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Sample records for a3243g mitochondrial dna

  1. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Weiduschat, Nora; Kaufmann, Petra; Mao, Xiangling; Engelstad, Kristin Marie; Hinton, Veronica; DiMauro, Salvatore; De Vivo, Darryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish cerebral metabolic features associated with the A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) and to assess their potential as prognostic biomarkers. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we investigated 135 clinically heterogeneous A3243G mutation carriers and 30 healthy volunteers (HVs) with 1H MRSI. Mutation carriers included 45 patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS); 11 participants who would develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (converters); and 79 participants who would not develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (nonconverters). The groups were compared with respect to MRSI metabolic indices of 1) anaerobic energy metabolism (lactate), 2) neuronal integrity (N-acetyl-l-aspartate [NAA]), 3) mitochondrial function (NAA; lactate), 4) cell energetics (total creatine), and 5) membrane biosynthesis and turnover (total choline [tCho]). Results: Consistent with prior studies, the patients with MELAS had higher lactate (p < 0.001) and lower NAA levels (p = 0.01) than HVs. Unexpectedly, converters showed higher NAA (p = 0.042), tCho (p = 0.004), and total creatine (p = 0.002), in addition to higher lactate levels (p = 0.032), compared with HVs. Compared with nonconverters, converters had higher tCho (p = 0.015). Clinically, converters and nonconverters did not differ at baseline. Lactate and tCho levels were reliable biomarkers for predicting the risk of individual mutation carriers to develop the MELAS phenotype. Conclusions: 1H MRSI assessment of cerebral metabolism in A3243G mutation carriers shows promise in identifying disease biomarkers as well as individuals at risk of developing the MELAS phenotype. PMID:24477106

  2. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of systemic redox states in patients carrying the MELAS A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Masamichi; Arakawa, Kenichiro; Hamano, Tadanori; Nagata, Miwako; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Kuriyama, Masaru; Koga, Yasutoshi; Yoneda, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the change of systemic redox states in patients carrying the A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA (A3243G), we evaluated oxidative stress and antioxidant activity in the serum of patients. Oxidative stress and antioxidant activity in the serum samples obtained from 14 patients carrying A3243G and from 34 healthy controls were analyzed using the diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests, respectively. The mean d-ROMs level of all patients was significantly greater than that of the controls (p < 0.005), and the mean BAP/d-ROMs ratio of all patients was significantly lower than that of the controls (p < 0.02). In the patients with a history of stroke-like episodes (n = 10), both mean d-ROMs and BAP levels were increased compared with those of the controls (both p < 0.01). The mean BAP level of the patients without a history of stroke-like episodes (n = 4) was significantly decreased compared with that of the controls (p < 0.001), but the mean d-ROMs levels were not significantly different. d-ROMs and BAP tests indicated that patients carrying A3243G are always exposed to underlying oxidative stress, even at a remission state of stroke-like episodes. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Valproic acid aggravates epilepsy due to MELAS in a patient with an A3243G mutation of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Thajeb, Peterus

    2007-03-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common presentations of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). MELAS is typically caused by an A-to-G substitution at nucleotide position 3243 of mitochondrial DNA. Valproic acid, a common anticonvulsant, can actually increase the frequency of seizures in individuals with MELAS. Here, we report a single case-study of a 38-year-old man who presented with focal seizures and had MELAS Syndrome due to the A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation. Manifestation of epilepsia partialis continua was aggravated by use of valproic acid. Convulsions abated after discontinuation of valproic acid. Our experience suggests that valproic acid should be avoided for the treatment of epilepsy in individuals with mitochondrial disease.

  5. A pilot study of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in a sample of Croatian patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Martin-Kleiner, I; Pape-Medvidović, E; Pavlić-Renar, I; Metelko, Z; Kusec, R; Gabrilovac, J; Boranić, M

    2004-12-01

    In this work, patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic mothers were tested for the presence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G. This mutation is associated with the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes), diabetes and deafness. Twenty-two diabetic persons were screened. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes and from swabs of oral mucosa. The mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G was detected using PCR-RFLP test. The mutation was detected in oral mucosal DNA of two patients (but not from lymphocyte DNA). One patient was a man with hearing and visual impairments and proteinuria; the other was a woman having proteinuria but no hearing impairment. The mutation was not detectable in oral mucosal DNA from the control persons: 20 diabetic patients having diabetic fathers and 22 healthy, nondiabetic volunteers. The incidence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in this study of Croatian diabetic patients is in line with data in the literature.

  6. [Diabetes mellitus associated with the mitochondrial mutation A3243G: frequency and clinical presentation].

    PubMed

    Salles, João Eduardo N; Kalinin, Larissa Bresgunov; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta G; Kasamatsu, Teresa; Moisés, Regina S

    2007-06-01

    Maternal inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) has been related to an A to G transition in the mitochondrial RNA Leu (UUR) at base pair 3243. The prevalence of MIDD in the diabetes population ranges between 0.5-3.0% depending on the ethnic background. To examine the frequency and clinical features of diabetes associated with this mutation in Brazilian patients with glucose intolerance. The study population comprised: 78 type 1 diabetic subjects (group I), 148 patients with type 2 diabetes (group II), 15 patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes and hearing loss (group III) and 492 Japanese Brazilians with varying degrees of glucose intolerance. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes and the A3243G mutation was determined by PCR amplification and Apa 1 digestion. In some individuals DNA was also extracted from buccal mucosa and hair follicles. The 3243 bp mutation was found in three individuals, all from group III, resulting in a prevalence of 0.4%. These subjects had an early age of diagnosis of diabetes, low or normal body mass index and requirement of insulin therapy. In conclusion MIDD is rare in our population and should be investigate in patients with diabetes and deafness.

  7. [Identification of an ideal noninvasive method to detect A3243G gene mutation in MELAS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-nan; Fang, Fang; Yang, Yan-ling; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Song-tao; Xu, Yu-feng; Pei, Pei; Yuan, Yun; Bu, Ding-fang; Qi, Yu

    2008-12-16

    To identify a better non-invasive method to detect the carrier of mitochondrial A3243G mutation, a cause of mitochondrial encephalopathy-lactic acidosis-stroke like episode (MELAS) syndrome. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood, urine, hair follicle, and saliva of 25 MELAS syndrome patients carrying A3243G mutation and their mothers and other maternal relatives, 33 persons in number, and the muscle tissues from 5 patients obtained by biopsy. A3243G mutation was detected by PCR-RFLP method, and the A3243G mutation ratio was identified by measuring the density of each band and calculation with the software AlphaEase 5.0. A3243G mutations were detected in all tissues of the 25 MELAS patients. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine was 62% +/- 9%, significantly higher than that in the blood [(36% +/- 10%), t = -11.13, P < 0.01]. A3243G mutations were detected in at least one tissue of the 28 maternal relatives. The A3243G mutation rates in their urine samples was 33.0% (5.0% - 70.4%), significantly higher than that in their blood samples [8.0% (0 - 33.3%), z = -4.197, P < 0.01]. There was no significant difference in A3243G mutation ratio among the samples of hair follicle, saliva, and blood. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine is significantly higher than those in blood samples of the patients and their maternal relatives. A noninvasive method, A3243G mutation ratio analysis of urine is superior to that in blood.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in diabetes mellitus patients in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suijun; Wu, Songhua; Zheng, Taishan; Yang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaojing; Jia, Weiping; Xiang, Kunsan

    2013-12-01

    Mutations of mitochondrial DNA are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). The present case-control study aimed to investigate the mutations of mitochondrial DNA in DM patients of Chinese Han ethnicity. A total of 770 DM patients and 309 healthy control individuals were enrolled. The mitochondrial DNA was extracted from blood cells and analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. In the diabetes group, there were 13 (1.69%) individuals carrying the mt3243 A → G mutation while none of the healthy control had this mutation. Though the 14709, 3316, 3394, and 12026 mutation variants were identified in 9, 17, 18 and 28 in DM patients respectively, there were no significant differences compared with control group. And the 3256, 8296, 8344, 8363, 3426 and 12258 mutations were not detected in either group. In the diabetes group, two double mutations were identified: A3243G+T3394C and A3243G+A12026G. Our data suggested that mitochondrial gene tRNA(Leu(UUR)) 3243 A → G mutation may be one risk of prevalence of DM and associated with worse clinical status in Chinese Han population. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitochondrial diabetes: molecular mechanisms and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Maassen, J Antonie; 'T Hart, Leen M; Van Essen, Einar; Heine, Rob J; Nijpels, Giel; Jahangir Tafrechi, Roshan S; Raap, Anton K; Janssen, George M C; Lemkes, Herman H P J

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) associate with various disease states. A few mtDNA mutations strongly associate with diabetes, with the most common mutation being the A3243G mutation in the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNA(Leu,UUR) gene. This article describes clinical characteristics of mitochondrial diabetes and its molecular diagnosis. Furthermore, it outlines recent developments in the pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms leading to a diabetic state. A gradual development of pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction upon aging, rather than insulin resistance, is the main mechanism in developing glucose intolerance. Carriers of the A3243G mutation show during a hyperglycemic clamp at 10 mmol/l glucose a marked reduction in first- and second-phase insulin secretion compared with noncarriers. The molecular mechanism by which the A3243G mutation affects insulin secretion may involve an attenuation of cytosolic ADP/ATP levels leading to a resetting of the glucose sensor in the pancreatic beta-cell, such as in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY)-2 patients with mutations in glucokinase. Unlike in MODY2, which is a nonprogressive form of diabetes, mitochondrial diabetes does show a pronounced age-dependent deterioration of pancreatic function indicating involvement of additional processes. Furthermore, one would expect that all mtDNA mutations that affect ATP synthesis lead to diabetes. This is in contrast to clinical observations. The origin of the age-dependent deterioration of pancreatic function in carriers of the A3243G mutation and the contribution of ATP and other mitochondrion-derived factors such as reactive oxygen species to the development of diabetes is discussed.

  10. Whole mitochondrial genome screening in maternally inherited non-syndromic hearing impairment using a microarray resequencing mitochondrial DNA chip.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Marianne; Marlin, Sandrine; Jonard, Laurence; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Baulande, Sylvain; Pierron, Denis; Lacombe, Didier; Duriez, Françoise; Francannet, Christine; Mom, Thierry; Journel, Hubert; Catros, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Faivre, Laurence; Duvillard, Christian; Couderc, Remy; Garabedian, Eréa-Noël; Petit, Christine; Feldmann, Delphine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss either as primary or as predisposing factors. As only a part of the mitochondrial genome is usually explored in deafness, its prevalence is probably under-estimated. Among 1350 families with non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss collected through a French collaborative network, we selected 29 large families with a clear maternal lineage and screened them for known mtDNA mutations in 12S rRNA, tRNASer(UCN) and tRNALeu(UUR) genes. When no mutation could be identified, a whole mitochondrial genome screening was performed, using a microarray resequencing chip: the MitoChip version 2.0 developed by Affymetrix Inc. Known mtDNA mutations was found in nine of the 29 families, which are described in the article: five with A1555G, two with the T7511C, one with 7472insC and one with A3243G mutation. In the remaining 20 families, the resequencing Mitochip detected 258 mitochondrial homoplasmic variants and 107 potentially heteroplasmic variants. Controls were made by direct sequencing on selected fragments and showed a high sensibility of the MitoChip but a low specificity, especially for heteroplasmic variations. An original analysis on the basis of species conservation, frequency and phylogenetic investigation was performed to select the more probably pathogenic variants. The entire genome analysis allowed us to identify five additional families with a putatively pathogenic mitochondrial variant: T669C, C1537T, G8078A, G12236A and G15077A. These results indicate that the new MitoChip platform is a rapid and valuable tool for identification of new mtDNA mutations in deafness.

  11. Animal Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Oliveira, Marcos T.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication highlight the diversity of both the mechanisms utilized and the structural and functional organization of the proteins at mtDNA replication fork, despite the simplicity of the animal mtDNA genome. DNA polymerase γ, mtDNA helicase and mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein- the key replisome proteins, have evolved distinct structural features and biochemical properties. These appear to be correlated with mtDNA genomic features in different metazoan taxa and with their modes of DNA replication, although a substantial integrative research is warranted to establish firmly these links. To date, several modes of mtDNA replication have been described for animals: rolling circle, theta, strand-displacement, and RITOLS/bootlace. Resolution of a continuing controversy relevant to mtDNA replication in mammals/vertebrates will have a direct impact on the mechanistic interpretation of mtDNA-related human diseases. Here we review these subjects, integrating earlier and recent data to provide a perspective on the major challenges for future research. PMID:27241933

  12. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gyanesh; Pachouri, U C; Khaidem, Devika Chanu; Kundu, Aman; Chopra, Chirag; Singh, Pushplata

    2015-01-01

    Various endogenous and environmental factors can cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage.  One of the reasons for enhanced mtDNA damage could be its proximity to the source of oxidants, and lack of histone-like protective proteins. Moreover, mitochondria contain inadequate DNA repair pathways, and, diminished DNA repair capacity may be one of the factors responsible for high mutation frequency of the mtDNA. mtDNA damage might cause impaired mitochondrial function, and, unrepaired mtDNA damage has been frequently linked with several diseases. Exploration of mitochondrial perspective of diseases might lead to a better understanding of several diseases, and will certainly open new avenues for detection, cure, and prevention of ailments.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh; Pachouri, U C; Khaidem, Devika Chanu; Kundu, Aman; Chopra, Chirag; Singh, Pushplata

    2015-01-01

    Various endogenous and environmental factors can cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage.  One of the reasons for enhanced mtDNA damage could be its proximity to the source of oxidants, and lack of histone-like protective proteins. Moreover, mitochondria contain inadequate DNA repair pathways, and, diminished DNA repair capacity may be one of the factors responsible for high mutation frequency of the mtDNA. mtDNA damage might cause impaired mitochondrial function, and, unrepaired mtDNA damage has been frequently linked with several diseases. Exploration of mitochondrial perspective of diseases might lead to a better understanding of several diseases, and will certainly open new avenues for detection, cure, and prevention of ailments. PMID:27508052

  15. AB036. Analysis of human mitochondrial genome mutations of Vietnamese patients tentatively diagnosed with encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nghia, Phan Tuan; Thai, Trinh Hong; Hue, Truong Thi; Van Minh, Nguyen; Khanh, Phung Bao; Hiep, Tran Duc; Anh, Tran Kieu; Loan, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van, Nguyen Thi Hong; Anh, Pham Van; Hung, Cao Vu; Anh, Le Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial genome consists of 16,569 bp, and replicates independently from the nuclear genome. Mutations in mitochondrial genome are usually causative factors of various metabolic disorders, especially those of encephalomyopathy. DNA analysis is the most reliable method for detection of mitochondrial genome mutations, and accordingly an excellent diagnostic tool for mitochondrial mutation-related diseases. In this study, 19 different mitochondrial genome mutations including A3243G, A3251G, T3271C and T3291C (MELAS); A8344G, T8356C and G8363A (MERRF); G3460A, G11778A and T14484C (LHON); T8993G/C and T9176G (Leigh); A1555G (deafness) and A4225G, G4298A, T10010C, T14727C, T14728C, T14709C (encephalomyopathy in general) were analyzed using PCR-RFLP in combination with DNA sequencing. In addition, a real-time PCR method using locked nucleic acid (LNA) Taqman probe was set up for heteroplasmy determination. Screening of 283 tentatively diagnosed encephalomyopathy patients revealed 7 cases of A3243G, 1 case of G11778A, 1 case of A1555G, 1 case of A4225G, 1 case G4298A, and 1 case of 6 bp (ACTCCT/CTCCTA) deletion. Using the LNA Taqman probe real-time PCR, the heteroplasmy of some point mutations was determined and the results support a potential relationship between heteroplasmy level and severity of the disease.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  18. When should MELAS (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes) be the diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo Soares; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a rare mitochondrial disorder. Diagnostic criteria for MELAS include typical manifestations of the disease: stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (laboratorial or histological) and known mitochondrial DNA gene mutations. Clinical features of MELAS are not necessarily uniform in the early stages of the disease, and correlations between clinical manifestations and physiopathology have not been fully elucidated. It is estimated that point mutations in the tRNALeu(UUR) gene of the DNAmt, mainly A3243G, are responsible for more of 80% of MELAS cases. Morphological changes seen upon muscle biopsy in MELAS include a substantive proportion of ragged red fibers (RRF) and the presence of vessels with a strong reaction for succinate dehydrogenase. In this review, we discuss mainly diagnostic criterion, clinical and laboratory manifestations, brain images, histology and molecular findings as well as some differential diagnoses and current treatments.

  19. DNA Precursor Metabolism and Mitochondrial Genome Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    mitochondrial DNA replication , to learn how the pool sizes are regulated, and to understand how perturbations of normal dNTP metabolism within the...mitochondria raises the possibility, however unlikely, that it is serving a function in addition to its role in DNA replication . The literature on non-DNA...is below since many authors do not follow the 200 word limit 14. SUBJECT TERMS Mitochondria, Genome stability, DNA precursors, Mitochondrial DNA

  20. Human mitochondrial DNA replication machinery and disease

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matthew J.; Copeland, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with key components of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication machinery. Defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide metabolism cause deletions, point mutations, or depletion of mtDNA. The resulting loss of cellular respiration ultimately induces mitochondrial genetic diseases, including mtDNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mtDNA deletion disorders such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. Here we review the current literature regarding human mtDNA replication and heritable disorders caused by genetic changes of the POLG, POLG2, Twinkle, RNASEH1, DNA2 and MGME1 genes. PMID:27065468

  1. Mitochondrial DNA evolution in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferris, S D; Sage, R D; Prager, E M; Ritte, U; Wilson, A C

    1983-11-01

    This study extends knowledge of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity in mice to include 208 animals belonging to eight species in the subgenus Mus. Highly purified mtDNA from each has been subjected to high-resolution restriction mapping with respect to the known sequence of one mouse mtDNA. Variation attributed to base substitutions was encountered at about 200 of the 300 cleavage sites examined, and a length mutation was located in or near the displacement loop. The variability of different functional regions in this genome was as follows, from least to most: ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, known proteins, displacement loop and unidentified reading frames. --Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the utility of the Sage and Marshall revision of mouse classification, according to which there are at least four species of commensal mice and three species of aboriginal mice in the complex that was formerly considered to be one species. The most thoroughly studied of these species is Mus domesticus, the house mouse of Western Europe and the Mediterranean region, which is the mitochondrial source of all 50 of the laboratory strains examined and of the representatives of wild house mice introduced by Europeans to North and South America during the past few hundred years. --The level of mtDNA variation among wild representatives of M. domesticus is similar to that for the Eastern European house mouse (M. musculus) and several other mammalian species. By contrast, among the many laboratory strains that are known or suspected to stem from the pet mouse trade, there is little interstrain variation, most strains having the "old inbred" type of domesticus mtDNA, whose frequency in the 145 wild mice examined is low, about 0.04. Also notable is the apparent homogeneity of mtDNA in domesticus races that have fixed six or more fused chromosomes and the close relationship of some of these mtDNAs to those of karyotypically normal mice. --In addition, this paper discusses fossil and other

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Evolution in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen D.; Sage, Richard D.; Prager, Ellen M.; Ritte, Uzi; Wilson, Allan C.

    1983-01-01

    This study extends knowledge of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity in mice to include 208 animals belonging to eight species in the subgenus Mus. Highly purified mtDNA from each has been subjected to high-resolution restriction mapping with respect to the known sequence of one mouse mtDNA. Variation attributed to base substitutions was encountered at about 200 of the 300 cleavage sites examined, and a length mutation was located in or near the displacement loop. The variability of different functional regions in this genome was as follows, from least to most: ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, known proteins, displacement loop and unidentified reading frames.—Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the utility of the Sage and Marshall revision of mouse classification, according to which there are at least four species of commensal mice and three species of aboriginal mice in the complex that was formerly considered to be one species. The most thoroughly studied of these species is Mus domesticus, the house mouse of Western Europe and the Mediterranean region, which is the mitochondrial source of all 50 of the laboratory strains examined and of the representatives of wild house mice introduced by Europeans to North and South America during the past few hundred years.—The level of mtDNA variation among wild representatives of (M. musculus) and several other mammalian species. By contrast, among the many laboratory strains that are known or suspected to stem from the pet mouse trade, there is little interstrain variation, most strains having the "old inbred" type of domesticus mtDNA, whose frequency in the 145 wild mice examined is low, about 0.04. Also notable is the apparent homogeneity of mtDNA in domesticus races that have fixed six or more fused chromosomes and the close relationship of some of these mtDNAs to those of karyotypically normal mice.—In addition, this paper discusses fossil and other evidence for the view that in mice, as in many other mammals, the average

  3. Inherited Mitochondrial Diseases of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial genetic diseases can result from defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the form of deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These mutations may be spontaneous, maternally inherited, or a result of inherited nuclear defects in genes that maintain mtDNA. This review focuses on our current understanding of nuclear gene mutations that produce mtDNA alterations and cause mitochondrial depletion syndrome (MDS), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). To date, all of these etiologic nuclear genes fall into one of two categories: genes whose products function directly at the mtDNA replication fork, such as POLG, POLG2, and TWINKLE, or genes whose products supply the mitochondria with deoxynucleotide triphosphate pools needed for DNA replication, such as TK2, DGUOK, TP, SUCLA2, ANT1, and possibly the newly identified MPV17. PMID:17892433

  4. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for a large group of inherited metabolic disorders most of which are due to a dysfunctional mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and, consequently, deficient energy production. MRC function depends on the coordinated expression of both nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes. Thus, mitochondrial diseases can be caused by genetic defects in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome, or in the cross-talk between the two. This impaired cross-talk gives rise to so-called nuclear-mitochondrial intergenomic communication disorders, which result in loss or instability of the mitochondrial genome and, in turn, impaired maintenance of qualitative and quantitative mtDNA integrity. In children, most MRC disorders are associated with nuclear gene defects rather than alterations in the mtDNA itself. The mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes (MDSs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders with an autosomal recessive pattern of transmission that have onset in infancy or early childhood and are characterized by a reduced number of copies of mtDNA in affected tissues and organs. The MDSs can be divided into least four clinical presentations: hepatocerebral, myopathic, encephalomyopathic and neurogastrointestinal. The focus of this review is to offer an overview of these syndromes, listing the clinical phenotypes, together with their relative frequency, mutational spectrum, and possible insights for improving diagnostic strategies. PMID:24708634

  5. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    PubMed

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA variants in obesity.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Nadja; Jarick, Ivonne; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Klingenspor, Martin; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Wiegand, Susanna; Biebermann, Heike; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Teumer, Alexander; Rosskopf, Dieter; Rimmbach, Christian; Schreiber, Stefan; Jacobs, Gunnar; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke

    2014-01-01

    Heritability estimates for body mass index (BMI) variation are high. For mothers and their offspring higher BMI correlations have been described than for fathers. Variation(s) in the exclusively maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might contribute to this parental effect. Thirty-two to 40 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were available from genome-wide association study SNP arrays (Affymetrix 6.0). For discovery, we analyzed association in a case-control (CC) sample of 1,158 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls. For independent confirmation, 7,014 population-based adults were analyzed as CC sample of n = 1,697 obese cases (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and n = 2,373 normal weight and lean controls (BMI<25 kg/m2). SNPs were analyzed as single SNPs and haplogroups determined by HaploGrep. Fisher's two-sided exact test was used for association testing. Moreover, the D-loop was re-sequenced (Sanger) in 192 extremely obese children and adolescents and 192 lean adult controls. Association testing of detected variants was performed using Fisher's two-sided exact test. For discovery, nominal association with obesity was found for the frequent allele G of m.8994G/A (rs28358887, p = 0.002) located in ATP6. Haplogroup W was nominally overrepresented in the controls (p = 0.039). These findings could not be confirmed independently. For two of the 252 identified D-loop variants nominal association was detected (m.16292C/T, p = 0.007, m.16189T/C, p = 0.048). Only eight controls carried the m.16292T allele, five of whom belonged to haplogroup W that was initially enriched among these controls. m.16189T/C might create an uninterrupted poly-C tract located near a regulatory element involved in replication of mtDNA. Though follow-up of some D-loop variants still is conceivable, our hypothesis of a contribution of variation in the exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA to the observed larger correlations for BMI between mothers and their

  7. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in Candida glabrata after mitochondrial transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwen; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2010-05-01

    Genetic manipulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the most direct method for investigating mtDNA, but until now, this has been achieved only in the diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, the ATP6 gene on mtDNA of the haploid yeast Candida glabrata (Torulopsis glabrata) was deleted by biolistic transformation of DNA fragments with a recoded ARG8(m) mitochondrial genetic marker, flanked by homologous arms to the ATP6 gene. Transformants were identified by arginine prototrophy. However, in the transformants, the original mtDNA was not lost spontaneously, even under arginine selective pressure. Moreover, the mtDNA transformants selectively lost the transformed mtDNA under aerobic conditions. The mtDNA heteroplasmy in the transformants was characterized by PCR, quantitative PCR, and Southern blotting, showing that the heteroplasmy was relatively stable in the absence of arginine. Aerobic conditions facilitated the loss of the original mtDNA, and anaerobic conditions favored loss of the transformed mtDNA. Moreover, detailed investigations showed that increases in reactive oxygen species in mitochondria lacking ATP6, along with their equal cell division, played important roles in determining the dynamics of heteroplasmy. Based on our analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy in C. glabrata, we were able to generate homoplasmic Deltaatp6 mtDNA strains.

  8. Future of human mitochondrial DNA editing technologies.

    PubMed

    Verechshagina, N; Nikitchina, N; Yamada, Y; Harashima, Н; Tanaka, M; Orishchenko, K; Mazunin, I

    2018-05-15

    ATP and other metabolites, which are necessary for the development, maintenance, and functioning of bodily cells are all synthesized in the mitochondria. Multiple copies of the genome, present within the mitochondria, together with its maternal inheritance, determine the clinical manifestation and spreading of mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The main obstacle in the way of thorough understanding of mitochondrial biology and the development of gene therapy methods for mitochondrial diseases is the absence of systems that allow to directly change mtDNA sequence. Here, we discuss existing methods of manipulating the level of mtDNA heteroplasmy, as well as the latest systems, that could be used in the future as tools for human mitochondrial genome editing.

  9. Large mitochondrial DNA deletion in an infant with addison disease.

    PubMed

    Duran, Gloria P; Martinez-Aguayo, A; Poggi, H; Lagos, M; Gutierrez, D; Harris, P R

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a group of disorders caused by mutations in nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA, usually involving multiple organ systems. Primary adrenal insufficiency due to mitochondrial disease is extremely infrequent and has been reported in association with mitochondrial DNA deletion syndromes such as Kearns-Sayre syndrome. To report a 3-year-old boy with Addison disease, congenital glaucoma, chronic pancreatitis, and mitochondrial myopathy due to large mitochondrial DNA deletion. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial DNA samples obtained from peripheral blood, oral mucosa, and muscle tissue. A novel large mitochondrial DNA deletion of 7,372bp was identified involving almost all genes on the big arch of mtDNA. This case reaffirms the association of adrenal insufficiency and mitochondrial DNA deletions and presents new evidence that glaucoma is another manifestation of mitochondrial diseases. Due to the genetic and clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial disorders, molecular analysis is crucial to confirm diagnosis and to allow accurate genetic counseling.

  10. Optimised detection of mitochondrial DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Rebecca; Crowther, Jonathan M; Bulsara, Pallav A; Wang, Xuying; Moore, David J; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2018-05-04

    Intrinsic and extrinsic factors that induce cellular oxidative stress damage tissue integrity and promote ageing, resulting in accumulative strand breaks to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. Limited repair mechanisms and close proximity to superoxide generation make mtDNA a prominent biomarker of oxidative damage. Using human DNA we describe an optimised long-range qPCR methodology that sensitively detects mtDNA strand breaks relative to a suite of short mitochondrial and nuclear DNA housekeeping amplicons, which control for any variation in mtDNA copy number. An application is demonstrated by detecting 16-36-fold mtDNA damage in human skin cells induced by hydrogen peroxide and solar simulated radiation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitochondrial Disorders of DNA Polymerase γ Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linsheng; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Wolff, Daynna J.

    2011-01-01

    Context Primary mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the most common causes of inherited disorders predominantly involving the neuromuscular system. Advances in the molecular study of mitochondrial DNA have changed our vision and our approach to primary mitochondrial disorders. Many of the mitochondrial disorders are caused by mutations in nuclear genes and are inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. Among the autosomal inherited mitochondrial disorders, those related to DNA polymerase γ dysfunction are the most common and the best studied. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and being familiar with the recent advances in laboratory diagnosis of this group of mitochondrial disorders are essential for pathologists to interpret abnormal histopathology and laboratory results and to suggest further studies for a definitive diagnosis. Objectives To help pathologists better understand the common clinical syndromes originating from mutations in DNA polymerase γ and its associated proteins and use the stepwise approach of clinical, laboratory, and pathologic diagnosis of these syndromes. Data Sources Review of pertinent published literature and relevant Internet databases. Conclusions Mitochondrial disorders are now better recognized with the development of molecular tests for clinical diagnosis. A cooperative effort among primary physicians, diagnostic pathologists, geneticists, and molecular biologists with expertise in mitochondrial disorders is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. PMID:21732785

  12. Role and Treatment of Mitochondrial DNA-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Sporadic Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Several sporadic neurodegenerative diseases display phenomena that directly or indirectly relate to mitochondrial function. Data suggesting altered mitochondrial function in these diseases could arise from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reviewed. Approaches for manipulating mitochondrial function and minimizing the downstream consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are discussed. PMID:21902672

  13. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases in mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Saada-Reisch, Ann

    2004-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of mitochondrial disorders, manifested by a decreased mtDNA copy number and respiratory chain dysfunction. Primary MDS are inherited autosomally and may affect a single organ or multiple tissues. Mutated mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside kinases; deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) and thymidine kinase 2 (TK2), were associated with the hepatocerebral and myopathic forms of MDS respectively. dGK and TK2 are key enzymes in the mitochondrial nucleotide salvage pathway, providing the mitochondria with deoxyribonucleotides (dNP) essential for mtDNA synthesis. Although the mitochondrial dNP pool is physically separated from the cytosolic one, dNP's may still be imported through specific transport. Non-replicating tissues, where cytosolic dNP supply is down regulated, are thus particularly vulnerable to dGK and TK2 deficiency. The overlapping substrate specificity of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) may explain the relative sparing of muscle in dGK deficiency, while low basal TK2 activity render this tissue susceptible to TK2 deficiency. The precise pathophysiological mechanisms of mtDNA depletion due to dGK and TK2 deficiencies remain to be determined, though recent findings confirm that it is attributed to imbalanced dNTP pools.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA repair and damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stein, Alexis; Sia, Elaine A

    2017-01-01

    The accurate maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is required in order for eukaryotic cells to assemble a functional electron transport chain. This independently-maintained genome relies on nuclear-encoded proteins that are imported into the mitochondria to carry out replication and repair processes. Decades of research has made clear that mitochondria employ robust and varied mtDNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms in order to ensure the proper maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. This review focuses on our current understanding of mtDNA repair and damage tolerance pathways including base excision repair, mismatch repair, homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, translesion synthesis and mtDNA degradation in both yeast and mammalian systems.

  15. Mitochondrial enteropathy: the primary pathology may not be within the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P; Jones, S; Sviland, L; Andrews, R; Parsons, T; Turnbull, D; Bindoff, L

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are an important cause of disease. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common in these patients, their pathogenesis remains uncertain.
AIM—To investigate the role of the mtDNA defect in the production of gastrointestinal dysfunction.
PATIENT—A 20 year old woman who presented at 15 years of age with recurrent vomiting and pseudo-obstruction, who did not respond to conservative management and ultimately had subtotal gastrectomy and Roux-en-y reconstruction. She subsequently presented with status epilepticus and was found to have a mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder due to a pathogenic mtDNA point mutation (A3243G).
METHODS—Resected bowel was studied using light and electron microscopy and mtDNA analysed from both mucosal and muscular layers using polymerase chain reaction generated RFLP analysis. 
RESULTS— Histological and electron microscopic studies revealed no morphological abnormalities in the resected stomach, and molecular genetic analysis failed to identify the genetic defect in either the mucosal or muscle layers.
CONCLUSION—This study suggests that in some individuals with gastrointestinal symptoms associated with established mitochondrial DNA disease, the primary pathology of the mitochondrial enteropathy lies outside the gastrointestinal tract.


Keywords: mitochondrial encephalomyopathy; cyclical vomiting; pseudo-obstruction PMID:11115833

  16. Targeted Transgenic Overexpression of Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase (TK2) Alters Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Mitochondrial Polypeptide Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed H.; Kohler, James J.; Haase, Chad P.; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-γ. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:17322372

  17. Mitochondrial DNA diagnosis for taeniasis and cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Nakao, Minoru; Sako, Yasuhito; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Sato, Marcello Otake; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Molecular diagnosis for taeniasis and cysticercosis in humans on the basis of mitochondrial DNA analysis was reviewed. Development and application of three different methods, including restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, base excision sequence scanning thymine-base analysis and multiplex PCR, were described. Moreover, molecular diagnosis of cysticerci found in specimens submitted for histopathology and the molecular detection of taeniasis using copro-DNA were discussed.

  18. [Morphological signs of mitochondrial cytopathy in skeletal muscles and micro-vessel walls in a patient with cerebral artery dissection associated with MELAS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sakharova, A V; Kalashnikova, L A; Chaĭkovskaia, R P; Mir-Kasimov, M F; Nazarova, M A; Pykhtina, T N; Dobrynina, L A; Patrusheva, N L; Patrushev, L I; Protskiĭ, S V

    2012-01-01

    Skin and muscles biopsy specimens of a patient harboring A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA, with dissection of internal carotid and vertebral arteries, associated with MELAS were studied using histochemical and electron-microscopy techniques. Ragged red fibers, regional variability of SDH histochemical reaction, two types of morphologically atypical mitochondria and their aggregation were found in muscle. There was correlation between SDH histochemical staining and number of mitochondria revealed by electron microscopy in muscle tissue. Similar mitochondrial abnormality, their distribution and cell lesions followed by extra-cellular matrix mineralization were found in the blood vessel walls. In line with generalization of cytopathy process caused by gene mutation it can be supposed that changes found in skin and muscle microvessels also exist in large cerebral vessels causing the vessel wall "weakness", predisposing them to dissection.

  19. Epigenetics, epidemiology and mitochondrial DNA diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick F; Elliott, Hannah R; Hudson, Gavin; Samuels, David C; Relton, Caroline L

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has emerged as a major cause of inherited human disease. The disorders present clinically in at least 1 in 10 000 adults, but pathogenic mutations are found in approximately 1 in 200 of the background population. Mitochondrial DNA is maternally inherited and there can be marked phenotypic variability within the same family. Heteroplasmy is a significant factor and environmental toxins also appear to modulate the phenotype. Although genetic and biochemical studies have provided part of the explanation, a comprehensive understanding of the incomplete penetrance of these diseases is lacking—both at the population and family levels. Here, we review the potential role of epigenetic factors in the pathogenesis of mtDNA diseases and the contribution that epidemiological approaches can make to improve our understanding in this area. Despite being previously dismissed, there is an emerging evidence that mitochondria contain the machinery required to epigenetically modify mtDNA expression. In addition, the increased production of reactive oxygen species seen in several mtDNA diseases could lead to the epigenetic modification of the nuclear genome, including chromatin remodelling and alterations to DNA methylation and microRNA expression, thus contributing to the diverse pathophysiology observed in this group of diseases. These observations open the door to future studies investigating the role of mtDNA methylation in human disease. PMID:22287136

  20. Heterologous mitochondrial DNA recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    D'Aurelio, Marilena; Gajewski, Carl D; Lin, Michael T; Mauck, William M; Shao, Leon Z; Lenaz, Giorgio; Moraes, Carlos T; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2004-12-15

    Inter-molecular heterologous mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination is known to occur in yeast and plants. Nevertheless, its occurrence in human cells is still controversial. To address this issue we have fused two human cytoplasmic hybrid cell lines, each containing a distinct pathogenic mtDNA mutation and specific sets of genetic markers. In this hybrid model, we found direct evidence of recombination between these two mtDNA haplotypes. Recombinant mtDNA molecules in the hybrid cells were identified using three independent experimental approaches. First, recombinant molecules containing genetic markers from both parental alleles were demonstrated with restriction fragment length polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction products, by measuring the relative frequencies of each marker. Second, fragments of recombinant mtDNA were cloned and sequenced to identify the regions involved in the recombination events. Finally, recombinant molecules were demonstrated directly by Southern blot using appropriate combinations of polymorphic restriction sites and probes. This combined approach confirmed the existence of heterogeneous species of recombinant mtDNA molecules in the hybrid cells. These findings have important implications for mtDNA-related diseases, the interpretation of human evolution and population genetics and forensic analyses based on mtDNA genotyping.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA alteration in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lacedonia, Donato; Carpagnano, Giovanna E; Crisetti, Elisabetta; Cotugno, Grazia; Palladino, Grazia P; Patricelli, Giulia; Sabato, Roberto; Foschino Barbaro, Maria P

    2015-04-07

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSAS) is a disease associated with the increase of cardiovascular risk and it is characterized by repeated episodes of Intermittent Hypoxia (IH) which inducing oxidative stress and systemic inflammation. Mitochondria are cell organelles involved in the respiratory that have their own DNA (MtDNA). The aim of this study was to investigate if the increase of oxidative stress in OSAS patients can induce also MtDNA alterations. 46 OSAS patients (age 59.27 ± 11.38; BMI 30.84 ± 3.64; AHI 36.63 ± 24.18) were compared with 36 control subjects (age 54.42 ± 6.63; BMI 29.06 ± 4.7; AHI 3.8 ± 1.10). In blood cells Content of MtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA) was measured in OSAS patients by Real Time PCR. The ratio between MtDNA/nDNA was then calculated. Presence of oxidative stress was evaluated by levels of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (ROMs), measured by diacron reactive oxygen metabolite test (d-ROM test). MtDNA/nDNA was higher in patients with OSAS than in the control group (150.94 ± 49.14 vs 128.96 ± 45.8; p = 0.04), the levels of ROMs were also higher in OSAS subjects (329.71 ± 70.17 vs 226 ± 36.76; p = 0.04) and they were positively correlated with MtDNA/nDNA (R = 0.5, p < 0.01). In OSAS patients there is a Mitochondrial DNA damage induced by the increase of oxidative stress. Intermittent hypoxia seems to be the main mechanism which leads to this process.

  2. Assignment of two mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides to human mitochondrial DNA and their use in the study of intracellular mitochondrial interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, N A; Wallace, D C

    1982-01-01

    Two mitochondrially synthesized marker polypeptides, MV-1 and MV-2, were found in human HeLa and HT1080 cells. These were assigned to the mitochondrial DNA in HeLa-HT1080 cybrids and hybrids by demonstrating their linkage to cytoplasmic genetic markers. These markers include mitochondrial DNA restriction site polymorphisms and resistance to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. In the absence of chloramphenicol, the expression of MV-1 and MV-2 in cybrids and hybrids was found to be directly proportional to the ratio of the parental mitochondrial DNAs. In the presence of chloramphenicol, the marker polypeptide linked to the chloramphenicol-sensitive mitochondrial DNA continued to be expressed. This demonstrated that resistant and sensitive mitochondrial DNAs can cooperate within a cell for gene expression and that the CAP-resistant allele was dominant or codominant to sensitive. Such cooperation suggests that mitochondrial DNAs can be exchanged between mitochondria. Images PMID:6955589

  3. Mitochondrial DNA perspective of Serbian genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Slobodan; Malyarchuk, Boris; Aleksic, Jelena M; Derenko, Miroslava; Topalovic, Vladanka; Litvinov, Andrey; Stevanovic, Milena; Kovacevic-Grujicic, Natasa

    2015-03-01

    Although south-Slavic populations have been studied to date from various aspects, the population of Serbia, occupying the central part of the Balkan Peninsula, is still genetically understudied at least at the level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation. We analyzed polymorphisms of the first and the second mtDNA hypervariable segments (HVS-I and HVS-II) and informative coding-region markers in 139 Serbians to shed more light on their mtDNA variability, and used available data on other Slavic and neighboring non-Slavic populations to assess their interrelations in a broader European context. The contemporary Serbian mtDNA profile is consistent with the general European maternal landscape having a substantial proportion of shared haplotypes with eastern, central, and southern European populations. Serbian population was characterized as an important link between easternmost and westernmost south-Slavic populations due to the observed lack of genetic differentiation with all other south-Slavic populations and its geographical positioning within the Balkan Peninsula. An increased heterogeneity of south Slavs, most likely mirroring turbulent demographic events within the Balkan Peninsula over time (i.e., frequent admixture and differential introgression of various gene pools), and a marked geographical stratification of Slavs to south-, east-, and west-Slavic groups, were also found. A phylogeographic analyses of 20 completely sequenced Serbian mitochondrial genomes revealed not only the presence of mtDNA lineages predominantly found within the Slavic gene pool (U4a2a*, U4a2a1, U4a2c, U4a2g, HV10), supporting a common Slavic origin, but also lineages that may have originated within the southern Europe (H5*, H5e1, H5a1v) and the Balkan Peninsula in particular (H6a2b and L2a1k). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Targeted transgenic overexpression of mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) alters mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial polypeptide abundance: transgenic TK2, mtDNA, and antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed H; Kohler, James J; Haase, Chad P; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-gamma. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity.

  5. Role of the mitochondrial DNA replication machinery in mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis, aging and age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    DeBalsi, Karen L.; Hoff, Kirsten E.; Copeland, William C.

    2016-01-01

    As regulators of bioenergetics in the cell and the primary source of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), dysfunctional mitochondria have been implicated for decades in the process of aging and age-related diseases. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated and repaired by nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) and several other associated proteins, which compose the mtDNA replication machinery. Here, we review evidence that errors caused by this replication machinery and failure to repair these mtDNA errors results in mtDNA mutations. Clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations results in mitochondrial dysfunction, such as decreased electron transport chain (ETC) enzyme activity and impaired cellular respiration. We address the literature that mitochondrial dysfunction, in conjunction with altered mitochondrial dynamics, is a major driving force behind aging and age-related diseases. Additionally, interventions to improve mitochondrial function and attenuate the symptoms of aging are examined. PMID:27143693

  6. Acceptance of Domestic Cat Mitochondrial DNA in a Criminal Proceeding

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Leslie A.; Grahn, Robert A.; Kun, Teri J.; Netzel, Linda R.; Wictum, Elizabeth E.; Halverson, Joy L.

    2014-01-01

    Shed hair from domestic animals readily adheres to clothing and other contact items, providing a source of transfer evidence for criminal investigations. Mitochondrial DNA is often the only option for DNA analysis of shed hair. Human mitochondrial DNA analysis has been accepted in the US court system since 1996. The murder trial of the State of Missouri versus Henry L. Polk, Jr. represents the first legal proceeding where cat mitochondrial DNA analysis was introduced into evidence. The mitochondrial DNA evidence was initially considered inadmissible due to concerns about the cat dataset and the scientific acceptance of the marker. Those concerns were subsequently addressed, and the evidence was deemed admissible. This report reviews the case in regards to the cat biological evidence and its ultimate admission as generally accepted and reliable. Expansion and saturation analysis of the cat mitochondrial DNA control region dataset supported the initial interpretation of the evidence. PMID:25086413

  7. Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gaidutšik, Ilja; Sedman, Tiina; Sillamaa, Sirelin; Sedman, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cellular energy metabolism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of nuclear genes influence the stability of mitochondrial genome; however, most corresponding gene products act indirectly and the actual molecular mechanisms of mtDNA inheritance remain poorly characterized. Recently, we found that a Superfamily II helicase Irc3 is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. Here we show that Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme. Irc3 modulates mtDNA metabolic intermediates by preferential binding and unwinding Holliday junctions and replication fork structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the loss of Irc3 can be complemented with mitochondrially targeted RecG of Escherichia coli. We suggest that Irc3 could support the stability of mtDNA by stimulating fork regression and branch migration or by inhibiting the formation of irregular branched molecules. PMID:27194389

  8. Mitochondrial DNA: impacting central and peripheral nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Because of their high-energy metabolism, neurons are highly dependent on mitochondria, which generate cellular ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. The mitochondrial genome encodes for critical components of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway machinery, and therefore mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause energy production defects that frequently have severe neurological manifestations. Here, we review the principles of mitochondrial genetics and focus on prototypical mitochondrial diseases to illustrate how primary defects in mtDNA or secondary defects in mtDNA due to nuclear genome mutations can cause prominent neurological and multisystem features. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying mitochondrial diseases, the cellular mechanisms that protect mitochondrial integrity, and the prospects for therapy. PMID:25521375

  9. Recombination of mitochondrial DNA in skeletal muscle of individuals with multiple mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy.

    PubMed

    Zsurka, Gábor; Kraytsberg, Yevgenia; Kudina, Tatiana; Kornblum, Cornelia; Elger, Christian E; Khrapko, Konstantin; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2005-08-01

    Experimental evidence for human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination was recently obtained in an individual with paternal inheritance of mtDNA and in an in vitro cell culture system. Whether mtDNA recombination is a common event in humans remained to be determined. To detect mtDNA recombination in human skeletal muscle, we analyzed the distribution of alleles in individuals with multiple mtDNA heteroplasmy using single-cell PCR and allele-specific PCR. In all ten individuals who carried a heteroplasmic D-loop mutation and a distantly located tRNA point mutation or a large deletion, we observed a mixture of four allelic combinations (tetraplasmy), a hallmark of recombination. Twelve of 14 individuals with closely located heteroplasmic D-loop mutation pairs contained a mixture of only three types of mitochondrial genomes (triplasmy), consistent with the absence of recombination between adjacent markers. These findings indicate that mtDNA recombination is common in human skeletal muscle.

  10. Defects in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated by the DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Nucleotide precursors for mtDNA replication arise from the mitochondrial salvage pathway originating from transport of nucleosides, or alternatively from cytoplasmic reduction of ribonucleotides. Defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mtDNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mtDNA depletion syndromes (MDS) such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mtDNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mtDNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2) and nucleotide metabolism (TYMP, TK2, DGOUK, and RRM2B) that cause instability of mtDNA and mitochondrial disease. PMID:22176657

  11. Beta-cell function in individuals carrying the mitochondrial tRNA leu (UUR) mutation.

    PubMed

    Salles, João Eduardo; Kasamatsu, Teresa S; Dib, Sérgio A; Moisés, Regina S

    2007-01-01

    To assess the beta-cell function in individuals with mitochondrial DNA A3243G mutation with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or diabetes mellitus (DM). Furthermore, in diabetic individuals, we evaluated the effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on insulin secretory response. Eight mutation-positive individuals with NGT (n = 4) or DM (n = 4) were studied. beta-Cell function was evaluated by C-peptide levels before and after a mixed liquid meal (Sustacal) challenge and by first-phase insulin response. Fasting and Sustacal-stimulated C-peptide levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients than that in controls (area under the curve: 104.1 +/- 75.7 vs 520.8 +/- 173.8, P = 0.001), whereas in individuals with NGT, this response was preserved (area under the curve: 537.8 +/- 74.3 vs 520.8 +/- 179.8, P = 0.87). The duration of diabetes was negatively correlated with fasting C-peptide levels (r = -0.961, P = 0.038). Among the 3 patients with residual insulin secretion, the short-term treatment with coenzyme Q10 (3 months) improved C-peptide levels in 2 of them. The first-phase insulin response was diminished in 2 individuals with NGT, the oldest ones. We showed an impaired insulin secretory capacity in individuals carrying the A3243G mutation, this possibly being the primary defect contributing to the development of DM. In addition, our data suggest that this could be a functional defect.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Induces Early Renal Mitochondrial DNA Repair and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Raquel R.; Fu, Ping; Suliman, Hagir B.; Crowley, Stephen D.; MacGarvey, Nancy Chou; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control), 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection. PMID:24988481

  13. DNA repair pathways and mitochondrial DNA mutations in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basso, Daniela; Navaglia, Filippo; Fogar, Paola; Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Greco, Eliana; Schiavon, Stefania; Fasolo, Michela; Stranges, Alessia; Falda, Alessandra; Padoan, Andrea; Fadi, Elisa; Pedrazzoli, Sergio; Plebani, Mario

    2007-05-01

    This work focuses on the main DNA repair pathways, highlighting their role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis and the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), mutations being described in several tumor types, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. The mismatch repair (MMR) system is inherently altered in patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, and plays a role in carcinogenesis in a subset of sporadic colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers. Alterations in homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) also contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer. Gene polymorphisms of some X-ray cross-complementing (XRCCs), cofactor proteins involved in the base excision repair pathway, have been investigated in relation to gastric, colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Yet only one polymorphism, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, appears to be involved in smoking-related cancers and in early onset pancreatic cancer. Although evidence in the literature indicates that mtDNA somatic mutations play a role in gastric and colorectal carcinogenesis, no sound conclusions have yet been drawn regarding this issue in pancreatic cancer, although an mtDNA variant at 16519 is believed to worsen the outcome of pancreatic cancer patients, possibly because it is involved in altering cellular metabolism.

  14. Dysregulation of mitochondrial calcium signaling and superoxide flashes cause mitochondrial genomic DNA damage in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Chen, Qian; Wang, Xianhua; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Wang, Yun; Cheng, He-Ping; Guo, Caixia; Sun, Qinmiao; Chen, Quan; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2013-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. Indications of oxidative stress are apparent in brain tissues from both HD patients and HD mouse models; however, the origin of this oxidant stress remains a mystery. Here, we used a yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128) to investigate the potential connections between dysregulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and mitochondrial oxidative damage in HD cells. We found that YAC128 mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit a strikingly higher level of mitochondrial matrix Ca(2+) loading and elevated superoxide generation compared with WT cells, indicating that both mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling and superoxide generation are dysregulated in HD cells. The excessive mitochondrial oxidant stress is critically dependent on mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading in HD cells, because blocking mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake abolished elevated superoxide generation. Similar results were obtained using neurons from HD model mice and fibroblast cells from HD patients. More importantly, mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading in HD cells caused a 2-fold higher level of mitochondrial genomic DNA (mtDNA) damage due to the excessive oxidant generation. This study provides strong evidence to support a new causal link between dysregulated mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling, elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress, and mtDNA damage in HD. Our results also indicate that reducing mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake could be a therapeutic strategy for HD.

  15. Inflexibility of AMPK-mediated metabolic reprogramming in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Kao, Shu-Huei; Ho, Che-Sheng; Wei, Yau-Huei; Hung, Pi-Lien; Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Wu, Tsu-Yen; Wang, Tuan-Jen; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Ming-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is most commonly caused by the A3243G mutation of mitochondrial DNA. The capacity to utilize fatty acid or glucose as a fuel source and how such dynamic switches of metabolic fuel preferences and transcriptional modulation of adaptive mechanism in response to energy deficiency in MELAS syndrome have not been fully elucidated. The fibroblasts from patients with MELAS syndrome demonstrated a remarkable deficiency of electron transport chain complexes I and IV, an impaired cellular biogenesis under glucose deprivation, and a decreased ATP synthesis. In situ analysis of the bioenergetic properties of MELAS cells demonstrated an attenuated fatty acid oxidation that concomitantly occurred with impaired mitochondrial respiration, while energy production was mostly dependent on glycolysis. Furthermore, the transcriptional modulation was mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway, which activated its downstream modulators leading to a subsequent increase in glycolytic flux through activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In contrast, the activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferase for fatty acid oxidation and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 for fatty acid synthesis were reduced and transcriptional regulation factors for biogenesis were not altered. These results provide novel information that MELAS cells lack the adaptive mechanism to switch fuel source from glucose to fatty acid, as glycolysis rates increase in response to energy deficiency. The aberrant secondary cellular responses to disrupted metabolic homeostasis mediated by AMPK signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the clinical phenotype. PMID:29088732

  16. Mitochondrial DNA recombination in a free-ranging Australian lizard.

    PubMed

    Ujvari, Beata; Dowton, Mark; Madsen, Thomas

    2007-04-22

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the traditional workhorse for reconstructing evolutionary events. The frequent use of mtDNA in such analyses derives from the apparent simplicity of its inheritance: maternal and lacking bi-parental recombination. However, in hybrid zones, the reproductive barriers are often not completely developed, resulting in the breakdown of male mitochondrial elimination mechanisms, leading to leakage of paternal mitochondria and transient heteroplasmy, resulting in an increased possibility of recombination. Despite the widespread occurrence of heteroplasmy and the presence of the molecular machinery necessary for recombination, we know of no documented example of recombination of mtDNA in any terrestrial wild vertebrate population. By sequencing the entire mitochondrial genome (16761bp), we present evidence for mitochondrial recombination in the hybrid zone of two mitochondrial haplotypes in the Australian frillneck lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii).

  17. Mitochondrial fusion increases the mitochondrial DNA copy number in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Hori, Akiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Ling, Feng

    2011-05-01

    Mitochondrial fusion plays an important role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In budding yeast, certain levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote recombination-mediated mtDNA replication, and mtDNA maintenance depends on the homologous DNA pairing protein Mhr1. Here, we show that the fusion of isolated yeast mitochondria, which can be monitored by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation-derived green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence, increases the mtDNA copy number in a manner dependent on Mhr1. The fusion event, accompanied by the degradation of dissociated electron transport chain complex IV and transient reductions in the complex IV subunits by the inner membrane AAA proteases such as Yme1, increases ROS levels. Analysis of the initial stage of mitochondrial fusion in early log-phase cells produced similar results. Moreover, higher ROS levels in mitochondrial fusion-deficient mutant cells increased the amount of newly synthesized mtDNA, resulting in increases in the mtDNA copy number. In contrast, reducing ROS levels in yme1 null mutant cells significantly decreased the mtDNA copy number, leading to an increase in cells lacking mtDNA. Our results indicate that mitochondrial fusion induces mtDNA synthesis by facilitating ROS-triggered, recombination-mediated replication and thereby prevents the generation of mitochondria lacking DNA. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Proteomic Dissection of the Mitochondrial DNA Metabolism Apparatus in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    SAlly A. Mackenzie

    2004-01-06

    This study involves the investigation of nuclear genetic components that regulate mitochondrial genome behavior in higher plants. The approach utilizes the advanced plant model system of Arabidopsis thaliana to identify and functionally characterize multiple components of the mitochondrial DNA replication, recombination and mismatch repair system and their interaction partners. The rationale for the research stems from the central importance of mitochondria to overall cellular metabolism and the essential nature of the mitochondrial genome to mitochondrial function. Relatively little is understood about mitochondrial DNA maintenance and transmission in higher eukaryotes, and the higher plant mitochondrial genome displays unique properties and behavior.more » This investigation has revealed at least three important properties of plant mitochondrial DNA metabolism components. (1) Many are dual targeted to mitochondrial and chloroplasts by novel mechanisms, suggesting that the mitochondria a nd chloroplast share their genome maintenance apparatus. (2)The MSH1 gene, originating as a component of mismatch repair, has evolved uniquely in plants to participate in differential replication of the mitochondrial genome. (3) This mitochondrial differential replication process, termed substoichiometric shifting and also involving a RecA-related gene, appears to represent an adaptive mechanism to expand plant reproductive capacity and is likely present throughout the plant kingdom.« less

  19. Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of inherited and somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Eric A.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial genome are known to cause an array of diverse disorders, most of which are maternally inherited, and all of which are associated with defects in oxidative energy metabolism. It is now emerging that somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are also linked to other complex traits, including neurodegenerative diseases, ageing and cancer. Here we discuss insights into the roles of mtDNA mutations in a wide variety of diseases, highlighting the interesting genetic characteristics of the mitochondrial genome and challenges in studying its contribution to pathogenesis. PMID:23154810

  20. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of the Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼ 1.2-1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼ 0.5-2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼ 1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance.

