of respective mechanical fuses. Each mechanical fuse is configured to trip when a respective modular robotic extension experiences a predefined load condition, such that the respective modular robotic extension detaches from the frame when the load condition is met.

  6. Modular organization and hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Ludwig; Vera, Antonio

    2007-02-01

    The concept of modularization represents a modern form of organization, which contains the vertical disaggregation of the firm and the use of market mechanisms within hierarchies. The objective of this paper is to examine whether the use of modular structures has a positive effect on hospital performance. The empirical section makes use of multiple regression analyses and leads to the main result that modularization does not have a positive effect on hospital performance. However, the analysis also finds out positive efficiency effects of two central ideas of modularization, namely process orientation and internal market mechanisms.

  7. Modular analysis of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Hans-Michael; Stelling, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of complex biological networks has traditionally relied on decomposition into smaller, semi-autonomous units such as individual signaling pathways. With the increased scope of systems biology (models), rational approaches to modularization have become an important topic. With increasing acceptance of de facto modularity in biology, widely different definitions of what constitutes a module have sparked controversies. Here, we therefore review prominent classes of modular approaches based on formal network representations. Despite some promising research directions, several important theoretical challenges remain open on the way to formal, function-centered modular decompositions for dynamic biological networks.

  8. Modular biometric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Charles; Viazanko, Michael; O'Looney, Jimmy; Szu, Harold

    2009-04-01

    Modularity Biometric System (MBS) is an approach to support AiTR of the cooperated and/or non-cooperated standoff biometric in an area persistent surveillance. Advanced active and passive EOIR and RF sensor suite is not considered here. Neither will we consider the ROC, PD vs. FAR, versus the standoff POT in this paper. Our goal is to catch the "most wanted (MW)" two dozens, separately furthermore ad hoc woman MW class from man MW class, given their archrivals sparse front face data basis, by means of various new instantaneous input called probing faces. We present an advanced algorithm: mini-Max classifier, a sparse sample realization of Cramer-Rao Fisher bound of the Maximum Likelihood classifier that minimize the dispersions among the same woman classes and maximize the separation among different man-woman classes, based on the simple feature space of MIT Petland eigen-faces. The original aspect consists of a modular structured design approach at the system-level with multi-level architectures, multiple computing paradigms, and adaptable/evolvable techniques to allow for achieving a scalable structure in terms of biometric algorithms, identification quality, sensors, database complexity, database integration, and component heterogenity. MBS consist of a number of biometric technologies including fingerprints, vein maps, voice and face recognitions with innovative DSP algorithm, and their hardware implementations such as using Field Programmable Gate arrays (FPGAs). Biometric technologies and the composed modularity biometric system are significant for governmental agencies, enterprises, banks and all other organizations to protect people or control access to critical resources.

  9. Modular Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A modular system for acquiring biometric data includes a plurality of data acquisition modules configured to sample biometric data from at least one respective input channel at a data acquisition rate. A representation of the sampled biometric data is stored in memory of each of the plurality of data acquisition modules. A central control system is in communication with each of the plurality of data acquisition modules through a bus. The central control system is configured to control communication of data, via the bus, with each of the plurality of data acquisition modules.

  10. Learning in Modular Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-07

    important for deep modular systems is that taking a series of small update steps and stopping before convergence, so called early stopping, is a form of regu...larization around the initial parameters of the system . For example, the stochastic gradient descent 5 1 u + 1 v = 1 6‖x2‖q = ‖x‖22q 22 Chapter 2...Aside from the overall speed of the classifier, no quantitative performance analysis was given, and the role played by the features in the larger system

  11. Polyketide Derivatives from Annona muricata Linn Leaves as Potencial Anticancer Material by Combination Treatment With Doxorubicin on Hela Cell Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artanti, A. N.; Astirin, O. P.; Prayito, A.; Widiyaningsih, R. F.; Prihapsara, F.

    2017-02-01

    One of the compounds found effication as an anticancer agent on cervical cancer is acetogenin, a polyketide compound that is abundant in Annona muricata L. leaves. This study has been done to examine polyketide derivatives was isolated from Annona muricata L. which has potency to induce apoptosis by p53 expression on hela cell line. An approach recently develop to overcome side effect of chemoterapeutic agent is used of combined chemoterapeutic agent, i.e doxorubicin. The determination of cytotoxic combination activity from polyketide derivative and doxorubicin was evaluated using MTT assay to obtain the value of CI (combination index). The expression of p53 profile was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on hela cell line. Data analysis showed that combination of polyketide derivative from Annona muricata L. (38,5 µg/ml) and doxorubicin with all of concentration performed synergistic effect on hela cell line with CI value from 0,33 - 0,65. The analysis on immucytochemistry showed that polyketide derivative from Annona muricata L. leaves could enhance p53 pathway significantly on hela cell line.

  12. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of space erecting a 100 meter paraboloidal radio frequency reflector by joining a number of individually deployed structural modules. Three module design concepts were considered: (1) the deployable cell module (DCM); (2) the modular paraboloidal erectable truss antenna (Mod-PETA); and (3) the modular erectable truss antenna (META). With the space shuttle (STS) as the launch system, the methodology of packaging and stowing in the orbiter, and of dispensing, deploying and joining, in orbit, were studied and the necessary support equipment identified. The structural performance of the completed reflectors was evaluated and their overall operational capability and feasibility were evaluated and compared. The potential of the three concepts to maintain stable shape in the space environment was determined. Their ability to operate at radio frequencies of 1 GHz and higher was assessed assuming the reflector surface to consist of a number of flat, hexagonal facets. A parametric study was performed to determine figure degradation as a function of reflector size, flat facet size, and f/D ratio.

  13. Modular radiochemistry synthesis system

    DOEpatents

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R.; Amarasekera, Bernard; Van Dam, Michael R.; Olma, Sebastian; Williams, Dirk; Eddings, Mark; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2016-11-01

    A modular chemical production system includes multiple modules for performing a chemical reaction, particularly of radiochemical compounds, from a remote location. One embodiment comprises a reaction vessel including a moveable heat source with the position thereof relative to the reaction vessel being controllable from a remote position. Alternatively the heat source may be fixed in location and the reaction vial is moveable into and out of the heat source. The reaction vessel has one or more sealing plugs, the positioning of which in relationship to the reaction vessel is controllable from a remote position. Also the one or more reaction vessel sealing plugs can include one or more conduits there through for delivery of reactants, gases at atmospheric or an elevated pressure, inert gases, drawing a vacuum and removal of reaction end products to and from the reaction vial, the reaction vial with sealing plug in position being operable at elevated pressures. The modular chemical production system is assembled from modules which can each include operating condition sensors and controllers configured for monitoring and controlling the individual modules and the assembled system from a remote position. Other modules include, but are not limited to a Reagent Storage and Delivery Module, a Cartridge Purification Module, a Microwave Reaction Module, an External QC/Analysis/Purification Interface Module, an Aliquotting Module, an F-18 Drying Module, a Concentration Module, a Radiation Counting Module, and a Capillary Reactor Module.

  14. Modular radiochemistry synthesis system

    DOEpatents

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R.; Amarasekera, Bernard; Van Dam, R. Michael; Olma, Sebastian; Williams, Dirk; Eddings, Mark; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2015-12-15

    A modular chemical production system includes multiple modules for performing a chemical reaction, particularly of radiochemical compounds, from a remote location. One embodiment comprises a reaction vessel including a moveable heat source with the position thereof relative to the reaction vessel being controllable from a remote position. Alternatively the heat source may be fixed in location and the reaction vial is moveable into and out of the heat source. The reaction vessel has one or more sealing plugs, the positioning of which in relationship to the reaction vessel is controllable from a remote position. Also the one or more reaction vessel sealing plugs can include one or more conduits there through for delivery of reactants, gases at atmospheric or an elevated pressure, inert gases, drawing a vacuum and removal of reaction end products to and from the reaction vial, the reaction vial with sealing plug in position being operable at elevated pressures. The modular chemical production system is assembled from modules which can each include operating condition sensors and controllers configured for monitoring and controlling the individual modules and the assembled system from a remote position. Other modules include, but are not limited to a Reagent Storage and Delivery Module, a Cartridge Purification Module, a Microwave Reaction Module, an External QC/Analysis/Purification Interface Module, an Aliquotting Module, an F-18 Drying Module, a Concentration Module, a Radiation Counting Module, and a Capillary Reactor Module.

  15. Modular radiochemistry synthesis system

    DOEpatents

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R; Amarasekera, Bernard; Van Dam, R. Michael; Olma, Sebastian; Williams, Dirk; Eddings, Mark A; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2015-02-10

    A modular chemical production system includes multiple modules for performing a chemical reaction, particularly of radiochemical compounds, from a remote location. One embodiment comprises a reaction vessel including a moveable heat source with the position thereof relative to the reaction vessel being controllable from a remote position. Alternatively the heat source may be fixed in location and the reaction vial is moveable into and out of the heat source. The reaction vessel has one or more sealing plugs, the positioning of which in relationship to the reaction vessel is controllable from a remote position. Also the one or more reaction vessel sealing plugs can include one or more conduits there through for delivery of reactants, gases at atmospheric or an elevated pressure, inert gases, drawing a vacuum and removal of reaction end products to and from the reaction vial, the reaction vial with sealing plug in position being operable at elevated pressures. The modular chemical production system is assembled from modules which can each include operating condition sensors and controllers configured for monitoring and controlling the individual modules and the assembled system from a remote position. Other modules include, but are not limited to a Reagent Storage and Delivery Module, a Cartridge Purification Module, a Microwave Reaction Module, an External QC/Analysis/Purification Interface Module, an Aliquotting Module, an F-18 Drying Module, a Concentration Module, a Radiation Counting Module, and a Capillary Reactor Module.

  16. Modular Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borroni-Bird, Christopher E. (Inventor); Lapp, Anthony Joseph (Inventor); Vitale, Robert L. (Inventor); Lee, Chunhao J. (Inventor); Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Ridley, Justin S. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Lutz, Jonathan J. (Inventor); Guo, Raymond (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular robotic vehicle includes a chassis, driver input devices, an energy storage system (ESS), a power electronics module (PEM), modular electronic assemblies (eModules) connected to the ESS via the PEM, one or more master controllers, and various embedded controllers. Each eModule includes a drive wheel containing a propulsion-braking module, and a housing containing propulsion and braking control assemblies with respective embedded propulsion and brake controllers, and a mounting bracket covering a steering control assembly with embedded steering controllers. The master controller, which is in communication with each eModule and with the driver input devices, communicates with and independently controls each eModule, by-wire, via the embedded controllers to establish a desired operating mode. Modes may include a two-wheel, four-wheel, diamond, and omni-directional steering modes as well as a park mode. A bumper may enable docking with another vehicle, with shared control over the eModules of the vehicles.

  17. The Polyketide Components of Waxes and the Cer-cqu Gene Cluster Encoding a Novel Polyketide Synthase, the β-Diketone Synthase, DKS

    PubMed Central

    von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny

    2017-01-01

    The primary function of the outermost, lipophilic layer of plant aerial surfaces, called the cuticle, is preventing non-stomatal water loss. Its exterior surface is often decorated with wax crystals, imparting a blue–grey color. Identification of the barley Cer-c, -q and -u genes forming the 101 kb Cer-cqu gene cluster encoding a novel polyketide synthase—the β-diketone synthase (DKS), a lipase/carboxyl transferase, and a P450 hydroxylase, respectively, establishes a new, major pathway for the synthesis of plant waxes. The major product is a β-diketone (14,16-hentriacontane) aliphatic that forms long, thin crystalline tubes. A pathway branch leads to the formation of esterified alkan-2-ols. PMID:28698520

  18. The Polyketide Components of Waxes and the Cer-cqu Gene Cluster Encoding a Novel Polyketide Synthase, the β-Diketone Synthase, DKS.

    PubMed

    von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny

    2017-07-10

    The primary function of the outermost, lipophilic layer of plant aerial surfaces, called the cuticle, is preventing non-stomatal water loss. Its exterior surface is often decorated with wax crystals, imparting a blue-grey color. Identification of the barley Cer-c , -q and -u genes forming the 101 kb Cer-cqu gene cluster encoding a novel polyketide synthase-the β-diketone synthase (DKS), a lipase/carboxyl transferase, and a P450 hydroxylase, respectively, establishes a new, major pathway for the synthesis of plant waxes. The major product is a β-diketone (14,16-hentriacontane) aliphatic that forms long, thin crystalline tubes. A pathway branch leads to the formation of esterified alkan-2-ols.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an acridone-producing novel multifunctional type III polyketide synthase from Huperzia serrata

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Kato, Ryohei

    2007-07-01

    An acridone-producing novel type III polyketide synthase from H. serrata has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å. Polyketide synthase 1 (PKS1) from Huperzia serrata is a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase that shows an unusually versatile catalytic potential, producing various aromatic tetraketides, including chalcones, benzophenones, phlorogulucinols and acridones. Recombinant H. serrata PKS1 expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group I222 or I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.3, b = 85.0, c = 137.7 Å, α =more » β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.« less

  20. Kernel based machine learning algorithm for the efficient prediction of type III polyketide synthase family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Mallika, V; Sivakumar, K C; Jaichand, S; Soniya, E V

    2010-07-13

    Type III Polyketide synthases (PKS) are family of proteins considered to have significant roles in the biosynthesis of various polyketides in plants, fungi and bacteria. As these proteins shows positive effects to human health, more researches are going on regarding this particular protein. Developing a tool to identify the probability of sequence being a type III polyketide synthase will minimize the time consumption and manpower efforts. In this approach, we have designed and implemented PKSIIIpred, a high performance prediction server for type III PKS where the classifier is Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Based on the limited training dataset, the tool efficiently predicts the type III PKS superfamily of proteins with high sensitivity and specificity. The PKSIIIpred is available at http://type3pks.in/prediction/. We expect that this tool may serve as a useful resource for type III PKS researchers. Currently work is being progressed for further betterment of prediction accuracy by including more sequence features in the training dataset.

  1. HSQC-TOCSY Fingerprinting-Directed Discovery of Antiplasmodial Polyketides from the Marine Ascidian-Derived Streptomyces sp. (USC-16018).

    PubMed

    Buedenbender, Larissa; Robertson, Luke P; Lucantoni, Leonardo; Avery, Vicky M; Kurtböke, D İpek; Carroll, Anthony R

    2018-05-30

    Chemical investigations on the fermentation extract obtained from an ascidian-derived Streptomyces sp. (USC-16018) yielded a new ansamycin polyketide, herbimycin G ( 1 ), as well as a known macrocyclic polyketide, elaiophylin ( 2 ), and four known diketopiperazines ( 3 ⁻ 6 ). The structures of the compounds were elucidated based on 1D/2D NMR and MS data. The absolute configuration of 1 was established by comparison of experimental and predicted electronic circular dichroism (ECD) data. Antiplasmodial activities were tested for the natural products against chloroquine sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum strains; the two polyketides ( 1 ⁻ 2 ) demonstrated an inhibition of >75% against both parasite strains and while 2 was highly cytotoxic, herbimycin G ( 1 ) showed no cytotoxicity and good predicted water solubility.

  2. Polyketide synthases of Diaporthe helianthi and involvement of DhPKS1 in virulence on sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Michelina; Baroncelli, Riccardo; Cacciola, Santa Olga; Pane, Catello; Monti, Maurilia Maria; Firrao, Giuseppe; Vergara, Mariarosaria; Magnano di San Lio, Gaetano; Vannacci, Giovanni; Scala, Felice

    2018-01-06

    The early phases of Diaporthe helianthi pathogenesis on sunflower are characterized by the production of phytotoxins that may play a role in host colonisation. In previous studies, phytotoxins of a polyketidic nature were isolated and purified from culture filtrates of virulent strains of D. helianthi isolated from sunflower. A highly aggressive isolate (7/96) from France contained a gene fragment of a putative nonaketide synthase (lovB) which was conserved in a virulent D. helianthi population. In order to investigate the role of polyketide synthases in D. helianthi 7/96, a draft genome of this isolate was examined. We were able to find and phylogenetically analyse 40 genes putatively coding for polyketide synthases (PKSs). Analysis of their domains revealed that most PKS genes of D. helianthi are reducing PKSs, whereas only eight lacked reducing domains. Most of the identified PKSs have orthologs shown to be virulence factors or genetic determinants for toxin production in other pathogenic fungi. One of the genes (DhPKS1) corresponded to the previously cloned D. helianthi lovB gene fragment and clustered with a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) -PKS hybrid/lovastatin nonaketide like A. nidulans LovB. We used DhPKS1 as a case study and carried out its disruption through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in the isolate 7/96. D. helianthi DhPKS1 deleted mutants were less virulent to sunflower compared to the wild type, indicating a role for this gene in the pathogenesis of the fungus. The PKS sequences analysed and reported here constitute a new genomic resource that will be useful for further research on the biology, ecology and evolution of D. helianthi and generally of fungal plant pathogens.

  3. Polyketide intermediate mimics as probes for revealing cryptic stereochemistry of ketoreductase domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Fiers, William D; Bernard, Steffen M; Smith, Janet L; Aldrich, Courtney C; Fecik, Robert A

    2014-12-19

    Among natural product families, polyketides have shown the most promise for combinatorial biosynthesis of natural product-like libraries. Though recent research in the area has provided many mechanistic revelations, a basic-level understanding of kinetic and substrate tolerability is still needed before the full potential of combinatorial biosynthesis can be realized. We have developed a novel set of chemical probes for the study of ketoreductase domains of polyketide synthases. This chemical tool-based approach was validated using the ketoreductase of pikromycin module 2 (PikKR2) as a model system. Triketide substrate mimics 12 and 13 were designed to increase stability (incorporating a nonhydrolyzable thioether linkage) and minimize nonessential functionality (truncating the phosphopantetheinyl arm). PikKR2 reduction product identities as well as steady-state kinetic parameters were determined by a combination of LC-MS/MS analysis of synthetic standards and a NADPH consumption assay. The d-hydroxyl product is consistent with bioinformatic analysis and results from a complementary biochemical and molecular biological approach. When compared to widely employed substrates in previous studies, diketide 63 and trans-decalone 64, substrates 12 and 13 showed 2-10 fold lower K(M) values (2.4 ± 0.8 and 7.8 ± 2.7 mM, respectively), indicating molecular recognition of intermediate-like substrates. Due to an abundance of the nonreducable enol-tautomer, the k(cat) values were attenuated by as much as 15-336 fold relative to known substrates. This study reveals the high stereoselectivity of PikKR2 in the face of gross substrate permutation, highlighting the utility of a chemical probe-based approach in the study of polyketide ketoreductases.

  4. Modular Flooring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thate, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The modular flooring system (MFS) was developed to provide a portable, modular, durable carpeting solution for NASA fs Robotics Alliance Project fs (RAP) outreach efforts. It was also designed to improve and replace a modular flooring system that was too heavy for safe use and transportation. The MFS was developed for use as the flooring for various robotics competitions that RAP utilizes to meet its mission goals. One of these competitions, the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC), currently uses two massive rolls of broadloom carpet for the foundation of the arena in which the robots are contained during the competition. The area of the arena is approximately 30 by 72 ft (approximately 9 by 22 m). This carpet is very cumbersome and requires large-capacity vehicles, and handling equipment and personnel to transport and deploy. The broadloom carpet sustains severe abuse from the robots during a regular three-day competition, and as a result, the carpet is not used again for competition. Similarly, broadloom carpets used for trade shows at convention centers around the world are typically discarded after only one use. This innovation provides a green solution to this wasteful practice. Each of the flooring modules in the previous system weighed 44 lb (.20 kg). The improvements in the overall design of the system reduce the weight of each module by approximately 22 lb (.10 kg) (50 %), and utilize an improved "module-to-module" connection method that is superior to the previous system. The MFS comprises 4-by-4-ft (.1.2-by- 1.2-m) carpet module assemblies that utilize commercially available carpet tiles that are bonded to a lightweight substrate. The substrate surface opposite from the carpeted surface has a module-to-module connecting interface that allows for the modules to be connected, one to the other, as the modules are constructed. This connection is hidden underneath the modules, creating a smooth, co-planar flooring surface. The modules are stacked and strapped

  5. Forazoline A: Marine-derived polyketide with antifungal in vivo efficacy

    DOE PAGES

    Wyche, Thomas P.; Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Hou, Yanpeng; ...

    2014-09-04

    Forazoline A, a novel antifungal polyketide with in vivo efficacy against Candida albicans, was discovered using LCMS-based metabolomics to investigate marine-invertebrate-associated bacteria. Forazoline A had a highly unusual and unprecedented skeleton. Acquisition of 13C– 13C gCOSY and 13C– 15N HMQC NMR data provided the direct carbon–carbon and carbon–nitrogen connectivity, respectively. This approach represents the first example of determining direct 13C– 15N connectivity for a natural product. In this paper, using yeast chemical genomics, we propose that forazoline A operated through a new mechanism of action with a phenotypic outcome of disrupting membrane integrity.

  6. Brocaenols A-C: novel polyketides from a marine derived Penicillium brocae.

    PubMed

    Bugni, Tim S; Bernan, Valerie S; Greenstein, Michael; Janso, Jeffrey E; Maiese, William M; Mayne, Charles L; Ireland, Chris M

    2003-03-07

    Chemical investigation of a Penicillium brocae, obtained from a tissue sample of a Fijian Zyzyya sp. sponge, yielded two known diketopiperazines and three novel cytotoxic polyketides, brocaenols A-C. The brocaenols contain an unusual enolized oxepine lactone ring system that to the best of our knowledge is unprecedented in the literature. The structures were elucidated by using 2D-NMR methods including an INADEQUATE experiment. The absolute stereochemistry of brocaenol A was established by using a modified Mosher method. The taxonomy of the producing fungus was elucidated by using both morphological and rDNA sequence analysis.

  7. Disseminins and Spiciferone Analogues: Polyketide-Derived Metabolites from a Fungicolous Isolate of Pestalotiopsis disseminata.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Hyun; Swenson, Dale C; Gloer, James B; Wicklow, Donald T

    2016-03-25

    Seven new polyketide metabolites (disseminins A-E, 1-5, and spiciferones D and E, 7 and 8) were obtained from cultures of a fungicolous isolate of Pestalotiopsis disseminata (NRRL 62562), together with a related compound (6) previously known only as a semisynthetic product. Structures were determined mainly by analysis of HRMS and NMR data. Biogenetically related compounds 1 and 2 possess uncommon bis-tetrahydrofuran and dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring systems, respectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the p-bromobenzoate derivative of 1 confirmed the structure and enabled assignment of its absolute configuration.

  8. A "methyl extension" strategy for polyketide natural product linker site validation and its application to dictyostatin.

    PubMed

    Ho, Stephen; Sackett, Dan L; Leighton, James L

    2015-11-11

    An approach to the validation of linker strategies for polyketide natural products with few or no obvious handles for linker attachment, and its application to dictyostatin, are described. Analogues in which the C(6)- and C(12)-methyl groups were replaced by 4-azidobutyl groups were prepared and shown to retain the low nanomolar potency of dictyostatin. Further, conjugation of the C(6) analogue with a cyclooctyne resulted in only minor attenuations in potency. Together, these results shed light on the binding of dictyostatin to β-tubulin, establish a validated linker strategy for dictyostatin, and set the stage for the synthesis and study of dictyostatin conjugates.

  9. Modular Cooling Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.; Hartenstine, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Three modular heat-transfer components designed for use together or separately. Simple mechanical connections facilitate assembly of these and related heat-transfer components into cooling systems of various configurations, such as to cool laboratory equipment rearranged for different experiments. Components are clamp-on cold plate, cold plate attached to flexible heat pipe, and thermal-bus receptacle. Clamp-on cold plate moved to any convenient location for attachment of equipment cooled by it, then clamped onto thermal bus. Heat from equipment conducted through plate and into coolant. Thermal-bus receptacle integral with thermal bus. Includes part of thermal bus to which clamp-on cold plate attached, plus tapered socket into which condenser end of flexible heat pipe plugged. Thermal-bus receptacle includes heat-pipe wick structure using coolant in bus to enhance transfer of heat from cold plate.

  10. Modular electronics packaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Don J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A modular electronics packaging system includes multiple packaging slices that are mounted horizontally to a base structure. The slices interlock to provide added structural support. Each packaging slice includes a rigid and thermally conductive housing having four side walls that together form a cavity to house an electronic circuit. The chamber is enclosed on one end by an end wall, or web, that isolates the electronic circuit from a circuit in an adjacent packaging slice. The web also provides a thermal path between the electronic circuit and the base structure. Each slice also includes a mounting bracket that connects the packaging slice to the base structure. Four guide pins protrude from the slice into four corresponding receptacles in an adjacent slice. A locking element, such as a set screw, protrudes into each receptacle and interlocks with the corresponding guide pin. A conduit is formed in the slice to allow electrical connection to the electronic circuit.

  11. Modular error embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Ettinger, J. Mark

    1999-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data containing noise in the low-order bits. The method applies to digital data representing analog signals, for example digital images. The method reduces the error introduced by other methods that replace the low-order bits with auxiliary information. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user through use of a digital key. The modular error embedding method includes a process to permute the order in which the host data values are processed. The method doubles the amount of auxiliary information that can be added to host data values, in comparison with bit-replacement methods for high bit-rate coding. The invention preserves human perception of the meaning and content of the host data, permitting the addition of auxiliary data in the amount of 50% or greater of the original host data.

  12. The Polyketide Synthase Gene pks4 of Trichoderma reesei Provides Pigmentation and Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Lea; Knox, Benjamin P.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Baker, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Species of the fungal genus Trichoderma (Hypocreales, Ascomycota) are well-known for their production of various secondary metabolites. Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides represent a major portion of these products. In a recent phylogenomic investigation of Trichoderma polyketide synthase (PKS)-encoding genes, the pks4 from T. reesei was shown to be an orthologue of pigment-forming PKSs involved in synthesis of aurofusarin and bikaverin in Fusarium spp. In this study, we show that deletion of this gene in T. reesei results in loss of green conidial pigmentation and in pigmentation alteration of teleomorph structures. It also has an impact on conidial cell wall stability and the antagonistic abilities of T. reesei against other fungi, including formation of inhibitory metabolites. In addition, deletion of pks4 significantly influences the expression of other PKS-encoding genes of T. reesei. To our knowledge, this is the first indication that a low-molecular-weight pigment-forming PKS is involved in defense, mechanical stability, and stress resistance in fungi. PMID:24036343

  13. Total Biosynthesis and Diverse Applications of the Nonribosomal Peptide-Polyketide Siderophore Yersiniabactin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Fawaz, Samar; Jones, Charles H.; Zhang, Guojian

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniabactin (Ybt) is a mixed nonribosomal peptide-polyketide natural product natively produced by the pathogen Yersinia pestis. The compound enables iron scavenging capabilities upon host infection and is biosynthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase featuring a polyketide synthase module. This pathway has been engineered for expression and biosynthesis using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host. In the current work, the biosynthetic process for Ybt formation was improved through the incorporation of a dedicated step to eliminate the need for exogenous salicylate provision. When this improvement was made, the compound was tested in parallel applications that highlight the metal-chelating nature of the compound. In the first application, Ybt was assessed as a rust remover, demonstrating a capacity of ∼40% compared to a commercial removal agent and ∼20% relative to total removal capacity. The second application tested Ybt in removing copper from a variety of nonbiological and biological solution mixtures. Success across a variety of media indicates potential utility in diverse scenarios that include environmental and biomedical settings. PMID:26025901

  14. Redundant synthesis of a conidial polyketide by two distinct secondary metabolite clusters in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Throckmorton, Kurt; Lim, Fang Yun; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Zheng, Weifa; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Filamentous fungi are renowned for the production of bioactive secondary metabolites. Typically, one distinct metabolite is generated from a specific secondary metabolite cluster. Here, we characterize the newly described trypacidin (tpc) cluster in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We find that this cluster as well as the previously characterized endocrocin (enc) cluster both contribute to the production of the spore metabolite endocrocin. Whereas trypacidin is eliminated when only tpc cluster genes are deleted, endocrocin production is only eliminated when both the tpc and enc non-reducing polyketide synthase-encoding genes, tpcC and encA, respectively, are deleted. EncC, an anthrone oxidase, converts the product released from EncA to endocrocin as a final product. In contrast, endocrocin synthesis by the tpc cluster likely results from incomplete catalysis by TpcK (a putative decarboxylase), as its deletion results in a nearly 10-fold increase in endocrocin production. We suggest endocrocin is likely a shunt product in all related non-reducing polyketide synthase clusters containing homologues of TpcK and TpcL (a putative anthrone oxidase), e.g. geodin and monodictyphenone. This finding represents an unusual example of two physically discrete secondary metabolite clusters generating the same natural product in one fungal species by distinct routes. PMID:26242966

  15. A dual role for a polyketide synthase in dynemicin enediyne and anthraquinone biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Douglas R.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2018-02-01

    Dynemicin A is a member of a subfamily of enediyne antitumour antibiotics characterized by a 10-membered carbocycle fused to an anthraquinone, both of polyketide origin. Sequencing of the dynemicin biosynthetic gene cluster in Micromonospora chersina previously identified an enediyne polyketide synthase (PKS), but no anthraquinone PKS, suggesting gene(s) for biosynthesis of the latter were distant from the core dynemicin cluster. To identify these gene(s), we sequenced and analysed the genome of M. chersina. Sequencing produced a short list of putative PKS candidates, yet CRISPR-Cas9 mutants of each locus retained dynemicin production. Subsequently, deletion of two cytochromes P450 in the dynemicin cluster suggested that the dynemicin enediyne PKS, DynE8, may biosynthesize the anthraquinone. Together with 18O-labelling studies, we now present evidence that DynE8 produces the core scaffolds of both the enediyne and anthraquinone, and provide a working model to account for their formation from the programmed octaketide of the enediyne PKS.

  16. Engineering a Polyketide Synthase for In Vitro Production of Adipic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Andrew; Poust, Sean; Rond, Tristan de

    2015-10-26

    Polyketides have enormous structural diversity, yet polyketide synthases (PKSs) have thus far been engineered to produce only drug candidates or derivatives thereof. Thousands of other molecules, including commodity and specialty chemicals, could be synthesized using PKSs if composing hybrid PKSs from well-characterized parts derived from natural PKSs was more efficient. Here, using modern mass spectrometry techniques as an essential part of the design–build–test cycle, we engineered a chimeric PKS to enable production one of the most widely used commodity chemicals, adipic acid. To accomplish this, we introduced heterologous reductive domains from various PKS clusters into the borrelidin PKS’ first extensionmore » module, which we previously showed produces a 3-hydroxy-adipoyl intermediate when coincubated with the loading module and a succinyl-CoA starter unit. Acyl-ACP intermediate analysis revealed an unexpected bottleneck at the dehydration step, which was overcome by introduction of a carboxyacyl-processing dehydratase domain. Appending a thioesterase to the hybrid PKS enabled the production of free adipic acid. Using acyl-intermediate based techniques to “debug” PKSs as described here, it should one day be possible to engineer chimeric PKSs to produce a variety of existing commodity and specialty chemicals, as well as thousands of chemicals that are difficult to produce from petroleum feedstocks using traditional synthetic chemistry.« less

  17. Putative Monofunctional Type I Polyketide Synthase Units: A Dinoflagellate-Specific Feature?

    PubMed Central

    Eichholz, Karsten; Beszteri, Bánk; John, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Marine dinoflagellates (alveolata) are microalgae of which some cause harmful algal blooms and produce a broad variety of most likely polyketide synthesis derived phycotoxins. Recently, novel polyketide synthesase (PKS) transcripts have been described from the Florida red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (gymnodiniales) which are evolutionarily related to Type I PKS but were apparently expressed as monofunctional proteins, a feature typical of Type II PKS. Here, we investigated expression units of PKS I-like sequences in Alexandrium ostenfeldii (gonyaulacales) and Heterocapsa triquetra (peridiniales) at the transcript and protein level. The five full length transcripts we obtained were all characterized by polyadenylation, a 3′ UTR and the dinoflagellate specific spliced leader sequence at the 5′end. Each of the five transcripts encoded a single ketoacylsynthase (KS) domain showing high similarity to K. brevis KS sequences. The monofunctional structure was also confirmed using dinoflagellate specific KS antibodies in Western Blots. In a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of KS domains from diverse PKSs, dinoflagellate KSs formed a clade placed well within the protist Type I PKS clade between apicomplexa, haptophytes and chlorophytes. These findings indicate that the atypical PKS I structure, i.e., expression as putative monofunctional units, might be a dinoflagellate specific feature. In addition, the sequenced transcripts harbored a previously unknown, apparently dinoflagellate specific conserved N-terminal domain. We discuss the implications of this novel region with regard to the putative monofunctional organization of Type I PKS in dinoflagellates. PMID:23139807

  18. Chaetochromones A and B, two new polyketides from the fungus Chaetomium indicum (CBS.860.68).

    PubMed

    Lu, Keyang; Zhang, Yisheng; Li, Li; Wang, Xuewei; Ding, Gang

    2013-09-05

    Chaetochromones A (1) and B (2), two novel polyketides, were isolated from the crude extract of fungus Chaetomium indicum (CBS.860.68) together with three known analogues PI-3(3), PI-4 (4) and SB236050 (5). The structures of these compounds were determined by HRESI-MS and NMR experiments. Chaetochromones A (1) and B (2) are a member of the polyketides family, which might originate from a similar biogenetic pathway as the known compounds PI-3 (3), PI-4 (4) and SB236050 (5). The biological activities of these secondary metabolites were evaluated against eight plant pathogens, including Alternaria alternata, Ilyonectria radicicola, Trichoderma viride pers, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium verticillioide, Irpex lacteus (Fr.), Poria placenta (Fr.) Cooke and Coriolus versicolor (L.) Quél. Compound 1 displayed moderate inhibitory rate (>60%) against the brown rot fungus Poria placenta (Fr.) Cooke, which causes significant wood decay. In addition, the cytotoxic activities against three cancer cell lines A549, MDA-MB-231, PANC-1 were also tested, without any inhibitory activities being detected.

  19. Inhibition of Grape Crown Gall by Agrobacterium vitis F2/5 Requires Two Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and One Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Desen; Burr, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Agrobacterium vitis nontumorigenic strain F2/5 is able to inhibit crown gall disease on grapevines. The mechanism of grape tumor inhibition (GTI) by F2/5 has not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that two nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes (F-avi3342 and F-avi5730) and one polyketide synthase gene (F-avi4330) are required for GTI. Knockout of any one of them resulted in F/25 losing GTI capacity. We previously reported that F-avi3342 and F-avi4330 but not F-avi5730 are required for induction of grape tissue necrosis and tobacco hypersensitive response. F-avi5730 is predicted to encode a single modular NRPS. It is located in a cluster that is homologous to the siderophore vicibactin biosynthesis locus in Rhizobium species. Individual disruption of F-avi5730 and two immediate downstream genes, F-avi5731 and F-avi5732, all resulted in reduced siderophore production; however, only F-avi5730 was found to be required for GTI. Complemented F-avi5730 mutant (ΔF-avi5730(+)) restored a wild-type level of GTI activity. It was determined that, over time, populations of ΔF-avi4330, ΔF-avi3342, and ΔF-avi5730 at inoculated wound sites on grapevine did not differ from those of ΔF-avi5730(+) indicating that loss of GTI was not due to reduced colonization of wound sites by mutants.

  20. Plant polyketide synthases: a chalcone synthase-type enzyme which performs a condensation reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA in the biosynthesis of C-methylated chalcones.

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Raiber, S; Berger, T; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, J; Soares-Sello, A M; Bardshiri, E; Strack, D; Simpson, T J; Veit, M; Schröder, G

    1998-06-09

    Heterologous screening of a cDNA library from Pinusstrobus seedlings identified clones for two chalcone synthase (CHS) related proteins (PStrCHS1 and PStrCHS2, 87.6% identity). Heterologous expression in Escherichia coli showed that PStrCHS1 performed the typical CHS reaction, that it used starter CoA-esters from the phenylpropanoid pathway, and that it performed three condensation reactions with malonyl-CoA, followed by the ring closure to the chalcone. PstrCHS2 was completely inactive with these starters and also with linear CoA-esters. Activity was detected only with a diketide derivative (N-acetylcysteamine thioester of 3-oxo-5-phenylpent-4-enoic acid) that corresponded to the CHS reaction intermediate postulated after the first condensation reaction. PstrCHS2 performed only one condensation, with 6-styryl-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone derivatives as release products. The enzyme preferred methylmalonyl-CoA against malonyl-CoA, if only methylmalonyl-CoA was available. These properties and a comparison with the CHS from Pinus sylvestris suggested for PstrCHS2 a special function in the biosynthesis of secondary products. In contrast to P. sylvestris, P. strobus contains C-methylated chalcone derivatives, and the methyl group is at the position predicted from a chain extension with methylmalonyl-CoA in the second condensation of the biosynthetic reaction sequence. We propose that PstrCHS2 specifically contributes the condensing reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA to yield a methylated triketide intermediate. We discuss a model that the biosynthesis of C-methylated chalcones represents the simplest example of a modular polyketide synthase.

  1. Alternative Sigma Factor Over-Expression Enables Heterologous Expression of a Type II Polyketide Biosynthetic Pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David Cole; Conway, Kyle R.; Pearce, Nelson; Villegas-Peñaranda, Luis Roberto; Garza, Anthony G.; Boddy, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterologous expression of bacterial biosynthetic gene clusters is currently an indispensable tool for characterizing biosynthetic pathways. Development of an effective, general heterologous expression system that can be applied to bioprospecting from metagenomic DNA will enable the discovery of a wealth of new natural products. Methodology We have developed a new Escherichia coli-based heterologous expression system for polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters. We have demonstrated the over-expression of the alternative sigma factor σ54 directly and positively regulates heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline biosynthetic gene cluster in E. coli. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that σ54 promoters are present in nearly 70% of polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide biosynthetic pathways. Conclusions We have demonstrated a new mechanism for heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline polyketide biosynthetic pathway, where high-level pleiotropic sigma factors from the heterologous host directly and positively regulate transcription of the non-native biosynthetic gene cluster. Our bioinformatics analysis is consistent with the hypothesis that heterologous expression mediated by the alternative sigma factor σ54 may be a viable method for the production of additional polyketide products. PMID:23724102

  2. Genomic and transcriptomic analyses reveal differential regulation of diverse terpenoid and polyketides secondary metabolites in Hericium erinaceus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Zeng, Xu; Yang, Yan Long; Xing, Yong Mei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Jia Mei; Ma, Ke; Liu, Hong Wei; Guo, Shun Xing

    2017-08-31

    The lion's mane mushroom Hericium erinaceus is a famous traditional medicinal fungus credited with anti-dementia activity and a producer of cyathane diterpenoid natural products (erinacines) useful against nervous system diseases. To date, few studies have explored the biosynthesis of these compounds, although their chemical synthesis is known. Here, we report the first genome and tanscriptome sequence of the medicinal fungus H. erinaceus. The size of the genome is 39.35 Mb, containing 9895 gene models. The genome of H. erinaceus reveals diverse enzymes and a large family of cytochrome P450 (CYP) proteins involved in the biosynthesis of terpenoid backbones, diterpenoids, sesquiterpenes and polyketides. Three gene clusters related to terpene biosynthesis and one gene cluster for polyketides biosynthesis (PKS) were predicted. Genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis were generally upregulated in mycelia, while the PKS gene was upregulated in the fruiting body. Comparative genome analysis of 42 fungal species of Basidiomycota revealed that most edible and medicinal mushroom show many more gene clusters involved in terpenoid and polyketide biosynthesis compared to the pathogenic fungi. None of the gene clusters for terpenoid or polyketide biosynthesis were predicted in the poisonous mushroom Amanita muscaria. Our findings may facilitate future discovery and biosynthesis of bioactive secondary metabolites from H. erinaceus and provide fundamental information for exploring the secondary metabolites in other Basidiomycetes.

  3. Spacecraft Modularity for Serviceable Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossetti, Dino; Keer, Beth; Panek, John; Reed, Benjamin; Cepollina, Frank; Ritter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite servicing has been a proven capability of NASA since the first servicing missions in the 1980s with astronauts on the space shuttle. This capability enabled the on-orbit assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and saved the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mission following the discovery of the flawed primary mirror. The effectiveness and scope of servicing opportunities, especially using robotic servicers, is a function of how cooperative a spacecraft is. In this paper, modularity will be presented as a critical design aspect for a spacecraft that is cooperative from a servicing perspective. Different features of modularity are discussed using examples from HST and the Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) program from the 1980s and 1990s. The benefits of modularity will be presented including those directly related to servicing and those outside of servicing including reduced costs and increased flexibility. The new Reconfigurable Operational spacecraft for Science and Exploration (ROSE) concept is introduced as an affordable implementation of modularity that provides cost savings and flexibility. Key aspects of the ROSE architecture are discussed such as the module design and the distributed avionics architecture. The ROSE concept builds on the experience from MMS and due to its modularity, would be highly suitable as a future client for on-orbit servicing.

  4. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Mason, Lee S.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    High-efficiency radioisotope power generators will play an important role in future NASA space exploration missions. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs) have been identified as a candidate generator technology capable of providing mission designers with an efficient, high-specific-power electrical generator. SRGs high conversion efficiency has the potential to extend the limited Pu-238 supply when compared with current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Due to budgetary constraints, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) was canceled in the fall of 2013. Over the past year a joint study by NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) called the Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) recommended that Stirling technologies continue to be explored. During the mission studies of the NPAS, spare SRGs were sometimes required to meet mission power system reliability requirements. This led to an additional mass penalty and increased isotope consumption levied on certain SRG-based missions. In an attempt to remove the spare power system, a new generator architecture is considered, which could increase the reliability of a Stirling generator and provide a more fault-tolerant power system. This new generator called the Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator (MSRG) employs multiple parallel Stirling convertor/controller strings, all of which share the heat from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. For this design, generators utilizing one to eight GPHS modules were analyzed, which provided about 50 to 450 W of direct current (DC) to the spacecraft, respectively. Four Stirling convertors are arranged around each GPHS module resulting in from 4 to 32 Stirling/controller strings. The convertors are balanced either individually or in pairs, and are radiatively coupled to the GPHS modules. Heat is rejected through the housing/radiator, which is similar in construction to the ASRG. Mass and power analysis for these systems indicate that specific

  5. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Mason, Lee S.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    High efficiency radioisotope power generators will play an important role in future NASA space exploration missions. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRG) have been identified as a candidate generator technology capable of providing mission designers with an efficient, high specific power electrical generator. SRGs high conversion efficiency has the potential to extend the limited Pu-238 supply when compared with current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). Due to budgetary constraints, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) was canceled in the fall of 2013. Over the past year a joint study by NASA and DOE called the Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) recommended that Stirling technologies continue to be explored. During the mission studies of the NPAS, spare SRGs were sometimes required to meet mission power system reliability requirements. This led to an additional mass penalty and increased isotope consumption levied on certain SRG-based missions. In an attempt to remove the spare power system, a new generator architecture is considered which could increase the reliability of a Stirling generator and provide a more fault-tolerant power system. This new generator called the Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator (MSRG) employs multiple parallel Stirling convertor/controller strings, all of which share the heat from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. For this design, generators utilizing one to eight GPHS modules were analyzed, which provide about 50 to 450 watts DC to the spacecraft, respectively. Four Stirling convertors are arranged around each GPHS module resulting in from 4 to 32 Stirling/controller strings. The convertors are balanced either individually or in pairs, and are radiatively coupled to the GPHS modules. Heat is rejected through the housing/radiator which is similar in construction to the ASRG. Mass and power analysis for these systems indicate that specific power may be slightly lower than the ASRG and

  6. Six New Polyketide Decalin Compounds from Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum 328#

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanhong; Li, Jing; Huang, Meixiang; Liu, Lan; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Six new compounds with polyketide decalin ring, peaurantiogriseols A–F (1–6), along with two known compounds, aspermytin A (7), 1-propanone,3-hydroxy-1-(1,2,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-2,5-dihydroxy-1,2,6-trimethyl-1-naphthalenyl) (8), were isolated from the fermentation products of mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum 328#. Their structures were elucidated based on their structure analysis. The absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were determined by 1H NMR analysis of their Mosher esters; the absolute configurations of 3–6 were determined by using theoretical calculations of electronic circular dichroism (ECD). Compounds 1–8 showed low inhibitory activity against human aldose reductase, no activity of inducing neurite outgrowth, nor antimicrobial activity. PMID:26473887

  7. Tagging polyketides/non-ribosomal peptides with a clickable functionality and applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuejun; Zhang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has recently emerged to be one of the most powerful tools in drug discovery and chemical biology. The exploration of it has successfully advanced the field of natural product research. In this Perspective, we survey current strategies for the installation of chemical handles into the molecular scaffolds of several major classes of natural products, including polyketides (PKs), non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), and their hybrids. By tagging these natural products with chemical handles and coupling them with subsequent bioorthogonal reactions, researchers have visualized and studied the mode of action of natural products, as well as synthesized derivatives with better pharmaceutical properties. We conclude this Perspective by considering two questions: is there a general way to synthesize tagged PKs/NRPs? Does natural product labeling have a broader impact in the field of natural product research beyond current known applications? PMID:25815285

  8. Pestalpolyols A-D, Cytotoxic Polyketides from Pestalotiopsis sp. cr013.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xie, Jin; Yang, Yin-He; Li, Xiao-Lian; Zeng, Ying; Zhao, Pei-Ji

    2015-09-01

    Four novel polyketides, named pestalpolyols A (1), B (2), C (3), and D (4), were isolated from solid fermentation products of Pestalotiopsis sp. cr013. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments, and the absolute configuration was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis using the anomalous scattering of Cu Kα radiation. The inhibitory activities of compounds 1, 2, and 4 against five human tumor lines were tested in vitro, and showed IC50 values 2.3-31.2 µM. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Polyketide derivatives from a marine-sponge-associated fungus Pestalotiopsis heterocornis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hui; Lin, Xiuping; Han, Li; Ma, Jian; Dong, Kailin; Wang, Xingbo; Zhong, Jialiang; Mu, Yu; Liu, Yonghong; Huang, Xueshi

    2017-10-01

    Twelve previously undescribed polyketide derivatives, heterocornols A-L, and seven known analogues were isolated from a culture of the fungus Pestalotiopsis heterocornis associated with sponge. Their structures were elucidated by a comprehensive spectroscopic data analysis and CD Cotton effects. These compounds were evaluated for cytotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro. Among them, heterocornols A-C, F-H, methyl-(2-formyl-3-hydroxyphenyl)propanoate, agropyrenol, and vaccinol G exhibited cytotoxicities against four human cancer cell lines with IC 50 values 15-100 μM, and they also showed antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis with MIC values ranging from 25 to 100 μg/mL. Moreover, compounds heterocornol C, heterocornol G, agropyrenol, and vaccinol G showed weak antifungal activities against Candida parapsilosis and Cryptococcus neoformans with MIC values 100 μg/mL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modular Power Standard for Space Explorations Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Gardner, Brent G.

    2016-01-01

    Future human space exploration will most likely be composed of assemblies of multiple modular spacecraft elements with interconnected electrical power systems. An electrical system composed of a standardized set modular building blocks provides significant development, integration, and operational cost advantages. The modular approach can also provide the flexibility to configure power systems to meet the mission needs. A primary goal of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power System (AMPS) project is to establish a Modular Power Standard that is needed to realize these benefits. This paper is intended to give the space exploration community a "first look" at the evolving Modular Power Standard and invite their comments and technical contributions.

  11. Functional analysis of environmental DNA-derived type II polyketide synthases reveals structurally diverse secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhiyang; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Brady, Sean F

    2011-08-02

    A single gram of soil is predicted to contain thousands of unique bacterial species. The majority of these species remain recalcitrant to standard culture methods, prohibiting their use as sources of unique bioactive small molecules. The cloning and analysis of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (environmental DNA, eDNA) provides a means of exploring the biosynthetic capacity of natural bacterial populations. Environmental DNA libraries contain large reservoirs of bacterial genetic diversity from which new secondary metabolite gene clusters can be systematically recovered and studied. The identification and heterologous expression of type II polyketide synthase-containing eDNA clones is reported here. Functional analysis of three soil DNA-derived polyketide synthase systems in Streptomyces albus revealed diverse metabolites belonging to well-known, rare, and previously uncharacterized structural families. The first of these systems is predicted to encode the production of the known antibiotic landomycin E. The second was found to encode the production of a metabolite with a previously uncharacterized pentacyclic ring system. The third was found to encode the production of unique KB-3346-5 derivatives, which show activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. These results, together with those of other small-molecule-directed metagenomic studies, suggest that culture-independent approaches are capable of accessing biosynthetic diversity that has not yet been extensively explored using culture-based methods. The large-scale functional screening of eDNA clones should be a productive strategy for generating structurally previously uncharacterized chemical entities for use in future drug development efforts.

  12. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases1

    PubMed Central

    Pandith, Shahzad A.; Dhar, Niha; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P.; Shah, Manzoor A.; Vishwakarma, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  13. Probing the Selectivity and Protein•Protein Interactions of a Non-Reducing Fungal Polyketide Synthase Using Mechanism-Based Crosslinkers

    PubMed Central

    Bruegger, Joel; Haushalter, Bob; Vagstad, Anna; Shakya, Gaurav; Mih, Nathan; Townsend, Craig A.; Burkart, Michael D.; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein•protein interactions, which often involve interactions between an acyl carrier protein (ACP) and its partner enzymes, are important for coordinating polyketide biosynthesis. However, the nature of such interactions is not well understood, especially in the fungal non-reducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) that biosynthesize toxic and pharmaceutically important polyketides. Here, we employ a mechanism-based crosslinker to successfully probe ACP and ketosynthase (KS) domain interactions in NR-PKSs. We found that crosslinking efficiency is closely correlated with the strength of ACP•KS interactions, and that KS demonstrates strong starter unit selectivity. We further identified positively charged surface residues by KS mutagenesis, which mediate key interactions with the negatively-charged ACP surface. Such complementary/matching contact pairs can serve as “adapter surfaces” for future efforts to generate new polyketides using NR-PKSs. PMID:23993461

  14. Modular assembly of optical nanocircuits.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinwei; Monticone, Francesco; Elias, Sarah; Wu, Yanwen; Ratchford, Daniel; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2014-05-29

    A key element enabling the microelectronic technology advances of the past decades has been the conceptualization of complex circuits with versatile functionalities as being composed of the proper combination of basic 'lumped' circuit elements (for example, inductors and capacitors). In contrast, modern nanophotonic systems are still far from a similar level of sophistication, partially because of the lack of modularization of their response in terms of basic building blocks. Here we demonstrate the design, assembly and characterization of relatively complex photonic nanocircuits by accurately positioning a number of metallic and dielectric nanoparticles acting as modular lumped elements. The nanoparticle clusters produce the desired spectral response described by simple circuit rules and are shown to be dynamically reconfigurable by modifying the direction or polarization of impinging signals. Our work represents an important step towards extending the powerful modular design tools of electronic circuits into nanophotonic systems.

  15. Modular assembly of optical nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jinwei; Monticone, Francesco; Elias, Sarah; Wu, Yanwen; Ratchford, Daniel; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    A key element enabling the microelectronic technology advances of the past decades has been the conceptualization of complex circuits with versatile functionalities as being composed of the proper combination of basic ‘lumped’ circuit elements (for example, inductors and capacitors). In contrast, modern nanophotonic systems are still far from a similar level of sophistication, partially because of the lack of modularization of their response in terms of basic building blocks. Here we demonstrate the design, assembly and characterization of relatively complex photonic nanocircuits by accurately positioning a number of metallic and dielectric nanoparticles acting as modular lumped elements. The nanoparticle clusters produce the desired spectral response described by simple circuit rules and are shown to be dynamically reconfigurable by modifying the direction or polarization of impinging signals. Our work represents an important step towards extending the powerful modular design tools of electronic circuits into nanophotonic systems.

  16. Product modular design incorporating preventive maintenance issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yicong; Feng, Yixiong; Tan, Jianrong

    2016-03-01

    Traditional modular design methods lead to product maintenance problems, because the module form of a system is created according to either the function requirements or the manufacturing considerations. For solving these problems, a new modular design method is proposed with the considerations of not only the traditional function related attributes, but also the maintenance related ones. First, modularity parameters and modularity scenarios for product modularity are defined. Then the reliability and economic assessment models of product modularity strategies are formulated with the introduction of the effective working age of modules. A mathematical model used to evaluate the difference among the modules of the product so that the optimal module of the product can be established. After that, a multi-objective optimization problem based on metrics for preventive maintenance interval different degrees and preventive maintenance economics is formulated for modular optimization. Multi-objective GA is utilized to rapidly approximate the Pareto set of optimal modularity strategy trade-offs between preventive maintenance cost and preventive maintenance interval difference degree. Finally, a coordinate CNC boring machine is adopted to depict the process of product modularity. In addition, two factorial design experiments based on the modularity parameters are constructed and analyzed. These experiments investigate the impacts of these parameters on the optimal modularity strategies and the structure of module. The research proposes a new modular design method, which may help to improve the maintainability of product in modular design.

  17. Portable or Modular? There Is a Difference....

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Describes differences between two types of school facilities: portable (prebuilt, temporary wood structure installed on site) and modular (method of construction for permanent buildings). Provides details of modular construction. (PKP)

  18. A Modularized Counselor-Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Thomas V.; Dimattia, Dominic J.

    1978-01-01

    Counselor-education programs may be enriched through the use of modularized learning experiences. This article notes several recent articles on competency-based counselor education, the concepts of simulation and modularization, and describes the process of developing a modularized master's program at the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut.…

  19. Rapidly Deployed Modular Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a telemetry system, and more specifically is a rapidly deployed modular telemetry apparatus which utilizes of SDR technology and the FPGA programming capability to reduce the number of hardware components and programming required to deploy a telemetry system.

  20. Survey of Modular Military Vehicles: Benefits and Burdens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Survey of Modular Military Vehicles: BENEFITS and BURDENS Jean M. Dasch and David J. Gorsich Modularity in military vehicle design is generally...considered a positive attribute that promotes adaptability, resilience, and cost savings. The benefits and burdens of modularity are considered by...Engineering Center, vehicles were considered based on horizontal modularity , vertical modularity , and distributed modularity . Examples were given for each

  1. Ruthenium-catalyzed insertion of adjacent diol carbon atoms into C-C bonds: Entry to type II polyketides.

    PubMed

    Bender, Matthias; Turnbull, Ben W H; Ambler, Brett R; Krische, Michael J

    2017-08-25

    Current catalytic processes involving carbon-carbon bond activation rely on π-unsaturated coupling partners. Exploiting the concept of transfer hydrogenative coupling, we report a ruthenium(0)-catalyzed cycloaddition of benzocyclobutenones that functionalizes two adjacent saturated diol carbon-hydrogen bonds. These regio- and diastereoselective processes enable convergent construction of type II polyketide substructures. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Policing starter unit selection of the enterocin type II polyketide synthase by the type II thioesterase EncL.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzis, John A; Cheng, Qian; Meluzzi, Dario; Xiang, Longkuan; Izumikawa, Miho; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Moore, Bradley S

    2011-11-15

    Enterocin is an atypical type II polyketide synthase (PKS) product from the marine actinomycete 'Streptomyces maritimus'. The enterocin biosynthesis gene cluster (enc) codes for proteins involved in the assembly and attachment of the rare benzoate primer that initiates polyketide assembly with the addition of seven malonate molecules and culminates in a Favorskii-like rearrangement of the linear poly-β-ketone to give its distinctive non-aromatic, caged core structure. Fundamental to enterocin biosynthesis, which utilizes a single acyl carrier protein (ACP), EncC, for both priming with benzoate and elongating with malonate, involves maintaining the correct balance of acyl-EncC substrates for efficient polyketide assembly. Here, we report the characterization of EncL as a type II thioesterase that functions to edit starter unit (mis)priming of EncC. We performed a series of in vivo mutational studies, heterologous expression experiments, in vitro reconstitution studies, and Fourier-transform mass spectrometry-monitored competitive enzyme assays that together support the proposed selective hydrolase activity of EncL toward misprimed acetyl-ACP over benzoyl-ACP to facilitate benzoyl priming of the enterocin PKS complex. While this system resembles the R1128 PKS that also utilizes an editing thioesterase (ZhuC) to purge acetate molecules from its initiation module ACP in favor of alkylacyl groups, the enterocin system is distinct in its usage of a single ACP for both priming and elongating reactions with different substrates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Policing Starter Unit Selection of the Enterocin Type II Polyketide Synthase by the Type II Thioesterase EncL

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzis, John A.; Cheng, Qian; Meluzzi, Dario; Xiang, Longkuan; Izumikawa, Miho; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Enterocin is an atypical type II polyketide synthase (PKS) product from the marine actinomycete “Streptomyces maritimus”. The enterocin biosynthesis gene cluster (enc) codes for proteins involved in the assembly and attachment of the rare benzoate primer that initiates polyketide assembly with the addition of seven malonate molecules and culminates in a Favorskii-like rearrangement of the linear poly-β-ketone to give its distinctive non-aromatic, caged core structure. Fundamental to enterocin biosynthesis, which utilizes a single acyl carrier protein (ACP), EncC, for both priming with benzoate and elongating with malonate, involves maintaining the correct balance of acyl-EncC substrates for efficient polyketide assembly. Here we report the characterization of EncL as a type II thioesterase that functions to edit starter unit (mis)priming of EncC. We performed a series of in vivo mutational studies, heterologous expression experiments, in vitro reconstitution studies, and Fourier-transform mass spectrometry-monitored competitive enzyme assays that together support the proposed selective hydrolase activity of EncL toward misprimed acetyl-ACP over benzoyl-ACP to facilitate benzoyl priming of the enterocin PKS complex. While this system resembles the R1128 PKS that also utilizes an editing thioesterase (ZhuC) to purge acetate molecules from its initiation module ACP in favor of alkylacyl groups, the enterocin system is distinct in its usage of a single ACP for both priming and elongating reactions with different substrates. PMID:21531566

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Chiho; Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Taura, Futoshi

    Polyketide synthase-1 from C. sativa has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b =more » 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1.« less

  5. The polyketide synthase gene pks4 is essential for sexual development and regulates fruiting body morphology in Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel; Nowrousian, Minou

    2014-07-01

    Filamentous ascomycetes have long been known as producers of a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which have toxic effects on other organisms. However, the role of these metabolites in the biology of the fungi that produce them remains in most cases enigmatic. A major group of fungal secondary metabolites are polyketides. They are chemically diverse, but have in common that their chemical scaffolds are synthesized by polyketide synthases (PKSs). In a previous study, we analyzed development-dependent expression of pks genes in the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. Here, we show that a deletion mutant of the pks4 gene is sterile, producing only protoperithecia but no mature perithecia, whereas overexpression of pks4 leads to enlarged, malformed fruiting bodies. Thus, correct expression levels of pks4 are essential for wild type-like perithecia formation. The predicted PKS4 protein has a domain structure that is similar to homologs in other fungi, but conserved residues of a methyl transferase domain present in other fungi are mutated in PKS4. Expression of several developmental genes is misregulated in the pks4 mutant. Surprisingly, the development-associated app gene is not downregulated in the mutant, in contrast to all other previously studied mutants with a block at the protoperithecial stage. Our data show that the polyketide synthase gene pks4 is essential for sexual development and plays a role in regulating fruiting body morphology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Finn P; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L

    2016-09-13

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA.

  7. Systematic Domain Swaps of Iterative, Nonreducing Polyketide Synthases Provide a Mechanistic Understanding and Rationale For Catalytic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iterative, nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) are multidomain enzymes responsible for the construction of the core architecture of aromatic polyketide natural products in fungi. Engineering these enzymes for the production of non-native metabolites has been a long-standing goal. We conducted a systematic survey of in vitro “domain swapped” NR-PKSs using an enzyme deconstruction approach. The NR-PKSs were dissected into mono- to multidomain fragments and recombined as noncognate pairs in vitro, reconstituting enzymatic activity. The enzymes used in this study produce aromatic polyketides that are representative of the four main chemical features set by the individual NR-PKS: starter unit selection, chain-length control, cyclization register control, and product release mechanism. We found that boundary conditions limit successful chemistry, which are dependent on a set of underlying enzymatic mechanisms. Crucial for successful redirection of catalysis, the rate of productive chemistry must outpace the rate of spontaneous derailment and thioesterase-mediated editing. Additionally, all of the domains in a noncognate system must interact efficiently if chemical redirection is to proceed. These observations refine and further substantiate current understanding of the mechanisms governing NR-PKS catalysis. PMID:24815013

  8. Isolation of polyketides from Prymnesium parvum (Haptophyta) and their detection by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry metabolic fingerprint analysis.

    PubMed

    Manning, Schonna R; La Claire Ii, John W

    2013-11-15

    Prymnesium parvum is a microalga that forms blooms coupled with the presence of potent exotoxins; however, no chemical standards are currently available for the toxins. Streamlined methods are presented for the separation and enrichment of polyketide toxins, prymnesin-1 (prym1) and prymnesin-2 (prym2). Prymnesins were separated by reversed-phase chromatography and detected by positive-mode electrospray ionization MS to generate a unique metabolic fingerprint. More than 10 ions were detected and mass assignments were in agreement with predicted isotopic distributions for the intact compounds and related fragments; ions occurred as multiply protonated species and with common salt adducts. The most prevalent ion was observed at 919.88 m/z, which represents the aglycone [prymagly+2H](2+) backbone structure common to both molecules. Expanded mass spectra for this and related ions were in excellent agreement (<0.5ppm) with empirically derived spectra based on elemental composition and naturally occurring isotopes. These investigations have confirmed the isolation of polyketide prymnesins from whole cells, which heretofore has not been reproduced since their original characterization. Moreover, this study represents the first time these compounds have been verified in aqueous materials. These tools should allow the direct identification and analysis of polyketide prymnesins, which will greatly improve our understanding of these toxins in P. parvum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification and characterization of the polyketide synthase involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis in Aspergillus carbonarius

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, Antonia; Knox, Benjamin P.; Bruno, Kenneth S.

    2014-06-02

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species and is a common contaminant of a wide variety of food commodities, with Aspergillus carbonarius being the main producer of OTA contamination in grapes and wine. The molecular structure of OTA is composed of a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and, as shown in different producing fungal species, a polyketide synthase (PKS) is a component of the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Similar to observations in other filamentous ascomycetes, the genome sequence of A. carbonarius contains a large number of genes predicted to encode PKSs. In this work amore » pks gene identified within the putative OTA cluster of A. carbonarius, designated as AcOTApks, was inactivated and the resulting mutant strain was unable to produce OTA, confirming the role of AcOTApks in this biosynthetic pathway. AcOTApks protein is characteristic of the highly reduced (HR)-PKS family, and also contains a putative methyltransferase domain likely responsible for the addition of the methyl group to the OTA polyketide structure. AcOTApks is different from the ACpks protein that we previously described which showed an expression profile compatible with OTA production. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the β-ketosynthase and acyl-transferase domains of the OTA PKSs which had been identified and characterized in different OTA producing fungal species. The phylogenetic results were similar for both the two domains analyzed and showed that OTA PKS of A. carbonarius, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus ochraceus clustered in a monophyletic group with 100% bootstrap support suggesting a common origin, while the other OTA PKSs analyzed were phylogenetically distant. A qRT-PCR assay monitored AcOTApks expression during fungal growth and concomitant production of OTA by A. carbonarius in synthetic grape medium. A clear correlation between the expression profile of AcOTApks and kinetics of OTA production was

  10. Quasispecies theory for evolution of modularity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Man; Niestemski, Liang Ren; Deem, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems are modular, and this modularity evolves over time and in different environments. A number of observations have been made of increased modularity in biological systems under increased environmental pressure. We here develop a quasispecies theory for the dynamics of modularity in populations of these systems. We show how the steady-state fitness in a randomly changing environment can be computed. We derive a fluctuation dissipation relation for the rate of change of modularity and use it to derive a relationship between rate of environmental changes and rate of growth of modularity. We also find a principle of least action for the evolved modularity at steady state. Finally, we compare our predictions to simulations of protein evolution and find them to be consistent.

  11. Characterization of the Biosynthetic Genes for 10,11-Dehydrocurvularin, a Heat Shock Response-Modulating Anticancer Fungal Polyketide from Aspergillus terreus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuquan; Espinosa-Artiles, Patricia; Schubert, Vivien; Xu, Ya-ming; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; Süssmuth, Roderich

    2013-01-01

    10,11-Dehydrocurvularin is a prevalent fungal phytotoxin with heat shock response and immune-modulatory activities. It features a dihydroxyphenylacetic acid lactone polyketide framework with structural similarities to resorcylic acid lactones like radicicol or zearalenone. A genomic locus was identified from the dehydrocurvularin producer strain Aspergillus terreus AH-02-30-F7 to reveal genes encoding a pair of iterative polyketide synthases (A. terreus CURS1 [AtCURS1] and AtCURS2) that are predicted to collaborate in the biosynthesis of 10,11-dehydrocurvularin. Additional genes in this locus encode putative proteins that may be involved in the export of the compound from the cell and in the transcriptional regulation of the cluster. 10,11-Dehydrocurvularin biosynthesis was reconstituted in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by heterologous expression of the polyketide synthases. Bioinformatic analysis of the highly reducing polyketide synthase AtCURS1 and the nonreducing polyketide synthase AtCURS2 highlights crucial biosynthetic programming differences compared to similar synthases involved in resorcylic acid lactone biosynthesis. These differences lead to the synthesis of a predicted tetraketide starter unit that forms part of the 12-membered lactone ring of dehydrocurvularin, as opposed to the penta- or hexaketide starters in the 14-membered rings of resorcylic acid lactones. Tetraketide N-acetylcysteamine thioester analogues of the starter unit were shown to support the biosynthesis of dehydrocurvularin and its analogues, with yeast expressing AtCURS2 alone. Differential programming of the product template domain of the nonreducing polyketide synthase AtCURS2 results in an aldol condensation with a different regiospecificity than that of resorcylic acid lactones, yielding the dihydroxyphenylacetic acid scaffold characterized by an S-type cyclization pattern atypical for fungal polyketides. PMID:23335766

  12. Modular synchronization in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Oh, E; Rho, K; Hong, H; Kahng, B

    2005-10-01

    We study the synchronization transition (ST) of a modified Kuramoto model on two different types of modular complex networks. It is found that the ST depends on the type of intermodular connections. For the network with decentralized (centralized) intermodular connections, the ST occurs at finite coupling constant (behaves abnormally). Such distinct features are found in the yeast protein interaction network and the Internet, respectively. Moreover, by applying the finite-size scaling analysis to an artificial network with decentralized intermodular connections, we obtain the exponent associated with the order parameter of the ST to be beta approximately 1 different from beta(MF) approximately 1/2 obtained from the scale-free network with the same degree distribution but the absence of modular structure, corresponding to the mean field value.

  13. Molecular architectures of benzoic acid-specific type III polyketide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Charles; Woods, Kate; Macias, Greg; Allan, Andrew C.; Noel, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    Biphenyl synthase and benzophenone synthase constitute an evolutionarily distinct clade of type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) that use benzoic acid-derived substrates to produce defense metabolites in plants. The use of benzoyl-CoA as an endogenous substrate is unusual for type III PKSs. Moreover, sequence analyses indicate that the residues responsible for the functional diversification of type III PKSs are mutated in benzoic acid-specific type III PKSs. In order to gain a better understanding of structure–function relationships within the type III PKS family, the crystal structures of biphenyl synthase from Malus × domestica and benzophenone synthase from Hypericum androsaemum were compared with the structure of an archetypal type III PKS: chalcone synthase from Malus × domestica. Both biphenyl synthase and benzophenone synthase contain mutations that reshape their active-site cavities to prevent the binding of 4-coumaroyl-CoA and to favor the binding of small hydrophobic substrates. The active-site cavities of biphenyl synthase and benzophenone synthase also contain a novel pocket associated with their chain-elongation and cyclization reactions. Collectively, these results illuminate structural determinants of benzoic acid-specific type III PKSs and expand the understanding of the evolution of specialized metabolic pathways in plants. PMID:29199980

  14. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of the griseusin polyketide synthase gene cluster from Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, T W; Bibb, M J; Revill, W P; Hopwood, D A

    1994-01-01

    A fragment of DNA was cloned from the Streptomyces griseus K-63 genome by using genes (act) for the actinorhodin polyketide synthase (PKS) of Streptomyces coelicolor as a probe. Sequencing of a 5.4-kb segment of the cloned DNA revealed a set of five gris open reading frames (ORFs), corresponding to the act PKS genes, in the following order: ORF1 for a ketosynthase, ORF2 for a chain length-determining factor, ORF3 for an acyl carrier protein, ORF5 for a ketoreductase, and ORF4 for a cyclase-dehydrase. Replacement of the gris genes with a marker gene in the S. griseus genome by using a single-stranded suicide vector propagated in Escherichia coli resulted in loss of the ability to produce griseusins A and B, showing that the five gris genes do indeed encode the type II griseusin PKS. These genes, encoding a PKS that is programmed differently from those for other aromatic PKSs so far available, will provide further valuable material for analysis of the programming mechanism by the construction and analysis of strains carrying hybrid PKS. Images PMID:8169211

  15. Construction of ivermectin producer by domain swaps of avermectin polyketide synthase in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Chen, Zhi; Li, Meng; Wen, Ying; Song, Yuan; Li, Jilun

    2006-10-01

    Ivermectin, 22, 23-dihydroavermectin B1, is commercially important in human, veterinary medicine, and pesticides. It is currently synthesized by chemical reduction of the double bond between C22 and C23 of avermectins B1, which are a mixture of B1a (>80%) and B1b (<20%) produced by fermentation of Streptomyces avermitilis. The cost of ivermectin is much higher than that of avermectins B1 owing to the necessity of region-specific hydrogenation at C22-C23 of avermectins B1 with rhodium chloride as the catalyst for producing ivermectin. Here we report that ivermectin can be produced directly by fermentation of recombinant strains constructed through targeted genetic engineering of the avermectin polyketide synthase (PKS) in S. avermitilis Olm73-12, which produces only avermectins B and not avermectins A and oligomycin. The DNA region encoding the dehydratase (DH) and ketoreductase (KR) domains of module 2 from the avermectin PKS in S. avermitilis Olm73-12 was replaced by the DNA fragment encoding the DH, enoylreductase, and KR domains from module 4 of the pikromycin PKS of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439 using a gene replacement vector pXL211. Twenty-seven of mutants were found to produce a small amount of 22, 23-dihydroavermectin B1a and avermectin B1a and B2a by high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis. This study might provide a route to the low-cost production of ivermectin by fermentation.

  16. Antifouling and antibacterial polyketides from marine gorgonian coral-associated fungus Penicillium sp. SCSGAF 0023.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Han, Zhuang; Gao, Hai-Chun; He, Fei; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Two new polyketides, 6,8,5'6'-tetrahydroxy-3'-methylflavone (1) and paecilin C (2), together with six known analogs secalonic acid D (3), secalonic acid B (4) penicillixanthone A (5), emodin (6), citreorosein (7) and isorhodoptilometrin (8) were obtained from a broth of gorgonian coral-associated fungus Penicillium sp. SCSGAF 0023. Compounds 1 and 6-8 had significant antifouling activity against Balanus amphitrite larvae settlement with EC50 values of 6.7, 6.1, 17.9 and 13.7 μg ml(-1), respectively, and 3-5 showed medium antibacterial activity against four tested bacterial strains. This was the first report of antibacterial activity of 3-5 against marine bacteria and antifouling activity of 6-8 against marine biofouling organism's larvae. The results indicated that gorgonian coral-associated fungus Penicillium sp. SCSGAF 0023 strain could produce antifouling and antibacterial compounds that might aid the host gorgonian coral in protection against marine pathogen bacteria, biofouling organisms and other intruders.

  17. Immunomodulatory Polyketides from a Phoma-like Fungus Isolated from a Soft Coral.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Zhe; Kurtán, Tibor; Mándi, Attila; Tang, Hua; Chou, Yalan; Soong, Keryea; Su, Li; Sun, Peng; Zhuang, Chun-Lin; Zhang, Wen

    2017-11-22

    Fourteen new polyketides with a trans-fused decalin ring system, libertalides A-N (3-16), together with two known analogues, aspermytin A and its acetate (1, 2), were isolated from the fermentation extract of a coral-derived Libertasomyces sp. fungus. Their relative configurations were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis, and the absolute configurations were determined by TDDFT-ECD and optical rotation (OR) calculations. The OR of 1 and 2 were found to have opposite signs in CH 3 CN and CHCl 3 , which was in agreement with the OR calculations producing alternating signs for the optical rotation depending on the applied conditions. Because the signs of the OR for 1 and 2 showed high solvent dependence, they may not be used alone to correlate the absolute configurations. Compound 16 displayed structural novelty characterized by an α-enol ether bridge conjugated with an aldehyde group. In in vitro immunomodulatory screening, compounds 1, 4, and 10 significantly induced the proliferation of CD3 + T cells, while compounds 2, 7, 11, and 14 significantly increased the CD4 + /CD8 + ratio at 3 μM. A preliminary structure-activity analysis revealed a crucial role of Δ 7 and a terminal OH group in the regulation of CD3 + T cell proliferation. This is the first report of immunoregulatory activity for metabolites of this kind.

  18. Molecular variation of the nonribosomal peptide-polyketide siderophore yersiniabactin through biosynthetic and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Fawaz, Samar; Fang, Lei; Yu, Zhipeng; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2016-05-01

    The production of the mixed nonribosomal peptide-polyketide natural product yersiniabactin (Ybt) has been established using E. coli as a heterologous host. In this study, precursor-directed biosynthesis was used to generate five new analogs of Ybt, demonstrating the flexibility of the heterologous system and the biosynthetic process in allowing compound diversity. A combination of biosynthetic and cellular engineering was then used to influence the production metrics of the resulting analogs. First, the cellular levels and activity of FadL, a hydrocarbon transport protein, were tested for subsequent influence upon exogenous precursor uptake and Ybt analog production with a positive correlation observed between FadL over-production and analog formation. Next, a Ybt biosynthetic editing enzyme was removed from the heterologous system which decreased native compound production but increased analog formation. A final series of experiments enhanced endogenous anthranilate towards complete pathway formation of the associated analog which showed a selective ability to bind gold. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Genetic diversity, morphological uniformity and polyketide production in dinoflagellates (Amphidinium, Dinoflagellata).

    PubMed

    Murray, Shauna A; Garby, Tamsyn; Hoppenrath, Mona; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are an intriguing group of eukaryotes, showing many unusual morphological and genetic features. Some groups of dinoflagellates are morphologically highly uniform, despite indications of genetic diversity. The species Amphidinium carterae is abundant and cosmopolitan in marine environments, grows easily in culture, and has therefore been used as a 'model' dinoflagellate in research into dinoflagellate genetics, polyketide production and photosynthesis. We have investigated the diversity of 'cryptic' species of Amphidinium that are morphologically similar to A. carterae, including the very similar species Amphidinium massartii, based on light and electron microscopy, two nuclear gene regions (LSU rDNA and ITS rDNA) and one mitochondrial gene region (cytochrome b). We found that six genetically distinct cryptic species (clades) exist within the species A. massartii and four within A. carterae, and that these clades differ from one another in molecular sequences at levels comparable to other dinoflagellate species, genera or even families. Using primers based on an alignment of alveolate ketosynthase sequences, we isolated partial ketosynthase genes from several Amphidinium species. We compared these genes to known dinoflagellate ketosynthase genes and investigated the evolution and diversity of the strains of Amphidinium that produce them.

  20. Genetic Diversity, Morphological Uniformity and Polyketide Production in Dinoflagellates (Amphidinium, Dinoflagellata)

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Mona; Neilan, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are an intriguing group of eukaryotes, showing many unusual morphological and genetic features. Some groups of dinoflagellates are morphologically highly uniform, despite indications of genetic diversity. The species Amphidinium carterae is abundant and cosmopolitan in marine environments, grows easily in culture, and has therefore been used as a ‘model’ dinoflagellate in research into dinoflagellate genetics, polyketide production and photosynthesis. We have investigated the diversity of ‘cryptic’ species of Amphidinium that are morphologically similar to A. carterae, including the very similar species Amphidinium massartii, based on light and electron microscopy, two nuclear gene regions (LSU rDNA and ITS rDNA) and one mitochondrial gene region (cytochrome b). We found that six genetically distinct cryptic species (clades) exist within the species A. massartii and four within A. carterae, and that these clades differ from one another in molecular sequences at levels comparable to other dinoflagellate species, genera or even families. Using primers based on an alignment of alveolate ketosynthase sequences, we isolated partial ketosynthase genes from several Amphidinium species. We compared these genes to known dinoflagellate ketosynthase genes and investigated the evolution and diversity of the strains of Amphidinium that produce them. PMID:22675531

  1. Polyketide-Terpene Hybrid Metabolites from an Endolichenic Fungus Pestalotiopsis sp.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Gang; Wang, Hai-Ying; Guo, Yu-Hua; Shang, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Five new polyketide-terpene hybrid metabolites (1–5) with highly functionalized groups, together with six known derivatives (6–11), were isolated from the endolichenic fungus Pestalotiopsis sp. Their structures were elucidated by extensive NMR experiments including 1H, 13C, HMQC, COSY, and HMBC. The relative configurations of the new compounds were determined by analysis of coupling constants and ROESY correlations. The absolute configurations especially the secondary alcohol at C-15 in 1 and secondary alcohol at C-14 in 5 were established via the CD experiments of the in situ formed [Rh2(OCOCF3)4] complex with the acetonide derivatives. These compounds were tested for their inhibition activity against six plant pathogens. Compounds 1 and 5 exhibited pronounced efficiency against Fusarium oxysporum, and compounds 5 and 6 potently inhibited Fusarium gramineum with MIC value of 8 µg/mL, which revealed the plausible ecological role of endolichenic fungus in providing chemical protection for its host lichen in the fungus-plant relationship. The biosynthetic pathway of compounds 1–11 was postulated for the first time, which paved the way for its further biosynthesis research. PMID:28593175

  2. Polyketide-Terpene Hybrid Metabolites from an Endolichenic Fungus Pestalotiopsis sp.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Ding, Gang; Wang, Hai-Ying; Guo, Yu-Hua; Shang, Hai; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Five new polyketide-terpene hybrid metabolites ( 1 - 5 ) with highly functionalized groups, together with six known derivatives ( 6 - 11 ), were isolated from the endolichenic fungus Pestalotiopsis sp. Their structures were elucidated by extensive NMR experiments including 1 H, 13 C, HMQC, COSY, and HMBC. The relative configurations of the new compounds were determined by analysis of coupling constants and ROESY correlations. The absolute configurations especially the secondary alcohol at C-15 in 1 and secondary alcohol at C-14 in 5 were established via the CD experiments of the in situ formed [Rh 2 (OCOCF 3 ) 4 ] complex with the acetonide derivatives. These compounds were tested for their inhibition activity against six plant pathogens. Compounds 1 and 5 exhibited pronounced efficiency against Fusarium oxysporum , and compounds 5 and 6 potently inhibited Fusarium gramineum with MIC value of 8  µ g/mL, which revealed the plausible ecological role of endolichenic fungus in providing chemical protection for its host lichen in the fungus-plant relationship. The biosynthetic pathway of compounds 1 - 11 was postulated for the first time, which paved the way for its further biosynthesis research.