  1. Sephardic signature in haplogroup T mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Felice L

    2012-01-01

    A rare combination of mutations within mitochondrial DNA subhaplogroup T2e is identified as affiliated with Sephardic Jews, a group that has received relatively little attention. Four investigations were pursued: Search of the motif in 250 000 control region records across 8 databases, comparison of frequencies of T subhaplogroups (T1, T2b, T2c, T2e, T4, T*) across 11 diverse populations, creation of a phylogenic median-joining network from public T2e control region entries, and analysis of one Sephardic mitochondrial full genomic sequence with the motif. It was found that the rare motif belonged only to Sephardic descendents (Turkey, Bulgaria), to inhabitants of North American regions known for secret Spanish–Jewish colonization, or were consistent with Sephardic ancestry. The incidence of subhaplogroup T2e decreased from the Western Arabian Peninsula to Italy to Spain and into Western Europe. The ratio of sister subhaplogroups T2e to T2b was found to vary 40-fold across populations from a low in the British Isles to a high in Saudi Arabia with the ratio in Sephardim more similar to Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Italy than to hosts Spain and Portugal. Coding region mutations of 2308G and 14499T may locate the Sephardic signature within T2e, but additional samples and reworking of current T2e phylogenetic branch structure is needed. The Sephardic Turkish community has a less pronounced founder effect than some Ashkenazi groups considered singly (eg, Polish), but other comparisons of interest await comparable averaging. Registries of signatures will benefit the study of populations with a large number of smaller-size founders. PMID:22108605

  2. Mitochondrial DNA depletion by ethidium bromide decreases neuronal mitochondrial creatine kinase: Implications for striatal energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Warren, Emily Booth; Aicher, Aidan Edward; Fessel, Joshua Patrick; Konradi, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the discrete genome which encodes subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is present at highly variable copy numbers across cell types. Though severe mtDNA depletion dramatically reduces mitochondrial function, the impact of tissue-specific mtDNA reduction remains debated. Previously, our lab identified reduced mtDNA quantity in the putamen of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients who had developed L-DOPA Induced Dyskinesia (LID), compared to PD patients who had not developed LID and healthy subjects. Here, we present the consequences of mtDNA depletion by ethidium bromide (EtBr) treatment on the bioenergetic function of primary cultured neurons, astrocytes and neuron-enriched cocultures from rat striatum. We report that EtBr inhibition of mtDNA replication and transcription consistently reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and that neurons are significantly more sensitive to EtBr than astrocytes. EtBr also increases glycolytic activity in astrocytes, whereas in neurons it reduces the expression of mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA and levels of phosphocreatine. Further, we show that mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA is similarly downregulated in dyskinetic PD patients, compared to both non-dyskinetic PD patients and healthy subjects. Our data support a hypothesis that reduced striatal mtDNA contributes to energetic dysregulation in the dyskinetic striatum by destabilizing the energy buffering system of the phosphocreatine/creatine shuttle.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA levels in Huntington disease leukocytes and dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jędrak, Paulina; Krygier, Magdalena; Tońska, Katarzyna; Drozd, Małgorzata; Kaliszewska, Magdalena; Bartnik, Ewa; Sołtan, Witold; Sitek, Emilia J; Stanisławska-Sachadyn, Anna; Limon, Janusz; Sławek, Jarosław; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Barańska, Sylwia

    2017-08-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the huntingtin gene. Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions in, and especially influence of the level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) on, development of this disease is unclear. Here, samples of blood from 84 HD patients and 79 controls, and dermal fibroblasts from 10 HD patients and 9 controls were analysed for mtDNA levels. Although the type of mitochondrial haplogroup had no influence on the mtDNA level, and there was no correlation between mtDNA level in leukocytes in HD patients and various parameters of HD severity, some considerable differences between HD patients and controls were identified. The average mtDNA/nDNA relative copy number was significantly higher in leukocytes, but lower in fibroblasts, of symptomatic HD patients relative to the control group. Moreover, HD women displayed higher mtDNA levels in leukocytes than HD men. Because this is the largest population analysed to date, these results might contribute to explanation of discrepancies between previously published studies concerning levels of mtDNA in cells of HD patients. We suggest that the size of the investigated population and type of cells from which DNA is isolated could significantly affect results of mtDNA copy number estimation in HD. Hence, these parameters should be taken into consideration in studies on mtDNA in HD, and perhaps also in other diseases where mitochondrial dysfunction occurs.

  4. Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA as relevant targets for environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Roubicek, Deborah A; Souza-Pinto, Nadja C de

    2017-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a closed circular molecule that encodes, in humans, 13 polypeptides components of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Integrity of the mitochondrial genome is essential for mitochondrial function and cellular homeostasis, and mutations and deletions in the mtDNA lead to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. In vitro and in situ studies suggest that when exposed to certain genotoxins, mtDNA accumulates more damage than nuclear DNA, likely owing to its organization and localization in the mitochondrial matrix, which tends to accumulate lipophilic, positively charged molecules. In that regard, several relevant environmental and occupational contaminants have physical-chemical characteristics that indicate that they might accumulate in mitochondria and target mtDNA. Nonetheless, very little is known so far about mtDNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction due to environmental exposure, either in model organisms or in humans. In this article, we discuss some of the characteristics of mtDNA which render it a potentially relevant target for damage by environmental contaminants, as well as possible functional consequences of damage/mutation accumulation. In addition, we review the data available in the literature focusing on mitochondrial effects of the most common classes of environmental pollutants. From that, we conclude that several lines of experimental evidence support the idea that mitochondria and mtDNA are susceptible and biologically relevant targets for pollutants, and more studies, including mechanistic ones, are needed to shed more light into the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to the environmental and human health effects of chemical exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Peripheral neuropathy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial diseases: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Luigetti, M; Sauchelli, D; Primiano, G; Cuccagna, C; Bernardo, D; Lo Monaco, M; Servidei, S

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy in mitochondrial diseases (MDs) may vary from a subclinical finding in a multisystem syndrome to a severe, even isolated, manifestation in some patients. To investigate the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in MDs extensive electrophysiological studies were performed in 109 patients with morphological, biochemical and genetic diagnosis of MD [12 A3243G progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO)/mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), 16 myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF), four mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), 67 PEO with single or multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA, 10 others]. A neuropathy was found in 49 patients (45%). The incidence was very high in MNGIE (100%), MELAS (92%) and MERRF (69%), whilst 28% of PEO patients had evidence of peripheral involvement. The most frequent abnormality was a sensory axonal neuropathy found in 32/49 patients (65%). A sensory-motor axonal neuropathy was instead detected in 16% of the patients and sensory-motor axonal demyelinating neuropathy in 16%. Finally one Leigh patient had a motor axonal neuropathy. It is interesting to note that the great majority had preserved tendon reflexes and no sensory disturbances. In conclusion, peripheral involvement in MD is frequent even if often mild or asymptomatic. The correct identification and characterization of peripheral neuropathy through electrophysiological studies represents another tile in the challenge of MD diagnosis. © 2016 EAN.

  6. Global Genetic Determinants of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hengshan; Singh, Keshav K.

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases including development of cancer is associated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content. These diseases are collectively described as mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS). High similarity between yeast and human mitochondria allows genomic study of the budding yeast to be used to identify human disease genes. In this study, we systematically screened the pre-existing respiratory-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains using fluorescent microscopy and identified 102 nuclear genes whose deletions result in a complete mtDNA loss, of which 52 are not reported previously. Strikingly, these genes mainly encode protein products involved in mitochondrial protein biosynthesis process (54.9%). The rest of these genes either encode protein products associated with nucleic acid metabolism (14.7%), oxidative phosphorylation (3.9%), or other protein products (13.7%) responsible for bud-site selection, mitochondrial intermembrane space protein import, assembly of cytochrome-c oxidase, vacuolar protein sorting, protein-nucleus import, calcium-mediated signaling, heme biosynthesis and iron homeostasis. Thirteen (12.7%) of the genes encode proteins of unknown function. We identified human orthologs of these genes, conducted the interaction between the gene products and linked them to human mitochondrial disorders and other pathologies. In addition, we screened for genes whose defects affect the nuclear genome integrity. Our data provide a systematic view of the nuclear genes involved in maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. Together, our studies i) provide a global view of the genes regulating mtDNA content; ii) provide compelling new evidence toward understanding novel mechanism involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance and iii) provide useful clues in understanding human diseases in which mitochondrial defect and in particular depletion of mitochondrial genome plays a critical role. PMID:25170845

  7. Aconitase couples metabolic regulation to mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin Jie; Wang, Xiaowen; Kaufman, Brett A; Butow, Ronald A

    2005-02-04

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cells to maintain respiratory competency and is inherited as a protein-DNA complex called the nucleoid. We have identified 22 mtDNA-associated proteins in yeast, among which is mitochondrial aconitase (Aco1p). We show that this Krebs-cycle enzyme is essential for mtDNA maintenance independent of its catalytic activity. Regulation of ACO1 expression by the HAP and retrograde metabolic signaling pathways directly affects mtDNA maintenance. When constitutively expressed, Aco1p can replace the mtDNA packaging function of the high-mobility-group protein Abf2p. Thus, Aco1p may integrate metabolic signals and mtDNA maintenance.

  8. Variant forms of mitochondrial translation products in yeast: evidence for location of determinants on mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Douglas, M G; Butow, R A

    1976-04-01

    Products of mitochondrial protein synthesis in yeast have been labeled in vivo with 35SO42-. More than 20 polypeptide species fulfilling the criteria of mitochondrial translation products have been detected by analysis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-exponential polyacrylamide slab gels. A comparison of mitochondrial translation products in two wild-type strains has revealed variant forms of some polypeptide species which show genetic behavior consistent with the location of their structural genes on mtDNA. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of performing genetic analysis on putative gene products of mtDNA in wild-type yeast by direct examination of the segregation and recombination behavior of specific polypeptide species.

  9. Evaluating mitochondrial DNA variation in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    HADJIXENOFONTOS, ATHENA; SCHMIDT, MICHAEL A.; WHITEHEAD, PATRICE L.; KONIDARI, IOANNA; HEDGES, DALE J.; WRIGHT, HARRY H.; ABRAMSON, RUTH K.; MENON, RAMKUMAR; WILLIAMS, SCOTT M.; CUCCARO, MICHAEL L.; HAINES, JONATHAN L.; GILBERT, JOHN R.; PERICAK-VANCE, MARGARET A.; MARTIN, EDEN R.; MCCAULEY, JACOB L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite the increasing speculation that oxidative stress and abnormal energy metabolism may play a role in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and the observation that patients with mitochondrial defects have symptoms consistent with ASD, there are no comprehensive published studies examining the role of mitochondrial variation in autism. Therefore, we have sought to comprehensively examine the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation with regard to ASD risk, employing a multi-phase approach. In phase 1 of our experiment, we examined 132 mtDNA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped as part of our genome-wide association studies of ASD. In phase 2 we genotyped the major European mitochondrial haplogroup-defining variants within an expanded set of autism probands and controls. Finally in phase 3, we resequenced the entire mtDNA in a subset of our Caucasian samples (~400 proband-father pairs). In each phase we tested whether mitochondrial variation showed evidence of association to ASD. Despite a thorough interrogation of mtDNA variation, we found no evidence to suggest a major role for mtDNA variation in ASD susceptibility. Accordingly, while there may be attractive biological hints suggesting the role of mitochondria in ASD our data indicate that mtDNA variation is not a major contributing factor to the development of ASD. PMID:23130936

  10. Oxidized mitochondrial DNA activates the NLRP3 inflammasome during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Karlin, Justin; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Chiba, Norika; Chen, Shuang; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Wolf, Andrea J; Vergnes, Laurent; Ojcius, David M; Rentsendorj, Altan; Vargas, Mario; Guerrero, Candace; Wang, Yinsheng; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Underhill, David M; Town, Terrence; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-03-23

    We report that in the presence of signal 1 (NF-κB), the NLRP3 inflammasome was activated by mitochondrial apoptotic signaling that licensed production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). NLRP3 secondary signal activators such as ATP induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, resulting in release of oxidized mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the cytosol, where it bound to and activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 inversely regulated mitochondrial dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA directly induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, because macrophages lacking mtDNA had severely attenuated IL-1β production, yet still underwent apoptosis. Both binding of oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β secretion could be competitively inhibited by the oxidized nucleoside 8-OH-dG. Thus, our data reveal that oxidized mtDNA released during programmed cell death causes activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results provide a missing link between apoptosis and inflammasome activation, via binding of cytosolic oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidized Mitochondrial DNA Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome During Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Karlin, Justin; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Chiba, Norika; Chen, Shuang; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Wolf, Andrea J.; Vergnes, Laurent; Ojcius, David M.; Rentsendorj, Altan; Vargas, Mario; Guerrero, Candace; Wang, Yinsheng; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Underhill, David M.; Town, Terrence; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We report that in the presence of signal 1 (NF-κB), the NLRP3 inflammasome was activated by mitochondrial apoptotic signaling that licensed production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). NLRP3 secondary signal activators such as ATP induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, resulting in release of oxidized mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the cytosol, where it bound to and activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 inversely regulated mitochondrial dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA directly induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, because macrophages lacking mtDNA had severely attenuated IL-1β production, yet still underwent apoptosis. Both binding of oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β secretion could be competitively inhibited by the oxidized nucleoside, 8-OH-dG. Thus, our data reveal that oxidized mtDNA released during programmed cell death causes activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results provide a missing link between apoptosis and inflammasome activation, via binding of cytosolic oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:22342844

  12. Complete Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in Iranians

    PubMed Central

    Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Denisova, Galina; Perkova, Maria; Farjadian, Shirin; Yepiskoposyan, Levon

    2013-01-01

    Due to its pivotal geographical location and proximity to transcontinental migratory routes, Iran has played a key role in subsequent migrations, both prehistoric and historic, between Africa, Asia and Europe. To shed light on the genetic structure of the Iranian population as well as on the expansion patterns and population movements which affected this region, the complete mitochondrial genomes of 352 Iranians were obtained. All Iranian populations studied here exhibit similarly high diversity values comparable to the other groups from the Caucasus, Anatolia and Europe. The results of AMOVA and MDS analyses did not associate any regional and/or linguistic group of populations in the Anatolia/Caucasus and Iran region pointing to close genetic positions of Persians and Qashqais to each other and to Armenians, and Azeris from Iran to Georgians. By reconstructing the complete mtDNA phylogeny of haplogroups R2, N3, U1, U3, U5a1g, U7, H13, HV2, HV12, M5a and C5c we have found a previously unexplored genetic connection between the studied Iranian populations and the Arabian Peninsula, India, Near East and Europe, likely the result of both ancient and recent gene flow. Our results for Persians and Qashqais point to a continuous increase of the population sizes from ∼24 kya to the present, although the phase between 14-24 kya is thought to be hyperarid according to the Gulf Oasis model. Since this would have affected hunter-gatherer ranges and mobility patterns and forced them to increasingly rely on coastal resources, this transition can explain the human expansion across the Persian Gulf region. PMID:24244704

  13. Mitochondrial DNA repairs double-strand breaks in yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ricchetti, M; Fairhead, C; Dujon, B

    1999-11-04

    The endosymbiotic theory for the origin of eukaryotic cells proposes that genetic information can be transferred from mitochondria to the nucleus of a cell, and genes that are probably of mitochondrial origin have been found in nuclear chromosomes. Occasionally, short or rearranged sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA are seen in the chromosomes of different organisms including yeast, plants and humans. Here we report a mechanism by which fragments of mitochondrial DNA, in single or tandem array, are transferred to yeast chromosomes under natural conditions during the repair of double-strand breaks in haploid mitotic cells. These repair insertions originate from noncontiguous regions of the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome indicates that the yeast nuclear genome does indeed contain several short sequences of mitochondrial origin which are similar in size and composition to those that repair double-strand breaks. These sequences are located predominantly in non-coding regions of the chromosomes, frequently in the vicinity of retrotransposon long terminal repeats, and appear as recent integration events. Thus, colonization of the yeast genome by mitochondrial DNA is an ongoing process.

  14. Mitochondrial telomerase reverse transcriptase binds to and protects mitochondrial DNA and function from damage.

    PubMed

    Haendeler, Judith; Dröse, Stefan; Büchner, Nicole; Jakob, Sascha; Altschmied, Joachim; Goy, Christine; Spyridopoulos, Ioakim; Zeiher, Andreas M; Brandt, Ulrich; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2009-06-01

    The enzyme telomerase and its catalytic subunit the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) are important for maintenance of telomere length in the nucleus. Recent studies provided evidence for a mitochondrial localization of TERT. Therefore, we investigated the exact localization of TERT within the mitochondria and its function. Here, we demonstrate that TERT is localized in the matrix of the mitochondria. TERT binds to mitochondrial DNA at the coding regions for ND1 and ND2. Binding of TERT to mitochondrial DNA protects against ethidium bromide-induced damage. TERT increases overall respiratory chain activity, which is most pronounced at complex I and dependent on the reverse transcriptase activity of the enzyme. Moreover, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are increased after genetic ablation of TERT by shRNA. Mitochondrially targeted TERT and not wild-type TERT revealed the most prominent protective effect on H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis. Lung fibroblasts from 6-month-old TERT(-/-) mice (F2 generation) showed increased sensitivity toward UVB radiation and heart mitochondria exhibited significantly reduced respiratory chain activity already under basal conditions, demonstrating the protective function of TERT in vivo. Mitochondrial TERT exerts a novel protective function by binding to mitochondrial DNA, increasing respiratory chain activity and protecting against oxidative stress-induced damage.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Joanna E; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V; Bamshad, Michael; Noonan, Carolyn; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Watson, Nathaniel F

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins. Academic clinical research center. 15 sleep duration discordant monozygotic twin pairs (30 twins, 80% female; mean age 42.1 years [SD 15.0]). Sleep duration was phenotyped with wrist actigraphy. Each twin pair included a "normal" (7-9 h/24) and "short" (< 7 h/24) sleeping twin. Fasting peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was assessed for mtDNA copy number via the n-fold difference between qPCR measured mtDNA and nuclear DNA creating an mtDNA measure without absolute units. We used generalized estimating equation linear regression models accounting for the correlated data structure to assess within-pair effects of sleep duration on mtDNA copy number. Mean within-pair sleep duration difference per 24 hours was 94.3 minutes (SD 62.6 min). We found reduced sleep duration (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.004, 0.12; P < 0.05) and sleep efficiency (β = 0.51; 95% CI 0.06, 0.95; P < 0.05) were significantly associated with reduced mtDNA copy number within twin pairs. Thus every 1-minute decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep duration was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.06. Likewise, a 1% decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep efficiency was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.51. Reduced sleep duration and sleep efficiency were associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number in sleep duration discordant monozygotic twins offering a potential mechanism whereby short sleep impairs health and longevity through mitochondrial stress. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA triplication and punctual mutations in patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna.mkaouar@gmail.com; Felhi, Rahma; Tabebi, Mouna

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders caused by the impairment of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system which have been associated with various mutations of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear gene mutations. The clinical phenotypes are very diverse and the spectrum is still expanding. As brain and muscle are highly dependent on OXPHOS, consequently, neurological disorders and myopathy are common features of mtDNA mutations. Mutations in mtDNA can be classified into three categories: large-scale rearrangements, point mutations in tRNA or rRNA genes and point mutations in protein coding genes. In the present report, we screened mitochondrial genes ofmore » complex I, III, IV and V in 2 patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders. The results showed the presence the pathogenic heteroplasmic m.9157G>A variation (A211T) in the MT-ATP6 gene in the first patient. We also reported the first case of triplication of 9 bp in the mitochondrial NC7 region in Africa and Tunisia, in association with the novel m.14924T>C in the MT-CYB gene in the second patient with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorder. - Highlights: • We reported 2 patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders. • The heteroplasmic MT-ATP6 9157G>A variation was reported. • A triplication of 9 bp in the mitochondrial NC7 region was detected. • The m.14924T>C transition (S60P) in the MT-CYB gene was found.« less

  17. Deoxynucleoside salvage enzymes and tissue specific mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Wang, L

    2010-06-01

    Adequate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copies are required for normal mitochondria function and reductions in mtDNA copy number due to genetic alterations cause tissue-specific mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS). There are eight nuclear genes, directly or indirectly involved in mtDNA replication and mtDNA precursor synthesis, which have been identified as the cause of MDS. However, the tissue specific pathology of these nuclear gene mutations is not well understood. Here, mtDNA synthesis, mtDNA copy number control, and mtDNA turnover, as well as the synthesis of mtDNA precursors in relation to the levels of salvage enzymes are discussed. The question why MDS caused by TK2 and p53R2 mutations are predominantly muscle specific while dGK deficiency affected mainly liver will be addressed.

  18. Mitochondrial medicine: to a new era of gene therapy for mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2011-04-01

    Mitochondrial disorders can no longer be ignored in most medical disciplines. Such disorders include specific and widespread organ involvement, with tissue degeneration or tumor formation. Primary or secondary actors, mitochondrial dysfunctions also play a role in the aging process. Despite progresses made in identification of their molecular bases, nearly everything remains to be done as regards therapy. Research dealing with mitochondrial physiology and pathology has >20 years of history around the world. We are involved, as are many other laboratories, in the challenge of finding ways to fight these diseases. However, our main limitation is the scarcety of animal models required for both understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the diseases and evaluating therapeutic strategies. This is especially true for diseases due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), since an authentic genetic model of mtDNA mutations is technically a very difficult task due to both the inability of manipulating the mitochondrial genome of living mammalian cells and to its multicopy nature. This has led researchers in the field to consider the prospect of gene therapy approaches that can roughly be divided into three groups: (1) import of wild-type copies or relevant sections of DNA or RNA into mitochondria, (2) manipulation of mitochondrial genetic content, and (3) rescue of a defect by expression of an engineered gene product from the nucleus (allotopic or xenotropic expression). We briefly introduce these concepts and indicate where promising progress has been made in the last decade.

  19. Mitochondrial-targeted drug and DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Weissig, Volkmar

    2003-01-01

    The field of mitochondrial research is currently among the fastest growing disciplines in biomedicine. Approximately 12,000 articles on mitochondria have been published since the beginning of the new millennium. What brings mitochondria into the limelight of the scientific community? Since the end of the 1980s, a series of key discoveries has been made that have rekindled the scientific interest in this long-known cell organelle. It has become increasingly evident that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to a variety of human disorders, ranging from neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases, obesity, and diabetes to ischemia-reperfusion injury and cancer. Moreover, since the middle of the 1990s, mitochondria, the "power houses" of the cell, have also become accepted as the cells' "arsenal," reflecting their increasingly acknowledged key role during apoptosis. Based on these recent developments in mitochondrial research, increased pharmacological and pharmaceutical efforts have lead to the emergence of mitochondrial medicine" as a new field of biomedical research. Targeting of biologically active molecules to mitochondria in living cells will open avenues for manipulating mitochondrial functions, which may result in the selective protection, repair, or eradication of cells. This review gives a comprehensive overview of current strategies of mitochondrial targeting and their possible therapeutic applications.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA as an inflammatory mediator in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Otsu, Kinya

    2018-03-06

    Mitochondria play a central role in multiple cellular functions, including energy production, calcium homeostasis, and cell death. Currently, growing evidence indicates the vital roles of mitochondria in triggering and maintaining inflammation. Chronic inflammation without microbial infection - termed sterile inflammation - is strongly involved in the development of heart failure. Sterile inflammation is triggered by the activation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense endogenous ligands called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Mitochondria release multiple DAMPs including mitochondrial DNA, peptides, and lipids, which induce inflammation via the stimulation of multiple PRRs. Among the mitochondrial DAMPs, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is currently highlighted as the DAMP that mediates the activation of multiple PRRs, including Toll-like receptor 9, Nod-like receptors, and cyclic GMP-AMP synthetase/stimulator of interferon gene pathways. These PRR signalling pathways, in turn, lead to the activation of nuclear factor-κB and interferon regulatory factor, which enhances the transcriptional activity of inflammatory cytokines and interferons, and induces the recruitment of inflammatory cells. As the heart is an organ comprising abundant mitochondria for its ATP consumption (needed to maintain constant cyclic contraction and relaxation), the generation of massive amounts of mitochondrial radical oxygen species and mitochondrial DAMPs are predicted to occur and promote cardiac inflammation. Here, we will focus on the role of mtDNA in cardiac inflammation and review the mechanism and pathological significance of mtDNA-induced inflammatory responses in cardiac diseases. © 2018 The Author(s).

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells with a pathological mitochondrial DNA deletion

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Anne B. C.; Gagne, Katelyn E.; McLoughlin, Erin M.; Baccei, Anna; Gorman, Bryan; Hartung, Odelya; Miller, Justine D.; Zhang, Jin; Zon, Rebecca L.; Ince, Tan A.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Lerou, Paul H.; Fleming, Mark D.; Daley, George Q.; Agarwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    In congenital mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders, a mixture of normal and mutated mtDNA (termed heteroplasmy) exists at varying levels in different tissues, which determines the severity and phenotypic expression of disease. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder caused by heteroplasmic deletions in mtDNA. The cause of the hematopoietic failure in PS is unknown, and adequate cellular and animal models are lacking. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are particularly amenable for studying mtDNA disorders, as cytoplasmic genetic material is retained during direct reprogramming. Here we derive and characterize iPS cells from a patient with PS. Taking advantage of the tendency for heteroplasmy to change with cell passage, we isolated isogenic PS-iPS cells without detectable levels of deleted mtDNA. We found that PS-iPS cells carrying a high burden of deleted mtDNA displayed differences in growth, mitochondrial function, and hematopoietic phenotype when differentiated in vitro, compared to isogenic iPS cells without deleted mtDNA. Our results demonstrate that reprogramming somatic cells from patients with mtDNA disorders can yield pluripotent stem cells with varying burdens of heteroplasmy that might be useful in the study and treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:23400930

  2. Genetics Home Reference: RRM2B-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with renal ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... is packaged in chromosomes within the cell's nucleus (nuclear DNA), mitochondria also have a small amount of their own DNA ( mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA). Mitochondria are the energy-producing centers in cells, and the DNA in ...

  3. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and cognition: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Inczedy-Farkas, Gabriella; Trampush, Joey W; Perczel Forintos, Dora; Beech, Danielle; Andrejkovics, Monika; Varga, Zsofia; Remenyi, Viktoria; Bereznai, Benjamin; Gal, Aniko; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome can impair normal metabolic function in the central nervous system (CNS) where cellular energy demand is high. Primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been linked to several mitochondrial disorders that have comorbid psychiatric, neurologic, and cognitive sequelae. Here, we present a series of cases with primary mtDNA mutations who were genotyped and evaluated across a common neuropsychological battery. Nineteen patients with mtDNA mutations were genotyped and clinically and cognitively evaluated. Pronounced deficits in nonverbal/visuoperceptual reasoning, verbal recall, semantic word generativity, and processing speed were evident and consistent with a "mitochondrial dementia" that has been posited. However, variation in cognitive performance was noteworthy, suggesting that the phenotypic landscape of cognition linked to primary mtDNA mutations is heterogeneous. Our patients with mtDNA mutations evidenced cognitive deficits quite similar to those commonly seen in Alzheimer's disease and could have clinical relevance to the evaluation of dementia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Marco; Somigliana, Edgardo; Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  5. Blood Cell Mitochondrial DNA Content and Premature Ovarian Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca; Arosio, M.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Biondi, M.; Bione, S.; Bruni, V.; Brigante, C.; Cannavo`, S.; Cavallo, L.; Cisternino, M.; Colombo, I.; Corbetta, S.; Crosignani, P.G.; D'Avanzo, M.G.; Dalpra, L.; Danesino, C.; Di Battista, E.; Di Prospero, F.; Donti, E.; Einaudi, S.; Falorni, A.; Foresta, C.; Fusi, F.; Garofalo, N.; Giotti, I.; Lanzi, R.; Larizza, D.; Locatelli, N.; Loli, P.; Madaschi, S.; Maghnie, M.; Maiore, S.; Mantero, F.; Marozzi, A.; Marzotti, S.; Migone, N.; Nappi, R.; Palli, D.; Patricelli, M.G.; Pisani, C.; Prontera, P.; Petraglia, F.; Radetti, G.; Renieri, A.; Ricca, I.; Ripamonti, A.; Rossetti, R.; Russo, G.; Russo, S.; Tonacchera, M.; Toniolo, D.; Torricelli, F.; Vegetti, W.; Villa, N.; Vineis, P.; Wasniewsk, M.; Zuffardi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  6. Nonneutral mitochondrial DNA variation in humans and chimpanzees

    SciTech Connect

    Nachman, M.W.; Aquadro, C.F.; Brown, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    We sequenced the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) gene from a sample of 61 humans, five common chimpanzees, and one gorilla to test whether patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are consistent with a neutral model of molecular evolution. Within humans and within chimpanzees, the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions was higher than observed in comparisons between species, contrary to neutral expectations. To test the generality of this result, we reanalyzed published human RFLP data from the entire mitochondrial genome. Gains of restriction sites relative to a known human mtDNA sequence were used to infer unambiguous nucleotide substitutions.more » We also compared the complete mtDNA sequences of three humans. Both the RFLP data and the sequence data reveal a higher ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions within humans than is seen between species. This pattern is observed at most or all human mitochondrial genes and is inconsistent with a strictly neutral model. These data suggest that many mitochondrial protein polymorphisms are slightly deleterious, consistent with studies of human mitochondrial diseases. 59 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.« less

  7. A comprehensive characterization of rare mitochondrial DNA variants in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, Piero; Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Hogarty, Michael D.; Castellano, Aurora; Conte, Massimo; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma, a tumor of the developing sympathetic nervous system, is a common childhood neoplasm that is often lethal. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors including neuroblastoma. We extracted mtDNA data from a cohort of neuroblastoma samples that had undergone Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and also used snap-frozen samples in which mtDNA was entirely sequenced by Sanger technology. We next undertook the challenge of determining those mutations that are relevant to, or arisen during tumor development. The bioinformatics pipeline used to extract mitochondrial variants from matched tumor/blood samples was enriched by a set of filters inclusive of heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. Results Our in silico multistep workflow applied both on WES and Sanger-sequenced neuroblastoma samples, allowed us to identify a limited burden of somatic and germline mitochondrial mutations with a potential pathogenic impact. Conclusions The few singleton germline and somatic mitochondrial mutations emerged, according to our in silico analysis, do not appear to impact on the development of neuroblastoma. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that most mitochondrial somatic mutations can be considered as ‘passengers’ and consequently have no discernible effect in this type of cancer. PMID:27351283

  8. A comprehensive characterization of rare mitochondrial DNA variants in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Clima, Rosanna; Pignataro, Piero; Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Hogarty, Michael D; Castellano, Aurora; Conte, Massimo; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Capasso, Mario

    2016-08-02

    Neuroblastoma, a tumor of the developing sympathetic nervous system, is a common childhood neoplasm that is often lethal. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors including neuroblastoma. We extracted mtDNA data from a cohort of neuroblastoma samples that had undergone Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and also used snap-frozen samples in which mtDNA was entirely sequenced by Sanger technology. We next undertook the challenge of determining those mutations that are relevant to, or arisen during tumor development. The bioinformatics pipeline used to extract mitochondrial variants from matched tumor/blood samples was enriched by a set of filters inclusive of heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. Our in silico multistep workflow applied both on WES and Sanger-sequenced neuroblastoma samples, allowed us to identify a limited burden of somatic and germline mitochondrial mutations with a potential pathogenic impact. The few singleton germline and somatic mitochondrial mutations emerged, according to our in silico analysis, do not appear to impact on the development of neuroblastoma. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that most mitochondrial somatic mutations can be considered as 'passengers' and consequently have no discernible effect in this type of cancer.

  9. MitoBreak: the mitochondrial DNA breakpoints database.

    PubMed

    Damas, Joana; Carneiro, João; Amorim, António; Pereira, Filipe

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements are key events in the development of many diseases. Investigations of mtDNA regions affected by rearrangements (i.e. breakpoints) can lead to important discoveries about rearrangement mechanisms and can offer important clues about the causes of mitochondrial diseases. Here, we present the mitochondrial DNA breakpoints database (MitoBreak; http://mitobreak.portugene.com), a free, web-accessible comprehensive list of breakpoints from three classes of somatic mtDNA rearrangements: circular deleted (deletions), circular partially duplicated (duplications) and linear mtDNAs. Currently, MitoBreak contains >1400 mtDNA rearrangements from seven species (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Macaca mulatta, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and Podospora anserina) and their associated phenotypic information collected from nearly 400 publications. The database allows researchers to perform multiple types of data analyses through user-friendly interfaces with full or partial datasets. It also permits the download of curated data and the submission of new mtDNA rearrangements. For each reported case, MitoBreak also documents the precise breakpoint positions, junction sequences, disease or associated symptoms and links to the related publications, providing a useful resource to study the causes and consequences of mtDNA structural alterations.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA inheritance in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixuan; Wilson, Amanda; Xu, Jianping

    2015-02-01

    The inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly uniparental in most sexual eukaryotes. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial inheritance pattern of Cryptococcus gattii, a basidiomycetous yeast responsible for the recent and ongoing outbreak of cryptococcal infections in the US Pacific Northwest and British Columbia (especially Vancouver Island) in Canada. Using molecular markers, we analyzed the inheritance of mtDNA in 14 crosses between strains within and between divergent lineages in C. gattii. Consistent with results from recent studies, our analyses identified significant variations in mtDNA inheritance patterns among strains and crosses, ranging from strictly uniparental to biparental. For two of the crosses that showed uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in standard laboratory conditions, we further investigated the effects of the following environmental variables on mtDNA inheritance: UV exposure, temperature, and treatments with the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and with the ubiquitination inhibitor ammonium chloride. Interestingly, one of these crosses showed no response to these environmental variables while the other exhibited diverse patterns ranging from complete uniparental inheritance of the MATa parent mtDNA, to biparental inheritance, and to a significant bias toward inheritance of the MATα parental mtDNA. Our results indicate that mtDNA inheritance in C. gattii differs from that in its closely related species Cryptococcus neoformans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  12. More evidence for non-maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA?

    PubMed

    Bandelt, H-J; Kong, Q-P; Parson, W; Salas, A

    2005-12-01

    A single case of paternal co-transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in humans has been reported so far. To find potential instances of non-maternal inheritance of mtDNA. Published medical case studies (of single patients) were searched for irregular mtDNA patterns by comparing the given haplotype information for different clones or tissues with the worldwide mtDNA database as known to date-a method that has proved robust and reliable for the detection of flawed mtDNA sequence data. More than 20 studies were found reporting clear cut instances with mtDNAs of different ancestries in single individuals. As examples, cases are reviewed from recent published reports which, at face value, may be taken as evidence for paternal inheritance of mtDNA or recombination. Multiple types (or recombinant types) of quite dissimilar mitochondrial DNA from different parts of the known mtDNA phylogeny are often reported in single individuals. From re-analyses and corrigenda of forensic mtDNA data, it is apparent that the phenomenon of mixed or mosaic mtDNA can be ascribed solely to contamination and sample mix up.

  13. Mutations in FBXL4 Cause Mitochondrial Encephalopathy and a Disorder of Mitochondrial DNA Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Bonnen, Penelope E.; Yarham, John W.; Besse, Arnaud; Wu, Ping; Faqeih, Eissa A.; Al-Asmari, Ali Mohammad; Saleh, Mohammad A.M.; Eyaid, Wafaa; Hadeel, Alrukban; He, Langping; Smith, Frances; Yau, Shu; Simcox, Eve M.; Miwa, Satomi; Donti, Taraka; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; Wong, Lee-Jun; Craigen, William J.; Graham, Brett H.; Scott, Kenneth L.; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear genetic disorders causing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and the molecular etiology remains undiagnosed in the majority of cases. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified recessive nonsense and splicing mutations in FBXL4 segregating in three unrelated consanguineous kindreds in which affected children present with a fatal encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and severe mtDNA depletion in muscle. We show that FBXL4 is an F-box protein that colocalizes with mitochondria and that loss-of-function and splice mutations in this protein result in a severe respiratory chain deficiency, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and a disturbance of the dynamic mitochondrial network and nucleoid distribution in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Expression of the wild-type FBXL4 transcript in cell lines from two subjects fully rescued the levels of mtDNA copy number, leading to a correction of the mitochondrial biochemical deficit. Together our data demonstrate that mutations in FBXL4 are disease causing and establish FBXL4 as a mitochondrial protein with a possible role in maintaining mtDNA integrity and stability. PMID:23993193

  14. Mitochondrial DNA transmission and confounding mitochondrial influences in cloned cattle and pigs.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kumiko

    2013-04-01

    Although somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a powerful tool for production of cloned animals, SCNT embryos generally have low developmental competency and many abnormalities. The interaction between the donor nucleus and the enucleated ooplasm plays an important role in early embryonic development, but the underlying mechanisms that negatively impact developmental competency remain unclear. Mitochondria have a broad range of critical functions in cellular energy supply, cell signaling, and programmed cell death; thus, affect embryonic and fetal development. This review focuses on mitochondrial considerations influencing SCNT techniques in farm animals. Donor somatic cell mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be transmitted through what has been considered a "bottleneck" in mitochondrial genetics via the SCNT maternal lineage. This indicates that donor somatic cell mitochondria have a role in the reconstructed cytoplasm. However, foreign somatic cell mitochondria may affect the early development of SCNT embryos. Nuclear-mitochondrial interactions in interspecies/intergeneric SCNT (iSCNT) result in severe problems. A major biological selective pressure exists against survival of exogenous mtDNA in iSCNT. Yet, mtDNA differences in SCNT animals did not reflect transfer of proteomic components following proteomic analysis. Further study of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions is needed to illuminate key developmental characteristics of SCNT animals associated with mitochondrial biology.

  15. Hybrid male sterility is caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Kohno, Shigeru

    2009-07-01

    Although it is known that the hybrid male mouse is sterile just like any other animal's heterogametic sex, the reason why only the male germ cells are impaired has yet to be discovered. TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay using a confocal fluorescence microscope and DNA fragmentation assay of hybrid testis indicated destruction of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rather than the nuclear DNA. Previously we reported that maternal mtDNA inheritance is through selective sperm mtDNA elimination based on the sperm factor and two egg factors, and expression of these three factors was recognized in the hybrid testis. It was thereby assumed that mtDNA destruction caused by the expression of maternal mtDNA inheritance system in male germ cells is implicated in the hybrid male sterility of mice.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA content and 4977 bp deletion in unfertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, C C W; Liu, V W S; Lau, E Y L; Yeung, W S B; Ng, E H Y; Ho, P C

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies analysing the incidences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and mtDNA content in unfertilized oocytes in relation to donors' age have been controversial. The objective of the study was to compare these two parameters in unfertilized oocytes and relate them to the donors' age. Fifty-two women donated 155 unfertilized metaphase II (MII) oocytes. The incidence of 4977 bp deletion was 34.6%, and the mtDNA copy number was 598 350 +/- 265 862. Women >or=35 years of age had a significantly higher incidence of 4977 bp deletion, lower mtDNA copy number, higher FSH level and poorer ovarian response when compared with younger women. The mtDNA copy number was negatively correlated with the donor's age. The higher incidence of mtDNA deletion and lower mtDNA copy number in older women suggested that these two parameters may reflect ovarian ageing.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins

    PubMed Central

    Wrede, Joanna E.; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Bamshad, Michael; Noonan, Carolyn; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins. Setting: Academic clinical research center. Participants: 15 sleep duration discordant monozygotic twin pairs (30 twins, 80% female; mean age 42.1 years [SD 15.0]). Design: Sleep duration was phenotyped with wrist actigraphy. Each twin pair included a “normal” (7–9 h/24) and “short” (< 7 h/24) sleeping twin. Fasting peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was assessed for mtDNA copy number via the n-fold difference between qPCR measured mtDNA and nuclear DNA creating an mtDNA measure without absolute units. We used generalized estimating equation linear regression models accounting for the correlated data structure to assess within-pair effects of sleep duration on mtDNA copy number. Measurements and Results: Mean within-pair sleep duration difference per 24 hours was 94.3 minutes (SD 62.6 min). We found reduced sleep duration (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.004, 0.12; P < 0.05) and sleep efficiency (β = 0.51; 95% CI 0.06, 0.95; P < 0.05) were significantly associated with reduced mtDNA copy number within twin pairs. Thus every 1-minute decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep duration was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.06. Likewise, a 1% decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep efficiency was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.51. Conclusions: Reduced sleep duration and sleep efficiency were associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number in sleep duration discordant monozygotic twins offering a potential mechanism whereby short sleep impairs health and longevity through mitochondrial stress. Citation: Wrede JE, Mengel-From J, Buchwald D, Vitiello MV, Bamshad M, Noonan C, Christiansen L, Christensen K, Watson NF. Mitochondrial DNA copy number

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction due to oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage is reduced through cooperative actions of diverse proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Thomas W; Doudican, Nicole A; Mackereth, Melinda D; Doetsch, Paul W; Shadel, Gerald S

    2002-06-01

    The mitochondrial genome is a significant target of exogenous and endogenous genotoxic agents; however, the determinants that govern this susceptibility and the pathways available to resist mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage are not well characterized. Here we report that oxidative mtDNA damage is elevated in strains lacking Ntg1p, providing the first direct functional evidence that this mitochondrion-localized, base excision repair enzyme functions to protect mtDNA. However, ntg1 null strains did not exhibit a mitochondrial respiration-deficient (petite) phenotype, suggesting that mtDNA damage is negotiated by the cooperative actions of multiple damage resistance pathways. Null mutations in ABF2 or PIF1, two genes implicated in mtDNA maintenance and recombination, exhibit a synthetic-petite phenotype in combination with ntg1 null mutations that is accompanied by enhanced mtDNA point mutagenesis in the corresponding double-mutant strains. This phenotype was partially rescued by malonic acid, indicating that reactive oxygen species generated by the electron transport chain contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in abf2 Delta strains. In contrast, when two other genes involved in mtDNA recombination, CCE1 and NUC1, were inactivated a strong synthetic-petite phenotype was not observed, suggesting that the effects mediated by Abf2p and Pif1p are due to novel activities of these proteins other than recombination. These results document the existence of recombination-independent mechanisms in addition to base excision repair to cope with oxidative mtDNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Such systems are likely relevant to those operating in human cells where mtDNA recombination is less prevalent, validating yeast as a model system in which to study these important issues.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA deletions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Bozoglu, Ceyda; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Yoruk, Ozgur; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 and 7400 bp deletions of mitochondrial DNA in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media and to indicate the possible association of mitochondrial DNA deletions with chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty-six patients with chronic suppurative otitis media were randomly selected to assess the mitochondrial DNA deletions. Tympanomastoidectomy was applied for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media, and the curettage materials including middle ear tissues were collected. The 4977 and 7400 bp deletion regions and two control regions of mitochondrial DNA were assessed by using the four pair primers. DNA was extracted from middle ear tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients, and then polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed. PCR products were separated in 2 % agarose gel. Seventeen of 36 patients had the heterozygote 4977 bp deletion in the middle ear tissue but not in peripheral blood. There wasn't any patient who had the 7400 bp deletion in mtDNA of their middle ear tissue or peripheral blood tissue. The patients with the 4977 bp deletion had a longer duration of chronic suppurative otitis media and a higher level of hearing loss than the others (p < 0.01). Long time chronic suppurative otitis media and the reactive oxygen species can cause the mitochondrial DNA deletions and this may be a predisposing factor to sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media. An antioxidant drug as a scavenger agent may be used in long-term chronic suppurative otitis media.

  20. Evidence for recombination of mitochondrial DNA in triploid crucian carp.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinhong; Liu, Shaojun; Liu, Yun

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of the allotetraploid and triploid crucian carp and compare the complete mtDNA sequences between the triploid crucian carp and its female parent Japanese crucian carp and between the triploid crucian carp and its male parent allotetraploid. Our results indicate that the complete mtDNA nucleotide identity (98%) between the triploid crucian carp and its male parent allotetraploid was higher than that (93%) between the triploid crucian carp and its female parent Japanese crucian carp. Moreover, the presence of a pattern of identity and difference at synonymous sites of mitochondrial genomes between the triploid crucian carp and its parents provides direct evidence that triploid crucian carp possessed the recombination mtDNA fragment (12,759 bp) derived from the paternal fish. These results suggest that mtDNA recombination was derived from the fusion of the maternal and paternal mtDNAs. Compared with the haploid egg with one set of genome from the Japanese crucian carp, the diploid sperm with two sets of genomes from the allotetraploid could more easily make its mtDNA fuse with the mtDNA of the haploid egg. In addition, the triple hybrid nature of the triploid crucian carp probably allowed its better mtDNA recombination. In summary, our results provide the first evidence of mtDNA combination in polyploid fish.

  1. Evidence for recombination in scorpion mitochondrial DNA (Scorpiones: Buthidae).

    PubMed

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Fet, Victor; Gantenbein-Ritter, Iris A; Balloux, François

    2005-04-07

    There has been very little undisputed evidence for recombination in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) provided so far. Previous unpublished results suggestive of mtDNA recombination in the scorpion family Buthidae, together with cytological evidence for a unique mechanism of mitochondrial fusion in that family, prompted us to investigate this group in more details. First, we sequenced the complete mtDNA genome of Mesobuthus gibbosus, and chose two genes opposing each other (16S and coxI). We then sequenced 150 individuals from the natural populations of four species of Buthidae (Old World genera Buthus and Mesobuthus). We observed strong evidence for widespread recombination through highly significant negative correlations between linkage disequilibrium and physical distance in three out of four species. The evidence is further confirmed when using five other tests for recombination and by the presence of a high amount of homoplasy in phylogenetic trees.

  2. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Edith E., E-mail: ed.mueller@salk.at; Mayr, Johannes A., E-mail: h.mayr@salk.at; Zimmermann, Franz A., E-mail: f.zimmermann@salk.at

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined OXPHOS and citrate synthase enzyme activities in HEK293 cells devoid of mtDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzymes partially encoded by mtDNA show reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also the entirely nuclear encoded complex II and citrate synthase exhibit reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of mtDNA induces a feedback mechanism that downregulates complex II and citrate synthase. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complexmore » II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 {rho}{sup 0} cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in {rho}{sup 0} cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.« less

  3. Mitochondrial DNA: An Endogenous Trigger for Immune Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Simon T; Franken, Lars; Adamzik, Michael; Schumak, Beatrix; Scherag, André; Engler, Andrea; Schönborn, Niels; Walden, Jennifer; Koch, Susanne; Baba, Hideo A; Steinmann, Jörg; Westendorf, Astrid M; Fandrey, Joachim; Bieber, Thomas; Kurts, Christian; Frede, Stilla; Peters, Jürgen; Limmer, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Critically ill patients are at high risk to suffer from sepsis, even in the absence of an initial infectious source, but the molecular mechanisms for their increased sepsis susceptibility, including a suppressed immune system, remain unclear. Although microbes and pathogen-associated molecular pattern are accepted inducers of sepsis and septic immunosuppression, the role of endogenous Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), in altering the immune response is unknown. Mitochondrial DNA serum concentrations of the mitochondrial genes D-Loop and adenosine triphosphatase 6 were determined (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) in 165 septic patients and 50 healthy volunteers. Furthermore, cytotoxic T-cell activity was analyzed in wild-type and TLR9 knockout mice, with/without previous mtDNA administration, followed by injection of an ovalbumin-expressing adenoviral vector. Mitochondrial DNA serum concentrations were increased in septic patients (adenosine triphosphatase 6, 123-fold; D-Loop, 76-fold, P < 0.0001) compared with volunteers. Furthermore, a single mtDNA injection caused profound, TLR9-dependent immunosuppression of adaptive T-cell cytotoxicity in wild-type but not in TLR9 knockout mice and evoked various immunosuppressive mechanisms including the destruction of the splenic microstructure, deletion of cross-presenting dendritic cells, and up-regulation of programmed cell death ligand 1 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Several of these findings in mice were mirrored in septic patients, and mtDNA concentrations were associated with an increased 30-day mortality. The findings of this study imply that mtDNA, an endogenous danger associated molecular pattern, is a hitherto unknown inducer of septic immunoparalysis and one possible link between initial inflammation and subsequent immunosuppression in critically ill patients.

  4. Fly Diversity Revealed by PCR-RFLP of Mitochondrial DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asraoui, Jimmy F.; Sayar, Nancy P.; Knio, Khouzama M.; Smith, Colin A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe an inexpensive, two-session undergraduate laboratory activity that introduces important molecular biology methods in the context of biodiversity. In the first session, students bring tentatively identified flies (order Diptera, true flies) to the laboratory, extract DNA, and amplify a region of the mitochondrial gene…

  5. A Polymorphism in Mitochondrial DNA Associated with IQ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skuder, Patricia; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Of 100 DNA markers examined in an allelic association study, only 1 showed a replicated association with IQ in samples totaling 107 children. How the gene marked by the particular restriction fragment length polymorphism was tracked and its mitochondrial origin identified is described. (SLD)

  6. Pathological mechanisms underlying single large‐scale mitochondrial DNA deletions

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Mariana C.; Rosa, Hannah S.; Grady, John P.; Blakely, Emma L.; He, Langping; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Newman, Jane; McFarland, Robert; Ng, Yi Shiau; Gorman, Grainne S.; Schaefer, Andrew M.; Tuppen, Helen A.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Single, large‐scale deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are a common cause of mitochondrial disease. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the genetic defect and molecular phenotype to improve understanding of pathogenic mechanisms associated with single, large‐scale mtDNA deletions in skeletal muscle. Methods We investigated 23 muscle biopsies taken from adult patients (6 males/17 females with a mean age of 43 years) with characterized single, large‐scale mtDNA deletions. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in skeletal muscle biopsies was quantified by immunoreactivity levels for complex I and complex IV proteins. Single muscle fibers with varying degrees of deficiency were selected from 6 patient biopsies for determination of mtDNA deletion level and copy number by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results We have defined 3 “classes” of single, large‐scale deletion with distinct patterns of mitochondrial deficiency, determined by the size and location of the deletion. Single fiber analyses showed that fibers with greater respiratory chain deficiency harbored higher levels of mtDNA deletion with an increase in total mtDNA copy number. For the first time, we have demonstrated that threshold levels for complex I and complex IV deficiency differ based on deletion class. Interpretation Combining genetic and immunofluorescent assays, we conclude that thresholds for complex I and complex IV deficiency are modulated by the deletion of complex‐specific protein‐encoding genes. Furthermore, removal of mt‐tRNA genes impacts specific complexes only at high deletion levels, when complex‐specific protein‐encoding genes remain. These novel findings provide valuable insight into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with these mutations. Ann Neurol 2018;83:115–130 PMID:29283441

  7. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  8. Prominent mitochondrial DNA recombination intermediates in human heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Kajander, O A; Karhunen, P J; Holt, I J; Jacobs, H T

    2001-11-01

    Recombination intermediates containing four-way (Holliday) junctions are generated during DNA repair and replication in many systems, including yeast mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In contrast, convincing evidence for recombination in mammalian mtDNA is lacking. We have used two-dimensional agarose-gel electrophoresis to analyse non-linear forms of mtDNA in human heart muscle. Replication intermediates from both the coupled and strand-asynchronous mtDNA replication pathways were detected. An additional class of non-linear molecules, with the electrophoretic properties of four-way junctions, was also prominent. These molecules were insensitive to topoisomerase I or RNase H, but were diminished by branch migration or RuvC treatment. Junctional molecules were detected in all regions of the mitochondrial genome, were found in myocardial DNA from young and old adults, but were present at lower levels in skeletal muscle and placenta. We suggest that they could represent intermediates of mtDNA repair, given their prevalence in the oxyradical-rich environment of heart muscle mitochondria.

  9. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of Bombyx mori mitochondrial transcription factor A, a conserved regulator of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sumitani, Megumi; Kondo, Mari; Kasashima, Katsumi; Endo, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kaoru; Misawa, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2017-04-15

    In the present study, we initially cloned and characterized a mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) homologue in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Bombyx mori TFAM (BmTFAM) localized to mitochondria in cultured silkworm and human cells, and co-localized with mtDNA nucleoids in human HeLa cells. In an immunoprecipitation analysis, BmTFAM was found to associate with human mtDNA in mitochondria, indicating its feature as a non-specific DNA-binding protein. In spite of the low identity between BmTFAM and human TFAM (26.5%), the expression of BmTFAM rescued mtDNA copy number reductions and enlarged mtDNA nucleoids in HeLa cells, which were induced by human Tfam knockdown. Thus, BmTFAM compensates for the function of human TFAM in HeLa cells, demonstrating that the mitochondrial function of TFAM is highly conserved between silkworms and humans. BmTfam mRNA was strongly expressed in early embryos. Through double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-based RNA interference (RNAi) in silkworm embryos, we found that the knockdown of BmTFAM reduced the amount of mtDNA and induced growth retardation at the larval stage. Collectively, these results demonstrate that BmTFAM is a highly conserved mtDNA regulator and may be a good candidate for investigating and modulating mtDNA metabolism in this model organism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Drosophila Melanogaster Mitochondrial DNA: Gene Organization and Evolutionary Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garesse, R.

    1988-01-01

    The sequence of a 8351-nucleotide mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragment has been obtained extending the knowledge of the Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial genome to 90% of its coding region. The sequence encodes seven polypeptides, 12 tRNAs and the 3' end of the 16S rRNA and CO III genes. The gene organization is strictly conserved with respect to the Drosophila yakuba mitochondrial genome, and different from that found in mammals and Xenopus. The high A + T content of D. melanogaster mitochondrial DNA is reflected in a reiterative codon usage, with more than 90% of the codons ending in T or A, G + C rich codons being practically absent. The average level of homology between the D. melanogaster and D. yakuba sequences is very high (roughly 94%), although insertion and deletions have been detected in protein, tRNA and large ribosomal genes. The analysis of nucleotide changes reveals a similar frequency for transitions and transversions, and reflects a strong bias against G+C on both strands. The predominant type of transition is strand specific. PMID:3130291

  12. A Novel Mitochondrial DNA Deletion in Patient with Pearson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khasawneh, Rame; Alsokhni, Hala; Alzghoul, Bayan; Momani, Asim; Abualsheikh, Nazih; Kamal, Nazmi; Qatawneh, Mousa

    2018-04-01

    Arteriovenous Pearson syndrome is a very rare multisystemic mitochondrial disease characterized by sideroblastic anemia and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. It is usually fatal in infancy. We reported a four-month-old infant presented with fever and pancytopenia. Bone marrow examination showed hypoplastic changes and sideroblastic features. Molecular Study showed a novel hetroplasmic mitochondrial deletions (m. 10760 -m. 15889+) in multiple genes (ND4,ND5,ND6, CYTB). In our patient the pathogenic mutation was 5.1 kb heteroplasmic deletions in multiple genes that are important and crucial for intact oxidative phosphorylation pathway and ATP production in the mitochondrial DNA. This mutation was not reported in literature including the mitomap.org website (which was last edited on Nov 30, 2017 and accessed on Jan 13, 2018).

  13. Evolution and inheritance of animal mitochondrial DNA: rules and exceptions.

    PubMed

    Ladoukakis, Emmanuel D; Zouros, Eleftherios

    2017-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been studied intensely for "its own" merit. Its role for the function of the cell and the organism remains a fertile field, its origin and evolution is an indispensable part of the evolution of life and its interaction with the nuclear DNA is among the most important cases of genome synergism and co-evolution. Also, mtDNA was proven one of the most useful tools in population genetics and molecular phylogenetics. In this article we focus on animal mtDNA and discuss briefly how our views about its structure, function and transmission have changed, how these changes affect the information we have accumulated through its use in the fields of phylogeny and population structure and what are the most important questions that remain open for future research.