  3. Discovery and Characterization of a Group of Fungal Polycyclic Polyketide Prenyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Yit-Heng; Wang, Peng; Fang, Jinxu; Li, Yanran; Wu, Katherine; Wang, Pin; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The prenyltransferase (PTase) gene vrtC was proposed to be involved in viridicatumtoxin (1) biosynthesis in Penicillium aethiopicum. Targeted gene deletion and reconstitution of recombinant VrtC activity in vitro established that VrtC is a geranyl transferase that catalyzes a regiospecific Friedel-Crafts alkylation of the naphthacenedione carboxamide intermediate 2 at carbon 6 with geranyl diphosphate (GPP). VrtC can function in the absence of divalent ions and can utilize similar naphthacenedione substrates, such as the acetyl-primed TAN-1612 (4). Genome mining using the VrtC protein sequence leads to the identification of a homologous group of PTase genes in the genomes of human and animal-associated fungi. Three enzymes encoded by this new subgroup of PTase genes from Neosartorya fischeri, Microsporum canis and Trichophyton tonsurans were shown to be able to catalyze transfer of dimethylallyl to several tetracyclic naphthacenedione substrates in vitro. In total, seven C5- or C10-prenylated naphthacenedione compounds were generated. The regioselectivity of these new polycyclic PTases (pcPTases) was confirmed by characterization of product 9 obtained from biotransformation of 4 in Escherichia coli expressing the N. fischeri pcPTase gene. The discovery of this new subgroup of PTases extends our enzymatic tools for modifying polycyclic compounds and enables genome mining of new prenylated polyketides. PMID:22590971

  4. Protein-Protein Interactions, Not Substrate Recognition, Dominate the Turnover of Chimeric Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases*

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Maja; Ostrowski, Matthew P.; Austerjost, Jonas; Robbins, Thomas; Lowry, Brian; Cane, David E.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-01-01

    The potential for recombining intact polyketide synthase (PKS) modules has been extensively explored. Both enzyme-substrate and protein-protein interactions influence chimeric PKS activity, but their relative contributions are unclear. We now address this issue by studying a library of 11 bimodular and 8 trimodular chimeric PKSs harboring modules from the erythromycin, rifamycin, and rapamycin synthases. Although many chimeras yielded detectable products, nearly all had specific activities below 10% of the reference natural PKSs. Analysis of selected bimodular chimeras, each with the same upstream module, revealed that turnover correlated with the efficiency of intermodular chain translocation. Mutation of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of the upstream module in one chimera at a residue predicted to influence ketosynthase-ACP recognition led to improved turnover. In contrast, replacement of the ketoreductase domain of the upstream module by a paralog that produced the enantiomeric ACP-bound diketide caused no changes in processing rates for each of six heterologous downstream modules compared with those of the native diketide. Taken together, these results demonstrate that protein-protein interactions play a larger role than enzyme-substrate recognition in the evolution or design of catalytically efficient chimeric PKSs. PMID:27246853

  5. Diversity of nonribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase gene clusters among taxonomically close Streptomyces strains.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Hisayuki; Sakurai, Kenta; Hosoyama, Akira; Kimura, Akane; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Tomohiko

    2018-05-02

    To identify the species of butyrolactol-producing Streptomyces strain TP-A0882, whole genome-sequencing of three type strains in a close taxonomic relationship was performed. In silico DNA-DNA hybridization using the genome sequences suggested that Streptomyces sp. TP-A0882 is classified as Streptomyces diastaticus subsp. ardesiacus. Strain TP-A0882, S. diastaticus subsp. ardesiacus NBRC 15402 T , Streptomyces coelicoflavus NBRC 15399 T , and Streptomyces rubrogriseus NBRC 15455 T harbor at least 14, 14, 10, and 12 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs), respectively, coding for nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs). All 14 gene clusters were shared by S. diastaticus subsp. ardesiacus strains TP-A0882 and NBRC 15402 T , while only four gene clusters were shared by the three distinct species. Although BGCs for bacteriocin, ectoine, indole, melanine, siderophores such as deferrioxamine, terpenes such as albaflavenone, hopene, carotenoid and geosmin are shared by the three species, many BGCs for secondary metabolites such as butyrolactone, lantipeptides, oligosaccharide, some terpenes are species-specific. These results indicate the possibility that strains belonging to the same species possess the same set of secondary metabolite-biosynthetic pathways, whereas strains belonging to distinct species have species-specific pathways, in addition to some common pathways, even if the strains are taxonomically close.

  6. Semi-quantitative assay for polyketide prymnesins isolated from Prymnesium parvum (Haptophyta) cultures.

    PubMed

    La Claire, J W; Manning, S R; Talarski, A E

    2015-08-01

    A fluorometric assay was developed to semi-quantify co-purified polyketide prymnesins-1 and -2 (PPs) from Prymnesium parvum cultures. Evaluations performed throughout the growth cycle of 5 practical salinity unit (PSU) cultures detected relatively 8-10 × more PPs in the culture medium (exotoxins) than in cells (endotoxins). The [exotoxin] remained stable and relatively low until post-log growth, when they increased significantly. However, on a per-cell basis, [exotoxin] declined throughout log phase and subsequently increased dramatically during late- and post-log phases. The [endotoxin] remained stable until late- and post-log phases, when it achieved its highest level before declining sharply. Shaking cultures of strains from Texas, South Carolina and the United Kingdom displayed dramatically different [exotoxin] during post-log decline. Cultures adapted to 30 PSU had significantly lower [exotoxin] over the course of cultivation than those grown at 5 PSU. Phosphate limitation enhanced [exotoxin] on a per-cell basis, especially in late- and post-log cultures. Media containing streptomycin exhibited a ∼20% increase in [exotoxin] in post-log cultures vs. control treatments, but it had only negligible effects on endotoxin levels. Brefeldin A had minimal effects on [exotoxin], suggesting that the presence of PPs in the medium may be largely derived from cell lysis or some other passive means. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-08-27

    A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

  8. PTERA - Modular Aircraft Flight Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-13

    Aerospace testing can be costly and time consuming but a new modular, subscale remotely piloted aircraft offers NASA researchers more affordable options for developing a wide range of cutting edge aviation and space technologies. The Prototype-Technology Evaluation and Research Aircraft (PTERA), developed by Area-I, Inc., of Kennesaw, Georgia, is an extremely versatile and high quality, yet inexpensive, flying laboratory bridging the gap between wind tunnels and crewed flight testing.

  9. Deinterlacing using modular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Dong H.; Eom, Il K.; Kim, Yoo S.

    2004-05-01

    Deinterlacing is the conversion process from the interlaced scan to progressive one. While many previous algorithms that are based on weighted-sum cause blurring in edge region, deinterlacing using neural network can reduce the blurring through recovering of high frequency component by learning process, and is found robust to noise. In proposed algorithm, input image is divided into edge and smooth region, and then, to each region, one neural network is assigned. Through this process, each neural network learns only patterns that are similar, therefore it makes learning more effective and estimation more accurate. But even within each region, there are various patterns such as long edge and texture in edge region. To solve this problem, modular neural network is proposed. In proposed modular neural network, two modules are combined in output node. One is for low frequency feature of local area of input image, and the other is for high frequency feature. With this structure, each modular neural network can learn different patterns with compensating for drawback of counterpart. Therefore it can adapt to various patterns within each region effectively. In simulation, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared with conventional deinterlacing methods and single neural network method.

  10. Assembly line termination in cylindrocyclophane biosynthesis: discovery of an editing type II thioesterase domain in a type I polyketide synthase† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1–S12; Tables S1–S8, full experimental details and procedures, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data and HRMS data of compounds 10 and 11 and the internal standards. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc03132f Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H.; Wang, J. X.

    2015-01-01

    The termination step is an important source of structural diversity in polyketide biosynthesis. Most type I polyketide synthase (PKS) assembly lines are terminated by a thioesterase (TE) domain located at the C-terminus of the final module, while other PKS assembly lines lack a terminal TE domain and are instead terminated by a separate enzyme in trans. In cylindrocyclophane biosynthesis, the type I modular PKS assembly line is terminated by a freestanding type III PKS (CylI). Unexpectedly, the final module of the type I PKS (CylH) also possesses a C-terminal TE domain. Unlike typical type I PKSs, the CylH TE domain does not influence assembly line termination by CylI in vitro. Instead, this domain phylogenetically resembles a type II TE and possesses activity consistent with an editing function. This finding may shed light on the evolution of unusual PKS termination logic. In addition, the presence of related type II TE domains in many cryptic type I PKS and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly lines has implications for pathway annotation, product prediction, and engineering. PMID:29218151

  11. Self-organized modularization in evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Dauscher, Peter; Uthmann, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The principle of modularization has proven to be extremely successful in the field of technical applications and particularly for Software Engineering purposes. The question to be answered within the present article is whether mechanisms can also be identified within the framework of Evolutionary Computation that cause a modularization of solutions. We will concentrate on processes, where modularization results only from the typical evolutionary operators, i.e. selection and variation by recombination and mutation (and not, e.g., from special modularization operators). This is what we call Self-Organized Modularization. Based on a combination of two formalizations by Radcliffe and Altenberg, some quantitative measures of modularity are introduced. Particularly, we distinguish Built-in Modularity as an inherent property of a genotype and Effective Modularity, which depends on the rest of the population. These measures can easily be applied to a wide range of present Evolutionary Computation models. It will be shown, both theoretically and by simulation, that under certain conditions, Effective Modularity (as defined within this paper) can be a selection factor. This causes Self-Organized Modularization to take place. The experimental observations emphasize the importance of Effective Modularity in comparison with Built-in Modularity. Although the experimental results have been obtained using a minimalist toy model, they can lead to a number of consequences for existing models as well as for future approaches. Furthermore, the results suggest a complex self-amplification of highly modular equivalence classes in the case of respected relations. Since the well-known Holland schemata are just the equivalence classes of respected relations in most Simple Genetic Algorithms, this observation emphasizes the role of schemata as Building Blocks (in comparison with arbitrary subsets of the search space).

  12. A novel polyketide biosynthesis gene cluster is involved in fruiting body morphogenesis in the filamentous fungi Sordaria macrospora and Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Nowrousian, Minou

    2009-04-01

    During fungal fruiting body development, hyphae aggregate to form multicellular structures that protect and disperse the sexual spores. Analysis of microarray data revealed a gene cluster strongly upregulated during fruiting body development in the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. Real time PCR analysis showed that the genes from the orthologous cluster in Neurospora crassa are also upregulated during development. The cluster encodes putative polyketide biosynthesis enzymes, including a reducing polyketide synthase. Analysis of knockout strains of a predicted dehydrogenase gene from the cluster showed that mutants in N. crassa and S. macrospora are delayed in fruiting body formation. In addition to the upregulated cluster, the N. crassa genome comprises another cluster containing a polyketide synthase gene, and five additional reducing polyketide synthase (rpks) genes that are not part of clusters. To study the role of these genes in sexual development, expression of the predicted rpks genes in S. macrospora (five genes) and N. crassa (six genes) was analyzed; all but one are upregulated during sexual development. Analysis of knockout strains for the N. crassa rpks genes showed that one of them is essential for fruiting body formation. These data indicate that polyketides produced by RPKSs are involved in sexual development in filamentous ascomycetes.

  13. Implication of PKS type I gene and chromatographic strategy for the biodiscovery of antimicrobial polyketide metabolites from endosymbiotic Nocardiopsis prasina CLA68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, H. C. Yashavantha; Rakshith, Devaraju; Gurudatt, D. M.; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2016-06-01

    Advanced approach in probing for polyketide antimicrobials requires novel genomics and chromatographic strategies. An endophytic strain CLA68 was isolated from the root of Combretum latifolium Blume (Combretaceae) collected from the Western Ghats of Southern India. Strain CLA68 was then identified as Nocardiopsis prasina by its characteristic culture morphology and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. Biosynthetic polyketide synthase genes were investigated using two pairs of degenerate primers. Ethyl acetate extract of CLA68 exhibited broad spectrum activity against a panel of test human pathogens. PKS type-I gene detection and chromatographic strategy yielded a robust polyketide antimicrobial compound which identified as nocapyrone E. Minimum inhibitory concentration of the purified compound against MRSA and other human pathogens ranged between 25 and 100 μg/ml. The present work highlights the utility of N. prasina CLA68 as potential source for antimicrobial polyketide nocapyrone E which could help to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens. This study demonstrates feasibility of PKS type-I gene-based molecular approach and chemical investigation by chromatographic approach is the best method for prediction and rapid discovery of novel polyketides from endosymbiotic actinomycetes. The sequence data of this endosymbiotic actinomycete is deposited in GenBank under the accession no. KP269077.

  14. Modular properties of 6d (DELL) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, G.; Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2017-11-01

    If super-Yang-Mills theory possesses the exact conformal invariance, there is an additional modular invariance under the change of the complex bare charge [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.]. The low-energy Seiberg-Witten prepotential ℱ( a), however, is not explicitly invariant, because the flat moduli also change a - → a D = ∂ℱ/∂ a. In result, the prepotential is not a modular form and depends also on the anomalous Eisenstein series E 2. This dependence is usually described by the universal MNW modular anomaly equation. We demonstrate that, in the 6 d SU( N) theory with two independent modular parameters τ and \\widehat{τ} , the modular anomaly equation changes, because the modular transform of τ is accompanied by an ( N -dependent!) shift of \\widehat{τ} and vice versa. This is a new peculiarity of double-elliptic systems, which deserves further investigation.

  15. Modular workcells: modern methods for laboratory automation.

    PubMed

    Felder, R A

    1998-12-01

    Laboratory automation is beginning to become an indispensable survival tool for laboratories facing difficult market competition. However, estimates suggest that only 8% of laboratories will be able to afford total laboratory automation systems. Therefore, automation vendors have developed alternative hardware configurations called 'modular automation', to fit the smaller laboratory. Modular automation consists of consolidated analyzers, integrated analyzers, modular workcells, and pre- and post-analytical automation. These terms will be defined in this paper. Using a modular automation model, the automated core laboratory will become a site where laboratory data is evaluated by trained professionals to provide diagnostic information to practising physicians. Modem software information management and process control tools will complement modular hardware. Proper standardization that will allow vendor-independent modular configurations will assure success of this revolutionary new technology.

  16. Modular Design in Treaty Verification Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Benz, Jacob; Tolk, Keith

    2015-01-27

    It is widely believed that modular design is a good thing. However, there are often few explicit arguments, or even an agreed range of definitions, to back up this belief. In this paper, we examine the potential range of design modularity, the implications of various amounts of modularity, and the advantages and disadvantages of each level of modular construction. We conclude with a comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of each type, as well as discuss many caveats that should be observed to take advantage of the positive features of modularity and minimize the effects of the negative. The tradeoffsmore » described in this paper will be evaluated during the conceptual design to determine what amount of modularity should be included.« less

  17. Modular, Hierarchical Learning By Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Pierre F.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1996-01-01

    Modular and hierarchical approach to supervised learning by artificial neural networks leads to neural networks more structured than neural networks in which all neurons fully interconnected. These networks utilize general feedforward flow of information and sparse recurrent connections to achieve dynamical effects. The modular organization, sparsity of modular units and connections, and fact that learning is much more circumscribed are all attractive features for designing neural-network hardware. Learning streamlined by imitating some aspects of biological neural networks.

  18. Mechanism and Stereochemistry of Polyketide Chain Elongation and Methyl Group Epimerization in Polyether Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinqiang; Garg, Ashish; Khosla, Chaitan; Cane, David E

    2017-03-01

    The polyketide synthases responsible for the biosynthesis of the polyether antibiotics nanchangmycin (1) and salinomycin (4) harbor a number of redox-inactive ketoreductase (KR 0 ) domains that are implicated in the generation of C2-epimerized (2S)-2-methyl-3-ketoacyl-ACP intermediates. Evidence that the natural substrate for the polyether KR 0 domains is, as predicted, a (2R)-2-methyl-3-ketoacyl-ACP intermediate, came from a newly developed coupled ketosynthase (KS)-ketoreductase (KR) assay that established that the decarboxylative condensation of methylmalonyl-CoA with S-propionyl-N-acetylcysteamine catalyzed by the Nan[KS1][AT1] didomain from module 1 of the nanchangmycin synthase generates exclusively the corresponding (2R)-2-methyl-3-ketopentanoyl-ACP (7a) product. In tandem equilibrium isotope exchange experiments, incubation of [2- 2 H]-(2R,3S)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-ACP (6a) with redox-active, epimerase-inactive EryKR6 from module 6 of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase and catalytic quantities of NADP + in the presence of redox-inactive, recombinant NanKR1 0 or NanKR5 0 , from modules 1 and 5 of the nanchangmycin synthase, or recombinant SalKR7 0 from module 7 of the salinomycin synthase, resulted in first-order, time-dependent washout of deuterium from 6a. Control experiments confirmed that this washout was due to KR 0 -catalyzed isotope exchange of the reversibly generated, transiently formed oxidation product [2- 2 H]-(2R)-2-methyl-3-ketopentanoyl-ACP (7a), consistent with the proposed epimerase activity of each of the KR 0 domains. Although they belong to the superfamily of short chain dehydrogenase-reductases, the epimerase-active KR 0 domains from polyether synthases lack one or both residues of the conserved Tyr-Ser dyad that has previously been implicated in KR-catalyzed epimerizations.

  19. Mechanism and Stereochemistry of Polyketide Chain Elongation and Methyl Group Epimerization in Polyether Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xinqiang; Garg, Ashish; Khosla, Chaitan; Cane, David E.

    2017-01-01

    The polyketide synthases responsible for the biosynthesis of the polyether antibiotics nanchangmycin (1) and salinomycin (4) harbor a number of redox-inactive ketoreductase (KR0) domains that are implicated in the generation of C2-epimerized (2S)-2-methyl-3-ketoacyl-ACP intermediates. Evidence that the natural substrate for the polyether KR0 domains is, as predicted, a (2R)-2-methyl-3-ketoacyl-ACP intermediate, came from a newly developed coupled ketosynthase (KS)-ketoreductase (KR) assay that established that the decarboxylative condensation of methylmalonyl-CoA with S-propionyl-N-acetylcysteamine catalyzed by the Nan[KS1][AT1] didomain from module 1 of the nanchangmycin synthase generates exclusively the corresponding (2R)-2-methyl-3-ketopentanoyl-ACP (7a) product. In tandem equilibrium isotope exchange experiments, incubation of [2-2H]-(2R,3S)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-ACP (6a) with redox-active, epimerase-inactive EryKR6 from module 6 of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase and catalytic quantities of NADP+ in the presence of redox-inactive, recombinant NanKR10 or NanKR50, from modules 1 and 5 of the nanchangmycin synthase, or recombinant SalKR70 from module 7 of the salinomycin synthase, resulted in first-order, time-dependent washout of deuterium from 6a. Control experiments confirmed that this washout was due to KR0-catalyzed isotope exchange of the reversibly-generated, transiently-formed oxidation product [2-2H]-(2R)-2-methyl-3-ketopentanoyl-ACP (7a), consistent with the proposed epimerase activity of each of the KR0 domains. Although they belong to the superfamily of short chain dehydrogenase-reductases, the epimerase-active KR0 domains from polyether synthases lack one or both residues of the conserved Tyr-Ser dyad that has previously been implicated in KR-catalyzed epimerizations. PMID:28157306

  20. Preclinical characterization of naturally occurring polyketide cyclophilin inhibitors from the sanglifehrin family.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Matthew A; Bobardt, Michael; Obeid, Susan; Chatterji, Udayan; Coates, Nigel J; Foster, Teresa; Gallay, Philippe; Leyssen, Pieter; Moss, Steven J; Neyts, Johan; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Paeshuyse, Jan; Piraee, Mahmood; Suthar, Dipen; Warneck, Tony; Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-05-01

    Cyclophilin inhibitors currently in clinical trials for hepatitis C virus (HCV) are all analogues of cyclosporine (CsA). Sanglifehrins are a group of naturally occurring cyclophilin binding polyketides that are structurally distinct from the cyclosporines and are produced by a microorganism amenable to biosynthetic engineering for lead optimization and large-scale production by fermentation. Preclinical characterization of the potential utility of this class of compounds for the treatment of HCV revealed that the natural sanglifehrins A to D are all more potent than CsA at disrupting formation of the NS5A-CypA, -CypB, and -CypD complexes and at inhibition of CypA, CypB, and CypD isomerase activity. In particular, sanglifehrin B (SfB) was 30- to 50-fold more potent at inhibiting the isomerase activity of all Cyps tested than CsA and was also shown to be a more potent inhibitor of the 1b subgenomic replicon (50% effective concentrations [EC50s] of 0.070 μM and 0.16 μM in Huh 5-2 and Huh 9-13 cells, respectively). Physicochemical and mouse pharmacokinetic analyses revealed low oral bioavailability (F<4%) and low solubility (<25 μM), although the half-lives (t1/2) of SfA and SfB in mouse blood after intravenous (i.v.) dosing were long (t1/2>5 h). These data demonstrate that naturally occurring sanglifehrins are suitable lead compounds for the development of novel analogues that are less immunosuppressive and that have improved metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties.

  1. Preclinical Characterization of Naturally Occurring Polyketide Cyclophilin Inhibitors from the Sanglifehrin Family▿†

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Matthew A.; Bobardt, Michael; Obeid, Susan; Chatterji, Udayan; Coates, Nigel J.; Foster, Teresa; Gallay, Philippe; Leyssen, Pieter; Moss, Steven J.; Neyts, Johan; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Paeshuyse, Jan; Piraee, Mahmood; Suthar, Dipen; Warneck, Tony; Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-01-01

    Cyclophilin inhibitors currently in clinical trials for hepatitis C virus (HCV) are all analogues of cyclosporine (CsA). Sanglifehrins are a group of naturally occurring cyclophilin binding polyketides that are structurally distinct from the cyclosporines and are produced by a microorganism amenable to biosynthetic engineering for lead optimization and large-scale production by fermentation. Preclinical characterization of the potential utility of this class of compounds for the treatment of HCV revealed that the natural sanglifehrins A to D are all more potent than CsA at disrupting formation of the NS5A-CypA, -CypB, and -CypD complexes and at inhibition of CypA, CypB, and CypD isomerase activity. In particular, sanglifehrin B (SfB) was 30- to 50-fold more potent at inhibiting the isomerase activity of all Cyps tested than CsA and was also shown to be a more potent inhibitor of the 1b subgenomic replicon (50% effective concentrations [EC50s] of 0.070 μM and 0.16 μM in Huh 5-2 and Huh 9-13 cells, respectively). Physicochemical and mouse pharmacokinetic analyses revealed low oral bioavailability (F < 4%) and low solubility (<25 μM), although the half-lives (t1/2) of SfA and SfB in mouse blood after intravenous (i.v.) dosing were long (t1/2 > 5 h). These data demonstrate that naturally occurring sanglifehrins are suitable lead compounds for the development of novel analogues that are less immunosuppressive and that have improved metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:21383094

  2. Polyketide synthase chemistry does not direct biosynthetic divergence between 9- and 10-membered enediynes

    PubMed Central

    Horsman, Geoff P.; Chen, Yihua; Thorson, Jon S.; Shen, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Enediynes are potent antitumor antibiotics that are classified as 9- or 10-membered according to the size of the enediyne core structure. However, almost nothing is known about enediyne core biosynthesis, and the determinants of 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence remain elusive. Previous work identified enediyne-specific polyketide synthases (PKSEs) that can be phylogenetically distinguished as being involved in 9- versus 10-membered enediyne biosynthesis, suggesting that biosynthetic divergence might originate from differing PKSE chemistries. Recent in vitro studies have identified several compounds produced by the PKSE and associated thioesterase (TE), but condition-dependent product profiles make it difficult to ascertain a true catalytic difference between 9- and 10-membered PKSE-TE systems. Here we report that PKSE chemistry does not direct 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence as revealed by comparing the products from three 9-membered and two 10-membered PKSE-TE systems under identical conditions using robust in vivo assays. Three independent experiments support a common catalytic function for 9- and 10-membered PKSEs by the production of a heptaene metabolite from: (i) all five cognate PKSE-TE pairs in Escherichia coli; (ii) the C-1027 and calicheamicin cognate PKSE-TEs in Streptomyces lividans K4-114; and (iii) selected native producers of both 9- and 10-membered enediynes. Furthermore, PKSEs and TEs from different 9- and 10-membered enediyne biosynthetic machineries are freely interchangeable, revealing that 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence occurs beyond the PKSE-TE level. These findings establish a starting point for determining the origins of this biosynthetic divergence. PMID:20534556

  3. Biotechnology of polyketides: New breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the “goose that laid the golden egg,” the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from “micro” to “nano”, that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms. PMID:24688489

  4. Structural and evolutionary relationships of "AT-less" type I polyketide synthase ketosynthases

    SciTech Connect

    Lohman, Jeremy; Ma, Ming; Osipiuk, Jerzy

    2015-10-13

    Acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) break the type I PKS paradigm. They lack the integrated AT domains within their modules and instead use a discrete AT that acts in trans, whereas a type I PKS module minimally contains AT, acyl carrier protein (ACP), and ketosynthase (KS) domains. Structures of canonical type I PKS KS-AT didomains reveal structured linkers that connect the two domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs have remnants of these linkers, which have been hypothesized to be AT docking domains. Natural products produced by AT-less type I PKSs are very complex because of an increased representationmore » of unique modifying domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs possess substrate specificity and fall into phylogenetic clades that correlate with their substrates, whereas canonical type I PKS KSs are monophyletic. We have solved crystal structures of seven AT-less type I PKS KS domains that represent various sequence clusters, revealing insight into the large structural and subtle amino acid residue differences that lead to unique active site topologies and substrate specificities. One set of structures represents a larger group of KS domains from both canonical and AT-less type I PKSs that accept amino acid-containing substrates. One structure has a partial AT-domain, revealing the structural consequences of a type I PKS KS evolving into an AT-less type I PKS KS. These structures highlight the structural diversity within the AT-less type I PKS KS family, and most important, provide a unique opportunity to study the molecular evolution of substrate specificity within the type I PKSs.« less

  5. Structural and evolutionary relationships of "AT-less" type I polyketide synthase ketosynthases.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Ma, Ming; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Nocek, Boguslaw; Kim, Youngchang; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Mack, Jamey; Bigelow, Lance; Li, Hui; Endres, Michael; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2015-10-13

    Acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) break the type I PKS paradigm. They lack the integrated AT domains within their modules and instead use a discrete AT that acts in trans, whereas a type I PKS module minimally contains AT, acyl carrier protein (ACP), and ketosynthase (KS) domains. Structures of canonical type I PKS KS-AT didomains reveal structured linkers that connect the two domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs have remnants of these linkers, which have been hypothesized to be AT docking domains. Natural products produced by AT-less type I PKSs are very complex because of an increased representation of unique modifying domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs possess substrate specificity and fall into phylogenetic clades that correlate with their substrates, whereas canonical type I PKS KSs are monophyletic. We have solved crystal structures of seven AT-less type I PKS KS domains that represent various sequence clusters, revealing insight into the large structural and subtle amino acid residue differences that lead to unique active site topologies and substrate specificities. One set of structures represents a larger group of KS domains from both canonical and AT-less type I PKSs that accept amino acid-containing substrates. One structure has a partial AT-domain, revealing the structural consequences of a type I PKS KS evolving into an AT-less type I PKS KS. These structures highlight the structural diversity within the AT-less type I PKS KS family, and most important, provide a unique opportunity to study the molecular evolution of substrate specificity within the type I PKSs.

  6. Structural and evolutionary relationships of “AT-less” type I polyketide synthase ketosynthases

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Jeremy R.; Ma, Ming; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Nocek, Boguslaw; Kim, Youngchang; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Mack, Jamey; Bigelow, Lance; Li, Hui; Endres, Michael; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) break the type I PKS paradigm. They lack the integrated AT domains within their modules and instead use a discrete AT that acts in trans, whereas a type I PKS module minimally contains AT, acyl carrier protein (ACP), and ketosynthase (KS) domains. Structures of canonical type I PKS KS-AT didomains reveal structured linkers that connect the two domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs have remnants of these linkers, which have been hypothesized to be AT docking domains. Natural products produced by AT-less type I PKSs are very complex because of an increased representation of unique modifying domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs possess substrate specificity and fall into phylogenetic clades that correlate with their substrates, whereas canonical type I PKS KSs are monophyletic. We have solved crystal structures of seven AT-less type I PKS KS domains that represent various sequence clusters, revealing insight into the large structural and subtle amino acid residue differences that lead to unique active site topologies and substrate specificities. One set of structures represents a larger group of KS domains from both canonical and AT-less type I PKSs that accept amino acid-containing substrates. One structure has a partial AT-domain, revealing the structural consequences of a type I PKS KS evolving into an AT-less type I PKS KS. These structures highlight the structural diversity within the AT-less type I PKS KS family, and most important, provide a unique opportunity to study the molecular evolution of substrate specificity within the type I PKSs. PMID:26420866

  7. Status of modular RTG technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Robert F.

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have been employed safely and reliably since 1961 to provide spacecraft electrical power for various NASA and Department of Defense missions. Historically, RTG development, fabrication and qualification have been performed under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy's Office of Special Nuclear Projects and its predecessor groups. RTG technology improvement programs have been conducted over the years by the DOE to improve RTG efficiency and operating performance. The modular RTG design concept resulted from such a program and is currently being developed by the General Electric Company for the DOE.

  8. Modular neural networks: a survey.

    PubMed

    Auda, G; Kamel, M

    1999-04-01

    Modular Neural Networks (MNNs) is a rapidly growing field in artificial Neural Networks (NNs) research. This paper surveys the different motivations for creating MNNs: biological, psychological, hardware, and computational. Then, the general stages of MNN design are outlined and surveyed as well, viz., task decomposition techniques, learning schemes and multi-module decision-making strategies. Advantages and disadvantages of the surveyed methods are pointed out, and an assessment with respect to practical potential is provided. Finally, some general recommendations for future designs are presented.

  9. Modular design attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chichester, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    A sequence of single axismodels and a series of reduced state linear observers of minimum order are used to reconstruct inaccessible variables pertaining to the modular attitude control of a rigid body flexible suspension model of a flexible spacecraft. The single axis models consist of two, three, four, and five rigid bodies, each interconnected by a flexible shaft passing through the mass centers of the bodies. Modal damping is added to each model. Reduced state linear observers are developed for synthesizing the inaccessible modal state variables for each modal model.

  10. Confluence of structural and chemical biology: plant polyketide synthases as biocatalysts for a bio-based future.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Charles; Vickery, Christopher R; Burkart, Michael D; Noel, Joseph P

    2013-06-01

    Type III plant polyketide synthases (PKSs) biosynthesize a dazzling array of polyphenolic products that serve important roles in both plant and human health. Recent advances in structural characterization of these enzymes and new tools from the field of chemical biology have facilitated exquisite probing of plant PKS iterative catalysis. These tools have also been used to exploit type III PKSs as biocatalysts to generate new chemicals. Going forward, chemical, structural and biochemical analyses will provide an atomic resolution understanding of plant PKSs and will serve as a springboard for bioengineering and scalable production of valuable molecules in vitro, by fermentation and in planta. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonthmicin, a Polyether Polyketide Bearing a Halogen-Modified Tetronate with Neuroprotective and Antiinvasive Activity from Actinomadura sp.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Noriaki; In, Yasuko; Kataura, Tetsushi; Tashiro, Etsu; Saiki, Ikuo; Sudoh, Yuri; Duangmal, Kannika; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip

    2017-03-17

    Nonthmicin (1), a new polyether polyketide bearing a chlorinated tetronic acid, was isolated from the culture extract of a soil-derived Actinomadura strain. The structure of 1 was elucidated by interpretation of NMR and MS spectroscopic data, and the absolute configuration of 1 was proposed on the basis of the crystal structure of its dechloro congener ecteinamycin (2) also isolated from the same strain. Tetronic acids modified by halogenation have never been reported from natural products. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to have neuroprotective activity and antimetastatic properties at submicromolar concentrations in addition to antibacterial activity.

  12. Engineering cofactor and transport mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced acetyl-CoA and polyketide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Javier; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2016-07-01

    Synthesis of polyketides at high titer and yield is important for producing pharmaceuticals and biorenewable chemical precursors. In this work, we engineered cofactor and transport pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increase acetyl-CoA, an important polyketide building block. The highly regulated yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass pathway was supplemented by overexpressing a modified Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHm) that accepts NADP(+) for acetyl-CoA production. After 24h of cultivation, a 3.7-fold increase in NADPH/NADP(+) ratio was observed relative to the base strain, and a 2.2-fold increase relative to introduction of the native E. coli PDH. Both E. coli pathways increased acetyl-CoA levels approximately 2-fold relative to the yeast base strain. Combining PDHm with a ZWF1 deletion to block the major yeast NADPH biosynthesis pathway resulted in a 12-fold NADPH boost and a 2.2-fold increase in acetyl-CoA. At 48h, only this coupled approach showed increased acetyl-CoA levels, 3.0-fold higher than that of the base strain. The impact on polyketide synthesis was evaluated in a S. cerevisiae strain expressing the Gerbera hybrida 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS) for the production of the polyketide triacetic acid lactone (TAL). Titers of TAL relative to the base strain improved only 30% with the native E. coli PDH, but 3.0-fold with PDHm and 4.4-fold with PDHm in the Δzwf1 strain. Carbon was further routed toward TAL production by reducing mitochondrial transport of pyruvate and acetyl-CoA; deletions in genes POR2, MPC2, PDA1, or YAT2 each increased titer 2-3-fold over the base strain (up to 0.8g/L), and in combination to 1.4g/L. Combining the two approaches (NADPH-generating acetyl-CoA pathway plus reduced metabolite flux into the mitochondria) resulted in a final TAL titer of 1.6g/L, a 6.4-fold increase over the non-engineered yeast strain, and 35% of theoretical yield (0.16g/g glucose), the highest reported to date. These biological driving

  13. The Post-polyketide Synthase Steps in iso-Migrastatin Biosynthesis Featuring Tailoring Enzymes with Broad Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Kwong, Thomas; Lim, Si-Kyu; Ju, Jianhua; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Shen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The iso-migrastatin (iso-MGS) biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993 consists of 11 genes, featuring an acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthase (PKS) and three tailoring enzymes MgsIJK. Systematic inactivation of mgsIJK in S. platensis enabled us to (i) identify two nascent products (10 and 13) of the iso-MGS AT-less type I PKS, establishing an unprecedented novel feature for AT-less type I PKSs, and (ii) account for the formation of all known post-PKS biosynthetic intermediates (10-17) generated by the three tailoring enzymes MgsIJK, which possessed significant substrate promiscuities. PMID:23394593

  14. A modular BLSS simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.; Volk, Tyler

    1987-01-01

    A bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) for extraterrestrial use will be faced with coordination problems more acute than those in any ecosystem found on Earth. A related problem in BLSS design is providing an interface between the various life support processors, one that will allow for their coordination while still allowing for system expansion. A modular model is presented of a BLSS that interfaces system processors only with the material storage reservoirs, allowing those reservoirs to act as the principal buffers in the system and thus minimizing difficulties with processor coordination. The modular nature of the model allows independent development of the detailed submodels that exist within the model framework. Using this model, BLSS dynamics were investigated under normal conditions and under various failure modes. Partial and complete failures of various components, such as the waste processors or the plants themselves, drive transient responses in the model system, allowing the examination of the effectiveness of the system reservoirs as buffers. The results from simulations help to determine control strategies and BLSS design requirements. An evolved version could be used as an interactive control aid in a future BLSS.

  15. Decentralized and Modular Electrical Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisabelar, Christian; Lebaratoux, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the studies made on the definition and design of a decentralized and modular electrical architecture that can be used for power distribution, active thermal control (ATC), standard inputs-outputs electrical interfaces.Traditionally implemented inside central unit like OBC or RTU, these interfaces can be dispatched in the satellite by using MicroRTU.CNES propose a similar approach of MicroRTU. The system is based on a bus called BRIO (Bus Réparti des IO), which is composed, by a power bus and a RS485 digital bus. BRIO architecture is made with several miniature terminals called BTCU (BRIO Terminal Control Unit) distributed in the spacecraft.The challenge was to design and develop the BTCU with very little volume, low consumption and low cost. The standard BTCU models are developed and qualified with a configuration dedicated to ATC, while the first flight model will fly on MICROSCOPE for PYRO actuations and analogue acquisitions. The design of the BTCU is made in order to be easily adaptable for all type of electric interface needs.Extension of this concept is envisaged for power conditioning and distribution unit, and a Modular PCDU based on BRIO concept is proposed.

  16. A Modular Laser Graphics Projection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newswanger, Craig D.

    1984-05-01

    WED Enterprises has designed and built a modular projection system for the presentation of animated laser shows. This system was designed specifically for use in Disney theme shows. Its modular design allows it to be adapted to many show situations with simple hardware and software adjustments. The primary goals were superior animation, long life, low maintenance and stand alone operation.

  17. Modular support blocks for fluid lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimino, J. M.; Deskin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Modular line block comprises matched modular elements machined to accept fluid lines of different diameters. Modules can support different fluid-line configurations. Top and bottom surfaces are machined to accept dovetail strip used for holding modules together. End modules have holes drilled through to accept fastening screws.

  18. Curriculum Development through YTS Modular Credit Accumulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This document reports the evaluation of the collaborately developed Modular Training Framework (MainFrame), a British curriculum development project, built around a commitment to a competency-based, modular credit accumulation program. The collaborators were three local education authorities (LEAs), those of Bedfordshire, Haringey, and Sheffield,…

  19. Modular interdependency in complex dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard A; Pollack, Jordan B

    2005-01-01

    Herbert A. Simon's characterization of modularity in dynamical systems describes subsystems as having dynamics that are approximately independent of those of other subsystems (in the short term). This fits with the general intuition that modules must, by definition, be approximately independent. In the evolution of complex systems, such modularity may enable subsystems to be modified and adapted independently of other subsystems, whereas in a nonmodular system, modifications to one part of the system may result in deleterious side effects elsewhere in the system. But this notion of modularity and its effect on evolvability is not well quantified and is rather simplistic. In particular, modularity need not imply that intermodule dependences are weak or unimportant. In dynamical systems this is acknowledged by Simon's suggestion that, in the long term, the dynamical behaviors of subsystems do interact with one another, albeit in an "aggregate" manner--but this kind of intermodule interaction is omitted in models of modularity for evolvability. In this brief discussion we seek to unify notions of modularity in dynamical systems with notions of how modularity affects evolvability. This leads to a quantifiable measure of modularity and a different understanding of its effect on evolvability.

  20. The relative efficiency of modular and non-modular networks of different size

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, Colin R.; McNally, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Most biological networks are modular but previous work with small model networks has indicated that modularity does not necessarily lead to increased functional efficiency. Most biological networks are large, however, and here we examine the relative functional efficiency of modular and non-modular neural networks at a range of sizes. We conduct a detailed analysis of efficiency in networks of two size classes: ‘small’ and ‘large’, and a less detailed analysis across a range of network sizes. The former analysis reveals that while the modular network is less efficient than one of the two non-modular networks considered when networks are small, it is usually equally or more efficient than both non-modular networks when networks are large. The latter analysis shows that in networks of small to intermediate size, modular networks are much more efficient that non-modular networks of the same (low) connective density. If connective density must be kept low to reduce energy needs for example, this could promote modularity. We have shown how relative functionality/performance scales with network size, but the precise nature of evolutionary relationship between network size and prevalence of modularity will depend on the costs of connectivity. PMID:25631996

  1. A Formal Theory for Modular ERDF Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analyti, Anastasia; Antoniou, Grigoris; Damásio, Carlos Viegas

    The success of the Semantic Web is impossible without any form of modularity, encapsulation, and access control. In an earlier paper, we extended RDF graphs with weak and strong negation, as well as derivation rules. The ERDF #n-stable model semantics of the extended RDF framework (ERDF) is defined, extending RDF(S) semantics. In this paper, we propose a framework for modular ERDF ontologies, called modular ERDF framework, which enables collaborative reasoning over a set of ERDF ontologies, while support for hidden knowledge is also provided. In particular, the modular ERDF stable model semantics of modular ERDF ontologies is defined, extending the ERDF #n-stable model semantics. Our proposed framework supports local semantics and different points of view, local closed-world and open-world assumptions, and scoped negation-as-failure. Several complexity results are provided.

  2. The secreted polyketide boydone A is responsible for the anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity of Scedosporium boydii.