  14. Regional differences in mitochondrial DNA methylation in human post-mortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Devall, Matthew; Smith, Rebecca G; Jeffries, Aaron; Hannon, Eilis; Davies, Matthew N; Schalkwyk, Leonard; Mill, Jonathan; Weedon, Michael; Lunnon, Katie

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism involved in gene regulation, with alterations in DNA methylation in the nuclear genome being linked to numerous complex diseases. Mitochondrial DNA methylation is a phenomenon that is receiving ever-increasing interest, particularly in diseases characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction; however, most studies have been limited to the investigation of specific target regions. Analyses spanning the entire mitochondrial genome have been limited, potentially due to the amount of input DNA required. Further, mitochondrial genetic studies have been previously confounded by nuclear-mitochondrial pseudogenes. Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation Sequencing is a technique widely used to profile DNA methylation across the nuclear genome; however, reads mapped to mitochondrial DNA are often discarded. Here, we have developed an approach to control for nuclear-mitochondrial pseudogenes within Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation Sequencing data. We highlight the utility of this approach in identifying differences in mitochondrial DNA methylation across regions of the human brain and pre-mortem blood. We were able to correlate mitochondrial DNA methylation patterns between the cortex, cerebellum and blood. We identified 74 nominally significant differentially methylated regions ( p  < 0.05) in the mitochondrial genome, between anatomically separate cortical regions and the cerebellum in matched samples ( N  = 3 matched donors). Further analysis identified eight significant differentially methylated regions between the total cortex and cerebellum after correcting for multiple testing. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the mitochondrial DNA methylome, we were able to identify tissue-specific patterns of mitochondrial DNA methylation between blood, cerebellum and cortex. Our study represents a comprehensive analysis of the mitochondrial methylome using pre-existing Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation

  15. Phylogeographic Differentiation of Mitochondrial DNA in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kong, Qing-Peng; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Kivisild, Toomas; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in Han Chinese from several provinces of China, we have sequenced the two hypervariable segments of the control region and the segment spanning nucleotide positions 10171–10659 of the coding region, and we have identified a number of specific coding-region mutations by direct sequencing or restriction-fragment–length–polymorphism tests. This allows us to define new haplogroups (clades of the mtDNA phylogeny) and to dissect the Han mtDNA pool on a phylogenetic basis, which is a prerequisite for any fine-grained phylogeographic analysis, the interpretation of ancient mtDNA, or future complete mtDNA sequencing efforts. Some of the haplogroups under study differ considerably in frequencies across different provinces. The southernmost provinces show more pronounced contrasts in their regional Han mtDNA pools than the central and northern provinces. These and other features of the geographical distribution of the mtDNA haplogroups observed in the Han Chinese make an initial Paleolithic colonization from south to north plausible but would suggest subsequent migration events in China that mainly proceeded from north to south and east to west. Lumping together all regional Han mtDNA pools into one fictive general mtDNA pool or choosing one or two regional Han populations to represent all Han Chinese is inappropriate for prehistoric considerations as well as for forensic purposes or medical disease studies. PMID:11836649

  16. Mitochondrial DNA replication: a PrimPol perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Laura J.

    2017-01-01

    PrimPol, (primase–polymerase), the most recently identified eukaryotic polymerase, has roles in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA maintenance. PrimPol is capable of acting as a DNA polymerase, with the ability to extend primers and also bypass a variety of oxidative and photolesions. In addition, PrimPol also functions as a primase, catalysing the preferential formation of DNA primers in a zinc finger-dependent manner. Although PrimPol's catalytic activities have been uncovered in vitro, we still know little about how and why it is targeted to the mitochondrion and what its key roles are in the maintenance of this multicopy DNA molecule. Unlike nuclear DNA, the mammalian mitochondrial genome is circular and the organelle has many unique proteins essential for its maintenance, presenting a differing environment within which PrimPol must function. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the mechanisms of DNA replication in the mitochondrion, the proteins that carry out these processes and how PrimPol is likely to be involved in assisting this vital cellular process. PMID:28408491

  17. Divergent evolution of life span associated with mitochondrial DNA evolution.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Biljana; Sayadi, Ahmed; Đorđević, Mirko; Jović, Jelena; Savković, Uroš; Arnqvist, Göran

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in ageing. The pursuit of genes that regulate variation in life span and ageing have shown that several nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes are important. However, the role of mitochondrial encoded genes (mtDNA) is more controversial and our appreciation of the role of mtDNA for the evolution of life span is limited. We use replicated lines of seed beetles that have been artificially selected for long or short life for >190 generations, now showing dramatic phenotypic differences, to test for a possible role of mtDNA in the divergent evolution of ageing and life span. We show that these divergent selection regimes led to the evolution of significantly different mtDNA haplotype frequencies. Selection for a long life and late reproduction generated positive selection for one specific haplotype, which was fixed in most such lines. In contrast, selection for reproduction early in life led to both positive selection as well as negative frequency-dependent selection on two different haplotypes, which were both present in all such lines. Our findings suggest that the evolution of life span was in part mediated by mtDNA, providing support for the emerging general tenet that adaptive evolution of life-history syndromes may involve mtDNA. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B., E-mail: Christopher.jackson@insel.ch; Gallati, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.gallati@insel.ch; Schaller, Andre, E-mail: andre.schaller@insel.ch

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serialmore » qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct

  19. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in a maternal lineage of Holstein cows.

    PubMed Central

    Hauswirth, W W; Laipis, P J

    1982-01-01

    Two mitochondrial genotypes are shown to exist within one Holstein cow maternal lineage. They were detected by the appearance of an extra Hae III recognition site in one genotype. The nucleotide sequence of this region has been determined and the genotypes are distinguished by an adenine/guanine base transition which creates the new Hae III site. This point mutation occurs within an open reading frame at the third position of a glycine codon and therefore does not alter the amino acid sequence. The present pattern of genotypes within the lineage demands that multiple shifts between genotypes must have occurred within the past 20 years with the most rapid shift taking place in no more than 4 years and indicates that mitochondrial DNA polymorphism can occur between maternally related mammals. The process that gave rise to different genotypes in one lineage is clearly of fundamental importance in understanding intraspecific mitochondrial polymorphism and evolution in mammals. Several potential mechanisms for rapid mitochondrial DNA variation are discussed in light of these results. Images PMID:6289312

  20. Transcription profiling suggests that mitochondrial topoisomerase IB acts as a topological barrier and regulator of mitochondrial DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Zhang, Hongliang; Khiati, Salim; Wu, Xiaolin; Pommier, Yves

    2017-12-08

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cell viability because it encodes subunits of the respiratory chain complexes. Mitochondrial topoisomerase IB (TOP1MT) facilitates mtDNA replication by removing DNA topological tensions produced during mtDNA transcription, but it appears to be dispensable. To test whether cells lacking TOP1MT have aberrant mtDNA transcription, we performed mitochondrial transcriptome profiling. To that end, we designed and implemented a customized tiling array, which enabled genome-wide, strand-specific, and simultaneous detection of all mitochondrial transcripts. Our technique revealed that Top1mt KO mouse cells process the mitochondrial transcripts normally but that protein-coding mitochondrial transcripts are elevated. Moreover, we found discrete long noncoding RNAs produced by H-strand transcription and encompassing the noncoding regulatory region of mtDNA in human and murine cells and tissues. Of note, these noncoding RNAs were strongly up-regulated in the absence of TOP1MT. In contrast, 7S DNA, produced by mtDNA replication, was reduced in the Top1mt KO cells. We propose that the long noncoding RNA species in the D-loop region are generated by the extension of H-strand transcripts beyond their canonical stop site and that TOP1MT acts as a topological barrier and regulator for mtDNA transcription and D-loop formation.

  1. Mutagenic effect of freezing on mitochondrial DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stoycheva, T; Venkov, P; Tsvetkov, Ts

    2007-06-01

    Although suggested in some studies, the mutagenic effect of freezing has not been proved by induction and isolation of mutants. Using a well-defined genetic model, we supply in this communication evidence for the mutagenic effect of freezing on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cooling for 2 h at +4 degrees C, followed by freezing for 1 h at -10 degrees C and 16 h at -20 degrees C resulted in induction of respiratory mutations. The immediate freezing in liquid nitrogen was without mutagenic effect. The study of the stepwise procedure showed that the induction of respiratory mutants takes place during the freezing at -10 and -20 degrees C of cells pre-cooled at +4 degrees C. The genetic crosses of freeze-induced mutants evidenced their mitochondrial rho- origin. The freeze-induced rho- mutants are most likely free of simultaneous nuclear mutations. The extracellular presence of cryoprotectants did not prevent the mutagenic effect of freezing while accumulation of cryoprotectors inside cells completely escaped mtDNA from cryodamage. Although the results obtained favor the notion that the mutagenic effect of freezing on yeast mtDNA is due to formation and growth of intracellular ice crystals, other reasons, such as impairment of mtDNA replication or elevated levels of ROS production are discussed as possible explanations of the mutagenic effect of freezing. It is concluded that: (i) freezing can be used as a method for isolation of mitochondrial mutants in S. cerevisiae and (ii) given the substantial development in cryopreservation of cells and tissues, special precautions should be made to avoid mtDNA damage during the cryopreservation procedures.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in the Arctoidea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Ryder, O A

    1993-10-15

    Some taxa in the superfamily Arctoidea, such as the giant panda and the lesser panda, have presented puzzles to taxonomists. In the present study, approximately 397 bases of the cytochrome b gene, 364 bases of the 12S rRNA gene, and 74 bases of the tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro) genes from the giant panda, lesser panda, kinkajou, raccoon, coatimundi, and all species of the Ursidae were sequenced. The high transition/transversion ratios in cytochrome b and RNA genes prior to saturation suggest that the presumed transition bias may represent a trend for some mammalian lineages rather than strictly a primate phenomenon. Transversions in the 12S rRNA gene accumulate in arctoids at about half the rate reported for artiodactyls. Different arctoid lineages evolve at different rates: the kinkajou, a procyonid, evolves the fastest, 1.7-1.9 times faster than the slowest lineage that comprises the spectacled and polar bears. Generation-time effect can only partially explain the different rates of nucleotide substitution in arctoids. Our results based on parsimony analysis show that the giant panda is more closely related to bears than to the lesser panda; the lesser panda is neither closely related to bears nor to the New World procyonids. The kinkajou, raccoon, and coatimundi diverged from each other very early, even though they group together. The polar bear is closely related to the spectacled bear, and they began to diverge from a common mitochondrial ancestor approximately 2 million years ago. Relationships of the remaining five bear species are derived.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in the Arctoidea.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y P; Ryder, O A

    1993-01-01

    Some taxa in the superfamily Arctoidea, such as the giant panda and the lesser panda, have presented puzzles to taxonomists. In the present study, approximately 397 bases of the cytochrome b gene, 364 bases of the 12S rRNA gene, and 74 bases of the tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro) genes from the giant panda, lesser panda, kinkajou, raccoon, coatimundi, and all species of the Ursidae were sequenced. The high transition/transversion ratios in cytochrome b and RNA genes prior to saturation suggest that the presumed transition bias may represent a trend for some mammalian lineages rather than strictly a primate phenomenon. Transversions in the 12S rRNA gene accumulate in arctoids at about half the rate reported for artiodactyls. Different arctoid lineages evolve at different rates: the kinkajou, a procyonid, evolves the fastest, 1.7-1.9 times faster than the slowest lineage that comprises the spectacled and polar bears. Generation-time effect can only partially explain the different rates of nucleotide substitution in arctoids. Our results based on parsimony analysis show that the giant panda is more closely related to bears than to the lesser panda; the lesser panda is neither closely related to bears nor to the New World procyonids. The kinkajou, raccoon, and coatimundi diverged from each other very early, even though they group together. The polar bear is closely related to the spectacled bear, and they began to diverge from a common mitochondrial ancestor approximately 2 million years ago. Relationships of the remaining five bear species are derived. PMID:8415740

  4. Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Activates Replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chatre, Laurent; Ricchetti, Miria

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear genome of eukaryotes is colonized by DNA fragments of mitochondrial origin, called NUMTs. These insertions have been associated with a variety of germ-line diseases in humans. The significance of this uptake of potentially dangerous sequences into the nuclear genome is unclear. Here we provide functional evidence that sequences of mitochondrial origin promote nuclear DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that NUMTs are rich in key autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) consensus motifs, whose mutation results in the reduction or loss of DNA replication activity. Furthermore, 2D-gel analysis of the mrc1 mutant exposed to hydroxyurea shows that several NUMTs function as late chromosomal origins. We also show that NUMTs located close to or within ARS provide key sequence elements for replication. Thus NUMTs can act as independent origins, when inserted in an appropriate genomic context or affect the efficiency of pre-existing origins. These findings show that migratory mitochondrial DNAs can impact on the replication of the nuclear region they are inserted in. PMID:21408151

  5. Nuclear mitochondrial DNA activates replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chatre, Laurent; Ricchetti, Miria

    2011-03-08

    The nuclear genome of eukaryotes is colonized by DNA fragments of mitochondrial origin, called NUMTs. These insertions have been associated with a variety of germ-line diseases in humans. The significance of this uptake of potentially dangerous sequences into the nuclear genome is unclear. Here we provide functional evidence that sequences of mitochondrial origin promote nuclear DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that NUMTs are rich in key autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) consensus motifs, whose mutation results in the reduction or loss of DNA replication activity. Furthermore, 2D-gel analysis of the mrc1 mutant exposed to hydroxyurea shows that several NUMTs function as late chromosomal origins. We also show that NUMTs located close to or within ARS provide key sequence elements for replication. Thus NUMTs can act as independent origins, when inserted in an appropriate genomic context or affect the efficiency of pre-existing origins. These findings show that migratory mitochondrial DNAs can impact on the replication of the nuclear region they are inserted in.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA variation in human metabolic rate and energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Tranah, Gregory J.; Manini, Todd M.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Nalls, Michael A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Newman, Anne B.; Harris, Tamara B.; Miljkovic, Iva; Biffi, Alessandro; Cummings, Steven R.; Liu, Yongmei

    2014-01-01

    The role of climate in driving selection of mtDNA as Homo sapiens migrated out of Africa into Eurasia remains controversial. We evaluated the role of mtDNA variation in resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE) among 294 older, community-dwelling African and European American adults from the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Common African haplogroups L0, L2 and L3 had significantly lower RMRs than European haplogroups H, JT and UK with haplogroup L1 RMR being intermediate to these groups. This study links mitochondrial haplogroups with ancestry-associated differences in metabolic rate and energy expenditure. PMID:21586348

  7. Mitochondrial DNA copy number threshold in mtDNA depletion myopathy.

    PubMed

    Durham, S E; Bonilla, E; Samuels, D C; DiMauro, S; Chinnery, P F

    2005-08-09

    The authors measured the absolute amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) within single muscle fibers from two patients with thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency and two healthy controls. TK2 deficient fibers containing more than 0.01 mtDNA/microm3 had residual cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity. This defines the minimum amount of wild-type mtDNA molecules required to maintain COX activity in skeletal muscle and provides an explanation for the mosaic histochemical pattern seen in patients with mtDNA depletion syndrome.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids

    PubMed Central

    DeBiasse, Melissa B.; Rabon, David R.; Chamberlain, Michael J.; Taylor, Sabrina S.

    2016-01-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350–1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote–wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves. PMID:26774058

  9. The role of Pif1p, a DNA helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in maintaining mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Dunaway, Stephen; Ivessa, Andreas S

    2007-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly susceptible to oxidative and chemically induced damage, and these insults lead to a number of diseases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DNA helicase Pif1p is localized to the nucleus and mitochondria. We show that pif1 mutant cells are sensitive to ethidium bromide-induced damage and this mtDNA is prone to fragmentation. We also show that Pif1p associates with mtDNA. In pif1 mutant cells, mtDNA breaks at specific sites that exhibit Pif1-dependent recombination. We conclude that Pif1p participates in the protection from double-stranded (ds) DNA breaks or alternatively in the repair process of dsDNA breaks in mtDNA.

  10. Primer retention owing to the absence of RNase H1 is catastrophic for mitochondrial DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Holmes, J Bradley; Akman, Gokhan; Wood, Stuart R; Sakhuja, Kiran; Cerritelli, Susana M; Moss, Chloe; Bowmaker, Mark R; Jacobs, Howard T; Crouch, Robert J; Holt, Ian J

    2015-07-28

    Encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, and its function is essential for mitochondrial DNA maintenance in the developing mouse. Here we define the role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication. Analysis of replicating mitochondrial DNA in embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase H1 reveals retention of three primers in the major noncoding region (NCR) and one at the prominent lagging-strand initiation site termed Ori-L. Primer retention does not lead immediately to depletion, as the persistent RNA is fully incorporated in mitochondrial DNA. However, the retained primers present an obstacle to the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ in subsequent rounds of replication and lead to the catastrophic generation of a double-strand break at the origin when the resulting gapped molecules are copied. Hence, the essential role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication is the removal of primers at the origin of replication.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Navajo neurohepatopathy Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) GeneReview: MPV17-Related Hepatocerebral Mitochondrial DNA Maintenance Defect The United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation: Treatments and ...

  12. Maintenance of mitochondrial DNA copy number and expression are essential for preservation of mitochondrial function and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Jaan-Yeh; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Lee, Jing-Wen; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Fong, Tsorng-Han; Hsieh, Rong-Hong

    2008-02-01

    To examine whether a reduction in the mtDNA level will compromise mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial function, we created a cell model with depleted mtDNA. Stable transfection of small interfering (si)RNA of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) was used to interfere with Tfam gene expression. Selected stable clones showed 60-95% reduction in Tfam gene expression and 50-90% reduction in cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene expression. Tfam gene knockdown clones also showed decreased mtDNA-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COX I) protein expression. However, no significant differences in protein expression were observed in nuclear DNA (nDNA)-encoded mitochondrial respiratory enzyme subunits. The cell morphology changed from a rhombus-like to a spindle-like form as determined in clones with decreased expressions of Tfam, mtRNA, and mitochondrial proteins. The mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activities and ATP production in such clones were significantly lower. The proportions of mtDNA mutations including 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a 4,977-bp deletion, and a 3,243-point mutation were also examined in these clones. No obvious increase in mtDNA mutations was observed in mitochondrial dysfunctional cell clones. The mitochondrial respiratory activity and ATP production ability recovered in cells with increased mtDNA levels after removal of the specific siRNA treatment. These experimental results provide direct evidence to substantiate that downregulation of mtDNA copy number and expression may compromise mitochondrial function and subsequent cell growth and morphology. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Triangulating the provenance of African elephants using mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Hondo, Tomoko; Roca, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    African elephant mitochondrial (mt) DNA follows a distinctive evolutionary trajectory. As females do not migrate between elephant herds, mtDNA exhibits low geographic dispersal. We therefore examined the effectiveness of mtDNA for assigning the provenance of African elephants (or their ivory). For 653 savanna and forest elephants from 22 localities in 13 countries, 4258 bp of mtDNA was sequenced. We detected eight mtDNA subclades, of which seven had regionally restricted distributions. Among 108 unique haplotypes identified, 72% were found at only one locality and 84% were country specific, while 44% of individuals carried a haplotype detected only at their sampling locality. We combined 316 bp of our control region sequences with those generated by previous trans-national surveys of African elephants. Among 101 unique control region haplotypes detected in African elephants across 81 locations in 22 countries, 62% were present in only a single country. Applying our mtDNA results to a previous microsatellite-based assignment study would improve estimates of the provenance of elephants in 115 of 122 mis-assigned cases. Nuclear partitioning followed species boundaries and not mtDNA subclade boundaries. For taxa such as elephants in which nuclear and mtDNA markers differ in phylogeography, combining the two markers can triangulate the origins of confiscated wildlife products. PMID:23798975

  14. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms associated with longevity in a Finnish population.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Hervonen, Antti; Hurme, Mikko; Karhunen, Pekka J; Jylhä, Marja; Majamaa, Kari

    2003-01-01

    Sequence variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may cause slight differences both in the functioning of the respiratory chain and in free radical production, and an association between certain mtDNA haplogroups and longevity has been suggested. In order to determine further the role of mtDNA in longevity, we studied the frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups and haplogroup clusters among elderly subjects and controls in a Finnish population. Samples were obtained from 225 persons aged 90-91 years (Vitality 90+) and from 400 middle-aged controls and 257 infants. MtDNA haplogroups were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The haplogroup frequencies of the Vitality 90+ group differed from both those of the middle-aged controls ( P=0.01) and the infants ( P=0.00005), haplogroup H being less frequent than among the middle-aged subjects ( P=0.001) and infants ( P=0.00001), whereas haplogroups U and J were more frequent. Haplogroup clusters also differed between Vitality 90+ and both the middle-aged subjects ( P=0.002) and infants ( P=0.00001), the frequency of haplogroup cluster HV being lower in the former and that of UK and WIX being higher. These data suggest an association between certain mtDNA haplogroups or haplogroup clusters and longevity. Furthermore, our data appear to favour the presence of advantageous polymorphisms and support a role for mitochondria and mtDNA in the degenerative processes involved in ageing.

  15. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  16. Mhr1p-dependent concatemeric mitochondrial DNA formation for generating yeast mitochondrial homoplasmic cells.

    PubMed

    Ling, Feng; Shibata, Takehiko

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondria carry many copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but mt-alleles quickly segregate during mitotic growth through unknown mechanisms. Consequently, all mtDNA copies are often genetically homogeneous within each individual ("homoplasmic"). Our previous study suggested that tandem multimers ("concatemers") formed mainly by the Mhr1p (a yeast nuclear gene-encoded mtDNA-recombination protein)-dependent pathway are required for mtDNA partitioning into buds with concomitant monomerization. The transmission of a few randomly selected clones (as concatemers) of mtDNA into buds is a possible mechanism to establish homoplasmy. The current study provides evidence for this hypothesis as follows: the overexpression of MHR1 accelerates mt-allele-segregation in growing heteroplasmic zygotes, and mhr1-1 (recombination-deficient) causes its delay. The mt-allele-segregation rate correlates with the abundance of concatemers, which depends on Mhr1p. In G1-arrested cells, concatemeric mtDNA was labeled by [14C]thymidine at a much higher density than monomers, indicating concatemers as the immediate products of mtDNA replication, most likely in a rolling circle mode. After releasing the G1 arrest in the absence of [14C]thymidine, the monomers as the major species in growing buds of dividing cells bear a similar density of 14C as the concatemers in the mother cells, indicating that the concatemers in mother cells are the precursors of the monomers in buds.

  17. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P.; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as a consequence of secondary contact after an ancient geographical isolation. However, it is not unlikely that selection acts on mitochondria whose genes are involved in relevant oxidative phosphorylation processes. In this study, we performed selection tests on a fragment of 1044 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using 455 individuals from 18 locations. We also tested correlations of six environmental features: temperature, salinity, apparent oxygen utilization and nutrient concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate, on a compilation of mitochondrial clade frequencies from 66 sampling sites comprising 2776 specimens from previously published studies. Positive selection in a single codon was detected predominantly (99%) in the anti-tropical clade and temperature was the most relevant environmental predictor, contributing with 59% of the variance in the geographical distribution of clade frequencies. These findings strongly suggest that temperature is shaping the contemporary distribution of mitochondrial DNA clade frequencies in the European anchovy. PMID:25143035

  18. Drosophila mitochondrial DNA: a novel gene order.

    PubMed Central

    Clary, D O; Goddard, J M; Martin, S C; Fauron, C M; Wolstenholme, D R

    1982-01-01

    Part of the replication origin-containing A+T-rich region of the Drosophila yakuba mtDNA molecule and segments on either side of this region have been sequenced, and the genes within them identified. The data confirm that the small and large rRNA genes lie in tandem adjacent to that side of the A+T-rich region which is replicated first, and establish that a tRNAval gene lies between the two rRNA genes and that URF1 follows the large rRNA gene. The data further establish that the genes for tRNAile, tRNAgln, tRNAf-met and URF2 lie in the order given, on the opposite side of the A+T-rich region to the rRNA genes and, except for tRNAgln, are contained in the opposite strand to the rRNA, tRNAval and URF1 genes. This is in contrast to mammalian mtDNAs where all of these genes are located on the side of the replication origin which is replicated last, within the order tRNAphe, small (12S) rRNA, tRNAval, large (16S) rRNA, tRNAleu, URF1, tRNAile, tRNAgln, tRNAf-met and URF2, and, except tRNAgln, are all contained in the same (H) strand. In D. yakuba URF1 and URF2, the triplet AGA appears to specify an amino acid, which is again different from the situation found in mammalian mtDNAs, where AGA is used only as a rare termination codon. PMID:6294611

  19. Mitochondrial nucleoid clusters protect newly synthesized mtDNA during Doxorubicin- and Ethidium Bromide-induced mitochondrial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Alán, Lukáš, E-mail: lukas.alan@fgu.cas.cz; Špaček

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is compacted in ribonucleoprotein complexes called nucleoids, which can divide or move within the mitochondrial network. Mitochondrial nucleoids are able to aggregate into clusters upon reaction with intercalators such as the mtDNA depletion agent Ethidium Bromide (EB) or anticancer drug Doxorobicin (DXR). However, the exact mechanism of nucleoid clusters formation remains unknown. Resolving these processes may help to elucidate the mechanisms of DXR-induced cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we addressed the role of two key nucleoid proteins; mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB); in the formation of mitochondrial nucleoid clusters during the action of intercalators.more » We found that both intercalators cause numerous aberrations due to perturbing their native status. By blocking mtDNA replication, both agents also prevented mtDNA association with TFAM, consequently causing nucleoid aggregation into large nucleoid clusters enriched with TFAM, co-existing with the normal nucleoid population. In the later stages of intercalation (> 48 h), TFAM levels were reduced to 25%. In contrast, mtSSB was released from mtDNA and freely distributed within the mitochondrial network. Nucleoid clusters mostly contained nucleoids with newly replicated mtDNA, however the nucleoid population which was not in replication mode remained outside the clusters. Moreover, the nucleoid clusters were enriched with p53, an anti-oncogenic gatekeeper. We suggest that mitochondrial nucleoid clustering is a mechanism for protecting nucleoids with newly replicated DNA against intercalators mediating genotoxic stress. These results provide new insight into the common mitochondrial response to mtDNA stress and can be implied also on DXR-induced mitochondrial cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • The mechanism for mitochondrial nucleoid clustering is proposed. • DNA intercalators (Doxorubicin or Ethidium Bromide) prevent

  20. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of least cisco Coregonus sardinella in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Padula, V M; Causey, D; López, J A

    2017-03-01

    This study presents the first detailed analysis of the mitochondrial DNA diversity of least cisco Coregonus sardinella in Alaska using a 678 bp segment of the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial genome. Findings suggest that the history of C. sardinella in Alaska differs from that of other species of Coregonus present in the state and surrounding regions. The examined populations of C. sardinella are genetically diverse across Alaska. Sixty-eight distinct mitochondrial haplotypes were identified among 305 individuals sampled from nine locations. The haplotype minimum spanning network and phylogeny showed a modest level of geographic segregation among haplotypes, suggesting high levels of on-going or recent connectivity among distant populations. Observed Φ ST values and the results of homogeneity and AMOVAs indicate incipient genetic differentiation between aggregations in three broad regional groups. Sites north of the Brooks Range formed one group, sites in the Yukon and Selawik Rivers formed a second group and sites south of the Yukon drainage formed the third group. Overall, the sequence data showed that a large proportion of mtDNA genetic variation in C. sardinella is shared across Alaska, but this variation is not homogeneously distributed across all regions and for all haplotype groups. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Discovery of cyanophage genomes which contain mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Mohr, Remus; Millard, Andrew D; Holmes, Antony B; Larkum, Anthony W; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Scanlan, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2011-08-01

    DNA polymerase γ is a family A DNA polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA in eukaryotes. The origins of DNA polymerase γ have remained elusive because it is not present in any known bacterium, though it has been hypothesized that mitochondria may have inherited the enzyme by phage-mediated nonorthologous displacement. Here, we present an analysis of two full-length homologues of this gene, which were found in the genomes of two bacteriophages, which infect the chlorophyll-d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina. Phylogenetic analyses of these phage DNA polymerase γ proteins show that they branch deeply within the DNA polymerase γ clade and therefore share a common origin with their eukaryotic homologues. We also found homologues of these phage polymerases in the environmental Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) database, which fell in the same clade. An analysis of the CAMERA assemblies containing the environmental homologues together with the filter fraction metadata indicated some of these assemblies may be of bacterial origin. We also show that the phage-encoded DNA polymerase γ is highly transcribed as the phage genomes are replicated. These findings provide data that may assist in reconstructing the evolution of mitochondria.

  2. Forensics and mitochondrial DNA: applications, debates, and foundations.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Allard, Marc W; Wilson, Mark R; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2003-01-01

    Debate on the validity and reliability of scientific methods often arises in the courtroom. When the government (i.e., the prosecution) is the proponent of evidence, the defense is obliged to challenge its admissibility. Regardless, those who seek to use DNA typing methodologies to analyze forensic biological evidence have a responsibility to understand the technology and its applications so a proper foundation(s) for its use can be laid. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), an extranuclear genome, has certain features that make it desirable for forensics, namely, high copy number, lack of recombination, and matrilineal inheritance. mtDNA typing has become routine in forensic biology and is used to analyze old bones, teeth, hair shafts, and other biological samples where nuclear DNA content is low. To evaluate results obtained by sequencing the two hypervariable regions of the control region of the human mtDNA genome, one must consider the genetically related issues of nomenclature, reference population databases, heteroplasmy, paternal leakage, recombination, and, of course, interpretation of results. We describe the approaches, the impact some issues may have on interpretation of mtDNA analyses, and some issues raised in the courtroom.

  3. Exploring the mitochondrial DNA variability of the Amazonian Yanomami.

    PubMed

    Varano, Sara; Scorrano, Gabriele; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Finocchio, Andrea; Rapone, Cesare; Berti, Andrea; Rickards, Olga

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the mitochondrial variability in the Yanomami population to reconstruct its demographic history and explore its genetic composition in relation to its cultural and linguistic features. A total of 174 human head hair shafts -collected in 1958- belonging to individuals from a Yanomami group living in Santa Isabel, Brazil, were analyzed. Automated extraction of the hairs was performed, and several methods were applied to optimize the analysis of the degraded DNA. The mtDNA hypervariable segments I-II, along with the 9-bp COII-tRNA Lys deletion, were investigated. Using published data from the Yanomami and other Amazonian populations, several statistical analyses were carried out to explore the genetic variability within the study population. Ninety eight percent of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences analyzed belonged to Native American haplogroups, while 2% belonged to African haplogroups. Compared with the Yanomami groups previously studied, the Santa Isabel sample seemed more genetically similar to other Amazonian populations. Among the Yanomami samples studied to date, the Santa Isabel Yanomami show a higher genetic heterogeneity. This could be due to gene flow with non-Yanomami populations, as well as to the introduction of new mitochondrial haplotypes by gold miners. In both cases, the geographic location of Santa Isabel might have made this Yanomami village less isolated than the others, suggesting that the Rio Negro played a central role in increasing its genetic variability. On the whole, the Yanomami were quite genetically diversified, probably mirroring their great linguistic heterogeneity. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:846-856, 2016. © 2016Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Pathogenic role of mtDNA duplications in mitochondrial diseases associated with mtDNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Odoardi, Francesca; Rana, Michele; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Modoni, Anna; D'Amico, Adele; Papacci, Manuela; Tonali, Pietro; Servidei, Serenella; Silvestri, Gabriella

    2003-04-30

    We estimated the frequency of multiple mtDNA rearrangements by Southern blot in 32 patients affected by mitochondrial disorders associated with single deletions in order to assess genotype-phenotype correlations and elucidate the pathogenic significance of mtDNA duplications. Muscle in situ hybridization studies were performed in patients showing mtDNA duplications at Southern blot. We found multiple rearrangements in 12/32 (37.5%) patients; in particular, mtDNA duplications were detected in 4/4 Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), in 1 Pearson's syndrome, in 1/3 encephalomyopathies with progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and in 2/23 PEO. In situ studies documented an exclusive accumulation of deleted mtDNAs in cytochrome c oxidase negative fibers of patients with mtDNA duplications. The presence of mtDNA duplications significantly correlated with onset of symptoms before age 15 and occurrence of clinical multisystem involvement. Analysis of biochemical data documented a predominant reduction of complex III in patients without duplications compared to patients with mtDNA duplications. Our data indicate that multiple mtDNA rearrangements are detectable in a considerable proportion of patients with single deletions and that mtDNA duplications do not cause any oxidative impairment. They more likely play a pathogenic role in the determination of clinical expression of mitochondrial diseases associated with single mtDNA deletions, possibly generating deleted mtDNAs in embryonic tissues by homologous recombination. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Mitochondrial inhibition of uracil-DNA glycosylase is not mutagenic

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sushant; Singh, Keshav K

    2004-01-01

    Background Uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) plays a major role in repair of uracil formed due to deamination of cytosine. UDG in human cells is present in both the nucleus and mitochondrial compartments. Although, UDG's role in the nucleus is well established its role in mitochondria is less clear. Results In order to identify UDG's role in the mitochondria we expressed UGI (uracil glycosylase inhibitor) a natural inhibitor of UDG in the mitochondria. Our studies suggest that inhibition of UDG by UGI in the mitochondria does not lead to either spontaneous or induced mutations in mtDNA. Our studies also suggest that UGI expression has no affect on cellular growth or cytochrome c-oxidase activity. Conclusions These results suggest that human cell mitochondria contain alternatives glycosylase (s) that may function as back up DNA repair protein (s) that repair uracil in the mitochondria. PMID:15574194

  6. Typing single polymorphic nucleotides in mitochondrial DNA as a way to access Middle Pleistocene DNA

    PubMed Central

    Valdiosera, Cristina; García, Nuria; Dalén, Love; Smith, Colin; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Lidén, Kerstin; Angerbjörn, Anders; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Götherström, Anders

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we have used a technique designed to target short fragments containing informative mitochondrial substitutions to extend the temporal limits of DNA recovery and study the molecular phylogeny of Ursus deningeri. We present a cladistic analysis using DNA recovered from 400 kyr old U. deningeri remains, which demonstrates U. deningeri's relation to Ursus spelaeus. This study extends the limits of recovery from skeletal remains by almost 300 kyr. Plant material from permafrost environments has yielded DNA of this age in earlier studies, and our data suggest that DNA in teeth from cave environments may be equally well preserved. PMID:17148299

  7. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons are decreased and mitochondrial biogenesis transcriptome signaling is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease hippocampi.

    PubMed

    Rice, Ann C; Keeney, Paula M; Algarzae, Norah K; Ladd, Amy C; Thomas, Ravindar R; Bennett, James P

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of adult-onset dementia and is characterized in its pre-diagnostic stage by reduced cerebral cortical glucose metabolism and in later stages by reduced cortical oxygen uptake, implying reduced mitochondrial respiration. Using quantitative PCR we determined the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene copy numbers from multiple groups of 15 or 20 pyramidal neurons, GFAP(+) astrocytes and dentate granule neurons isolated using laser capture microdissection, and the relative expression of mitochondrial biogenesis (mitobiogenesis) genes in hippocampi from 10 AD and 9 control (CTL) cases. AD pyramidal but not dentate granule neurons had significantly reduced mtDNA copy numbers compared to CTL neurons. Pyramidal neuron mtDNA copy numbers in CTL, but not AD, positively correlated with cDNA levels of multiple mitobiogenesis genes. In CTL, but not in AD, hippocampal cDNA levels of PGC1α were positively correlated with multiple downstream mitobiogenesis factors. Mitochondrial DNA copy numbers in pyramidal neurons did not correlate with hippocampal Aβ1-42 levels. After 48 h exposure of H9 human neural stem cells to the neurotoxic fragment Aβ25-35, mtDNA copy numbers were not significantly altered. In summary, AD postmortem hippocampal pyramidal neurons have reduced mtDNA copy numbers. Mitochondrial biogenesis pathway signaling relationships are disrupted in AD, but are mostly preserved in CTL. Our findings implicate complex alterations of mitochondria-host cell relationships in AD.

  9. Low abundance of mitochondrial DNA changes mitochondrial status and renders cells resistant to serum starvation and sodium nitroprusside insult.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Heo, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In Sung; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Han, Jin

    2015-07-01

    Mutation or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause severe mitochondrial malfunction, originating from the mitochondrion itself, or from the crosstalk between nuclei and mitochondria. However, the changes that would occur if the amount of mtDNA is diminished are less known. Thus, we generated rat myoblast H9c2 cells containing lower amounts of mtDNA via ethidium bromide and uridine supplementation. After confirming the depletion of mtDNA by quantitative PCR and gel electrophoresis analysis, we investigated the changes in mitochondrial physical parameters by using flow cytometry. We also evaluated the resistance of these cells to serum starvation and sodium nitroprusside. H9c2 cells with diminished mtDNA contents showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, mass, free calcium, and zinc ion contents as compared to naïve H9c2 cells. Furthermore, cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels were significantly higher in mtDNA-lowered H9c2 cells than in the naïve cells. Although the oxygen consumption rate and cell proliferation were decreased, mtDNA-lowered H9c2 cells were more resistant to serum deprivation and nitroprusside insults than the naïve H9c2 cells. Taken together, we conclude that the low abundance of mtDNA cause changes in cellular status, such as changes in reactive oxygen species, calcium, and zinc ion levels inducing resistance to stress. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  10. Problem-based test: replication of mitochondrial DNA during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sétáló, György

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cell cycle, generation time, S-phase, cell culture synchronization, isotopic pulse-chase labeling, density labeling, equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation, buoyant density, rate-zonal centrifugation, nucleoside, nucleotide, kinase enzymes, polymerization of nucleic acids, re-replication block, cell fractionation, Svedberg (sedimentation constant = [ S]), nuclear DNA, mitochondrial DNA, heavy and light mitochondrial DNA chains, heteroplasmy, mitochondrial diseases Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Sofia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Fedeli, Ugo; Mielzynska-Svach, Danuta; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2013-10-01

    Increased mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) is a biologic response to mtDNA damage and dysfunction, predictive of lung cancer risk. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are established lung carcinogens and may cause mitochondrial toxicity. Whether PAH exposure and PAH-related nuclear DNA (nDNA) genotoxic effects are linked with increased mtDNAcn has never been evaluated. We investigated the effect of chronic exposure to PAHs on mtDNAcn in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of 46 Polish male noncurrent smoking coke-oven workers and 44 matched controls, who were part of a group of 94 study individuals examined in our previous work. Subjects' PAH exposure and genetic alterations were characterized through measures of internal dose (urinary 1-pyrenol), target dose [anti-benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (anti-BPDE)-DNA adduct], genetic instability (micronuclei and telomere length), and DNA methylation (p53 promoter) in PBLs. mtDNAcn (MT/S) was measured using a validated real-time PCR method. Workers with PAH exposure above the median value (>3 μmol 1-pyrenol/mol creatinine) showed higher mtDNAcn [geometric means (GM) of 1.06 (unadjusted) and 1.07 (age-adjusted)] compared with controls [GM 0.89 (unadjusted); 0.89 (age-adjusted); (P = 0.029 and 0.016)], as well as higher levels of genetic and chromosomal [i.e., anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (P < 0.001), micronuclei (P < 0.001), and telomere length (P = 0.053)] and epigenetic [i.e., p53 gene-specific promoter methylation (P < 0.001)] alterations in the nDNA. In the whole study population, unadjusted and age-adjusted mtDNAcn was positively correlated with 1-pyrenol (P = 0.043 and 0.032) and anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (P = 0.046 and 0.049). PAH exposure and PAH-related nDNA genotoxicity are associated with increased mtDNAcn. The present study is suggestive of potential roles of mtDNAcn in PAH-induced carcinogenesis.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Pavanello, Sofia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Fedeli, Ugo; Mielzynska-Švach, Danuta; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) is a biological response to mtDNA damage and dysfunction predictive of lung cancer risk. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are established lung carcinogens and may cause mitochondrial toxicity. Whether PAH exposure and PAH-related nuclear DNA (nDNA) genotoxic effects are linked with increased mtDNAcn has never been evaluated. Methods We investigated the effect of chronic exposure to PAHs on mtDNAcn in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of 46 Polish male non-current smoking cokeoven workers and 44 matched controls, who were part of a group of 94 study individuals examined in our previous work. Subjects PAH exposure and genetic alterations were characterized through measures of internal dose (urinary 1-pyrenol), target dose [anti-benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (anti-BPDE)-DNA adduct], genetic instability (micronuclei, MN and telomere length [TL]) and DNA methylation [p53 promoter] in PBLs. mtDNAcn (MT/S) was measured using a validated real-time PCR method. Results Workers with PAH exposure above the median value (>3 µmol 1-pyrenol/mol creatinine) showed higher mtDNAcn [geometric means (GM) of 1.06 (unadjusted) and 1.07 (age-adjusted)] compared to controls [GM 0.89 (unadjusted); 0.89 (age-adjusted)] (p=0.029 and 0.016), as well as higher levels of genetic and chromosomal [i.e. anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (p<0.001), MN (p<0.001) and TL (p=0.053)] and epigenetic [i.e., p53 gene-specific promoter methylation (p<0.001)] alterations in the nDNA. In the whole study population, unadjusted and age-adjusted mtDNAcn was positively correlated with 1-pyrenol (p=0.043 and 0.032) and anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (p=0.046 and 0.049). Conclusions PAH exposure and PAH-related nDNA genotoxicity are associated with increased mtDNAcn. Impact The present study is suggestive of potential roles of mtDNAcn in PAH-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23885040

  13. Plasma Mitochondrial DNA--a Novel DAMP in Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Di Caro, Valentina; Walko, Thomas D; Bola, R Aaron; Hong, John D; Pang, Diana; Hsue, Victor; Au, Alicia K; Halstead, E Scott; Carcillo, Joseph A; Clark, Robert S B; Aneja, Rajesh K

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a novel danger-associated molecular pattern that on its release into the extracellular milieu acts via toll-like receptor-9, a pattern recognition receptor of the immune system. We hypothesized that plasma mtDNA concentrations will be elevated in septic children, and these elevations are associated with an increase in the severity of illness. In a separate set of in vitro experiments, we test the hypothesis that exposing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to mtDNA activates the immune response and induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release. Children with sepsis/systemic inflammatory response syndrome or control groups were enrolled within 24  h of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. Mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COX1) concentrations were measured by real-time quantitative PCR in the DNA extracted from plasma. PBMCs were treated with mtDNA (10  μg/mL) and supernatant TNF levels were measured. The median plasma mtDNA concentrations were significantly elevated in the septic patients as compared with the critically ill non-septic and healthy control patients [1.75E+05 (IQR 6.64E+04-3.67E+05) versus 5.73E+03 (IQR 3.90E+03-1.28E+04) and 6.64E+03 (IQR 5.22E+03-1.63E+04) copies/μL respectively]. The median concentrations of plasma mtDNA were significantly greater in patients with MOF as compared with patients without MOF (3.2E+05 (IQR 1.41E+05-1.08E+06) vs. 2.9E+04 (IQR 2.47E+04-5.43E+04) copies/μL). PBMCs treated with mtDNA demonstrated higher supernatant TNF levels as compared with control cells (6.5 ± 1.8 vs. 3.5 ± 0.5  pg/mL, P > 0.05). Our data suggest that plasma mtDNA is a novel danger-associated molecular pattern in pediatric sepsis and appears to be associated with MOF.

  14. Association Between Chloroplast DNA and Mitochondrial DNA Haplotypes in Prunus spinosa L. (Rosaceae) Populations across Europe

    PubMed Central

    MOHANTY, APARAJITA; MARTÍN, JUAN PEDRO; GONZÁLEZ, LUIS MIGUEL; AGUINAGALDE, ITZIAR

    2003-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were studied in 24 populations of Prunus spinosa sampled across Europe. The cpDNA and mtDNA fragments were amplified using universal primers and subsequently digested with restriction enzymes to obtain the polymorphisms. Combinations of all the polymorphisms resulted in 33 cpDNA haplotypes and two mtDNA haplotypes. Strict association between the cpDNA haplotypes and the mtDNA haplotypes was detected in most cases, indicating conjoint inheritance of the two genomes. The most frequent and abundant cpDNA haplotype (C20; frequency, 51 %) is always associated with the more frequent and abundant mtDNA haplotype (M1; frequency, 84 %). All but two of the cpDNA haplotypes associated with the less frequent mtDNA haplotype (M2) are private haplotypes. These private haplotypes are phylogenetically related but geographically unrelated. They form a separate cluster on the minimum‐length spanning tree. PMID:14534199

  15. Historically low mitochondrial DNA diversity in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal marsupial that was historically widespread across eastern Australia until the end of the 19th century when it suffered a steep population decline. Hunting for the fur trade, habitat conversion, and disease contributed to a precipitous reduction in koala population size during the late 1800s and early 1900s. To examine the effects of these reductions in population size on koala genetic diversity, we sequenced part of the hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in koala museum specimens collected in the 19th and 20th centuries, hypothesizing that the historical samples would exhibit greater genetic diversity. Results The mtDNA haplotypes present in historical museum samples were identical to haplotypes found in modern koala populations, and no novel haplotypes were detected. Rarefaction analyses suggested that the mtDNA genetic diversity present in the museum samples was similar to that of modern koalas. Conclusions Low mtDNA diversity may have been present in koala populations prior to recent population declines. When considering management strategies, low genetic diversity of the mtDNA hypervariable region may not indicate recent inbreeding or founder events but may reflect an older historical pattern for koalas. PMID:23095716

  16. The long story of mitochondrial DNA and respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Degli Esposti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the long story of the relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and respiratory complex I, NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase, from its beginning  in the genome of the bacterial endosymbiont which then evolved into the mitochondria of our cells. The story begins with the evolution of ancient forms of bacterial complex I into the Nuo14 complex I that was present in the alpha proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria. The story then becomes complicated in the diversity of eukaryotic organisms that are currently recognized. Therefore, it does not have a clear end, because currently available information shows different situations of metabolic adaptation and gene loss, indicating cases of de-evolution of the original protonmotive complex into a system that may fundamentally assist [FeFe]-hydrogenases in re-oxidising metabolically produced NADH under anaerobic conditions. The history of complex I is thus a never ending story of molecular and physiological evolution producing new perspectives for studying the enzyme complex that occupies the largest proportion of mitochondrial DNA.

  17. The Mitochondrial DNA-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Blomme, Jonas; Van Aken, Olivier; Van Leene, Jelle; Jégu, Teddy; De Rycke, Riet; De Bruyne, Michiel; Vercruysse, Jasmien; Nolf, Jonah; Van Daele, Twiggy; De Milde, Liesbeth; Vermeersch, Mattias; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; De Jaeger, Geert; Benhamed, Moussa; Millar, A Harvey; Inzé, Dirk; Gonzalez, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana Gain- and loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol consumption and breast tumor mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Platek, Mary E; Shields, Peter G; Tan, Duanjun; Marian, Catalin; Bonner, Matthew R; McCann, Susan E; Nie, Jing; Wilding, Gregory E; Ambrosone, Christine; Millen, Amy E; Trevisan, Maurizio; Russell, Marcia; Nochajski, Thomas H; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2010-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are frequent in breast tumors, but the etiology of these mutations is unknown. We hypothesized that these mutations are associated with exposures that affect oxidative stress such as alcohol metabolism. Using archived tumor blocks from incident breast cancer cases in a case control study, the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) study, analysis of mtDNA mutations was conducted on 128 breast cancer cases selected based on extremes of alcohol intake. Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) was used to screen the entire mtDNA genome and sequencing was completed for all TTGE positive samples. Case-case comparisons were completed using unconditional logistic regression to determine the relative prevalence of the mutations by exposures including alcohol consumption, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) genotype, nutrient intake related to oxidative stress and established breast cancer risk factors. Somatic mtDNA mutations were found in 60 of the 128 tumors examined. There were no differences in the prevalence of mtDNA mutations by alcohol consumption, MnSOD genotype or dietary intake. The likelihood of mtDNA mutations was reduced among those with a positive family history for breast cancer (OR = 0.33, CI = 0.12-0.92), among postmenopausal women who used hormone replacement therapy (OR = 0.46, CI = 0.19-1.08, P = 0.08) and was increased for ER negative tumors (OR = 2.05, CI = 0.95-4.43, P = 0.07). Consistent with previous studies, we found that mtDNA mutations are a frequent occurrence in breast tumors. An understanding of the etiology of mtDNA mutations may provide insight into breast carcinogenesis.

  19. Dichloroacetate treatment in Leigh syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, J; Sugita, K; Tanabe, Y; Maemoto, T; Niimi, H

    1997-01-01

    Sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) was administered to a 1-year-old female case of Leigh syndrome, who had a T > G point mutation at nt 8993 of mitochondrial DNA. Her biochemical and clinical symptoms improved gradually, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed reduction of the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio, and magnetic resonance imaging showed progressive cerebral atrophy despite the DCA therapy. These results suggest that DCA therapy may not retard the progress of the primary disease in Leigh syndrome, but produced clinical improvement most likely by reducing toxic accumulation of lactate.

  20. Additional mitochondrial DNA influences the interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in a bovine embryo model of nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Srirattana, Kanokwan; St John, Justin C

    2018-05-08

    We generated cattle embryos using mitochondrial supplementation and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), named miNT, to determine how additional mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) modulates the nuclear genome. To eliminate any confounding effects from somatic cell mtDNA in intraspecies SCNT, donor cell mtDNA was depleted prior to embryo production. Additional oocyte mtDNA did not affect embryo development rates but increased mtDNA copy number in blastocyst stage embryos. Moreover, miNT-derived blastocysts had different gene expression profiles when compared with SCNT-derived blastocysts. Additional mtDNA increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, cell cycle and DNA repair. Supplementing the embryo culture media with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), had no beneficial effects on the development of miNT-derived embryos, unlike SCNT-derived embryos. When compared with SCNT-derived blastocysts cultured in the presence of TSA, additional mtDNA alone had beneficial effects as the activity of glycolysis may increase and embryonic cell death may decrease. However, these beneficial effects were not found with additional mtDNA and TSA together, suggesting that additional mtDNA alone enhances reprogramming. In conclusion, additional mtDNA increased mtDNA copy number and expression levels of genes involved in energy production and embryo development in blastocyst stage embryos emphasising the importance of nuclear-mitochondrial interactions.

  1. Relaxation of selective constraint on dog mitochondrial DNA following domestication.

    PubMed

    Björnerfeldt, Susanne; Webster, Matthew T; Vilà, Carles

    2006-08-01

    The domestication of dogs caused a dramatic change in their way of life compared with that of their ancestor, the gray wolf. We hypothesize that this new life style changed the selective forces that acted upon the species, which in turn had an effect on the dog's genome. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA genome in 14 dogs, six wolves, and three coyotes. Here we show that dogs have accumulated nonsynonymous changes in mitochondrial genes at a faster rate than wolves, leading to elevated levels of variation in their proteins. This suggests that a major consequence of domestication in dogs was a general relaxation of selective constraint on their mitochondrial genome. If this change also affected other parts of the dog genome, it could have facilitated the generation of novel functional genetic diversity. This diversity could thus have contributed raw material upon which artificial selection has shaped modern breeds and may therefore be an important source of the extreme phenotypic variation present in modern-day dogs.

  2. Diversity of mitochondrial DNA lineages in South Siberia.

    PubMed

    Derenko, M V; Grzybowski, T; Malyarchuk, B A; Dambueva, I K; Denisova, G A; Czarny, J; Dorzhu, C M; Kakpakov, V T; Miścicka-Sliwka, D; Woźniak, M; Zakharov, I A

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the origin and evolution of aboriginal populations of South Siberia, a comprehensive mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis (HVR1 sequencing combined with RFLP typing) of 480 individuals, representing seven Altaic-speaking populations (Altaians, Khakassians, Buryats, Sojots, Tuvinians, Todjins and Tofalars), was performed. Additionally, HVR2 sequence information was obtained for 110 Altaians, providing, in particular, some novel details of the East Asian mtDNA phylogeny. The total sample revealed 81% East Asian (M*, M7, M8, M9, M10, C, D, G, Z, A, B, F, N9a, Y) and 17% West Eurasian (H, U, J, T, I, N1a, X) matrilineal genetic contribution, but with regional differences within South Siberia. The highest influx of West Eurasian mtDNAs was observed in populations from the East Sayan and Altai regions (from 12.5% to 34.5%), whereas in populations from the Baikal region this contribution was markedly lower (less than 10%). The considerable substructure within South Siberian haplogroups B, F, and G, together with the high degree of haplogroup C and D diversity revealed there, allows us to conclude that South Siberians carry the genetic imprint of early-colonization phase of Eurasia. Statistical analyses revealed that South Siberian populations contain high levels of mtDNA diversity and high heterogeneity of mtDNA sequences among populations (Fst = 5.05%) that might be due to geography but not due to language and anthropological features.

  3. Signatures of Climatic Change In Human Mitochondrial Dna From Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. B.; Macaulay, V. A.; Torroni, A.; Bandelt, H.-J.

    Founder analysis is an approach to analysing non-recombining DNA sequence data, such as variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which aims at identifying and dating migrations into new territory. We applied the approach to about 4,000 human mtDNA sequences from Europe and the Near East, in order to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived at various times during the continent's past. We found that the major signal dates to about 15,000 years ago, at the time of rewarming following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). There is little or no archaeological evidence for immigration into Europe at this time, and the record indicates that at least parts of southern Europe remained populated during the LGM. Therefore, we interpret this signal as the trace of a bottleneck at the time of the LGM, as a result of the retreat from northern Europe during the peak of the glaciation, followed by a re-expansion from one or more refugial zones. Immigration episodes then figure at the beginning of the Early Upper Palaeolithic, during the Middle Upper Palaeolithic, and with the Neolithic. The impact of the latter on the composition of the European mtDNA pool was evidently rather minor. This result implies that climate is likely to have been a major force shaping human demographic history in Europe.

  4. Chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA are paternally inherited in Sequoia sempervirens D. Don Endl

    PubMed Central

    Neale, David B.; Marshall, Kimberly A.; Sederoff, Ronald R.

    1989-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in controlled crosses were used to infer the mode of inheritance of chloroplast DNA and mitochondrial DNA in coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens D. Don Endl.). Chloroplast DNA was paternally inherited, as is true for all other conifers studied thus far. Surprisingly, a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected by a mitochondrial probe was paternally inherited as well. This polymorphism could not be detected in hybridizations with chloroplast probes covering the entire chloroplast genome, thus providing evidence that the mitochondrial probe had not hybridized to chloroplast DNA on the blot. We conclude that mitochondrial DNA is paternally inherited in coast redwood. To our knowledge, paternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA in sexual crosses of a multicellular eukaryotic organism has not been previously reported. Images PMID:16594091

  5. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA variation of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Resende, Adriana; Gonçalves, Joana; Muigai, Anne W T; Pereira, Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The history of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Africa remains largely unknown. After being first introduced from the Near East, sheep gradually spread through the African continent with pastoral societies. The eastern part of Africa was important either for the first diffusion of sheep southward or for putative secondary introductions from the Arabian Peninsula or southern Asia. We analysed mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 91 domestic sheep from Kenya and found a high diversity of matrilines from the widespread haplogroup B, whereas only a single individual from haplogroup A was detected. Our phylogeography analyses of more than 500 available mitochondrial DNA sequences also identified ancestral haplotypes that were probably first introduced in Africa and are now widely distributed. Moreover, we found no evidence of an admixture between East and West African sheep. The presence of shared haplotypes in eastern and ancient southern African sheep suggests the possible southward movement of sheep along the eastern part of Africa. Finally, we found no evidence of an extensive introduction of sheep from southern Asia into Africa via the Indian Ocean trade. The overall findings on the phylogeography of East African domestic sheep set the grounds for understanding the origin and subsequent movements of sheep in Africa. The richness of maternal lineages in Kenyan breeds is of prime importance for future conservation and breeding programmes. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups and Neurocognitive Impairment During HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Samuels, David C.; Bush, William; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Heaton, Robert K.; Franklin, Donald R.; Straub, Peter; Murdock, Deborah G.; Clifford, David B.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Marra, Christina M.; McArthur, Justin C.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; Grant, Igor; Kallianpur, Asha R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains an important complication in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Ancestry-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups have been associated with outcomes of HIV infection and combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), and with neurodegenerative diseases. We hypothesize that mtDNA haplogroups are associated with NCI in HIV-infected adults and performed a genetic association study in the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort. Methods. CHARTER is an observational study of ambulatory HIV-infected adults. Haplogroups were assigned using mtDNA sequence, and principal components were derived from ancestry-informative nuclear DNA variants. Outcomes were cross-sectional global deficit score (GDS) as a continuous measure, GDS impairment (GDS ≥ 0.50), and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) using international criteria. Multivariable models were adjusted for comorbidity status (incidental vs contributing), current CART, plasma HIV RNA, reading ability, and CD4 cell nadir. Results. Haplogroups were available from 1027 persons; median age 43 years, median CD4 nadir 178 cells/mm3, 72% on CART, and 46% with HAND. The 102 (9.9%) persons of genetically determined admixed Hispanic ancestry had more impairment by GDS or HAND than persons of European or African ancestry (P < .001 for all). In multivariate models including persons of admixed Hispanic ancestry, those with haplogroup B had lower GDS (β = −0.34; P = .008) and less GDS impairment (odds ratio = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, .04, .63; P = .009) than other haplogroups. There were no significant haplogroup associations among persons of European or African ancestry. Conclusions. In these mostly CART-treated persons, mtDNA haplogroup B was associated with less NCI among persons of genetically determined Hispanic ancestry. mtDNA variation may represent an ancestry-specific factor influencing NCI in HIV

  8. Mgm101p Is a Novel Component of the Mitochondrial Nucleoid That Binds DNA and Is Required for the Repair of Oxidatively Damaged Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Shelly; Tieu, Quinton; Wong, Edith; Weiss, Eric; Schieltz, David; Yates, John R.; Nunnari, Jodi

    1999-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during cell division is required for progeny to be respiratory competent. Maintenance involves the replication, repair, assembly, segregation, and partitioning of the mitochondrial nucleoid. MGM101 has been identified as a gene essential for mtDNA maintenance in S. cerevisiae, but its role is unknown. Using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified Mgm101p as a component of highly enriched nucleoids, suggesting that it plays a nucleoid-specific role in maintenance. Subcellular fractionation, indirect immunofluorescence and GFP tagging show that Mgm101p is exclusively associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid structure in cells. Furthermore, DNA affinity chromatography of nucleoid extracts indicates that Mgm101p binds to DNA, suggesting that its nucleoid localization is in part due to this activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells containing a temperature sensitive mgm101 allele suggests that Mgm101p is not involved in mtDNA packaging, segregation, partitioning or required for ongoing mtDNA replication. We examined Mgm101p's role in mtDNA repair. As compared with wild-type cells, mgm101 cells were more sensitive to mtDNA damage induced by UV irradiation and were hypersensitive to mtDNA damage induced by gamma rays and H2O2 treatment. Thus, we propose that Mgm101p performs an essential function in the repair of oxidatively damaged mtDNA that is required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:10209025

  9. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.

    PubMed

    Brzeski, Kristin E; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350-1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote-wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves. © The American Genetic Association. 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway.

    PubMed

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-19

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway

    PubMed Central

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-01

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. PMID:25487335

  13. Amplification of Mitochondrial DNA for detection of Plasmodiumvivax in Balochistan.

    PubMed

    Shahwani, Muhammad Naeem; Nisar, Samia; Aleem, Abdul; Panezai, Marina; Afridi, Sarwat; Malik, Shaukat Iqbal

    2017-05-01

    To access a new step using PCR to amplify the targeted mtDNA sequence for detecting specifically Plasmodium vivax and its co-infections, false positive and false negative results with Plasmodium falciparum. In this study we have standardized a new technical approach in which the target mitochondrial DNA sequence (mtDNA) was amplified by using a PCR technique as a tool to detect Plasmodium spp. Species specific primers were designed to hybridize with cytochrome c oxidase gene of P. vivax (cox I) and P. falciparum (cox III). Two hundred blood samples were collected on the basis of clinical symptoms which were initially examined through microscopic analysis after preparing Giemsa stained thick and thin blood smears. Afterwards genomic DNA was extracted from all samples and was then subjected to PCR amplification by using species specific primers and amplified segments were sequenced for confirmation of results. One-hundred and thirty-two blood samples were detected as positive for malaria by PCR, out of which 64 were found to be positive by PCR and 53 by both microscopy and PCR for P.vivax infection. Nine samples were found to be false negative, one P.vivax mono infection was declared as co infection by PCR and 3 samples identified as having P.falciparum gametes were confirmed as P.vivax by PCR amplification. Sensitivity and specificity were found to be 85% and 92% respectively. Results obtained through PCR method were comparatively better and reliable than microscopy.

  14. Drosophila mitochondrial transcription factor B1 modulates mitochondrial translation but not transcription or DNA copy number in Schneider cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Yuichi; Adán, Cristina; Garesse, Rafael; Kaguni, Laurie S

    2005-04-29

    We report the cloning and molecular analysis of Drosophila mitochondrial transcription factor (d-mtTF) B1. An RNA interference (RNAi) construct was designed that reduces expression of d-mtTFB1 to 5% of its normal level in Schneider cells. In striking contrast with our previous study on d-mtTFB2, we found that RNAi knock-down of d-mtTFB1 does not change the abundance of specific mitochondrial RNA transcripts, nor does it affect the copy number of mitochondrial DNA. In a corollary manner, overexpression of d-mtTFB1 did not increase either the abundance of mitochondrial RNA transcripts or mitochondrial DNA copy number. Our data suggest that, unlike d-mtTFB2, d-mtTFB1 does not have a critical role in either transcription or regulation of the copy number of mitochondrial DNA. Instead, because we found that RNAi knockdown of d-mtTFB1 reduces mitochondrial protein synthesis, we propose that it serves its primary role in modulating translation. Our work represents the first study to document the role of mtTFB1 in vivo and establishes clearly functional differences between mtTFB1 and mtTFB2.

  15. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Unwinding Enzyme Required for Liver Regeneration | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The liver has an exceptional capacity to proliferate. This ability allows the liver to regenerate its mass after partial surgical removal or injury and is the key to successful partial liver transplants. Liver cells, called hepatocytes, are packed with mitochondria, and regulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is crucial to mitochondrial function, including energy

  17. Alterations of mitochondrial DNA in CEM cells selected for resistance toward ddC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bjerke, M; Franco, M; Johansson, M; Balzarini, J; Karlsson, A

    2006-01-01

    2 ',3 '-dideoxycytidine (ddC) is a nucleoside analog that has been shown to produce a delayed toxicity which may be due to the depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In order to gain further understanding of the events involved in mitochondrial toxicity, two different CEM cell lines were selected for resistance to the delayed ddC toxicity.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Emilio J.

    2013-01-01

    The frequencies of four mitochondrial Native American DNA haplogroups were determined in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia and compared to the frequencies previously obtained for Amerindian and Afro-Colombian populations. Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups ranged from 74% to 97%. The lowest frequencies were found in Departments on the Caribbean coast and in the Pacific region, where the frequency of Afro-Colombians is higher, while the highest mtDNA Amerindian haplogroup frequencies were found in Departments that historically have a strong Amerindian heritage. Interestingly, all four mtDNA haplogroups were found in all Departments, in contrast to the complete absence of haplogroup D and high frequencies of haplogroup A in Amerindian populations in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Our results indicate that all four Native American mtDNA haplogroups were widely distributed in Colombia at the time of the Spanish conquest. PMID:24130438

  19. Validation of the use of an artificial mitochondrial reporter DNA vector containing a Cytomegalovirus promoter for mitochondrial transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Ishikawa, Takuya; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondria have their own gene expression system that is independent of the nuclear system, and control cellular functions in cooperation with the nucleus. While a number of useful technologies for achieving nuclear transgene expression have been reported, only a few have focused on mitochondria. In this study, we validated the utility of an artificial mitochondrial DNA vector with a virus promoter on mitochondrial transgene expression. We designed and constructed pCMV-mtLuc (CGG) that contains a CMV promotor derived from Cytomegalovirus and an artificial mitochondrial genome with a NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase gene that records adjustments to the mitochondrial codon system. Nluc luciferase activity measurements showed that the pCMV-mtLuc (CGG) efficiently produced the Nluc luciferase protein in human HeLa cells. Moreover, we optimized the mitochondrial transfection of pCMV-mtLuc (CGG) using a MITO-Porter system, a liposome-based carrier for mitochondrial delivery via membrane fusion. As a result, we found that transfection of pCMV-mtLuc (CGG) by MITO-Porter modified with the KALA peptide (cationic amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide) showed a high mitochondrial transgene expression. The developed mitochondrial transgene expression system represents a potentially useful tool for the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology for controlling the intracellular microenvironment via the regulation of mitochondrial function and promises to open additional innovative research fields of study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogeographic Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA in Northern Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Derenko, Miroslava ; Malyarchuk, Boris ; Grzybowski, Tomasz ; Denisova, Galina ; Dambueva, Irina ; Perkova, Maria ; Dorzhu, Choduraa ; Luzina, Faina ; Lee, Hong Kyu ; Vanecek, Tomas ; Villems, Richard ; Zakharov, Ilia 

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the human colonization process of northern Asia and human dispersals to the Americas, a diverse subset of 71 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages was chosen for complete genome sequencing from the collection of 1,432 control-region sequences sampled from 18 autochthonous populations of northern, central, eastern, and southwestern Asia. On the basis of complete mtDNA sequencing, we have revised the classification of haplogroups A, D2, G1, M7, and I; identified six new subhaplogroups (I4, N1e, G1c, M7d, M7e, and J1b2a); and fully characterized haplogroups N1a and G1b, which were previously described only by the first hypervariable segment (HVS1) sequencing and coding-region restriction-fragment–length polymorphism analysis. Our findings indicate that the southern Siberian mtDNA pool harbors several lineages associated with the Late Upper Paleolithic and/or early Neolithic dispersals from both eastern Asia and southwestern Asia/southern Caucasus. Moreover, the phylogeography of the D2 lineages suggests that southern Siberia is likely to be a geographical source for the last postglacial maximum spread of this subhaplogroup to northern Siberia and that the expansion of the D2b branch occurred in Beringia ∼7,000 years ago. In general, a detailed analysis of mtDNA gene pools of northern Asians provides the additional evidence to rule out the existence of a northern Asian route for the initial human colonization of Asia. PMID:17924343

  1. Phylogeographic analysis of mitochondrial DNA in northern Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Grzybowski, Tomasz; Denisova, Galina; Dambueva, Irina; Perkova, Maria; Dorzhu, Choduraa; Luzina, Faina; Lee, Hong Kyu; Vanecek, Tomas; Villems, Richard; Zakharov, Ilia

    2007-11-01

    To elucidate the human colonization process of northern Asia and human dispersals to the Americas, a diverse subset of 71 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages was chosen for complete genome sequencing from the collection of 1,432 control-region sequences sampled from 18 autochthonous populations of northern, central, eastern, and southwestern Asia. On the basis of complete mtDNA sequencing, we have revised the classification of haplogroups A, D2, G1, M7, and I; identified six new subhaplogroups (I4, N1e, G1c, M7d, M7e, and J1b2a); and fully characterized haplogroups N1a and G1b, which were previously described only by the first hypervariable segment (HVS1) sequencing and coding-region restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis. Our findings indicate that the southern Siberian mtDNA pool harbors several lineages associated with the Late Upper Paleolithic and/or early Neolithic dispersals from both eastern Asia and southwestern Asia/southern Caucasus. Moreover, the phylogeography of the D2 lineages suggests that southern Siberia is likely to be a geographical source for the last postglacial maximum spread of this subhaplogroup to northern Siberia and that the expansion of the D2b branch occurred in Beringia ~7,000 years ago. In general, a detailed analysis of mtDNA gene pools of northern Asians provides the additional evidence to rule out the existence of a northern Asian route for the initial human colonization of Asia.

  2. Unveiling the mystery of mitochondrial DNA replication in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin Jie; Clark-Walker, George Desmond

    2018-01-01

    Conventional DNA replication is initiated from specific origins and requires the synthesis of RNA primers for both the leading and lagging strands. In contrast, the replication of yeast mitochondrial DNA is origin-independent. The replication of the leading strand is likely primed by recombinational structures and proceeded by a rolling circle mechanism. The coexistent linear and circular DNA conformers facilitate the recombination-based initiation. The replication of the lagging strand is poorly understood. Re-evaluation of published data suggests that the rolling circle may also provide structures for the synthesis of the lagging-strand by mechanisms such as template switching. Thus, the coupling of recombination with rolling circle replication and possibly, template switching, may have been selected as an economic replication mode to accommodate the reductive evolution of mitochondria. Such a replication mode spares the need for conventional replicative components, including those required for origin recognition/remodelling, RNA primer synthesis and lagging-strand processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  3. SINGLE STRAND-CONTAINING REPLICATING MOLECULES OF CIRCULAR MITOCHONDRIAL DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenholme, David R.; Koike, Katsuro; Cochran-Fouts, Patricia

    1973-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) from Chang rat solid hepatomas and Novikoff rat ascites hepatomas were examined in the electron microscope after preparation by the aqueous and by the formamide protein monolayer techniques. MtDNAs from both tumors were found to include double-forked circular molecules with a form and size suggesting they were replicative intermediates. These molecules were of two classes. In molecules of one class, all three segments were apparently totally double stranded. Molecules of the second class were distinguished by the fact that one of the segments spanning the region between the forks in which replication had occurred (the daughter segments) was either totally single stranded, or contained a single-stranded region associated with one of the forks. Daughter segments of both totally double-stranded and single strand-containing replicating molecules varied in length from about 3 to about 80% of the circular contour length of the molecule. Similar classes of replicating molecules were found in mtDNA from regenerating rat liver and chick embryos, indicating them to be normal intermediates in the replication of mtDNA All of the mtDNAs examined included partially single-stranded simple (nonforked) circular molecules. A possible scheme for the replication of mtDNA is presented, based on the different molecular forms observed PMID:4345165

  4. Mitochondrial catalase overexpressed transgenic mice are protected against lung fibrosis in part via preventing alveolar epithelial cell mitochondrial DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Cheng, Yuan; Hogan, Erin; Yeldandi, Anjana; Chi, Monica; Piseaux, Raul; Ridge, Karen; Michael Hart, C; Chandel, Navdeep; Scott Budinger, G R; Kamp, David W

    2016-12-01

    Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury and mitochondrial dysfunction are important in the development of lung fibrosis. Our group has shown that in the asbestos exposed lung, the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AEC mediate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and apoptosis which are necessary for lung fibrosis. These data suggest that mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants should ameliorate asbestos-induced lung. To determine whether transgenic mice that express mitochondrial-targeted catalase (MCAT) have reduced lung fibrosis following exposure to asbestos or bleomycin and, if so, whether this occurs in association with reduced AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Crocidolite asbestos (100µg/50µL), TiO 2 (negative control), bleomycin (0.025 units/50µL), or PBS was instilled intratracheally in 8-10 week-old wild-type (WT - C57Bl/6J) or MCAT mice. The lungs were harvested at 21d. Lung fibrosis was quantified by collagen levels (Sircol) and lung fibrosis scores. AEC apoptosis was assessed by cleaved caspase-3 (CC-3)/Surfactant protein C (SFTPC) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and semi-quantitative analysis. AEC (primary AT2 cells from WT and MCAT mice and MLE-12 cells) mtDNA damage was assessed by a quantitative PCR-based assay, apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation, and ROS production was assessed by a Mito-Sox assay. Compared to WT, crocidolite-exposed MCAT mice exhibit reduced pulmonary fibrosis as measured by lung collagen levels and lung fibrosis score. The protective effects in MCAT mice were accompanied by reduced AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Similar findings were noted following bleomycin exposure. Euk-134, a mitochondrial SOD/catalase mimetic, attenuated MLE-12 cell DNA damage and apoptosis. Finally, compared to WT, asbestos-induced MCAT AT2 cell ROS production was reduced. Our finding that MCAT mice have reduced pulmonary fibrosis, AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis following exposure to asbestos or bleomycin suggests an important role

  5. Mitochondrial catalase overexpressed transgenic mice are protected against lung fibrosis in part via preventing alveolar epithelial cell mitochondrial DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P.; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Cheng, Yuan; Hogan, Erin; Yeldandi, Anjana; Chi, Monica; Piseaux, Raul; Ridge, Karen; Hart, C. Michael; Chandel, Navdeep; Budinger, G.R. Scott; Kamp, David W.

    2018-01-01

    Rationale Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury and mitochondrial dysfunction are important in the development of lung fibrosis. Our group has shown that in the asbestos exposed lung, the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AEC mediate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and apoptosis which are necessary for lung fibrosis. These data suggest that mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants should ameliorate asbestos-induced lung. Objective To determine whether transgenic mice that express mitochondrial-targeted catalase (MCAT) have reduced lung fibrosis following exposure to asbestos or bleomycin and, if so, whether this occurs in association with reduced AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Methods Crocidolite asbestos (100 μg/50 μL), TiO2 (negative control), bleomycin (0.025 units/50 μL), or PBS was instilled intratracheally in 8–10 week-old wild-type (WT - C57Bl/6 J) or MCAT mice. The lungs were harvested at 21 d. Lung fibrosis was quantified by collagen levels (Sircol) and lung fibrosis scores. AEC apoptosis was assessed by cleaved caspase-3 (CC-3)/Surfactant protein C (SFTPC) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and semi-quantitative analysis. AEC (primary AT2 cells from WT and MCAT mice and MLE-12 cells) mtDNA damage was assessed by a quantitative PCR-based assay, apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation, and ROS production was assessed by a Mito-Sox assay. Results Compared to WT, crocidolite-exposed MCAT mice exhibit reduced pulmonary fibrosis as measured by lung collagen levels and lung fibrosis score. The protective effects in MCAT mice were accompanied by reduced AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis. Similar findings were noted following bleomycin exposure. Euk-134, a mitochondrial SOD/catalase mimetic, attenuated MLE-12 cell DNA damage and apoptosis. Finally, compared to WT, asbestos-induced MCAT AT2 cell ROS production was reduced. Conclusions Our finding that MCAT mice have reduced pulmonary fibrosis, AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis following exposure

  6. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of camel spiders (Arachnida: Solifugae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Maddahi, Hassan; Khazanehdari, Mahsa; Aliabadian, Mansour; Kami, Haji Gholi; Mirshamsi, Amin; Mirshamsi, Omid

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of five solifuge families of Iran is presented using phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, subunit 1 (COI) sequence data. Moreover, we included available representatives from seven families from GenBank to examine the genetic distance between Old and New World taxa and test the phylogenetic relationships among more solifuge families. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed based on the two most probabilistic methods, Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) approaches. Resulting topologies demonstrated the monophyly of the families Daesiidae, Eremobatidae, Galeodidae, Karschiidae and Rhagodidae, whereas the monophyly of the families Ammotrechidae and Gylippidae was not supported. Also, within the family Eremobatidae, the subfamilies Eremobatinae and Therobatinae and the genus Hemerotrecha were paraphyletic or polyphyletic. According to the resulted topologies, the taxonomic placements of Trichotoma michaelseni (Gylippidae) and Nothopuga sp. 1 (Ammotrechidae) are still remain under question and their revision might be appropriate. According to the results of this study, within the family Galeodidae, the validity of the genus Galeodopsis is supported, while the validity of the genus Paragaleodes still remains uncertain. Moreover, our results revealed that the species Galeodes bacillatus, and Rhagodes melanochaetus are junior synonyms of G. caspius, and R. eylandti, respectively.

  7. Associations of mitochondrial haplogroups and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers with end-stage renal disease in a Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuheng; Zhao, Ying; Wen, Shuzhen; Yan, Rengna; Yang, Qinglan; Chen, Huimei

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is closely related to mitochondrion function, and variations have been suggested to be involved in pathogenesis of complex diseases. The present study sought to elucidate mitochondrial haplogroups and mtDNA copy number in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a Han population. First, the mitochondrial haplogroups of 37 ESRD patients were clustered into several haplogroups, and haplogroup A & D were taken as the candidate risk haplogroups for ESRD. Second, the frequencies of A and D were assessed in 344 ESRD patients and 438 healthy controls, respectively. Haplogroup D was found to be risk maker for ESRD in young subjects (<30 years) with an OR of 2.274. Finally, intracellular and cell-free mtDNA copy numbers were evaluated with quantitative-PCR. The ESRD patients exhibited greater cell-free mtDNA contents than the healthy controls but less intracellular mtDNA. Haplogroup D exhibited a further increase in cell-free mtDNA content and a decrease in intracellular mtDNA content among the ESRDs patients. Our findings suggest that mtNDA haplogroup D may contributes to pathogenesis of early-onset ESRD through alterations of mtDNA copy numbers.

  8. DNA Sequences Proximal to Human Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Breakpoints Prevalent in Human Disease Form G-quadruplexes, a Class of DNA Structures Inefficiently Unwound by the Mitochondrial Replicative Twinkle Helicase*

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Sommers, Joshua A.; Zhou, Jun; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Brosh, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA deletions are prominent in human genetic disorders, cancer, and aging. It is thought that stalling of the mitochondrial replication machinery during DNA synthesis is a prominent source of mitochondrial genome instability; however, the precise molecular determinants of defective mitochondrial replication are not well understood. In this work, we performed a computational analysis of the human mitochondrial genome using the “Pattern Finder” G-quadruplex (G4) predictor algorithm to assess whether G4-forming sequences reside in close proximity (within 20 base pairs) to known mitochondrial DNA deletion breakpoints. We then used this information to map G4P sequences with deletions characteristic of representative mitochondrial genetic disorders and also those identified in various cancers and aging. Circular dichroism and UV spectral analysis demonstrated that mitochondrial G-rich sequences near deletion breakpoints prevalent in human disease form G-quadruplex DNA structures. A biochemical analysis of purified recombinant human Twinkle protein (gene product of c10orf2) showed that the mitochondrial replicative helicase inefficiently unwinds well characterized intermolecular and intramolecular G-quadruplex DNA substrates, as well as a unimolecular G4 substrate derived from a mitochondrial sequence that nests a deletion breakpoint described in human renal cell carcinoma. Although G4 has been implicated in the initiation of mitochondrial DNA replication, our current findings suggest that mitochondrial G-quadruplexes are also likely to be a source of instability for the mitochondrial genome by perturbing the normal progression of the mitochondrial replication machinery, including DNA unwinding by Twinkle helicase. PMID:25193669

  9. Evidence for a Role of FEN1 in Maintaining Mitochondrial DNA Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kalifa, Lidza; Beutner, Gisela; Phadnis, Naina; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Sia, Elaine A.

    2009-01-01

    Although the nuclear processes responsible for genomic DNA replication and repair are well characterized, the pathways involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and repair remain unclear. DNA repair has been identified as being particularly important within the mitochondrial compartment due to the organelle’s high propensity to accumulate oxidative DNA damage. It has been postulated that continual accumulation of mtDNA damage and subsequent mutagenesis may function in cellular aging. Mitochondrial base excision repair (mtBER) plays a major role in combating mtDNA oxidative damage; however, the proteins involved in mtBER have yet to be fully characterized. It has been established that during nuclear long-patch (LP) BER, FEN1 is responsible for cleavage of 5′ flap structures generated during DNA synthesis. Furthermore, removal of 5′ flaps has been observed in mitochondrial extracts of mammalian cell lines; yet, the mitochondrial localization of FEN1 has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, we analyzed the effects of deleting the yeast FEN1 homolog, RAD27, on mtDNA stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our findings demonstrate that Rad27p/FEN1 is localized in the mitochondrial compartment of both yeast and mice and that Rad27p has a significant role in maintaining mtDNA integrity. PMID:19699691

  10. Inter- and intraspecific mitochondrial DNA variation in North American bears (Ursus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Matthew A.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Garner, Gerald W.; Vyse, Ernest R.

    1991-01-01

    We assessed mitochondrial DNA variation in North American black bears (Ursus americanus), brown bears (Ursus arctos), and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Divergent mitochondrial DNA haplotypes (0.05 base substitutions per nucleotide) were identified in populations of black bears from Montana and Oregon. In contrast, very similar haplotypes occur in black bears across North America. This discordance of haplotype phylogeny and geographic distribution indicates that there has been maintenance of polymorphism and considerable gene flow throughout the history of the species. Intraspecific mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence in brown bears and polar bears is lower than in black bears. The two morphological forms of U. arctos, grizzly and coastal brown bears, are not in distinct mtDNA lineages. Interspecific comparisons indicate that brown bears and polar bears share similar mitochondrial DNA (0.023 base substitutions per nucleotide) which is quite divergent (0.078 base substitutions per nucleotide) from that of black bears. High mitochondrial DNA divergence within black bears and paraphyletic relationships of brown and polar bear mitochondrial DNA indicate that intraspecific variation across species' ranges should be considered in phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA.

  11. Mitochondrial depolarization in yeast zygotes inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Golyshev, Sergey A; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S; Severin, Fedor F; Knorre, Dmitry A

    2017-04-01

    Non-identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) compete with each other within a cell and the ultimate variant of mtDNA present depends on their relative replication rates. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as a model, we studied the effects of mitochondrial inhibitors on the competition between wild-type mtDNA and mutant selfish mtDNA in heteroplasmic zygotes. We found that decreasing mitochondrial transmembrane potential by adding uncouplers or valinomycin changes the competition outcomes in favor of the wild-type mtDNA. This effect was significantly lower in cells with disrupted mitochondria fission or repression of the autophagy-related genes ATG8 , ATG32 or ATG33 , implying that heteroplasmic zygotes activate mitochondrial degradation in response to the depolarization. Moreover, the rate of mitochondrially targeted GFP turnover was higher in zygotes treated with uncoupler than in haploid cells or untreated zygotes. Finally, we showed that vacuoles of zygotes with uncoupler-activated autophagy contained DNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mitochondrial depolarization inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA and this effect depends on mitochondrial fission and autophagy. These observations suggest an activation of mitochondria quality control mechanisms in heteroplasmic yeast zygotes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Exercise-induced mitochondrial p53 repairs mtDNA mutations in mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Adeel; Khrapko, Konstantin; Flynn, James M; Saleem, Ayesha; De Lisio, Michael; Johnston, Adam P W; Kratysberg, Yevgenya; Samjoo, Imtiaz A; Kitaoka, Yu; Ogborn, Daniel I; Little, Jonathan P; Raha, Sandeep; Parise, Gianni; Akhtar, Mahmood; Hettinga, Bart P; Rowe, Glenn C; Arany, Zoltan; Prolla, Tomas A; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic disorders and transgenic mouse models have shown that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and telomere dysfunction instigate the aging process. Epidemiologically, exercise is associated with greater life expectancy and reduced risk of chronic diseases. While the beneficial effects of exercise are well established, the molecular mechanisms instigating these observations remain unclear. Endurance exercise reduces mtDNA mutation burden, alleviates multisystem pathology, and increases lifespan of the mutator mice, with proofreading deficient mitochondrial polymerase gamma (POLG1). We report evidence for a POLG1-independent mtDNA repair pathway mediated by exercise, a surprising notion as POLG1 is canonically considered to be the sole mtDNA repair enzyme. Here, we show that the tumor suppressor protein p53 translocates to mitochondria and facilitates mtDNA mutation repair and mitochondrial biogenesis in response to endurance exercise. Indeed, in mutator mice with muscle-specific deletion of p53, exercise failed to prevent mtDNA mutations, induce mitochondrial biogenesis, preserve mitochondrial morphology, reverse sarcopenia, or mitigate premature mortality. Our data establish a new role for p53 in exercise-mediated maintenance of the mtDNA genome and present mitochondrially targeted p53 as a novel therapeutic modality for diseases of mitochondrial etiology.

  13. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Exploring the effect of asymmetric mitochondrial DNA introgression on estimating niche divergence in morphologically cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Wielstra, Ben; Arntzen, Jan W

    2014-01-01

    If potential morphologically cryptic species, identified based on differentiated mitochondrial DNA, express ecological divergence, this increases support for their treatment as distinct species. However, mitochondrial DNA introgression hampers the correct estimation of ecological divergence. We test the hypothesis that estimated niche divergence differs when considering nuclear DNA composition or mitochondrial DNA type as representing the true species range. We use empirical data of two crested newt species (Amphibia: Triturus) which possess introgressed mitochondrial DNA from a third species in part of their ranges. We analyze the data in environmental space by determining Fisher distances in a principal component analysis and in geographical space by determining geographical overlap of species distribution models. We find that under mtDNA guidance in one of the two study cases niche divergence is overestimated, whereas in the other it is underestimated. In the light of our results we discuss the role of estimated niche divergence in species delineation.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA variation and genetic relationships of Populus species.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J W; Rajora, O P; Yeh, F C; Dancik, B P; Strobeck, C

    1993-02-01

    We examined variation in and around the region coding for the cytochrome c oxidase I (coxI) and ATPase 6 (atp6) genes in the mitochondrial genomes of four Populus species (P. nigra, P. deltoides, P. maximowiczii, and P. tremuloides) and the natural hybrid P. x canadensis (P. deltoides x P. nigra). Total cellular DNAs of these poplars were digested with 16 restriction endonucleases and probed with maize mtDNA-specific probes (CoxI and Atp6). The only variant observed for Atp6 was interspecific, with P. maximowiczii separated from the other species as revealed by EcoRI digestions. No intraspecific mtDNA variation was observed among individuals of P. nigra, P. maximowiczii, P. x canadensis, or P. tremuloides for the CoxI probe. However, two varieties of P. deltoides were distinct because of a single site change in the KpnI digestions, demonstrating that P. deltoides var. deltoides (eastern cottonwood) and var. occidentalis (plains cottonwood) have distinct mitochondrial genomes in the region of the coxI gene. Populus x canadensis shared the same restriction fragment patterns as its suspected maternal parent P. deltoides. Nucleotide substitutions per base in and around the coxI and atp6 genes among the Populus species and the hybrid ranged from 0.0017 to 0.0077. The interspecific estimates of nucleotide substitution per base suggested that P. tremuloides was furthest removed from P. deltoides and P. x canadensis and least diverged from P. nigra. Populus maximowiczii was placed between these two clusters.

  16. Linguistic isolates in Portugal: insights from the mitochondrial DNA pattern.

    PubMed

    Mairal, Quim; Santos, Cristina; Silva, Marina; Marques, Sofia L; Ramos, Amanda; Aluja, Maria Pilar; Amorim, Antonio; Prata, Maria João; Alvarez, Luis

    2013-12-01

    Miranda do Douro, located in the northeastern region of Portugal, has notable characteristics not only from a geographic or naturalistic point of view, but also from a cultural perspective. A remarkable one is the coexistence of two different languages: Portuguese and Mirandese, the second being an Astur-Leonese dialect. The current persistence of the Astur-Leonese dialect in this population falls on the singularity of the region: relative isolation, implying difficulties to communicate with other Portuguese regions, while the same location facilitated the establishment of social and commercial relationships with adjacent Spanish territories, origin of the Astur-Leonese language. The objective of this study was to characterize the population from Miranda through the analysis of maternal lineages in order to evaluate whether its mitochondrial DNA diversity fitted the patterns previously reported for other populations from the Iberian Peninsula. Viewing that, the entire control region of mitochondrial DNA from 121 individuals was examined. Miranda showed a haplogroup composition usual for a Western European population, in the sense that as high as 63.6% of sequences belonged to macro-haplogroup R0. Lineages ascribed to have an African (L2a and L1b) origin, were detected, but reaching an amount commonly found in Portugal. Miranda also presented a few haplogroups typically found in Jewish populations, while rarely observed in other Iberian populations. The finding can be explained by gene flow with crypto-Jew communities that since long are known to be established in the region where Miranda is located. In Miranda, both genetic and nucleotide diversities presented low values (0.9292 ± 0.0180 and 0.01101 ± 0.00614 respectively) when compared to populations from its micro-geographical framework, which constitute a sign of population isolation that certainly provided conditions for the survival of the Astur-Leonese dialect in the region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  17. Selective Gene Delivery for Integrating Exogenous DNA into Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes Using Peptide-DNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Chuah, Jo-Ann; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2018-05-14

    Selective gene delivery into organellar genomes (mitochondrial and plastid genomes) has been limited because of a lack of appropriate platform technology, even though these organelles are essential for metabolite and energy production. Techniques for selective organellar modification are needed to functionally improve organelles and produce transplastomic/transmitochondrial plants. However, no method for mitochondrial genome modification has yet been established for multicellular organisms including plants. Likewise, modification of plastid genomes has been limited to a few plant species and algae. In the present study, we developed ionic complexes of fusion peptides containing organellar targeting signal and plasmid DNA for selective delivery of exogenous DNA into the plastid and mitochondrial genomes of intact plants. This is the first report of exogenous DNA being integrated into the mitochondrial genomes of not only plants, but also multicellular organisms in general. This fusion peptide-mediated gene delivery system is a breakthrough platform for both plant organellar biotechnology and gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases in animals.

  18. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Their Role in Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is significantly increased in the older population. Risk factors and predictors of future cardiovascular events such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes are observed with higher frequency in elderly individuals. A major determinant of vascular aging is endothelial dysfunction, characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent signaling processes. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress, loss of nitric oxide (•NO) signaling, loss of endothelial barrier function and infiltration of leukocytes to the vascular wall, explaining the low-grade inflammation characteristic for the aged vasculature. We here discuss the importance of different sources of ROS for vascular aging and their contribution to the increased cardiovascular risk in the elderly population with special emphasis on mitochondrial ROS formation and oxidative damage of mitochondrial DNA. Also the interaction (crosstalk) of mitochondria with nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is highlighted. Current concepts of vascular aging, consequences for the development of cardiovascular events and the particular role of ROS are evaluated on the basis of cell culture experiments, animal studies and clinical trials. Present data point to a more important role of oxidative stress for the maximal healthspan (healthy aging) than for the maximal lifespan. PMID:26184181

  19. Concise Review: Heteroplasmic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations and Mitochondrial Diseases: Toward iPSC-Based Disease Modeling, Drug Discovery, and Regenerative Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Hideyuki; Goto, Yu-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own genome (mitochondrial DNA; mtDNA). Once mitochondria are damaged by mutant mtDNA, mitochondrial dysfunction is strongly induced, followed by symptomatic appearance of mitochondrial diseases. Major genetic causes of mitochondrial diseases are defects in mtDNA, and the others are defects of mitochondria-associating genes that are encoded in nuclear DNA (nDNA). Numerous pathogenic mutations responsible for various types of mitochondrial diseases have been identified in mtDNA; however, it remains uncertain why mitochondrial diseases present a wide variety of clinical spectrum even among patients carrying the same mtDNA mutations (e.g., variations in age of onset, in affected tissues and organs, or in disease progression and phenotypic severity). Disease-relevant induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from mitochondrial disease patients have therefore opened new avenues for understanding the definitive genotype-phenotype relationship of affected tissues and organs in various types of mitochondrial diseases triggered by mtDNA mutations. In this concise review, we briefly summarize several recent approaches using patient-derived iPSCs and their derivatives carrying various mtDNA mutations for applications in human mitochondrial disease modeling, drug discovery, and future regenerative therapeutics. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G; Brown, Jamelle A; Feeley, Kyle P; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Weisbrod, Robert M; Widlansky, Michael E; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2016-03-31

    Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We assessed non-invasive vascular function and mitochondrial DNA damage in 275 patients (age 57 ± 9 years, 60 % women) with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease alone (N = 55), diabetes mellitus alone (N = 74), combined atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus (N = 48), and controls age >45 without diabetes mellitus or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (N = 98). Mitochondrial DNA damage measured by quantitative PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher with clinical atherosclerosis alone (0.55 ± 0.65), diabetes mellitus alone (0.65 ± 1.0), and combined clinical atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus (0.89 ± 1.32) as compared to control subjects (0.23 ± 0.64, P < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for age, sex, and relevant cardiovascular risk factors, clinical atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus remained associated with higher mitochondrial DNA damage levels (β = 0.14 ± 0.13, P = 0.04 and β = 0.21 ± 0.13, P = 0.002, respectively). Higher mitochondrial DNA damage was associated with higher baseline pulse amplitude, a measure of arterial pulsatility, but not with flow-mediated dilation or hyperemic response, measures of vasodilator function. We found greater mitochondrial DNA damage in patients with diabetes mellitus and clinical atherosclerosis. The association of mitochondrial DNA damage and baseline pulse amplitude may suggest a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive small artery pulsatility with potentially adverse microvascular impact.

  1. An Analysis of Enzyme Kinetics Data for Mitochondrial DNA Strand Termination by Nucleoside Reverse Transcription Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine V.; Song, Zhuo; Cao, Yang; Samuels, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs used in antiretroviral treatment have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity. The polymerase-γ hypothesis states that this toxicity stems from the analogs' inhibition of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase (polymerase-γ) leading to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. We have constructed a computational model of the interaction of polymerase-γ with activated nucleoside and nucleotide analog drugs, based on experimentally measured reaction rates and base excision rates, together with the mtDNA genome size, the human mtDNA sequence, and mitochondrial dNTP concentrations. The model predicts an approximately 1000-fold difference in the activated drug concentration required for a 50% probability of mtDNA strand termination between the activated di-deoxy analogs d4T, ddC, and ddI (activated to ddA) and the activated forms of the analogs 3TC, TDF, AZT, FTC, and ABC. These predictions are supported by experimental and clinical data showing significantly greater mtDNA depletion in cell culture and patient samples caused by the di-deoxy analog drugs. For zidovudine (AZT) we calculated a very low mtDNA replication termination probability, in contrast to its reported mitochondrial toxicity in vitro and clinically. Therefore AZT mitochondrial toxicity is likely due to a mechanism that does not involve strand termination of mtDNA replication. PMID:19132079

  2. CDK1 enhances mitochondrial bioenergetics for radiation-induced DNA repair

    DOE PAGES

    Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; ...

    2015-12-06

    Nuclear DNA repair capacity is a critical determinant of cell fate under genotoxic stress conditions. DNA repair is a well-defined energy-consuming process. However, it is unclear how DNA repair is fueled and whether mitochondrial energy production contributes to nuclear DNA repair. Here, we report a dynamic enhancement of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial ATP generation in irradiated normal cells, paralleled with increased mitochondrial relocation of the cell-cycle kinase CDK1 and nuclear DNA repair. The basal and radiation-induced mitochondrial ATP generation is reduced significantly in cells harboring CDK1 phosphorylation-deficient mutant complex I subunits. Similarly, mitochondrial ATP generation and nuclear DNA repair aremore » also compromised severely in cells harboring mitochondrially targeted, kinase-deficient CDK1. These findings demonstrate a mechanism governing the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus by which CDK1 boosts mitochondrial bioenergetics to meet the increased cellular fuel demand for DNA repair and cell survival under genotoxic stress conditions.« less

  3. Inhibiting Mitochondrial DNA Ligase IIIα Activates Caspase 1-Dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Roginskaya, Vera; Van Houten, Bennett; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-09-15

    Elevated levels of DNA ligase IIIα (LigIIIα) have been identified as a biomarker of an alteration in DNA repair in cancer cells that confers hypersensitivity to a LigIIIα inhibitor, L67, in combination with a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor. Because LigIIIα functions in the nucleus and mitochondria, we examined the effect of L67 on these organelles. Here, we show that, although the DNA ligase inhibitor selectively targets mitochondria, cancer and nonmalignant cells respond differently to disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism. Inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα in cancer cells resulted in abnormal mitochondrial morphology, reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA, and increased levels of mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species that caused nuclear DNA damage. In contrast, these effects did not occur in nonmalignant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα activated a caspase 1-dependent apoptotic pathway, which is known to be part of inflammatory responses induced by pathogenic microorganisms in cancer, but not nonmalignant cells. These results demonstrate that the disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism elicits different responses in nonmalignant and cancer cells and suggests that the abnormal response in cancer cells may be exploited in the development of novel therapeutic strategies that selectively target cancer cells. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5431-41. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Expanding the functional human mitochondrial DNA database by the establishment of primate xenomitochondrial cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Lesley; Moraes, Carlos T.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear and mitochondrial genomes coevolve to optimize approximately 100 different interactions necessary for an efficient ATP-generating system. This coevolution led to a species-specific compatibility between these genomes. We introduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from different primates into mtDNA-less human cells and selected for growth of cells with a functional oxidative phosphorylation system. mtDNA from common chimpanzee, pigmy chimpanzee, and gorilla were able to restore oxidative phosphorylation in the context of a human nuclear background, whereas mtDNA from orangutan, and species representative of Old-World monkeys, New-World monkeys, and lemurs were not. Oxygen consumption, a sensitive index of respiratory function, showed that mtDNA from chimpanzee, pigmy chimpanzee, and gorilla replaced the human mtDNA and restored respiration to essentially normal levels. Mitochondrial protein synthesis was also unaltered in successful “xenomitochondrial cybrids.” The abrupt failure of mtDNA from primate species that diverged from humans as recently as 8–18 million years ago to functionally replace human mtDNA suggests the presence of one or a few mutations affecting critical nuclear–mitochondrial genome interactions between these species. These cellular systems provide a demonstration of intergenus mtDNA transfer, expand more than 20-fold the number of mtDNA polymorphisms that can be analyzed in a human nuclear background, and provide a novel model for the study of nuclear–mitochondrial interactions. PMID:9256447

  5. A Genome-Wide Map of Mitochondrial DNA Recombination in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Emilie S.; Chabbert, Christophe D.; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  6. A genome-wide map of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Emilie S; Chabbert, Christophe D; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  7. Length Variation in Mitochondrial DNA of the Minnow Cyprinella Spiloptera

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, R. E.; Dowling, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Length differences in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are common, frequently due to variation in copy number of direct tandem duplications. While such duplications appear to form without great difficulty in some taxonomic groups, they appear to be relatively short-lived, as typical duplication products are geographically restricted within species and infrequently shared among species. To better understand such length variation, we have studied a tandem and direct duplication of approximately 260 bp in the control region of the cyprinid fish, Cyprinella spiloptera. Restriction site analysis of 38 individuals was used to characterize population structure and the distribution of variation in repeat copy number. This revealed two length variants, including individuals with two or three copies of the repeat, and little geographic structure among populations. No standard length (single copy) genomes were found and heteroplasmy, a common feature of length variation in other taxa, was absent. Nucleotide sequence of tandem duplications and flanking regions localized duplication junctions in the phenylalanine tRNA and near the origin of replication. The locations of these junctions and the stability of folded repeat copies support the hypothesized importance of secondary structures in models of duplication formation. PMID:8001785

  8. Mitochondrial DNA replication, nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and AIDS cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, William

    2003-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in combination with other antiretrovirals (HAART) are the cornerstones of current AIDS therapy, but extensive use brought mitochondrial side effects to light. Clinical experience, pharmacological, cell, and molecular biological evidence links altered mitochondrial (mt-) DNA replication to the toxicity of NRTIs in many tissues, and conversely, mtDNA replication defects and mtDNA depletion in target tissues are observed. Organ-specific pathological changes or diverse systemic effects result from and are frequently attributed to HAART in which NRTIs are included. The shared features of mtDNA depletion and energy depletion became key observations and related the clinical and in vivo experimental findings to inhibition of mtDNA replication by NRTI triphosphates in vitro. Subsequent to those findings, other observations suggested that mitochondrial energy deprivation is concomitant with or the result of mitochondrial oxidative stress in AIDS (from HIV, for example) or from NRTI therapy itself. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA)

  9. Endurance exercise rescues progeroid aging and induces systemic mitochondrial rejuvenation in mtDNA mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Adeel; Bourgeois, Jacqueline M.; Ogborn, Daniel I.; Little, Jonathan P.; Hettinga, Bart P.; Akhtar, Mahmood; Thompson, James E.; Melov, Simon; Mocellin, Nicholas J.; Kujoth, Gregory C.; Prolla, Tomas A.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A causal role for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis in mammalian aging is supported by recent studies demonstrating that the mtDNA mutator mouse, harboring a defect in the proofreading-exonuclease activity of mitochondrial polymerase gamma, exhibits accelerated aging phenotypes characteristic of human aging, systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, multisystem pathology, and reduced lifespan. Epidemiologic studies in humans have demonstrated that endurance training reduces the risk of chronic diseases and extends life expectancy. Whether endurance exercise can attenuate the cumulative systemic decline observed in aging remains elusive. Here we show that 5 mo of endurance exercise induced systemic mitochondrial biogenesis, prevented mtDNA depletion and mutations, increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity and respiratory chain assembly, restored mitochondrial morphology, and blunted pathological levels of apoptosis in multiple tissues of mtDNA mutator mice. These adaptations conferred complete phenotypic protection, reduced multisystem pathology, and prevented premature mortality in these mice. The systemic mitochondrial rejuvenation through endurance exercise promises to be an effective therapeutic approach to mitigating mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and related comorbidities. PMID:21368114

  10. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Association between mitochondrial DNA variations and Alzheimer's Disease in the ADNI cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Anita; Derbeneva, Olga; Younes, Danny; Keator, David; Bakken, Trygve; Lvova, Maria; Brandon, Marty; Guffanti, Guia; Reglodi, Dora; Saykin, Andrew; Weiner, Michael; Macciardi, Fabio; Schork, Nicholas; Wallace, Douglas C.; Potkin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the central role of amyloid deposition in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the pathogenesis of AD still remains elusive at the molecular level. Increasing evidence suggests that compromised mitochondrial function contributes to the aging process and thus may increase the risk of AD. Dysfunctional mitochondria contribute to reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can lead to extensive macromolecule oxidative damage and the progression of amyloid pathology. Oxidative stress and amyloid toxicity leave neurons chemically vulnerable. Because the brain relies on aerobic metabolism, it is apparent that mitochondria are critical for the cerebral function. Mitochondrial DNA sequence-changes could shift cell dynamics and facilitate neuronal vulnerability. Therefore we postulated that mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphisms may increase the risk of AD. We evaluated the role of mitochondrial haplogroups derived from 138 mitochondrial polymorphisms in 358 Caucasian ADNI subjects. Our results indicate that the mitochondrial haplogroup UK may confer genetic susceptibility to AD independently of the APOE4 allele. PMID:20538375

  12. New features of mitochondrial DNA replication system in yeast and man.

    PubMed

    Lecrenier, N; Foury, F

    2000-04-04

    In this review, we sum up the research carried out over two decades on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, primarily by comparing this system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens. Brief incursions into systems of other organisms have also been achieved when they provide new information.S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been thought for a long time to share closely related architecture and replication mechanisms. However, recent studies suggest that mitochondrial genome of S. cerevisiae may be formed, at least partially, from linear multimeric molecules, while human mtDNA is circular. Although several proteins involved in the replication of these two genomes are very similar, divergences are also now increasingly evident. As an example, the recently cloned human mitochondrial DNA polymerase beta-subunit has no counterpart in yeast. Yet, yeast Abf2p and human mtTFA are probably not as closely functionally related as thought previously. Some mtDNA metabolism factors, like DNA ligases, were until recently largely uncharacterized, and have been found to be derived from alternative nuclear products. Many factors involved in the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA are linked through genetic or biochemical interconnections. These links are presented on a map. Finally, we discuss recent studies suggesting that the yeast mtDNA replication system diverges from that observed in man, and may involve recombination, possibly coupled to alternative replication mechanisms like rolling circle replication.

  13. Psychiatric symptoms of patients with primary mitochondrial DNA disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to assess psychiatric symptoms in patients with genetically proven primary mutation of the mitochondrial DNA. Methods 19 adults with known mitochondrial mutation (MT) have been assessed with the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire 20-item Disability Index (HAQ-DI), the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form (BDI-SF), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the clinical version of the Structured Clinical Interview for the the DSM-IV (SCID-I and SCID-II) As control, 10 patients with hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy (HN), harboring the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) mutation were examined with the same tools. Results The two groups did not differ significantly in gender, age or education. Mean HAQ-DI score was 0.82 in the MT (range: 0-1.625) and 0.71 in the HN group (range: 0-1.625). Level of disability between the two groups did not differ significantly (p = 0.6076). MT patients scored significantly higher on the BDI-SF and HDRS than HN patients (12.85 versus 4.40, p = 0.031, and 15.62 vs 7.30, p = 0.043, respectively). The Global Severity Index (GSI) of SCL-90-R also showed significant difference (1.44 vs 0.46, p = 0.013) as well as the subscales except for somatization. SCID-I interview yielded a variety of mood disorders in both groups. Eight MT patient (42%) had past, 6 (31%) had current, 5 (26%) had both past and current psychiatric diagnosis, yielding a lifetime prevalence of 9/19 (47%) in the MT group. In the HN group, 3 patients had both past and current diagnosis showing a lifetime prevalence of 3/10 (30%) in this group. SCID-II detected personality disorder in 8 MT cases (42%), yielding 3 avoidant, 2 obsessive-compulsive and 3 personality disorder not otherwise specified (NOS) diagnosis. No personality disorder was identified in the HN group. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in patients with mitochondrial

  14. Biparental inheritance of organelles in Pelargonium: evidence for intergenomic recombination of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Janina; Weihe, Andreas; Pohlheim, Frank; Börner, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    While uniparental transmission of mtDNA is widespread and dominating in eukaryotes leaving mutation as the major source of genotypic diversity, recently, biparental inheritance of mitochondrial genes has been demonstrated in reciprocal crosses of Pelargonium zonale and P. inquinans. The thereby arising heteroplasmy carries the potential for recombination between mtDNAs of different descent, i.e. between the parental mitochondrial genomes. We have analyzed these Pelargonium hybrids for mitochondrial intergenomic recombination events by examining differences in DNA blot hybridization patterns of the mitochondrial genes atp1 and cob. Further investigation of these genes and their flanking regions using nucleotide sequence polymorphisms and PCR revealed DNA segments in the progeny, which contained both P. zonale and P. inquinans sequences suggesting an intergenomic recombination in hybrids of Pelargonium. This turns Pelargonium into an interesting subject for studies of recombination and evolutionary dynamics of mitochondrial genomes.

  15. Epilepsy Characteristics and Clinical Outcome in Patients With Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha Neul; Eom, Soyong; Kim, Se Hoon; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong; Lee, Young-Mock

    2016-11-01

    Epileptic seizures in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) are heterogeneous with no pathognomonic features. We reviewed epilepsy characteristics and clinical outcome exclusively in a pediatric population. Twenty-two children and adolescents (13 males) with confirmed mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes due to mitochondrial DNA A3243G mutation and epilepsy were recruited. Clinical data including seizure semiology, treatment response, neuroimaging findings, and electroencephalography were analyzed. We also examined the effect of the age at seizure onset and initial symptoms on the clinical variables. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography abnormalities showed no syndrome-specific findings. Focal seizures occurred in 21 of 22 subjects (95.5%), whereas generalized seizures developed in seven of 22 subjects (31.8%). Twenty of 22 subjects (90.9%) achieved partial to complete reduction of clinical seizures for more than one year with a combination of more than two antiepileptic drugs. The subgroup with earlier seizure onset presented significantly earlier and showed significantly higher rates of drug-resistant epilepsy compared with the late onset group, although there were no significant differences in the initial symptoms. The subjects with severe epileptic conditions tended to have more severe clinical dysfunction and more severe organ involvement. Both focal and generalized seizures occurred in patients with MELAS. Epilepsy in this population is drug resistant, but a certain degree of clinical seizure reduction was achievable with antiepileptic drugs, with more favorable outcomes than historically expected. Close observation and active epilepsy treatment of individuals with MELAS episodes and earlier seizure onset might improve the prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-11-18

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce (1)O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial (1)O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by (1)O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro.

  17. Biolayer Interferometry: A Novel Method to Elucidate Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interactions in the Mitochondrial DNA Replisome.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L; Hytönen, Vesa P; Kaguni, Laurie S

    2016-01-01

    A lack of effective treatment for mitochondrial diseases prompts scientists to investigate the molecular processes that underlie their development. The major cause of mitochondrial diseases is dysfunction of the sole mitochondrial DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ). The development of treatment strategies will require a detailed characterization of the molecular properties of Pol γ. A novel technique, biolayer interferometry, allows one to monitor molecular interactions in real time, thus providing an insight into the kinetics of the process. Here, we present an application of the biolayer interferometry technique to characterize the fundamental reactions that Pol γ undergoes during the initiation phase of mitochondrial DNA replication: holoenzyme formation and binding to the primer-template.

  18. Biolayer Interferometry: A Novel Method to Elucidate Protein–Protein and Protein–DNA Interactions in the Mitochondrial DNA Replisome

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2015-01-01

    A lack of effective treatment for mitochondrial diseases prompts scientists to investigate the molecular processes that underlie their development. The major cause of mitochondrial diseases is dysfunction of the sole mitochondrial DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ). The development of treatment strategies will require a detailed characterization of the molecular properties of Pol γ. A novel technique, biolayer interferometry, allows one to monitor molecular interactions in real time, thus providing an insight into the kinetics of the process. Here, we present an application of the biolayer interferometry technique to characterize the fundamental reactions that Pol γ undergoes during the initiation phase of mitochondrial DNA replication: holoenzyme formation and binding to the primer-template. PMID:26530686

  19. Repair of DNA damage caused by cytosine deamination in mitochondrial DNA of forensic case samples.

    PubMed

    Gorden, Erin M; Sturk-Andreaggi, Kimberly; Marshall, Charla

    2018-05-01

    DNA sequence damage from cytosine deamination is well documented in degraded samples, such as those from ancient and forensic contexts. This study examined the effect of a DNA repair treatment on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from aged and degraded skeletal samples. DNA extracts from 21 non-probative, degraded skeletal samples (aged 50-70 years) were utilized for the analysis. A portion of each sample extract was subjected to DNA repair using a commercial repair kit, the New England BioLabs' NEBNext FFPE DNA Repair Kit (Ipswich, MA). MtDNA was enriched using PCR and targeted capture in a side-by-side experiment of untreated and repaired DNA. Sequencing was performed using both traditional (Sanger-type; STS) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods Although cytosine deamination was evident in the mtDNA sequence data, the observed level of damaged bases varied by sequencing method as well as by enrichment type. The STS PCR amplicon data did not show evidence of cytosine deamination that could be distinguished from background signal in either the untreated or repaired sample set. However, the same PCR amplicons showed 850 C → T/G → A substitutions consistent with cytosine deamination with variant frequencies (VFs) of up to 25% when sequenced using NGS methods The occurrence of base misincorporation due to cytosine deamination was reduced by 98% (to 10) in the NGS amplicon data after repair. The NGS capture data indicated low levels (1-2%) of cytosine deamination in mtDNA fragments that was effectively mitigated by DNA repair. The observed difference in the level of cytosine deamination between the PCR and capture enrichment methods can be attributed to the greater propensity for stochastic effects from the PCR enrichment technique employed (e.g., low template input, increased PCR cycles). Altogether these results indicate that DNA repair may be required when sequencing PCR-amplified DNA from degraded forensic case samples with NGS methods. Copyright

  20. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Will, Yvonne

    2012-10-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with themore » latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ► mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ► CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ► Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ► Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.« less

  1. A role for recombination junctions in the segregation of mitochondrial DNA in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lockshon, D; Zweifel, S G; Freeman-Cook, L L; Lorimer, H E; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1995-06-16

    In S. cerevisiae, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules, in spite of their high copy number, segregate as if there were a small number of heritable units. The rapid segregation of mitochondrial genomes can be analyzed using mtDNA deletion variants. These small, amplified genomes segregate preferentially from mixed zygotes relative to wild-type mtDNA. This segregation advantage is abolished by mutations in a gene, MGT1, that encodes a recombination junction-resolving enzyme. We show here that resolvase deficiency causes a larger proportion of molecules to be linked together by recombination junctions, resulting in the aggregation of mtDNA into a small number of cytological structures. This change in mtDNA structure can account for the increased mitotic loss of mtDNA and the altered pattern of mtDNA segregation from zygotes. We propose that the level of unresolved recombination junctions influences the number of heritable units of mtDNA.