    PubMed

    Staerck, Cindy; Landreau, Anne; Herbette, Gaëtan; Roullier, Catherine; Bertrand, Samuel; Siegler, Benjamin; Larcher, Gérald; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Fleury, Maxime J J

    2017-12-01

    Usually living as a soil saprophyte, the filamentous fungus Scedosporium boydii may also cause various infections in human. Particularly, it is one of the major causative agents of fungal colonization of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To compete with other microorganisms in the environment, fungi have evolved sophisticated strategies, including the production of secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity that may also help them to establish successfully within the respiratory tract of receptive hosts. Here, the culture filtrate from a human pathogenic strain of S. boydii was investigated searching for an antibacterial activity, mainly against the major CF bacterial pathogens. A high antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains of this species, was observed. Bio-guided fractionation and analysis of the active fractions by nuclear magnetic resonance or by high-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry allowed us to identify boydone A as responsible for this antibacterial activity. Together, these results suggest that this six-membered cyclic polyketide could be one of the virulence factors of the fungus. Genes involved in the synthesis of this secreted metabolite are currently being identified in order to confirm the role of this polyketide in pathogenesis. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. In Vitro Investigation of Crosstalk between Fatty Acid and Polyketide Synthases in the Andrimid Biosynthetic Assembly Line.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Sugimoto, Hiroyasu; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2016-11-17

    Andrimid (Adm) synthase, which belongs to the type II system of enzymes, produces Adm in Pantoea agglomerans. The adm biosynthetic gene cluster lacks canonical acyltransferases (ATs) to load the malonyl group to acyl carrier proteins (ACPs), thus suggesting that a malonyl-CoA ACP transacylase (MCAT) from the fatty acid synthase (FAS) complex provides the essential AT activity in Adm biosynthesis. Here we report that an MCAT is essential for catalysis of the transacylation of malonate from malonyl-CoA to AdmA polyketide synthase (PKS) ACP in vitro. Catalytic self-malonylation of AdmA (PKS ACP) was not observed in reactions without MCAT, although many type II PKS ACPs are capable of catalyzing self-acylation. This lack of self-malonylation was explained by amino acid sequence analysis of the AdmA PKS ACP and the type II PKS ACPs. The results show that MCAT from the organism's FAS complex can provide the missing AT activity in trans, thus suggesting a protein-protein interaction between the fatty acid and polyketide synthases in the Adm assembly line. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Divergent Mechanistic Routes for the Formation of gem-Dimethyl Groups in the Biosynthesis of Complex Polyketides

    SciTech Connect

    Poust, S; Phelan, RM; Deng, K

    The gem-dimethyl groups in polyketide-derived natural products add steric bulk and, accordingly, lend increased stability to medicinal compounds, however, our ability to rationally incorporate this functional group in modified natural products is limited. In order to characterize the mechanism of gem-dimethyl group formation, with a goal toward engineering of novel compounds containing this moiety, the gem-dimethyl group producing polyketide synthase (PKS) modules of yersiniabactin and epothilone were characterized using mass spectrometry. The work demonstrated, contrary to the canonical understanding of reaction order in PKSs, that methylation can precede condensation in gem-dimethyl group producing PKS modules. Experiments showed that both PKSsmore » are able to use dimethylmalonyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) as an extender unit. Interestingly, for epothilone module8, use of dimethylmalonyl-ACP appeared to be the sole route to form a gem-dimethylated product, while the yersiniabactin PKS could methylate before or after ketosynthase condensation.« less

  5. Improved heterologous production of the nonribosomal peptide-polyketide siderophore yersiniabactin through metabolic engineering and induction optimization.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of complex natural products like polyketides and nonribosomal peptides using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host provides an opportunity to access these molecules. The value in doing so stems from the fact that many compounds hold some therapeutic or other beneficial property and their original production hosts are intractable for a variety of reasons. In this work, metabolic engineering and induction variable optimization were used to increase production of the polyketide-nonribosomal peptide compound yersiniabactin, a siderophore that has been utilized to selectively remove metals from various solid and aqueous samples. Specifically, several precursor substrate support pathways were altered through gene expression and exogenous supplementation in order to boost production of the final compound. The gene expression induction process was also analyzed to identify the temperatures and inducer concentrations resulting in highest final production levels. When combined, yersiniabactin production was extended to ∼175 mg L -1 . © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1412-1417, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Identification and regulation of fusA, the polyketide synthase gene responsible for fusarin production in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Sánchez, Violeta; Avalos, Javier; Limón, M Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Fusarins are a class of mycotoxins of the polyketide family produced by different Fusarium species, including the gibberellin-producing fungus Fusarium fujikuroi. Based on sequence comparisons between polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymes for fusarin production in other Fusarium strains, we have identified the F. fujikuroi orthologue, called fusA. The participation of fusA in fusarin biosynthesis was demonstrated by targeted mutagenesis. Fusarin production is transiently stimulated by nitrogen availability in this fungus, a regulation paralleled by the fusA mRNA levels in the cell. Illumination of the cultures results in a reduction of the fusarin content, an effect partially explained by a high sensitivity of these compounds to light. Mutants of the fusA gene exhibit no external phenotypic alterations, including morphology and conidiation, except for a lack of the characteristic yellow and/or orange pigmentation of fusarins. Moreover, the fusA mutants are less efficient than the wild type at degrading cellophane on agar cultures, a trait associated with pathogenesis functions in Fusarium oxysporum. The fusA mutants, however, are not affected in their capacities to grow on plant tissues.

  7. Charged structure constants from modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Diptarka; Datta, Shouvik; Pal, Sridip

    2017-11-01

    We derive a universal formula for the average heavy-heavy-light structure constants for 2 d CFTs with non-vanishing u(1) charge. The derivation utilizes the modular properties of one-point functions on the torus. Refinements in N=2 SCFTs, show that the resulting Cardy-like formula for the structure constants has precisely the same shifts in the central charge as that of the thermodynamic entropy found earlier. This analysis generalizes the recent results by Kraus and Maloney for CFTs with an additional global u(1) symmetry [1]. Our results at large central charge are also shown to match with computations from the holographic dual, which suggest that the averaged CFT three-point coefficient also serves as a useful probe of detecting black hole hair.

  8. BESST: A Miniature, Modular Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert; Good, William; Baldwin-Stevens, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A new radiometer assembly has been developed that incorporates modular design principles in order to provide flexibility and versatility. The assembly, shown in Figure 1, is made up of six modules plus a central cubical frame. A small thermal imaging detector is used to determine the temperature of remote objects. To improve the accuracy of the temperature reading, frequent calibration is required. The detector must view known temperature targets before viewing the remote object. Calibration is achieved by using a motorized fold mirror to select the desired scene the detector views. The motor steps the fold mirror through several positions, which allows the detector to view the calibration targets or the remote object. The details, features, and benefits of the radiometer are described in this paper.

  9. MODULAR MANIPULATOR FOR ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph W. Geisinger, Ph.D.

    ARM Automation, Inc. is developing a framework of modular actuators that can address the DOE's wide range of robotics needs. The objective of this effort is to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology by constructing a manipulator from these actuators within a glovebox for Automated Plutonium Processing (APP). At the end of the project, the system of actuators was used to construct several different manipulator configurations, which accommodate common glovebox tasks such as repackaging. The modular nature and quickconnects of this system simplify installation into ''hot'' boxes and any potential modifications or repair therein. This work focused on the developmentmore » of self-contained robotic actuator modules including the embedded electronic controls for the purpose of building a manipulator system. Both of the actuators developed under this project contain the control electronics, sensors, motor, gear train, wiring, system communications and mechanical interfaces of a complete robotics servo device. Test actuators and accompanying DISC{trademark}s underwent validation testing at The University of Texas at Austin and ARM Automation, Inc. following final design and fabrication. The system also included custom links, an umbilical cord, an open architecture PC-based system controller, and operational software that permitted integration into a completely functional robotic manipulator system. The open architecture on which this system is based avoids proprietary interfaces and communication protocols which only serve to limit the capabilities and flexibility of automation equipment. The system was integrated and tested in the contractor's facility for intended performance and operations. The manipulator was tested using the full-scale equipment and process mock-ups. The project produced a practical and operational system including a quantitative evaluation of its performance and cost.« less

  10. Synergistic Cytotoxicity Effect by Combination Treatment of Polyketide Derivatives from Annona muricata Linn Leaves and Doxorubicin as Potential Anticancer Material on Raji Cell Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artanti, A. N.; Astirin, O. P.; Prayito, A.; Fisma, R.; Prihapsara, F.

    2018-03-01

    Nasopharynx cancer is one of the most deadly cancer. The main priority of nasopharynx cancer treatment is the use of chemotherapeutic agents, especially doxorubicin. However, doxorubicin might also lead to diverse side effect. An approach recently develop to overcome side effect of doxorubicin is to used of combined chemotherapeutic agent. One of the compounds found effication as an anticancer agent on nasopharynx cancer is acetogenin, a polyketide compound that is abundant in Annona muricata L. leaves. This study has been done to examine polyketide derivatives was isolated from Annona muricata L. which has potency to induce apoptosis by p53 expression on raji cell line. The determination of cytotoxic combination activity from polyketide derivative and doxorubicin was evaluated using MTT assay to obtain the value of CI (combination index). Data analysis showed that combination of polyketide derivative from Annona muricata L. (14,4 µg/ml) and doxorubicin with all of concentration performed synergistic effect on raji cell line with CI value from 0.13 – 0.65.

  11. Chemogenomics driven discovery of endogenous polyketide anti-infective compounds from endosymbiotic Emericella variecolor CLB38 and their RNA secondary structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yashavantha Rao, H. C.; Rakshith, Devaraju; Harini, Ballagere Puttaraju; Gurudatt, Doddahosuru Mahadevappa; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2017-01-01

    In the postgenomic era, a new strategy for chemical dereplication of polyketide anti-infective drugs requires novel genomics and chromatographic strategies. An endosymbiotic fungal strain CLB38 was isolated from the root tissue of Combretum latifolium Blume (Combretaceae) which was collected from the Western Ghats of India. The isolate CLB38 was then identified as Emericella variecolor by its characteristic stellate ascospores culture morphology and molecular analysis of ITS nuclear rDNA and intervening 5.8S rRNA gene sequence. ITS2 RNA secondary structure modeling clearly distinguished fungal endosymbiont E. variecolor CLB38 with other lifestyles in the same monophyletic clade. Ethyl acetate fraction of CLB38 explored a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant pathogens. Biosynthetic PKS type-I gene and chromatographic approach afford two polyketide antimicrobial compounds which identified as evariquinone and isoindolones derivative emerimidine A. MIC of purified compounds against test microorganisms ranged between 3.12 μg/ml and 12.5 μg/ml. This research highlights the utility of E. variecolor CLB38 as an anticipate source for anti-infective polyketide metabolites evariquinone and emerimidine A to combat multidrug resistant microorganisms. Here we demonstrates a chemogenomics strategy via the feasibility of PKS type-I gene and chromatographic approach as a proficient method for the rapid prediction and discovery of new polyketides compounds from fungal endosymbionts. PMID:28245269

  12. Telepathology: design of a modular system.

    PubMed

    Brauchli, K; Christen, H; Meyer, P; Haroske, G; Meyer, W; Kunze, K D; Otto, R; Oberholzer, M

    2000-01-01

    Although telepathology systems have been developed for more than a decade, they are still not a widespread tool for routine diagnostic applications. Lacking interoperability, software that is not satisfying user needs as well as high costs have been identified as reasons. In this paper we would like to demonstrate that with a clear separation of the tasks required for a telepathology application, telepathology systems can be built in a modular way, where many modules can be implemented using standard software components. With such a modular design, systems can be easily adapted to changing user needs and new technological developments and it is easier to integrate modular systems into existing environments.

  13. Modular standards for emerging avionics technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, B.; Boaz, J.

    The present investigation is concerned with modular standards for the integration of new avionics technologies into production aircraft, taking into account also major retrofit programs. It is pointed out that avionics systems are about to undergo drastic changes in the partitioning of functions and judicious sharing of resources. These changes have the potential to significantly improve reliability and maintainability, and to reduce costs. Attention is given to a definition of the modular avionics concept, the existing module program, the development approach, development progress on the modular avionics standard, and the future of avionics installation standards.

  14. Generalized epidemic process on modular networks.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kihong; Baek, Yongjoo; Kim, Daniel; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-05-01

    Social reinforcement and modular structure are two salient features observed in the spreading of behavior through social contacts. In order to investigate the interplay between these two features, we study the generalized epidemic process on modular networks with equal-sized finite communities and adjustable modularity. Using the analytical approach originally applied to clique-based random networks, we show that the system exhibits a bond-percolation type continuous phase transition for weak social reinforcement, whereas a discontinuous phase transition occurs for sufficiently strong social reinforcement. Our findings are numerically verified using the finite-size scaling analysis and the crossings of the bimodality coefficient.

  15. Modular Courses in British Higher Education: A Critical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Clive

    1975-01-01

    The trends towards modular course structures is examined. British conceptions of modularization are compared with American interpretations of modular instruction, the former shown to be concerned almost exclusively with content, the latter attempting more radical changes in students' learning behavior. Rationales for British modular schemes are…

  16. Modular modelling with Physiome standards

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, David P.; Nielsen, Poul M. F.; Hunter, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The complexity of computational models is increasing, supported by research in modelling tools and frameworks. But relatively little thought has gone into design principles for complex models.We propose a set of design principles for complex model construction with the Physiome standard modelling protocol CellML.By following the principles, models are generated that are extensible and are themselves suitable for reuse in larger models of increasing complexity.We illustrate these principles with examples including an architectural prototype linking, for the first time, electrophysiology, thermodynamically compliant metabolism, signal transduction, gene regulation and synthetic biology.The design principles complement other Physiome research projects, facilitating the application of virtual experiment protocols and model analysis techniques to assist the modelling community in creating libraries of composable, characterised and simulatable quantitative descriptions of physiology. Abstract The ability to produce and customise complex computational models has great potential to have a positive impact on human health. As the field develops towards whole‐cell models and linking such models in multi‐scale frameworks to encompass tissue, organ, or organism levels, reuse of previous modelling efforts will become increasingly necessary. Any modelling group wishing to reuse existing computational models as modules for their own work faces many challenges in the context of construction, storage, retrieval, documentation and analysis of such modules. Physiome standards, frameworks and tools seek to address several of these challenges, especially for models expressed in the modular protocol CellML. Aside from providing a general ability to produce modules, there has been relatively little research work on architectural principles of CellML models that will enable reuse at larger scales. To complement and support the existing tools and frameworks, we develop a set

  17. Modular digital holographic fringe data processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downward, J. G.; Vavra, P. C.; Schebor, F. S.; Vest, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    A software architecture suitable for reducing holographic fringe data into useful engineering data is developed and tested. The results, along with a detailed description of the proposed architecture for a Modular Digital Fringe Analysis System, are presented.

  18. Automatic Modeling and Simulation of Modular Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Wei, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2018-03-01

    The ability of reconfiguration makes modular robots have the ability of adaptable, low-cost, self-healing and fault-tolerant. It can also be applied to a variety of mission situations. In this manuscript, a robot platform which relied on the module library was designed, based on the screw theory and module theory. Then, the configuration design method of the modular robot was proposed. And the different configurations of modular robot system have been built, including industrial mechanical arms, the mobile platform, six-legged robot and 3D exoskeleton manipulator. Finally, the simulation and verification of one system among them have been made, using the analyses of screw kinematics and polynomial planning. The results of experiments demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of this modular system.

  19. Modular Heat Exchanger With Integral Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1992-01-01

    Modular heat exchanger with integral heat pipe transports heat from source to Stirling engine. Alternative to heat exchangers depending on integrities of thousands of brazed joints, contains only 40 brazed tubes.

  20. Modular biowaste monitoring system conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define requirements and generate a conceptual design for a Modular Biowaste Monitoring System for specifically supporting shuttle life science experimental and diagnostic programs.

  1. Modular thought in the circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng

    2018-04-01

    Applied to solve the problem of modular thought, provides a whole for simplification's method, the complex problems have become of, and the study of circuit is similar to the above problems: the complex connection between components, make the whole circuit topic solution seems to be more complex, and actually components the connection between the have rules to follow, this article mainly tells the story of study on the application of the circuit modular thought. First of all, this paper introduces the definition of two-terminal network and the concept of two-terminal network equivalent conversion, then summarizes the common source resistance hybrid network modular approach, containing controlled source network modular processing method, lists the common module, typical examples analysis.

  2. Small modular reactors are 'crucial technology'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2018-03-01

    Small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs) offer a way for the UK to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation, while allowing the country to meet the expected increase in demand for electricity from electric vehicles and other uses.

  3. Optimal Network Modularity for Information Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematzadeh, Azadeh; Ferrara, Emilio; Flammini, Alessandro; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the impact of community structure on information diffusion with the linear threshold model. Our results demonstrate that modular structure may have counterintuitive effects on information diffusion when social reinforcement is present. We show that strong communities can facilitate global diffusion by enhancing local, intracommunity spreading. Using both analytic approaches and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal network modularity, where global diffusion requires the minimal number of early adopters.

  4. Data handling for the modular observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taber, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The current paper summarizes work undertaken at TRW for the EOS satellite and related missions, and it presents conclusions that lead to a flexible and low-cost overall system implementation. It shows how the usual communication and data handling functions must be altered to meet the modularization ground rules, and it demonstrates the modularization that is possible in the handling of wideband payload data both on board and on the ground.

  5. Modular Wideband Active Vibration Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zewari, Wahid; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Smith, David R.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of space experiments with previous missions shows a common theme. Some of the recent experiments are based on the scientific fundamentals of instruments of prior years. However, the main distinguishing characteristic is the embodiment of advances in engineering and manufacturing in order to extract clearer and sharper images and extend the limits of measurement. One area of importance to future missions is providing vibration free observation platforms at acceptable costs. It has been shown by researchers that vibration problems cannot be eliminated by passive isolation techniques alone. Therefore, various organizations have conducted research in the area of combining active and passive vibration control techniques. The essence of this paper is to present progress in what is believed to be a new concept in this arena. It is based on the notion that if one active element in a vibration transmission path can provide a reasonable vibration attenuation, two active elements in series may provide more control options and better results. The paper presents the functions of a modular split shaft linear actuator developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and University of Massachusetts Lowell. It discusses some of the control possibilities facilitated by the device. Some preliminary findings and problems are also discussed.

  6. Paenilamicin: structure and biosynthesis of a hybrid nonribosomal peptide/polyketide antibiotic from the bee pathogen Paenibacillus larvae.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian; Garcia-Gonzalez, Eva; Mainz, Andi; Hertlein, Gillian; Heid, Nina C; Mösker, Eva; van den Elst, Hans; Overkleeft, Herman S; Genersch, Elke; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2014-09-26

    The spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB), a fatal disease of honey bees that occurs worldwide. Previously, we identified a complex hybrid nonribosomal peptide/polyketide synthesis (NRPS/PKS) gene cluster in the genome of P. larvae. Herein, we present the isolation and structure elucidation of the antibacterial and antifungal products of this gene cluster, termed paenilamicins. The unique structures of the paenilamicins give deep insight into the underlying complex hybrid NRPS/PKS biosynthetic machinery. Bee larval co-infection assays reveal that the paenilamicins are employed by P. larvae in fighting ecological niche competitors and are not directly involved in killing the bee larvae. Their antibacterial and antifungal activities qualify the paenilamicins as attractive candidates for drug development. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Mycobacterial polyketide-associated proteins are acyltransferases: Proof of principle with Mycobacterium tuberculosis PapA5

    PubMed Central

    Onwueme, Kenolisa C.; Ferreras, Julian A.; Buglino, John; Lima, Christopher D.; Quadri, Luis E. N.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) produces complex virulence-enhancing lipids with scaffolds consisting of phthiocerol and phthiodiolone dimycocerosate esters (PDIMs). Sequence analysis suggested that PapA5, a so-called polyketide-associated protein (Pap) encoded in the PDIM synthesis gene cluster, as well as PapA5 homologs found in Mt and other species, are a subfamily of acyltransferases. Studies with recombinant protein confirmed that PapA5 is an acetyltransferase. Deletion analysis in Mt demonstrated that papA5 is required for PDIM synthesis. We propose that PapA5 catalyzes diesterification of phthiocerol and phthiodiolone with mycocerosate. These studies present the functional characterization of a Pap and permit inferences regarding roles of other Paps in the synthesis of complex lipids, including the antibiotic rifamycin. PMID:15070765

  8. Gibepyrone Biosynthesis in the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi Is Facilitated by a Small Polyketide Synthase Gene Cluster*

    PubMed Central

    Janevska, Slavica; Arndt, Birgit; Niehaus, Eva-Maria; Burkhardt, Immo; Rösler, Sarah M.; Brock, Nelson L.; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    The 2H-pyran-2-one gibepyrone A and its oxidized derivatives gibepyrones B–F have been isolated from the rice pathogenic fungus Fusarium fujikuroi already more than 20 years ago. However, these products have not been linked to the respective biosynthetic genes, and therefore, their biosynthesis has not yet been analyzed on a molecular level. Feeding experiments with isotopically labeled precursors clearly supported a polyketide origin for the formal monoterpenoid gibepyrone A, whereas the terpenoid pathway could be excluded. Targeted gene deletion verified that the F. fujikuroi polyketide synthase PKS13, designated Gpy1, is responsible for gibepyrone A biosynthesis. Next to Gpy1, the ATP-binding cassette transporter Gpy2 is encoded by the gibepyrone gene cluster. Gpy2 was shown to have only a minor impact on the actual efflux of gibepyrone A out of the cell. Instead, we obtained evidence that Gpy2 is involved in gene regulation as it represses GPY1 gene expression. Thus, GPY1 was up-regulated and gibepyrone A production was enhanced both extra- and intracellularly in Δgpy2 mutants. Furthermore, expression of GPY genes is strictly repressed by members of the fungus-specific velvet complex, Vel1, Vel2, and Lae1, whereas Sge1, a major regulator of secondary metabolism in F. fujikuroi, affects gibepyrone biosynthesis in a positive manner. The gibepyrone A derivatives gibepyrones B and D were shown to be produced by cluster-independent P450 monooxygenases, probably to protect the fungus from the toxic product. In contrast, the formation of gibepyrones E and F from gibepyrone A is a spontaneous process and independent of enzymatic activity. PMID:27856636

  9. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D.; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Considering that 70% of our planet’s surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds. PMID:27092515

  10. Theory for the Emergence of Modularity in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael; Park, Jeong-Man

    2013-03-01

    Biological systems are modular, and this modularity evolves over time and in different environments. A number of observations have been made of increased modularity in biological systems under increased environmental pressure. We here develop a theory for the dynamics of modularity in these systems. We find a principle of least action for the evolved modularity at long times. In addition, we find a fluctuation dissipation relation for the rate of change of modularity at short times. We discuss a number of biological and social systems that can be understood with this framework. The modularity of the protein-protein interaction network increases when yeast are exposed to heat shock, and the modularity of the protein-protein networks in both yeast and E. coli appears to have increased over evolutionary time. Food webs in low-energy, stressful environments are more modular than those in plentiful environments, arid ecologies are more modular during droughts, and foraging of sea otters is more modular when food is limiting. The modularity of social networks changes over time: stock brokers instant messaging networks are more modular under stressful market conditions, criminal networks are more modular under increased police pressure, and world trade network modularity has decreased

  11. Why Go Modular? A Review of Modular A-Level Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taverner, Sally; Wright, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Attitudes, academic intentions, and attainment of students gaining a grade in A-level (Advanced level) mathematics were compared for those who followed a modular course and those assessed at the end of two years of study. Overall, the final grades of those assessed modularly were half a grade higher. (JOW)

  12. Robust modular product family design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lan; Allada, Venkat

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a modified Taguchi methodology to improve the robustness of modular product families against changes in customer requirements. The general research questions posed in this paper are: (1) How to effectively design a product family (PF) that is robust enough to accommodate future customer requirements. (2) How far into the future should designers look to design a robust product family? An example of a simplified vacuum product family is used to illustrate our methodology. In the example, customer requirements are selected as signal factors; future changes of customer requirements are selected as noise factors; an index called quality characteristic (QC) is set to evaluate the product vacuum family; and the module instance matrix (M) is selected as control factor. Initially a relation between the objective function (QC) and the control factor (M) is established, and then the feasible M space is systemically explored using a simplex method to determine the optimum M and the corresponding QC values. Next, various noise levels at different time points are introduced into the system. For each noise level, the optimal values of M and QC are computed and plotted on a QC-chart. The tunable time period of the control factor (the module matrix, M) is computed using the QC-chart. The tunable time period represents the maximum time for which a given control factor can be used to satisfy current and future customer needs. Finally, a robustness index is used to break up the tunable time period into suitable time periods that designers should consider while designing product families.

  13. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  14. Modular Manufacturing Simulator: Users Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Modular Manufacturing Simulator (MMS) has been developed for the beginning user of computer simulations. Consequently, the MMS cannot model complex systems that require branching and convergence logic. Once a user becomes more proficient in computer simulation and wants to add more complexity, the user is encouraged to use one of the many available commercial simulation systems. The (MMS) is based on the SSE5 that was developed in the early 1990's by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). A recent survey by MSFC indicated that the simulator has been a major contributor to the economic impact of the MSFC technology transfer program. Many manufacturers have requested additional features for the SSE5. Consequently, the following features have been added to the MMS that are not available in the SSE5: runs under Windows, print option for both input parameters and output statistics, operator can be fixed at a station or assigned to a group of stations, operator movement based on time limit, part limit, or work-in-process (WIP) limit at next station. The movement options for a moveable operators are: go to station with largest WIP, rabbit chase where operator moves in circular sequence between stations, and push/pull where operator moves back and forth between stations. This user's manual contains the necessary information for installing the MMS on a PC, a description of the various MMS commands, and the solutions to a number of sample problems using the MMS. Also included in the beginning of this report is a brief discussion of technology transfer.

  15. Modular architectures for quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirker, A.; Wallnöfer, J.; Dür, W.

    2018-05-01

    We consider the problem of generating multipartite entangled states in a quantum network upon request. We follow a top-down approach, where the required entanglement is initially present in the network in form of network states shared between network devices, and then manipulated in such a way that the desired target state is generated. This minimizes generation times, and allows for network structures that are in principle independent of physical links. We present a modular and flexible architecture, where a multi-layer network consists of devices of varying complexity, including quantum network routers, switches and clients, that share certain resource states. We concentrate on the generation of graph states among clients, which are resources for numerous distributed quantum tasks. We assume minimal functionality for clients, i.e. they do not participate in the complex and distributed generation process of the target state. We present architectures based on shared multipartite entangled Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger states of different size, and fully connected decorated graph states, respectively. We compare the features of these architectures to an approach that is based on bipartite entanglement, and identify advantages of the multipartite approach in terms of memory requirements and complexity of state manipulation. The architectures can handle parallel requests, and are designed in such a way that the network state can be dynamically extended if new clients or devices join the network. For generation or dynamical extension of the network states, we propose a quantum network configuration protocol, where entanglement purification is used to establish high fidelity states. The latter also allows one to show that the entanglement generated among clients is private, i.e. the network is secure.

  16. Teleoperated Modular Robots for Lunar Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Hornby, Greg; Larchev, Greg; Hancher, Matt; Cannon, Howard; Lohn, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Solar system exploration is currently carried out by special purpose robots exquisitely designed for the anticipated tasks. However, all contingencies for in situ resource utilization (ISRU), human habitat preparation, and exploration will be difficult to anticipate. Furthermore, developing the necessary special purpose mechanisms for deployment and other capabilities is difficult and error prone. For example, the Galileo high gain antenna never opened, severely restricting the quantity of data returned by the spacecraft. Also, deployment hardware is used only once. To address these problems, we are developing teleoperated modular robots for lunar missions, including operations in transit from Earth. Teleoperation of lunar systems from Earth involves a three second speed-of-light delay, but experiment suggests that interactive operations are feasible.' Modular robots typically consist of many identical modules that pass power and data between them and can be reconfigured for different tasks providing great flexibility, inherent redundancy and graceful degradation as modules fail. Our design features a number of different hub, link, and joint modules to simplify the individual modules, lower structure cost, and provide specialized capabilities. Modular robots are well suited for space applications because of their extreme flexibility, inherent redundancy, high-density packing, and opportunities for mass production. Simple structural modules can be manufactured from lunar regolith in situ using molds or directed solar sintering. Software to direct and control modular robots is difficult to develop. We have used genetic algorithms to evolve both the morphology and control system for walking modular robots3 We are currently using evolvable system technology to evolve controllers for modular robots in the ISS glove box. Development of lunar modular robots will require software and physical simulators, including regolith simulation, to enable design and test of robot

  17. Bioactive compounds synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and type-I polyketide synthases discovered through genome-mining and metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nikolouli, Katerina; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2012-08-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKS-I) are multimodular enzymes involved in biosynthesis of oligopeptide and polyketide secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi. New findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS-I evolution illustrate how microorganisms expand their metabolic potential. During the last decade rapid development of bioinformatics tools as well as improved sequencing and annotation of microbial genomes led to discovery of novel bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and PKS-I through genome-mining. Taking advantage of these technological developments metagenomics is a fast growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes or specific gene groups and their products. Discovery of novel bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and PKS-I will certainly be accelerated through metagenomics, allowing the exploitation of so far untapped microbial resources in biotechnology and medicine.

  18. The gravity duals of modular Hamiltonians

    DOE PAGES

    Jafferis, Daniel L.; Suh, S. Josephine

    2016-09-12

    In this study, we investigate modular Hamiltonians defined with respect to arbitrary spatial regions in quantum field theory states which have semi-classical gravity duals. We find prescriptions in the gravity dual for calculating the action of the modular Hamiltonian on its defining state, including its dual metric, and also on small excitations around the state. Curiously, use of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy formula leads us to the conclusion that the modular Hamiltonian, which in the quantum field theory acts only in the causal completion of the region, does not commute with bulk operators whose entire gauge-invariant description is space-likemore » to the causal completion of the region.« less

  19. The gravity duals of modular Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Jafferis, Daniel L.; Suh, S. Josephine

    In this study, we investigate modular Hamiltonians defined with respect to arbitrary spatial regions in quantum field theory states which have semi-classical gravity duals. We find prescriptions in the gravity dual for calculating the action of the modular Hamiltonian on its defining state, including its dual metric, and also on small excitations around the state. Curiously, use of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy formula leads us to the conclusion that the modular Hamiltonian, which in the quantum field theory acts only in the causal completion of the region, does not commute with bulk operators whose entire gauge-invariant description is space-likemore » to the causal completion of the region.« less

  20. A Modular PMAD System for Small Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    Current trends in satellite design are focused on developing small, reliable, and inexpensive spacecraft. To that end, a modular power management and distribution system (PMAD) is proposed which will help transition the aerospace industry towards an assembly line approach to building spacecraft. The modular system is based on an innovative DC voltage boost converter called the Series Connected Boost Regulator (SCBR). The SCBR uses existing DC-DC converters and adds a unique series connection. This simple modification provides the SCBR topology with many advantages over existing boost converters. Efficiencies of 94-98%, power densities above 1,000 We/kg, and inherent fault tolerance are just a few of the characteristics presented. Limitations of the SCBR technology are presented, and it is shown that the SCBR makes an ideal photovoltaic array regulator. A modular design based on the series connected boost unit is outlined and functional descriptions of the components are given.

  1. Aromatic Polyketide GTRI-02 is a Previously Unidentified Product of the act Gene Cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Wu, Changsheng; Ichinose, Koji; Choi, Young Hae; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2017-07-18

    The biosynthesis of aromatic polyketides derived from type II polyketide synthases (PKSs) is complex, and it is not uncommon that highly similar gene clusters give rise to diverse structural architectures. The act biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC) of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is an archetypal type II PKS. Here we show that the act BGC also specifies the aromatic polyketide GTRI-02 (1) and propose a mechanism for the biogenesis of its 3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2H)-one backbone. Polyketide 1 was also produced by Streptomyces sp. MBT76 after activation of the act-like qin gene cluster by overexpression of the pathway-specific activator. Mining of this strain also identified dehydroxy-GTRI-02 (2), which most likely originated from dehydration of 1 during the isolation process. This work shows that even extensively studied model gene clusters such as act of S. coelicolor can still produce new chemistry, offering new perspectives for drug discovery. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. iso-Migrastatin, migrastatin, and dorrigocin production in Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993 is governed by a single biosynthetic machinery featuring an acyltransferase-less type I polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Lim, Si-Kyu; Ju, Jianhua; Zazopoulos, Emmanuel; Jiang, Hui; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Chen, Yihua; Feng, Zhiyang; Rajski, Scott R; Farnet, Chris M; Shen, Ben

    2009-10-23

    iso-Migrastatin and related glutarimide-containing polyketides are potent inhibitors of tumor cell migration and their implied potential as antimetastatic agents for human cancers has garnered significant attention. Genome scanning of Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993 unveiled two candidate gene clusters (088D and mgs); each encodes acyltransferase-less type I polyketide synthases commensurate with iso-migrastatin biosynthesis. Both clusters were inactivated by lambda-RED-mediated PCR-targeting mutagenesis in S. platensis; iso-migrastatin production was completely abolished in the DeltamgsF mutant SB11012 strain, whereas inactivation of 088D-orf7 yielded the SB11006 strain that exhibited no discernible change in iso-migrastatin biosynthesis. These data indicate that iso-migrastatin production is governed by the mgs cluster. Systematic gene inactivation allowed determination of the precise boundaries of the mgs cluster and the essentiality of the genes within the mgs cluster in iso-migrastatin production. The mgs cluster consists of 11 open reading frames that encode three acyltransferase-less type I polyketide synthases (MgsEFG), one discrete acyltransferase (MgsH), a type II thioesterase (MgsB), three post-PKS tailoring enzymes (MgsIJK), two glutarimide biosynthesis enzymes (MgsCD), and one regulatory protein (MgsA). A model for iso-migrastatin biosynthesis is proposed based on functional assignments derived from bioinformatics and is further supported by the results of in vivo gene inactivation experiments.

  3. iso-Migrastatin, Migrastatin, and Dorrigocin Production in Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993 Is Governed by a Single Biosynthetic Machinery Featuring an Acyltransferase-less Type I Polyketide Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Si-Kyu; Ju, Jianhua; Zazopoulos, Emmanuel; Jiang, Hui; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Chen, Yihua; Feng, Zhiyang; Rajski, Scott R.; Farnet, Chris M.; Shen, Ben

    2009-01-01

    iso-Migrastatin and related glutarimide-containing polyketides are potent inhibitors of tumor cell migration and their implied potential as antimetastatic agents for human cancers has garnered significant attention. Genome scanning of Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993 unveiled two candidate gene clusters (088D and mgs); each encodes acyltransferase-less type I polyketide synthases commensurate with iso-migrastatin biosynthesis. Both clusters were inactivated by λ-RED-mediated PCR-targeting mutagenesis in S. platensis; iso-migrastatin production was completely abolished in the ΔmgsF mutant SB11012 strain, whereas inactivation of 088D-orf7 yielded the SB11006 strain that exhibited no discernible change in iso-migrastatin biosynthesis. These data indicate that iso-migrastatin production is governed by the mgs cluster. Systematic gene inactivation allowed determination of the precise boundaries of the mgs cluster and the essentiality of the genes within the mgs cluster in iso-migrastatin production. The mgs cluster consists of 11 open reading frames that encode three acyltransferase-less type I polyketide synthases (MgsEFG), one discrete acyltransferase (MgsH), a type II thioesterase (MgsB), three post-PKS tailoring enzymes (MgsIJK), two glutarimide biosynthesis enzymes (MgsCD), and one regulatory protein (MgsA). A model for iso-migrastatin biosynthesis is proposed based on functional assignments derived from bioinformatics and is further supported by the results of in vivo gene inactivation experiments. PMID:19726666

  4. Convergence of isoprene and polyketide biosynthetic machinery: isoprenyl-S-carrier proteins in the pksX pathway of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Calderone, Christopher T; Kowtoniuk, Walter E; Kelleher, Neil L; Walsh, Christopher T; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2006-06-13

    The pksX gene cluster from Bacillus subtilis is predicted to encode the biosynthesis of an as yet uncharacterized hybrid nonribosomal peptide/polyketide secondary metabolite. We used a combination of biochemical and mass spectrometric techniques to assign functional roles to the proteins AcpK, PksC, PksL, PksF, PksG, PksH, and PksI, and we conclude that they act to incorporate an acetate-derived beta-methyl branch on an acetoacetyl-S-carrier protein and ultimately generate a Delta(2)-isoprenyl-S-carrier protein. This work highlights the power of mass spectrometry to elucidate the functions of orphan biosynthetic enzymes, and it details a mechanism by which single-carbon beta-branches can be inserted into polyketide-like structures. This pathway represents a noncanonical route to the construction of prenyl units and serves as a prototype for the intersection of isoprenoid and polyketide biosynthetic manifolds in other natural product biosynthetic pathways.

  5. Modular arrangement of regulatory RNA elements.

    PubMed

    Roßmanith, Johanna; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-03-04

    Due to their simple architecture and control mechanism, regulatory RNA modules are attractive building blocks in synthetic biology. This is especially true for riboswitches, which are natural ligand-binding regulators of gene expression. The discovery of various tandem riboswitches inspired the design of combined RNA modules with activities not yet found in nature. Riboswitches were placed in tandem or in combination with a ribozyme or temperature-responsive RNA thermometer resulting in new functionalities. Here, we compare natural examples of tandem riboswitches with recently designed artificial RNA regulators suggesting substantial modularity of regulatory RNA elements. Challenges associated with modular RNA design are discussed.

  6. Common modular avionics - Partitioning and design philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. M.; Mulvaney, S. P.

    The design objectives and definition criteria for common modular hardware that will perform digital processing functions in multiple avionic subsystems are examined. In particular, attention is given to weapon system-level objectives, such as increased supportability, reduced life cycle costs, and increased upgradability. These objectives dictate the following overall modular design goals: reduce test equipment requirements; have a large number of subsystem applications; design for architectural growth; and standardize for technology transparent implementations. Finally, specific partitioning criteria are derived on the basis of the weapon system-level objectives and overall design goals.

  7. Proving relations between modular graph functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban

    2016-12-01

    We consider modular graph functions that arise in the low energy expansion of the four graviton amplitude in type II string theory. The vertices of these graphs are the positions of insertions of vertex operators on the toroidal worldsheet, while the links are the scalar Green functions connecting the vertices. Graphs with four and five links satisfy several non-trivial relations, which have been proved recently. We prove these relations by using elementary properties of Green functions and the details of the graphs. We also prove a relation between modular graph functions with six links.

  8. Modular Apparatus and Method for Attaching Multiple Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for attaching sensors and electronics is disclosed. The modular apparatus includes a square recess including a plurality of cavities and a reference cavity such that a pressure sensor can be connected to the modular apparatus. The modular apparatus also includes at least one voltage input hole and at least one voltage output hole operably connected to each of the plurality of cavities such that voltage can be applied to the pressure sensor and received from the pressure sensor.

  9. The Modular need for the Division Signal Battalion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    findings and analyzes them to expand on them. It is with these findings and subsequent analysis that the case studies shape the answer to the three...These case studies focus on the signal leadership development and how it occurred in the pre-modular force structure, during modularity, and the...the comparative case study research. The case studies focus on signal leader development in a pre-modular signal force, a modular signal force, and

  10. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service studies on polyketide toxins of Fusarium oxysporum f sp vasinfectum: potential targets for disease control.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alois A; Wheeler, Michael H; Liu, Jinggao; Stipanovic, Robert D; Puckhaber, Lorraine S; Orta, Heather

    2003-01-01

    A group of 133 isolates of the cotton wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht f sp vasinfectum (Atk) Sny & Hans, representing five races and 20 vegetative compatibility groups within race 1 were used to determine the identity, biosynthetic regulation and taxonomic distribution of polyketide toxins produced by this pathogen. All isolates of F oxysporum f sp vasinfectum produced and secreted the nonaketide naphthazarin quinones, bikaverin and norbikaverin. Most isolates of race 1 (previously denoted as races 1, 2 and 6; and also called race A) also synthesized the heptaketide naphthoquinones, nectriafurone, anhydrofusarubin lactol and 5-O-methyljavanicin. Nine avirulent isolates of F oxysporum from Upland cotton roots, three isolates of race 3 of F oxysporum f sp vasinfectum, and four isolates of F oxysporum f sp vasinfectum from Australia, all of which previously failed to cause disease of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L) in stem-puncture assays, also failed to synthesize or secrete more than trace amounts of the heptaketide compounds. These results indicate that the heptaketides may have a unique role in the virulence of race 1 to Upland cotton. The synthesis of all polyketide toxins by ATCC isolate 24908 of F oxysporum f sp vasinfectum was regulated by pH, carbon/nitrogen ratios, and availability of calcium in media. Synthesis was greatest below pH 7.0 and increased progressively as carbon/nitrogen ratios were increased by decreasing the amounts of nitrogen added to media. The nonaketides were the major polyketides accumulated in synthetic media at pH 4.5 and below, whereas the heptaketides were predominant at pH 5.0 and above. The heptaketides were the major polyketides formed when 10 F oxysporum f sp vasinfectum race 1 isolates were grown on sterilized stems of Fusarium wilt-susceptible cotton cultivars, but these compounds were not produced on sorghum grain cultures. Both groups of polyketide toxins were apparently secreted by F oxysporum f sp vasinfectum

  11. On Classification of Modular Categories by Rank: Table A.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bruillard, Paul; Ng, Siu-Hung; Rowell, Eric C.