  2. Directed alteration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA by biolistic transformation and homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Fox, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently the only species in which genetic transformation of mitochondria can be used to generate a wide variety of defined alterations in mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA). DNA sequences can be delivered into yeast mitochondria by microprojectile bombardment (biolistic transformation) and subsequently incorporated into mtDNA by the highly active homologous recombination machinery present in the organelle. Although transformation frequencies are relatively low, the availability of strong mitochondrial selectable markers for the yeast system, both natural and synthetic, makes the isolation of transformants routine. The strategies and procedures reviewed here allow the researcher to insert defined mutations into endogenous mitochondrial genes and to insert new genes into mtDNA. These methods provide powerful in vivo tools for the study of mitochondrial biology.

  3. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Myklebost, Ola; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Bova, Steven G; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. © 2015 Ju et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Evidence for double-strand break mediated mitochondrial DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Prasai, Kanchanjunga; Robinson, Lucy C.; Scott, Rona S.; Tatchell, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mechanism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controversial. Evidence exists for double-strand break (DSB) mediated recombination-dependent replication at mitochondrial replication origin ori5 in hypersuppressive ρ− cells. However, it is not clear if this replication mode operates in ρ+ cells. To understand this, we targeted bacterial Ku (bKu), a DSB binding protein, to the mitochondria of ρ+ cells with the hypothesis that bKu would bind persistently to mtDNA DSBs, thereby preventing mtDNA replication or repair. Here, we show that mitochondrial-targeted bKu binds to ori5 and that inducible expression of bKu triggers petite formation preferentially in daughter cells. bKu expression also induces mtDNA depletion that eventually results in the formation of ρ0 cells. This data supports the idea that yeast mtDNA replication is initiated by a DSB and bKu inhibits mtDNA replication by binding to a DSB at ori5, preventing mtDNA segregation to daughter cells. Interestingly, we find that mitochondrial-targeted bKu does not decrease mtDNA content in human MCF7 cells. This finding is in agreement with the fact that human mtDNA replication, typically, is not initiated by a DSB. Therefore, this study provides evidence that DSB-mediated replication is the predominant form of mtDNA replication in ρ+ yeast cells. PMID:28549155

  5. The numbers of individual mitochondrial DNA molecules and mitochondrial DNA nucleoids in yeast are co-regulated by the general amino acid control pathway.

    PubMed

    MacAlpine, D M; Perlman, P S; Butow, R A

    2000-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is inherited as a protein-DNA complex (the nucleoid). We show that activation of the general amino acid response pathway in rho(+) and rho(-) petite cells results in an increased number of nucleoids without an increase in mtDNA copy number. In rho(-) cells, activation of the general amino acid response pathway results in increased intramolecular recombination between tandemly repeated sequences of rho(-) mtDNA to produce small, circular oligomers that are packaged into individual nucleoids, resulting in an approximately 10-fold increase in nucleoid number. The parsing of mtDNA into nucleoids due to general amino acid control requires Ilv5p, a mitochondrial protein that also functions in branched chain amino acid biosynthesis, and one or more factors required for mtDNA recombination. Two additional proteins known to function in mtDNA recombination, Abf2p and Mgt1p, are also required for parsing mtDNA into a larger number of nucleoids, although expression of these proteins is not under general amino acid control. Increased nucleoid number leads to increased mtDNA transmission, suggesting a mechanism to enhance mtDNA inheritance under amino acid starvation conditions.

  6. Genetic variation in mitochondrial DNA among Enterobius vermicularis in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mario Rodrıguez; Röser, Dennis; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel; Olsen, Annette; Nejsum, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Despite being the most prevalent nematode infections of man in Western Europe and North America, our knowledge of the genetic variability in Enterobius vermicularis is fragmented. We here report on a genetic study of pinworms in Denmark, performed using the cytochrome oxidase I (cox1) gene, with DNA extracted from individual eggs collected from clinical (human) samples. We collected cellophane-tape-test samples positive for pinworm eggs from 14 Departments of Clinical Microbiology in Denmark and surface-sterilized the eggs using a 1% hypochlorite solution before performing conventional PCR. Twenty-two haplotypes were identified from a total of 58 Danish patients. Cluster analysis showed that all Danish worms grouped together with human samples from Germany and Greece and with samples from Japanese chimpanzees designated as 'type B'. Analysis of molecular variance showed no significant difference or trends in geographical distribution of the pinworms in Denmark, and several haplotypes were identical or closely related to samples collected in Germany, Greece and Japan. However, worms from the 4 countries were found to belong to different populations, with Fst values in the range of 0·16 to 0·47. This study shows pinworms in Denmark to be a homogenous population, when analysed using the cox1 mitochondrial gene.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA identification of game and harvested freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Kyle, C J; Wilson, C C

    2007-02-14

    The use of DNA in forensics has grown rapidly for human applications along with the concomitant development of bioinformatics and demographic databases to help fully realize the potential of this molecular information. Similar techniques are also used routinely in many wildlife cases, such as species identification in food products, poaching and the illegal trade of endangered species. The use of molecular techniques in forensic cases related to wildlife and the development of associated databases has, however, mainly focused on large mammals with the exception of a few high-profile species. There is a need to develop similar databases for aquatic species for fisheries enforcement, given the large number of exploited and endangered fish species, the intensity of exploitation, and challenges in identifying species and their derived products. We sequenced a 500bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from representative individuals from 26 harvested fish taxa from Ontario, Canada, focusing on species that support major commercial and recreational fisheries. Ontario provides a unique model system for the development of a fish species database, as the province contains an evolutionarily diverse array of freshwater fish families representing more than one third of all freshwater fish in Canada. Inter- and intraspecific sequence comparisons using phylogenetic analysis and a BLAST search algorithm provided rigorous statistical metrics for species identification. This methodology and these data will aid in fisheries enforcement, providing a tool to easily and accurately identify fish species in enforcement investigations that would have otherwise been difficult or impossible to pursue.

  8. Paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA as an integral part of mitochondrial inheritance in metapopulations of Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J N; Nafisinia, M; Sutovsky, P; Ballard, J W O

    2013-01-01

    Maternal inheritance is one of the hallmarks of animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and central to its success as a molecular marker. This mode of inheritance and subsequent lack of heterologous recombination allows us to retrace evolutionary relationships unambiguously down the matriline and without the confounding effects of recombinant genetic information. Accumulating evidence of biparental inheritance of mtDNA (paternal leakage), however, challenges our current understanding of how this molecule is inherited. Here, using Drosophila simulans collected from an East African metapopulation exhibiting recurring mitochondrial heteroplasmy, we conducted single fly matings and screened F1 offspring for the presence of paternal mtDNA using allele-specific PCR assays (AS-PCR). In all, 27 out of 4092 offspring were identified as harboring paternal mtDNA, suggesting a frequency of 0.66% paternal leakage in this species. Our findings strongly suggest that recurring mtDNA heteroplasmy as observed in natural populations of Drosophila simulans is most likely caused by repeated paternal leakage. Our findings further suggest that this phenomenon to potentially be an integral part of mtDNA inheritance in these populations and consequently of significance for mtDNA as a molecular marker.

  9. Fructose-Rich Diet Affects Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Repair in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Federica; Senese, Rosalba; Lasala, Pasquale; Ziello, Angela; Mazzoli, Arianna; Crescenzo, Raffaella; Liverini, Giovanna; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando; Iossa, Susanna

    2017-03-24

    Evidence indicates that many forms of fructose-induced metabolic disturbance are associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are prominent targets of oxidative damage; however, it is not clear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and/or its lack of repair are events involved in metabolic disease resulting from a fructose-rich diet. In the present study, we evaluated the degree of oxidative damage to liver mtDNA and its repair, in addition to the state of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the liver of rats fed a high-fructose diet. We used male rats feeding on a high-fructose or control diet for eight weeks. Our results showed an increase in mtDNA damage in the liver of rats fed a high-fructose diet and this damage, as evaluated by the expression of DNA polymerase γ, was not repaired; in addition, the mtDNA copy number was found to be significantly reduced. A reduction in the mtDNA copy number is indicative of impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, as is the finding of a reduction in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. In conclusion, a fructose-rich diet leads to mitochondrial and mtDNA damage, which consequently may have a role in liver dysfunction and metabolic diseases.

  10. The Role of Mitochondrial DNA in Mediating Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P.; Williams, David B.; Kamp, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Convincing evidence has emerged demonstrating that impairment of mitochondrial function is critically important in regulating alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) programmed cell death (apoptosis) that may contribute to aging-related lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis following asbestos exposure). The mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for 13 proteins, including several essential for oxidative phosphorylation. We review the evidence implicating that oxidative stress-induced mtDNA damage promotes AEC apoptosis and pulmonary fibrosis. We focus on the emerging role for AEC mtDNA damage repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO-2) in maintaining mtDNA integrity which is important in preventing AEC apoptosis and asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. We then review recent studies linking the sirtuin (SIRT) family members, especially SIRT3, to mitochondrial integrity and mtDNA damage repair and aging. We present a conceptual model of how SIRTs modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven mitochondrial metabolism that may be important for their tumor suppressor function. The emerging insights into the pathobiology underlying AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis is suggesting novel therapeutic targets that may prove useful for the management of age-related diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:26370974

  11. Screen for mitochondrial DNA copy number maintenance genes reveals essential role for ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoh, Atsushi; Cannino, Giuseppe; Gerards, Mike; Buckley, Suzanne; Kazancioglu, Selena; Scialo, Filippo; Lihavainen, Eero; Ribeiro, Andre; Dufour, Eric; Jacobs, Howard T

    2014-01-01

    The machinery of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is only partially characterized and is of wide interest due to its involvement in disease. To identify novel components of this machinery, plus other cellular pathways required for mtDNA viability, we implemented a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells, assaying for loss of fluorescence of mtDNA nucleoids stained with the DNA-intercalating agent PicoGreen. In addition to previously characterized components of the mtDNA replication and transcription machineries, positives included many proteins of the cytosolic proteasome and ribosome (but not the mitoribosome), three proteins involved in vesicle transport, some other factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis or nuclear gene expression, > 30 mainly uncharacterized proteins and most subunits of ATP synthase (but no other OXPHOS complex). ATP synthase knockdown precipitated a burst of mitochondrial ROS production, followed by copy number depletion involving increased mitochondrial turnover, not dependent on the canonical autophagy machinery. Our findings will inform future studies of the apparatus and regulation of mtDNA maintenance, and the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics and signaling in modulating mtDNA copy number. PMID:24952591

  12. Peripheral artery disease, calf skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA copy number, and functional performance.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Peterson, Charlotte A; Sufit, Robert; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Kibbe, Melina R; Polonsky, Tamar S; Tian, Lu; Criqui, Michael H; Zhao, Lihui; Stein, James H; Li, Lingyu; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2018-05-01

    In people without lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD), mitochondrial DNA copy number declines with aging, and this decline is associated with declines in mitochondrial activity and functional performance. However, whether lower extremity ischemia is associated with lower mitochondrial DNA copy number and whether mitochondrial DNA copy number is associated with the degree of functional impairment in people with PAD is unknown. In people with and without PAD, age 65 years and older, we studied associations of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) with mitochondrial DNA copy number and associations of mitochondrial DNA copy number with functional impairment. Calf muscle biopsies were obtained from 34 participants with PAD (mean age: 73.5 years (SD 6.4), mean ABI: 0.67 (SD 0.15), mean 6-minute walk distance: 1191 feet (SD 223)) and 10 controls without PAD (mean age: 73.1 years (SD 4.7), mean ABI: 1.14 (SD 0.07), mean 6-minute walk distance: 1387 feet (SD 488)). Adjusting for age and sex, lower ABI values were associated with higher mitochondrial DNA copy number, measured in relative copy number (ABI<0.60: 914, ABI 0.60-0.90: 731, ABI 0.90-1.50: 593; p trend=0.016). The association of mitochondrial DNA copy number with the 6-minute walk distance and 4-meter walking velocity differed significantly between participants with versus without PAD ( p-value for interaction=0.001 and p=0.015, respectively). The correlation coefficient between mitochondrial DNA copy number and the 6-minute walk distance was 0.653 ( p=0.056) among people without PAD and -0.254 ( p=0.154) among people with PAD and ABI < 0.90. In conclusion, lower ABI values are associated with increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Associations of mitochondrial DNA copy number with the 6-minute walk distance and 4-meter walking velocity significantly differed between people with versus without PAD, with stronger positive associations observed in people without PAD than in people with PAD. The cross

  13. The innate immune system in host mice targets cells with allogenic mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Morimoto, Mami; Imanishi, Hirotake; Yoshizaki, Mariko; Sasawatari, Shigemi; Niikura, Mamoru; Takenaga, Keizo; Yonekawa, Hiromichi

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be involved in respiratory function, and mtDNA mutations have been associated with aging, tumors, and various disorders, but the effects of mtDNA imported into transplants from different individuals or aged subjects have been unclear. We examined this issue by generating trans-mitochondrial tumor cells and embryonic stem cells that shared the syngenic C57BL/6 (B6) strain–derived nuclear DNA background but possessed mtDNA derived from allogenic mouse strains. We demonstrate that transplants with mtDNA from the NZB/B1NJ strain were rejected from the host B6 mice, not by the acquired immune system but by the innate immune system. This rejection was caused partly by NK cells and involved a MyD88-dependent pathway. These results introduce novel roles of mtDNA and innate immunity in tumor immunology and transplantation medicine. PMID:20937705

  14. Human mitochondrial pyrophosphatase: cDNA cloning and analysis of the gene in patients with mtDNA depletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Curbo, Sophie; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Palenzuela, Lluis; Lucioli, Simona; Hirano, Michio; Santorelli, Filippo; Arenas, Joaquin; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Magnus

    2006-03-01

    Pyrophosphatases (PPases) catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate generated in several cellular enzymatic reactions. A novel human pyrophosphatase cDNA encoding a 334-amino-acid protein approximately 60% identical to the previously identified human cytosolic PPase was cloned and characterized. The novel enzyme, named PPase-2, was enzymatically active and catalyzed hydrolysis of pyrophosphate at a rate similar to that of the previously identified PPase-1. A functional mitochondrial import signal sequence was identified in the N-terminus of PPase-2, which targeted the enzyme to the mitochondrial matrix. The human pyrophosphatase 2 gene (PPase-2) was mapped to chromosome 4q25 and the 1.4-kb mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, with highest levels in muscle, liver, and kidney. The yeast homologue of the mitochondrial PPase-2 is required for mitochondrial DNA maintenance and yeast cells lacking the enzyme exhibit mitochondrial DNA depletion. We sequenced the PPA2 gene in 13 patients with mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes (MDS) of unknown cause to determine if mutations in the PPA2 gene of these patients were associated with this disease. No pathogenic mutations were identified in the PPA2 gene of these patients and we found no evidence that PPA2 gene mutations are a common cause of MDS in humans.

  15. Thymidine kinase 2 enzyme kinetics elucidate the mechanism of thymidine-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ren; Wang, Liya

    2014-10-07

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a nuclear gene-encoded protein, synthesized in the cytosol and subsequently translocated into the mitochondrial matrix, where it catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine (dT) and deoxycytidine (dC). The kinetics of dT phosphorylation exhibits negative cooperativity, but dC phosphorylation follows hyperbolic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The two substrates compete with each other in that dT is a competitive inhibitor of dC phosphorylation, while dC acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of dT phosphorylation. In addition, TK2 is feedback inhibited by dTTP and dCTP. TK2 also phosphorylates a number of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapy and thus plays an important role in mitochondrial toxicities caused by nucleoside analogues. Deficiency in TK2 activity due to genetic alterations causes devastating mitochondrial diseases, which are characterized by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion or multiple deletions in the affected tissues. Severe TK2 deficiency is associated with early-onset fatal mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, while less severe deficiencies result in late-onset phenotypes. In this review, studies of the enzyme kinetic behavior of TK2 enzyme variants are used to explain the mechanism of mtDNA depletion caused by TK2 mutations, thymidine overload due to thymidine phosphorylase deficiency, and mitochondrial toxicity caused by antiviral thymidine analogues.

  16. Adult cases of mitochondrial DNA depletion due to TK2 defect: an expanding spectrum.

    PubMed

    Béhin, A; Jardel, C; Claeys, K G; Fagart, J; Louha, M; Romero, N B; Laforêt, P; Eymard, B; Lombès, A

    2012-02-28

    In this study we aim to demonstrate the occurrence of adult forms of TK2 mutations causing progressive mitochondrial myopathy with significant muscle mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. Patients' investigations included serum creatine kinase, blood lactate, electromyographic, echocardiographic, and functional respiratory analyses as well as TK2 gene sequencing and TK2 activity measurement. Mitochondrial activities and mtDNA were analyzed in the patients' muscle biopsy. The 3 adult patients with TK2 mutations presented with slowly progressive myopathy compatible with a fairly normal life during decades. Apart from its much slower progression, these patients' phenotype closely resembled that of pediatric cases including early onset, absence of CNS symptoms, generalized muscle weakness predominating on axial and proximal muscles but affecting facial, ocular, and respiratory muscles, typical mitochondrial myopathy with a mosaic pattern of COX-negative and ragged-red fibers, combined mtDNA-dependent respiratory complexes deficiency and mtDNA depletion. In accordance with the disease's relatively slow progression, the residual mtDNA content was higher than that observed in pediatric cases. That difference was not explained by the type of the TK2 mutations or by the residual TK2 activity. TK2 mutations can cause mitochondrial myopathy with a slow progression. Comparison of patients with similar mutations but different disease progression might address potential mechanisms of mtDNA maintenance modulation.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA level, but not active replicase, is essential for Caenorhabditis elegans development

    PubMed Central

    Bratic, Ivana; Hench, Jürgen; Henriksson, Johan; Antebi, Adam; Bürglin, Thomas R; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies showed that the development and the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans is dependent on mitochondrial function. In this study, we addressed the role of mitochondrial DNA levels and mtDNA maintenance in development of C. elegans by analyzing deletion mutants for mitochondrial polymerase gamma (polg-1(ok1548)). Surprisingly, even though previous studies in other model organisms showed necessity of polymerase gamma for embryonic development, homozygous polg-1(ok1548) mutants had normal development and reached adulthood without any morphological defects. However, polg-1 deficient animals have a seriously compromised gonadal function as a result of severe mitochondrial depletion, leading to sterility and shortened lifespan. Our results indicate that the gonad is the primary site of mtDNA replication, whilst the mtDNA of adult somatic tissues mainly stems from the developing embryo. Furthermore, we show that the mtDNA copy number shows great plasticity as it can be almost tripled as a response to the environmental stimuli. Finally, we show that the mtDNA copy number is an essential limiting factor for the worm development and therefore, a number of mechanisms set to maintain mtDNA levels exist, ensuring a normal development of C. elegans even in the absence of the mitochondrial replicase. PMID:19181702

  18. Drosophila nuclear factor DREF regulates the expression of the mitochondrial DNA helicase and mitochondrial transcription factor B2 but not the mitochondrial translation factor B1

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Hernández, Rosana; Adán, Cristina; Roberti, Marina; Bruni, Francesco; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Cantatore, Palmiro; Matsushima, Yuichi; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Garesse, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DREF [DRE (DNA replication-related element)-binding factor] controls the transcription of numerous genes in Drosophila, many involved in nuclear DNA (nDNA) replication and cell proliferation, three in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and two in mtDNA transcription termination. In this work, we have analysed the involvement of DREF in the expression of the known remaining genes engaged in the minimal mtDNA replication (d-mtDNA helicase) and transcription (the activator d-mtTFB2) machineries and of a gene involved in mitochondrial mRNA translation (d-mtTFB1). We have identified their transcriptional initiation sites and DRE sequences in their promoter regions. Gel-shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that DREF interacts in vitro and in vivo with the d-mtDNA helicase and d-mtTFB2, but not with the d-mtTFB1 promoters. Transient transfection assays in Drosophila S2 cells with mutated DRE motifs and truncated promoter regions show that DREF controls the transcription of d-mtDNA helicase and d-mtTFB2, but not that of d-mtTFB1. RNA interference of DREF in S2 cells reinforces these results showing a decrease in the mRNA levels of d-mtDNA helicase and d-mtTFB2 and no changes in those of the d-mtTFB1. These results link the genetic regulation of nuclear DNA replication with the genetic control of mtDNA replication and transcriptional activation in Drosophila. PMID:23916463

  19. Potential efficacy of mitochondrial genes for animal DNA barcoding: a case study using eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Arong; Zhang, Aibing; Ho, Simon Yw; Xu, Weijun; Zhang, Yanzhou; Shi, Weifeng; Cameron, Stephen L; Zhu, Chaodong

    2011-01-28

    A well-informed choice of genetic locus is central to the efficacy of DNA barcoding. Current DNA barcoding in animals involves the use of the 5' half of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 gene (CO1) to diagnose and delimit species. However, there is no compelling a priori reason for the exclusive focus on this region, and it has been shown that it performs poorly for certain animal groups. To explore alternative mitochondrial barcoding regions, we compared the efficacy of the universal CO1 barcoding region with the other mitochondrial protein-coding genes in eutherian mammals. Four criteria were used for this comparison: the number of recovered species, sequence variability within and between species, resolution to taxonomic levels above that of species, and the degree of mutational saturation. Based on 1,179 mitochondrial genomes of eutherians, we found that the universal CO1 barcoding region is a good representative of mitochondrial genes as a whole because the high species-recovery rate (> 90%) was similar to that of other mitochondrial genes, and there were no significant differences in intra- or interspecific variability among genes. However, an overlap between intra- and interspecific variability was still problematic for all mitochondrial genes. Our results also demonstrated that any choice of mitochondrial gene for DNA barcoding failed to offer significant resolution at higher taxonomic levels. We suggest that the CO1 barcoding region, the universal DNA barcode, is preferred among the mitochondrial protein-coding genes as a molecular diagnostic at least for eutherian species identification. Nevertheless, DNA barcoding with this marker may still be problematic for certain eutherian taxa and our approach can be used to test potential barcoding loci for such groups.

  20. Potential efficacy of mitochondrial genes for animal DNA barcoding: a case study using eutherian mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A well-informed choice of genetic locus is central to the efficacy of DNA barcoding. Current DNA barcoding in animals involves the use of the 5' half of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 gene (CO1) to diagnose and delimit species. However, there is no compelling a priori reason for the exclusive focus on this region, and it has been shown that it performs poorly for certain animal groups. To explore alternative mitochondrial barcoding regions, we compared the efficacy of the universal CO1 barcoding region with the other mitochondrial protein-coding genes in eutherian mammals. Four criteria were used for this comparison: the number of recovered species, sequence variability within and between species, resolution to taxonomic levels above that of species, and the degree of mutational saturation. Results Based on 1,179 mitochondrial genomes of eutherians, we found that the universal CO1 barcoding region is a good representative of mitochondrial genes as a whole because the high species-recovery rate (> 90%) was similar to that of other mitochondrial genes, and there were no significant differences in intra- or interspecific variability among genes. However, an overlap between intra- and interspecific variability was still problematic for all mitochondrial genes. Our results also demonstrated that any choice of mitochondrial gene for DNA barcoding failed to offer significant resolution at higher taxonomic levels. Conclusions We suggest that the CO1 barcoding region, the universal DNA barcode, is preferred among the mitochondrial protein-coding genes as a molecular diagnostic at least for eutherian species identification. Nevertheless, DNA barcoding with this marker may still be problematic for certain eutherian taxa and our approach can be used to test potential barcoding loci for such groups. PMID:21276253

  1. Altered Mitochondrial DNA Methylation Pattern in Alzheimer Disease-Related Pathology and in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Marta; Mosquera, Jose Luis; Ansoleaga, Belén; Ferrer, Isidre; Barrachina, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked with the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles essential for cell viability and are characterized by the presence of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA. DNA methylation is a well-known epigenetic mechanism that regulates nuclear gene transcription. However, mtDNA methylation is not the subject of the same research attention. The present study shows the presence of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in CpG and non-CpG sites in the entorhinal cortex and substantia nigra of control human postmortem brains, using the 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencer. Moreover, increased mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels are found in the D-loop region of mtDNA in the entorhinal cortex in brain samples with Alzheimer disease-related pathology (stages I to II and stages III to IV of Braak and Braak; n = 8) with respect to control cases. Interestingly, this region shows a dynamic pattern in the content of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 mice along with Alzheimer disease pathology progression (3, 6, and 12 months of age). Finally, a loss of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels in the D-loop region is found in the substantia nigra in Parkinson disease (n = 10) with respect to control cases. In summary, the present findings suggest mtDNA epigenetic modulation in human brain is vulnerable to neurodegenerative disease states. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. XPD localizes in mitochondria and protects the mitochondrial genome from oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Fang, Hongbo; Chi, Zhenfen; Wu, Zan; Wei, Di; Mo, Dongliang; Niu, Kaifeng; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Hei, Tom K; Nie, Linghu; Zhao, Yongliang

    2015-06-23

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD/ERCC2) encodes an ATP-dependent helicase that plays essential roles in both transcription and nucleotide excision repair of nuclear DNA, however, whether or not XPD exerts similar functions in mitochondria remains elusive. In this study, we provide the first evidence that XPD is localized in the inner membrane of mitochondria, and cells under oxidative stress showed an enhanced recruitment of XPD into mitochondrial compartment. Furthermore, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and levels of oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) common deletion were significantly elevated, whereas capacity for oxidative damage repair of mtDNA was markedly reduced in both XPD-suppressed human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells and XPD-deficient human fibroblasts. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify interacting factor(s) with XPD and TUFM, a mitochondrial Tu translation elongation factor was detected to be physically interacted with XPD. Similar to the findings in XPD-deficient cells, mitochondrial common deletion and oxidative damage repair capacity in U2OS cells were found to be significantly altered after TUFM knock-down. Our findings clearly demonstrate that XPD plays crucial role(s) in protecting mitochondrial genome stability by facilitating an efficient repair of oxidative DNA damage in mitochondria. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. The yeast Holliday junction resolvase, CCE1, can restore wild-type mitochondrial DNA to human cells carrying rearranged mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sembongi, Hiroshi; Di Re, Miriam; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Holt, Ian J

    2007-10-01

    Rearrangements of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are a well-recognized cause of human disease; deletions are more frequent, but duplications are more readily transmitted to offspring. In theory, partial duplications of mtDNA can be resolved to partially deleted and wild-type (WT) molecules, via homologous recombination. Therefore, the yeast CCE1 gene, encoding a Holliday junction resolvase, was introduced into cells carrying partially duplicated or partially triplicated mtDNA. Some cell lines carrying the CCE1 gene had substantial amounts of WT mtDNA suggesting that the enzyme can mediate intramolecular recombination in human mitochondria. However, high levels of expression of CCE1 frequently led to mtDNA loss, and so it is necessary to strictly regulate the expression of CCE1 in human cells to ensure the selection and maintenance of WT mtDNA.

  4. Ntg1p, the base excision repair protein, generates mutagenic intermediates in yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Naina; Mehta, Reema; Meednu, Nida; Sia, Elaine A

    2006-07-13

    Mitochondrial DNA is predicted to be highly prone to oxidative damage due to its proximity to free radicals generated by oxidative phosphorylation. Base excision repair (BER) is the primary repair pathway responsible for repairing oxidative damage in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In yeast mitochondria, three N-glycosylases have been identified so far, Ntg1p, Ogg1p and Ung1p. Ntg1p, a broad specificity N-glycosylase, takes part in catalyzing the first step of BER that involves the removal of the damaged base. In this study, we examined the role of Ntg1p in maintaining yeast mitochondrial genome integrity. Using genetic reporters and assays to assess mitochondrial mutations, we found that loss of Ntg1p suppresses mitochondrial point mutation rates, frameshifts and recombination rates. We also observed a suppression of respiration loss in the ntg1-Delta cells in response to ultraviolet light exposure implying an overlap between BER and UV-induced damage in the yeast mitochondrial compartment. Over-expression of the BER AP endonuclease, Apn1p, did not significantly affect the mitochondrial mutation rate in the presence of Ntg1p, whereas Apn1p over-expression in an ntg1-Delta background increased the frequency of mitochondrial mutations. In addition, loss of Apn1p also suppressed mitochondrial point mutations. Our work suggests that both Ntg1p and Apn1p generate mutagenic intermediates in the yeast mitochondrial genome.

  5. Age-Related Mitochondrial DNA Depletion and the Impact on Pancreatic Beta Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Nile, Donna L.; Brown, Audrey E.; Kumaheri, Meutia A.; Blair, Helen R.; Heggie, Alison; Miwa, Satomi; Cree, Lynsey M.; Payne, Brendan; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Brown, Louise; Gunn, David A.; Walker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterised by an age-related decline in insulin secretion. We previously identified a 50% age-related decline in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in isolated human islets. The purpose of this study was to mimic this degree of mtDNA depletion in MIN6 cells to determine whether there is a direct impact on insulin secretion. Transcriptional silencing of mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, decreased mtDNA levels by 40% in MIN6 cells. This level of mtDNA depletion significantly decreased mtDNA gene transcription and translation, resulting in reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and ATP production. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was impaired following partial mtDNA depletion, but was normalised following treatment with glibenclamide. This confirms that the deficit in the insulin secretory pathway precedes K+ channel closure, indicating that the impact of mtDNA depletion is at the level of mitochondrial respiration. In conclusion, partial mtDNA depletion to a degree comparable to that seen in aged human islets impaired mitochondrial function and directly decreased insulin secretion. Using our model of partial mtDNA depletion following targeted gene silencing of TFAM, we have managed to mimic the degree of mtDNA depletion observed in aged human islets, and have shown how this correlates with impaired insulin secretion. We therefore predict that the age-related mtDNA depletion in human islets is not simply a biomarker of the aging process, but will contribute to the age-related risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25532126

  6. Age-related mitochondrial DNA depletion and the impact on pancreatic Beta cell function.

    PubMed

    Nile, Donna L; Brown, Audrey E; Kumaheri, Meutia A; Blair, Helen R; Heggie, Alison; Miwa, Satomi; Cree, Lynsey M; Payne, Brendan; Chinnery, Patrick F; Brown, Louise; Gunn, David A; Walker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterised by an age-related decline in insulin secretion. We previously identified a 50% age-related decline in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in isolated human islets. The purpose of this study was to mimic this degree of mtDNA depletion in MIN6 cells to determine whether there is a direct impact on insulin secretion. Transcriptional silencing of mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, decreased mtDNA levels by 40% in MIN6 cells. This level of mtDNA depletion significantly decreased mtDNA gene transcription and translation, resulting in reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and ATP production. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was impaired following partial mtDNA depletion, but was normalised following treatment with glibenclamide. This confirms that the deficit in the insulin secretory pathway precedes K+ channel closure, indicating that the impact of mtDNA depletion is at the level of mitochondrial respiration. In conclusion, partial mtDNA depletion to a degree comparable to that seen in aged human islets impaired mitochondrial function and directly decreased insulin secretion. Using our model of partial mtDNA depletion following targeted gene silencing of TFAM, we have managed to mimic the degree of mtDNA depletion observed in aged human islets, and have shown how this correlates with impaired insulin secretion. We therefore predict that the age-related mtDNA depletion in human islets is not simply a biomarker of the aging process, but will contribute to the age-related risk of type 2 diabetes.

  7. The Strictly Aerobic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Tolerates Loss of a Mitochondrial DNA-Packaging Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Arata, Kosuke; Matsunobu, Miki; Ono, Bungo; Aoki, Tomoyo; Lajdova, Dana; Nebohacova, Martina; Nosek, Jozef; Miyakawa, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly compacted into DNA-protein structures termed mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The key mt-nucleoid components responsible for mtDNA condensation are HMG box-containing proteins such as mammalian mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and Abf2p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To gain insight into the function and organization of mt-nucleoids in strictly aerobic organisms, we initiated studies of these DNA-protein structures in Yarrowia lipolytica. We identified a principal component of mt-nucleoids in this yeast and termed it YlMhb1p (Y. lipolytica mitochondrial HMG box-containing protein 1). YlMhb1p contains two putative HMG boxes contributing both to DNA binding and to its ability to compact mtDNA in vitro. Phenotypic analysis of a Δmhb1 strain lacking YlMhb1p resulted in three interesting findings. First, although the mutant exhibits clear differences in mt-nucleoids accompanied by a large decrease in the mtDNA copy number and the number of mtDNA-derived transcripts, its respiratory characteristics and growth under most of the conditions tested are indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. Second, our results indicate that a potential imbalance between subunits of the respiratory chain encoded separately by nuclear DNA and mtDNA is prevented at a (post)translational level. Third, we found that mtDNA in the Δmhb1 strain is more prone to mutations, indicating that mtHMG box-containing proteins protect the mitochondrial genome against mutagenic events. PMID:24972935

  8. Inhibition of mTOR Prevents ROS Production Initiated by Ethidium Bromide-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Nacarelli, Timothy; Azar, Ashley; Sell, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial mass and DNA content involves a complex interaction between mitochondrial DNA replication machinery, functional components of the electron transport chain, selective clearance of mitochondria, and nuclear gene expression. In order to gain insight into cellular responses to mitochondrial stress, we treated human diploid fibroblasts with ethidium bromide at concentrations that induced loss of mitochondrial DNA over a period of 7 days. The decrease in mitochondrial DNA was accompanied by a reduction in steady state levels of the mitochondrial DNA binding protein, TFAM, a reduction in several electron transport chain protein levels, increased mitochondrial and total cellular ROS, and activation of p38 MAPK. However, there was an increase in mitochondrial mass and voltage dependent anion channel levels. In addition, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity, as judged by p70S6K targets, was decreased while steady state levels of p62/SQSTM1 and Parkin were increased. Treatment of cells with rapamycin created a situation in which cells were better able to adapt to the mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in decreased ROS and increased cell viability but did not prevent the reduction in mitochondrial DNA. These effects may be due to a more efficient flux through the electron transport chain, increased autophagy, or enhanced AKT signaling, coupled with a reduced growth rate. Together, the results suggest that mTOR activity is affected by mitochondrial stress, which may be part of the retrograde signal system required for normal mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:25104948

  9. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  10. Advances in the understanding of mitochondrial DNA as a pathogenic factor in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boyapati, Ray K.; Tamborska, Arina; Dorward, David A.; Ho, Gwo-Tzer

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has many similarities with bacterial DNA because of their shared common ancestry. Increasing evidence demonstrates mtDNA to be a potent danger signal that is recognised by the innate immune system and can directly modulate the inflammatory response. In humans, elevated circulating mtDNA is found in conditions with significant tissue injury such as trauma and sepsis and increasingly in chronic organ-specific and systemic illnesses such as steatohepatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we examine our current understanding of mtDNA-mediated inflammation and how the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial homeostasis and mtDNA release represent exciting and previously under-recognised important factors in many human inflammatory diseases, offering many new translational opportunities. PMID:28299196

  11. Reduced Glucose Sensation Can Increase the Fitness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lacking Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Akdoğan, Emel; Tardu, Mehmet; Garipler, Görkem; Baytek, Gülkız; Kavakli, İ. Halil; Dunn, Cory D.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) can lead to diseases for which there are no clearly effective treatments. Since mitochondrial function and biogenesis are controlled by the nutrient environment of the cell, it is possible that perturbation of conserved, nutrient-sensing pathways may successfully treat mitochondrial disease. We found that restricting glucose or otherwise reducing the activity of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway can lead to improved proliferation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking mtDNA and that the transcriptional response to mtDNA loss is reduced in cells with diminished PKA activity. We have excluded many pathways and proteins from being individually responsible for the benefits provided to cells lacking mtDNA by PKA inhibition, and we found that robust import of mitochondrial polytopic membrane proteins may be required in order for cells without mtDNA to receive the full benefits of PKA reduction. Finally, we have discovered that the transcription of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and aromatic amino acid catabolism is altered after mtDNA damage. Our results highlight the potential importance of nutrient detection and availability on the outcome of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26751567

  12. Postglacial species displacement in Triturus newts deduced from asymmetrically introgressed mitochondrial DNA and ecological niche models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background If the geographical displacement of one species by another is accompanied by hybridization, mitochondrial DNA can introgress asymmetrically, from the outcompeted species into the invading species, over a large area. We explore this phenomenon using the two parapatric crested newt species, Triturus macedonicus and T. karelinii, distributed on the Balkan Peninsula in south-eastern Europe, as a model. Results We first delimit a ca. 54,000 km2 area in which T. macedonicus contains T. karelinii mitochondrial DNA. This introgression zone bisects the range of T. karelinii, cutting off a T. karelinii enclave. The high similarity of introgressed mitochondrial DNA haplotypes with those found in T. karelinii suggests a recent transfer across the species boundary. We then use ecological niche modeling to explore habitat suitability of the location of the present day introgression zone under current, mid-Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum conditions. This area was inhospitable during the Last Glacial Maximum for both species, but would have been habitable at the mid-Holocene. Since the mid-Holocene, habitat suitability generally increased for T. macedonicus, whereas it decreased for T. karelinii. Conclusion The presence of a T. karelinii enclave suggests that T. karelinii was the first to colonize the area where the present day introgression zone is positioned after the Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequently, we propose T. karelinii was outcompeted by T. macedonicus, which captured T. karelinii mitochondrial DNA via introgressive hybridization in the process. Ecological niche modeling suggests that this replacement was likely facilitated by a shift in climate since the mid-Holocene. We suggest that the northwestern part of the current introgression zone was probably never inhabited by T. karelinii itself, and that T. karelinii mitochondrial DNA spread there through T. macedonicus exclusively. Considering the spatial distribution of the introgressed mitochondrial DNA and

  13. Postglacial species displacement in Triturus newts deduced from asymmetrically introgressed mitochondrial DNA and ecological niche models.

    PubMed

    Wielstra, Ben; Arntzen, Jan W

    2012-08-30

    If the geographical displacement of one species by another is accompanied by hybridization, mitochondrial DNA can introgress asymmetrically, from the outcompeted species into the invading species, over a large area. We explore this phenomenon using the two parapatric crested newt species, Triturus macedonicus and T. karelinii, distributed on the Balkan Peninsula in south-eastern Europe, as a model. We first delimit a ca. 54,000 km(2) area in which T. macedonicus contains T. karelinii mitochondrial DNA. This introgression zone bisects the range of T. karelinii, cutting off a T. karelinii enclave. The high similarity of introgressed mitochondrial DNA haplotypes with those found in T. karelinii suggests a recent transfer across the species boundary. We then use ecological niche modeling to explore habitat suitability of the location of the present day introgression zone under current, mid-Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum conditions. This area was inhospitable during the Last Glacial Maximum for both species, but would have been habitable at the mid-Holocene. Since the mid-Holocene, habitat suitability generally increased for T. macedonicus, whereas it decreased for T. karelinii. The presence of a T. karelinii enclave suggests that T. karelinii was the first to colonize the area where the present day introgression zone is positioned after the Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequently, we propose T. karelinii was outcompeted by T. macedonicus, which captured T. karelinii mitochondrial DNA via introgressive hybridization in the process. Ecological niche modeling suggests that this replacement was likely facilitated by a shift in climate since the mid-Holocene. We suggest that the northwestern part of the current introgression zone was probably never inhabited by T. karelinii itself, and that T. karelinii mitochondrial DNA spread there through T. macedonicus exclusively. Considering the spatial distribution of the introgressed mitochondrial DNA and the signal derived from

  14. Introducing Human Population Biology through an Easy Laboratory Exercise on Mitochondrial DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardinas, Antonio F.; Dopico, Eduardo; Roca, Agustin; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Lopez, Belen

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an easy and cheap laboratory exercise for students to discover their own mitochondrial haplogroup. Students use buccal swabs to obtain mucosa cells as noninvasive tissue samples, extract DNA, and with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis they can obtain DNA fragments of…

  15. Recent Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Increase the Risk of Developing Common Late-Onset Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Gavin; Gomez-Duran, Aurora; Wilson, Ian J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly polymorphic at the population level, and specific mtDNA variants affect mitochondrial function. With emerging evidence that mitochondrial mechanisms are central to common human diseases, it is plausible that mtDNA variants contribute to the “missing heritability” of several complex traits. Given the central role of mtDNA genes in oxidative phosphorylation, the same genetic variants would be expected to alter the risk of developing several different disorders, but this has not been shown to date. Here we studied 38,638 individuals with 11 major diseases, and 17,483 healthy controls. Imputing missing variants from 7,729 complete mitochondrial genomes, we captured 40.41% of European mtDNA variation. We show that mtDNA variants modifying the risk of developing one disease also modify the risk of developing other diseases, thus providing independent replication of a disease association in different case and control cohorts. High-risk alleles were more common than protective alleles, indicating that mtDNA is not at equilibrium in the human population, and that recent mutations interact with nuclear loci to modify the risk of developing multiple common diseases. PMID:24852434

  16. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium in mitochondrial DNA of 16 ruminant populations.

    PubMed

    Slate, J; Phua, S H

    2003-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a widely employed molecular tool in phylogeography, in the inference of human evolutionary history, in dating the domestication of livestock and in forensic science. In humans and other vertebrates the popularity of mtDNA can be partially attributed to an assumption of strict maternal inheritance, such that there is no recombination between mitochondrial lineages. The recent demonstration that linkage disequilibrium (LD) declines as a function of distance between polymorphic sites in hominid mitochondrial genomes has been interpreted as evidence of recombination between mtDNA haplotypes, and hence nonclonal inheritance. However, critics of mtDNA recombination have suggested that this association is an artefact of an inappropriate measure of LD or of sequencing error, and subsequent studies of other populations have failed to replicate the initial finding. Here we report the analysis of 16 ruminant populations and present evidence that LD significantly declines with distance in five of them. A meta-analysis of the data indicates a nonsignificant trend of LD declining with distance. Most of the earlier criticisms of patterns between LD and distance in hominid mtDNA are not applicable to this data set. Our results suggest that either ruminant mtDNA is not strictly clonal or that compensatory selection has influenced patterns of variation at closely linked sites within the mitochondrial control region. The potential impact of these processes should be considered when using mtDNA as a tool in vertebrate population genetic, phylogenetic and forensic studies.

  17. Effects of Wolbachia on mitochondrial DNA variation in populations of Athetis lepigone (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that infect arthropods and incompatibility among strains can affect gene flow within host insect populations, that can result in significant host mitochondrial DNA (MtD) variation. The effects of Wolbachia infection on mtDNA variation was studied in Athetis lepi...

  18. Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Oliver; Turnbull, Doug, E-mail: doug.turnbull@newcastle.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA diseases are common neurological conditions caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes responsible for its maintenance. Current treatments for these disorders are focussed on the management of the symptoms, rather than the correction of biochemical defects caused by the mutation. This review focuses on the molecular effects of mutations, the symptoms they cause and current work focusing on the development of targeted treatments for mitochondrial DNA disease. - Highlights: • We discuss several common disease causing mtDNA mutations. • We highlight recent work linking pathogenicity to deletion size and heteroplasmy. • We discuss recent advancesmore » in the development of targeted mtDNA disease treatments.« less

  19. Transfection of mitochondria: strategy towards a gene therapy of mitochondrial DNA diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Seibel, P; Trappe, J; Villani, G; Klopstock, T; Papa, S; Reichmann, H

    1995-01-01

    Successes in classical gene therapies have been achieved by placing a corrected copy of a defective nuclear gene in cells. A similar gene replacement approach for a mutant mitochondrial genome is invariably linked to the use of a yet unavailable mitochondrial transfection vector. Here we show that DNA coupled covalently to a short mitochondrial leader peptide (chimera) can enter mitochondria via the protein import pathway, opening a new way for gene-, antisense-RNA- or antisense-DNA-delivery in molecular therapies. The import behavior of the purified chimera, composed of the amino-terminal leader peptide of the rat ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) and a double stranded DNA molecule (17 bp or 322 bp), was tested by incubating with coupled and 'energized' rat liver mitochondria in the presence of reticulocyte lysate. The chimera was translocated with a high efficiency into the matrix of mitochondria utilizing the protein import pathway, independent from the size of its passenger DNA. Images PMID:7870573

  20. Role of mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction in veterans with Gulf War Illness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Meyer, Joel N; Hill, Helene Z; Lange, Gudrun; Condon, Michael R; Klein, Jacquelyn C; Ndirangu, Duncan; Falvo, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a chronic multi-symptom illness not currently diagnosed by standard medical or laboratory test that affects 30% of veterans who served during the 1990-1991 Gulf War. The clinical presentation of GWI is comparable to that of patients with certain mitochondrial disorders-i.e., clinically heterogeneous multisystem symptoms. Therefore, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to both the symptoms of GWI as well as its persistence over time. We recruited 21 cases of GWI (CDC and Kansas criteria) and 7 controls to participate in this study. Peripheral blood samples were obtained in all participants and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) based assay was performed to quantify mitochondrial and nuclear DNA lesion frequency and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number (mtDNAcn) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Samples were also used to analyze nuclear DNA lesion frequency and enzyme activity for mitochondrial complexes I and IV. Both mtDNA lesion frequency (p = 0.015, d = 1.13) and mtDNAcn (p = 0.001; d = 1.69) were elevated in veterans with GWI relative to controls. Nuclear DNA lesion frequency was also elevated in veterans with GWI (p = 0.344; d = 1.41), but did not reach statistical significance. Complex I and IV activity (p > 0.05) were similar between groups and greater mtDNA lesion frequency was associated with reduced complex I (r2 = -0.35, p = 0.007) and IV (r2 = -0.28, p < 0.01) enzyme activity. In conclusion, veterans with GWI exhibit greater mtDNA damage which is consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Nucleotide pools dictate the identity and frequency of ribonucleotide incorporation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Anna-Karin; Navarrete, Clara; Engqvist, Martin K M; Hoberg, Emily; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Taylor, Robert W; Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria; Clausen, Anders R

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the presence of ribonucleotides in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the present study we use a genome-wide approach to precisely map the location of these. We find that ribonucleotides are distributed evenly between the heavy- and light-strand of mtDNA. The relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides reflect that DNA polymerase γ discriminates the four ribonucleotides differentially during DNA synthesis. The observed pattern is also dependent on the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools and disease-causing mutations that change these pools alter both the absolute and relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides. Our analyses strongly suggest that DNA polymerase γ-dependent incorporation is the main source of ribonucleotides in mtDNA and argues against the existence of a mitochondrial ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in human cells. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that when dNTP pools are limiting, ribonucleotides serve as a source of building blocks to maintain DNA replication. Increased levels of embedded ribonucleotides in patient cells with disturbed nucleotide pools may contribute to a pathogenic mechanism that affects mtDNA stability and impair new rounds of mtDNA replication.

  2. Nucleotide pools dictate the identity and frequency of ribonucleotide incorporation in mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoberg, Emily; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Taylor, Robert W.; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Falkenberg, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the presence of ribonucleotides in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the present study we use a genome-wide approach to precisely map the location of these. We find that ribonucleotides are distributed evenly between the heavy- and light-strand of mtDNA. The relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides reflect that DNA polymerase γ discriminates the four ribonucleotides differentially during DNA synthesis. The observed pattern is also dependent on the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools and disease-causing mutations that change these pools alter both the absolute and relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides. Our analyses strongly suggest that DNA polymerase γ-dependent incorporation is the main source of ribonucleotides in mtDNA and argues against the existence of a mitochondrial ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in human cells. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that when dNTP pools are limiting, ribonucleotides serve as a source of building blocks to maintain DNA replication. Increased levels of embedded ribonucleotides in patient cells with disturbed nucleotide pools may contribute to a pathogenic mechanism that affects mtDNA stability and impair new rounds of mtDNA replication. PMID:28207748

  3. p53 improves aerobic exercise capacity and augments skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA content.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon-Young; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Matsumoto, Takumi; Sung, Ho Joong; Ma, Wenzhe; Choi, Jeong W; Anderson, Stasia A; Leary, Scot C; Balaban, Robert S; Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Hwang, Paul M

    2009-09-25

    Exercise capacity is a physiological characteristic associated with protection from both cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. p53 regulates mitochondrial function and its deletion markedly diminishes exercise capacity, but the underlying genetic mechanism orchestrating this is unclear. Understanding the biology of how p53 improves exercise capacity may provide useful insights for improving both cardiovascular as well as general health. The purpose of this study was to understand the genetic mechanism by which p53 regulates aerobic exercise capacity. Using a variety of physiological, metabolic, and molecular techniques, we further characterized maximum exercise capacity and the effects of training, measured various nonmitochondrial and mitochondrial determinants of exercise capacity, and examined putative regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. As p53 did not affect baseline cardiac function or inotropic reserve, we focused on the involvement of skeletal muscle and now report a wider role for p53 in modulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. p53 interacts with Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A (TFAM), a nuclear-encoded gene important for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and maintenance, and regulates mtDNA content. The increased mtDNA in p53(+/+) compared to p53(-/-) mice was more marked in aerobic versus glycolytic skeletal muscle groups with no significant changes in cardiac tissue. These in vivo observations were further supported by in vitro studies showing overexpression of p53 in mouse myoblasts increases both TFAM and mtDNA levels whereas depletion of TFAM by shRNA decreases mtDNA content. Our current findings indicate that p53 promotes aerobic metabolism and exercise capacity by using different mitochondrial genes and mechanisms in a tissue-specific manner.

  4. mtDNA, Metastasis, and the Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response (UPRmt).

    PubMed

    Kenny, Timothy C; Germain, Doris

    2017-01-01

    While several studies have confirmed a link between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and cancer cell metastasis, much debate remains regarding the nature of the alternations in mtDNA leading to this effect. Meanwhile, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR mt ) has gained much attention in recent years, with most studies of this pathway focusing on its role in aging. However, the UPR mt has also been studied in the context of cancer. More recent work suggests that rather than a single mutation or alternation, specific combinatorial mtDNA landscapes able to activate the UPR mt may be those that are selected by metastatic cells, while mtDNA landscapes unable to activate the UPR mt do not. This review aims at offering an overview of the confusing literature on mtDNA mutations and metastasis and the more recent work on the UPR mt in this setting.

  5. Periodic expression of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication genes during the trypanosomatid cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Pasion, S G; Brown, G W; Brown, L M; Ray, D S

    1994-12-01

    In trypanosomatids, DNA replication in the nucleus and in the single mitochondrion (or kinetoplast) initiates nearly simultaneously, suggesting that the DNA synthesis (S) phases of the nucleus and the mitochondrion are coordinately regulated. To investigate the basis for the temporal link between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA synthesis phases the expression of the genes encoding DNA ligase I, the 51 and 28 kDa subunits of replication protein A, dihydrofolate reductase and the mitochondrial type II topoisomerase were analyzed during the cell cycle progression of synchronous cultures of Crithidia fasciculata. These DNA replication genes were all expressed periodically, with peak mRNA levels occurring just prior to or at the peak of DNA synthesis in the synchronized cultures. A plasmid clone (pdN-1) in which TOP2, the gene encoding the mitochondrial topoisomerase, was disrupted by the insertion of a NEO drug-resistance cassette was found to express both a truncated TOP2 mRNA and a truncated topoisomerase polypeptide. The truncated mRNA was also expressed periodically coordinate with the expression of the endogenous TOP2 mRNA indicating that cis elements necessary for periodic expression are contained within cloned sequences. The expression of both TOP2 and nuclear DNA replication genes at the G1/S boundary suggests that regulated expression of these genes may play a role in coordinating nuclear and mitochondrial S phases in trypanosomatids.

  6. Transcriptional mapping of the ribosomal RNA region of mouse L-cell mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nagley, P; Clayton, D A

    1980-01-01

    The map positions in mouse mitochondrial DNA of the two ribosomal RNA genes and adjacent genes coding several small transcripts have been determined precisely by application of a procedure in which DNA-RNA hybrids have been subjected to digestion by S1 nuclease under conditions of varying severity. Digestion of the DNA-RNA hybrids with S1 nuclease yielded a series of species which were shown to contain ribosomal RNA molecules together with adjacent transcripts hybridized conjointly to a continuous segment of mitochondrial DNA. There is one small transcript about 60 bases long whose gene adjoins the sequences coding the 5'-end of the small ribosomal RNA (950 bases) and which lies approximately 200 nucleotides from the D-loop origin of heavy strand mitochondrial DNA synthesis. An 80-base transcript lies between the small and large ribosomal RNA genes, and genes for two further short transcript (each about 80 bases in length) abut the sequences coding the 3'-end of the large ribosomal RNA (approximately 1500 bases). The ability to isolate a discrete DNA-RNA hybrid species approximately 2700 base pairs in length containing all these transcripts suggests that there can be few nucleotides in this region of mouse mitochondrial DNA which are not represented as stable RNA species. Images PMID:6253898

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Unwinding Enzyme Required for Liver Regeneration | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The liver has an exceptional capacity to proliferate. This ability allows the liver to regenerate its mass after partial surgical removal or injury and is the key to successful partial liver transplants. Liver cells, called hepatocytes, are packed with mitochondria, and regulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is crucial to mitochondrial function, including energy production, during proliferation. Yves Pommier, M.D., Ph.D., of CCR’s Developmental Therapeutics Branch, and his colleagues recently showed that the vertebrate mitochondrial topoisomerase, Top1mt, was critical in maintaining mitochondrial function in the heart after doxorubicin-induced damage. The group wondered whether Top1mt might play a similar role in liver regeneration.

  8. Molecular diversification of Trichuris spp. from Sigmodontinae (Cricetidae) rodents from Argentina based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Robles, María Del Rosario; Panei, Carlos Javier; Cutillas, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for the genus Trichuris based on sequence data from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) and cytochrome b (cob). The taxa consisted of nine populations of whipworm from five species of Sigmodontinae rodents from Argentina. Bayesian Inference, Maximum Parsimony, and Maximum Likelihood methods were used to infer phylogenies for each gene separately but also for the combined mitochondrial data and the combined mitochondrial and nuclear dataset. Phylogenetic results based on cox1 and cob mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) revealed three clades strongly resolved corresponding to three different species (Trichuris navonae, Trichuris bainae, and Trichuris pardinasi) showing phylogeographic variation, but relationships among Trichuris species were poorly resolved. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on concatenated sequences had greater phylogenetic resolution for delimiting species and populations intra-specific of Trichuris than those based on partitioned genes. Thus, populations of T. bainae and T. pardinasi could be affected by geographical factors and co-divergence parasite-host.

  9. Decreased Integrity, Content, and Increased Transcript Level of Mitochondrial DNA Are Associated with Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiao-Dan; Chen, Zhao-Li; Qu, Ming-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Wen; Li, Su-Xia; Chen, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of keratoconus (KC). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is involved in mitochondrial function, and the mtDNA content, integrity, and transcript level may affect the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and be involved in the pathogenesis of KC. We designed a case-control study to research the relationship between KC and mtDNA integrity, content and transcription. One-hundred ninety-eight KC corneas and 106 normal corneas from Chinese patients were studied. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the relative mtDNA content, transcript levels of mtDNA and related genes. Long-extension PCR was used to detect mtDNA damage. ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP were measured by respective assay kit, and Mito-Tracker Green was used to label the mitochondria. The relative mtDNA content of KC corneas was significantly lower than that of normal corneas (P = 9.19×10−24), possibly due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) gene (P = 3.26×10−3). In contrast, the transcript levels of mtDNA genes were significantly increased in KC corneas compared with normal corneas (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [ND1]: P = 1.79×10−3; cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 [COX1]: P = 1.54×10−3; NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, [ND6]: P = 4.62×10−3). The latter may be the result of increased expression levels of mtDNA transcription-related genes mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) (P = 2.55×10−4) and transcription factor B2 mitochondrial (TFB2M) (P = 7.88×10−5). KC corneas also had increased mtDNA damage (P = 3.63×10−10), higher ROS levels, and lower mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels compared with normal corneas. Decreased integrity, content and increased transcript level of mtDNA are associated with KC. These changes may affect the generation of ROS and play a role in the pathogenesis of KC. PMID:27783701

  10. Direct evidence for homologous recombination in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ladoukakis, E D; Zouros, E

    2001-07-01

    The assumption that animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) does not undergo homologous recombination is based on indirect evidence, yet it has had an important influence on our understanding of mtDNA repair and mutation accumulation (and thus mitochondrial disease and aging) and on biohistorical inferences made from population data. Recently, several studies have suggested recombination in primate mtDNA on the basis of patterns of frequency distribution and linkage associations of mtDNA mutations in human populations, but others have failed to produce similar evidence. Here, we provide direct evidence for homologous mtDNA recombination in mussels, where heteroplasmy is the rule in males. Our results indicate a high rate of mtDNA recombination. Coupled with the observation that mammalian mitochondria contain the enzymes needed for the catalysis of homologous recombination, these findings suggest that animal mtDNA molecules may recombine regularly and that the extent to which this generates new haplotypes may depend only on the frequency of biparental inheritance of the mitochondrial genome. This generalization must, however, await evidence from animal species with typical maternal mtDNA inheritance.

  11. Yeast mitochondrial HMG proteins: DNA-binding properties of the most evolutionarily divergent component of mitochondrial nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Marini, Victoria; Willcox, Smaranda; Nosek, Jozef; Griffith, Jack D; Krejci, Lumir; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2015-12-08

    Yeast mtDNA is compacted into nucleoprotein structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The principal mediators of nucleoid formation are mitochondrial high-mobility group (HMG)-box containing (mtHMG) proteins. Although these proteins are some of the fastest evolving components of mt-nucleoids, it is not known whether the divergence of mtHMG proteins on the level of their amino acid sequences is accompanied by diversification of their biochemical properties. In the present study we performed a comparative biochemical analysis of yeast mtHMG proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScAbf2p), Yarrowia lipolytica (YlMhb1p) and Candida parapsilosis (CpGcf1p). We found that all three proteins exhibit relatively weak binding to intact dsDNA. In fact, ScAbf2p and YlMhb1p bind quantitatively to this substrate only at very high protein to DNA ratios and CpGcf1p shows only negligible binding to dsDNA. In contrast, the proteins exhibit much higher preference for recombination intermediates such as Holliday junctions (HJ) and replication forks (RF). Therefore, we hypothesize that the roles of the yeast mtHMG proteins in maintenance and compaction of mtDNA in vivo are in large part mediated by their binding to recombination/replication intermediates. We also speculate that the distinct biochemical properties of CpGcf1p may represent one of the prerequisites for frequent evolutionary tinkering with the form of the mitochondrial genome in the CTG-clade of hemiascomycetous yeast species. © 2016 Authors.

  12. A ketogenic diet accelerates neurodegeneration in mice with induced mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Regnell, Christine E; Kleppa, Liv; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Gjedde, Albert; Klungland, Arne; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome maintenance plays a central role in preserving brain health. We previously demonstrated accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and severe neurodegeneration in transgenic mice inducibly expressing a mutated mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1) selectively in forebrain neurons. Here, we examine whether severe neurodegeneration in mutUNG1-expressing mice could be rescued by feeding the mice a ketogenic diet, which is known to have beneficial effects in several neurological disorders. The diet increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 2, and mitochondrial mass, enzymes, and regulators such as SIRT1 and FIS1, and appeared to downregulate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A/B and upregulate γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA A ) receptor subunits α 1 . However, unexpectedly, the ketogenic diet aggravated neurodegeneration and mitochondrial deterioration. Electron microscopy showed structurally impaired mitochondria accumulating in neuronal perikarya. We propose that aggravation is caused by increased mitochondrial biogenesis of generally dysfunctional mitochondria. This study thereby questions the dogma that a ketogenic diet is unambiguously beneficial in mitochondrial disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A ketogenic diet accelerates neurodegeneration in mice with induced mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Knut H.; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Regnell, Christine E.; Kleppa, Liv; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Gjedde, Albert; Klungland, Arne; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome maintenance plays a central role in preserving brain health. We previously demonstrated accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and severe neurodegeneration in transgenic mice inducibly expressing a mutated mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1) selectively in forebrain neurons. Here, we examine whether severe neurodegeneration in mutUNG1-expressing mice could be rescued by feeding the mice a ketogenic diet, which is known to have beneficial effects in several neurological disorders. The diet increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 2, and mitochondrial mass, enzymes, and regulators such as SIRT1 and FIS1, and appeared to downregulate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A/B and upregulate γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunits α1. However, unexpectedly, the ketogenic diet aggravated neurodegeneration and mitochondrial deterioration. Electron microscopy showed structurally impaired mitochondria accumulating in neuronal perikarya. We propose that aggravation is caused by increased mitochondrial biogenesis of generally dysfunctional mitochondria. This study thereby questions the dogma that a ketogenic diet is unambiguously beneficial in mitochondrial disorders. PMID:27639119

  14. Mitochondrial DNA of Vitis vinifera and the issue of rampant horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Salamini, Francesco; Velasco, Riccardo; Viola, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of grape (Vitis vinifera), the largest organelle genome sequenced so far, is presented. The genome is 773,279 nt long and has the highest coding capacity among known angiosperm mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs). The proportion of promiscuous DNA of plastid origin in the genome is also the largest ever reported for an angiosperm mtDNA, both in absolute and relative terms. In all, 42.4% of chloroplast genome of Vitis has been incorporated into its mitochondrial genome. In order to test if horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has also contributed to the gene content of the grape mtDNA, we built phylogenetic trees with the coding sequences of mitochondrial genes of grape and their homologs from plant mitochondrial genomes. Many incongruent gene tree topologies were obtained. However, the extent of incongruence between these gene trees is not significantly greater than that observed among optimal trees for chloroplast genes, the common ancestry of which has never been in doubt. In both cases, we attribute this incongruence to artifacts of tree reconstruction, insufficient numbers of characters, and gene paralogy. This finding leads us to question the recent phylogenetic interpretation of Bergthorsson et al. (2003, 2004) and Richardson and Palmer (2007) that rampant HGT into the mtDNA of Amborella best explains phylogenetic incongruence between mitochondrial gene trees for angiosperms. The only evidence for HGT into the Vitis mtDNA found involves fragments of two coding sequences stemming from two closteroviruses that cause the leaf roll disease of this plant. We also report that analysis of sequences shared by both chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes provides evidence for a previously unknown gene transfer route from the mitochondrion to the chloroplast.

  15. Energy, ageing, fidelity and sex: oocyte mitochondrial DNA as a protected genetic template

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Wilson B. M.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Agip, Ahmed-Noor A.; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Allen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation couples ATP synthesis to respiratory electron transport. In eukaryotes, this coupling occurs in mitochondria, which carry DNA. Respiratory electron transport in the presence of molecular oxygen generates free radicals, reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are mutagenic. In animals, mutational damage to mitochondrial DNA therefore accumulates within the lifespan of the individual. Fertilization generally requires motility of one gamete, and motility requires ATP. It has been proposed that oxidative phosphorylation is nevertheless absent in the special case of quiescent, template mitochondria, that these remain sequestered in oocytes and female germ lines and that oocyte mitochondrial DNA is thus protected from damage, but evidence to support that view has hitherto been lacking. Here we show that female gametes of Aurelia aurita, the common jellyfish, do not transcribe mitochondrial DNA, lack electron transport, and produce no free radicals. In contrast, male gametes actively transcribe mitochondrial genes for respiratory chain components and produce ROS. Electron microscopy shows that this functional division of labour between sperm and egg is accompanied by contrasting mitochondrial morphology. We suggest that mitochondrial anisogamy underlies division of any animal species into two sexes with complementary roles in sexual reproduction. We predict that quiescent oocyte mitochondria contain DNA as an unexpressed template that avoids mutational accumulation by being transmitted through the female germ line. The active descendants of oocyte mitochondria perform oxidative phosphorylation in somatic cells and in male gametes of each new generation, and the mutations that they accumulated are not inherited. We propose that the avoidance of ROS-dependent mutation is the evolutionary pressure underlying maternal mitochondrial inheritance and the developmental origin of the female germ line. PMID:23754815

  16. Off-Target Effects of Drugs that Disrupt Human Mitochondrial DNA Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) were the first drugs used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) the cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Development of severe mitochondrial toxicity has been well documented in patients infected with HIV and administered NRTIs. In vitro biochemical experiments have demonstrated that the replicative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase gamma, Polg, is a sensitive target for inhibition by metabolically active forms of NRTIs, nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs). Once incorporated into newly synthesized daughter strands NtRTIs block further DNA polymerization reactions. Human cell culture and animal studies have demonstrated that cell lines and mice exposed to NRTIs display mtDNA depletion. Further complicating NRTI off-target effects on mtDNA maintenance, two additional DNA polymerases, Pol beta and PrimPol, were recently reported to localize to mitochondria as well as the nucleus. Similar to Polg, in vitro work has demonstrated both Pol beta and PrimPol incorporate NtRTIs into nascent DNA. Cell culture and biochemical experiments have also demonstrated that antiviral ribonucleoside drugs developed to treat hepatitis C infection act as off-target substrates for POLRMT, the mitochondrial RNA polymerase and primase. Accompanying the above-mentioned topics, this review examines: (1) mtDNA maintenance in human health and disease, (2) reports of DNA polymerases theta and zeta (Rev3) localizing to mitochondria, and (3) additional drugs with off-target effects on mitochondrial function. Lastly, mtDNA damage may induce cell death; therefore, the possibility of utilizing compounds that disrupt mtDNA maintenance to kill cancer cells is discussed. PMID:29214156

  17. Evidence for double-strand break mediated mitochondrial DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Kanchanjunga; Robinson, Lucy C; Scott, Rona S; Tatchell, Kelly; Harrison, Lynn

    2017-07-27

    The mechanism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controversial. Evidence exists for double-strand break (DSB) mediated recombination-dependent replication at mitochondrial replication origin ori5 in hypersuppressive ρ- cells. However, it is not clear if this replication mode operates in ρ+ cells. To understand this, we targeted bacterial Ku (bKu), a DSB binding protein, to the mitochondria of ρ+ cells with the hypothesis that bKu would bind persistently to mtDNA DSBs, thereby preventing mtDNA replication or repair. Here, we show that mitochondrial-targeted bKu binds to ori5 and that inducible expression of bKu triggers petite formation preferentially in daughter cells. bKu expression also induces mtDNA depletion that eventually results in the formation of ρ0 cells. This data supports the idea that yeast mtDNA replication is initiated by a DSB and bKu inhibits mtDNA replication by binding to a DSB at ori5, preventing mtDNA segregation to daughter cells. Interestingly, we find that mitochondrial-targeted bKu does not decrease mtDNA content in human MCF7 cells. This finding is in agreement with the fact that human mtDNA replication, typically, is not initiated by a DSB. Therefore, this study provides evidence that DSB-mediated replication is the predominant form of mtDNA replication in ρ+ yeast cells. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. [Leigh syndrome resulting from a de novo mitochondrial DNA mutation (T8993G)].

    PubMed

    Playán, A; Solano-Palacios, A; González de la Rosa, J B; Merino-Arribas, J M; Andreu, A L; López-Pérez, M; Montoya, J

    Several degenerative neurological diseases are caused by mutations in the mitochondrial gene coding for subunit 6 of the ATPase. Thus, NARP (neurogenic weakness, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa) and Leigh syndromes are associated to a T8993G mutation when the percentage of mutant mitochondrial DNA is low (60 90%) or high (>90%), respectively. Leigh syndrome is also caused by a second mutation in the same position T8993C. The patient, a boy that died at 6 months, had generalized hypotonia, psychomotor delay, hepatomegaly, choreic movements and hyporreflexia. MRI showed hypodensities in the basal ganglia and brain stem as well as hyperlactacidemia. Molecular genetic analysis of the mitochondrial DNA showed that the patient had the T8993G mutation in a percentage higher than 95%. No mutated DNA was detected in blood of the proband s mother, maternal aunt and grandmother. The point mutation T8993G may occur de novo, at high levels, causing neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Inferring patterns in mitochondrial DNA sequences through hypercube independent spanning trees.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eduardo Sant Ana da; Pedrini, Helio

    2016-03-01

    Given a graph G, a set of spanning trees rooted at a vertex r of G is said vertex/edge independent if, for each vertex v of G, v≠r, the paths of r to v in any pair of trees are vertex/edge disjoint. Independent spanning trees (ISTs) provide a number of advantages in data broadcasting due to their fault tolerant properties. For this reason, some studies have addressed the issue by providing mechanisms for constructing independent spanning trees efficiently. In this work, we investigate how to construct independent spanning trees on hypercubes, which are generated based upon spanning binomial trees, and how to use them to predict mitochondrial DNA sequence parts through paths on the hypercube. The prediction works both for inferring mitochondrial DNA sequences comprised of six bases as well as infer anomalies that probably should not belong to the mitochondrial DNA standard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consequences of the pathogenic T9176C mutation of human mitochondrial DNA on yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kucharczyk, Roza; Ezkurdia, Nahia; Couplan, Elodie; Procaccio, Vincent; Ackerman, Sharon H.; Blondel, Marc; di Rago, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Several human neurological disorders have been associated with various mutations affecting mitochondrial enzymes involved in cellular ATP production. One of these mutations, T9176C in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), changes a highly conserved leucine residue into proline at position 217 of the mitochondrially encoded Atp6p (or a) subunit of the F1FO-ATP synthase. The consequences of this mutation on the mitochondrial ATP synthase are still poorly defined. To gain insight into the primary pathogenic mechanisms induced by T9176C, we have investigated the consequences of this mutation on the ATP synthase of yeast where Atp6p is also encoded by the mtDNA. In vitro, yeast atp6-T9176C mitochondria showed a 30% decrease in the rate of ATP synthesis. When forcing the F1FO complex to work in the reverse mode, i.e. F1-catalyzed hydrolysis of ATP coupled to proton transport out of the mitochondrial matrix, the mutant showed a normal proton-pumping activity and this activity was fully sensitive to oligomycin, an inhibitor of the ATP synthase proton channel. However, under conditions of maximal ATP hydrolytic activity, using non-osmotically protected mitochondria, the mutant ATPase activity was less efficiently inhibited by oligomycin (60% inhibition versus 85% for the wild type control). BN-PAGE analyses revealed that atp6-T9176C yeast accumulated rather good levels of fully assembled ATP synthase complexes. However, a number of subcomplexes (F1, Atp9p-ring, unassembled α-F1 subunits) could be detected as well, presumably because of a decreased stability of Atp6p within the ATP synthase. Although the oxidative phosphorylation capacity was reduced in atp6-T9176C yeast, the number of ATP molecules synthesized per electron transferred to oxygen was similar compared with wild type yeast. It can therefore be inferred that the coupling efficiency within the ATP synthase was mostly unaffected and that the T9176C mutation did not increase the proton permeability of the

  1. Retrospective assessment of the most common mitochondrial DNA mutations in a large Hungarian cohort of suspect mitochondrial cases.

    PubMed

    Remenyi, Viktoria; Inczedy-Farkas, Gabriella; Komlosi, Katalin; Horvath, Rita; Maasz, Anita; Janicsek, Ingrid; Pentelenyi, Klara; Gal, Aniko; Karcagi, Veronika; Melegh, Bela; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2015-08-01

    Prevalence estimations for mitochondrial disorders still vary widely and only few epidemiologic studies have been carried out so far. With the present work we aim to give a comprehensive overview about frequencies of the most common mitochondrial mutations in Hungarian patients. A total of 1328 patients were tested between 1999 and 2012. Among them, 882 were screened for the m.3243A > G, m.8344A > G, m.8993T > C/G mutations and deletions, 446 for LHON primary mutations. The mutation frequency in our cohort was 2.61% for the m.3243A > G, 1.47% for the m.8344A > G, 17.94% for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (m.3460G > A, m.11778G > A, m.14484T > C) and 0.45% for the m.8993T > C/G substitutions. Single mtDNA deletions were detected in 14.97%, while multiple deletions in 6.01% of the cases. The mutation frequency in Hungarian patients suggestive of mitochondrial disease was similar to other Caucasian populations. Further retrospective studies of different populations are needed in order to accurately assess the importance of mitochondrial diseases and manage these patients.

  2. Human REV3 DNA Polymerase Zeta Localizes to Mitochondria and Protects the Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Li, Xiurong; Owens, Kjerstin M; Vanniarajan, Ayyasamy; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    To date, mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) is the only polymerase known to be present in mammalian mitochondria. A dogma in the mitochondria field is that there is no other polymerase present in the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here we demonstrate localization of REV3 DNA polymerase in the mammalian mitochondria. We demonstrate localization of REV3 in the mitochondria of mammalian tissue as well as cell lines. REV3 associates with POLG and mitochondrial DNA and protects the mitochondrial genome from DNA damage. Inactivation of Rev3 leads to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced OXPHOS activity, and increased glucose consumption. Conversely, inhibition of the OXPHOS increases expression of Rev3. Rev3 expression is increased in human primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Inactivation of Rev3 decreases cell migration and invasion, and localization of Rev3 in mitochondria increases survival and the invasive potential of cancer cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that REV3 functions in mammalian mitochondria and that mitochondrial REV3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cells.

  3. [Relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, membrane potential of human embryo and embryo morphology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Teng, X M; Li, Y F

    2017-11-25

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the embryo with the different morphological types in the third day and its mitochondrial copy number, the membrane potential. Methods: Totally 117 embryos with poor development after normal fertilization and were not suitable transferred in the fresh cycle and 106 frozen embryos that were discarded voluntarily by infertility patients with in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer after successful pregnancy were selected. According to evaluation of international standard in embryos, all cleavage stage embryos were divided into class Ⅰ frozen embryo group ( n= 64), class Ⅱ frozen embryo group ( n= 42) and class Ⅲ fresh embryonic group (not transplanted embryos; n= 117). Real-time PCR and confocal microscopy methods were used to detect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and the mitochondrial membrane potential of a single embryo. The differences between embryo quality and mtDNA copy number and membrane potential of each group were compared. Results: The copy number of mtDNA and the mitochondrial membrane potential in class Ⅲ fresh embryonic group [(1.7±1.0)×10(5) copy/μl, 1.56±0.32] were significantly lower than those in class Ⅰ frozen embryo group [(3.4±1.7)×10(5) copy/μl, 2.66±0.21] and class Ⅱ frozen embryo group [(2.6±1.2)×10(5) copy/μl, 1.80±0.32; all P< 0.05]. The copy number of mtDNA and the mitochondrial membrane potential in classⅠ frozen embryo group were significantly higher than those in classⅡ frozen embryo group (both P< 0.05). Conclusion: The mtDNA copy number and the mitochondrial membrane potential of embryos of the better quality embryo are higher.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA transfer to the nucleus generates extensive insertion site variation in maize.

    PubMed

    Lough, Ashley N; Roark, Leah M; Kato, Akio; Ream, Thomas S; Lamb, Jonathan C; Birchler, James A; Newton, Kathleen J

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) insertions into nuclear chromosomes have been documented in a number of eukaryotes. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to examine the variation of mtDNA insertions in maize. Twenty overlapping cosmids, representing the 570-kb maize mitochondrial genome, were individually labeled and hybridized to root tip metaphase chromosomes from the B73 inbred line. A minimum of 15 mtDNA insertion sites on nine chromosomes were detectable using this method. One site near the centromere on chromosome arm 9L was identified by a majority of the cosmids. To examine variation in nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs), a mixture of labeled cosmids was applied to chromosome spreads of ten diverse inbred lines: A188, A632, B37, B73, BMS, KYS, Mo17, Oh43, W22, and W23. The number of detectable NUMTs varied dramatically among the lines. None of the tested inbred lines other than B73 showed the strong hybridization signal on 9L, suggesting that there is a recent mtDNA insertion at this site in B73. Different sources of B73 and W23 were examined for NUMT variation within inbred lines. Differences were detectable, suggesting either that mtDNA is being incorporated or lost from the maize nuclear genome continuously. The results indicate that mtDNA insertions represent a major source of nuclear chromosomal variation.

  5. The Mitochondrial DNA-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vercruysse, Jasmien; Van Daele, Twiggy; De Milde, Liesbeth; Benhamed, Moussa; Inzé, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Gain- and loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development. PMID:28420746

  6. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions and copy number in transfusion-dependent thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Calloway, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron overload is the primary cause of morbidity in transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Increase in iron causes mitochondrial dysfunction under experimental conditions, but the occurrence and significance of mitochondrial damage is not understood in patients with thalassemia. METHODS. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to nuclear DNA copy number (Mt/N) and frequency of the common 4977-bp mitochondrial deletion (ΔmtDNA4977) were quantified using a quantitative PCR assay on whole blood samples from 38 subjects with thalassemia who were receiving regular transfusions. RESULTS. Compared with healthy controls, Mt/N and ΔmtDNA4977 frequency were elevated in thalassemia (P = 0.038 and P < 0.001, respectively). ΔmtDNA4977 was increased in the presence of either liver iron concentration > 15 mg/g dry-weight or splenectomy, with the highest levels observed in subjects who had both risk factors (P = 0.003). Myocardial iron (MRI T2* < 20 ms) was present in 0%, 22%, and 46% of subjects with ΔmtDNA4977 frequency < 20, 20–40, and > 40/1 × 107 mtDNA, respectively (P = 0.025). Subjects with Mt/N values below the group median had significantly lower Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (5.76 ± 0.53) compared with the high Mt/N group (9.11 ± 0.95, P = 0.008). CONCLUSION. Individuals with transfusion-dependent thalassemia demonstrate age-related increase in mtDNA damage in leukocytes. These changes are markedly amplified by splenectomy and are associated with extrahepatic iron deposition. Elevated mtDNA damage in blood cells may predict the risk of iron-associated organ damage in thalassemia. FUNDING. This project was supported by Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland Institutional Research Award and by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH, through UCSF-CTSI grant UL1 TR000004. PMID:27583305

  7. Spastic Paraplegia Type 7 Is Associated with Multiple Mitochondrial DNA Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Wedding, Iselin Marie; Koht, Jeanette; Tran, Gia Tuong; Misceo, Doriana; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Holmgren, Asbjørn; Frengen, Eirik; Bindoff, Laurence; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Tzoulis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Spastic paraplegia 7 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding paraplegin, a protein located at the inner mitochondrial membrane and involved in the processing of other mitochondrial proteins. The mechanism whereby paraplegin mutations cause disease is unknown. We studied two female and two male adult patients from two Norwegian families with a combination of progressive external ophthalmoplegia and spastic paraplegia. Sequencing of SPG7 revealed a novel missense mutation, c.2102A>C, p.H 701P, which was homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in trans with a known pathogenic mutation c.1454_1462del in the other. Muscle was examined from an additional, unrelated adult female patient with a similar phenotype caused by a homozygous c.1047insC mutation in SPG7. Immunohistochemical studies in skeletal muscle showed mosaic deficiency predominantly affecting respiratory complex I, but also complexes III and IV. Molecular studies in single, microdissected fibres showed multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions segregating at high levels (38–97%) in respiratory deficient fibres. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that paraplegin mutations cause accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. While paraplegin is not known to be directly associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid, it is known to process other mitochondrial proteins and it is possible therefore that paraplegin mutations lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions by impairing proteins involved in the homeostasis of the mitochondrial genome. These studies increase our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of SPG7 mutations and suggest that SPG7 testing should be included in the diagnostic workup of autosomal recessive, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, especially if spasticity is present. PMID:24466038

  8. Mouse models of mitochondrial DNA defects and their relevance for human disease

    PubMed Central

    Tyynismaa, Henna; Suomalainen, Anu

    2009-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been shown to be common causes of inherited neurodegenerative and muscular diseases, and have also been implicated in ageing. These diseases can be caused by primary mtDNA mutations, or by defects in nuclear-encoded mtDNA maintenance proteins that cause secondary mtDNA mutagenesis or instability. Furthermore, it has been proposed that mtDNA copy number affects cellular tolerance to environmental stress. However, the mechanisms that regulate mtDNA copy number and the tissue-specific consequences of mtDNA mutations are largely unknown. As post-mitotic tissues differ greatly from proliferating cultured cells in their need for mtDNA maintenance, and as most mitochondrial diseases affect post-mitotic cell types, the mouse is an important model in which to study mtDNA defects. Here, we review recently developed mouse models, and their contribution to our knowledge of mtDNA maintenance and its role in disease. PMID:19148224

  9. mtDNA depletion myopathy: elucidation of the tissue specificity in the mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saada, Ann; Shaag, Avraham; Elpeleg, Orly

    2003-05-01

    Decreased mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) activity is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and respiratory chain dysfunction and is manifested by isolated, fatal skeletal myopathy. Other tissues such as liver, brain, heart, and skin remain unaffected throughout the patients' life. In order to elucidate the mechanism of tissue specificity in the disease we have investigated the expression of the mitochondrial deoxynucleotide carrier, the mtDNA content and the activity of TK2 in mitochondria of various tissues. Our results suggest that low basal TK2 activity combined with a high requirement for mitochondrial encoded proteins in muscle predispose this tissue to the devastating effect of TK2 deficiency.

  10. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations

    PubMed Central

    Aanen, Duur K.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Beekman, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is relaxed. Furthermore, because mtDNA replication is not strictly regulated, within-cell selection may favour mtDNA variants with a replication advantage, but a deleterious effect on cell fitness. The opportunities for selfish mtDNA mutations to spread are restricted by various organism-level adaptations, such as uniparental transmission, germline mtDNA bottlenecks, germline selection and, during somatic growth, regular alternation between fusion and fission of mitochondria. These mechanisms are all hypothesized to maintain functional mtDNA. However, the strength of selection for maintenance of functional mtDNA progressively declines with age, resulting in age-related diseases. Furthermore, organismal adaptations that most probably evolved to restrict the opportunities for selfish mtDNA create secondary problems. Owing to predominantly maternal mtDNA transmission, recombination among mtDNA from different individuals is highly restricted or absent, reducing the scope for repair. Moreover, maternal inheritance precludes selection against mtDNA variants with male-specific effects. We finish by discussing the consequences of life-history differences among taxa with respect to mtDNA evolution and make a case for the use of microorganisms to experimentally manipulate levels of selection. PMID:24864309

  11. MitBASE : a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database. The present status

    PubMed Central

    Attimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Brennicke, A.; Cooper, J. M.; D’Elia, D.; Montalvo, A. de; Pinto, B. de; De Robertis, M.; Golik, P.; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.; Lazowska, J.; Licciulli, F.; Malladi, B. S.; Memeo, F.; Monnerot, M.; Pasimeni, R.; Pilbout, S.; Schapira, A. H. V.; Sloof, P.; Saccone, C.

    2000-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects, under a single interface, databases for Plant, Vertebrate, Invertebrate, Human, Protist and Fungal mtDNA and a Pilot database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MitBASE reports all available information from different organisms and from intraspecies variants and mutants. Data have been drawn from the primary databases and from the literature; value adding information has been structured, e.g., editing information on protist mtDNA genomes, pathological information for human mtDNA variants, etc. The different databases, some of which are structured using commercial packages (Microsoft Access, File Maker Pro) while others use a flat-file format, have been integrated under ORACLE. Ad hoc retrieval systems have been devised for some of the above listed databases keeping into account their peculiarities. The database is resident at the EBI and is available at the following site: http://www3.ebi.ac.uk/Research/Mitbase/mitbase.pl . The impact of this project is intended for both basic and applied research. The study of mitochondrial genetic diseases and mitochondrial DNA intraspecies diversity are key topics in several biotechnological fields. The database has been funded within the EU Biotechnology programme. PMID:10592207

  12. Mitochondrial-targeted DNA delivery using a DF-MITO-Porter, an innovative nano carrier with cytoplasmic and mitochondrial fusogenic envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial gene therapy has the potential for curing a variety of diseases that are associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations and/or defects. To achieve this, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents into the mitochondria in diseased cells. A number of mitochondrial drug delivery systems have been reported to date. However, reports of mitochondrial-targeted DNA delivery are limited. To achieve this, the therapeutic agent must be taken up by the cell (1), after which, the multi-processes associated with intracellular trafficking must be sophisticatedly regulated so as to release the agent from the endosome and deliver it to the cytosol (2) and to pass through the mitochondrial membrane (3). We report herein on the mitochondrial delivery of oligo DNA as a model therapeutic using a Dual Function (DF)-MITO-Porter, an innovative nano carrier designed for mitochondrial delivery. The critical structural elements of the DF-MITO-Porter include mitochondria-fusogenic inner envelopes and endosome-fusogenic outer envelopes, modified with octaarginine which greatly assists in cellular uptake. Inside the cell, the carrier passes through the endosomal and mitochondrial membranes via step-wise membrane fusion. When the oligo DNA was packaged in the DF-MITO-Porter, cellular uptake efficiency was strongly enhanced. Intracellular observation using confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the DF-MITO-Porter was effectively released from endosomes. Moreover, the findings confirmed that the mitochondrial targeting activity of the DF-MITO-Porter was significantly higher than that of a carrier without outer endosome-fusogenic envelopes. These results support the conclusion that mitochondrial-targeted DNA delivery using a DF-MITO-Porter can be achieved when intracellular trafficking is optimally regulated.

  13. Simultaneous detection of human mitochondrial DNA and nuclear-inserted mitochondrial-origin sequences (NumtS) using forensic mtDNA amplification strategies and pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Bintz, Brittania J; Dixon, Groves B; Wilson, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies enable the identification of minor mitochondrial DNA variants with higher sensitivity than Sanger methods, allowing for enhanced identification of minor variants. In this study, mixtures of human mtDNA control region amplicons were subjected to pyrosequencing to determine the detection threshold of the Roche GS Junior(®) instrument (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN). In addition to expected variants, a set of reproducible variants was consistently found in reads from one particular amplicon. A BLASTn search of the variant sequence revealed identity to a segment of a 611-bp nuclear insertion of the mitochondrial control region (NumtS) spanning the primer-binding sites of this amplicon (Nature 1995;378:489). Primers (Hum Genet 2012;131:757; Hum Biol 1996;68:847) flanking the insertion were used to confirm the presence or absence of the NumtS in buccal DNA extracts from twenty donors. These results further our understanding of human mtDNA variation and are expected to have a positive impact on the interpretation of mtDNA profiles using deep-sequencing methods in casework. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. DNA-PK Promotes the Mitochondrial, Metabolic, and Physical Decline that Occurs During Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jun; Gavrilova, Oksana; Brown, Alexandra L; Soto, Jamie E; Bremner, Shannon; Kim, Jeonghan; Xu, Xihui; Yang, Shutong; Um, Jee-Hyun; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Lieber, Richard L; Philp, Andrew; Baar, Keith; Kohama, Steven G; Abel, E Dale; Kim, Myung K; Chung, Jay H

    2017-05-02

    Hallmarks of aging that negatively impact health include weight gain and reduced physical fitness, which can increase insulin resistance and risk for many diseases, including type 2 diabetes. The underlying mechanism(s) for these phenomena is poorly understood. Here we report that aging increases DNA breaks and activates DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in skeletal muscle, which suppresses mitochondrial function, energy metabolism, and physical fitness. DNA-PK phosphorylates threonines 5 and 7 of HSP90α, decreasing its chaperone function for clients such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is critical for mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism. Decreasing DNA-PK activity increases AMPK activity and prevents weight gain, decline of mitochondrial function, and decline of physical fitness in middle-aged mice and protects against type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, DNA-PK is one of the drivers of the metabolic and fitness decline during aging, and therefore DNA-PK inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in obesity and low exercise capacity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Widespread unidirectional transfer of mitochondrial DNA: a case in western Palaearctic water frogs.

    PubMed

    Plötner, J; Uzzell, T; Beerli, P; Spolsky, C; Ohst, T; Litvinchuk, S N; Guex, G-D; Reyer, H-U; Hotz, H

    2008-05-01

    Interspecies transfer of mitochondrial (mt) DNA is a common phenomenon in plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, normally linked with hybridization of closely related species in zones of sympatry or parapatry. In central Europe, in an area north of 48 degrees N latitude and between 8 degrees and 22 degrees E longitude, western Palaearctic water frogs show massive unidirectional introgression of mtDNA: 33.7% of 407 Rana ridibunda possessed mtDNA specific for Rana lessonae. By contrast, no R. lessonae with R. ridibunda mtDNA was observed. That R. ridibunda with introgressed mitochondrial genomes were found exclusively within the range of the hybrid Rana esculenta and that most hybrids had lessonae mtDNA (90.4% of 335 individuals investigated) is evidence that R. esculenta serves as a vehicle for transfer of lessonae mtDNA into R. ridibunda. Such introgression has occurred several times independently. The abundance and wide distribution of individuals with introgressed mitochondrial genomes show that R. lessonae mt genomes work successfully in a R. ridibunda chromosomal background despite their high sequence divergence from R. ridibunda mtDNAs (14.2-15.2% in the ND2/ND3 genes). Greater effectiveness of enzymes encoded by R. lessonae mtDNA may be advantageous to individuals of R. ridibunda and probably R. esculenta in the northern parts of their ranges.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA plays an equal role in influencing female and male longevity in centenarians.

    PubMed

    He, Yong-Han; Lu, Xiang; Tian, Jiao-Yang; Yan, Dong-Jing; Li, Yu-Chun; Lin, Rong; Perry, Benjamin; Chen, Xiao-Qiong; Yu, Qin; Cai, Wang-Wei; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2016-10-01

    The mitochondrion is a double membrane-bound organelle which plays important functional roles in aging and many other complex phenotypes. Transmission of the mitochondrial genome in the matrilineal line causes the evolutionary selection sieve only in females. Theoretically, beneficial or neutral variations are more likely to accumulate and be retained in the female mitochondrial genome during evolution, which may be an initial trigger of gender dimorphism in aging. The asymmetry of evolutionary processes between gender could lead to males and females aging in different ways. If so, gender specific variation loads could be an evolutionary result of maternal heritage of mitochondrial genomes, especially in centenarians who live to an extreme age and are considered as good models for healthy aging. Here, we tested whether the mitochondrial variation loads were associated with altered aging patterns by investigating the mtDNA haplogroup distribution and genetic diversity between female and male centenarians. We found no evidence of differences in aging patterns between genders in centenarians. Our results indicate that the evolutionary consequence of gender dimorphism in mitochondrial genomes is not a factor in the altered aging patterns in human, and that mitochondrial DNA contributes equally to longevity in males and females. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Liver ultrastructural morphology and mitochondrial DNA levels in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfection: no evidence of mitochondrial damage with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Motoi; Chu, Fanny F S; Au, May; Lu, Helen; Chen, Jennifer; Rietkerk, Sonja; Barrios, Rolando; Farley, John D; Montaner, Julio S; Montessori, Valentina C; Walker, David C; Côté, Hélène C F

    2008-06-19

    Liver mitochondrial toxicity is a concern, particularly in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Liver biopsies from HIV/HCV co-infected patients, 14 ON-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and nine OFF-HAART, were assessed by electron microscopy quantitative morphometric analyses. Hepatocytes tended to be larger ON-HAART than OFF-HAART (P = 0.05), but mitochondrial volume, cristae density, lipid volume, mitochondrial DNA and RNA levels were similar. We found no evidence of increased mitochondrial toxicity in individuals currently on HAART, suggesting that concomitant HAART should not delay HCV therapy.

  18. Association of Common Mitochondrial DNA Variants with Multiple Sclerosis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Vyshkina, Tamara; Sylvester, Andrew; Sadiq, Saud; Bonilla, Eduardo; Canter, Jeff A.; Perl, Andras; Kalman, Bernadette

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study re-investigates the roles of previously suggested candidate genes of energy metabolism (Complex I genes located in the nucleus and in the mitochondria) in patients with MS relative to ethnically matched SLE patients and healthy controls. After stringent correction for multiple testing, we reproduce the association of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA haplotype K* with MS, but reject the importance of previously suggested borderline associations with nuclear genes of Complex I. In addition, we detect the association of common variants of the mitochondrial ND2 and ATP6 genes with both MS and SLE, which raises the possibility of a shared mitochondrial genetic background of these two autoimmune diseases. PMID:18708297

  19. Requirement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae APN1 Gene for the Repair of Mitochondrial DNA Alkylation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Torres, Karina; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Ayala-Torres, Sylvette; Torres-Ramos, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae APN1 gene that participates in base excision repair has been localized both in the nucleus and the mitochondria. APN1 deficient cells (apn1Δ) show increased mutation frequencies in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggesting that APN1 is also important for mtDNA stability. To understand APN1-dependent mtDNA repair processes we studied the formation and repair of mtDNA lesions in cells exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). We show that MMS induces mtDNA damage in a dose-dependent fashion and that deletion of the APN1 gene enhances the susceptibility of mtDNA to MMS. Repair kinetic experiments demonstrate that in wild-type cells (WT) it takes 4 hr to repair the damage induced by 0.1% MMS, whereas in the apn1Δ strain there is a lag in mtDNA repair that results in significant differences in the repair capacity between the two yeast strains. Analysis of lesions in nuclear DNA (nDNA) after treatment with 0.1% MMS shows a significant difference in the amount of nDNA lesions between WT and apn1Δ cells. Interestingly, comparisons between nDNA and mtDNA damage show that nDNA is more sensitive to the effects of MMS treatment. However, both strains are able to repair the nDNA lesions, contrary to mtDNA repair, which is compromised in the apn1Δ mutant strain. Therefore, although nDNA is more sensitive than mtDNA to the effects of MMS, deletion of APN1 has a stronger phenotype in mtDNA repair than in nDNA. These results highlight the prominent role of APN1 in the repair of environmentally induced mtDNA damage. PMID:19197988

  20. Differential mitochondrial DNA and gene expression in inherited retinal dysplasia in miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    PubMed

    Appleyard, Greg D; Forsyth, George W; Kiehlbauch, Laura M; Sigfrid, Kristen N; Hanik, Heather L J; Quon, Anita; Loewen, Matthew E; Grahn, Bruce H

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the molecular basis of inherited retinal dysplasia in miniature Schnauzers. Retina and retinal pigment epithelial tissues were collected from canine subjects at the age of 3 weeks. Total RNA isolated from these tissues was reverse transcribed to make representative cDNA pools that were compared for differences in gene expression by using a subtractive hybridization technique referred to as representational difference analysis (RDA). Expression differences identified by RDA were confirmed and quantified by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Mitochondrial morphology from leukocytes and skeletal muscle of normal and affected miniature Schnauzers was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RDA screening of retinal pigment epithelial cDNA identified differences in mRNA transcript coding for two mitochondrial (mt) proteins--cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6--in affected dogs. Contrary to expectations, these identified sequences did not contain mutations. Based on the implication of mt-DNA-encoded proteins by the RDA experiments we used real-time PCR to compare the relative amounts of mt-DNA template in white blood cells from normal and affected dogs. White blood cells of affected dogs contained less than 30% of the normal amount of two specific mtDNA sequences, compared with the content of the nuclear-encoded glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GA-3-PDH) reference gene. Retina and RPE tissue from affected dogs had reduced mRNA transcript levels for the two mitochondrial genes detected in the RDA experiment. Transcript levels for another mtDNA-encoded gene as well as the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial Tfam transcription factor were reduced in these tissues in affected dogs. Mitochondria from affected dogs were reduced in number and size and were unusually electron dense. Reduced levels of nuclear and mitochondrial transcripts in the retina and RPE of miniature Schnauzers affected with retinal dysplasia suggest that

  1. Rapid step-gradient purification of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Welter, C; Meese, E; Blin, N

    1988-01-01

    A convenient modification of the step gradient (CsCl/ethidium bomide) procedure is described. This rapid method allows isolation of covalently closed circular DNA separated from contaminating proteins, RNA and chromosomal DNA in ca. 5 h. Large scale preparations can be performed for circular DNA from eukaryotic organelles (mitochondria). The protocol uses organelle pelleting/NaCl-sarcosyl incubation steps for mitochondria followed by a CsCl step gradient and exhibits yields equal to the conventional procedures. It results in DNA sufficiently pure to be used for restriction endonuclease analysis, subcloning, 5'-end labeling, gel retention assays, and various types of hybridization.

  2. Mitochondrial genome rearrangements in glomus species triggered by homologous recombination between distinct mtDNA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms.AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence,were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigated podiversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity.We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants.

  3. Mitochondrial Genome Rearrangements in Glomus Species Triggered by Homologous Recombination between Distinct mtDNA Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms. AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence, were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigate dpo diversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity. We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants. PMID:23925788

  4. MELAS syndrome, cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and autism associated with the A3260G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Barbara S; Feigenbaum, Annette S J; Robinson, Brian H; Dipchand, Anne I; Simon, David K; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2010-11-12

    The A to G transition mutation at position 3260 of the mitochondrial genome is usually associated with cardiomyopathy and myopathy. One Japanese kindred reported the phenotype of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome) in association with the A3260G mtDNA mutation. We describe the first Caucasian cases of MELAS syndrome associated with the A3260G mutation. Furthermore, this mutation was associated with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, hearing loss, seizures, cardiomyopathy, and autism in the large kindred. We conclude that the A3260G mtDNA mutation is associated with wide phenotypic heterogeneity with MELAS and other "classical" mitochondrial phenotypes being manifestations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitochondrial targeting of recombinant RNAs modulates the level of a heteroplasmic mutation in human mitochondrial DNA associated with Kearns Sayre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Caroline; Tonin, Yann; Heckel-Mager, Anne-Marie; Boucheham, Abdeldjalil; Smirnov, Alexandre; Auré, Karine; Lombès, Anne; Martin, Robert P.; Entelis, Nina; Tarassov, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial mutations, an important cause of incurable human neuromuscular diseases, are mostly heteroplasmic: mutated mitochondrial DNA is present in cells simultaneously with wild-type genomes, the pathogenic threshold being generally >70% of mutant mtDNA. We studied whether heteroplasmy level could be decreased by specifically designed oligoribonucleotides, targeted into mitochondria by the pathway delivering RNA molecules in vivo. Using mitochondrially imported RNAs as vectors, we demonstrated that oligoribonucleotides complementary to mutant mtDNA region can specifically reduce the proportion of mtDNA bearing a large deletion associated with the Kearns Sayre Syndrome in cultured transmitochondrial cybrid cells. These findings may be relevant to developing of a new tool for therapy of mtDNA associated diseases. PMID:23087375

  6. Decoupled mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA population structure reveals Holocene collapse and population isolation in a threatened Mexican-endemic conifer.

    Treesearch

    Juan P. Jaramillo-Correa; Jean Beaulieu; F. Thomas Ledig; Jean Bousqueter

    2006-01-01

    Chihuahua spruce (Picea chihuahuana Martínez) is a montane subtropical conifer endemic to the Sierra Madre Occidental in northwestern México. Range-wide variation was investigated using maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) and paternally inherited chloroplast (cpDNA) DNA markers. Among the 16 mtDNA regions analysed, only...

  7. Persistence and protection of mitochondrial DNA in the generative cell of cucumber is consistent with its paternal transmission

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber, unlike most plants, shows paternal inheritance of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); however, the mechanisms regulating this unique transmission mode are unclear. Here we monitored the amounts of mtDNA through the development of cucumber microspores to pollen and observed that mtDNA decreases ...

  8. In vitro-reconstituted nucleoids can block mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Farge, Géraldine; Mehmedovic, Majda; Baclayon, Marian; van den Wildenberg, Siet M J L; Roos, Wouter H; Gustafsson, Claes M; Wuite, Gijs J L; Falkenberg, Maria

    2014-07-10

    The mechanisms regulating the number of active copies of mtDNA are still unclear. A mammalian cell typically contains 1,000-10,000 copies of mtDNA, which are packaged into nucleoprotein complexes termed nucleoids. The main protein component of these structures is mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). Here, we reconstitute nucleoid-like particles in vitro and demonstrate that small changes in TFAM levels dramatically impact the fraction of DNA molecules available for transcription and DNA replication. Compaction by TFAM is highly cooperative, and at physiological ratios of TFAM to DNA, there are large variations in compaction, from fully compacted nucleoids to naked DNA. In compacted nucleoids, TFAM forms stable protein filaments on DNA that block melting and prevent progression of the replication and transcription machineries. Based on our observations, we suggest that small variations in the TFAM-to-mtDNA ratio may be used to regulate mitochondrial gene transcription and DNA replication. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing Clark's nutcracker seed-caching flights using maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA of whitebark pine

    Treesearch

    Bryce A. Richardson; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Steven J. Brunsfeld

    2002-01-01

    Maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) were used to examine the maternal genetic structure at three hierarchical spatial scales: fine scale, coarse scale, and interpopulation. These data were used to draw inferences into Clark’s nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana Wilson)...

  10. Corresponding Mitochondrial DNA and Niche Divergence for Crested Newt Candidate Species

    PubMed Central

    Wielstra, Ben; Beukema, Wouter; Arntzen, Jan W.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Toxopeus, Albertus G.; Raes, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Genetic divergence of mitochondrial DNA does not necessarily correspond to reproductive isolation. However, if mitochondrial DNA lineages occupy separate segments of environmental space, this supports the notion of their evolutionary independence. We explore niche differentiation among three candidate species of crested newt (characterized by distinct mitochondrial DNA lineages) and interpret the results in the light of differences observed for recognized crested newt species. We quantify niche differences among all crested newt (candidate) species and test hypotheses regarding niche evolution, employing two ordination techniques (PCA-env and ENFA). Niche equivalency is rejected: all (candidate) species are found to occupy significantly different segments of environmental space. Furthermore, niche overlap values for the three candidate species are not significantly higher than those for the recognized species. As the three candidate crested newt species are, not only in terms of mitochondrial DNA genetic divergence, but also ecologically speaking, as diverged as the recognized crested newt species, our findings are in line with the hypothesis that they represent cryptic species. We address potential pitfalls of our methodology. PMID:23029564

  11. Rewiring of Glutamine Metabolism Is a Bioenergetic Adaptation of Human Cells with Mitochondrial DNA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuying; Kirk, Kathryne; Shurubor, Yevgeniya I; Zhao, Dazhi; Arreguin, Andrea J; Shahi, Ifrah; Valsecchi, Federica; Primiano, Guido; Calder, Elizabeth L; Carelli, Valerio; Denton, Travis T; Beal, M Flint; Gross, Steven S; Manfredi, Giovanni; D'Aurelio, Marilena

    2018-05-01

    Using molecular, biochemical, and untargeted stable isotope tracing approaches, we identify a previously unappreciated glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate (αKG) energy-generating anaplerotic flux to be critical in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutant cells that harbor human disease-associated oxidative phosphorylation defects. Stimulating this flux with αKG supplementation enables the survival of diverse mtDNA mutant cells under otherwise lethal obligatory oxidative conditions. Strikingly, we demonstrate that when residual mitochondrial respiration in mtDNA mutant cells exceeds 45% of control levels, αKG oxidative flux prevails over reductive carboxylation. Furthermore, in a mouse model of mitochondrial myopathy, we show that increased oxidative αKG flux in muscle arises from enhanced alanine synthesis and release into blood, concomitant with accelerated amino acid catabolism from protein breakdown. Importantly, in this mouse model of mitochondriopathy, muscle amino acid imbalance is normalized by αKG supplementation. Taken together, our findings provide a rationale for αKG supplementation as a therapeutic strategy for mitochondrial myopathies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Massively parallel sequencing-enabled mixture analysis of mitochondrial DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Jennifer D; Stoljarova, Monika; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2018-02-22

    The mitochondrial genome has a number of characteristics that provide useful information to forensic investigations. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies offer improvements to the quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial genome, specifically the interpretation of mixed mitochondrial samples. Two-person mixtures with nuclear DNA ratios of 1:1, 5:1, 10:1, and 20:1 of individuals from different and similar phylogenetic backgrounds and three-person mixtures with nuclear DNA ratios of 1:1:1 and 5:1:1 were prepared using the Precision ID mtDNA Whole Genome Panel and Ion Chef, and sequenced on the Ion PGM or Ion S5 sequencer (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). These data were used to evaluate whether and to what degree MPS mixtures could be deconvolved. Analysis was effective in identifying the major contributor in each instance, while SNPs from the minor contributor's haplotype only were identified in the 1:1, 5:1, and 10:1 two-person mixtures. While the major contributor was identified from the 5:1:1 mixture, analysis of the three-person mixtures was more complex, and the mixed haplotypes could not be completely parsed. These results indicate that mixed mitochondrial DNA samples may be interpreted with the use of MPS technologies.

  13. Systematics of the Dioryctria abietella Species Group (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) Based on Mitochondrial DNA Ann

    Treesearch

    G. Roux-Morabito; N.E. Gillette; A. Roques; L. Dormont; J. Stein; F.A.H. Sperling

    2008-01-01

    Coneworms of the genus Dioryctria Zeller include several serious pests of conifer seeds that are notoriously difficult to distinguish as species. We surveyed mitochondrial DNA variation within the abietella species group by sequencing 451 bp of cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and 572 bp of cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 (COII...

  14. Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-06-23

    In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Variation in North Atlantic Long-Finned Pilot Whales, Globicephala melas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Delphinapterus leucas : mitochondrial DNA sequence variation within and among North American populations. M.Sc. thesis. McMaster University. Brown, G.G...Delphinapteras leucas ) (Brennin 1992), minke whales {Balaenoptera acutorostratd) (Wada et al. 1991), bottlenose dolphins {Tursiops truncatus) (Dowling & Brown

  16. Packaging of single DNA molecules by the yeast mitochondrial protein Abf2p.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Laurence R; Friddle, Raymond; Noy, Aleksandr; Baldwin, Enoch; Martin, Shelley S; Corzett, Michele; Balhorn, Rod; Baskin, Ronald J

    2003-10-01

    Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are packaged by proteins in a very different manner. Although protein-DNA complexes called "nucleoids" have been identified as the genetic units of mitochondrial inheritance in yeast and man, little is known about their physical structure. The yeast mitochondrial protein Abf2p was shown to be sufficient to compact linear dsDNA, without the benefit of supercoiling, using optical and atomic force microscopy single molecule techniques. The packaging of DNA by Abf2p was observed to be very weak as evidenced by a fast Abf2p off-rate (k(off) = 0.014 +/- 0.001 s(-1)) and the extremely small forces (<0.6 pN) stabilizing the condensed protein-DNA complex. Atomic force microscopy images of individual complexes showed the 190-nm structures are loosely packaged relative to nuclear chromatin. This organization may leave mtDNA accessible for transcription and replication, while making it more vulnerable to damage.

  17. Horizontal transfer of whole mitochondria restores tumorigenic potential in mitochondrial DNA-deficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lan-Feng; Kovarova, Jaromira; Bajzikova, Martina; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Svec, David; Endaya, Berwini; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Coelho, Ana R; Sebkova, Natasa; Ruzickova, Anna; Tan, An S; Kluckova, Katarina; Judasova, Kristyna; Zamecnikova, Katerina; Rychtarcikova, Zuzana; Gopalan, Vinod; Andera, Ladislav; Sobol, Margarita; Yan, Bing; Pattnaik, Bijay; Bhatraju, Naveen; Truksa, Jaroslav; Stopka, Pavel; Hozak, Pavel; Lam, Alfred K; Sedlacek, Radislav; Oliveira, Paulo J; Kubista, Mikael; Agrawal, Anurag; Dvorakova-Hortova, Katerina; Rohlena, Jakub; Berridge, Michael V; Neuzil, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we showed that generation of tumours in syngeneic mice by cells devoid of mitochondrial (mt) DNA (ρ0 cells) is linked to the acquisition of the host mtDNA. However, the mechanism of mtDNA movement between cells remains unresolved. To determine whether the transfer of mtDNA involves whole mitochondria, we injected B16ρ0 mouse melanoma cells into syngeneic C57BL/6Nsu9-DsRed2 mice that express red fluorescent protein in their mitochondria. We document that mtDNA is acquired by transfer of whole mitochondria from the host animal, leading to normalisation of mitochondrial respiration. Additionally, knockdown of key mitochondrial complex I (NDUFV1) and complex II (SDHC) subunits by shRNA in B16ρ0 cells abolished or significantly retarded their ability to form tumours. Collectively, these results show that intact mitochondria with their mtDNA payload are transferred in the developing tumour, and provide functional evidence for an essential role of oxidative phosphorylation in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22187.001 PMID:28195532

  18. Horizontal transfer of whole mitochondria restores tumorigenic potential in mitochondrial DNA-deficient cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lan-Feng; Kovarova, Jaromira; Bajzikova, Martina; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Svec, David; Endaya, Berwini; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Coelho, Ana R; Sebkova, Natasa; Ruzickova, Anna; Tan, An S; Kluckova, Katarina; Judasova, Kristyna; Zamecnikova, Katerina; Rychtarcikova, Zuzana; Gopalan, Vinod; Andera, Ladislav; Sobol, Margarita; Yan, Bing; Pattnaik, Bijay; Bhatraju, Naveen; Truksa, Jaroslav; Stopka, Pavel; Hozak, Pavel; Lam, Alfred K; Sedlacek, Radislav; Oliveira, Paulo J; Kubista, Mikael; Agrawal, Anurag; Dvorakova-Hortova, Katerina; Rohlena, Jakub; Berridge, Michael V; Neuzil, Jiri

    2017-02-15

    Recently, we showed that generation of tumours in syngeneic mice by cells devoid of mitochondrial (mt) DNA (ρ 0 cells) is linked to the acquisition of the host mtDNA. However, the mechanism of mtDNA movement between cells remains unresolved. To determine whether the transfer of mtDNA involves whole mitochondria, we injected B16ρ 0 mouse melanoma cells into syngeneic C57BL/6N su9-DsRed2 mice that express red fluorescent protein in their mitochondria. We document that mtDNA is acquired by transfer of whole mitochondria from the host animal, leading to normalisation of mitochondrial respiration. Additionally, knockdown of key mitochondrial complex I (NDUFV1) and complex II (SDHC) subunits by shRNA in B16ρ 0 cells abolished or significantly retarded their ability to form tumours. Collectively, these results show that intact mitochondria with their mtDNA payload are transferred in the developing tumour, and provide functional evidence for an essential role of oxidative phosphorylation in cancer.