    2016-04-10

    The feasibility of a classification-by-rank program for modular categories follows from the Rank-Finiteness Theorem. We develop arithmetic, representation theoretic and algebraic methods for classifying modular categories by rank. As an application, we determine all possible fusion rules for all rank=5 modular categories and describe the corresponding monoidal equivalence classes.

  12. 46 CFR 181.450 - Independent modular smoke detecting units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Independent modular smoke detecting units. 181.450... Independent modular smoke detecting units. (a) An independent modular smoke detecting unit must: (1) Meet UL 217 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) and be listed as a “Single Station Smoke detector...

  13. 46 CFR 181.450 - Independent modular smoke detecting units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Independent modular smoke detecting units. 181.450... Independent modular smoke detecting units. (a) An independent modular smoke detecting unit must: (1) Meet UL 217 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) and be listed as a “Single Station Smoke detector...

  14. 46 CFR 181.450 - Independent modular smoke detecting units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Independent modular smoke detecting units. 181.450... Independent modular smoke detecting units. (a) An independent modular smoke detecting unit must: (1) Meet UL 217 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) and be listed as a “Single Station Smoke detector...

  15. 46 CFR 181.450 - Independent modular smoke detecting units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent modular smoke detecting units. 181.450... Independent modular smoke detecting units. (a) An independent modular smoke detecting unit must: (1) Meet UL 217 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) and be listed as a “Single Station Smoke detector...

  16. 46 CFR 181.450 - Independent modular smoke detecting units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Independent modular smoke detecting units. 181.450... Independent modular smoke detecting units. (a) An independent modular smoke detecting unit must: (1) Meet UL 217 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) and be listed as a “Single Station Smoke detector...

  17. Consciousness in SLA: A Modular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truscott, John

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the place of consciousness in second language acquisition (SLA) is crucial for an understanding of how acquisition occurs. Considerable work has been done on this topic, but nearly all of it assumes a highly non-modular view, according to which language and its development is "nothing special". As this assumption runs…

  18. Selforganization of modular activity of grid cells

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Si, Bailu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A unique topographical representation of space is found in the concerted activity of grid cells in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex. Many among the principal cells in this region exhibit a hexagonal firing pattern, in which each cell expresses its own set of place fields (spatial phases) at the vertices of a triangular grid, the spacing and orientation of which are typically shared with neighboring cells. Grid spacing, in particular, has been found to increase along the dorso‐ventral axis of the entorhinal cortex but in discrete steps, that is, with a modular structure. In this study, we show that such a modular activity may result from the self‐organization of interacting units, which individually would not show discrete but rather continuously varying grid spacing. Within our “adaptation” network model, the effect of a continuously varying time constant, which determines grid spacing in the isolated cell model, is modulated by recurrent collateral connections, which tend to produce a few subnetworks, akin to magnetic domains, each with its own grid spacing. In agreement with experimental evidence, the modular structure is tightly defined by grid spacing, but also involves grid orientation and distortion, due to interactions across modules. Thus, our study sheds light onto a possible mechanism, other than simply assuming separate networks a priori, underlying the formation of modular grid representations. PMID:28768062

  19. Modularity, Working Memory and Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baddeley, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of modularity is used to contrast the approach to working memory proposed by Truscott with the Baddeley and Hitch multicomponent model. This proposes four sub components comprising the "central executive," an executive control system of limited attentional capacity that utilises storage based on separate but interlinked…

  20. Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarrant, Charlie; Crook, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    The Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS) Program is a technology demonstration effort designed to advance the state-of-the-art in launch vehicle propulsion systems. Its emphasis is on developing and demonstrating a modular software architecture for a generic, advanced engine control system that will result in lower software maintenance (operations) costs. It effectively accommodates software requirements changes that occur due to hardware. technology upgrades and engine development testing. Ground rules directed by MSFC were to optimize modularity and implement the software in the Ada programming language. MRECS system software and the software development environment utilize Commercial-Off-the-Shelf (COTS) products. This paper presents the objectives and benefits of the program. The software architecture, design, and development environment are described. MRECS tasks are defined and timing relationships given. Major accomplishment are listed. MRECS offers benefits to a wide variety of advanced technology programs in the areas of modular software, architecture, reuse software, and reduced software reverification time related to software changes. Currently, the program is focused on supporting MSFC in accomplishing a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot-fire test at Stennis Space Center and the Low Cost Boost Technology (LCBT) Program.

  1. Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarrant, C.; Crook, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Modular Rocket Engine Control Software (MRECS) Program is a technology demonstration effort designed to advance the state-of-the-art in launch vehicle propulsion systems. Its emphasis is on developing and demonstrating a modular software architecture for advanced engine control systems that will result in lower software maintenance (operations) costs. It effectively accommodates software requirement changes that occur due to hardware technology upgrades and engine development testing. Ground rules directed by MSFC were to optimize modularity and implement the software in the Ada programming language. MRECS system software and the software development environment utilize Commercial-Off-the-Shelf (COTS) products. This paper presents the objectives, benefits, and status of the program. The software architecture, design, and development environment are described. MRECS tasks are defined and timing relationships given. Major accomplishments are listed. MRECS offers benefits to a wide variety of advanced technology programs in the areas of modular software architecture, reuse software, and reduced software reverification time related to software changes. MRECS was recently modified to support a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot-fire test. Cold Flow and Flight Readiness Testing were completed before the test was cancelled. Currently, the program is focused on supporting NASA MSFC in accomplishing development testing of the Fastrac Engine, part of NASA's Low Cost Technologies (LCT) Program. MRECS will be used for all engine development testing.

  2. Design of a modular digital computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A Central Control Element (CCE) module which controls the Automatically Reconfigurable Modular System (ARMS) and allows both redundant processing and multi-computing in the same computer with real time mode switching, is discussed. The same hardware is used for either reliability enhancement, speed enhancement, or for a combination of both.

  3. Modular Building Institute 2002 Educational Showcase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modular Building Inst., Charlottesville, VA.

    This publication contains brief articles concerned with modular school structures. Some articles offer examples of such structures at actual schools. The articles in this issue are: (1) "Re-Educating Schools" (Chuck Savage); (2) "Tax-Exempt Financing for Public Schools" (John Kennedy); (3) "Help Us Rebuild America" (Michael Roman); (4) "Case…

  4. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  5. Progress toward Modular UAS for Geoscience Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, R. P.; Clark, M. A.; Comstock, R. J.; Fladeland, M.; Gascot, H., III; Haig, T. H.; Lam, S. J.; Mazhari, A. A.; Palomares, R. R.; Pinsker, E. A.; Prathipati, R. T.; Sagaga, J.; Thurling, J. S.; Travers, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have become accepted tools for geoscience, ecology, agriculture, disaster response, land management, and industry. A variety of consumer UAS options exist as science and engineering payload platforms, but their incompatibilities with one another contribute to high operational costs compared with those of piloted aircraft. This research explores the concept of modular UAS, demonstrating airframes that can be reconfigured in the field for experimental optimization, to enable multi-mission support, facilitate rapid repair, or respond to changing field conditions. Modular UAS is revolutionary in allowing aircraft to be optimized around the payload, reversing the conventional wisdom of designing the payload to accommodate an unmodifiable aircraft. UAS that are reconfigurable like Legos™ are ideal for airborne science service providers, system integrators, instrument designers and end users to fulfill a wide range of geoscience experiments. Modular UAS facilitate the adoption of open-source software and rapid prototyping technology where design reuse is important in the context of a highly regulated industry like aerospace. The industry is now at a stage where consolidation, acquisition, and attrition will reduce the number of small manufacturers, with a reduction of innovation and motivation to reduce costs. Modularity leads to interface specifications, which can evolve into de facto or formal standards which contain minimum (but sufficient) details such that multiple vendors can then design to those standards and demonstrate interoperability. At that stage, vendor coopetition leads to robust interface standards, interoperability standards and multi-source agreements which in turn drive costs down significantly.

  6. Modular Infrastructure for Rapid Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pires, Craig

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of modular infrastructure to assist in the development of flight software. A feature of this program is the use of model based approach for application unique software. A review of two programs that this approach was use on are: the development of software for Hover Test Vehicle (HTV), and Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Experiment (LADEE).

  7. Decentralized Modular Systems Versus Centralized Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossey, R. E.

    Building design, planning, and construction programing for modular decentralized mechanical building systems are outlined in terms of costs, performance, expansion and flexibility. Design strategy, approach, and guidelines for implementing such systems for buildings are suggested, with emphasis on mechanical equipment and building element…

  8. Lattices, vertex algebras, and modular categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ekeren, Jethro

    2018-03-01

    In this note we give an account of recent progress on the construction of holomorphic vertex algebras as cyclic orbifolds as well as related topics in lattices and modular categories. We present a novel computation of the Schur indicator of a lattice involution orbifold using finite Heisenberg groups and discriminant forms.

  9. The Modular Market. Studies in Further Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodossin, Ernest

    Origins of modular courses and the module in British postcompulsory education are considered, along with characteristics of modules, credit transfer, five case studies, and marketing in further and higher education. A module is a measured part (or course) of an extended learning experience that leads to specified qualifications. A designated…

  10. Modularization--A Road to Relevance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palow, William P.

    This paper describes a modular program at a community college for instructing non-science majors in college algebra. The two-course sequence is comprised of four modules each and successful completion of a module is required before a student proceeds to the next. Placement, grading policies, and scheduling are all discussed. A formative evaluation…

  11. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212... powered, it must comply with the AC line conducted requirements found in § 15.207. AC or DC power lines...

  12. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212... powered, it must comply with the AC line conducted requirements found in § 15.207. AC or DC power lines...

  13. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212... powered, it must comply with the AC line conducted requirements found in § 15.207. AC or DC power lines...

  14. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212... powered, it must comply with the AC line conducted requirements found in § 15.207. AC or DC power lines...

  15. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212... powered, it must comply with the AC line conducted requirements found in § 15.207. AC or DC power lines...

  16. Modular evolution of the Cetacean vertebral column.

    PubMed

    Buchholtz, Emily A

    2007-01-01

    Modular theory predicts that hierarchical developmental processes generate hierarchical phenotypic units that are capable of independent modification. The vertebral column is an overtly modular structure, and its rapid phenotypic transformation in cetacean evolution provides a case study for modularity. Terrestrial mammals have five morphologically discrete vertebral series that are now known to be coincident with Hox gene expression patterns. Here, I present the hypothesis that in living Carnivora and Artiodactyla, and by inference in the terrestrial ancestors of whales, the series are themselves components of larger precaudal and caudal modular units. Column morphology in a series of fossil and living whales is used to predict the type and sequence of developmental changes responsible for modification of that ancestral pattern. Developmental innovations inferred include independent meristic additions to the precaudal column in basal archaeocetes and basilosaurids, stepwise homeotic reduction of the sacral series in protocetids, and dissociation of the caudal series into anterior tail and fluke subunits in basilosaurids. The most dramatic change was the novel association of lumbar and anterior caudal vertebrae in a module that crosses the precaudal/caudal boundary. This large unit is defined by shared patterns of vertebral morphology, count, and size in all living whales (Neoceti).

  17. 48 CFR 39.103 - Modular contracting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.103 Modular contracting. (a) This section implements Section 5202, Incremental Acquisition of Information Technology, of the Clinger-Cohen... technology. Consistent with the agency's information technology architecture, agencies should, to the maximum...

  18. A Modular Curriculum in Information Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Large, J. A.

    Prepared under a contract between UNESCO and IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations), this modular curriculum is intended as a resource from which curricula can be constructed by individual departments of information studies to meet local needs and circumstances. Following an introductory discussion and explanation of the…

  19. 48 CFR 39.103 - Modular contracting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... increments to take advantage of any evolution in technology or needs that occur during implementation and use... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.103 Modular contracting. (a) This section implements Section 5202, Incremental Acquisition of Information Technology, of the Clinger-Cohen...

  20. 48 CFR 39.103 - Modular contracting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... increments to take advantage of any evolution in technology or needs that occur during implementation and use... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.103 Modular contracting. (a) This section implements Section 5202, Incremental Acquisition of Information Technology, of the Clinger-Cohen...

  1. 48 CFR 39.103 - Modular contracting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... increments to take advantage of any evolution in technology or needs that occur during implementation and use... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.103 Modular contracting. (a) This... technology. Consistent with the agency's information technology architecture, agencies should, to the maximum...

  2. 48 CFR 39.103 - Modular contracting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... increments to take advantage of any evolution in technology or needs that occur during implementation and use... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.103 Modular contracting. (a) This section implements Section 5202, Incremental Acquisition of Information Technology, of the Clinger-Cohen...

  3. Design of a modular digital computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A design tradeoff study is reported for a modular spaceborne computer system that is responsive to many mission types and phases. The computer uses redundancy to maximize reliability, and multiprocessing to maximize processing capacity. Fault detection and recovery features provide optimal reliability.

  4. Review of the Modular Administrative Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grand Valley State Colleges, Allendale, MI. Office of Institutional Analysis.

    The modular administrative structure implemented at Grand Valley State Colleges in 1973 is described as a system in which administrative affairs are divided into functional self-contained units called modules, each of which has a head or acting head who is responsible for the management of the functions contained within the module. A long-range…

  5. Isolation and purification of a new kalimantacin/batumin-related polyketide antibiotic and elucidation of its biosynthesis gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Mattheus, Wesley; Gao, Ling-Jie; Herdewijn, Piet; Landuyt, Bart; Verhaegen, Jan; Masschelein, Joleen; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2010-02-26

    Kal/bat, a polyketide, isolated to high purity (>95%) is characterized by strong and selective antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus species (minimum inhibitory concentration, 0.05 microg/mL), and no resistance was observed in strains already resistant to commonly used antibiotics. The kal/bat biosynthesis gene cluster was determined to a 62 kb genomic region of Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. The kal/bat gene cluster consists of 16 open reading frames (ORF), encoding a hybrid PKS-NRPS system, extended with trans-acting tailoring functions. A full model for kal/bat biosynthesis is postulated and experimentally tested by gene inactivation, structural confirmation (using NMR spectroscopy), and complementation. The structural and microbiological study of biosynthetic kal/bat analogs revealed the importance of the carbamoyl group and 17-keto group for antibacterial activity. The mechanism of self-resistance lies within the production of an inactive intermediate, which is activated in a one-step enzymatic oxidation upon export. The genetic basis and biochemical elucidation of the biosynthesis pathway of this antibiotic will facilitate rational engineering for the design of novel structures with improved activities. This makes it a promising new therapeutic option to cope with multidrug-resistant clinical infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Condensation of Macrocyclic Polyketides Produced by Penicillium sp. DRF2 with Mercaptopyruvate Represents a New Fungal Detoxification Pathway.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Marcos V; Ióca, Laura P; Williams, David E; Costa, Bruna Z; Mizuno, Carolina M; Santos, Mario F C; de Jesus, Karen; Ferreira, Éverton L F; Seleghim, Mirna H R; Sette, Lara D; Pereira Filho, Edenir R; Ferreira, Antonio G; Gonçalves, Natália S; Santos, Raquel A; Patrick, Brian O; Andersen, Raymond J; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2016-06-24

    Application of a refined procedure of experimental design and chemometric analysis to improve the production of curvularin-related polyketides by a marine-derived Penicillium sp. DRF2 resulted in the isolation and identification of cyclothiocurvularins 6-8 and cyclosulfoxicurvularins 10 and 11, novel curvularins condensed with a mercaptolactate residue. Two additional new curvularins, 3 and 4, are also reported. The structures of the sulfur-bearing curvularins were unambiguously established by analysis of spectroscopic data and by X-ray diffraction analysis. Analysis of stable isotope feeding experiments with [U-(13)C3(15)N]-l-cysteine confirmed the presence of the 2-hydroxy-3-mercaptopropanoic acid residue in 6-8 and the oxidized sulfoxide in 10 and 11. Cyclothiocurvularins A (6) and B (7) are formed by spontaneous reaction between 10,11-dehydrocurvularin (2) and mercaptopyruvate (12) obtained by transamination of cysteine. High ratios of [U-(13)C3(15)N]-l-cysteine incorporation into cyclothiocurvularin B (7), the isolation of two diastereomers of cyclothiocurvularins, the lack of cytotoxicity of cyclothiocurvularin B (7) and its methyl ester (8), and the spontaneous formation of cyclothiocurvularins from 10,11-dehydrocurvularin and mercaptopyruvate provide evidence that the formation of cyclothiocurvularins may well correspond to a 10,11-dehydrocurvularin detoxification process by Penicillium sp. DRF2.

  7. Production and New Extraction Method of Polyketide Red Pigments Produced by Ascomycetous Fungi from Terrestrial and Marine Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Lebeau, Juliana; Venkatachalam, Mekala; Fouillaud, Mireille; Petit, Thomas; Vinale, Francesco; Dufossé, Laurent; Caro, Yanis

    2017-01-01

    The use of ascomycetous fungi as pigment producers opens the way to an alternative to synthetic dyes, especially in the red-dye industries, which have very few natural pigment alternatives. The present paper aimed to bio-prospect and screen out 15 selected ascomycetous fungal strains, originating from terrestrial and marine habitats belonging to seven different genera (Penicillium, Talaromyces, Fusarium, Aspergillus, Trichoderma, Dreschlera, and Paecilomyces). We identified four strains, Penicillium purpurogenum rubisclerotium, Fusarium oxysporum, marine strains identified as Talaromyces spp., and Trichoderma atroviride, as potential red pigment producers. The extraction of the pigments is a crucial step, whereby the qualitative and quantitative compositions of each fungal extract need to be respected for reliable identification, as well as preserving bioactivity. Furthermore, there is a growing demand for more sustainable and cost-effective extraction methods. Therefore, a pressurized liquid extraction technique was carried out in this study, allowing a greener and faster extraction step of the pigments, while preserving their chemical structures and bioactivities in comparison to conventional extraction processes. The protocol was illustrated with the production of pigment extracts from P. purpurogenum rubisclerotium and Talaromyces spp. Extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography combined with photodiode array-detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). The more promising strain was the isolate Talaromyces spp. of marine origin. The main polyketide pigment produced by this strain has been characterized as N-threoninerubropunctamine, a non-toxic red Monascus-like azaphilone pigment. PMID:29371552

  8. Expanding the chemical diversity of natural esters by engineering a polyketide-derived pathway into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Bravo, Simón; Comba, Santiago; Sabatini, Martín; Arabolaza, Ana; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-07-01

    Microbial fatty acid (FA)-derived molecules have emerged as promising alternatives to petroleum-based chemicals for reducing dependence on fossil hydrocarbons. However, native FA biosynthetic pathways often yield limited structural diversity, and therefore restricted physicochemical properties, of the end products by providing only a limited variety of usually linear hydrocarbons. Here we have engineered into Escherichia coli a mycocerosic polyketide synthase-based biosynthetic pathway from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and redefined its biological role towards the production of multi-methyl-branched-esters (MBEs) with novel chemical structures. Expression of FadD28, Mas and PapA5 enzymes enabled the biosynthesis of multi-methyl-branched-FA and their further esterification to an alcohol. The high substrate tolerance of these enzymes towards different FA and alcohol moieties resulted in the biosynthesis of a broad range of MBE. Further metabolic engineering of the MBE producer strain coupled this system to long-chain-alcohol biosynthetic pathways resulting in de novo production of branched wax esters following addition of only propionate. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christina A.; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C. A.; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. PMID:26002894

  10. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christina A; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Production of New Cladosporin Analogues by Reconstitution of the Polyketide Synthases Responsible for the Biosynthesis of this Antimalarial Agent.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Rachel V K; Sanichar, Randy; Lambkin, Gareth R; Reiz, Béla; Xu, Wei; Tang, Yi; Vederas, John C

    2016-01-11

    The antimalarial agent cladosporin is a nanomolar inhibitor of the Plasmodium falciparum lysyl-tRNA synthetase, and exhibits activity against both blood- and liver-stage infection. Cladosporin can be isolated from the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides, where it is biosynthesized by a highly reducing (HR) and a non-reducing (NR) iterative type I polyketide synthase (PKS) pair. Genome sequencing of the host organism and subsequent heterologous expression of these enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced cladosporin, confirming the identity of the putative gene cluster. Incorporation of a pentaketide intermediate analogue indicated a 5+3 assembly by the HR PKS Cla2 and the NR PKS Cla3 during cladosporin biosynthesis. Advanced-intermediate analogues were synthesized and incorporated by Cla3 to furnish new cladosporin analogues. A putative lysyl-tRNA synthetase resistance gene was identified in the cladosporin gene cluster. Analysis of the active site emphasizes key structural features thought to be important in resistance to cladosporin. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chemistry and Selective Tumor Cell Growth Inhibitory Activity of Polyketides from the South China Sea Sponge Plakortis sp.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Li, Cui; Riccio, Raffaele; Lauro, Gianluigi; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Li, Tie-Jun; Tang, Hua; Zhuang, Chun-Lin; Ma, Hao; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Wen

    2017-05-03

    Simplextone E ( 1 ), a new metabolite of polyketide origin, was isolated with eight known analogues ( 2 - 9 ) from the South China Sea sponge Plakortis sp. The relative configuration of the new compound was elucidated by a detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data and quantum mechanical calculation of NMR chemical shifts, aided by the newly reported DP4+ approach. Its absolute configuration was determined by the TDDFT/ECD calculation. Simplextone E ( 1 ) is proven to be one of the isomers of simplextone D. The absolute configuration at C-8 in alkyl chain of plakortone Q ( 2 ) was also assigned based on the NMR calculation. In the preliminary in vitro bioassay, compounds 6 and 7 showed a selective growth inhibitory activity against HCT-116 human colon cancer cells with IC 50 values of 8.3 ± 2.4 and 8.4 ± 2.3 μM, corresponding to that of the positive control, adriamycin (IC 50 4.1 μM). The two compounds also showed selective activities towards MCF-7 human breast cancer and K562 human erythroleukemia cells while compound 3 only displayed weak activity against K562 cells.

  13. An In Planta-Expressed Polyketide Synthase Produces (R)-Mellein in the Wheat Pathogen Parastagonospora nodorum

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Christian; Barrow, Russell A.; Chen, Shasha; Trengove, Robert; Oliver, Richard P.; Solomon, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Parastagonospora nodorum is a pathogen of wheat that affects yields globally. Previous transcriptional analysis identified a partially reducing polyketide synthase (PR-PKS) gene, SNOG_00477 (SN477), in P. nodorum that is highly upregulated during infection of wheat leaves. Disruption of the corresponding SN477 gene resulted in the loss of production of two compounds, which we identified as (R)-mellein and (R)-O-methylmellein. Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast heterologous expression system, we successfully demonstrated that SN477 is the only enzyme required for the production of (R)-mellein. This is the first identification of a fungal PKS that is responsible for the synthesis of (R)-mellein. The P. nodorum ΔSN477 mutant did not show any significant difference from the wild-type strain in its virulence against wheat. However, (R)-mellein at 200 μg/ml inhibited the germination of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) seeds. Comparative sequence analysis identified the presence of mellein synthase (MLNS) homologues in several Dothideomycetes and two sodariomycete genera. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the MLNSs in fungi and bacteria evolved convergently from fungal and bacterial 6-methylsalicylic acid synthases. PMID:25326302

  14. Polyketide synthase (PKS) reduces fusion of Legionella pneumophila-containing vacuoles with lysosomes and contributes to bacterial competitiveness during infection.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Olga; Pägelow, Dennis; Rasch, Janine; Döhrmann, Simon; Günther, Gabriele; Hoppe, Julia; Ünal, Can Murat; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel; Steinert, Michael

    2014-11-01

    L. pneumophila-containing vacuoles (LCVs) exclude endocytic and lysosomal markers in human macrophages and protozoa. We screened a L. pneumophila mini-Tn10 transposon library for mutants, which fail to inhibit the fusion of LCVs with lysosomes by loading of the lysosomal compartment with colloidal iron dextran, mechanical lysis of infected host cells, and magnetic isolation of LCVs that have fused with lysosomes. In silico analysis of the mutated genes, D. discoideum plaque assays and infection assays in protozoa and U937 macrophage-like cells identified well established as well as novel putative L. pneumophila virulence factors. Promising candidates were further analyzed for their co-localization with lysosomes in host cells using fluorescence microscopy. This approach corroborated that the O-methyltransferase, PilY1, TPR-containing protein and polyketide synthase (PKS) of L. pneumophila interfere with lysosomal degradation. Competitive infections in protozoa and macrophages revealed that the identified PKS contributes to the biological fitness of pneumophila strains and may explain their prevalence in the epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Fine Tuning of Antibiotic Activity by a Tailoring Hydroxylase in a Trans-AT Polyketide Synthase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Hadi H; Connolly, Jack A; Song, Zhongshu; Hothersall, Joanne; Race, Paul R; Willis, Christine L; Simpson, Thomas J; Winn, Peter J; Thomas, Christopher M

    2018-04-16

    The addition or removal of hydroxy groups modulates the activity of many pharmacologically active biomolecules. It can be integral to the basic biosynthetic factory or result from associated tailoring steps. For the anti-MRSA antibiotic mupirocin, removal of a C8-hydroxy group late in the biosynthetic pathway gives the active pseudomonic acid A. An extra hydroxylation, at C4, occurs in the related but more potent antibiotic thiomarinol A. We report here in vivo and in vitro studies that show that the putative non-haem-iron(II)/α-ketoglutaratedependent dioxygenase TmuB, from the thiomarinol cluster, 4-hydroxylates various pseudomonic acids whereas C8-OH, and other substituents around the tetrahydropyran ring, block enzyme action but not substrate binding. Molecular modelling suggested a basis for selectivity, but mutation studies had a limited ability to rationally modify TmuB substrate specificity. 4-Hydroxylation had opposite effects on the potency of mupirocin and thiomarinol. Thus, TmuB can be added to the toolbox of polyketide tailoring technologies for the in vivo generation of new antibiotics in the future. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Modular femoral neck fracture after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sotereanos, Nicholas G; Sauber, Timothy J; Tupis, Todd T

    2013-01-01

    The use of modular femoral stems in primary total hip arthroplasty has increased considerably in recent years. These modular components offer the surgeon the ability to independently alter version, offset, and length of the femoral component of a hip arthroplasty. This increases the surgeon's ability to accurately recreate the relevant anatomy but increases the possibilities of corrosion and fracture. Multiple case reports have highlighted fractures of these modular components. We present a case of a fracture of a modular design that has had no previously reported modular neck fractures. The patient was informed that data concerning the case would be submitted, and he consented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SMEX-Lite Modular Solar Array Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, John

    2002-01-01

    For the most part, Goddard solar arrays have been custom designs that are unique to each mission. The solar panel design has been frozen prior to issuing an RFP for their procurement. There has typically been 6-9 months between RFP release and contract award, followed by an additional 24 months for performance of the contract. For Small Explorer (SMEX) missions, with three years between mission definition and launch, this has been a significant problem. The SMEX solar panels have been sufficiently small that the contract performance period has been reduced to 12-15 months. The bulk of this time is used up in the final design definition and fabrication of flight solar cell assemblies. Even so, it has been virtually impossible to have the spacecraft design at a level of maturity sufficient to freeze the solar panel geometry and release the RFP in time to avoid schedule problems with integrating the solar panels to the spacecraft. With that in mind, the SMEX-Lite project team developed a modular architecture for the assembly of solar arrays to greatly reduce the cost and schedule associated with the development of a mission- specific solar array. In the modular architecture, solar cells are fabricated onto small substrate panels. This modular panel (approximately 8.5" x 17" in this case) becomes the building block for constructing solar arrays for multiple missions with varying power requirements and geometrical arrangements. The mechanical framework that holds these modules together as a solar array is the only mission-unique design, changing in size and shape as required for each mission. There are several advantages to this approach. First, the typical solar array development cycle requires a mission unique design, procurement, and qualification including a custom qualification panel. With the modular architecture, a single qualification of the SMEX-Lite modules and the associated mechanical framework in a typical configuration provided a qualification by

  18. Implicit Contractive Mappings in Modular Metric and Fuzzy Metric Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, N.; Salimi, P.

    2014-01-01

    The notion of modular metric spaces being a natural generalization of classical modulars over linear spaces like Lebesgue, Orlicz, Musielak-Orlicz, Lorentz, Orlicz-Lorentz, and Calderon-Lozanovskii spaces was recently introduced. In this paper we investigate the existence of fixed points of generalized α-admissible modular contractive mappings in modular metric spaces. As applications, we derive some new fixed point theorems in partially ordered modular metric spaces, Suzuki type fixed point theorems in modular metric spaces and new fixed point theorems for integral contractions. In last section, we develop an important relation between fuzzy metric and modular metric and deduce certain new fixed point results in triangular fuzzy metric spaces. Moreover, some examples are provided here to illustrate the usability of the obtained results. PMID:25003157

  19. CosmoSIS: Modular cosmological parameter estimation

    DOE PAGES

    Zuntz, J.; Paterno, M.; Jennings, E.; ...

    2015-06-09

    Cosmological parameter estimation is entering a new era. Large collaborations need to coordinate high-stakes analyses using multiple methods; furthermore such analyses have grown in complexity due to sophisticated models of cosmology and systematic uncertainties. In this paper we argue that modularity is the key to addressing these challenges: calculations should be broken up into interchangeable modular units with inputs and outputs clearly defined. Here we present a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community. We describe the modules already available in CosmoSIS, including CAMB, Planck, cosmicmore » shear calculations, and a suite of samplers. Lastly, we illustrate it using demonstration code that you can run out-of-the-box with the installer available at http://bitbucket.org/joezuntz/cosmosis« less

  20. Versatile microrobotics using simple modular subunits

    PubMed Central

    Cheang, U Kei; Meshkati, Farshad; Kim, Hoyeon; Lee, Kyoungwoo; Fu, Henry Chien; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-01-01

    The realization of reconfigurable modular microrobots could aid drug delivery and microsurgery by allowing a single system to navigate diverse environments and perform multiple tasks. So far, microrobotic systems are limited by insufficient versatility; for instance, helical shapes commonly used for magnetic swimmers cannot effectively assemble and disassemble into different size and shapes. Here by using microswimmers with simple geometries constructed of spherical particles, we show how magnetohydrodynamics can be used to assemble and disassemble modular microrobots with different physical characteristics. We develop a mechanistic physical model that we use to improve assembly strategies. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of dynamically changing the physical properties of microswimmers through assembly and disassembly in a controlled fluidic environment. Finally, we show that different configurations have different swimming properties by examining swimming speed dependence on configuration size. PMID:27464852

  1. Versatile microrobotics using simple modular subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U. Kei; Meshkati, Farshad; Kim, Hoyeon; Lee, Kyoungwoo; Fu, Henry Chien; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    The realization of reconfigurable modular microrobots could aid drug delivery and microsurgery by allowing a single system to navigate diverse environments and perform multiple tasks. So far, microrobotic systems are limited by insufficient versatility; for instance, helical shapes commonly used for magnetic swimmers cannot effectively assemble and disassemble into different size and shapes. Here by using microswimmers with simple geometries constructed of spherical particles, we show how magnetohydrodynamics can be used to assemble and disassemble modular microrobots with different physical characteristics. We develop a mechanistic physical model that we use to improve assembly strategies. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of dynamically changing the physical properties of microswimmers through assembly and disassembly in a controlled fluidic environment. Finally, we show that different configurations have different swimming properties by examining swimming speed dependence on configuration size.

  2. A modular approach to adaptive structures.

    PubMed

    Pagitz, Markus; Pagitz, Manuel; Hühne, Christian

    2014-10-07

    A remarkable property of nastic, shape changing plants is their complete fusion between actuators and structure. This is achieved by combining a large number of cells whose geometry, internal pressures and material properties are optimized for a given set of target shapes and stiffness requirements. An advantage of such a fusion is that cell walls are prestressed by cell pressures which increases, decreases the overall structural stiffness, weight. Inspired by the nastic movement of plants, Pagitz et al (2012 Bioinspir. Biomim. 7) published a novel concept for pressure actuated cellular structures. This article extends previous work by introducing a modular approach to adaptive structures. An algorithm that breaks down any continuous target shapes into a small number of standardized modules is presented. Furthermore it is shown how cytoskeletons within each cell enhance the properties of adaptive modules. An adaptive passenger seat and an aircrafts leading, trailing edge is used to demonstrate the potential of a modular approach.

  3. SMEX-Lite Modular Solar Array Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, John W.; Day, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Small Explorer (SMEX) missions have typically had three years between mission definition and launch. This short schedule has posed significant challenges with respect to solar array design and procurement. Typically, the solar panel geometry is frozen prior to going out with a procurement. However, with the SMEX schedule, it has been virtually impossible to freeze the geometry in time to avoid scheduling problems with integrating the solar panels to the spacecraft. A modular solar array architecture was developed to alleviate this problem. This approach involves procuring sufficient modules for multiple missions and assembling the modules onto a solar array framework that is unique to each mission. The modular approach removes the solar array from the critical path of the SMEX integration and testing schedule. It also reduces the cost per unit area of the solar arrays and facilitates the inclusion of experiments involving new solar cell or panel technologies in the SMEX missions.

  4. Preliminary design study. Shuttle modular scanning spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Fundamental concepts on which to base a detailed design for a Shuttle Modular Scanning Spectroradiometer were developed, and a preliminary design is presented. The recommended design features modularity and flexibility. It includes a 75-cm f/1.7-telescope assembly in an all-reflective Schmidt configuration, a solid state scan system (pushbroom) with high resolution over a 15 deg field of view, and ten detector channels covering the spectral range from 0.45 to 12.5 micrometers. It uses charge transfer device techniques to accommodate a large number of detector elements for earth observation measurements. Methods for in-flight radiometric calibration, for image motion compensation, and for data processing are described. Recommendations for ground support equipment are included, and interfaces with the shuttle orbiter vehicle are illustrated.

  5. Modular Chemical Process Intensification: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Park, Lydia K; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2017-06-07

    Modular chemical process intensification can dramatically improve energy and process efficiencies of chemical processes through enhanced mass and heat transfer, application of external force fields, enhanced driving forces, and combinations of different unit operations, such as reaction and separation, in single-process equipment. These dramatic improvements lead to several benefits such as compactness or small footprint, energy and cost savings, enhanced safety, less waste production, and higher product quality. Because of these benefits, process intensification can play a major role in industrial and manufacturing sectors, including chemical, pulp and paper, energy, critical materials, and water treatment, among others. This article provides an overview of process intensification, including definitions, principles, tools, and possible applications, with the objective to contribute to the future development and potential applications of modular chemical process intensification in industrial and manufacturing sectors. Drivers and barriers contributing to the advancement of process intensification technologies are discussed.

  6. SMARBot: a modular miniature mobile robot platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yan; Johnson, Kerry; Simms, Brian; Conforth, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Miniature robots have many advantages over their larger counterparts, such as low cost, low power, and easy to build a large scale team for complex tasks. Heterogeneous multi miniature robots could provide powerful situation awareness capability due to different locomotion capabilities and sensor information. However, it would be expensive and time consuming to develop specific embedded system for different type of robots. In this paper, we propose a generic modular embedded system architecture called SMARbot (Stevens Modular Autonomous Robot), which consists of a set of hardware and software modules that can be configured to construct various types of robot systems. These modules include a high performance microprocessor, a reconfigurable hardware component, wireless communication, and diverse sensor and actuator interfaces. The design of all the modules in electrical subsystem, the selection criteria for module components, and the real-time operating system are described. Some proofs of concept experimental results are also presented.

  7. Modular Chemical Process Intensification: A Review

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Park, Lydia K.; Yiacoumi, Sotira; ...

    2016-06-24

    Modular chemical process intensification can dramatically improve energy and process efficiencies of chemical processes through enhanced mass and heat transfer, application of external force fields, enhanced driving forces, and combinations of different unit operations, such as reaction and separation, in single-process equipment. Dramatic improvements such as these lead to several benefits such as compactness or small footprint, energy and cost savings, enhanced safety, less waste production, and higher product quality. Because of these benefits, process intensification can play a major role in industrial and manufacturing sectors, including chemical, pulp and paper, energy, critical materials, and water treatment, among others. Thismore » article provides an overview of process intensification, including definitions, principles, tools, and possible applications, with the objective to contribute to the future development and potential applications of modular chemical process intensification in industrial and manufacturing sectors. Drivers and barriers contributing to the advancement of process intensification technologies are discussed.« less

  8. Modular, bluetooth enabled, wireless electroencephalograph (EEG) platform.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Joseph A; Witt, Tyler S; Beyette, Fred R

    2013-01-01

    A design for a modular, compact, and accurate wireless electroencephalograph (EEG) system is proposed. EEG is the only non-invasive measure for neuronal function of the brain. Using a number of digital signal processing (DSP) techniques, this neuronal function can be acquired and processed into meaningful representations of brain activity. The system described here utilizes Bluetooth to wirelessly transmit the digitized brain signal for an end application use. In this way, the system is portable, and modular in terms of the device to which it can interface. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) has become a popular extension of EEG systems in modern research. This design serves as a platform for applications using BCI capability.

  9. Toward the Modularization of Decision Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Decision support systems are typically developed entirely from scratch without the use of modular components. This “stovepiped” approach is inefficient and costly because it prevents a developer from leveraging the data, models, tools, and services of other developers. Even when a decision support component is made available, it is difficult to know what problem it solves, how it relates to other components, or even that the component exists, The Spatial Decision Support (SDS) Consortium was formed in 2008 to organize the body of knowledge in SDS within a common portal. The portal identifies the canonical steps in the decision process and enables decision support components to be registered, categorized, and searched. This presentation describes how a decision support system can be assembled from modular models, data, tools and services, based on the needs of the Earth science application.

  10. [Modularization by the open standard. (I)].

    PubMed

    Hirano, H

    2000-10-01

    We are proceeding with the project called "Open LA21 Project" in the course of the clinical laboratory automation toward the 21st century. With the modular system that realizes integration, downsizing, a reasonable price, and is the future course in the clinical testing automation system as well, we aim to establish common standards among manufacturers as the only way to create user friendly market environments where the proper competition exists among the manufacturers. The common standards which are in preparation by the participating companies as "Open module system standards" are the standards which are going to be made public. They are intended to guarantee connection, compatibility of the products in conformity with the standards. In this project, we intend to realize the modular system that integrates each field, such as chemistry, hematology, coagulation/fibrinolysis, immunology, urinalysis in an early stage, and contribute positively to restructuring and upgrading the "raison d'etre" of the 21st century clinical testing.