  19. A Rolling Circle Replication Mechanism Produces Multimeric Lariats of Mitochondrial DNA in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Samantha C.; Joers, Priit; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D.; Jacobs, Howard T.; Hyman, Bradley C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes respiratory complex subunits essential to almost all eukaryotes; hence respiratory competence requires faithful duplication of this molecule. However, the mechanism(s) of its synthesis remain hotly debated. Here we have developed Caenorhabditis elegans as a convenient animal model for the study of metazoan mtDNA synthesis. We demonstrate that C. elegans mtDNA replicates exclusively by a phage-like mechanism, in which multimeric molecules are synthesized from a circular template. In contrast to previous mammalian studies, we found that mtDNA synthesis in the C. elegans gonad produces branched-circular lariat structures with multimeric DNA tails; we were able to detect multimers up to four mtDNA genome unit lengths. Further, we did not detect elongation from a displacement-loop or analogue of 7S DNA, suggesting a clear difference from human mtDNA in regard to the site(s) of replication initiation. We also identified cruciform mtDNA species that are sensitive to cleavage by the resolvase RusA; we suggest these four-way junctions may have a role in concatemer-to-monomer resolution. Overall these results indicate that mtDNA synthesis in C. elegans does not conform to any previously documented metazoan mtDNA replication mechanism, but instead are strongly suggestive of rolling circle replication, as employed by bacteriophages. As several components of the metazoan mitochondrial DNA replisome are likely phage-derived, these findings raise the possibility that the rolling circle mtDNA replication mechanism may be ancestral among metazoans. PMID:25693201

  20. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: revised and extended guidelines for mitochondrial DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R; Irwin, J A; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Pokorak, E; Prinz, M; Salas, A; Schneider, P M; Parsons, T J

    2014-11-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in forensic casework. While the foundations set forth in the earlier recommendations still apply, new approaches to the quality control, alignment and nomenclature of mitochondrial sequences, as well as the establishment of mtDNA reference population databases, have been developed. Here, we describe these developments and discuss their application to both mtDNA casework and mtDNA reference population databasing applications. While the generation of mtDNA for forensic casework has always been guided by specific standards, it is now well-established that data of the same quality are required for the mtDNA reference population data used to assess the statistical weight of the evidence. As a result, we introduce guidelines regarding sequence generation, as well as quality control measures based on the known worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, that can be applied to ensure the highest quality population data possible. For both casework and reference population databasing applications, the alignment and nomenclature of haplotypes is revised here and the phylogenetic alignment proffered as acceptable standard. In addition, the interpretation of heteroplasmy in the forensic context is updated, and the utility of alignment-free database searches for unbiased probability estimates is highlighted. Finally, we discuss statistical issues and define minimal standards for mtDNA database searches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA evolution in the Anaxyrus boreas species group

    Treesearch

    Anna M. Goebel; Tom A. Ranker; Paul Stephen Corn; Richard G. Olmstead

    2009-01-01

    The Anaxyrus boreas species group currently comprises four species in western North America including the broadly distributed A. boreas, and three localized species, Anaxyrus nelsoni, Anaxyrus exsul and Anaxyrus canorus. Phylogenetic analyses of the mtDNA 12S rDNA, cytochrome...

  2. Import of desired nucleic acid sequences using addressing motif of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA for fluorescent in vivo hybridization of mitochondrial DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Alán, Lukáš; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2014-04-01

    Based on the matrix-addressing sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA (termed MAM), which is naturally imported into mitochondria, we have constructed an import system for in vivo targeting of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mt-mRNA, in order to provide fluorescence hybridization of the desired sequences. Thus DNA oligonucleotides were constructed, containing the 5'-flanked T7 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro transcription and fluorescent labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 or 647 dye, we obtained the fluorescent "L-ND5 probe" containing MAM and exemplar cargo, i.e., annealing sequence to a short portion of ND5 mRNA and to the light-strand mtDNA complementary to the heavy strand nd5 mt gene (5'-end 21 base pair sequence). For mitochondrial in vivo fluorescent hybridization, HepG2 cells were treated with dequalinium micelles, containing the fluorescent probes, bringing the probes proximally to the mitochondrial outer membrane and to the natural import system. A verification of import into the mitochondrial matrix of cultured HepG2 cells was provided by confocal microscopy colocalizations. Transfections using lipofectamine or probes without 5S-rRNA addressing MAM sequence or with MAM only were ineffective. Alternatively, the same DNA oligonucleotides with 5'-CACC overhang (substituting T7 promoter) were transcribed from the tetracycline-inducible pENTRH1/TO vector in human embryonic kidney T-REx®-293 cells, while mitochondrial matrix localization after import of the resulting unlabeled RNA was detected by PCR. The MAM-containing probe was then enriched by three-order of magnitude over the natural ND5 mRNA in the mitochondrial matrix. In conclusion, we present a proof-of-principle for mitochondrial in vivo hybridization and mitochondrial nucleic acid import.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Depletion in Respiratory Chain-Deficient Parkinson Disease Neurons.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Anne; Rygiel, Karolina A; Hepplewhite, Philippa D; Morris, Christopher M; Picard, Martin; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-03-01

    To determine the extent of respiratory chain abnormalities and investigate the contribution of mtDNA to the loss of respiratory chain complexes (CI-IV) in the substantia nigra (SN) of idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) patients at the single-neuron level. Multiple-label immunofluorescence was applied to postmortem sections of 10 IPD patients and 10 controls to quantify the abundance of CI-IV subunits (NDUFB8 or NDUFA13, SDHA, UQCRC2, and COXI) and mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM and TFB2M) relative to mitochondrial mass (porin and GRP75) in dopaminergic neurons. To assess the involvement of mtDNA in respiratory chain deficiency in IPD, SN neurons, isolated with laser-capture microdissection, were assayed for mtDNA deletions, copy number, and presence of transcription/replication-associated 7S DNA employing a triplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Whereas mitochondrial mass was unchanged in single SN neurons from IPD patients, we observed a significant reduction in the abundances of CI and II subunits. At the single-cell level, CI and II deficiencies were correlated in patients. The CI deficiency concomitantly occurred with low abundances of the mtDNA transcription factors TFAM and TFB2M, which also initiate transcription-primed mtDNA replication. Consistent with this, real-time PCR analysis revealed fewer transcription/replication-associated mtDNA molecules and an overall reduction in mtDNA copy number in patients. This effect was more pronounced in single IPD neurons with severe CI deficiency. Respiratory chain dysfunction in IPD neurons not only involves CI, but also extends to CII. These deficiencies are possibly a consequence of the interplay between nDNA and mtDNA-encoded factors mechanistically connected via TFAM. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  4. Reduced mitochondrial DNA content associates with poor prognosis of prostate cancer in African American men.

    PubMed

    Koochekpour, Shahriar; Marlowe, Timothy; Singh, Keshav K; Attwood, Kristopher; Chandra, Dhyan

    2013-01-01

    Reduction or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been associated with cancer progression. Although imbalanced mtDNA content is known to occur in prostate cancer, differences in mtDNA content between African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) men are not defined. We provide the first evidence that tumors in AA men possess reduced level of mtDNA compared to CA men. The median tumor mtDNA content was reduced in AA men. mtDNA content was also reduced in normal prostate tissues of AA men compared to CA men, suggesting a possible predisposition to cancer in AA men. mtDNA content was also reduced in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue from AA men. Tumor and BPH tissues from patients ≥ 60 years of age possess reduced mtDNA content compared to patients <60 years of age. In addition, mtDNA content was higher in normal tissues from patients with malignant T3 stage disease compared to patients with T2 stage disease. mtDNA levels in matched normal prostate tissues were nearly doubled in Gleason grade of >7 compared to ≤ 7, whereas reduced mtDNA content was observed in tumors of Gleason grade >7 compared to ≤ 7. Together, our data suggest that AA men possess lower mtDNA levels in normal and tumor tissues compared to CA men, which could contribute to higher risk and more aggressive prostate cancer in AA men.

  5. Germline mitochondrial DNA mutations aggravate ageing and can impair brain development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jaime M; Stewart, James B; Hagström, Erik; Brené, Stefan; Mourier, Arnaud; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Freyer, Christoph; Lagouge, Marie; Hoffer, Barry J; Olson, Lars; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2013-09-19

    Ageing is due to an accumulation of various types of damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction has long been considered to be important in this process. There is substantial sequence variation in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and the high mutation rate is counteracted by different mechanisms that decrease maternal transmission of mutated mtDNA. Despite these protective mechanisms, it is becoming increasingly clear that low-level mtDNA heteroplasmy is quite common and often inherited in humans. We designed a series of mouse mutants to investigate the extent to which inherited mtDNA mutations can contribute to ageing. Here we report that maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations can induce mild ageing phenotypes in mice with a wild-type nuclear genome. Furthermore, maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations lead to anticipation of reduced fertility in mice that are heterozygous for the mtDNA mutator allele (PolgA(wt/mut)) and aggravate premature ageing phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice (PolgA(mut/mut)). Unexpectedly, a combination of maternally transmitted and somatic mtDNA mutations also leads to stochastic brain malformations. Our findings show that a pre-existing mutation load will not only allow somatic mutagenesis to create a critically high total mtDNA mutation load sooner but will also increase clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations to enhance the normally occurring mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing tissues. Our findings suggest that maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations may have a similar role in aggravating aspects of normal human ageing.

  6. Peripheral Blood Mitochondrial DNA Damage as a Potential Noninvasive Biomarker of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manish; Lillvis, John; Seyoum, Berhane; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the development of diabetic retinopathy, retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is damaged. Because retinopathy is a progressive disease, and circulating glucose levels are high in diabetes, our aim was to investigate if peripheral blood mtDNA damage can serve as a potential biomarker of diabetic retinopathy. Methods Peripheral blood mtDNA damage was investigated by extended-length PCR in rats and mice, diabetic for 10 to 12 months (streptozotocin-induced, type 1 model), and in 12- and 40-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF, type 2). Mitochondrial copy number (in gDNA) and transcription (in cDNA) were quantified by qPCR. Similar parameters were measured in blood from diabetic patients with/without retinopathy. Results Peripheral blood from diabetic rodents had significantly increased mtDNA damage and decreased copy numbers and transcription. Lipoic acid administration in diabetic rats, or Sod2 overexpression or MMP-9 knockdown in mice, the therapies that prevent diabetic retinopathy, also ameliorated blood mtDNA damage and restored copy numbers and transcription. Although blood from 40-week-old ZDF rats had significant mtDNA damage, 12-week-old rats had normal mtDNA. Diabetic patients with retinopathy had increased blood mtDNA damage, and decreased transcription and copy numbers compared with diabetic patients without retinopathy and nondiabetic individuals. Conclusions Type 1 diabetic rodents with oxidative stress modulated by pharmacologic/genetic means, and type 2 animal model and patients with/without diabetic retinopathy, demonstrate a strong relation between peripheral blood mtDNA damage and diabetic retinopathy, and suggest the possibility of use of peripheral blood mtDNA as a noninvasive biomarker of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27494345

  7. Accurate quantitation of circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA in plasma by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Tang, Xiaojun; Liu, Chu; Wen, Chaowei; Li, Wei; Lyu, Jianxin

    2017-04-01

    To establish a method for accurate quantitation of circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA (ccf-mtDNA) in plasma by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), we designed a ddPCR method to determine the copy number of ccf-mtDNA by amplifying mitochondrial ND1 (MT-ND1). To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the method, a recombinant pMD18-T plasmid containing MT-ND1 sequences and mtDNA-deleted (ρ 0 ) HeLa cells were used, respectively. Subsequently, different plasma samples were prepared for ddPCR to evaluate the feasibility of detecting plasma ccf-mtDNA. In the results, the ddPCR method showed high sensitivity and specificity. When the DNA was extracted from plasma prior to ddPCR, the ccf-mtDNA copy number was higher than that measured without extraction. This difference was not due to a PCR inhibitor, such as EDTA-Na 2 , an anti-coagulant in plasma, because standard EDTA-Na 2 concentration (5 mM) did not significantly inhibit ddPCR reactions. The difference might be attributable to plasma exosomal mtDNA, which was 4.21 ± 0.38 copies/μL of plasma, accounting for ∼19% of plasma ccf-mtDNA. Therefore, ddPCR can quickly and reliably detect ccf-mtDNA from plasma with a prior DNA extraction step, providing for a more accurate detection of ccf-mtDNA. The direct use of plasma as a template in ddPCR is suitable for the detection of exogenous cell-free nucleic acids within plasma, but not of nucleic acids that have a vesicle-associated form, such as exosomal mtDNA. Graphical Abstract Designs of the present work. *: Module 1, #: Module 2, &: Module 3.

  8. A molecular phylogeny of anseriformes based on mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Donne-Goussé, Carole; Laudet, Vincent; Hänni, Catherine

    2002-06-01

    To study the phylogenetic relationships among Anseriformes, sequences for the complete mitochondrial control region (CR) were determined from 45 waterfowl representing 24 genera, i.e., half of the existing genera. To confirm the results based on CR analysis we also analyzed representative species based on two mitochondrial protein-coding genes, cytochrome b (cytb) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2). These data allowed us to construct a robust phylogeny of the Anseriformes and to compare it with existing phylogenies based on morphological or molecular data. Chauna and Dendrocygna were identified as early offshoots of the Anseriformes. All the remaining taxa fell into two clades that correspond to the two subfamilies Anatinae and Anserinae. Within Anserinae Branta and Anser cluster together, whereas Coscoroba, Cygnus, and Cereopsis form a relatively weak clade with Cygnus diverging first. Five clades are clearly recognizable among Anatinae: (i) the Anatini with Anas and Lophonetta; (ii) the Aythyini with Aythya and Netta; (iii) the Cairinini with Cairina and Aix; (iv) the Mergini with Mergus, Bucephala, Melanitta, Callonetta, Somateria, and Clangula, and (v) the Tadornini with Tadorna, Chloephaga, and Alopochen. The Tadornini diverged early on from the Anatinae; then the Mergini and a large group that comprises the Anatini, Aythyini, Cairinini, and two isolated genera, Chenonetta and Marmaronetta, diverged. The phylogeny obtained with the control region appears more robust than the one obtained with mitochondrial protein-coding genes such as ND2 and cytb. This suggests that the CR is a powerful tool for bird phylogeny, not only at a small scale (i.e., relationships between species) but also at the family level. Whereas morphological analysis effectively resolved the split between Anatinae and Anserinae and the existence of some of the clades, the precise composition of the clades are different when morphological and molecular data are compared. (c) 2002 Elsevier

  9. Two copies of mthmg1, encoding a novel mitochondrial HMG-like protein, delay accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Dequard-Chablat, Michelle; Allandt, Cynthia

    2002-08-01

    In the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, two degenerative processes which result in growth arrest are associated with mitochondrial genome (mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA]) instability. Senescence is correlated with mtDNA rearrangements and amplification of specific regions (senDNAs). Premature death syndrome is characterized by the accumulation of specific mtDNA deletions. This accumulation is due to indirect effects of the AS1-4 mutation, which alters a cytosolic ribosomal protein gene. The mthmg1 gene has been identified as a double-copy suppressor of premature death. It greatly delays premature death and the accumulation of deletions when it is present in two copies in an ASI-4 context. The duplication of mthmg1 has no significant effect on the wild-type life span or on senDNA patterns. In anAS1+ context, deletion of the mthmg1 gene alters germination, growth, and fertility and reduces the life span. The deltamthmg1 senescent strains display a particular senDNA pattern. This deletion is lethal in an AS1-4 context. According to its physical properties (very basic protein with putative mitochondrial targeting sequence and HMG-type DNA-binding domains) and the cellular localization of an mtHMG1-green fluorescent protein fusion, mtHMG1 appears to be a mitochondrial protein possibly associated with mtDNA. It is noteworthy that it is the first example of a protein combining the two DNA-binding domains, AT-hook motif and HMG-1 boxes. It may be involved in the stability and/or transmission of the mitochondrial genome. To date, no structural homologues have been found in other organisms. However, mtHMG1 displays functional similarities with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial HMG-box protein Abf2.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Depletion in Respiratory Chain–Deficient Parkinson Disease Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rygiel, Karolina A.; Hepplewhite, Philippa D.; Morris, Christopher M.; Picard, Martin; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of respiratory chain abnormalities and investigate the contribution of mtDNA to the loss of respiratory chain complexes (CI–IV) in the substantia nigra (SN) of idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) patients at the single‐neuron level. Methods Multiple‐label immunofluorescence was applied to postmortem sections of 10 IPD patients and 10 controls to quantify the abundance of CI–IV subunits (NDUFB8 or NDUFA13, SDHA, UQCRC2, and COXI) and mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM and TFB2M) relative to mitochondrial mass (porin and GRP75) in dopaminergic neurons. To assess the involvement of mtDNA in respiratory chain deficiency in IPD, SN neurons, isolated with laser‐capture microdissection, were assayed for mtDNA deletions, copy number, and presence of transcription/replication‐associated 7S DNA employing a triplex real‐time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Results Whereas mitochondrial mass was unchanged in single SN neurons from IPD patients, we observed a significant reduction in the abundances of CI and II subunits. At the single‐cell level, CI and II deficiencies were correlated in patients. The CI deficiency concomitantly occurred with low abundances of the mtDNA transcription factors TFAM and TFB2M, which also initiate transcription‐primed mtDNA replication. Consistent with this, real‐time PCR analysis revealed fewer transcription/replication‐associated mtDNA molecules and an overall reduction in mtDNA copy number in patients. This effect was more pronounced in single IPD neurons with severe CI deficiency. Interpretation Respiratory chain dysfunction in IPD neurons not only involves CI, but also extends to CII. These deficiencies are possibly a consequence of the interplay between nDNA and mtDNA‐encoded factors mechanistically connected via TFAM. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:366–378 PMID:26605748

  11. Therapeutic Targeting of the Mitochondria Initiates Excessive Superoxide Production and Mitochondrial Depolarization Causing Decreased mtDNA Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L.; Biel, Thomas G.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Rao, V. Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysregulation is closely associated with excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Altered redox homeostasis has been implicated in the onset of several diseases including cancer. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and proteins are particularly sensitive to ROS as they are in close proximity to the respiratory chain (RC). Mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondria-targeted redox agent, selectively damages breast cancer cells possibly through damage induced via enhanced ROS production. However, the effects of MitoQ and other triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) conjugated agents on cancer mitochondrial homeostasis remain unknown. The primary objective of this study was to determine the impact of mitochondria-targeted agent [(MTAs) conjugated to TPP+: mitoTEMPOL, mitoquinone and mitochromanol-acetate] on mitochondrial physiology and mtDNA integrity in breast (MDA-MB-231) and lung (H23) cancer cells. The integrity of the mtDNA was assessed by quantifying the degree of mtDNA fragmentation and copy number, as well as by measuring mitochondrial proteins essential to mtDNA stability and maintenance (TFAM, SSBP1, TWINKLE, POLG and POLRMT). Mitochondrial status was evaluated by measuring superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen consumption, extracellular acidification and mRNA or protein levels of the RC complexes along with TCA cycle activity. In this study, we demonstrated that all investigated MTAs impair mitochondrial health and decrease mtDNA integrity in MDA-MB-231 and H23 cells. However, differences in the degree of mitochondrial damage and mtDNA degradation suggest unique properties among each MTA that may be cell line, dose and time dependent. Collectively, our study indicates the potential for TPP+ conjugated molecules to impair breast and lung cancer cells by targeting mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:28030582

  12. Therapeutic Targeting of the Mitochondria Initiates Excessive Superoxide Production and Mitochondrial Depolarization Causing Decreased mtDNA Integrity.

    PubMed

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L; Biel, Thomas G; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Rao, V Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysregulation is closely associated with excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Altered redox homeostasis has been implicated in the onset of several diseases including cancer. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and proteins are particularly sensitive to ROS as they are in close proximity to the respiratory chain (RC). Mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondria-targeted redox agent, selectively damages breast cancer cells possibly through damage induced via enhanced ROS production. However, the effects of MitoQ and other triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) conjugated agents on cancer mitochondrial homeostasis remain unknown. The primary objective of this study was to determine the impact of mitochondria-targeted agent [(MTAs) conjugated to TPP+: mitoTEMPOL, mitoquinone and mitochromanol-acetate] on mitochondrial physiology and mtDNA integrity in breast (MDA-MB-231) and lung (H23) cancer cells. The integrity of the mtDNA was assessed by quantifying the degree of mtDNA fragmentation and copy number, as well as by measuring mitochondrial proteins essential to mtDNA stability and maintenance (TFAM, SSBP1, TWINKLE, POLG and POLRMT). Mitochondrial status was evaluated by measuring superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen consumption, extracellular acidification and mRNA or protein levels of the RC complexes along with TCA cycle activity. In this study, we demonstrated that all investigated MTAs impair mitochondrial health and decrease mtDNA integrity in MDA-MB-231 and H23 cells. However, differences in the degree of mitochondrial damage and mtDNA degradation suggest unique properties among each MTA that may be cell line, dose and time dependent. Collectively, our study indicates the potential for TPP+ conjugated molecules to impair breast and lung cancer cells by targeting mitochondrial homeostasis.

  13. Mitochondrial genome of the moon jelly Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa): A linear DNA molecule encoding a putative DNA-dependent DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyong; Graf, Shannon; Chaga, Oleg Y; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2006-10-15

    The 16,937-nuceotide sequence of the linear mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) molecule of the moon jelly Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) - the first mtDNA sequence from the class Scypozoa and the first sequence of a linear mtDNA from Metazoa - has been determined. This sequence contains genes for 13 energy pathway proteins, small and large subunit rRNAs, and methionine and tryptophan tRNAs. In addition, two open reading frames of 324 and 969 base pairs in length have been found. The deduced amino-acid sequence of one of them, ORF969, displays extensive sequence similarity with the polymerase [but not the exonuclease] domain of family B DNA polymerases, and this ORF has been tentatively identified as dnab. This is the first report of dnab in animal mtDNA. The genes in A. aurita mtDNA are arranged in two clusters with opposite transcriptional polarities; transcription proceeding toward the ends of the molecule. The determined sequences at the ends of the molecule are nearly identical but inverted and lack any obvious potential secondary structures or telomere-like repeat elements. The acquisition of mitochondrial genomic data for the second class of Cnidaria allows us to reconstruct characteristic features of mitochondrial evolution in this animal phylum.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA variations in ova and blastocyst: implications in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Monis Bilal; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Chawla, Latika; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Neeta; Mittal, Suneeta; Talwar, Pankaj; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Dada, Rima

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of oocyte is critical for its function, embryo quality and development. Analysis of complete mtDNA of 49 oocytes and 18 blastocysts from 67 females opting for IVF revealed 437 nucleotide variations. 40.29% samples had either disease associated or non-synonymous novel or pathogenic mutation in evolutionarily conserved regions. Samples with disease associated mtDNA mutations had low fertilization rate and poor embryo quality, however no difference in implantation or clinical pregnancy rate was observed. Screening mtDNA from oocyte/blastocyst is a simple, clinically reliable method for diagnostic evaluation of female infertility and may reduce risk of mtDNA disease transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  15. High-Resolution Melting (HRM) of Hypervariable Mitochondrial DNA Regions for Forensic Science.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Rocha, Alípio; de Amorim, Isis Salviano Soares; Simão, Tatiana de Almeida; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza; Garrido, Rodrigo Grazinoli; Mencalha, Andre Luiz

    2018-03-01

    Forensic strategies commonly are proceeding by analysis of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, new additional strategies have been proposed for forensic science. Thus, this article standardized the high-resolution melting (HRM) of DNA for forensic analyzes. For HRM, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from eight individuals were extracted from mucosa swabs by DNAzol reagent, samples were amplified by PCR and submitted to HRM analysis to identify differences in hypervariable (HV) regions I and II. To confirm HRM, all PCR products were DNA sequencing. The data suggest that is possible discriminate DNA from different samples by HRM curves. Also, uncommon dual-dissociation was identified in a single PCR product, increasing HRM analyzes by evaluation of melting peaks. Thus, HRM is accurate and useful to screening small differences in HVI and HVII regions from mtDNA and increase the efficiency of laboratory routines based on forensic genetics. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. The Maintenance of Mitochondrial DNA Integrity—Critical Analysis and Update

    PubMed Central

    Alexeyev, Mikhail; Shokolenko, Inna; Wilson, Glenn; LeDoux, Susan

    2013-01-01

    DNA molecules in mitochondria, just like those in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, are constantly damaged by noxious agents. Eukaryotic cells have developed efficient mechanisms to deal with this assault. The process of DNA repair in mitochondria, initially believed nonexistent, has now evolved into a mature area of research. In recent years, it has become increasingly appreciated that mitochondria possess many of the same DNA repair pathways that the nucleus does. Moreover, a unique pathway that is enabled by high redundancy of the mitochondrial DNA and allows for the disposal of damaged DNA molecules operates in this organelle. In this review, we attempt to present a unified view of our current understanding of the process of DNA repair in mitochondria with an emphasis on issues that appear controversial. PMID:23637283

  17. Mechanism of homologous recombination and implications for aging-related deletions in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin Jie

    2013-09-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal process, conserved from bacteriophage to human, which is important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Recombination in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was documented more than 4 decades ago, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive. Recent studies have revealed the presence of a Rad52-type recombination system of bacteriophage origin in mitochondria, which operates by a single-strand annealing mechanism independent of the canonical RecA/Rad51-type recombinases. Increasing evidence supports the notion that, like in bacteriophages, mtDNA inheritance is a coordinated interplay between recombination, repair, and replication. These findings could have profound implications for understanding the mechanism of mtDNA inheritance and the generation of mtDNA deletions in aging cells.

  18. Mechanism of Homologous Recombination and Implications for Aging-Related Deletions in Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Homologous recombination is a universal process, conserved from bacteriophage to human, which is important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Recombination in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was documented more than 4 decades ago, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive. Recent studies have revealed the presence of a Rad52-type recombination system of bacteriophage origin in mitochondria, which operates by a single-strand annealing mechanism independent of the canonical RecA/Rad51-type recombinases. Increasing evidence supports the notion that, like in bacteriophages, mtDNA inheritance is a coordinated interplay between recombination, repair, and replication. These findings could have profound implications for understanding the mechanism of mtDNA inheritance and the generation of mtDNA deletions in aging cells. PMID:24006472

  19. Double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase Irc3p is directly involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Sedman, Tiina; Gaidutšik, Ilja; Villemson, Karin; Hou, YingJian; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid-dependent ATPases are involved in nearly all aspects of DNA and RNA metabolism. Previous studies have described a number of mitochondrial helicases. However, double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPases, including translocases or enzymes remodeling DNA-protein complexes, have not been identified in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae. Here, we demonstrate that Irc3p is a mitochondrial double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase of the Superfamily II. In contrast to the other mitochondrial Superfamily II enzymes Mss116p, Suv3p and Mrh4p, which are RNA helicases, Irc3p has a direct role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Specific Irc3p-dependent mtDNA metabolic intermediates can be detected, including high levels of double-stranded DNA breaks that accumulate in irc3Δ mutants. irc3Δ-related topology changes in rho- mtDNA can be reversed by the deletion of mitochondrial RNA polymerase RPO41, suggesting that Irc3p counterbalances adverse effects of transcription on mitochondrial genome stability. PMID:25389272

  20. Application of a mitochondrial DNA control region frequency database for UK domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Barbara; Lall, Gurdeep Matharu; Sacchini, Federico; Jobling, Mark A; Wetton, Jon H

    2017-03-01

    DNA variation in 402bp of the mitochondrial control region flanked by repeat sequences RS2 and RS3 was evaluated by Sanger sequencing in 152 English domestic cats, in order to determine the significance of matching DNA sequences between hairs found with a victim's body and the suspect's pet cat. Whilst 95% of English cats possessed one of the twelve globally widespread mitotypes, four new variants were observed, the most common of which (2% frequency) was shared with the evidential samples. No significant difference in mitotype frequency was seen between 32 individuals from the locality of the crime and 120 additional cats from the rest of England, suggesting a lack of local population structure. However, significant differences were observed in comparison with frequencies in other countries, including the closely neighbouring Netherlands, highlighting the importance of appropriate genetic databases when determining the evidential significance of mitochondrial DNA evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscarinic Receptor Activation Protects Cells from Apoptotic Effects of DNA Damage, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    De Sarno, Patrizia; Shestopal, Svetlana A.; King, Taj D.; Zmijewska, Anna; Song, Ling; Jope, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of muscarinic receptor stimulation was examined on apoptotic signaling induced by DNA damage, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial impairment. Exposure of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to the DNA-damaging agent camptothecin increased p53 levels, activated caspase-3, and caused cell death. Pretreatment with oxotremorine-M, a selective agonist of muscarinic receptors that are expressed endogenously in these cells, did not affect the accumulation of p53 but greatly attenuated caspase-3 activation and protected from cell death to nearly the same extent as treatment with a general caspase inhibitor. Treatment with 50–200 μm H2O2 caused the activation of caspase-3 beginning after 2–3 h, followed by eventual cell death. Oxotremorine-M pretreatment protected cells from H2O2-inducedcaspase-3 activation and death, and this was equivalent to protection afforded by a caspase inhibitor. Muscarinic receptor stimulation also protected cells from caspase-3 activation induced by exposure to rotenone, a mitochondrial complex 1 inhibitor, but no protection was evident from staurosporine-induced caspase-3 activation. The mechanism of protection afforded by muscarinic receptor activation from camptothecin-induced apoptotic signaling involved blockade of mitochondrial cytochrome c release associated with a bolstering of mitochondrial bcl-2 levels and blockade of the translocation of Bax to mitochondria. Likely the most proximal of these events to muscarinic receptor activation, mitochondrial Bax accumulation, also was attenuated by oxotremorine-M treatment after treatment with H2O2 or rotenone. These results demonstrate that stimulation of muscarinic receptors provides substantial protection from DNA damage, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial impairment, insults that may be encountered by neurons in development, aging, or neurodegenerative diseases. These findings suggest that neurotransmitter-induced signaling bolsters survival mechanisms, and inadequate

  2. The mitochondrially targeted antioxidant MitoQ protects the intestinal barrier by ameliorating mitochondrial DNA damage via the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiongyuan; Ren, Jianan; Li, Guanwei; Wu, Jie; Wu, Xiuwen; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Huajian; Hong, Zhiwu; Li, Jieshou

    2018-03-14

    Disruption of the mucosal barrier following intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) is life threatening in clinical practice. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress significantly contribute to the early phase of I/R injury and amplify the inflammatory response. MitoQ is a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant that exerts protective effects following I/R injury. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether and how MitoQ protects intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from I/R injury. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, we found that MitoQ pretreatment downregulated I/R-induced oxidative stress and stabilized the intestinal barrier, as evidenced by MitoQ-treated I/R mice exhibiting attenuated intestinal hyperpermeability, inflammatory response, epithelial apoptosis, and tight junction damage compared to controls. Mechanistically, I/R elevated mitochondrial 8-hydroxyguanine content, reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and mRNA transcription levels, and induced mitochondrial disruption in IECs. However, MitoQ pretreatment dramatically inhibited these deleterious effects. mtDNA depletion alone was sufficient to induce apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction of IECs. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a key activator of mitochondrial transcription, was significantly reduced during I/R injury, a phenomenon that was prevented by MitoQ treatment. Furthermore, we observed that thee protective properties of MitoQ were affected by upregulation of cellular antioxidant genes, including HO-1, NQO-1, and γ-GCLC. Transfection with Nrf2 siRNA in IECs exposed to hypoxia/reperfusion conditions partially blocked the effects of MitoQ on mtDNA damage and mitochondrial oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data suggest that MitoQ exerts protective effect on I/R-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction.

  3. Identification of Forensic Samples via Mitochondrial DNA in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Julie T.; Pilon, André M.

    2003-04-01

    A recent forensic approach for identification of unknown biological samples is mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify a 440 base pair hypervariable region of human mtDNA from a variety of "crime scene" samples (e.g., teeth, hair, nails, cigarettes, envelope flaps, toothbrushes, and chewing gum). Amplification is verified via agarose gel electrophoresis and then samples are subjected to cycle sequencing. Sequence alignments are made via the program CLUSTAL W, allowing students to compare samples and solve the "crime."

  4. SANDO syndrome in a cohort of 107 patients with CPEO and mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Frank; Kornhuber, Malte; Alston, Charlotte L; Taylor, Robert W; Deschauer, Marcus; Zierz, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    The sensory ataxic neuropathy with dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO) syndrome is a subgroup of mitochondrial chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO)-plus disorders associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. There is no systematic survey on SANDO in patients with CPEO with either single or multiple large-scale mtDNA deletions. In this retrospective analysis, we characterised the frequency, the genetic and clinical phenotype of 107 index patients with mitochondrial CPEO (n=66 patients with single and n=41 patients with multiple mtDNA deletions) and assessed these for clinical evidence of a SANDO phenotype. Patients with multiple mtDNA deletions were additionally screened for mutations in the nuclear-encoded POLG, SLC25A4, PEO1 and RRM2B genes. The clinical, histological and genetic data of 11 patients with SANDO were further analysed. None of the 66 patients with single, large-scale mtDNA deletions fulfilled the clinical criteria of SANDO syndrome. In contrast, 9 of 41 patients (22%) with multiple mtDNA deletions and two additional family members fulfilled the clinical criteria for SANDO. Within this subgroup, multiple mtDNA deletions were associated with the following nuclear mutations: POLG (n=6), PEO1 (n=2), unidentified (n=2). The combination of sensory ataxic neuropathy with ophthalmoparesis (SANO) was observed in 70% of patients with multiple mtDNA deletions but only in 4% with single deletions. The combination of CPEO and sensory ataxic neuropathy (SANO, incomplete SANDO) was found in 43% of patients with multiple mtDNA deletions but not in patients with single deletions. The SANDO syndrome seems to indicate a cluster of symptoms within the wide range of multisystemic symptoms associated with mitochondrial CPEO. SANO seems to be the most frequent phenotype associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in our cohort but not or is rarely associated with single, large-scale mtDNA deletions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  5. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signaling Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Preventing Mitochondrial DNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ben; Kwan, Kevin; Levine, Yaakov A; Olofsson, Peder S; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Joshi, Sonia; Wang, Haichao; Andersson, Ulf; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Tracey, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of cellular and environmental stress. Cellular stress is associated with changes in immunity and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a key component of innate immunity. Here we show that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR)-signaling inhibits inflammasome activation and prevents release of mitochondrial DNA, an NLRP3 ligand. Cholinergic receptor agonists or vagus nerve stimulation significantly inhibits inflammasome activation, whereas genetic deletion of α7 nAchR significantly enhances inflammasome activation. Acetylcholine accumulates in macrophage cytoplasm after adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stimulation in an α7 nAchR-independent manner. Acetylcholine significantly attenuated calcium or hydrogen oxide–induced mitochondrial damage and mitochondrial DNA release. Together, these findings reveal a novel neurotransmitter-mediated signaling pathway: acetylcholine translocates into the cytoplasm of immune cells during inflammation and inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation by preventing mitochondrial DNA release. PMID:24849809

  6. Enzyme Kinetics of the Mitochondrial Deoxyribonucleoside Salvage Pathway Are Not Sufficient to Support Rapid mtDNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Vishal V.; Samuels, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Using a computational model, we simulated mitochondrial deoxynucleotide metabolism and mitochondrial DNA replication. Our results indicate that the output from the mitochondrial salvage enzymes alone is inadequate to support a mitochondrial DNA replication duration of as long as 10 hours. We find that an external source of deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates or triphosphates (dNTPs), in addition to those supplied by mitochondrial salvage, is essential for the replication of mitochondrial DNA to complete in the experimentally observed duration of approximately 1 to 2 hours. For meeting a relatively fast replication target of 2 hours, almost two-thirds of the dNTP requirements had to be externally supplied as either deoxyribonucleoside di- or triphosphates, at about equal rates for all four dNTPs. Added monophosphates did not suffice. However, for a replication target of 10 hours, mitochondrial salvage was able to provide for most, but not all, of the total substrate requirements. Still, additional dGTPs and dATPs had to be supplied. Our analysis of the enzyme kinetics also revealed that the majority of enzymes of this pathway prefer substrates that are not precursors (canonical deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides) for mitochondrial DNA replication, such as phosphorylated ribonucleotides, instead of the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. The kinetic constants for reactions between mitochondrial salvage enzymes and deoxyribonucleotide substrates are physiologically unreasonable for achieving efficient catalysis with the expected in situ concentrations of deoxyribonucleotides. PMID:21829339

  7. Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sammler, Svenja; Bleidorn, Christoph; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2011-01-14

    Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead to gene conversion among duplicates. Although the mechanisms for concerted evolution in mtDNA are not fully understood yet, recombination rates have been estimated from "one per speciation event" down to 850 years or even "during every replication cycle". Here we present the first complete mt genome of the avian family Bucerotidae, i.e., that of two Philippine hornbills, Aceros waldeni and Penelopides panini. The mt genomes are characterized by a tandemly duplicated region encompassing part of cytochrome b, 3 tRNAs, NADH6, and the control region. The duplicated fragments are identical to each other except for a short section in domain I and for the length of repeat motifs in domain III of the control region. Due to the heteroplasmy with regard to the number of these repeat motifs, there is some size variation in both genomes; with around 21,657 bp (A. waldeni) and 22,737 bp (P. panini), they significantly exceed the hitherto longest known avian mt genomes, that of the albatrosses. We discovered concerted evolution between the duplicated fragments within individuals. The existence of differences between individuals in coding genes as well as in the control region, which are maintained between duplicates, indicates that recombination apparently occurs frequently, i.e., in every generation. The homogenised duplicates are interspersed by a short fragment which shows no sign of recombination. We hypothesize that this region corresponds to the so-called Replication Fork Barrier (RFB), which has been described from the chicken mitochondrial genome. As this RFB

  8. Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead to gene conversion among duplicates. Although the mechanisms for concerted evolution in mtDNA are not fully understood yet, recombination rates have been estimated from "one per speciation event" down to 850 years or even "during every replication cycle". Results Here we present the first complete mt genome of the avian family Bucerotidae, i.e., that of two Philippine hornbills, Aceros waldeni and Penelopides panini. The mt genomes are characterized by a tandemly duplicated region encompassing part of cytochrome b, 3 tRNAs, NADH6, and the control region. The duplicated fragments are identical to each other except for a short section in domain I and for the length of repeat motifs in domain III of the control region. Due to the heteroplasmy with regard to the number of these repeat motifs, there is some size variation in both genomes; with around 21,657 bp (A. waldeni) and 22,737 bp (P. panini), they significantly exceed the hitherto longest known avian mt genomes, that of the albatrosses. We discovered concerted evolution between the duplicated fragments within individuals. The existence of differences between individuals in coding genes as well as in the control region, which are maintained between duplicates, indicates that recombination apparently occurs frequently, i.e., in every generation. Conclusions The homogenised duplicates are interspersed by a short fragment which shows no sign of recombination. We hypothesize that this region corresponds to the so-called Replication Fork Barrier (RFB), which has been described from the chicken

  9. Diagnostic value of succinate ubiquinone reductase activity in the identification of patients with mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, P; Rahman, S; Guthrie, P; Taanman, J W; Leonard, J V; Land, J M; Heales, S J R

    2002-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (McKusick 251880) is characterized by a progressive quantitative loss of mtDNA resulting in severe mitochondrial dysfunction. A diagnosis of mtDNA depletion can only be confirmed after Southern blot analysis of affected tissue. Only a limited number of centres have the facilities to offer this service, and this is frequently on an irregular basis. There is therefore a need for a test that can refine sample selection as well as complementing the molecular analysis. In this study we compared the activities of the nuclear-encoded succinate ubiquinone reductase (complex II) to the activities of the combined mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes; NADH:ubiquinone reductase (complex I), ubiquinol-cytochrome-c reductase (complex III), and cytochrome-c oxidase (complex IV), in skeletal muscle biopsies from 7 patients with confirmed mtDNA depletion. In one patient there was no evidence of an ETC defect. However, the remaining 6 patients exhibited reduced complex I and IV activities. Five of these patients also displayed reduced complex II-III (succinate:cytochrome-c reductase) activity. Individual measurement of complex II and complex III activities demonstrated normal levels of complex II activity compared to complex III, which was reduced in the 5 biopsies assayed. These findings suggest a possible diagnostic value for the detection of normal levels of complex II activity in conjunction with reduced complex I, III and IV activity in the identification of likely candidates for mtDNA depletion syndrome

  10. The determination of complete human mitochondrial DNA sequences in single cells: implications for the study of somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert W.; Taylor, Geoffrey A.; Durham, Steve E.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of single cells have previously shown intracellular clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations to levels that can cause a focal cytochrome c oxidase (COX) defect. Whilst techniques are available to study mtDNA rearrangements at the level of the single cell, recent interest has focused on the possible role of somatic mtDNA point mutations in ageing, neurodegenerative disease and cancer. We have therefore developed a method that permits the reliable determination of the entire mtDNA sequence from single cells without amplifying contaminating, nuclear-embedded pseudogenes. Sequencing and PCR–RFLP analyses of individual COX-negative muscle fibres from a patient with a previously described heteroplasmic COX II (T7587C) mutation indicate that mutant loads as low as 30% can be reliably detected by sequencing. This technique will be particularly useful in identifying the mtDNA mutational spectra in age-related COX-negative cells and will increase our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms by which they occur. PMID:11470889

  11. [Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms shared between modern humans and neanderthals: adaptive convergence or evidence for interspecific hybridization?].

    PubMed

    Maliarchuk, B A

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of the variability of the nucleotide sequences in the mitochondrial genome of modern humans, neanderthals, Denisovans, and other primates has shown that there are shared polymorphisms at positions 2758 and 7146 between modern Homo sapiens (in phylogenetic cluster L2'3'4'5'6) and Homo neanderthalensis (in the group of European neanderthals younger than 48000 years). It is suggested that the convergence may be due to adaptive changes in the mitochondrial genomes of modern humans and neanderthals or interspecific hybridization associated with mtDNA recombination.

  12. Mitochondrial-DNA variation among subspecies and populations of sea otters (Enhydra lutris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Matthew A.; Bodkin, James L.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Estes, James A.; Patton, John C.

    1996-01-01

    We used restriction-enzyme analysis of polymerase-chain reaction-amplified, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to assess genetic differentiation of subspecies and populations of sea otters, Enhydra lutris, throughout the range of the species. There were several haplotypes of mtDNA in each subspecies and geographically separate populations. MtDNA sequence divergence of haplotypes of sea otters was 0.0004–0.0041 base substitutions per nucleotide. E. L nereis appears to have monophyletic mitochondrial DNA, while E. I. lutris and E. I. kenyoni do not. Different frequencies of haplotypes of mtDNA among populations reflect current restriction of gene flow and the unique histories of different populations. There are two or three haplotypes of mtDNA and diversity of haplotypes is 0.1376–0.5854 in each population of otters. This is consistent with theoretical work, which suggests that population bottlenecks of sea otters probably did not result in major losses of genetic variation for individual populations, or the species as a whole.

  13. Mgm101 is a Rad52-related protein required for mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Mbantenkhu, MacMillan; Wang, Xiaowen; Nardozzi, Jonathan D; Wilkens, Stephan; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Patel, Anamika; Cosgrove, Michael S; Chen, Xin Jie

    2011-12-09

    Homologous recombination is a conserved molecular process that has primarily evolved for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks and stalled replication forks. However, the recombination machinery in mitochondria is poorly understood. Here, we show that the yeast mitochondrial nucleoid protein, Mgm101, is related to the Rad52-type recombination proteins that are widespread in organisms from bacteriophage to humans. Mgm101 is required for repeat-mediated recombination and suppression of mtDNA fragmentation in vivo. It preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA and catalyzes the annealing of ssDNA precomplexed with the mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Mgm101 forms large oligomeric rings of ∼14-fold symmetry and highly compressed helical filaments. Specific mutations affecting ring formation reduce protein stability in vitro. The data suggest that the ring structure may provide a scaffold for stabilization of Mgm101 by preventing the aggregation of the otherwise unstable monomeric conformation. Upon binding to ssDNA, Mgm101 is remobilized from the rings to form distinct nucleoprotein filaments. These studies reveal a recombination protein of likely bacteriophage origin in mitochondria and support the notion that recombination is indispensable for mtDNA integrity.

  14. Meat species identification and Halal authentication analysis using mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Murugaiah, Chandrika; Noor, Zainon Mohd; Mastakim, Maimunah; Bilung, Lesley Maurice; Selamat, Jinap; Radu, Son

    2009-09-01

    A method utilizing PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the mitochondrial genes was developed for beef (Bos taurus), pork (Sus scrofa), buffalo (Bubalus bubali), quail (Coturnix coturnix), chicken (Gallus gallus), goat (Capra hircus), rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) species identification and Halal authentication. PCR products of 359-bp were successfully obtained from the cyt b gene of these six meats. AluI, BsaJI, RsaI, MseI, and BstUI enzymes were identified as potential restriction endonucleases to differentiate the meats. The genetic differences within the cyt b gene among the meat were successfully confirmed by PCR-RFLP. A reliable typing scheme of species which revealed the genetic differences among the species was developed.

  15. Accumulation of linear mitochondrial DNA fragments in the nucleus shortens the chronological life span of yeast.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Ivessa, Andreas S

    2012-10-01

    Translocation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments to the nucleus and insertion of those fragments into nuclear DNA has been observed in several organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals. Disruption of specific nuclear genes by de novo insertions of mtDNA fragments has even been linked to the initiation of several human diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that baker's yeast strains with high rates of mtDNA fragments migrating to the nucleus (yme1-1 mutant) exhibit short chronological life spans (CLS). The yeast CLS is determined by the survival of non-dividing cell populations. Here, we show that lack of the non-homologous-end-joining enzyme DNA ligase IV (DNL4) can rescue the short CLS of the yme1-1 mutant. In fission yeast, DNA ligase IV has been shown to be required for the capture of mtDNA fragments during the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks in nuclear DNA. In further analyses using pulse field gel and 2D gel electrophoresis we demonstrate that linear mtDNA fragments with likely nuclear localization accumulate in the yme1-1 mutant. The accumulation of the linear mtDNA fragments in the yme1-1 mutant is suppressed when Dnl4 is absent. We propose that the linear nuclear mtDNA fragments accelerate the aging process in the yme1-1 mutant cells by possibly affecting nuclear processes including DNA replication, recombination, and repair as well as transcription of nuclear genes. We speculate further that Dnl4 protein has besides its function as a ligase also a role in DNA protection. Dnl4 protein may stabilize the linear mtDNA fragments in the nucleus by binding to their physical ends. In the absence of Dnl4 protein the linear fragments are therefore unprotected and possibly degraded by nuclear nucleases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. TDP1 repairs nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by chain-terminating anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shar-yin N.; Murai, Junko; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Naumova, Alena; Gmeiner, William H.; Pommier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs) that cause stalling or premature termination of DNA replication forks are widely used as anticancer and antiviral drugs. However, it is not well understood how cells repair the DNA damage induced by these drugs. Here, we reveal the importance of tyrosyl–DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) in the repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by CTNAs. On investigating the effects of four CTNAs—acyclovir (ACV), cytarabine (Ara-C), zidovudine (AZT) and zalcitabine (ddC)—we show that TDP1 is capable of removing the covalently linked corresponding CTNAs from DNA 3′-ends. We also show that Tdp1−/− cells are hypersensitive and accumulate more DNA damage when treated with ACV and Ara-C, implicating TDP1 in repairing CTNA-induced DNA damage. As AZT and ddC are known to cause mitochondrial dysfunction, we examined whether TDP1 repairs the mitochondrial DNA damage they induced. We find that AZT and ddC treatment leads to greater depletion of mitochondrial DNA in Tdp1−/− cells. Thus, TDP1 seems to be critical for repairing nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage caused by CTNAs. PMID:23775789

  17. Nomenclature of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graziano, Sara L.; Brown, K.H.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Congruence of genetic data is critical for comparative and collaborative studies on natural fish populations. A comprehensive list of reported mitochrondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss generated using the S-Phe/P2 primer set is presented as a resource for future investigations of this species.

  18. Phylogenetic Position of a Copper Age Sheep (Ovis aries) Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Background Sheep (Ovis aries) were domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region about 9,000-8,000 years ago. Currently, few mitochondrial (mt) DNA studies are available on archaeological sheep. In particular, no data on archaeological European sheep are available. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the first portion of mtDNA sequence of a Copper Age European sheep. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the clothes of the so-called Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi (5,350 - 5,100 years before present). Mitochondrial DNA (a total of 2,429 base pairs, encompassing a portion of the control region, tRNAPhe, a portion of the 12S rRNA gene, and the whole cytochrome B gene) was sequenced using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplification and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products. We have compared the sequence with the corresponding sequence of 334 extant lineages. Conclusions/Significance A phylogenetic network based on a new cladistic notation for the mitochondrial diversity of domestic sheep shows that the Ötzi's sheep falls within haplogroup B, thus demonstrating that sheep belonging to this haplogroup were already present in the Alps more than 5,000 years ago. On the other hand, the lineage of the Ötzi's sheep is defined by two transitions (16147, and 16440) which, assembled together, define a motif that has not yet been identified in modern sheep populations. PMID:22457789

  19. Disruptive mitochondrial DNA mutations in complex I subunits are markers of oncocytic phenotype in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Bonora, Elena; Pennisi, Lucia Fiammetta; Toller, Matteo; Iommarini, Luisa; Ghelli, Anna; Moretti, Massimo; Betts, Christine M; Martinelli, Giuseppe Nicola; Ceroni, Alberto Rinaldi; Curcio, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela; Tallini, Giovanni; Romeo, Giovanni

    2007-05-22

    Oncocytic tumors are a distinctive class of proliferative lesions composed of cells with a striking degree of mitochondrial hyperplasia that are particularly frequent in the thyroid gland. To understand whether specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with the accumulation of mitochondria, we sequenced the entire mtDNA in 50 oncocytic lesions (45 thyroid tumors of epithelial cell derivation and 5 mitochondrion-rich breast tumors) and 52 control cases (21 nononcocytic thyroid tumors, 15 breast carcinomas, and 16 gliomas) by using recently developed technology that allows specific and reliable amplification of the whole mtDNA with quick mutation scanning. Thirteen oncocytic lesions (26%) presented disruptive mutations (nonsense or frameshift), whereas only two samples (3.8%) presented such mutations in the nononcocytic control group. In one case with multiple thyroid nodules analyzed separately, a disruptive mutation was found in the only nodule with oncocytic features. In one of the five mitochondrion-rich breast tumors, a disruptive mutation was identified. All disruptive mutations were found in complex I subunit genes, and the association between these mutations and the oncocytic phenotype was statistically significant (P=0.001). To study the pathogenicity of these mitochondrial mutations, primary cultures from oncocytic tumors and corresponding normal tissues were established. Electron microscopy and biochemical and molecular analyses showed that primary cultures derived from tumors bearing disruptive mutations failed to maintain the mutations and the oncocytic phenotype. We conclude that disruptive mutations in complex I subunits are markers of thyroid oncocytic tumors.

  20. Cytogenetic and Sequence Analyses of Mitochondrial DNA Insertions in Nuclear Chromosomes of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Lough, Ashley N.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Hussain, Abid; Roark, Leah M.; Langewisch, Tiffany L.; Backes, Teresa; Kremling, Karl A. G.; Jiang, Jiming; Birchler, James A.; Newton, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into nuclear genomes is a regularly occurring process that has been observed in many species. Few studies, however, have focused on the variation of nuclear-mtDNA sequences (NUMTs) within a species. This study examined mtDNA insertions within chromosomes of a diverse set of Zea mays ssp. mays (maize) inbred lines by the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization. A relatively large NUMT on the long arm of chromosome 9 (9L) was identified at approximately the same position in four inbred lines (B73, M825, HP301, and Oh7B). Further examination of the similarly positioned 9L NUMT in two lines, B73 and M825, indicated that the large size of these sites is due to the presence of a majority of the mitochondrial genome; however, only portions of this NUMT (∼252 kb total) were found in the publically available B73 nuclear sequence for chromosome 9. Fiber-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis estimated the size of the B73 9L NUMT to be ∼1.8 Mb and revealed that the NUMT is methylated. Two regions of mtDNA (2.4 kb and 3.3 kb) within the 9L NUMT are not present in the B73 mitochondrial NB genome; however, these 2.4-kb and 3.3-kb segments are present in other Zea mitochondrial genomes, including that of Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, a progenitor of domesticated maize. PMID:26333837

  1. Elimination of mitochondrial DNA is not required for herpes simplex virus 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Duguay, Brett A; Saffran, Holly A; Ponomarev, Alina; Duley, Shayla A; Eaton, Heather E; Smiley, James R

    2014-03-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) results in the rapid elimination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from host cells. It is known that a mitochondrial isoform of the viral alkaline nuclease (UL12) called UL12.5 triggers this process. However, very little is known about the impact of mtDNA depletion on viral replication or the biology of HSV-1 infections. These questions have been difficult to address because UL12.5 and UL12 are encoded by overlapping transcripts that share the same open reading frame. As a result, mutations that alter UL12.5 also affect UL12, and UL12 null mutations severely impair viral growth by interfering with the intranuclear processing of progeny viral genomes. Therefore, to specifically assess the impact of mtDNA depletion on viral replication, it is necessary to eliminate the activity of UL12.5 while preserving the nuclear functions of UL12. Previous work has shown that the human cytomegalovirus alkaline nuclease UL98 can functionally substitute for UL12 during HSV-1 replication. We found that UL98 is unable to deplete mtDNA in transfected cells and therefore generated an HSV-1 variant in which UL98 coding sequences replace the UL12/UL12.5 open reading frame. The resulting virus was severely impaired in its ability to trigger mtDNA loss but reached titers comparable to those of wild-type HSV-1 in one-step and multistep growth experiments. Together, these observations demonstrate that the elimination of mtDNA is not required for HSV-1 replication in cell culture. Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 destroy the DNA of host cell mitochondria, the powerhouses of cells. Epstein-Barr virus, a distantly related herpesvirus, has a similar effect, indicating that mitochondrial DNA destruction is under positive selection and thus confers a benefit to the virus. The present work shows that mitochondrial DNA destruction is not required for efficient replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in cultured Vero kidney epithelial cells

  2. Increased levels of mitochondrial DNA copy number in patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Vaseghi, H; Houshmand, M; Jadali, Z

    2017-10-01

    Oxidative stress is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as vitiligo. Evidence suggests that the human mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) is vulnerable to damage mediated by oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare peripheral blood mtDNAcn and oxidative DNA damage byproducts (8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine; 8-OHdG) in patients with vitiligo and healthy controls (HCs). The relative mtDNAcn and the oxidative damage (formation of 8-OHdG in mtDNA) of each sample were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Blood samples were obtained from 56 patients with vitiligo and 46 HCs. The mean mtDNAcn and the degree of mtDNA damage were higher in patients with vitiligo than in HCs. These data suggest that increase in mtDNAcn and oxidative DNA damage may be involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ: Novel Mechanisms of Function and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Euro, Liliya; Haapanen, Outi; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Suomalainen, Anu; Sharma, Vivek

    2017-03-07

    DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is a key component of the mitochondrial DNA replisome and an important cause of neurological diseases. Despite the availability of its crystal structures, the molecular mechanism of DNA replication, the switch between polymerase and exonuclease activities, the site of replisomal interactions, and functional effects of patient mutations that do not affect direct catalysis have remained elusive. Here we report the first atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations of the human Pol γ replicative complex. Our simulation data show that DNA binding triggers remarkable changes in the enzyme structure, including (1) completion of the DNA-binding channel via a dynamic subdomain, which in the apo form blocks the catalytic site, (2) stabilization of the structure through the distal accessory β-subunit, and (3) formation of a putative transient replisome-binding platform in the "intrinsic processivity" subdomain of the enzyme. Our data indicate that noncatalytic mutations may disrupt replisomal interactions, thereby causing Pol γ-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. mtDNA-Server: next-generation sequencing data analysis of human mitochondrial DNA in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Weissensteiner, Hansi; Forer, Lukas; Fuchsberger, Christian; Schöpf, Bernd; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Specht, Günther; Kronenberg, Florian; Schönherr, Sebastian

    2016-07-08

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows investigating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) characteristics such as heteroplasmy (i.e. intra-individual sequence variation) to a higher level of detail. While several pipelines for analyzing heteroplasmies exist, issues in usability, accuracy of results and interpreting final data limit their usage. Here we present mtDNA-Server, a scalable web server for the analysis of mtDNA studies of any size with a special focus on usability as well as reliable identification and quantification of heteroplasmic variants. The mtDNA-Server workflow includes parallel read alignment, heteroplasmy detection, artefact or contamination identification, variant annotation as well as several quality control metrics, often neglected in current mtDNA NGS studies. All computational steps are parallelized with Hadoop MapReduce and executed graphically with Cloudgene. We validated the underlying heteroplasmy and contamination detection model by generating four artificial sample mix-ups on two different NGS devices. Our evaluation data shows that mtDNA-Server detects heteroplasmies and artificial recombinations down to the 1% level with perfect specificity and outperforms existing approaches regarding sensitivity. mtDNA-Server is currently able to analyze the 1000G Phase 3 data (n = 2,504) in less than 5 h and is freely accessible at https://mtdna-server.uibk.ac.at. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Characterizing nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in spent embryo culture media: genetic contamination identified.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Elizabeth R; McGillivray, Brent C; Wicker, Sophie M; Peek, John C; Shelling, Andrew N; Stone, Peter; Chamley, Larry W; Cree, Lynsey M

    2017-01-01

    To characterize nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in spent culture media from normally developing blastocysts to determine whether it could be used for noninvasive genetic assessment. Prospective embryo cohort study. Academic center and private in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic. Seventy patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and 227 blastocysts. Culture media assessment, artificial blastocoele fluid collapse and DNA analysis using digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR), long-range PCR, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and DNA fingerprinting. Presence of nuclear and mtDNA in three different commercial culture media from Vitrolife and Irvine Scientific, spent embryo media assessment at the cleavage and blastocyst stages of development, and analysis of the internal media controls for each patient that had been exposed to identical conditions as embryo media but did not come into contact with embryos. Higher levels of nuclear and mtDNA were observed in the culture media that had been exposed to embryos compared with the internal media controls. Nuclear DNA (∼4 copies) and mtDNA (∼600 copies) could be detected in spent media, and the levels increased at the blastocyst stage. No increase in DNA was detected after artificial blastocoele fluid collapse. Mixed sex chromosome DNA was detected. This originated from contamination in the culture media and from maternal (cumulus) cells. Due to the limited amount of template, the presence of embryonic nuclear DNA could not be confirmed by DNA fingerprinting analysis. Currently DNA from culture media cannot be used for genetic assessment because embryo-associated structures release DNA into the culture medium and the DNA is of mixed origin. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A test of the transcription model for biased inheritance of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, H E; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1995-09-01

    Two strand-specific origins of replication appear to be required for mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. Structural equivalents of these origins are found in the rep sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA. These striking similarities have contributed to a universal model for the initiation of mtDNA replication in which a primer is created by cleavage of an origin region transcript. Consistent with this model are the properties of deletion mutants of yeast mtDNA ([rho-]) with a high density of reps (HS [rho-]). These mutant mtDNAs are preferentially inherited by the progeny resulting from the mating of HS [rho-] cells with cells containing wild-type mtDNA ([rho+]). This bias is presumed to result from a replication advantage conferred on HS [rho-] mtDNA by the high density of rep sequences acting as origins. To test whether transcription is indeed required for the preferential inheritance of HS [rho-] mtDNA, we deleted the nuclear gene (RPO41) for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, reducing transcripts by at least 1000-fold. Since [rho-] genomes, but not [rho+] genomes, are stable when RPO41 is deleted, we examined matings between HS [rho-] and neutral [rho-] cells. Neutral [rho-] mtDNAs lack rep sequences and are not preferentially inherited in [rho-] x [rho+] crosses. In HS [rho-] x neutral [rho-] matings, the HS [rho-] mtDNA was preferentially inherited whether both parents were wild type or both were deleted for RPO41. Thus, transcription from the rep promoter does not appear to be necessary for biased inheritance. Our results, and analysis of the literature, suggest that priming by transcription is not a universal mechanism for mtDNA replication initiation.