  11. Modular, Reconfigurable, High-Energy Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrington, Connie; Howell, Joe

    2006-01-01

    The Modular, Reconfigurable High-Energy (MRHE) Technology Demonstrator project was to have been a series of ground-based demonstrations to mature critical technologies needed for in-space assembly of a highpower high-voltage modular spacecraft in low Earth orbit, enabling the development of future modular solar-powered exploration cargo-transport vehicles and infrastructure. MRHE was a project in the High Energy Space Systems (HESS) Program, within NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESR&T) Program. NASA participants included Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Glenn Research Center (GRC). Contractor participants were the Boeing Phantom Works in Huntsville, AL, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, CA, ENTECH, Inc. in Keller, TX, and the University of AL Huntsville (UAH). MRHE's technical objectives were to mature: (a) lightweight, efficient, high-voltage, radiation-resistant solar power generation (SPG) technologies; (b) innovative, lightweight, efficient thermal management systems; (c) efficient, 100kW-class, high-voltage power delivery systems from an SPG to an electric thruster system; (d) autonomous rendezvous and docking technology for in-space assembly of modular, reconfigurable spacecraft; (e) robotic assembly of modular space systems; and (f) modular, reconfigurable distributed avionics technologies. Maturation of these technologies was to be implemented through a series of increasingly-inclusive laboratory demonstrations that would have integrated and demonstrated two systems-of-systems: (a) the autonomous rendezvous and docking of modular spacecraft with deployable structures, robotic assembly, reconfiguration both during assembly and (b) the development and integration of an advanced thermal heat pipe and a high-voltage power delivery system with a representative lightweight high-voltage SPG array. In addition, an integrated simulation testbed would have been developed

  12. A Modular, Reconfigurable Surveillance UAV Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-02

    Una Società Galileo Avionica A Modular, Reconfigurable Surveillance UAV Architecture METEOR, Finmeccanica Group Zona Industriale di Soleschiano Via...ES) METEOR, Finmeccanica Group Zona Industriale di Soleschiano Via Mario Stoppani 21 34077 Ronchi dei Legionari (GO) ITALY 8. PERFORMING...PMSFMS RS1Backup FMS NSU Payload Control Actuators Router Router RS2 Recovery Devices Una Società Galileo Avionica • Daylight TV Camera • IR Sensor • HR

  13. lazar: a modular predictive toxicology framework

    PubMed Central

    Maunz, Andreas; Gütlein, Martin; Rautenberg, Micha; Vorgrimmler, David; Gebele, Denis; Helma, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    lazar (lazy structure–activity relationships) is a modular framework for predictive toxicology. Similar to the read across procedure in toxicological risk assessment, lazar creates local QSAR (quantitative structure–activity relationship) models for each compound to be predicted. Model developers can choose between a large variety of algorithms for descriptor calculation and selection, chemical similarity indices, and model building. This paper presents a high level description of the lazar framework and discusses the performance of example classification and regression models. PMID:23761761

  14. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Ault, Earl R.; Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

  15. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.; Ault, E.R.; Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment. 2 figs.

  16. Space Ultrareliable Modular Computer (SUMC) instruction simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The design principles, description, functional operation, and recommended expansion and enhancements are presented for the Space Ultrareliable Modular Computer interpretive simulator. Included as appendices are the user's manual, program module descriptions, target instruction descriptions, simulator source program listing, and a sample program printout. In discussing the design and operation of the simulator, the key problems involving host computer independence and target computer architectural scope are brought into focus.

  17. Asynchronous networks: modularization of dynamics theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Field, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Building on the first part of this paper, we develop the theory of functional asynchronous networks. We show that a large class of functional asynchronous networks can be (uniquely) represented as feedforward networks connecting events or dynamical modules. For these networks we can give a complete description of the network function in terms of the function of the events comprising the network: the modularization of dynamics theorem. We give examples to illustrate the main results.

  18. Maass Forms and Quantum Modular Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolen, Larry

    This thesis describes several new results in the theory of harmonic Maass forms and related objects. Maass forms have recently led to a flood of applications throughout number theory and combinatorics in recent years, especially following their development by the work of Bruinier and Funke the modern understanding Ramanujan's mock theta functions due to Zwegers. The first of three main theorems discussed in this thesis concerns the integrality properties of singular moduli. These are well-known to be algebraic integers, and they play a beautiful role in complex multiplication and explicit class field theory for imaginary quadratic fields. One can also study "singular moduli" for special non-holomorphic functions, which are algebraic but are not necessarily algebraic integers. Here we will explain the phenomenon of integrality properties and provide a sharp bound on denominators of symmetric functions in singular moduli. The second main theme of the thesis concerns Zagier's recent definition of a quantum modular form. Since their definition in 2010 by Zagier, quantum modular forms have been connected to numerous different topics such as strongly unimodal sequences, ranks, cranks, and asymptotics for mock theta functions. Motivated by Zagier's example of the quantum modularity of Kontsevich's "strange" function F(q), we revisit work of Andrews, Jimenez-Urroz, and Ono to construct a natural vector-valued quantum modular form whose components. The final chapter of this thesis is devoted to a study of asymptotics of mock theta functions near roots of unity. In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. The theory of mock theta functions has been brought to fruition using the framework of harmonic Maass forms, thanks to Zwegers. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan's original definition. Here we prove that Ramanujan's examples do indeed satisfy his

  19. Modular architecture for robotics and teleoperation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert J.

    1996-12-03

    Systems and methods for modularization and discretization of real-time robot, telerobot and teleoperation systems using passive, network based control laws. Modules consist of network one-ports and two-ports. Wave variables and position information are passed between modules. The behavior of each module is decomposed into uncoupled linear-time-invariant, and coupled, nonlinear memoryless elements and then are separately discretized.

  20. Modular vaccine packaging increases packing efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Bryan A.; Rajgopal, Jayant; Lim, Jung; Gorham, Katrin; Haidari, Leila; Brown, Shawn T.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Within a typical vaccine supply chain, vaccines are packaged into individual cylindrical vials (each containing one or more doses) that are bundled together in rectangular “inner packs” for transport via even larger groupings such as cold boxes and vaccine carriers. The variability of vaccine inner pack and vial size may hinder efficient vaccine distribution because it constrains packing of cold boxes and vaccine carriers to quantities that are often inappropriate or suboptimal in the context of country-specific vaccination guidelines. Methods We developed in Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) a spreadsheet model that evaluated the impact of different packing schemes for the Benin routine regimen plus the introduction of the Rotarix vaccine. Specifically, we used the model to compare the current packing scheme to that of a proposed modular packing scheme. Results Conventional packing of a Dometic RCW25 that aims to maximize fully-immunized children (FICs) results in 123 FICs and a packing efficiency of 81.93% compared to a maximum of 155 FICs and 94.1% efficiency for an alternative modular packaging system. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that modular packaging systems could offer significant advantages over conventional vaccine packaging systems with respect to space efficiency and potential FICs, when they are stored in standard vaccine carrying devices. This allows for more vaccines to be stored within the same volume while also simplifying the procedures used by field workers to pack storage devices. Ultimately, modular packaging systems could be a simple way to help increase vaccine coverage worldwide. PMID:25957666

  1. Modular Closed-Loop Control of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Magni, L.; Dassau, E.; Hughes-Karvetski, C.; Toffanin, C.; De Nicolao, G.; Del Favero, S.; Breton, M.; Man, C. Dalla; Renard, E.; Zisser, H.; Doyle, F. J.; Cobelli, C.; Kovatchev, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity plays a key role in many engineering systems, allowing for plug-and-play integration of components, enhancing flexibility and adaptability, and facilitating standardization. In the control of diabetes, i.e., the so-called “artificial pancreas,” modularity allows for the step-wise introduction of (and regulatory approval for) algorithmic components, starting with subsystems for assured patient safety and followed by higher layer components that serve to modify the patient’s basal rate in real time. In this paper, we introduce a three-layer modular architecture for the control of diabetes, consisting in a sensor/pump interface module (IM), a continuous safety module (CSM), and a real-time control module (RTCM), which separates the functions of insulin recommendation (postmeal insulin for mitigating hyperglycemia) and safety (prevention of hypoglycemia). In addition, we provide details of instances of all three layers of the architecture: the APS© serving as the IM, the safety supervision module (SSM) serving as the CSM, and the range correction module (RCM) serving as the RTCM. We evaluate the performance of the integrated system via in silico preclinical trials, demonstrating 1) the ability of the SSM to reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia under nonideal operating conditions and 2) the ability of the RCM to reduce glycemic variability. PMID:22481809

  2. Modular closed-loop control of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patek, S D; Magni, L; Dassau, E; Karvetski, C; Toffanin, C; De Nicolao, G; Del Favero, S; Breton, M; Man, C Dalla; Renard, E; Zisser, H; Doyle, F J; Cobelli, C; Kovatchev, B P

    2012-11-01

    Modularity plays a key role in many engineering systems, allowing for plug-and-play integration of components, enhancing flexibility and adaptability, and facilitating standardization. In the control of diabetes, i.e., the so-called "artificial pancreas," modularity allows for the step-wise introduction of (and regulatory approval for) algorithmic components, starting with subsystems for assured patient safety and followed by higher layer components that serve to modify the patient's basal rate in real time. In this paper, we introduce a three-layer modular architecture for the control of diabetes, consisting in a sensor/pump interface module (IM), a continuous safety module (CSM), and a real-time control module (RTCM), which separates the functions of insulin recommendation (postmeal insulin for mitigating hyperglycemia) and safety (prevention of hypoglycemia). In addition, we provide details of instances of all three layers of the architecture: the APS© serving as the IM, the safety supervision module (SSM) serving as the CSM, and the range correction module (RCM) serving as the RTCM. We evaluate the performance of the integrated system via in silico preclinical trials, demonstrating 1) the ability of the SSM to reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia under nonideal operating conditions and 2) the ability of the RCM to reduce glycemic variability.

  3. MACOP modular architecture with control primitives

    PubMed Central

    Waegeman, Tim; Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Walking, catching a ball and reaching are all tasks in which humans and animals exhibit advanced motor skills. Findings in biological research concerning motor control suggest a modular control hierarchy which combines movement/motor primitives into complex and natural movements. Engineers inspire their research on these findings in the quest for adaptive and skillful control for robots. In this work we propose a modular architecture with control primitives (MACOP) which uses a set of controllers, where each controller becomes specialized in a subregion of its joint and task-space. Instead of having a single controller being used in this subregion [such as MOSAIC (modular selection and identification for control) on which MACOP is inspired], MACOP relates more to the idea of continuously mixing a limited set of primitive controllers. By enforcing a set of desired properties on the mixing mechanism, a mixture of primitives emerges unsupervised which successfully solves the control task. We evaluate MACOP on a numerical model of a robot arm by training it to generate desired trajectories. We investigate how the tracking performance is affected by the number of controllers in MACOP and examine how the individual controllers and their generated control primitives contribute to solving the task. Furthermore, we show how MACOP compensates for the dynamic effects caused by a fixed control rate and the inertia of the robot. PMID:23888140

  4. Evolution of a modular software network

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Miguel A.; Bonachela, Juan A.; Levin, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    “Evolution behaves like a tinkerer” (François Jacob, Science, 1977). Software systems provide a singular opportunity to understand biological processes using concepts from network theory. The Debian GNU/Linux operating system allows us to explore the evolution of a complex network in a unique way. The modular design detected during its growth is based on the reuse of existing code in order to minimize costs during programming. The increase of modularity experienced by the system over time has not counterbalanced the increase in incompatibilities between software packages within modules. This negative effect is far from being a failure of design. A random process of package installation shows that the higher the modularity, the larger the fraction of packages working properly in a local computer. The decrease in the relative number of conflicts between packages from different modules avoids a failure in the functionality of one package spreading throughout the entire system. Some potential analogies with the evolutionary and ecological processes determining the structure of ecological networks of interacting species are discussed. PMID:22106260

  5. Conversion of the high-yield salinomycin producer Streptomyces albus BK3-25 into a surrogate host for polyketide production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Lu, Chenyang; Bai, Linquan

    2017-09-01

    An ideal surrogate host for heterologous production of various natural products is expected to have efficient nutrient utilization, fast growth, abundant precursors and energy supply, and a pronounced gene expression. Streptomyces albus BK3-25 is a high-yield industrial strain producing type-I polyketide salinomycin, with a unique ability of bean oil utilization. Its potential of being a surrogate host for heterologous production of PKS was engineered and evaluated herein. Firstly, introduction of a three-gene cassette for the biosynthesis of ethylmalonyl-CoA resulted in accumulation of ethylmalonyl-CoA precursor and salinomycin, and subsequent deletion of the salinomycin biosynthetic gene cluster resulted in a host with rich supplies of common polyketide precursors, including malonyl-CoA, methylmalonyl-CoA, and ethylmalonyl-CoA. Secondly, the energy and reducing force were measured, and the improved accumulation of ATP and NADPH was observed in the mutant. Furthermore, the strength of a series of selected endogenous promoters based on microarray data was assessed at different growth phases, and a strong constitutive promoter was identified, providing a useful tool for further engineered gene expression. Finally, the potential of the BK3-25 derived host ZXJ-6 was evaluated with the introduction of the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor, and the heterologous production of actinorhodin was obtained. This work clearly indicated the potential of the high-yield salinomycin producer as a surrogate host for heterologous production of polyketides, although more genetic manipulation should be conducted to streamline its performance.

  6. DHA Production in Escherichia coli by Expressing Reconstituted Key Genes of Polyketide Synthase Pathway from Marine Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun-Feng; Chen, Wen-Chao; Xiao, Kang; Xu, Lin; Wang, Lian; Wan, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase), pfaE, a component of the polyketide synthase (PKS) pathway, is crucial for the production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6ω3), along with the other pfa cluster members pfaA, pfaB, pfaC and pfaD. DHA was produced in Escherichia coli by co-expressing pfaABCD from DHA-producing Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H with one of four pfaE genes from bacteria producing arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4ω6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5ω3) or DHA, respectively. Substitution of the pfaE gene from different strain source in E. coli did not influence the function of the PKS pathway producing DHA, although they led to different DHA yields and fatty acid profiles. This result suggested that the pfaE gene could be switchable between these strains for the production of DHA. The DHA production by expressing the reconstituted PKS pathway was also investigated in different E. coli strains, at different temperatures, or with the treatment of cerulenin. The highest DHA production, 2.2 mg of DHA per gram of dry cell weight or 4.1% of total fatty acids, was obtained by co-expressing pfaE(EPA) from the EPA-producing strain Shewanella baltica with pfaABCD in DH5α. Incubation at low temperature (10-15°C) resulted in higher accumulation of DHA compared to higher temperatures. The addition of cerulenin to the medium increased the proportion of DHA and saturated fatty acids, including C12:0, C14:0 and C16:0, at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids, including C16:1 and C18:1. Supplementation with 1 mg/L cerulenin resulted in the highest DHA yield of 2.4 mg/L upon co-expression of pfaE(DHA) from C. psychrerythraea.

  7. Identification and cloning of a type III polyketide synthase required for diffusible pigment biosynthesis in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Jesús; Velasco, Javier; Foster, Graham; Blackaby, Andrew P; Rudd, Brian A M; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2002-06-01

    The soluble, diffusible red-brown pigment produced by a Saccharopolyspora erythraea "red variant" has been shown to contain glycosylated and polymerized derivatives of 2,5,7-trihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (flaviolin). Flaviolin is a spontaneous oxidation product of 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene (THN), which is biosynthesized in bacteria by a chalcone synthase-like (CS-like) type III polyketide synthase (PKS). A fragment of the gene responsible for THN biosynthesis in S. erythraea E_8-7 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerate primers based on conserved regions of known plant CS and bacterial CS-like genes. From the isolated fragment, a suicide vector was prepared, which was subsequently used to disrupt the red-brown pigment-producing (rpp) locus in S. erythraea, generating a mutant that displayed an albino phenotype. Chromosomal DNA from the albino mutant was subsequently used in a vector-recapture protocol to isolate a plasmid that contained an insert spanning the entire rpp locus. Sequencing of the insert revealed that the disrupted open reading frame (ORF) encodes a CS-like protein displaying 69% sequence identity to the rppA gene of Streptomyces griseus. The S. griseus rppA gene encodes RppA, the first characterized bacterial CS-like protein, which is sufficient in vitro for the synthesis of THN from malonyl-CoA. The rppA disruption mutant and rppA sequence provided a means by which to address the mechanism of diffusible pigment biosynthesis, as well as to investigate any link between this and the modulation of erythromycin A titre, which has been observed for S. erythraea variants.

  8. Adaptive multi-resolution Modularity for detecting communities in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Wang, Zhi-Zhong; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Zhou, Ji; Xiang, Ju; Li, Jian-Ming; Yi, Chen-He

    2018-02-01

    Community structure is a common topological property of complex networks, which attracted much attention from various fields. Optimizing quality functions for community structures is a kind of popular strategy for community detection, such as Modularity optimization. Here, we introduce a general definition of Modularity, by which several classical (multi-resolution) Modularity can be derived, and then propose a kind of adaptive (multi-resolution) Modularity that can combine the advantages of different Modularity. By applying the Modularity to various synthetic and real-world networks, we study the behaviors of the methods, showing the validity and advantages of the multi-resolution Modularity in community detection. The adaptive Modularity, as a kind of multi-resolution method, can naturally solve the first-type limit of Modularity and detect communities at different scales; it can quicken the disconnecting of communities and delay the breakup of communities in heterogeneous networks; and thus it is expected to generate the stable community structures in networks more effectively and have stronger tolerance against the second-type limit of Modularity.

  9. Identification of PaPKS1, a polyketide synthase involved in melanin formation and its use as a genetic tool in Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Coppin, Evelyne; Silar, Philippe

    2007-08-01

    In the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, many pigmentation mutations map to the median region of the complex locus '14', called segment '29'. The data presented in this paper show that segment 29 corresponds to a gene encoding a polyketide synthase, designated PaPKS1, and identifies two mutations that completely or partially abolish the activity of the PaPKS1 polypeptide. We present evidence that the P. anserina green pigment is a (DHN)-melanin. Using the powerful genetic system of PaPKS1 cloning, we demonstrate that in P. anserina trans-duplicated sequences are subject to the RIP process as previously demonstrated for the cis-duplicated regions.

  10. The Conformational Flexibility of the Acyltransferase from the Disorazole Polyketide Synthase Is Revealed by an X-ray Free-Electron Laser Using a Room-Temperature Sample Delivery Method for Serial Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Kim; Robbins, Thomas; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Khosla, Chaitan; DeMirci, Hasan; McPhillips, Scott E.; Hollenbeck, Michael; Soltis, Michael; Cohen, Aina E.

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of the trans-acyltrans-ferase (AT) from the disorazole polyketide synthase (PKS) was determined at room temperature to a resolution of 2.5 Å using a new method for the direct delivery of the sample into an X-ray free-electron laser. A novel sample extractor efficiently delivered limited quantities of microcrystals directly from the native crystallization solution into the X-ray beam at room temperature. The AT structure revealed important catalytic features of this core PKS enzyme, including the occurrence of conformational changes around the active site. The implications of these conformational changes for polyketide synthase reaction dynamics are discussed. PMID:28832129

  11. The Conformational Flexibility of the Acyltransferase from the Disorazole Polyketide Synthase Is Revealed by an X-ray Free-Electron Laser Using a Room-Temperature Sample Delivery Method for Serial Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Irimpan I.; Allison, Kim; Robbins, Thomas

    The crystal structure of the trans-acyltransferase (AT) from the disorazole polyketide synthase (PKS) was determined at room temperature to a resolution of 2.5 Å using a new method for sample delivery directly into an X-ray free-electron laser. A novel sample extractor efficiently delivered limited quantities of microcrystals directly from the native crystallization solution into the X-ray beam at room temperature. The AT structure revealed important catalytic features of this core PKS enzyme, including the occurrence of conformational changes around the active site. The implications of these conformational changes on polyketide synthase reaction dynamics are discussed.

  12. The Conformational Flexibility of the Acyltransferase from the Disorazole Polyketide Synthase Is Revealed by an X-ray Free-Electron Laser Using a Room-Temperature Sample Delivery Method for Serial Crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Mathews, Irimpan I.; Allison, Kim; Robbins, Thomas; ...

    2017-08-23

    The crystal structure of the trans-acyltransferase (AT) from the disorazole polyketide synthase (PKS) was determined at room temperature to a resolution of 2.5 Å using a new method for sample delivery directly into an X-ray free-electron laser. A novel sample extractor efficiently delivered limited quantities of microcrystals directly from the native crystallization solution into the X-ray beam at room temperature. The AT structure revealed important catalytic features of this core PKS enzyme, including the occurrence of conformational changes around the active site. The implications of these conformational changes on polyketide synthase reaction dynamics are discussed.

  13. Towards a Formal Basis for Modular Safety Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Pai, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Safety assurance using argument-based safety cases is an accepted best-practice in many safety-critical sectors. Goal Structuring Notation (GSN), which is widely used for presenting safety arguments graphically, provides a notion of modular arguments to support the goal of incremental certification. Despite the efforts at standardization, GSN remains an informal notation whereas the GSN standard contains appreciable ambiguity especially concerning modular extensions. This, in turn, presents challenges when developing tools and methods to intelligently manipulate modular GSN arguments. This paper develops the elements of a theory of modular safety cases, leveraging our previous work on formalizing GSN arguments. Using example argument structures we highlight some ambiguities arising through the existing guidance, present the intuition underlying the theory, clarify syntax, and address modular arguments, contracts, well-formedness and well-scopedness of modules. Based on this theory, we have a preliminary implementation of modular arguments in our toolset, AdvoCATE.

  14. Brain modularity controls the critical behavior of spontaneous activity.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Herrmann, H J; de Arcangelis, L

    2014-03-13

    The human brain exhibits a complex structure made of scale-free highly connected modules loosely interconnected by weaker links to form a small-world network. These features appear in healthy patients whereas neurological diseases often modify this structure. An important open question concerns the role of brain modularity in sustaining the critical behaviour of spontaneous activity. Here we analyse the neuronal activity of a model, successful in reproducing on non-modular networks the scaling behaviour observed in experimental data, on a modular network implementing the main statistical features measured in human brain. We show that on a modular network, regardless the strength of the synaptic connections or the modular size and number, activity is never fully scale-free. Neuronal avalanches can invade different modules which results in an activity depression, hindering further avalanche propagation. Critical behaviour is solely recovered if inter-module connections are added, modifying the modular into a more random structure.

  15. Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-02

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The main goal of the original MUSIQC proposal was to construct and demonstrate a modular and universally- expandable ion...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 02-06-2016 1-Aug-2010 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ion trap quantum computation, scalable modular architectures REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  16. Highly-Efficient and Modular Medium-Voltage Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    HVDC modular multilevel converter in decoupled double synchronous reference frame for voltage oscillation reduction," IEEE Trans. Ind...Electron., vol. 29, pp. 77-88, Jan 2014. [10] M. Guan and Z. Xu, "Modeling and control of a modular multilevel converter -based HVDC system under...34 Modular multilevel converter design for VSC HVDC applications," IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics, vol. 3, pp.

  17. Modularity-like objective function in annotated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jia-Rong; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2017-12-01

    We ascertain the modularity-like objective function whose optimization is equivalent to the maximum likelihood in annotated networks. We demonstrate that the modularity-like objective function is a linear combination of modularity and conditional entropy. In contrast with statistical inference methods, in our method, the influence of the metadata is adjustable; when its influence is strong enough, the metadata can be recovered. Conversely, when it is weak, the detection may correspond to another partition. Between the two, there is a transition. This paper provides a concept for expanding the scope of modularity methods.

  18. Full characterization of modular values for finite-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Le Bin; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Kedem and Vaidman obtained a relationship between the spin-operator modular value and its weak value for specific coupling strengths [14]. Here we give a general expression for the modular value in the n-dimensional Hilbert space using the weak values up to (n - 1)th order of an arbitrary observable for any coupling strength, assuming non-degenerated eigenvalues. For two-dimensional case, it shows a linear relationship between the weak value and the modular value. We also relate the modular value of the sum of observables to the weak value of their product.

  19. A 32-bit NMOS microprocessor with a large register file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherburne, R. W., Jr.; Katevenis, M. G. H.; Patterson, D. A.; Sequin, C. H.

    1984-10-01

    Two scaled versions of a 32-bit NMOS reduced instruction set computer CPU, called RISC II, have been implemented on two different processing lines using the simple Mead and Conway layout rules with lambda values of 2 and 1.5 microns (corresponding to drawn gate lengths of 4 and 3 microns), respectively. The design utilizes a small set of simple instructions in conjunction with a large register file in order to provide high performance. This approach has resulted in two surprisingly powerful single-chip processors.

  20. A Polyketide Synthase Encoded by the Gene An15g07920 Is Involved in the Biosynthesis of Ochratoxin A in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Liuyang; Chen, Haoyu; Li, Min; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Depei; Zhang, Ying

    2016-12-28

    The polyketide synthase gene An15g07920 was known in Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88 as putatively involved in the production of ochratoxin A (OTA). Genome resequencing analysis revealed that the gene An15g07920 is also present in the ochratoxin-producing A. niger strain 1062. Disruption of An15g07920 in A. niger 1062 removed its capacity to biosynthesize ochratoxin β (OTβ), ochratoxin α (OTα), and OTA. These results indicate that the polyketide synthase encoded by An15g07920 is a crucial player in the biosynthesis of OTA, in the pathway prior to the phenylalanine ligation step. The gene An15g07920 reached its maximum transcription level before OTA accumulation reached its highest level, confirming that gene transcription precedes OTA production. These findings will not only help explain the mechanism of OTA production in A. niger but also provide necessary information for the development of effective diagnostic, preventive, and control strategies to reduce the risk of OTA contamination in foods.

  1. Characterization of a polyketide synthase in Aspergillus niger whose product is a precursor for both dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin and naphtho-γ-pyrone.

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yi Ming; Meyer, Kristen M; Praseuth, Michael

    2010-12-06

    The genome sequencing of the fungus Aspergillus niger, an industrial workhorse, uncovered a large cache of genes encoding enzymes thought to be involved in the production of secondary metabolites yet to be identified. Identification and structural characterization of many of these predicted secondary metabolites are hampered by their low concentration relative to the known A. niger metabolites such as the naphtho-γ-pyrone family of polyketides. We deleted a nonreducing PKS gene in A. niger strain ATCC 11414, a daughter strain of A. niger ATCC strain 1015 whose genome was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. This PKS encoding gene ismore » a predicted ortholog of alb1 from Aspergillus fumigatus which is responsible for production of YWA1, a precursor of fungal DHN melanin. Our results show that the A. niger alb1 PKS is responsible for the production of the polyketide precursor for DHN melanin biosynthesis. Deletion of alb1 elimnates the production of major metabolites, naphtho-γ-pyrones. The generation of an A. niger strain devoid of naphtho-γ-pyrones will greatly facilitate the elucidation of cryptic biosynthetic pathways in this organism.« less

  2. Evolution of Chemical Diversity in a Group of Non-Reduced Polyketide Gene Clusters: Using Phylogenetics to Inform the Search for Novel Fungal Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Throckmorton, Kurt; Wiemann, Philipp; Keller, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal polyketides are a diverse class of natural products, or secondary metabolites (SMs), with a wide range of bioactivities often associated with toxicity. Here, we focus on a group of non-reducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) in the fungal phylum Ascomycota that lack a thioesterase domain for product release, group V. Although widespread in ascomycete taxa, this group of NR-PKSs is notably absent in the mycotoxigenic genus Fusarium and, surprisingly, found in genera not known for their secondary metabolite production (e.g., the mycorrhizal genus Oidiodendron, the powdery mildew genus Blumeria, and the causative agent of white-nose syndrome in bats, Pseudogymnoascus destructans). This group of NR-PKSs, in association with the other enzymes encoded by their gene clusters, produces a variety of different chemical classes including naphthacenediones, anthraquinones, benzophenones, grisandienes, and diphenyl ethers. We discuss the modification of and transitions between these chemical classes, the requisite enzymes, and the evolution of the SM gene clusters that encode them. Integrating this information, we predict the likely products of related but uncharacterized SM clusters, and we speculate upon the utility of these classes of SMs as virulence factors or chemical defenses to various plant, animal, and insect pathogens, as well as mutualistic fungi. PMID:26378577

  3. A coupled in vitro/in vivo approach for engineering a heterologous type III PKS to enhance polyketide biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Christopher R; Cardenas, Javier; Bowman, Marianne E; Burkart, Michael D; Da Silva, Nancy A; Noel, Joseph P

    2018-06-01

    Polyketides are attractive compounds for uses ranging from biorenewable chemical precursors to high-value therapeutics. In many cases, synthesis in a heterologous host is required to produce these compounds in industrially relevant quantities. The type III polyketide synthase 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS) from Gerbera hybrida was used for the production of triacetic acid lactone (TAL) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Initial in vitro characterization of 2-PS led to the identification of active site variants with improved kinetic properties relative to wildtype. Further in vivo evaluation in S. cerevisiae suggested certain 2-PS mutations altered enzyme stability during fermentation. In vivo experiments also revealed beneficial cysteine to serine mutations that were not initially explored due to their distance from the active site of 2-PS, leading to the design of additional 2-PS enzymes. While these variants showed varying catalytic efficiencies in vitro, they exhibited up to 2.5-fold increases in TAL production when expressed in S. cerevisiae. Coupling of the 2-PS variant [C35S,C372S] to an engineered S. cerevisiae strain led to over 10 g/L TAL at 38% of theoretical yield following fed-batch fermentation, the highest reported to date. Our studies demonstrate the success of a coupled in vitro/in vivo approach to engineering enzymes and provide insight on cysteine-rich enzymes and design principles toward their use in non-native microbial hosts. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Imaging Total Stations - Modular and Integrated Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauth, Stefan; Schlüter, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Keywords: 3D-Metrology, Engineering Geodesy, Digital Image Processing Initialized in 2009, the Institute for Spatial Information and Surveying Technology i3mainz, Mainz University of Applied Sciences, forces research towards modular concepts for imaging total stations. On the one hand, this research is driven by the successful setup of high precision imaging motor theodolites in the near past, on the other hand it is pushed by the actual introduction of integrated imaging total stations to the positioning market by the manufacturers Topcon and Trimble. Modular concepts for imaging total stations are manufacturer independent to a large extent and consist of a particular combination of accessory hardware, software and algorithmic procedures. The hardware part consists mainly of an interchangeable eyepiece adapter offering opportunities for digital imaging and motorized focus control. An easy assembly and disassembly in the field is possible allowing the user to switch between the classical and the imaging use of a robotic total station. The software part primarily has to ensure hardware control, but several level of algorithmic support might be added and have to be distinguished. Algorithmic procedures allow to reach several levels of calibration concerning the geometry of the external digital camera and the total station. We deliver insight in our recent developments and quality characteristics. Both the modular and the integrated approach seem to have its individual strengths and weaknesses. Therefore we expect that both approaches might point at different target applications. Our aim is a better understanding of appropriate applications for robotic imaging total stations. First results are presented. Stefan Hauth, Martin Schlüter i3mainz - Institut für Raumbezogene Informations- und Messtechnik FH Mainz University of Applied Sciences Lucy-Hillebrand-Straße 2, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  5. Lightweight composites for modular panelized construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Amol S.

    Rapid advances in construction materials technology have enabled civil engineers to achieve impressive gains in the safety, economy, and functionality of structures built to serve the common needs of society. Modular building systems is a fast-growing modern, form of construction gaining recognition for its increased efficiency and ability to apply modern technology to the needs of the market place. In the modular construction technique, a single structural panel can perform a number of functions such as providing thermal insulation, vibration damping, and structural strength. These multifunctional panels can be prefabricated in a manufacturing facility and then transferred to the construction site. A system that uses prefabricated panels for construction is called a "panelized construction system". This study focuses on the development of pre-cast, lightweight, multifunctional sandwich composite panels to be used for panelized construction. Two thermoplastic composite panels are proposed in this study, namely Composite Structural Insulated Panels (CSIPs) for exterior walls, floors and roofs, and Open Core Sandwich composite for multifunctional interior walls of a structure. Special manufacturing techniques are developed for manufacturing these panels. The structural behavior of these panels is analyzed based on various building design codes. Detailed descriptions of the design, cost analysis, manufacturing, finite element modeling and structural testing of these proposed panels are included in this study in the of form five peer-reviewed journal articles. The structural testing of the proposed panels involved in this study included flexural testing, axial compression testing, and low and high velocity impact testing. Based on the current study, the proposed CSIP wall and floor panels were found satisfactory, based on building design codes ASCE-7-05 and ACI-318-05. Joining techniques are proposed in this study for connecting the precast panels on the construction

  6. Shape optimization of the modular press body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabiszczak, Stanisław

    2016-12-01

    A paper contains an optimization algorithm of cross-sectional dimensions of a modular press body for the minimum mass criterion. Parameters of the wall thickness and the angle of their inclination relative to the base of section are assumed as the decision variables. The overall dimensions are treated as a constant. The optimal values of parameters were calculated using numerical method of the tool Solver in the program Microsoft Excel. The results of the optimization procedure helped reduce body weight by 27% while maintaining the required rigidity of the body.

  7. Prototype of the Modular Equipment Transporter (MET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A prototype of the Modular Equipment Transporter (MET), nicknamed the 'Rickshaw' after its shape and method of propulsion. This equipment was used by the Apollo 14 astronauts during their geological and lunar surface simulation training in the Pinacate volcanic area of northwestern Sonora, Mexico. The Apollo 14 crew will be the first one to use the MET. It will be a portable workbench with a place for the lunar handtools and their carrier, three cameras, two sample container bags, a Special Environmental Sample Container, spare film magazines, and a Lunar Surface Penetrometer.

  8. Multizone Modular Artillery Propelling Charge Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    15). As in the previous tcst s, !it th hi-,pad and 4bd itlo A" was at the front o)f the .1 A Aŕ~~ ComEŔ"MU 11- ZONE MODULAR CHARGE obk0- 51 m OMA-22...EXPPTP.R7-2a b A ,tO 1 N.Wfl& ’-.k TYP 11 (CTUAL L(T)__ PA’+ 2,00 5-w bt --356 d td 14~ Jan 82 - - PCD-18,020 lbs. --- C. ARMNY AY ,UNMTON PLANT, RADFORD, VA

  9. Modular Track System For Positioning Mobile Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Conceptual system for positioning mobile robotic manipulators on large main structure includes modular tracks and ancillary structures assembled easily along with main structure. System, called "tracked robotic location system" (TROLS), originally intended for application to platforms in outer space, but TROLS concept might also prove useful on Earth; for example, to position robots in factories and warehouses. T-cross-section rail keeps mobile robot on track. Bar codes mark locations along track. Each robot equipped with bar-code-recognizing circuitry so it quickly finds way to assigned location.

  10. Intelligent subsystem interface for modular hardware system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Robert T. (Inventor); Krening, Douglas N. (Inventor); Lannan, Gregory B. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A single chip application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which provides a flexible, modular interface between a subsystem and a standard system bus. The ASIC includes a microcontroller/microprocessor, a serial interface for connection to the bus, and a variety of communications interface devices available for coupling to the subsystem. A three-bus architecture, utilizing arbitration, provides connectivity within the ASIC and between the ASIC and the subsystem. The communication interface devices include UART (serial), parallel, analog, and external device interface utilizing bus connections paired with device select signals. A low power (sleep) mode is provided as is a processor disable option.

  11. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOEpatents

    Ulanovsky, Levy; Raja, Mugasimangalam C.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  12. Data Acquisition for Modular Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor); Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A modular system for acquiring biometric data includes a plurality of data acquisition modules configured to sample biometric data from at least one respective input channel at a data acquisition rate. A representation of the sampled biometric data is stored in memory of each of the plurality of data acquisition modules. A central control system is in communication with each of the plurality of data acquisition modules through a bus. The central control system is configured to collect data asynchronously, via the bus, from the memory of the plurality of data acquisition modules according to a relative fullness of the memory of the plurality of data acquisition modules.

  13. New Modular Camera No Ordinary Joe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Although dubbed 'Little Joe' for its small-format characteristics, a new wavefront sensor camera has proved that it is far from coming up short when paired with high-speed, low-noise applications. SciMeasure Analytical Systems, Inc., a provider of cameras and imaging accessories for use in biomedical research and industrial inspection and quality control, is the eye behind Little Joe's shutter, manufacturing and selling the modular, multi-purpose camera worldwide to advance fields such as astronomy, neurobiology, and cardiology.

  14. Modular power converter having fluid cooled support

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-09-06

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  15. Modular power converter having fluid cooled support

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-12-06

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  16. The axion mass in modular invariant supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Butter, Daniel; Gaillard, Mary K.

    2005-02-09

    When supersymmetry is broken by condensates with a single condensing gauge group, there is a nonanomalous R-symmetry that prevents the universal axion from acquiring a mass. It has been argued that, in the context of supergravity, higher dimension operators will break this symmetry and may generate an axion mass too large to allow the identification of the universal axion with the QCD axion. We show that such contributions to the axion mass are highly suppressed in a class of models where the effective Lagrangian for gaugino and matter condensation respects modular invariance (T-duality).

  17. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Pinakin [Danbury, CT; Urko, Willam [West Granby, CT

    2008-01-29

    A modular multi-stack fuel-cell assembly in which the fuel-cell stacks are situated within a containment structure and in which a gas distributor is provided in the structure and distributes received fuel and oxidant gases to the stacks and receives exhausted fuel and oxidant gas from the stacks so as to realize a desired gas flow distribution and gas pressure differential through the stacks. The gas distributor is centrally and symmetrically arranged relative to the stacks so that it itself promotes realization of the desired gas flow distribution and pressure differential.

  18. Uncovering the formation and selection of benzylmalonyl-CoA from the biosynthesis of splenocin and enterocin reveals a versatile way to introduce amino acids into polyketide carbon scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chenchen; Huang, Rong; Yan, Yan; Ma, Hongmin; Dai, Zheng; Zhang, Benying; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Wen; Qu, Xudong

    2015-04-01

    Selective modification of carbon scaffolds via biosynthetic engineering is important for polyketide structural diversification. Yet, this scope is currently restricted to simple aliphatic groups due to (1) limited variety of CoA-linked extender units, which lack aromatic structures and chemical reactivity, and (2) narrow acyltransferase (AT) specificity, which is limited to aliphatic CoA-linked extender units. In this report, we uncovered and characterized the first aromatic CoA-linked extender unit benzylmalonyl-CoA from the biosynthetic pathways of splenocin and enterocin in Streptomyces sp. CNQ431. Its synthesis employs a deamination/reductive carboxylation strategy to convert phenylalanine into benzylmalonyl-CoA, providing a link between amino acid and CoA-linked extender unit synthesis. By characterization of its selection, we further validated that AT domains of splenocin, and antimycin polyketide synthases are able to select this extender unit to introduce the phenyl group into their dilactone scaffolds. The biosynthetic machinery involved in the formation of this extender unit is highly versatile and can be potentially tailored for tyrosine, histidine and aspartic acid. The disclosed aromatic extender unit, amino acid-oriented synthetic pathway, and aromatic-selective AT domains provides a systematic breakthrough toward current knowledge of polyketide extender unit formation and selection, and also opens a route for further engineering of polyketide carbon scaffolds using amino acids.

  19. Modular cell biology: retroactivity and insulation

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Ninfa, Alexander J; Sontag, Eduardo D

    2008-01-01

    Modularity plays a fundamental role in the prediction of the behavior of a system from the behavior of its components, guaranteeing that the properties of individual components do not change upon interconnection. Just as electrical, hydraulic, and other physical systems often do not display modularity, nor do many biochemical systems, and specifically, genetic networks. Here, we study the effect of interconnections on the input–output dynamic characteristics of transcriptional components, focusing on a property, which we call ‘retroactivity', that plays a role analogous to non-zero output impedance in electrical systems. In transcriptional networks, retroactivity is large when the amount of transcription factor is comparable to, or smaller than, the amount of promoter-binding sites, or when the affinity of such binding sites is high. To attenuate the effect of retroactivity, we propose a feedback mechanism inspired by the design of amplifiers in electronics. We introduce, in particular, a mechanism based on a phosphorylation–dephosphorylation cycle. This mechanism enjoys a remarkable insulation property, due to the fast timescales of the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. PMID:18277378

  20. Modular assembly of thick multifunctional cardiac patches

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering cells are seeded within porous biomaterial scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. Here, we report on a bottom-up approach to assemble a modular tissue consisting of multiple layers with distinct structures and functions. Albumin electrospun fiber scaffolds were laser-patterned to create microgrooves for engineering aligned cardiac tissues exhibiting anisotropic electrical signal propagation. Microchannels were patterned within the scaffolds and seeded with endothelial cells to form closed lumens. Moreover, cage-like structures were patterned within the scaffolds and accommodated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticulate systems that controlled the release of VEGF, which promotes vascularization, or dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory agent. The structure, morphology, and function of each layer were characterized, and the tissue layers were grown separately in their optimal conditions. Before transplantation the tissue and microparticulate layers were integrated by an ECM-based biological glue to form thick 3D cardiac patches. Finally, the patches were transplanted in rats, and their vascularization was assessed. Because of the simple modularity of this approach, we believe that it could be used in the future to assemble other multicellular, thick, 3D, functional tissues. PMID:28167795

  1. A modular platform for targeted RNAi therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedmi, Ranit; Veiga, Nuphar; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Goldsmith, Meir; Rosenblum, Daniel; Dammes, Niels; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Nahary, Limor; Leviatan-Ben-Arye, Shani; Harlev, Michael; Behlke, Mark; Benhar, Itai; Lieberman, Judy; Peer, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have identified relevant genes and signalling pathways that are hampered in human disorders as potential candidates for therapeutics. Developing nucleic acid-based tools to manipulate gene expression, such as short interfering RNAs1-3 (siRNAs), opens up opportunities for personalized medicine. Yet, although major progress has been made in developing siRNA targeted delivery carriers, mainly by utilizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for targeting4-8, their clinical translation has not occurred. This is in part because of the massive development and production requirements and the high batch-to-batch variability of current technologies, which rely on chemical conjugation. Here we present a self-assembled modular platform that enables the construction of a theoretically unlimited repertoire of siRNA targeted carriers. The self-assembly of the platform is based on a membrane-anchored lipoprotein that is incorporated into siRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles that interact with the antibody crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain. We show that a simple switch of eight different mAbs redirects the specific uptake of siRNAs by diverse leukocyte subsets in vivo. The therapeutic potential of the platform is demonstrated in an inflammatory bowel disease model by targeting colon macrophages to reduce inflammatory symptoms, and in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma xenograft model by targeting cancer cells to induce cell death and improve survival. This modular delivery platform represents a milestone in the development of precision medicine.

  2. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Shettleworth, Sara J

    2012-10-05

    Darwin's claim 'that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind' is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the 'core knowledge' account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research.

  3. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness

    PubMed Central

    Shettleworth, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Darwin's claim ‘that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind’ is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the ‘core knowledge’ account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research. PMID:22927578

  4. A modular platform for targeted RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kedmi, Ranit; Veiga, Nuphar; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Goldsmith, Meir; Rosenblum, Daniel; Dammes, Niels; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Nahary, Limor; Leviatan-Ben-Arye, Shani; Harlev, Michael; Behlke, Mark; Benhar, Itai; Lieberman, Judy; Peer, Dan

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies have identified relevant genes and signalling pathways that are hampered in human disorders as potential candidates for therapeutics. Developing nucleic acid-based tools to manipulate gene expression, such as short interfering RNAs 1-3 (siRNAs), opens up opportunities for personalized medicine. Yet, although major progress has been made in developing siRNA targeted delivery carriers, mainly by utilizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for targeting 4-8 , their clinical translation has not occurred. This is in part because of the massive development and production requirements and the high batch-to-batch variability of current technologies, which rely on chemical conjugation. Here we present a self-assembled modular platform that enables the construction of a theoretically unlimited repertoire of siRNA targeted carriers. The self-assembly of the platform is based on a membrane-anchored lipoprotein that is incorporated into siRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles that interact with the antibody crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain. We show that a simple switch of eight different mAbs redirects the specific uptake of siRNAs by diverse leukocyte subsets in vivo. The therapeutic potential of the platform is demonstrated in an inflammatory bowel disease model by targeting colon macrophages to reduce inflammatory symptoms, and in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma xenograft model by targeting cancer cells to induce cell death and improve survival. This modular delivery platform represents a milestone in the development of precision medicine.

  5. Polyethylene wear debris in modular acetabular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C; Mead, E H; Pinto, J G; Colwell, C W

    1995-08-01

    The longevity of total hip arthroplasty has brought forth the recognition of aseptic loosening of prosthetic components as the leading cause of implant failure. Modularity of implants, although a significant improvement in versatility, may increase debris formation, a recognized cause of implant failure. This study was designed to measure the relative motion, and to assess the polyethylene wear debris production at the interface between the metal acetabular shell and the back side of the polyethylene liner, in modular hip prostheses. Five models from 4 manufacturers with different locking mechanisms and acetabular shell surface treatments were tested under long-term simultaneous sinusoidal and static loading (10(7) cycles at 3 Hz with +/- 2.5 Nmeter and 220 N static load). Results showed that there were marked differences in the security of the acetabular shell and polyethylene liner locking mechanism, wear pattern, damage sites, and amount of polyethylene debris on the acetabular shell and polyethylene liner surfaces. The range of polyethylene liner motion observed among the 5 models during 1 cycle of testing varied from an average of 0.96 degrees to movement too small to be detected by the test machines. Image and scanning electron microscopy analysis showed different wear patterns and a wide range in the average polyethylene liner surface wear area (0.26 cm2-4.61 cm2). In general, a stable locking mechanism and a smooth acetabular shell surface are essential in minimizing polyethylene liner wear and polyethylene debris production.

  6. Modular packaging concept for MEMS and MOEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchly, Vanessa; Reinert, Wolfgang; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim

    2017-11-01

    Wherever technical systems detect objects in their environment or interact with people, optical devices may play an important role. Light can be relatively easily produced and spatially and temporally modulated. Laser can project sharp images over long distances or cut materials in short distances. Depending on the wavelength an invisible scanning in near infrared for gesture recognition is possible as well as a projection of brilliant colour images. For several years, the Fraunhofer ISIT develops Opto-Packaging processes based on the viscous reshaping of glass wafers: First, hermetically sealed laser micro-mirror scanners WLP with inclined windows deflect in the central light reflex of the window out of the image area. Second, housing with lateral light exit permits hermetic sealing of edge-emitting lasers for highest reliability and durability. Such systems are currently experiencing an extremely high interest of the industry in all segments, from consumer to automotive through to materials processing. Our modular Opto-Packaging platform enables fast product developments. Housing for opto mechanical MEMS devices are equipped with inclined windows to minimize distortion, stray light and reflection losses. The hot viscous glass forming technology is also applied to functionalized substrate wafers which possess areas with high heat dissipation in addition to thermally insulating areas. Electrical contacts may be realized with metal filled vias or TGV (Through Glass Vias). The modular system reduces the development times for new, miniaturized optical systems so that manufacturers can focus on the essentials in their development, namely their product functionalities.

  7. Quantification of complex modular architecture in plants.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Catherine; Kaandorp, Jaap; Jansson, Fredrik; Puillandre, Nicolas; Dubuisson, Jean-Yves; Cornette, Raphaël; Jabbour, Florian; Coudert, Yoan; Patiño, Jairo; Flot, Jean-François; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2018-04-01

    Morphometrics, the assignment of quantities to biological shapes, is a powerful tool to address taxonomic, evolutionary, functional and developmental questions. We propose a novel method for shape quantification of complex modular architecture in thalloid plants, whose extremely reduced morphologies, combined with the lack of a formal framework for thallus description, have long rendered taxonomic and evolutionary studies extremely challenging. Using graph theory, thalli are described as hierarchical series of nodes and edges, allowing for accurate, homologous and repeatable measurements of widths, lengths and angles. The computer program MorphoSnake was developed to extract the skeleton and contours of a thallus and automatically acquire, at each level of organization, width, length, angle and sinuosity measurements. Through the quantification of leaf architecture in Hymenophyllum ferns (Polypodiopsida) and a fully worked example of integrative taxonomy in the taxonomically challenging thalloid liverwort genus Riccardia, we show that MorphoSnake is applicable to all ramified plants. This new possibility of acquiring large numbers of quantitative traits in plants with complex modular architectures opens new perspectives of applications, from the development of rapid species identification tools to evolutionary analyses of adaptive plasticity. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. The Modular Optical Underwater Survey System

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Richards, Benjamin L.; Misa, William F. X. E.; Taylor, Jeremy C.; Miller, Dianna R.; Rollo, Audrey K.; Demarke, Christopher; Ossolinski, Justin E.; Reardon, Russell T.; Koyanagi, Kyle H.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center deploys the Modular Optical Underwater Survey System (MOUSS) to estimate the species-specific, size-structured abundance of commercially-important fish species in Hawaii and the Pacific Islands. The MOUSS is an autonomous stereo-video camera system designed for the in situ visual sampling of fish assemblages. This system is rated to 500 m and its low-light, stereo-video cameras enable identification, counting, and sizing of individuals at a range of 0.5–10 m. The modular nature of MOUSS allows for the efficient and cost-effective use of various imaging sensors, power systems, and deployment platforms. The MOUSS is in use for surveys in Hawaii, the Gulf of Mexico, and Southern California. In Hawaiian waters, the system can effectively identify individuals to a depth of 250 m using only ambient light. In this paper, we describe the MOUSS’s application in fisheries research, including the design, calibration, analysis techniques, and deployment mechanism. PMID:29019962

  9. Modular thermal analyzer routine, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Phillips, M. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Modular Thermal Analyzer Routine (MOTAR) is a general thermal analysis routine with strong capabilities for performing thermal analysis of systems containing flowing fluids, fluid system controls (valves, heat exchangers, etc.), life support systems, and thermal radiation situations. Its modular organization permits the analysis of a very wide range of thermal problems for simple problems containing a few conduction nodes to those containing complicated flow and radiation analysis with each problem type being analyzed with peak computational efficiency and maximum ease of use. The organization and programming methods applied to MOTAR achieved a high degree of computer utilization efficiency in terms of computer execution time and storage space required for a given problem. The computer time required to perform a given problem on MOTAR is approximately 40 to 50 percent that required for the currently existing widely used routines. The computer storage requirement for MOTAR is approximately 25 percent more than the most commonly used routines for the most simple problems but the data storage techniques for the more complicated options should save a considerable amount of space.

  10. A neural network with modular hierarchical learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Pierre F. (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides a new hierarchical approach for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories. The modular hierarchical methodology leads to architectures which are more structured than fully interconnected networks. The networks utilize a general feedforward flow of information and sparse recurrent connections to achieve dynamic effects. The advantages include the sparsity of units and connections, the modular organization. A further advantage is that the learning is much more circumscribed learning than in fully interconnected systems. The present invention is embodied by a neural network including a plurality of neural modules each having a pre-established performance capability wherein each neural module has an output outputting present results of the performance capability and an input for changing the present results of the performance capabilitiy. For pattern recognition applications, the performance capability may be an oscillation capability producing a repeating wave pattern as the present results. In the preferred embodiment, each of the plurality of neural modules includes a pre-established capability portion and a performance adjustment portion connected to control the pre-established capability portion.

  11. Modular adaptive implant based on smart materials.

    PubMed

    Bîzdoacă, N; Tarniţă, Daniela; Tarniţă, D N

    2008-01-01

    Applications of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology are defined as Bionics. The present paper describes a bionics application of shape memory alloy in construction of orthopedic implant. The main idea of this paper is related to design modular adaptive implants for fractured bones. In order to target the efficiency of medical treatment, the implant has to protect the fractured bone, for the healing period, undertaking much as is possible from the daily usual load of the healthy bones. After a particular stage of healing period is passed, using implant modularity, the load is gradually transferred to bone, assuring in this manner a gradually recover of bone function. The adaptability of this design is related to medical possibility of the physician to made the implant to correspond to patient specifically anatomy. Using a CT realistic numerical bone models, the mechanical simulation of different types of loading of the fractured bones treated with conventional method are presented. The results are commented and conclusions are formulated.

  12. A Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ty Davis

    Electric propulsion technologies promise to revolutionize access to space, opening the door for mission concepts unfeasible by traditional propulsion methods alone. The Hall effect thruster is a relatively high thrust, moderate specific impulse electric propulsion device that belongs to the class of electrostatic thrusters. Hall effect thrusters benefit from an extensive flight history, and offer significant performance and cost advantages when compared to other forms of electric propulsion. Ongoing research on these devices includes the investigation of mechanisms that tend to decrease overall thruster efficiency, as well as the development of new techniques to extend operational lifetimes. This thesis is primarily concerned with the design and construction of a Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster (SMLHET), and its operation on argon propellant gas. Particular attention was addressed at low-cost, modular design principles, that would facilitate simple replacement and modification of key thruster parts such as the magnetic circuit and discharge channel. This capability is intended to facilitate future studies of device physics such as anomalous electron transport and magnetic shielding of the channel walls, that have an impact on thruster performance and life. Preliminary results demonstrate SMLHET running on argon in a manner characteristic of Hall effect thrusters, additionally a power balance method was utilized to estimate thruster performance. It is expected that future thruster studies utilizing heavier though more expensive gases like xenon or krypton, will observe increased efficiency and stability.

  13. Modularity, Working Memory, and Second Language Acquisition: A Research Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truscott, John

    2017-01-01

    Considerable reason exists to view the mind, and language within it, as modular, and this view has an important place in research and theory in second language acquisition (SLA) and beyond. But it has had very little impact on the study of working memory and its role in SLA. This article considers the need for modular study of working memory,…

  14. Manufactured Housing--The Modular Home in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindt, Roger P.

    This report deals principally with modular homes (permanently sited structures) although it also presents some recent information on mobile homes. In 1976, modular home construction companies were surveyed in Texas and across the United States to assess the extent of their construction activity and market penetration and to gather some insight…

  15. An instrumental puzzle: the modular integration of AOLI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Roberto L.; Velasco, Sergio; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Valdivia, Juan J. F.; Puga, Marta; Oscoz, Alejandro; Rebolo, Rafael; MacKay, Craig; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis Fernando; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel M.; King, David; Labadie, Lucas; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Rodríguez-Coira, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager, AOLI, is an instrument developed to deliver the highest spatial resolution ever obtained in the visible, 20 mas, from ground-based telescopes. In AOLI a new philosophy of instrumental prototyping has been applied, based on the modularization of the subsystems. This modular concept offers maximum flexibility regarding the instrument, telescope or the addition of future developments.

  16. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excluded structures-modular homes... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME PROCEDURAL AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General § 3282.12 Excluded structures—modular homes. (a) The purpose of this section is to provide the certification...

  17. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded structures-modular homes... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME PROCEDURAL AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General § 3282.12 Excluded structures—modular homes. (a) The purpose of this section is to provide the certification...

  18. Modular Building Supplement: A Quick, Quality Solution for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodmiller, Brian D.; Schendell, Derek G.

    2003-01-01

    This supplement presents three articles on modular construction that look at: "Fast Track Expansion for a New Jersey School" (involving a modular addition); "Precast Construction Helps Schools Meet Attendance Boom" (precast concrete components are quick, durable, and flexible); and "Airing HVAC Concerns" (poor indoor air quality in prefabricated…

  19. Development of a 32-bit UNIX-based ELAS workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A.; Pearson, Ronnie W.; Cheng, Thomas D.

    1987-01-01

    A mini/microcomputer UNIX-based image analysis workstation has been designed and is being implemented to use the Earth Resources Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS). The hardware system includes a MASSCOMP 5600 computer, which is a 32-bit UNIX-based system (compatible with AT&T System V and Berkeley 4.2 BSD operating system), a floating point accelerator, a 474-megabyte fixed disk, a tri-density magnetic tape drive, and an 1152 by 910 by 12-plane color graphics/image interface. The software conversion includes reconfiguring the ELAs driver Master Task, recompiling and then testing the converted application modules. This hardware and software configuration is a self-sufficient image analysis workstation which can be used as a stand-alone system, or networked with other compatible workstations.

  20. Future Concepts for Modular, Intelligent Aerospace Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Soeder, James F.

    2004-01-01

    Nasa's resent commitment to Human and Robotic Space Exploration obviates the need for more affordable and sustainable systems and missions. Increased use of modularity and on-board intelligent technologies will enable these lofty goals. To support this new paradigm, an advanced technology program to develop modular, intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) system technologies is presented. The many benefits to developing and including modular functionality in electrical power components and systems are shown to include lower costs and lower mass for highly reliable systems. The details of several modular technologies being developed by NASA are presented, broken down into hierarchical levels. Modularity at the device level, including the use of power electronic building blocks, is shown to provide benefits in lowering the development time and costs of new power electronic components.

  1. Local modular Hamiltonians from the quantum null energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeller, Jason; Leichenauer, Stefan; Levine, Adam; Shahbazi-Moghaddam, Arvin

    2018-03-01

    The vacuum modular Hamiltonian K of the Rindler wedge in any relativistic quantum field theory is given by the boost generator. Here we investigate the modular Hamiltonian for more general half-spaces which are bounded by an arbitrary smooth cut of a null plane. We derive a formula for the second derivative of the modular Hamiltonian with respect to the coordinates of the cut which schematically reads K''=Tv v . This formula can be integrated twice to obtain a simple expression for the modular Hamiltonian. The result naturally generalizes the standard expression for the Rindler modular Hamiltonian to this larger class of regions. Our primary assumptions are the quantum null energy condition—an inequality between the second derivative of the von Neumann entropy of a region and the stress tensor—and its saturation in the vacuum for these regions. We discuss the validity of these assumptions in free theories and holographic theories to all orders in 1 /N .

  2. Hierarchical functional modularity in the resting-state human brain.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, Luca; Veer, Ilya M; Baerends, Evelinda; van Tol, Marie-José; Renken, Remco J; van der Wee, Nic J A; Veltman, Dirk J; Aleman, André; Zitman, Frans G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Buchem, Mark A; Reiber, Johan H C; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Milles, Julien

    2009-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that anatomically distinct brain regions are functionally connected during the resting state. Basic topological properties in the brain functional connectivity (BFC) map have highlighted the BFC's small-world topology. Modularity, a more advanced topological property, has been hypothesized to be evolutionary advantageous, contributing to adaptive aspects of anatomical and functional brain connectivity. However, current definitions of modularity for complex networks focus on nonoverlapping clusters, and are seriously limited by disregarding inclusive relationships. Therefore, BFC's modularity has been mainly qualitatively investigated. Here, we introduce a new definition of modularity, based on a recently improved clustering measurement, which overcomes limitations of previous definitions, and apply it to the study of BFC in resting state fMRI of 53 healthy subjects. Results show hierarchical functional modularity in the brain. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  3. Modularity Induced Gating and Delays in Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shein-Idelson, Mark; Cohen, Gilad; Hanein, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Neural networks, despite their highly interconnected nature, exhibit distinctly localized and gated activation. Modularity, a distinctive feature of neural networks, has been recently proposed as an important parameter determining the manner by which networks support activity propagation. Here we use an engineered biological model, consisting of engineered rat cortical neurons, to study the role of modular topology in gating the activity between cell populations. We show that pairs of connected modules support conditional propagation (transmitting stronger bursts with higher probability), long delays and propagation asymmetry. Moreover, large modular networks manifest diverse patterns of both local and global activation. Blocking inhibition decreased activity diversity and replaced it with highly consistent transmission patterns. By independently controlling modularity and disinhibition, experimentally and in a model, we pose that modular topology is an important parameter affecting activation localization and is instrumental for population-level gating by disinhibition. PMID:27104350

  4. Z-Score-Based Modularity for Community Detection in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Atsushi; Kawase, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Identifying community structure in networks is an issue of particular interest in network science. The modularity introduced by Newman and Girvan is the most popular quality function for community detection in networks. In this study, we identify a problem in the concept of modularity and suggest a solution to overcome this problem. Specifically, we obtain a new quality function for community detection. We refer to the function as Z-modularity because it measures the Z-score of a given partition with respect to the fraction of the number of edges within communities. Our theoretical analysis shows that Z-modularity mitigates the resolution limit of the original modularity in certain cases. Computational experiments using both artificial networks and well-known real-world networks demonstrate the validity and reliability of the proposed quality function. PMID:26808270

  5. The Modular Modeling System (MMS): User's Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leavesley, G.H.; Restrepo, Pedro J.; Markstrom, S.L.; Dixon, M.; Stannard, L.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Modular Modeling System (MMS) is an integrated system of computer software that has been developed to provide the research and operational framework needed to support development, testing, and evaluation of physical-process algorithms and to facilitate integration of user-selected sets of algorithms into operational physical-process models. MMS uses a module library that contains modules for simulating a variety of water, energy, and biogeochemical processes. A model is created by selectively coupling the most appropriate modules from the library to create a 'suitable' model for the desired application. Where existing modules do not provide appropriate process algorithms, new modules can be developed. The MMS user's manual provides installation instructions and a detailed discussion of system concepts, module development, and model development and application using the MMS graphical user interface.

  6. Modular electron transfer circuits for synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer is central to a wide range of essential metabolic pathways, from photosynthesis to fermentation. The evolutionary diversity and conservation of proteins that transfer electrons makes these pathways a valuable platform for engineered metabolic circuits in synthetic biology. Rational engineering of electron transfer pathways containing hydrogenases has the potential to lead to industrial scale production of hydrogen as an alternative source of clean fuel and experimental assays for understanding the complex interactions of multiple electron transfer proteins in vivo. We designed and implemented a synthetic hydrogen metabolism circuit in Escherichia coli that creates an electron transfer pathway both orthogonal to and integrated within existing metabolism. The design of such modular electron transfer circuits allows for facile characterization of in vivo system parameters with applications toward further engineering for alternative energy production. PMID:21468209

  7. RSA and its Correctness through Modular Arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meelu, Punita; Malik, Sitender

    2010-11-01

    To ensure the security to the applications of business, the business sectors use Public Key Cryptographic Systems (PKCS). An RSA system generally belongs to the category of PKCS for both encryption and authentication. This paper describes an introduction to RSA through encryption and decryption schemes, mathematical background which includes theorems to combine modular equations and correctness of RSA. In short, this paper explains some of the maths concepts that RSA is based on, and then provides a complete proof that RSA works correctly. We can proof the correctness of RSA through combined process of encryption and decryption based on the Chinese Remainder Theorem (CRT) and Euler theorem. However, there is no mathematical proof that RSA is secure, everyone takes that on trust!.

  8. Modular Chemical Descriptor Language (MCDL): Stereochemical modules

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, Andrei A; Burnett, Michael N; Trepalin, Sergei V.

    2011-01-01

    In our previous papers we introduced the Modular Chemical Descriptor Language (MCDL) for providing a linear representation of chemical information. A subsequent development was the MCDL Java Chemical Structure Editor which is capable of drawing chemical structures from linear representations and generating MCDL descriptors from structures. In this paper we present MCDL modules and accompanying software that incorporate unique representation of molecular stereochemistry based on Cahn-Ingold-Prelog and Fischer ideas in constructing stereoisomer descriptors. The paper also contains additional discussions regarding canonical representation of stereochemical isomers, and brief algorithm descriptions of the open source LINDES, Java applet, and Open Babel MCDLmore » processing module software packages. Testing of the upgraded MCDL Java Chemical Structure Editor on compounds taken from several large and diverse chemical databases demonstrated satisfactory performance for storage and processing of stereochemical information in MCDL format.« less

  9. Modular telerobot control system for accident response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard J. M.; Shirey, David L.

    1999-08-01

    The Accident Response Mobile Manipulator System (ARMMS) is a teleoperated emergency response vehicle that deploys two hydraulic manipulators, five cameras, and an array of sensors to the scene of an incident. It is operated from a remote base station that can be situated up to four kilometers away from the site. Recently, a modular telerobot control architecture called SMART was applied to ARMMS to improve the precision, safety, and operability of the manipulators on board. Using SMART, a prototype manipulator control system was developed in a couple of days, and an integrated working system was demonstrated within a couple of months. New capabilities such as camera-frame teleoperation, autonomous tool changeout and dual manipulator control have been incorporated. The final system incorporates twenty-two separate modules and implements seven different behavior modes. This paper describes the integration of SMART into the ARMMS system.

  10. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; McInnes, Ian D.; Massey, John V.

    1988-01-01

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  11. The modular nature of trustworthiness detection.

    PubMed

    Bonnefon, Jean-François; Hopfensitz, Astrid; De Neys, Wim

    2013-02-01

    The capacity to trust wisely is a critical facilitator of success and prosperity, and it has been conjectured that people of higher intelligence are better able to detect signs of untrustworthiness from potential partners. In contrast, this article reports five trust game studies suggesting that reading trustworthiness of the faces of strangers is a modular process. Trustworthiness detection from faces is independent of general intelligence (Study 1) and effortless (Study 2). Pictures that include nonfacial features such as hair and clothing impair trustworthiness detection (Study 3) by increasing reliance on conscious judgments (Study 4), but people largely prefer to make decisions from this sort of pictures (Study 5). In sum, trustworthiness detection in an economic interaction is a genuine and effortless ability, possessed in equal amount by people of all cognitive capacities, but whose impenetrability leads to inaccurate conscious judgments and inappropriate informational preferences. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  12. Modularizing Spatial Ontologies for Assisted Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hois, Joana

    Assisted living systems are intended to support daily-life activities in user homes by automatizing and monitoring behavior of the environment while interacting with the user in a non-intrusive way. The knowledge base of such systems therefore has to define thematically different aspects of the environment mostly related to space, such as basic spatial floor plan information, pieces of technical equipment in the environment and their functions and spatial ranges, activities users can perform, entities that occur in the environment, etc. In this paper, we present thematically different ontologies, each of which describing environmental aspects from a particular perspective. The resulting modular structure allows the selection of application-specific ontologies as necessary. This hides information and reduces complexity in terms of the represented spatial knowledge and reasoning practicability. We motivate and present the different spatial ontologies applied to an ambient assisted living application.

  13. Modular Hydropower Engineering and Pilot Scale Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, Phillip C.

    Emrgy has developed, prototyped and tested a modular hydropower system for renewable energy generation. ORNL worked with Emrgy to demonstrate the use of additive manufacturing in the production of the hydrofoils and spokes for the hydrokinetic system. Specifically, during Phase 1 of this effort, ORNL printed and finished machined patterns for both the hydrofoils and spokes that were subsequently used in a sand casting manufacturing process. Emrgy utilized the sand castings for a pilot installation in Denver, CO, where the parts represented an 80% cost savings from the previous prototype build that was manufactured using subtractive manufacturing. In addition, themore » castings were completed with ORNL’s newly developed AlCeMg alloy that will be tested for performance improvements including higher corrosion resistance in a water application than the 6160 alloy used previously« less

  14. Rare-event statistics and modular invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaev, S. K.; Polovnikov, K.

    2018-01-01

    Simple geometric arguments based on constructing the Euclid orchard are presented, which explain the equivalence of various types of distributions that result from rare-event statistics. In particular, the spectral density of the exponentially weighted ensemble of linear polymer chains is examined for its number-theoretic properties. It can be shown that the eigenvalue statistics of the corresponding adjacency matrices in the sparse regime show a peculiar hierarchical structure and are described by the popcorn (Thomae) function discontinuous in the dense set of rational numbers. Moreover, the spectral edge density distribution exhibits Lifshitz tails, reminiscent of 1D Anderson localization. Finally, a continuous approximation for the popcorn function is suggested based on the Dedekind η-function, and the hierarchical ultrametric structure of the popcorn-like distributions is demonstrated to be related to hidden SL(2,Z) modular symmetry.

  15. Biosynthesis of Modular Ascarosides in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Oishika; Akagi, Allison E.; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Judkins, Joshua C.; Le, Henry H.; Mahanti, Parag; Cohen, Sarah M.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2017-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans uses simple building blocks from primary metabolism and a strategy of modular assembly to build a great diversity of signaling molecules, the ascarosides, which function as a chemical language in this model organism. In the ascarosides, the dideoxysugar ascarylose serves as a scaffold to which diverse moieties from lipid, amino acid, neurotransmitter, and nucleoside metabolism are attached. However, the mechanisms that underlie the highly specific assembly of ascarosides are not understood. We show that the acyl-CoA synthetase ACS-7, which localizes to lysosome-related organelles, is specifically required for the attachment of different building blocks to the 4′-position of ascr#9. We further show that mutants lacking lysosome-related organelles are defective in the production of all 4′-modified ascarosides, thus identifying the waste disposal system of the cell as a hotspot for ascaroside biosynthesis. PMID:28371259

  16. LEGO: A modular accelerator design code

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Donald, M.; Irwin, J.

    1997-08-01

    An object-oriented accelerator design code has been designed and implemented in a simple and modular fashion. It contains all major features of its predecessors: TRACY and DESPOT. All physics of single-particle dynamics is implemented based on the Hamiltonian in the local frame of the component. Components can be moved arbitrarily in the three dimensional space. Several symplectic integrators are used to approximate the integration of the Hamiltonian. A differential algebra class is introduced to extract a Taylor map up to arbitrary order. Analysis of optics is done in the same way both for the linear and nonlinear case. Currently, themore » code is used to design and simulate the lattices of the PEP-II. It will also be used for the commissioning.« less

  17. Modularized TGFbeta-Smad Signaling Pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng; Wang, M.; Carra, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling pathway is a prominent regulatory signaling pathway controlling various important cellular processes. It can be induced by several factors, including ionizing radiation. It is regulated by Smads in a negative feedback loop through promoting increases in the regulatory Smads in the cell nucleus, and subsequent expression of inhibitory Smad, Smad7 to form a ubiquitin ligase with Smurf targeting active TGF receptors for degradation. In this work, we proposed a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced Smad-regulated TGF signaling pathway. By modularization, we are able to analyze each module (subsystem) and recover the nonlinear dynamics of the entire network system. Meanwhile the excitability, a common feature observed in the biological systems, along the TGF signaling pathway is discussed by mathematical analysis and numerical simulation.

  18. Modularized Smad-regulated TGFβ signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Minli; Carra, Claudio; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-12-01

    The transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) signaling pathway is a prominent regulatory signaling pathway controlling various important cellular processes. TGFβ signaling can be induced by several factors including ionizing radiation. The pathway is regulated in a negative feedback loop through promoting the nuclear import of the regulatory Smads and a subsequent expression of inhibitory Smad7, that forms ubiquitin ligase with Smurf2, targeting active TGFβ receptors for degradation. In this work, we proposed a mathematical model to study the Smad-regulated TGFβ signaling pathway. By modularization, we are able to analyze mathematically each component subsystem and recover the nonlinear dynamics of the entire network system. Meanwhile the excitability, a common feature observed in the biological systems, in the TGFβ signaling pathway is discussed and supported as well by numerical simulation, indicating the robustness of the model. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. LST and instrument considerations. [modular design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, G. M.

    1974-01-01

    In order that the LST meet its scientific objectives and also be a National Astronomical Space Facility during the 1980's and 1990's, broad requirements have been levied by the scientific community. These scientific requirements can be directly translated into design requirements and specifications for the scientific instruments. The instrument ensemble design must be consistent with a 15-year operational lifetime. Downtime for major repair/refurbishment or instrument updating must be minimized. The overall efficiency and performance of the instruments should be maximized. Modularization of instruments and instrument subsystems, some degree of on-orbit servicing (both repair and replacement), on-axis location, minimizing the number of reflections within instruments, minimizing polarization effects, and simultaneous operation of the F/24 camera with other instruments, are just a few of the design guidelines and specifications which can and will be met in order that these broader scientific requirements be satisfied.-

  20. Modular, security enclosure and method of assembly

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Moyer, John W.

    1995-01-01

    A transportable, reusable rapidly assembled and disassembled, resizable modular, security enclosure utilizes a stepped panel construction. Each panel has an inner portion and an outer portion which form joints. A plurality of channels can be affixed to selected joints of the panels. Panels can be affixed to a base member and then affixed to one another by the use of elongated pins extending through the channel joints. Alternatively, the base member can be omitted and the panels themselves can be used as the floor of the enclosure. The pins will extend generally parallel to the joint in which they are located. These elongated pins are readily inserted into and removable from the channels in a predetermined sequence to allow assembly and disassembly of the enclosure. A door constructed from panels is used to close the opening to the enclosure.

  1. Modular Mount Control System for Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, J.; Cleis, R.; Kyono, T.; Edwards, M.

    The Space Observatory Control Kit (SpOCK) is the hardware, computers and software used to run small and large telescopes in the RDS division of the Air Force Research Laboratories (AFRL). The system is used to track earth satellites, celestial objects, terrestrial objects and aerial objects. The system will track general targets when provided with state vectors in one of five coordinate systems. Client-toserver and server-to-gimbals communication occurs via human-readable s-expressions that may be evaluated by the computer language called Racket. Software verification is achieved by scripts that exercise these expressions by sending them to the server, and receiving the expressions that the server evaluates. This paper describes the adaptation of a modular mount control system developed primarily for LEO satellite imaging on large and small portable AFRL telescopes with a goal of orbit determination and the generation of satellite metrics.

  2. FOAM: the modular adaptive optics framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Werkhoven, T. I. M.; Homs, L.; Sliepen, G.; Rodenhuis, M.; Keller, C. U.

    2012-07-01

    Control software for adaptive optics systems is mostly custom built and very specific in nature. We have developed FOAM, a modular adaptive optics framework for controlling and simulating adaptive optics systems in various environments. Portability is provided both for different control hardware and adaptive optics setups. To achieve this, FOAM is written in C++ and runs on standard CPUs. Furthermore we use standard Unix libraries and compilation procedures and implemented a hardware abstraction layer in FOAM. We have successfully implemented FOAM on the adaptive optics system of ExPo - a high-contrast imaging polarimeter developed at our institute - in the lab and will test it on-sky late June 2012. We also plan to implement FOAM on adaptive optics systems for microscopy and solar adaptive optics. FOAM is available* under the GNU GPL license and is free to be used by anyone.

  3. MODULAR CORE UNITS FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Gage, J.F. Jr.; Sherer, D.B.

    1964-04-01

    A modular core unit for use in a nuclear reactor is described. Many identical core modules can be placed next to each other to make up a complete core. Such a module includes a cylinder of moderator material surrounding a fuel- containing re-entrant coolant channel. The re-entrant channel provides for the circulation of coolant such as liquid sodium from one end of the core unit, through the fuel region, and back out through the same end as it entered. Thermal insulation surrounds the moderator exterior wall inducing heat to travel inwardly to the coolant channel. Spaces between units may be used to accommodate control rods and support structure, which may be cooled by a secondary gas coolant, independently of the main coolant. (AEC)

  4. Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler

    DOEpatents

    Nichols, Ralph L.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Mullinex, Harry; Orne, William H.; Looney, Brian B.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

  5. Modularity of logarithmic parafermion vertex algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Jean; Creutzig, Thomas; Ridout, David

    2018-05-01

    The parafermionic cosets Ck = {Com} ( H , Lk(sl2) ) are studied for negative admissible levels k, as are certain infinite-order simple current extensions Bk of Ck . Under the assumption that the tensor theory considerations of Huang, Lepowsky and Zhang apply to Ck , irreducible Ck - and Bk -modules are obtained from those of Lk(sl2) . Assuming the validity of a certain Verlinde-type formula likewise gives the Grothendieck fusion rules of these irreducible modules. Notably, there are only finitely many irreducible Bk -modules. The irreducible Ck - and Bk -characters are computed and the latter are shown, when supplemented by pseudotraces, to carry a finite-dimensional representation of the modular group. The natural conjecture then is that the Bk are C_2 -cofinite vertex operator algebras.

  6. Lightweight Modular Instrumentation for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    An instrumentation, called Space Active Modular Materials ExperimentS (SAMMES), is developed for monitoring the spacecraft environment and for accurately measuring the degradation of space materials in low earth orbit (LEO). The SAMMES architecture concept can be extended to instrumentation for planetary exploration, both on spacecraft and in situ. The operating environment for planetary application will be substantially different, with temperature extremes and harsh solar wind and cosmic ray flux on lunar surfaces and temperature extremes and high winds on venusian and Martian surfaces. Moreover, instruments for surface deployment, which will be packaged in a small lander/rover (as in MESUR, for example), must be extremely compact with ultralow power and weight. With these requirements in mind, the SAMMES concept was extended to a sensor/instrumentation scheme for the lunar and Martian surface environment.

  7. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  8. Quadruped robots' modular trajectories: Stability issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Pinto, Santos, Rocha and Matos [13, 12] study a CPG model for the generation of modular trajectories of quadruped robots. They consider that each movement is composed of two types of primitives: rhythmic and discrete. The rhythmic primitive models the periodic patterns and the discrete primitive is inserted as a perturbation of those patterns. In this paper we begin to tackle numerically the problem of the stability of that mathematical model. We observe that if the discrete part is inserted in all limbs, with equal values, and as an offset of the rhythmic part, the obtained gait is stable and has the same spatial and spatio-temporal symmetry groups as the purely rhythmic gait, differing only on the value of the offset.

  9. Modular experimental platform for science and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    A modularized, standardized spacecraft bus, known as MESA, suitable for a variety of science and applications missions is discussed. The basic bus consists of a simple structural arrangement housing attitude control, telemetry/command, electrical power, propulsion and thermal control subsystems. The general arrangement allows extensive subsystem adaptation to mission needs. Kits provide for the addition of tape recorders, increased power levels and propulsion growth. Both 3-axis and spin stabilized flight proven attitude control subsystems are available. The MESA bus can be launched on Ariane, as a secondary payload for low cost, or on the STS with a PAM-D or other suitable upper stage. Multi-spacecraft launches are possible with either booster. Launch vehicle integration is simple and cost-effective. The low cost of the MESA bus is achieved by the extensive utilization of existing subsystem design concepts and equipment, and efficient program management and test integration techniques.

  10. Introducing a modular activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Attila; Stricker, Didier

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the idea of a modular activity monitoring system is introduced. By using different combinations of the system's three modules, different functionality becomes available: 1) a coarse intensity estimation of physical activities 2) different features based on HR-data and 3) the recognition of basic activities and postures. 3D-accelerometers--placed on lower arm, chest and foot--and a heart rate monitor were used as sensors. A dataset with 8 subjects and 14 different activities was recorded to evaluate the performance of the system. The overall performance on the intensity estimation task, relying on the chest-worn accelerometer and the HR-monitor, was 94.37%. The overall performance on the activity recognition task, using all three accelerometer placements and the HR-monitor, was 90.65%. This paper also gives an analysis of the importance of different accelerometer placements and the importance of a HR-monitor for both tasks.

  11. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space system (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower earth orbit (BLEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular extravehicular activity system (MEVAS) that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs and define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs

  12. Modular Control of Treadmill vs Overground Running

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Dario; Kersting, Uwe Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Motorized treadmills have been widely used in locomotion studies, although a debate remains concerning the extrapolation of results obtained from treadmill experiments to overground locomotion. Slight differences between treadmill (TRD) and overground running (OVG) kinematics and muscle activity have previously been reported. However, little is known about differences in the modular control of muscle activation in these two conditions. Therefore, we aimed at investigating differences between motor modules extracted from TRD and OVG by factorization of multi-muscle electromyographic (EMG) signals. Twelve healthy men ran on a treadmill and overground at their preferred speed while we recorded tibial acceleration and surface EMG from 11 ipsilateral lower limb muscles. We extracted motor modules representing relative weightings of synergistic muscle activations by non-negative matrix factorization from 20 consecutive gait cycles. Four motor modules were sufficient to accurately reconstruct the EMG signals in both TRD and OVG (average reconstruction quality = 92±3%). Furthermore, a good reconstruction quality (80±7%) was obtained also when muscle weightings of one condition (either OVG or TRD) were used to reconstruct the EMG data from the other condition. The peak amplitudes of activation signals showed a similar timing (pattern) across conditions. The magnitude of peak activation for the module related to initial contact was significantly greater for OVG, whereas peak activation for modules related to leg swing and preparation to landing were greater for TRD. We conclude that TRD and OVG share similar muscle weightings throughout motion. In addition, modular control for TRD and OVG is achieved with minimal temporal adjustments, which were dependent on the phase of the running cycle. PMID:27064978

  13. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space systems (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower Earth orbit (LEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular EVA system that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs, and to define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs. An upgrade option

  14. Type II thioesterase gene (ECO-orf27) from Amycolatopsis orientalis influences production of the polyketide antibiotic, ECO-0501 (LW01).

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Huang, He; Zhu, Li; Luo, Minyu; Chen, Daijie

    2012-11-01

    ECO-orf27 associated with the cluster of ECO-0501 (LW01) from Amycolatopsis orientalis is deduced to encode a type II thioesterase. Disruption of ECO-orf27 reduced LW01 production by 95 %. Complementation of the disrupted mutant with intact ECO-orf27 restored the production of LW01 suggesting that ECO-orf27 is crucial for LW01 biosynthesis. ECO-TE I, the gene encoding type I thioesterase from LW01 polyketide synthases, cannot complement ECO-orf27 deficient mutant distinguishing ECO-orf27 from type I thioesterase gene. Type II thioesterase gene pikAV from Streptomyces venezuelae could complement ECO-orf27 in A. orientalis indicating that the two genes are equivalent in their function. Overexpression of ECO-orf27 resulted in a 20 % increase in LW01 production providing an alternative approach for yield improvement.

  15. Advanced Modular Power Approach to Affordable, Supportable Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Kimnach, Greg L.; Fincannon, James; Mckissock,, Barbara I.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Wong, Edmond

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of missions to the Moon, Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) indicate that these missions often involve several distinct separately launched vehicles that must ultimately be integrated together in-flight and operate as one unit. Therefore, it is important to see these vehicles as elements of a larger segmented spacecraft rather than separate spacecraft flying in formation. The evolution of large multi-vehicle exploration architecture creates the need (and opportunity) to establish a global power architecture that is common across all vehicles. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power System (AMPS) project managed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is aimed at establishing the modular power system architecture that will enable power systems to be built from a common set of modular building blocks. The project is developing, demonstrating and evaluating key modular power technologies that are expected to minimize non-recurring development costs, reduce recurring integration costs, as well as, mission operational and support costs. Further, modular power is expected to enhance mission flexibility, vehicle reliability, scalability and overall mission supportability. The AMPS project not only supports multi-vehicle architectures but should enable multi-mission capability as well. The AMPS technology development involves near term demonstrations involving developmental prototype vehicles and field demonstrations. These operational demonstrations not only serve as a means of evaluating modular technology but also provide feedback to developers that assure that they progress toward truly flexible and operationally supportable modular power architecture.

  16. On the classification of weakly integral modular categories

    SciTech Connect

    Bruillard, Paul; Galindo, César; Ng, Siu-Hung

    In this paper we classify all modular categories of dimension 4m, where m is an odd square-free integer, and all rank 6 and rank 7 weakly integral modular categories. This completes the classification of weakly integral modular categories through rank 7. In particular, our results imply that all integral modular categories of rank at most 7 are pointed (that is, every simple object has dimension 1). All the non-integral (but weakly integral) modular categories of ranks 6 and 7 have dimension 4m, with m an odd square free integer, so their classification is an application of our main result. Themore » classification of rank 7 integral modular categories is facilitated by an analysis of the two group actions on modular categories: the Galois group of the field generated by the entries of the S-matrix and the group of invertible isomorphism classes of objects. We derive some valuable arithmetic consequences from these actions.« less

  17. An Sfp-type PPTase and associated polyketide and nonribosomal peptide synthases in Agrobacterium vitis are essential for induction of tobacco hypersensitive response and grape necrosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Desen; Burr, Thomas J

    2013-07-01

    An Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) encoding gene F-avi5813 in Agrobacterium vitis F2/5 was found to be required for the induction of a tobacco hypersensitive response (HR) and grape necrosis. Sfp-type PPTases are post-translation modification enzymes that activate acyl-carry protein (ACP) domains in polyketide synthases (PKS) and peptidyl-carrier protein (PCP) domains of nonribosomal peptide synthases (NRPS). Mutagenesis of PKS and NRPS genes in A. vitis led to the identification of a PKS gene (F-avi4330) and NRPS gene (F-avi3342) that are both required for HR and necrosis. The gene immediately downstream of F-avi4330 (F-avi4329) encoding a predicted aminotransferase was also found to be required for HR and necrosis. Regulation of F-avi4330 and F-avi3342 by quorum-sensing genes avhR, aviR, and avsR and by a lysR-type regulator, lhnR, was investigated. It was determined that F-avi4330 expression is positively regulated by avhR, aviR, and lhnR and negatively regulated by avsR. F-avi3342 was found to be positively regulated by avhR, aviR, and avsR and negatively regulated by lhnR. Our results suggest that a putative hybrid peptide-polyketide metabolite synthesized by F-avi4330 and F-avi3342 is associated with induction of tobacco HR and grape necrosis. This is the first report that demonstrates that NRPS and PKS play essential roles in conferring the unique ability of A. vitis to elicit a non-host-specific HR and host-specific necrosis.

  18. A Modular Robotic System with Applications to Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancher, Matthew D.; Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    Modular robotic systems offer potential advantages as versatile, fault-tolerant, cost-effective platforms for space exploration, but a sufficiently mature system is not yet available. We describe the possible applications of such a system, and present prototype hardware intended as a step in the right direction. We also present elements of an automated design and optimization framework aimed at making modular robots easier to design and use, and discuss the results of applying the system to a gait optimization problem. Finally, we discuss the potential near-term applications of modular robotics to terrestrial robotics research.

  19. Development of a space universal modular architecture (SUMO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Bernie F.

    This concept paper proposes that the space community should develop and implement a universal standard for spacecraft modularity - to improve interoperability of spacecraft components. Pursuing a global industry consensus standard for open and modular spacecraft architecture will encourage trade, remove standards-related market barriers, and in the long run increase both value provided to customers and profitability of the space industrial sector. This concept paper sets out: (1) the goals for a SUMO standard and how it will benefit the space community; (2) background on spacecraft modularity and existing related standards; (3) the proposed technical scope of the current standardization effort; and (4) an approach for creating a SUMO standard.

  20. Multi-kilowatt modularized spacecraft power processing system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R. E.; Hayden, J. H.; Hedges, R. T.; Rehmann, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A review of existing information pertaining to spacecraft power processing systems and equipment was accomplished with a view towards applicability to the modularization of multi-kilowatt power processors. Power requirements for future spacecraft were determined from the NASA mission model-shuttle systems payload data study which provided the limits for modular power equipment capabilities. Three power processing systems were compared to evaluation criteria to select the system best suited for modularity. The shunt regulated direct energy transfer system was selected by this analysis for a conceptual design effort which produced equipment specifications, schematics, envelope drawings, and power module configurations.

  1. Alternative diagnostic criteria for idiopathic hypersomnia: A 32-hour protocol.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Elisa; Lopez, Régis; Barateau, Lucie; Chenini, Sofiene; Bosco, Adriana; Jaussent, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2018-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of extended sleep duration on a controlled 32-hour bed rest protocol in idiopathic hypersomnia (IH). One hundred sixteen patients with high suspicion of IH (37 clear-cut IH according to multiple sleep latency test criteria and 79 probable IH), 32 with hypersomnolence associated with a comorbid disorder (non-IH), and 21 controls underwent polysomnography, modified sleep latency tests, and a 32-hour bed rest protocol. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to find optimal total sleep time (TST) cutoff values on various periods that discriminate patients from controls. TST was longer in patients with clear-cut IH than other groups (probable IH, non-IH, and controls) and in patients with probable IH than non-IH and controls. The TST cutoff best discriminating clear-cut IH and controls was 19 hours for the 32-hour recording (sensitivity = 91.9%, specificity = 85.7%) and 12 hours (100%, 85.7%) for the first 24 hours. The 19-hour cutoff displayed a specificity and sensitivity of 91.9% and 81.2% between IH and non-IH patients. Patients with IH above the 19-hour cutoff were overweight, had more sleep inertia, and had higher TST on all periods compared to patients below 19 hours, whereas no differences were found for the 12-hour cutoff. An inverse correlation was found between the mean sleep latency and TST during 32-hour recording in IH patients. In standardized and controlled stringent conditions, the optimal cutoff best discriminating patients from controls was 19 hours over 32 hours, allowing a clear-cut phenotypical characterization of major interest for research purposes. Sleepier patients on the multiple sleep latency test were also the more severe in terms of extended sleep. Ann Neurol 2018;83:235-247. © 2018 American Neurological Association.

  2. POWOW: A Modular, High Power Spacecraft Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A robust space infrastructure encompasses a broad range of mission needs along with an imperative to reduce costs of satellites meeting those needs. A critical commodity for science, commercial and civil satellites is power at an affordable cost. The POWOW (POwer WithOut Wires) spacecraft concept was created to provide, at one end of the scale, multi-megawatts of power yet also be composed of modules that can meet spacecraft needs in the kilowatt range. With support from the NASA-sponsored Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology Program, the POWOW spacecraft concept was designed to meet Mars mission needs - while at the same time having elements applicable to a range of other missions. At Mars, the vehicle would reside in an aerosynchronous orbit and beam power to a variety of locations on the surface. It is the purpose of this paper to present the latest concept design results. The Space Power Institute along with four companies: Able Engineering, Inc., Entech, Inc., Primex Aerospace Co., and TECSTAR have produced a modular, power-rich electrically propelled spacecraft design that meets these requirements. In addition, it also meets a range of civil and commercial needs. The spacecraft design is based on multijunction Ill-V solar cells, the new Stretched Lens Aurora (SLA) module, a lightweight array design based on a multiplicity of 8 kW end-of-life subarrays and electric thrusters. The solar cells have excellent radiation resistance and efficiencies above 30%. The SLA has a concentration ratio up to 15x while maintaining an operating temperature of 80 C. The design of the 8 kW array building block will be presented and its applicability to commercial and government missions will be discussed. Electric propulsion options include Hall, MPD and ion thrusters of various power levels and trade studies have been conducted to define the most advantageous options. The present baseline spacecraft design providing 900 kW using technologies expected to be

  3. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has produced many standards and recommendations whose aim is to generate an architecture that starts from astrophysical resources, in a general sense, and ends up in deployed consumable services (that are themselves astrophysical resources). Focusing on the Data Access Layer (DAL) system architecture, that these standards define, in the last years a web based application has been developed and maintained at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives) to try to deploy and manage multiple VO (Virtual Observatory) services in a uniform way: VO-Dance. However a set of criticalities have arisen since when the VO-Dance idea has been produced, plus some major changes underwent and are undergoing at the IVOA DAL layer (and related standards): this urged IA2 to identify a new solution for its own service layer. Keeping on the basic ideas from VO-Dance (simple service configuration, service instantiation at call time and modularity) while switching to different software technologies (e.g. dismissing Java Reflection in favour of Enterprise Java Bean, EJB, based solution), the new solution has been sketched out and tested for feasibility. Here we present the results originating from this test study. The main constraints for this new project come from various fields. A better homogenized solution rising from IVOA DAL standards: for example the new DALI (Data Access Layer Interface) specification that acts as a common interface system for previous and oncoming access protocols. The need for a modular system where each component is based upon a single VO specification allowing services to rely on common capabilities instead of homogenizing them inside service components directly. The search for a scalable system that takes advantage from distributed systems. The constraints find answer in the adopted solutions hereafter sketched. The

  4. A modular network for legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin; Stewart, Ian; Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Collins, J. J.

    1998-04-01

    In this paper we use symmetry methods to study networks of coupled cells, which are models for central pattern generators (CPGs). In these models the cells obey identical systems of differential equations and the network specifies how cells are coupled. Previously, Collins and Stewart showed that the phase relations of many of the standard gaits of quadrupeds and hexapods can be obtained naturally via Hopf bifurcation in small networks. For example, the networks they used to study quadrupeds all had four cells, with the understanding that each cell determined the phase of the motion of one leg. However, in their work it seemed necessary to employ several different four-oscillator networks to obtain all of the standard quadrupedal gaits. We show that this difficulty with four-oscillator networks is unavoidable, but that the problems can be overcome by using a larger network. Specifically, we show that the standard gaits of a quadruped, including walk, trot and pace, cannot all be realized by a single four-cell network without introducing unwanted conjugacies between trot and pace - conjugacies that imply a dynamic equivalence between these gaits that seems inconsistent with observations. In this sense a single network with four cells cannot model the CPG of a quadruped. We also introduce a single eight-cell network that can model all of the primary gaits of quadrupeds without these unwanted conjugacies. Moreover, this network is modular in that it naturally generalizes to provide models of gaits in hexapods, centipedes, and millipedes. The analysis of models for many-legged animals shows that wave-like motions, similar to those obtained by Kopell and Ermentrout, can be expected. However, our network leads to a prediction that the wavelength of the wave motion will divide twice the length of the animal. Indeed, we reproduce illustrations of wave-like motions in centipedes where the animal is approximately one-and-a-half wavelength long - motions that are consistent

  5. A Modular Approach to Year 11 Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Terry G.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a secondary school science program which includes modularized courses in the earth science unified science, biology, chemistry, and physics. Students may continue in one science course or switch between courses upon completing modules. (SL)

  6. A LANGUAGE FOR MODULAR SPATIO-TEMPORAL SIMULATION (R824766)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creating an effective environment for collaborative spatio-temporal model development will require computational systems that provide support for the user in three key areas: (1) Support for modular, hierarchical model construction and archiving/linking of simulation modules; (2)...

  7. Modular chassis simplifies packaging and interconnecting of circuit boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E.; Boline, K. G.

    1964-01-01

    A system of modular chassis structures has simplified the design for mounting a number of printed circuit boards. This design is structurally adaptable to computer and industrial control system applications.

  8. Astronaut Alan Bean works on Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, works at the Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) on the Apollo 12 Lunar Module during the mission's first extravehicular activity, EVA-1, on November 19, 1969.

  9. Modular Approach to Structural Simulation for Vehicle Crashworthiness Prediction

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-03-01

    A modular formulation for simulation of the structural deformation and deceleration of a vehicle for crashworthiness and collision compatibility is presented. This formulation includes three dimensional beam elements, various spring elements, rigid b...

  10. Modularization: An Attempt at Collegiate Level in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, J.; Pillai, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    The effectiveness of a modular approach to learning in a botany unit as compared to the traditional teaching approach in terms of learning efficiency, learning time, and mastery level is reported. Three references are cited. (Author/CHC)

  11. Fast Modular Exponentiation and Elliptic Curve Group Operation in Maple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, S. Y.; James, G.

    2006-01-01

    The modular exponentiation, y[equivalent to]x[superscript k](mod n) with x,y,k,n integers and n [greater than] 1; is the most fundamental operation in RSA and ElGamal public-key cryptographic systems. Thus the efficiency of RSA and ElGamal depends entirely on the efficiency of the modular exponentiation. The same situation arises also in elliptic…

  12. Applications of Spacelab Payload Standard Modular Electronics /SPSME/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, D. D.; Kasulka, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA sponsored Spacelab Payload Standard Modular Electronics program has been designed with the basic objective of providing a space-qualified set of standardized modular electronics to support investigations identified for Spacelab payloads. These units are reusable, have functional, physical, and interface characteristics which allow them to be conveniently assembled in a multitude of configurations, and functionally interchangeable with their ground-based equivalents. The interfacing and control modules are described and typical hardware applications are presented.

  13. Standardized Modular Power Interfaces for Future Space Explorations Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Earlier studies show that future human explorations missions are composed of multi-vehicle assemblies with interconnected electric power systems. Some vehicles are often intended to serve as flexible multi-purpose or multi-mission platforms. This drives the need for power architectures that can be reconfigured to support this level of flexibility. Power system developmental costs can be reduced, program wide, by utilizing a common set of modular building blocks. Further, there are mission operational and logistics cost benefits of using a common set of modular spares. These benefits are the goals of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power System (AMPS) project. A common set of modular blocks requires a substantial level of standardization in terms of the Electrical, Data System, and Mechanical interfaces. The AMPS project is developing a set of proposed interface standards that will provide useful guidance for modular hardware developers but not needlessly constrain technology options, or limit future growth in capability. In 2015 the AMPS project focused on standardizing the interfaces between the elements of spacecraft power distribution and energy storage. The development of the modular power standard starts with establishing mission assumptions and ground rules to define design application space. The standards are defined in terms of AMPS objectives including Commonality, Reliability-Availability, Flexibility-Configurability and Supportability-Reusability. The proposed standards are aimed at assembly and sub-assembly level building blocks. AMPS plans to adopt existing standards for spacecraft command and data, software, network interfaces, and electrical power interfaces where applicable. Other standards including structural encapsulation, heat transfer, and fluid transfer, are governed by launch and spacecraft environments and bound by practical limitations of weight and volume. Developing these mechanical interface standards is more difficult but

  14. MOBS - A modular on-board switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, W.; Grassmann, W.; Piontek, M.

    The authors describe a multibeam satellite system that is designed for business services and for communications at a high bit rate. The repeater is regenerative with a modular onboard switching system. It acts not only as baseband switch but also as the central node of the network, performing network control and protocol evaluation. The hardware is based on a modular bus/memory architecture with associated processors.

  15. Evaporation mitigation by floating modular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. M.; Peirson, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged periods of drought and consequent evaporation from open water bodies in arid parts of Australia continue to be a threat to water availability for agricultural production. Over many parts of Australia, the annual average evaporation exceeds the annual precipitation by more than 5 times. Given its significance, it is surprising that no evaporation mitigation technique has gained widespread adoption to date. High capital and maintenance costs of manufactured products are a significant barrier to implementation. The use of directly recycled clean plastic containers as floating modular devices to mitigate evaporation has been investigated for the first time. A six-month trial at an arid zone site in Australia of this potential cost effective solution has been undertaken. The experiment was performed using clean conventional drinking water bottles as floating modules on the open water surface of 240-L tanks with three varying degrees of covering (nil, 34% and 68%). A systematic reduction in evaporation is demonstrated during the whole study period that is approximately linearly proportional to the covered surface. These results provide a potential foundation for robust evaporation mitigation with the prospect of implementing a cost-optimal design.

  16. Modular reconfigurable matched spectral filter spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schundler, Elizabeth; Engel, James R.; Gruber, Thomas; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Mansur, David J.; Dixon, John; Potter, Kevin; Newbry, Scott

    2015-06-01

    OPTRA is currently developing a modular, reconfigurable matched spectral filter (RMSF) spectrometer for the monitoring of greenhouse gases. The heart of this spectrometer will be the RMSF core, which is a dispersive spectrometer that images the sample spectrum from 2000 - 3333 cm-1 onto a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) such that different columns correspond to different wavebands. By applying masks to this DMD, a matched spectral filter can be applied in hardware. The core can then be paired with different fore-optics or detector modules to achieve active in situ or passive remote detection of the chemicals of interest. This results in a highly flexible system that can address a wide variety of chemicals by updating the DMD masks and a wide variety of applications by swapping out fore-optic and detector modules. In either configuration, the signal on the detector is effectively a dot-product between the applied mask and the sample spectrum that can be used to make detection and quantification determinations. Using this approach significantly reduces the required data bandwidth of the sensor without reducing the information content, therefore making it ideal for remote, unattended systems. This paper will focus on the design of the RMSF core.

  17. Proliferation resistance of small modular reactors fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Polidoro, F.; Parozzi, F.; Fassnacht, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the proliferation resistance of different types of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) has been examined and classified with criteria available in the literature. In the first part of the study, the level of proliferation attractiveness of traditional low-enriched UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels to be used in SMRs based on pressurized water technology has been analyzed. On the basis of numerical simulations both cores show significant proliferation risks. Although the MOX core is less proliferation prone in comparison to the UO{sub 2} core, it still can be highly attractive for diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material. Inmore » the second part of the paper, calculations to assess the proliferation attractiveness of fuel in typical small sodium cooled fast reactor show that proliferation risks from spent fuel cannot be neglected. The core contains a highly attractive plutonium composition during the whole life cycle. Despite some aspects of the design like the sealed core that enables easy detection of unauthorized withdrawal of fissile material and enhances proliferation resistance, in case of open Non-Proliferation Treaty break-out, weapon-grade plutonium in sufficient quantities could be extracted from the reactor core.« less

  18. MOLSIM: A modular molecular simulation software

    PubMed Central

    Jurij, Reščič

    2015-01-01

    The modular software MOLSIM for all‐atom molecular and coarse‐grained simulations is presented with focus on the underlying concepts used. The software possesses four unique features: (1) it is an integrated software for molecular dynamic, Monte Carlo, and Brownian dynamics simulations; (2) simulated objects are constructed in a hierarchical fashion representing atoms, rigid molecules and colloids, flexible chains, hierarchical polymers, and cross‐linked networks; (3) long‐range interactions involving charges, dipoles and/or anisotropic dipole polarizabilities are handled either with the standard Ewald sum, the smooth particle mesh Ewald sum, or the reaction‐field technique; (4) statistical uncertainties are provided for all calculated observables. In addition, MOLSIM supports various statistical ensembles, and several types of simulation cells and boundary conditions are available. Intermolecular interactions comprise tabulated pairwise potentials for speed and uniformity and many‐body interactions involve anisotropic polarizabilities. Intramolecular interactions include bond, angle, and crosslink potentials. A very large set of analyses of static and dynamic properties is provided. The capability of MOLSIM can be extended by user‐providing routines controlling, for example, start conditions, intermolecular potentials, and analyses. An extensive set of case studies in the field of soft matter is presented covering colloids, polymers, and crosslinked networks. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25994597

  19. Modular countermine payload for small robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herman; Few, Doug; Versteeg, Roelof; Valois, Jean-Sebastien; McMahill, Jeff; Licitra, Michael; Henciak, Edward

    2010-04-01

    Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processor that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multimission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.

  20. Modular control of endothelial sheet migration

    PubMed Central

    Vitorino, Philip; Meyer, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Growth factor-induced migration of endothelial cell monolayers enables embryonic development, wound healing, and angiogenesis. Although collective migration is widespread and therapeutically relevant, the underlying mechanism by which cell monolayers respond to growth factor, sense directional signals, induce motility, and coordinate individual cell movements is only partially understood. Here we used RNAi to identify 100 regulatory proteins that enhance or suppress endothelial sheet migration into cell-free space. We measured multiple live-cell migration parameters for all siRNA perturbations and found that each targeted protein primarily regulates one of four functional outputs: cell motility, directed migration, cell–cell coordination, or cell density. We demonstrate that cell motility regulators drive random, growth factor-independent motility in the presence or absence of open space. In contrast, directed migration regulators selectively transduce growth factor signals to direct cells along the monolayer boundary toward open space. Lastly, we found that regulators of cell–cell coordination are growth factor-independent and reorient randomly migrating cells inside the sheet when boundary cells begin to migrate. Thus, cells transition from random to collective migration through a modular control system, whereby growth factor signals convert boundary cells into pioneers, while cells inside the monolayer reorient and follow pioneers through growth factor-independent migration and cell–cell coordination. PMID:19056882

  1. Remote entanglement stabilization for modular quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didier, Nicolas; Shankar, S.; Mirrahimi, M.

    Quantum information processing in a modular architecture requires to distribute and stabilize entanglement in a qubit network. We present autonomous entanglement stabilization protocols between two qubits that are coupled to distant cavities. The cavities coupling is mediated and controlled via a three-wave mixing device that generates either a delocalized mode or a two-mode squeezed state between the remote cavities depending on the pump frequency. Local drives on the qubits and the cavities steer and maintain the system to the desired qubit Bell state. We show that these reservoir-engineering based protocols stabilize entanglement in presence of qubit-cavity asymmetries and losses. Most spectacularly, even a weakly-squeezed state can stabilize a maximally entangled Bell state of two distant qubits through entanglement accumulation. This research was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche under Grant ANR-14-CE26-0018, by Inria's DPEI under the TAQUILLA associated team and by ARO under Grant No. W911NF-14-1-0011.

  2. Modular Countermine Payload for Small Robots

    SciTech Connect

    Herman Herman; Doug Few; Roelof Versteeg

    2010-04-01

    Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processormore » that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multi-mission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.« less

  3. Modular representation of layered neural networks.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Chihiro; Hiramatsu, Kaoru; Kashino, Kunio

    2018-01-01

    Layered neural networks have greatly improved the performance of various applications including image processing, speech recognition, natural language processing, and bioinformatics. However, it is still difficult to discover or interpret knowledge from the inference provided by a layered neural network, since its internal representation has many nonlinear and complex parameters embedded in hierarchical layers. Therefore, it becomes important to establish a new methodology by which layered neural networks can be understood. In this paper, we propose a new method for extracting a global and simplified structure from a layered neural network. Based on network analysis, the proposed method detects communities or clusters of units with similar connection patterns. We show its effectiveness by applying it to three use cases. (1) Network decomposition: it can decompose a trained neural network into multiple small independent networks thus dividing the problem and reducing the computation time. (2) Training assessment: the appropriateness of a trained result with a given hyperparameter or randomly chosen initial parameters can be evaluated by using a modularity index. And (3) data analysis: in practical data it reveals the community structure in the input, hidden, and output layers, which serves as a clue for discovering knowledge from a trained neural network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modular nonvolatile solid state recorder (MONSSTR) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klang, Mark R.; Small, Martin B.; Beams, Tom

    2001-12-01

    Solid state recorders have begun replacing traditional tape recorders in fulfilling the requirement to record images on airborne platforms. With the advances in electro-optical, IR, SAR, Multi and Hyper-spectral sensors and video recording requirements, solid state recorders have become the recorder of choice. Solid state recorders provide the additional storage, higher sustained bandwidth, less power, less weight and smaller footprint to meet the current and future recording requirements. CALCULEX, Inc., manufactures a non-volatile flash memory solid state recorder called the MONSSTR (Modular Non-volatile Solid State Recorder). MONSSTR is being used to record images from many different digital sensors on high performance aircraft such as the RF- 4, F-16 and the Royal Air Force Tornado. MONSSTR, with its internal multiplexer, is also used to record instrumentation data. This includes multiple streams of PCM and multiple channels of 1553 data. Instrumentation data is being recorded by MONSSTR systems in a range of platforms including F-22, F-15, F-16, Comanche Helicopter and US Navy torpedos. MONSSTR can also be used as a cockpit video recorder. This paper will provide an update of the MONSSTR.

  5. EDTA analysis on the Roche MODULAR analyser.

    PubMed

    Davidson, D F

    2007-05-01

    Patient specimens can be subject to subtle interference from cross contamination by liquid-based, potassium-containing EDTA anticoagulant, leading to misinterpretation of results. A rapid method for EDTA analysis to detect such contamination is described. An in-house EDTA assay on the Roche MODULAR analyser was assessed for accuracy and precision by comparison with an adjusted calcium difference measurement (atomic absorption and o-cresolphthalein complexone colorimetry). EDTA method versus adjusted calcium difference showed: slope = 1.038 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.949-1.131); intercept = 0.073 (95% CI 0.018-0.132) mmol/L; r = 0.914; n = 94. However, inter-assay precision of the calcium difference method was estimated to be poorer (coefficient of variation 24.8% versus 3.4% for the automated colorimetric method at an EDTA concentration of 0.25 mmol/L). Unequivocal contamination was observed at an EDTA concentration of > or =0.2 mmol/L. The automated method showed positive interference from haemolysis and negative interference from oxalate. The method was unaffected by lipaemia (triglycerides <20 mmol/L), icterus (bilirubin <500 micromol/L), glucose (<100 mmol/L), iron (<100 micromol/L), and citrate, phosphate or fluoride (all <2.5 mmol/L). The automated colorimetric assay described is an accurate, precise and rapid (3 min) means of detecting EDTA contamination of unhaemolysed biochemistry specimens.

  6. Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler

    DOEpatents

    Nichols, R.L.; Widdowson, M.A.; Mullinex, H.; Orne, W.H.; Looney, B.B.

    1994-03-15

    An apparatus is described for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations. 3 figures.

  7. Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2006-01-01

    The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS) is a graphical simulation environment designed for the development of advanced control algorithms and rapid testing of these algorithms on a generic computational model of a turbofan engine and its control system. MAPSS is a nonlinear, non-real-time simulation comprising a Component Level Model (CLM) module and a Controller-and-Actuator Dynamics (CAD) module. The CLM module simulates the dynamics of engine components at a sampling rate of 2,500 Hz. The controller submodule of the CAD module simulates a digital controller, which has a typical update rate of 50 Hz. The sampling rate for the actuators in the CAD module is the same as that of the CLM. MAPSS provides a graphical user interface that affords easy access to engine-operation, engine-health, and control parameters; is used to enter such input model parameters as power lever angle (PLA), Mach number, and altitude; and can be used to change controller and engine parameters. Output variables are selectable by the user. Output data as well as any changes to constants and other parameters can be saved and reloaded into the GUI later.

  8. Insights from a Modular Interdisciplinary Laboratory Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Carmona, V.

    2016-12-01

    A laboratory curriculum is naturally oriented towards "hands on" and problem-based learning. An earth science course, like chemical ecology, has the additional advantage of interdisciplinary education. Our Chemical Ecology course at Loyola Marymount University was structured as a small modular workshop. Students first gained hands-on experience with each analytical technique in the laboratory. The class then discussed these first datasets, delved into lecture topics, and tweaked their experimental procedures. Lastly, students were given time to design and execute their own experiments and present their findings. Three-to-four class periods were allotted for each laboratory topic. Detailed information and student reflections will be presented from the Spectroscopy module. Students used the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent method to extract the phenolic content of vegetation and/or soils. Because phenols are produced by plants for defense, this spectroscopic laboratory activity provided insight on allelopathy using analytical chemistry. Students were extremely engaged and learned not only the lab theory and technique, but also its application to our local ecology.

  9. Brain Modularity Mediates the Relation between Task Complexity and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fengdan; Yue, Qiuhai; Martin, Randi; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Ramos-Nuã+/-Ez, Aurora; Deem, Michael

    Recent work in cognitive neuroscience has focused on analyzing the brain as a network, rather than a collection of independent regions. Prior studies taking this approach have found that individual differences in the degree of modularity of the brain network relate to performance on cognitive tasks. However, inconsistent results concerning the direction of this relationship have been obtained, with some tasks showing better performance as modularity increases, and other tasks showing worse performance. A recent theoretical model suggests that these inconsistencies may be explained on the grounds that high-modularity networks favor performance on simple tasks whereas low-modularity networks favor performance on complex tasks. The current study tests these predictions by relating modularity from resting-state fMRI to performance on a set of behavioral tasks. Complex and simple tasks were defined on the basis of whether they drew on executive attention. Consistent with predictions, we found a negative correlation between individuals' modularity and their performance on the complex tasks but a positive correlation with performance on the simple tasks. The results presented here provide a framework for linking measures of whole brain organization to cognitive processing.

  10. Multiple D3-Instantons and Mock Modular Forms I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Banerjee, Sibasish; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2017-07-01

    We study D3-instanton corrections to the hypermultiplet moduli space in type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold. In a previous work, consistency of D3-instantons with S-duality was established at first order in the instanton expansion, using the modular properties of the M5-brane elliptic genus. We extend this analysis to the two-instanton level, where wall-crossing phenomena start playing a role. We focus on the contact potential, an analogue of the Kähler potential which must transform as a modular form under S-duality. We show that it can be expressed in terms of a suitable modification of the partition function of D4-D2-D0 BPS black holes, constructed out of the generating function of MSW invariants (the latter coincide with Donaldson-Thomas invariants in a particular chamber). Modular invariance of the contact potential then requires that, in the case where the D3-brane wraps a reducible divisor, the generating function of MSW invariants must transform as a vector-valued mock modular form, with a specific modular completion built from the MSW invariants of the constituents. Physically, this gives a powerful constraint on the degeneracies of BPS black holes. Mathematically, our result gives a universal prediction for the modular properties of Donaldson-Thomas invariants of pure two-dimensional sheaves.

  11. Modular Knowledge Representation and Reasoning in the Semantic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, Luciano; Homola, Martin

    Construction of modular ontologies by combining different modules is becoming a necessity in ontology engineering in order to cope with the increasing complexity of the ontologies and the domains they represent. The modular ontology approach takes inspiration from software engineering, where modularization is a widely acknowledged feature. Distributed reasoning is the other side of the coin of modular ontologies: given an ontology comprising of a set of modules, it is desired to perform reasoning by combination of multiple reasoning processes performed locally on each of the modules. In the last ten years, a number of approaches for combining logics has been developed in order to formalize modular ontologies. In this chapter, we survey and compare the main formalisms for modular ontologies and distributed reasoning in the Semantic Web. We select four formalisms build on formal logical grounds of Description Logics: Distributed Description Logics, ℰ-connections, Package-based Description Logics and Integrated Distributed Description Logics. We concentrate on expressivity and distinctive modeling features of each framework. We also discuss reasoning capabilities of each framework.

  12. Modularity and the spread of perturbations in complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Gates, Alexander J.; Rocha, Luis M.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method to decompose dynamical systems based on the idea that modules constrain the spread of perturbations. We find partitions of system variables that maximize "perturbation modularity," defined as the autocovariance of coarse-grained perturbed trajectories. The measure effectively separates the fast intramodular from the slow intermodular dynamics of perturbation spreading (in this respect, it is a generalization of the "Markov stability" method of network community detection). Our approach captures variation of modular organization across different system states, time scales, and in response to different kinds of perturbations: aspects of modularity which are all relevant to real-world dynamical systems. It offers a principled alternative to detecting communities in networks of statistical dependencies between system variables (e.g., "relevance networks" or "functional networks"). Using coupled logistic maps, we demonstrate that the method uncovers hierarchical modular organization planted in a system's coupling matrix. Additionally, in homogeneously coupled map lattices, it identifies the presence of self-organized modularity that depends on the initial state, dynamical parameters, and type of perturbations. Our approach offers a powerful tool for exploring the modular organization of complex dynamical systems.

  13. Functional modularity in lake-dwelling characin fishes of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Amando; Herder, Fabian; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Modular evolution promotes evolutionary change, allowing independent variation across morphological units. Recent studies have shown that under contrasting ecological pressures, patterns of modularity could be related to divergent evolution. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the presence of modular evolution in two sister lacustrine species, Astyanax aeneus and A. caballeroi, which are differentiated by their trophic habits. Two different datasets were analyzed: (1) skull X-rays from 73 specimens (35 A. aeneus and 38 A. caballeroi) to characterize skull variation patterns, considering both species and sex effects. For this dataset, three different modularity hypotheses were tested, previously supported in other lacustrine divergent species; (2) a complete body shape dataset was also tested for four modularity hypotheses, which included a total of 196 individuals (110 Astyanax aeneus and 86 A. caballeroi). Skull shape showed significant differences among species and sex (P < 0.001), where Astyanax caballeroi species showed an upwardly projected mandible and larger preorbital region. For the skull dataset, the modularity hypothesis ranked first included three partitioning modules. While for the complete body dataset the best ranked hypothesis included two modules (head vs the rest of the body), being significant only for A. caballeroi. PMID:28951817

  14. Functional modularity in lake-dwelling characin fishes of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-García, Claudia Patricia; Bautista, Amando; Herder, Fabian; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Modular evolution promotes evolutionary change, allowing independent variation across morphological units. Recent studies have shown that under contrasting ecological pressures, patterns of modularity could be related to divergent evolution. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the presence of modular evolution in two sister lacustrine species, Astyanax aeneus and A. caballeroi , which are differentiated by their trophic habits. Two different datasets were analyzed: (1) skull X-rays from 73 specimens (35 A. aeneus and 38 A. caballeroi ) to characterize skull variation patterns, considering both species and sex effects. For this dataset, three different modularity hypotheses were tested, previously supported in other lacustrine divergent species; (2) a complete body shape dataset was also tested for four modularity hypotheses, which included a total of 196 individuals (110 Astyanax aeneus and 86 A. caballeroi ). Skull shape showed significant differences among species and sex ( P  < 0.001), where Astyanax caballeroi species showed an upwardly projected mandible and larger preorbital region. For the skull dataset, the modularity hypothesis ranked first included three partitioning modules. While for the complete body dataset the best ranked hypothesis included two modules (head vs the rest of the body), being significant only for A. caballeroi .

  15. Modularity and the spread of perturbations in complex dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Gates, Alexander J; Rocha, Luis M

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method to decompose dynamical systems based on the idea that modules constrain the spread of perturbations. We find partitions of system variables that maximize "perturbation modularity," defined as the autocovariance of coarse-grained perturbed trajectories. The measure effectively separates the fast intramodular from the slow intermodular dynamics of perturbation spreading (in this respect, it is a generalization of the "Markov stability" method of network community detection). Our approach captures variation of modular organization across different system states, time scales, and in response to different kinds of perturbations: aspects of modularity which are all relevant to real-world dynamical systems. It offers a principled alternative to detecting communities in networks of statistical dependencies between system variables (e.g., "relevance networks" or "functional networks"). Using coupled logistic maps, we demonstrate that the method uncovers hierarchical modular organization planted in a system's coupling matrix. Additionally, in homogeneously coupled map lattices, it identifies the presence of self-organized modularity that depends on the initial state, dynamical parameters, and type of perturbations. Our approach offers a powerful tool for exploring the modular organization of complex dynamical systems.

  16. Isolation and Assessment of the in Vitro Anti-Tumor Activity of Smenothiazole A and B, Chlorinated Thiazole-Containing Peptide/Polyketides from the Caribbean Sponge, Smenospongia aurea

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Germana; Teta, Roberta; Miceli, Roberta; Ceccarelli, Luca S.; Della Sala, Gerardo; Camerlingo, Rosa; Irollo, Elena; Mangoni, Alfonso; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Costantino, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    The study of the secondary metabolites contained in the organic extract of Caribbean sponge Smenospongia aurea led to the isolation of smenothiazole A (3) and B (4), hybrid peptide/polyketide compounds. Assays performed using four solid tumor cell lines showed that smenothiazoles exert a potent cytotoxic activity at nanomolar levels, with selectivity over ovarian cancer cells and a pro-apoptotic mechanism. PMID:25603342

  17. Modular Extracellular Matrices: Solutions for the Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Monica A.; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2008-01-01

    The common technique of growing cells in two-dimensions (2-D) is gradually being replaced by culturing cells on matrices with more appropriate composition and stiffness, or by encapsulation of cells in three-dimensions (3-D). The universal acceptance of the new 3-D paradigm has been constrained by the absence of a commercially available, biocompatible material that offers ease of use, experimental flexibility, and a seamless transition from in vitro to in vivo applications. The challenge – the puzzle that needs a solution – is to replicate the complexity of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) environment with the minimum number of components necessary to allow cells to rebuild and replicate a given tissue. For use in drug discovery, toxicology, cell banking, and ultimately in reparative medicine, the ideal matrix would therefore need to be highly reproducible, manufacturable, approvable, and affordable. Herein we describe the development of a set of modular components that can be assembled into biomimetic materials that meet these requirements. These semi-synthetic ECMs, or sECMs, are based on hyaluronan derivatives that form covalently crosslinked, biodegradable hydrogels suitable for 3-D culture of primary and stem cells in vitro, and for tissue formation in vivo. The sECMs can be engineered to provide appropriate biological cues needed to recapitulate the complexity of a given ECM environment. Specific applications for different sECM compositions include stem cell expansion with control of differentiation, scar-free wound healing, growth factor delivery, cell delivery for osteochondral defect and liver repair, and development of vascularized tumor xenografts for personalized chemotherapy. PMID:18442709

  18. A Modular Re-configurable Rover System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouloubasis, A.; McKee, G.; Active Robotics Lab

    In this paper we present the novel concepts incorporated in a planetary surface exploration rover design that is currently under development. The Multitasking Rover (MTR) aims to demonstrate functionality that will cover many of the current and future needs such as rough-terrain mobility, modularity and upgradeability [1]. The rover system has enhanced mobility characteristics. It operates in conjunction with Science Packs (SPs) and Tool Packs (TPs) - modules attached to the main frame of the rover, which are either special tools or science instruments and alter the operation capabilities of the system. To date, each rover system design is very much task driven for example, the scenario of cooperative transportation of extended payloads [2], comprises two rovers each equipped with a manipulator dedicated to the task [3]. The MTR approach focuses mostly on modularity and upgradeability presenting at the same time a fair amount of internal re-configurability for the sake of rough terrain stability. The rover itself does not carry any scientific instruments or tools. To carry out the scenario mentioned above, the MTR would have to locate and pick-up a TP with the associated manipulator. After the completion of the task the TP could be put away to a storage location enabling the rover to utilize a different Pack. The rover will not only offer mobility to these modules, but also use them as tools, transforming its role and functionality. The advantage of this approach is that instead of sending a large number of rovers to perform a variety of tasks, a smaller number of MTRs could be deployed with a large number of SPs/TPs, offering multiples of the functionality at a reduced payload. Two SPs or TPs (or a combination of) can be carried and deployed. One of the key elements in the design of the four wheeled rover, lies within its suspension system. It comprises a linear actuator located within each leg and also an active differential linking the two shoulders. This novel

  19. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Worrall, Andrew; Todosow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include:more » increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle

  20. Multiple D3-Instantons and Mock Modular Forms II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Banerjee, Sibasish; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2018-03-01

    We analyze the modular properties of D3-brane instanton corrections to the hypermultiplet moduli space in type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold. In Part I, we found a necessary condition for the existence of an isometric action of S-duality on this moduli space: the generating function of DT invariants in the large volume attractor chamber must be a vector-valued mock modular form with specified modular properties. In this work, we prove that this condition is also sufficient at two-instanton order. This is achieved by producing a holomorphic action of {SL(2,Z)} on the twistor space which preserves the holomorphic contact structure. The key step is to cancel the anomalous modular variation of the Darboux coordinates by a local holomorphic contact transformation, which is generated by a suitable indefinite theta series. For this purpose we introduce a new family of theta series of signature (2, n - 2), find their modular completion, and conjecture sufficient conditions for their convergence, which may be of independent mathematical interest.