  7. Novel large-range mitochondrial DNA deletions and fatal multisystemic disorder with prominent hepatopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Marzia; Rizza, Teresa; Verrigni, Daniela

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expanded array of mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pearson syndrome with prominent hepatopathy associated with single mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of deletions in fibroblasts and blood avoids muscle and liver biopsy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Look for mtDNA deletions before to study nuclear genes related to mtDNA depletion. -- Abstract: Hepatic involvement in mitochondrial cytopathies rarely manifests in adulthood, but is a common feature in children. Multiple OXPHOS enzyme defects in children with liver involvement are often associated with dramatically reduced amounts of mtDNA. We investigated two novel large scale deletions in two infants with a multisystem disorder and prominent hepatopathy. Amount ofmore » mtDNA deletions and protein content were measured in different post-mortem tissues. The highest levels of deleted mtDNA were in liver, kidney, pancreas of both patients. Moreover, mtDNA deletions were detected in cultured skin fibroblasts in both patients and in blood of one during life. Biochemical analysis showed impairment of mainly complex I enzyme activity. Patients manifesting multisystem disorders in childhood may harbour rare mtDNA deletions in multiple tissues. For these patients, less invasive blood specimens or cultured fibroblasts can be used for molecular diagnosis. Our data further expand the array of deletions in the mitochondrial genomes in association with liver failure. Thus analysis of mtDNA should be considered in the diagnosis of childhood-onset hepatopathies.« less

  8. Selective sweeps of mitochondrial DNA can drive the evolution of uniparental inheritance.

    PubMed

    Christie, Joshua R; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-08-01

    Although the uniparental (or maternal) inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is widespread, the reasons for its evolution remain unclear. Two main hypotheses have been proposed: selection against individuals containing different mtDNAs (heteroplasmy) and selection against "selfish" mtDNA mutations. Recently, uniparental inheritance was shown to promote adaptive evolution in mtDNA, potentially providing a third hypothesis for its evolution. Here, we explore this hypothesis theoretically and ask if the accumulation of beneficial mutations provides a sufficient fitness advantage for uniparental inheritance to invade a population in which mtDNA is inherited biparentally. In a deterministic model, uniparental inheritance increases in frequency but cannot replace biparental inheritance if only a single beneficial mtDNA mutation sweeps through the population. When we allow successive selective sweeps of mtDNA, however, uniparental inheritance can replace biparental inheritance. Using a stochastic model, we show that a combination of selection and drift facilitates the fixation of uniparental inheritance (compared to a neutral trait) when there is only a single selective mtDNA sweep. When we consider multiple mtDNA sweeps in a stochastic model, uniparental inheritance becomes even more likely to replace biparental inheritance. Our findings thus suggest that selective sweeps of beneficial mtDNA haplotypes can drive the evolution of uniparental inheritance. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Fine Dissection of Human Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup HV Lineages Reveals Paleolithic Signatures from European Glacial Refugia

    PubMed Central

    Sarno, Stefania; Sevini, Federica; Vianello, Dario; Tamm, Erika; Metspalu, Ene; van Oven, Mannis; Hübner, Alexander; Sazzini, Marco; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata

    2015-01-01

    Genetic signatures from the Paleolithic inhabitants of Eurasia can be traced from the early divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages still present in contemporary human populations. Previous studies already suggested a pre-Neolithic diffusion of mitochondrial haplogroup HV*(xH,V) lineages, a relatively rare class of mtDNA types that includes parallel branches mainly distributed across Europe and West Asia with a certain degree of structure. Up till now, variation within haplogroup HV was addressed mainly by analyzing sequence data from the mtDNA control region, except for specific sub-branches, such as HV4 or the widely distributed haplogroups H and V. In this study, we present a revised HV topology based on full mtDNA genome data, and we include a comprehensive dataset consisting of 316 complete mtDNA sequences including 60 new samples from the Italian peninsula, a previously underrepresented geographic area. We highlight points of instability in the particular topology of this haplogroup, reconstructed with BEAST-generated trees and networks. We also confirm a major lineage expansion that probably followed the Late Glacial Maximum and preceded Neolithic population movements. We finally observe that Italy harbors a reservoir of mtDNA diversity, with deep-rooting HV lineages often related to sequences present in the Caucasus and the Middle East. The resulting hypothesis of a glacial refugium in Southern Italy has implications for the understanding of late Paleolithic population movements and is discussed within the archaeological cultural shifts occurred over the entire continent. PMID:26640946

  10. RPO41-independent maintenance of [rho-] mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fangman, W L; Henly, J W; Brewer, B J

    1990-01-01

    A subset of promoters in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed to participate in replication initiation, giving rise to a primer through site-specific cleavage of an RNA transcript. To test whether transcription is essential for mtDNA maintenance, we examined two simple mtDNA deletion ([rho-]) genomes in yeast cells. One genome (HS3324) contains a consensus promoter (ATATAAGTA) for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase encoded by the nuclear gene RPO41, and the other genome (4a) does not. As anticipated, in RPO41 cells transcripts from the HS3324 genome were more abundant than were transcripts from the 4a genome. When the RPO41 gene was disrupted, both [rho-] genomes were efficiently maintained. The level of transcripts from HS3324 mtDNA was decreased greater than 400-fold in cells carrying the RPO41 disrupted gene; however, the low-level transcripts from 4a mtDNA were undiminished. These results indicate that replication of [rho-] genomes can be initiated in the absence of wild-type levels of the RPO41-encoded RNA polymerase.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in the emerging field of massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Just, Rebecca S.; Irwin, Jodi A.; Parson, Walther

    2015-01-01

    Long an important and useful tool in forensic genetic investigations, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typing continues to mature. Research in the last few years has demonstrated both that data from the entire molecule will have practical benefits in forensic DNA casework, and that massively parallel sequencing (MPS) methods will make full mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) sequencing of forensic specimens feasible and cost-effective. A spate of recent studies has employed these new technologies to assess intraindividual mtDNA variation. However, in several instances, contamination and other sources of mixed mtDNA data have been erroneously identified as heteroplasmy. Well vetted mtGenome datasets based on both Sanger and MPS sequences have found authentic point heteroplasmy in approximately 25% of individuals when minor component detection thresholds are in the range of 10–20%, along with positional distribution patterns in the coding region that differ from patterns of point heteroplasmy in the well-studied control region. A few recent studies that examined very low-level heteroplasmy are concordant with these observations when the data are examined at a common level of resolution. In this review we provide an overview of considerations related to the use of MPS technologies to detect mtDNA heteroplasmy. In addition, we examine published reports on point heteroplasmy to characterize features of the data that will assist in the evaluation of future mtGenome data developed by any typing method. PMID:26009256

  12. Low mitochondrial DNA diversity of Japanese Polled and Kuchinoshima feral cattle.

    PubMed

    Mannen, Hideyuki; Yonesaka, Riku; Noda, Aoi; Shimogiri, Takeshi; Oshima, Ichiro; Katahira, Kiyomi; Kanemaki, Misao; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Inayoshi, Yousuke; Mukai, Fumio; Sasazaki, Shinji

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to estimate the mitochondrial genetic diversity and structure of Japanese Polled and Kuchinoshima feral cattle, which are maintained in small populations. We determined the mitochondrial DMA (mtDNA) displacement loop (D-loop) sequences for both cattle populations and analyzed these in conjunction with previously published data from Northeast Asian cattle populations. Our findings showed that Japanese native cattle have a predominant, Asian-specific mtDNA haplogroup T4 with high frequencies (0.43-0.81). This excluded Kuchinoshima cattle (32 animals), which had only one mtDNA haplotype belonging to the haplogroup T3. Japanese Polled showed relatively lower mtDNA diversity in the average sequence divergence (0.0020) than other Wagyu breeds (0.0036-0.0047). Japanese Polled have been maintained in a limited area of Yamaguchi, and the population size is now less than 200. Therefore, low mtDNA diversity in the Japanese Polled could be explained by the decreasing population size in the last three decades. We found low mtDNA diversity in both Japanese Polled and Kuchinoshima cattle. The genetic information obtained in this study will be useful for maintaining these populations and for understanding the origin of Japanese native cattle. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Regulation of Small Mitochondrial DNA Replicative Advantage by Ribonucleotide Reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Elliot; Yoshida, Minoru; Ling, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Small mitochondrial genomes can behave as selfish elements by displacing wild-type genomes regardless of their detriment to the host organism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, small hypersuppressive mtDNA transiently coexist with wild-type in a state of heteroplasmy, wherein the replicative advantage of the small mtDNA outcompetes wild-type and produces offspring without respiratory capacity in >95% of colonies. The cytosolic enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in dNTP synthesis and its inhibition has been correlated with increased petite colony formation, reflecting loss of respiratory function. Here, we used heteroplasmic diploids containing wild-type (rho+) and suppressive (rho−) or hypersuppressive (HS rho−) mitochondrial genomes to explore the effects of RNR activity on mtDNA heteroplasmy in offspring. We found that the proportion of rho+ offspring was significantly increased by RNR overexpression or deletion of its inhibitor, SML1, while reducing RNR activity via SML1 overexpression produced the opposite effects. In addition, using Ex Taq and KOD Dash polymerases, we observed a replicative advantage for small over large template DNA in vitro, but only at low dNTP concentrations. These results suggest that dNTP insufficiency contributes to the replicative advantage of small mtDNA over wild-type and cytosolic dNTP synthesis by RNR is an important regulator of heteroplasmy involving small mtDNA molecules in yeast. PMID:28717049

  14. Replication intermediates of the linear mitochondrial DNA of Candida parapsilosis suggest a common recombination based mechanism for yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Joachim M; Sedman, Tiina; Visacka, Katarina; Slezakova, Judita; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-08-15

    Variation in the topology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in eukaryotes evokes the question if differently structured DNAs are replicated by a common mechanism. RNA-primed DNA synthesis has been established as a mechanism for replicating the circular animal/mammalian mtDNA. In yeasts, circular mtDNA molecules were assumed to be templates for rolling circle DNA-replication. We recently showed that in Candida albicans, which has circular mapping mtDNA, recombination driven replication is a major mechanism for replicating a complex branched mtDNA network. Careful analyses of C. albicans-mtDNA did not reveal detectable amounts of circular DNA molecules. In the present study we addressed the question of how the unit sized linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis terminating at both ends with arrays of tandem repeats (mitochondrial telomeres) is replicated. Originally, we expected to find replication intermediates diagnostic of canonical bi-directional replication initiation at the centrally located bi-directional promoter region. However, we found that the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis also employs recombination for replication initiation. The most striking findings were that the mitochondrial telomeres appear to be hot spots for recombination driven replication, and that stable RNA:DNA hybrids, with a potential role in mtDNA replication, are also present in the mtDNA preparations. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Replication Intermediates of the Linear Mitochondrial DNA of Candida parapsilosis Suggest a Common Recombination Based Mechanism for Yeast Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Joachim M.; Sedman, Tiina; Visacka, Katarina; Slezakova, Judita; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-01-01

    Variation in the topology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in eukaryotes evokes the question if differently structured DNAs are replicated by a common mechanism. RNA-primed DNA synthesis has been established as a mechanism for replicating the circular animal/mammalian mtDNA. In yeasts, circular mtDNA molecules were assumed to be templates for rolling circle DNA-replication. We recently showed that in Candida albicans, which has circular mapping mtDNA, recombination driven replication is a major mechanism for replicating a complex branched mtDNA network. Careful analyses of C. albicans-mtDNA did not reveal detectable amounts of circular DNA molecules. In the present study we addressed the question of how the unit sized linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis terminating at both ends with arrays of tandem repeats (mitochondrial telomeres) is replicated. Originally, we expected to find replication intermediates diagnostic of canonical bi-directional replication initiation at the centrally located bi-directional promoter region. However, we found that the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis also employs recombination for replication initiation. The most striking findings were that the mitochondrial telomeres appear to be hot spots for recombination driven replication, and that stable RNA:DNA hybrids, with a potential role in mtDNA replication, are also present in the mtDNA preparations. PMID:24951592

  16. Horizontal transfer of DNA from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome and its subsequent evolution in milkweeds (Apocynaceae)

    Treesearch

    Shannon C.K. Straub; Richard C. Cronn; Christopher Edwards; Mark Fishbein; Aaron Liston

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of DNA from the plastid to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of higher plants is a common phenomenon; however, plastid genomes (plastomes) are highly conserved and have generally been regarded as impervious to HGT. We sequenced the 158 kb plastome and the 690 kb mitochondrial genome of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca [Apocynaceae...

  17. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in human evolution and disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D C

    1994-09-13

    Germ-line and somatic mtDNA mutations are hypothesized to act together to shape our history and our health. Germ-line mtDNA mutations, both ancient and recent, have been associated with a variety of degenerative diseases. Mildly to moderately deleterious germ-line mutations, like neutral polymorphisms, have become established in the distant past through genetic drift but now may predispose certain individuals to late-onset degenerative diseases. As an example, a homoplasmic, Caucasian, tRNA(Gln) mutation at nucleotide pair (np) 4336 has been observed in 5% of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease patients and may contribute to the multifactorial etiology of these diseases. Moderately to severely deleterious germ-line mutations, on the other hand, appear repeatedly but are eliminated by selection. Hence, all extant mutations of this class are recent and associated with more devastating diseases of young adults and children. Representative of these mutations is a heteroplasmic mutation in MTND6 at np 14459 whose clinical presentations range from adult-onset blindness to pediatric dystonia and basal ganglial degeneration. To the inherited mutations are added somatic mtDNA mutations which accumulate in random arrays within stable tissues. These mutations provide a molecular clock that measures our age and may cause a progressive decline in tissue energy output that could precipitate the onset of degenerative diseases in individuals harboring inherited deleterious mutations.

  18. Positioning the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) Hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman into a Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Marota, Isolina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Ermini, Luca; Fusco, Letizia; Pietrelli, Alessandro; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco; Luciani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    In the last years several phylogeographic studies of both extant and extinct red deer populations have been conducted. Three distinct mitochondrial lineages (western, eastern and North-African/Sardinian) have been identified reflecting different glacial refugia and postglacial recolonisation processes. However, little is known about the genetics of the Alpine populations and no mitochondrial DNA sequences from Alpine archaeological specimens are available. Here we provide the first mitochondrial sequences of an Alpine Copper Age Cervus elaphus. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the remains of the clothes of the glacier mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi (5,350–5,100 years before present). A 2,297 base pairs long fragment was sequenced using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplifications and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer's haplotype with haplotypes of modern and ancient European red deer. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the haplotype of the Alpine Copper Age red deer falls within the western European mitochondrial lineage in contrast with the current populations from the Italian Alps belonging to the eastern lineage. We also discussed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer with the populations from Mesola Wood (northern Italy) and Sardinia. PMID:24988290

  19. Positioning the red deer (Cervus elaphus) hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman into a mitochondrial DNA phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Cristina; Marota, Isolina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Ermini, Luca; Fusco, Letizia; Pietrelli, Alessandro; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco; Luciani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    In the last years several phylogeographic studies of both extant and extinct red deer populations have been conducted. Three distinct mitochondrial lineages (western, eastern and North-African/Sardinian) have been identified reflecting different glacial refugia and postglacial recolonisation processes. However, little is known about the genetics of the Alpine populations and no mitochondrial DNA sequences from Alpine archaeological specimens are available. Here we provide the first mitochondrial sequences of an Alpine Copper Age Cervus elaphus. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the remains of the clothes of the glacier mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi (5,350-5,100 years before present). A 2,297 base pairs long fragment was sequenced using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplifications and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer's haplotype with haplotypes of modern and ancient European red deer. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the haplotype of the Alpine Copper Age red deer falls within the western European mitochondrial lineage in contrast with the current populations from the Italian Alps belonging to the eastern lineage. We also discussed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer with the populations from Mesola Wood (northern Italy) and Sardinia.

  20. Influence of seasonal migration on geographic distribution of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Baker, C S; Palumbi, S R; Lambertsen, R H; Weinrich, M T; Calambokidis, J; O'Brien, S J

    1990-03-15

    Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) migrate nearly 10,000 km each year between summer feeding grounds in temperate or near-polar waters and winter breeding grounds in shallow tropical waters. Observations of marked individuals suggest that major oceanic populations of humpback whales are divided into a number of distinct seasonal subpopulations which are not separated by obvious geographic barriers. To test whether these observed patterns of distribution and migration are reflected in the genetic structure of populations, we looked for variation in the mitochondrial DNA of 84 individual humpback whales on different feeding and wintering grounds of the North Pacific and western North Atlantic oceans. On the basis of restriction-fragment analysis, we now report a marked segregation of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes among subpopulations as well as between the two oceans. We interpret this segregation to be the consequence of maternally directed fidelity to migratory destinations.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Profiling of Illegal Tortoiseshell Products Derived from Hawksbill Sea Turtles.

    PubMed

    Foran, David R; Ray, Rebecca L

    2016-07-01

    The hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) is a highly endangered species, commonly poached for its ornate shell. "Tortoiseshell" products made from the shell are widely, although illegally, available in many countries. Hawksbills have a circumglobal distribution; thus, determining their origin is difficult, although genetic differences exist geographically. In the research presented, a procedure was developed to extract and amplify mitochondrial DNA from tortoiseshell items, in an effort to better understand where the species is being poached. Confiscated tortoiseshell items were obtained from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and DNA from 56 of them was analyzed. Multiple mitochondrial haplotypes were identified, including five not previously reported. Only one tortoiseshell item proved to be of Atlantic origin, while all others corresponded to genetic stocks in the Indo-Pacific region. The developed methodology allows for unique, and previously unattainable, genetic information on the illegal poaching of sea turtles for the decorative tortoiseshell trade. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Modulation of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number to Induce Hepatocytic Differentiation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Vijesh; Cain, Jason E; Lee, William; Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Tuch, Bernard E; St John, Justin C

    2017-10-15

    Mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) copy number is tightly regulated during pluripotency and differentiation. There is increased demand of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during differentiation for energy-intensive cell types such as hepatocytes and neurons to meet the cell's functional requirements. During hepatocyte differentiation, mtDNA copy number should be synchronously increased to generate sufficient ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Unlike bone marrow mesenchymal cells, mtDNA copy number failed to increase by 28 days of differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) into hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) despite their expression of some end-stage hepatic markers. This was due to higher levels of DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, the mtDNA-specific replication factor. Treatment with a DNA demethylation agent, 5-azacytidine, resulted in increased mtDNA copy number, reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, and reduced hepatic gene expression. Depletion of mtDNA followed by subsequent differentiation did not increase mtDNA copy number, but reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA and increased expression of hepatic and pluripotency genes. We encapsulated hAEC in barium alginate microcapsules and subsequently differentiated them into HLC. Encapsulation resulted in no net increase of mtDNA copy number but a significant reduction in DNA methylation of POLGA. RNAseq analysis showed that differentiated HLC express hepatocyte-specific genes but also increased expression of inflammatory interferon genes. Differentiation in encapsulated cells showed suppression of inflammatory genes as well as increased expression of genes associated with hepatocyte function pathways and networks. This study demonstrates that an increase in classical hepatic gene expression can be achieved in HLC through encapsulation, although they fail to effectively regulate mtDNA copy number.

  3. In vivo conformation of mitochondrial DNA revealed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in the true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, R; Sasaki, N; Takano, H; Abe, T; Kawano, S

    2000-04-28

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to examine the in vivo and in vitro conformations of Physarum polycephalum mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We used plugs containing isolated mitochondria, isolated mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nuclei), and isolated mtDNA, in addition to whole cells. The mtDNA contained in the myxamoebae, plasmodia, isolated mitochondria, and isolated mt-nuclei was circular, but most of the isolated mtDNA had been site-specifically fragmented and linearized during DNA preparation and storage under low ionic strength conditions. Restriction mapping of Physarum mtDNA by the direct digestion of the isolated mt-nuclei from two different strains, DP89 x AI16 and KM88 x AI16, resulted in the circular form. A linear mitochondrial plasmid, mF, is known to promote mitochondrial fusion and integration of itself into the mtDNA in Physarum. Linearization of mtDNA by the integration of the mF plasmid was demonstrated when we used PFGE to analyze isolated mitochondria from the plasmodial strain DP89 x NG7 carrying the mF plasmid (mF+). The PFGE system can be used not only to determine whether the form of mtDNA is linear or circular but also to analyze the dynamic conformational changes of mtDNA.

  4. Iron deficiency and iron excess damage mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in rats

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Patrick B.; Knutson, Mitchell D.; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Lee, Sonia; Xu, Yu; Viteri, Fernando E.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2002-01-01

    Approximately two billion people, mainly women and children, are iron deficient. Two studies examined the effects of iron deficiency and supplementation on rats. In study 1, mitochondrial functional parameters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage were assayed in iron-deficient (≤5 μg/day) and iron-normal (800 μg/day) rats and in both groups after daily high-iron supplementation (8,000 μg/day) for 34 days. This dose is equivalent to the daily dose commonly given to iron-deficient humans. Iron-deficient rats had lower liver mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and increased levels of oxidants in polymorphonuclear-leukocytes, as assayed by dichlorofluorescein (P < 0.05). Rhodamine 123 fluorescence of polymorphonuclear-leukocytes also increased (P < 0.05). Lowered respiratory control ratios were found in daily high-iron-supplemented rats regardless of the previous iron status (P < 0.05). mtDNA damage was observed in both iron-deficient rats and rats receiving daily high-iron supplementation, compared with iron-normal rats (P < 0.05). Study 2 compared iron-deficient rats given high doses of iron (8,000 μg) either daily or every third day and found that rats given iron supplements every third day had less mtDNA damage on the second and third day after the last dose compared to daily high iron doses. Both inadequate and excessive iron (10 × nutritional need) cause significant mitochondrial malfunction. Although excess iron has been known to cause oxidative damage, the observation of oxidant-induced damage to mitochondria from iron deficiency has been unrecognized previously. Untreated iron deficiency, as well as excessive-iron supplementation, are deleterious and emphasize the importance of maintaining optimal iron intake. PMID:11854522

  5. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the Eastern keelback mullet Liza affinis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoling; Zhu, Wenjia; Bao, Baolong

    2016-05-01

    Eastern keelback mullet (Liza affinis) inhabits inlet waters and estuaries of rivers. In this paper, we initially determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Liza affinis. The entire mtDNA sequence is 16,831 bp in length, including 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 1 putative control region. Its order and numbers of genes are similar to most bony fishes.

  6. DNA primers for amplification of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I from diverse metazoan invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Folmer, O; Black, M; Hoeh, W; Lutz, R; Vrijenhoek, R

    1994-10-01

    We describe "universal" DNA primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a 710-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) from 11 invertebrate phyla: Echinodermata, Mollusca, Annelida, Pogonophora, Arthropoda, Nemertinea, Echiura, Sipuncula, Platyhelminthes, Tardigrada, and Coelenterata, as well as the putative phylum Vestimentifera. Preliminary comparisons revealed that these COI primers generate informative sequences for phylogenetic analyses at the species and higher taxonomic levels.

  7. Evidence for mitochondrial DNA recombination in a human population of island Melanesia.

    PubMed Central

    Hagelberg, E; Goldman, N; Lió, P; Whelan, S; Schiefenhövel, W; Clegg, J B; Bowden, D K

    1999-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis has proved useful in studies of recent human evolution and the genetic affinities of human groups of different geographical regions. As part of an extensive survey of mtDNA diversity in present-day Pacific populations, we obtained sequence information of the hypervariable mtDNA control region of 452 individuals from various localities in the western Pacific. The mtDNA types fell into three major groups which reflect the settlement history of the area. Interestingly, we detected an extremely rare point mutation at high frequency in the small island of Nguna in the Melanesian archipelago of Vanuatu. Phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA data indicated that the mutation was present in individuals of separate mtDNA lineages. We propose that the multiple occurrence of a rare mutation event in one isolated locality is highly improbable, and that recombination between different mtDNA types is a more likely explanation for our observation. If correct, this conclusion has important implications for the use of mtDNA in phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. PMID:10189712

  8. Mechanisms of formation and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in aging neurons.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hirokazu; Moraes, Carlos T

    2009-03-15

    Age-dependent accumulation of partially deleted mitochondrial DNA (DeltamtDNA) has been suggested to contribute to aging and the development of age-associated diseases including Parkinson's disease. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation and accumulation of DeltamtDNA have not been addressed in vivo. In this study, we have developed a mouse model expressing an inducible mitochondria-targeted restriction endonuclease (PstI). Using this system, we could trigger mtDNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in adult neurons. We found that this transient event leads to the generation of a family of DeltamtDNA with features that closely resemble naturally-occurring mtDNA deletions. The formation of these deleted species is likely to be mediated by yet uncharacterized DNA repairing machineries that participate in homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Furthermore, we obtained in vivo evidence that DeltamtDNAs with larger deletions accumulate faster than those with smaller deletions, implying a replicative advantage of smaller mtDNAs. These findings identify DSB, DNA repair systems and replicative advantage as likely mechanisms underlying the generation and age-associated accumulation of DeltamtDNA in mammalian neurons.

  9. Evidence for mitochondrial DNA recombination in a human population of island Melanesia.

    PubMed

    Hagelberg, E; Goldman, N; Lió, P; Whelan, S; Schiefenhövel, W; Clegg, J B; Bowden, D K

    1999-03-07

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis has proved useful in studies of recent human evolution and the genetic affinities of human groups of different geographical regions. As part of an extensive survey of mtDNA diversity in present-day Pacific populations, we obtained sequence information of the hypervariable mtDNA control region of 452 individuals from various localities in the western Pacific. The mtDNA types fell into three major groups which reflect the settlement history of the area. Interestingly, we detected an extremely rare point mutation at high frequency in the small island of Nguna in the Melanesian archipelago of Vanuatu. Phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA data indicated that the mutation was present in individuals of separate mtDNA lineages. We propose that the multiple occurrence of a rare mutation event in one isolated locality is highly improbable, and that recombination between different mtDNA types is a more likely explanation for our observation. If correct, this conclusion has important implications for the use of mtDNA in phylogenetic and evolutionary studies.

  10. Genetic diversity and differentiation in Prunus species (Rosaceae) using chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA CAPS markers.

    PubMed

    Ben Mustapha, S; Ben Tamarzizt, H; Baraket, G; Abdallah, D; Salhi Hannachi, A

    2015-04-27

    Chloroplast (cpDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were analyzed to establish genetic relationships among Tunisian plum cultivars using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Two mtDNA regions (nad 1 b/c and nad 4 1/2) and a cpDNA region (trnL-trnF) were amplified and digested using restriction enzymes. Seventy and six polymorphic sites were revealed in cpDNA and mtDNA, respectively. As a consequence, cpDNA appears to be more polymorphic than mtDNA. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendrogram showed that accessions were distributed independently of their geographical origin, and introduced and local cultivars appear to be closely related. Both UPGMA and principal component analysis grouped Tunisian plum accessions into similar clusters. The analysis of the pooled sequences allowed the detection of 17 chlorotypes and 12 mitotypes. The unique haplotypes detected for cultivars are valuable for management and preservation of the plum local resources. From this study, PCR-RFLP analysis appears to be a useful approach to detect and identify cytoplasmic variation in plum trees. Our results also provide useful information for the management of genetic resources and to establish a program to improve the genetic resources available for plums.

  11. Large Variation in the Ratio of Mitochondrial to Nuclear Mutation Rate across Animals: Implications for Genetic Diversity and the Use of Mitochondrial DNA as a Molecular Marker.

    PubMed

    Allio, Remi; Donega, Stefano; Galtier, Nicolas; Nabholz, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    It is commonly assumed that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolves at a faster rate than nuclear DNA (nuDNA) in animals. This has contributed to the popularity of mtDNA as a molecular marker in evolutionary studies. Analyzing 121 multilocus data sets and four phylogenomic data sets encompassing 4,676 species of animals, we demonstrate that the ratio of mitochondrial over nuclear mutation rate is highly variable among animal taxa. In nonvertebrates, such as insects and arachnids, the ratio of mtDNA over nuDNA mutation rate varies between 2 and 6, whereas it is above 20, on average, in vertebrates such as scaled reptiles and birds. Interestingly, this variation is sufficient to explain the previous report of a similar level of mitochondrial polymorphism, on average, between vertebrates and nonvertebrates, which was originally interpreted as reflecting the effect of pervasive positive selection. Our analysis rather indicates that the among-phyla homogeneity in within-species mtDNA diversity is due to a negative correlation between mtDNA per-generation mutation rate and effective population size, irrespective of the action of natural selection. Finally, we explore the variation in the absolute per-year mutation rate of both mtDNA and nuDNA using a reduced data set for which fossil calibration is available, and discuss the potential determinants of mutation rate variation across genomes and taxa. This study has important implications regarding DNA-based identification methods in predicting that mtDNA barcoding should be less reliable in nonvertebrates than in vertebrates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of bears (the Ursidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Ryder, O A

    1994-12-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among some bear species are still open questions. We present here mitochondrial DNA sequences of D-loop region, cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, tRNA(Pro), and tRNA(Thr) genes from all bear species and the giant panda. A series of evolutionary trees with concordant topology has been derived based on the combined data set of all of the mitochondrial DNA sequences, which may have resolved the evolutionary relationships of all bear species: the ancestor of the spectacled bear diverged first, followed by the sloth bear; the brown bear and polar bear are sister taxa relative to the Asiatic black bear; the closest relative of the American black bear is the sun bear. Primers for forensic identification of the giant panda and bears are proposed. Analysis of these data, in combination with data from primates and antelopes, suggests that relative substitutional rates between different mitochondrial DNA regions may vary greatly among different taxa of the vertebrates.

  13. Plastome Sequencing of Ten Nonmodel Crop Species Uncovers a Large Insertion of Mitochondrial DNA in Cashew.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Samar O; Lee, Chaehee; Hajrah, Nahid H; Makki, Rania M; Alharby, Hesham F; Alhebshi, Alawiah M; Sabir, Jamal S M; Jansen, Robert K; Ruhlman, Tracey A

    2017-11-01

    In plant evolution, intracellular gene transfer (IGT) is a prevalent, ongoing process. While nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are known to integrate foreign DNA via IGT and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), plastid genomes (plastomes) have resisted foreign DNA incorporation and only recently has IGT been uncovered in the plastomes of a few land plants. In this study, we completed plastome sequences for l0 crop species and describe a number of structural features including variation in gene and intron content, inversions, and expansion and contraction of the inverted repeat (IR). We identified a putative in cinnamon ( J. Presl) and other sequenced Lauraceae and an apparent functional transfer of to the nucleus of quinoa ( Willd.). In the orchard tree cashew ( L.), we report the insertion of an ∼6.7-kb fragment of mitochondrial DNA into the plastome IR. BLASTn analyses returned high identity hits to mitogenome sequences including an intact open reading frame. Using three plastome markers for five species of , we generated a phylogeny to investigate the distribution and timing of the insertion. Four species share the insertion, suggesting that this event occurred <20 million yr ago in a single clade in the genus. Our study extends the observation of mitochondrial to plastome IGT to include long-lived tree species. While previous studies have suggested possible mechanisms facilitating IGT to the plastome, more examples of this phenomenon, along with more complete mitogenome sequences, will be required before a common, or variable, mechanism can be elucidated. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  14. Recombination of mitochondrial DNA without selection pressure among compatible strains of the Aspergillus niger species aggregate.

    PubMed

    Tóth, B; Hamari, Z; Ferenczy, L; Varga, J; Kevei, F

    1998-03-01

    Previous mitochondrial transmission experiments between oligomycin-resistant and oligomycin-sensitive incompatible strains of the A. niger aggregate bearing various mtDNA RFLP profiles resulted in a great variety of mitochondrial recombinants under selection pressure. Apart from the recombinant mtDNAs, resistant clones harbouring unchanged RFLP profiles of resistant donor mtDNAs with the recipient nuclear backgrounds were rarely isolated. These strains were anastomosed with nuclearly isogenic oligomycin-sensitive recipient partners and the mitochondria of the resulting progeny were examined under non-selective conditions. These experiments provide insights into events which are possibly similar to those occurring in nature. The heterokaryons obtained formed both oligomycin-resistant and -sensitive sectors, most of which were found to be homoplasmons. Progenies harbouring oligomycin-resistant and -sensitive mtDNAs may originate either from individual recombination events or be due to parental segregation. MtDNA recombination might take place in the heterokaryons without selection by oligomycin. The most frequent recombinant types of mtDNA RFLP profiles were indistinguishable from those recombinant mtDNAs which were frequently obtained under selection pressure from directed transfer experiments between incompatible strains. We present evidence that mixed mitochondrial populations may influence the compatibility reactions in the presence of an isogenic nuclear background, that recombination may take place without selection pressure, and that the process does not require specific nuclear sequences of both parental strains.

  15. Migration of mitochondrial DNA in the nuclear genome of colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Srinivasainagendra, Vinodh; Sandel, Michael W; Singh, Bhupendra; Sundaresan, Aishwarya; Mooga, Ved P; Bajpai, Prachi; Tiwari, Hemant K; Singh, Keshav K

    2017-03-29

    Colorectal adenocarcinomas are characterized by abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and genomic instability, but a molecular interaction between mitochondrial and nuclear genome remains unknown. Here we report the discovery of increased copies of nuclear mtDNA (NUMT) in colorectal adenocarcinomas, which supports link between mtDNA and genomic instability in the nucleus. We name this phenomenon of nuclear occurrence of mitochondrial component as numtogenesis. We provide a description of NUMT abundance and distribution in tumor versus matched blood-derived normal genomes. Whole-genome sequence data were obtained for colon adenocarcinoma and rectum adenocarcinoma patients participating in The Cancer Genome Atlas, via the Cancer Genomics Hub, using the GeneTorrent file acquisition tool. Data were analyzed to determine NUMT proportion and distribution on a genome-wide scale. A NUMT suppressor gene was identified by comparing numtogenesis in other organisms. Our study reveals that colorectal adenocarcinoma genomes, on average, contains up to 4.2-fold more somatic NUMTs than matched normal genomes. Women colorectal tumors contained more NUMT than men. NUMT abundance in tumor predicted parallel abundance in blood. NUMT abundance positively correlated with GC content and gene density. Increased numtogenesis was observed with higher mortality. We identified YME1L1, a human homolog of yeast YME1 (yeast mitochondrial DNA escape 1) to be frequently mutated in colorectal tumors. YME1L1 was also mutated in tumors derived from other tissues. We show that inactivation of YME1L1 results in increased transfer of mtDNA in the nuclear genome. Our study demonstrates increased somatic transfer of mtDNA in colorectal tumors. Our study also reveals sex-based differences in frequency of NUMT occurrence and that NUMT in blood reflects NUMT in tumors, suggesting NUMT may be used as a biomarker for tumorigenesis. We identify YME1L1 as the first NUMT suppressor gene in human and

  16. Mitochondrial DNA evolution in the Anaxyrus boreas species group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goebel, A.M.; Ranker, T.A.; Corn, P.S.; Olmstead, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Anaxyrus boreas species group currently comprises four species in western North America including the broadly distributed A. boreas, and three localized species, Anaxyrus nelsoni, Anaxyrus exsul and Anaxyrus canorus. Phylogenetic analyses of the mtDNA 12S rDNA, cytochrome oxidase I, control region, and restriction sites data, identified three major haplotype clades. The Northwest clade (NW) includes both subspecies of A. boreas and divergent minor clades in the middle Rocky Mountains, coastal, and central regions of the west and Pacific Northwest. The Southwest (SW) clade includes A. exsul, A. nelsoni, and minor clades in southern California. Anaxyrus canorus, previously identified as paraphyletic, has populations in both the NW and SW major clades. The Eastern major clade (E) includes three divergent lineages from southern Utah, the southern Rocky Mountains, and north of the Great Basin at the border of Utah and Nevada. These results identify new genetic variation in the eastern portion of the toad's range and are consistent with previous regional studies from the west coast. Low levels of control region sequence divergence between major clades (2.2-4.7% uncorrected pair-wise distances) are consistent with Pleistocene divergence and suggest that the phylogeographic history of the group was heavily influenced by dynamic Pleistocene glacial and climatic changes, and especially pluvial changes, in western North America. Results reported here may impact conservation plans in that the current taxonomy does not reflect the diversity in the group. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  17. Age-related decline in mitochondrial DNA copy number in isolated human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Cree, L M; Patel, S K; Pyle, A; Lynn, S; Turnbull, D M; Chinnery, P F; Walker, M

    2008-08-01

    Pancreatic beta cell function has been shown to decline with age in man. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is associated with impaired insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cell lines, and decreased mtDNA copy number has been observed with age in skeletal muscle in man. We investigated whether mtDNA copy number decreases with age in human pancreatic beta cells, which might in turn contribute to the age-related decline in insulin secretory capacity. We quantified mtDNA copy number in isolated human islet preparations from 15 pancreas donors aged between 17 and 75 years. Islets (n = 20) were individually hand-picked and pooled from each donor isolate for the quantification of mtDNA copy number and deleted mtDNA (%), which were determined using real-time PCR methods. There was a significant negative correlation between mtDNA copy number and islet donor age (r = -0.53, p = 0.044). mtDNA copy number was significantly decreased in islet preparations from donors aged > or =50 years (n = 8) compared with those aged <50 years (n = 7) (median [interquartile range]: 418 [236-503] vs 596 [554-729] mtDNA copy number/diploid genome; p = 0.032). None of the islet preparations harboured high levels of deleted mtDNA affecting the major arc. Given the correlation between mtDNA content and respiratory chain activity, the age-related decrease in mtDNA copy number that we observed in human pancreatic islet preparations may contribute to the age-dependent decline in pancreatic beta cell insulin secretory capacity.

  18. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability. PMID:26251896

  19. A Transient Kinetic Approach to Investigate Nucleoside Inhibitors of Mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs play an essential role in treating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic and work by inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), a viral polymerase essential for DNA replication. Today, over 90% of all regimens for HIV treatment contain at least one nucleoside. Long-term use of nucleoside analogs has been associated with adverse effects including mitochondrial toxicity due to inhibition of the mitochondrial polymerase, DNA polymerase gamma (mtDNA pol ©). In this review, we describe our efforts to delineate the molecular mechanism of nucleoside inhibition of HIV-1 RT and mtDNA pol © based upon a transient kinetic approach using rapid chemical quench methodology. Using transient kinetic methods, the maximum rate of polymerization (kpol), the dissociation constant for the ground state binding (Kd), and the incorporation efficiency (kpol/Kd) can be determined for the nucleoside analogs and their natural substrates. This analysis allowed us to develop an understanding of the structure activity relationships that allow correlation between the structural and stereochemical features of the nucleoside analog drugs with their mechanistic behavior toward the viral polymerase, RT, and the host cell polymerase, mtDNA pol γ. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of inhibition of these enzymes is imperative in overcoming problems associated with toxicity. PMID:20573564

  20. Comparison of six simple methods for extracting ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA from Toxocara and Toxascaris nematodes.

    PubMed

    Mikaeili, F; Kia, E B; Sharbatkhori, M; Sharifdini, M; Jalalizand, N; Heidari, Z; Zarei, Z; Stensvold, C R; Mirhendi, H

    2013-06-01

    Six simple methods for extraction of ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA from Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina were compared by evaluating the presence, appearance and intensity of PCR products visualized on agarose gels and amplified from DNA extracted by each of the methods. For each species, two isolates were obtained from the intestines of their respective hosts: T. canis and T. leonina from dogs, and T. cati from cats. For all isolates, total DNA was extracted using six different methods, including grinding, boiling, crushing, beating, freeze-thawing and the use of a commercial kit. To evaluate the efficacy of each method, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene were chosen as representative markers for ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. Among the six DNA extraction methods, the beating method was the most cost effective for all three species, followed by the commercial kit. Both methods produced high intensity bands on agarose gels and were characterized by no or minimal smear formation, depending on gene target; however, beating was less expensive. We therefore recommend the beating method for studies where costs need to be kept at low levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-level mitochondrial heteroplasmy modulates DNA replication, glucose metabolism and lifespan in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Misa; Schilf, Paul; Gupta, Yask; Zarse, Kim; Künstner, Axel; Fähnrich, Anke; Busch, Hauke; Yin, Junping; Wright, Marvin N; Ziegler, Andreas; Vallier, Marie; Belheouane, Meriem; Baines, John F; Tautz, Diethard; Johann, Kornelia; Oelkrug, Rebecca; Mittag, Jens; Lehnert, Hendrik; Othman, Alaa; Jöhren, Olaf; Schwaninger, Markus; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Shima, Kensuke; Rupp, Jan; Häsler, Robert; Fuellen, Georg; Köhling, Rüdiger; Ristow, Michael; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2018-04-12

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lead to heteroplasmy, i.e., the intracellular coexistence of wild-type and mutant mtDNA strands, which impact a wide spectrum of diseases but also physiological processes, including endurance exercise performance in athletes. However, the phenotypic consequences of limited levels of naturally arising heteroplasmy have not been experimentally studied to date. We hence generated a conplastic mouse strain carrying the mitochondrial genome of an AKR/J mouse strain (B6-mt AKR ) in a C57BL/6 J nuclear genomic background, leading to >20% heteroplasmy in the origin of light-strand DNA replication (OriL). These conplastic mice demonstrate a shorter lifespan as well as dysregulation of multiple metabolic pathways, culminating in impaired glucose metabolism, compared to that of wild-type C57BL/6 J mice carrying lower levels of heteroplasmy. Our results indicate that physiologically relevant differences in mtDNA heteroplasmy levels at a single, functionally important site impair the metabolic health and lifespan in mice.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA sequence data reveals association of haplogroup U with psychosis in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Frye, Mark A; Ryu, Euijung; Nassan, Malik; Jenkins, Gregory D; Andreazza, Ana C; Evans, Jared M; McElroy, Susan L; Oglesbee, Devin; Highsmith, W Edward; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2017-01-01

    Converging genetic, postmortem gene-expression, cellular, and neuroimaging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in bipolar disorder. This study was conducted to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are associated with sub-phenotypes of bipolar disorder. MtDNA from 224 patients with Bipolar I disorder (BPI) was sequenced, and association of sequence variations with 3 sub-phenotypes (psychosis, rapid cycling, and adolescent illness onset) was evaluated. Gene-level tests were performed to evaluate overall burden of minor alleles for each phenotype. The haplogroup U was associated with a higher risk of psychosis. Secondary analyses of SNVs provided nominal evidence for association of psychosis with variants in the tRNA, ND4 and ND5 genes. The association of psychosis with ND4 (gene that encodes NADH dehydrogenase 4) was further supported by gene-level analysis. Preliminary analysis of mtDNA sequence data suggests a higher risk of psychosis with the U haplogroup and variation in the ND4 gene implicated in electron transport chain energy regulation. Further investigation of the functional consequences of this mtDNA variation is encouraged. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA content in embryo culture medium is significantly associated with human embryo fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Stigliani, S; Anserini, P; Venturini, P L; Scaruffi, P

    2013-10-01

    Is the amount of cell-free DNA released by human embryos into culture medium correlated with embryo morphological features? The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content of culture medium is significantly associated with the fragmentation rate on Days 2 and 3 of embryo development, whether the oocyte came from women ≤ 35 or >35 years old. Cellular fragmentation is often utilized as one of the morphological parameters for embryo quality assessment. The amount of cellular fragments is considered to be an important morphological parameter for embryo implantation potential. It has been hypothesized that fragments are apoptotic bodies or anuclear cytoplasmatic pieces of blastomeres, although no definitive conclusion has been drawn about their pathogenesis. Human fertilized oocytes were individually cultured from Day 1 to Days 2 and 3. A total of 800 samples (166 spent media from Day 2 and 634 from Day 3) were enrolled into the present study. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was quantified in 800 spent embryo culture media by Pico Green dye fluorescence assay. After DNA purification, genomic DNA (gDNA) and mtDNA were profiled by specific quantitative PCR. Statistical analyses defined correlations among DNA contents, embryo morphology and maternal age. Different independent tests confirmed the presence of DNA into embryo culture medium and, for the first time, we demonstrate that both gDNA and mtDNA are detectable in the secretome. The amount of DNA is larger in embryos with bad quality cleavage compared with high-grade embryos, suggesting that the DNA profile of culture medium is an objective marker for embryo quality assessment. In particular, DNA profiles are significantly associated with fragmentation feature (total dsDNA: P = 0.0010; mtDNA; P = 0.0247) and advanced maternal age. It is necessary to establish whether DNA profiling of spent embryo culture medium is a robust onsite test that can improve the prediction of blastulation, implantation and/or pregnancy rate. The

  4. The human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein displays distinct kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA binding and exchange

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yufeng; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    The human mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein (mtSSB) is a homotetrameric protein, involved in mtDNA replication and maintenance. Although mtSSB is structurally similar to SSB from Escherichia coli (EcoSSB), it lacks the C-terminal disordered domain, and little is known about the biophysics of mtSSB–ssDNA interactions. Here, we characterized the kinetics and thermodynamics of mtSSB binding to ssDNA by equilibrium titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements. We show that the mtSSB tetramer can bind to ssDNA in two distinct binding modes: (SSB)30 and (SSB)60, defined by DNA binding site sizes of 30 and 60 nucleotides, respectively. We found that the binding mode is modulated by magnesium ion and NaCl concentration, but unlike EcoSSB, the mtSSB does not show negative intersubunit cooperativity. Global fitting of both the equilibrium and kinetic data afforded estimates for the rate and equilibrium constants governing the formation of (SSB)60 and (SSB)30 complexes and for the transitions between the two binding modes. We found that the mtSSB tetramer binds to ssDNA with a rate constant near the diffusion limit (2 × 109 m−1 s−1) and that longer DNA (≥60 nucleotides) rapidly wraps around all four monomers, as revealed by FRET assays. We also show that the mtSSB tetramer can directly transfer from one ssDNA molecule to another via an intermediate with two DNA molecules bound to the mtSSB. In conclusion, our results indicate that human mtSSB shares many physicochemical properties with EcoSSB and that the differences may be explained by the lack of an acidic, disordered C-terminal tail in human mtSSB protein. PMID:28615444

  5. Phylogeny and genetic diversity of Bridgeoporus nobilissimus inferred using mitochondrial and nuclear rDNA sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redberg, G.L.; Hibbett, D.S.; Ammirati, J.F.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    The genetic diversity and phylogeny of Bridgeoporus nobilissimus have been analyzed. DNA was extracted from spores collected from individual fruiting bodies representing six geographically distinct populations in Oregon and Washington. Spore samples collected contained low levels of bacteria, yeast and a filamentous fungal species. Using taxon-specific PCR primers, it was possible to discriminate among rDNA from bacteria, yeast, a filamentous associate and B. nobilissimus. Nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences of B. nobilissimus were compared among individuals representing six populations and were found to have less than 2% variation. These sequences also were used to design dual and nested PCR primers for B. nobilissimus-specific amplification. Mitochondrial small-subunit rDNA sequences were used in a phylogenetic analysis that placed B. nobilissimus in the hymenochaetoid clade, where it was associated with Oxyporus and Schizopora.

  6. Atypical presentation of Leigh syndrome associated with a Leber hereditary optic neuropathy primary mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Fruhman, Gary; Landsverk, Megan L; Lotze, Timothy E; Hunter, Jill V; Wangler, Michael F; Adesina, Adekunle M; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Scaglia, Fernando

    2011-06-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is caused by point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is characterized by bilateral, painless sub-acute visual loss that develops during the second decade of life. Here we report the case of a five year old girl who presented with clinical and neuroradiological findings reminiscent of Leigh syndrome but carried a mtDNA mutation m.11778G>A (p.R340H) in the MTND4 gene usually observed in patients with LHON. This case is unusual for age of onset, gender, associated neurological findings and evolution, further expanding the clinical spectrum associated with primary LHON mtDNA mutations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA typing from human axillary, pubic and head hair shafts - success rates and sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, H; Hühne, J; Ortmann, C; Waterkamp, K; Brinkmann, B

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from shed hairs has gained high importance in forensic casework since telogen hairs are one of the most common types of evidence left at the crime scene. In this systematic study of hair shafts from 20 individuals, the correlation of mtDNA recovery with hair morphology (length, diameter, volume, colour), with sex, and with body localisation (head, armpit, pubis) was investigated. The highest average success rate of hypervariable region 1 (HV 1) sequencing was found in head hair shafts (75%) followed by pubic (66%) and axillary hair shafts (52%). No statistically significant correlation between morphological parameters or sex and the success rate of sequencing was found. MtDNA sequences of buccal cells, head, pubic and axillary hair shafts did not show intraindividual differences. Heteroplasmic base positions were observed neither in the hair shafts nor in control samples of buccal cells.

  8. Nuclear counterparts of the cytoplasmic mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene: a problem of ancient DNA and molecular phylogenies.

    PubMed

    van der Kuyl, A C; Kuiken, C L; Dekker, J T; Perizonius, W R; Goudsmit, J

    1995-06-01

    Monkey mummy bones and teeth originating from the North Saqqara Baboon Galleries (Egypt), soft tissue from a mummified baboon in a museum collection, and nineteenth/twentieth-century skin fragments from mangabeys were used for DNA extraction and PCR amplification of part of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. Sequences aligning with the 12S rRNA gene were recovered but were only distantly related to contemporary monkey mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequences. However, many of these sequences were identical or closely related to human nuclear DNA sequences resembling mitochondrial 12S rRNA (isolated from a cell line depleted in mitochondria) and therefore have to be considered contamination. Subsequently in a separate study we were able to recover genuine mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequences from many extant species of nonhuman Old World primates and sequences closely resembling the human nuclear integrations. Analysis of all sequences by the neighbor-joining (NJ) method indicated that mitochondrial DNA sequences and their nuclear counterparts can be divided into two distinct clusters. One cluster contained all temporary cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA sequences and approximately half of the monkey nuclear mitochondriallike sequences. A second cluster contained most human nuclear sequences and the other half of monkey nuclear sequences with a separate branch leading to human and gorilla mitochondrial and nuclear sequences. Sequences recovered from ancient materials were equally divided between the two clusters. These results constitute a warning for when working with ancient DNA or performing phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial DNA as a target sequence: Nuclear counterparts of mitochondrial genes may lead to faulty interpretation of results.

  9. Is antioxidant potential of the mitochondrial targeted ubiquinone derivative MitoQ conserved in cells lacking mtDNA?

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Zhang, Dawei; Whiteman, Matthew; Armstrong, Jeffrey S

    2008-03-01

    MitoQ has been developed as a mitochondrial targeted antioxidant for diseases associated with oxidative stress. Here we show that MitoQ blocks the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial protein thiol oxidation, and preserves mitochondrial function and ultrastructure after glutathione (GSH) depletion. Furthermore, the antioxidant effect of MitoQ is conserved in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA, indicating that its antioxidant properties do not depend on a functional electron transport chain (ETC). Our results elucidate the antioxidant mechanism of MitoQ and suggest that it may be a useful therapeutic for disorders associated with a dysfunctional ETC and increased ROS production.

  10. The mitochondrial DNA makeup of Romanians: A forensic mtDNA control region database and phylogenetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Turchi, Chiara; Stanciu, Florin; Paselli, Giorgia; Buscemi, Loredana; Parson, Walther; Tagliabracci, Adriano

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the pattern of Romanian population from a mitochondrial perspective and to establish an appropriate mtDNA forensic database, we generated a high-quality mtDNA control region dataset from 407 Romanian subjects belonging to four major historical regions: Moldavia, Transylvania, Wallachia and Dobruja. The entire control region (CR) was analyzed by Sanger-type sequencing assays and the resulting 306 different haplotypes were classified into haplogroups according to the most updated mtDNA phylogeny. The Romanian gene pool is mainly composed of West Eurasian lineages H (31.7%), U (12.8%), J (10.8%), R (10.1%), T (9.1%), N (8.1%), HV (5.4%),K (3.7%), HV0 (4.2%), with exceptions of East Asian haplogroup M (3.4%) and African haplogroup L (0.7%). The pattern of mtDNA variation observed in this study indicates that the mitochondrial DNA pool is geographically homogeneous across Romania and that the haplogroup composition reveals signals of admixture of populations of different origin. The PCA scatterplot supported this scenario, with Romania located in southeastern Europe area, close to Bulgaria and Hungary, and as a borderland with respect to east Mediterranean and other eastern European countries. High haplotype diversity (0.993) and nucleotide diversity indices (0.00838±0.00426), together with low random match probability (0.0087) suggest the usefulness of this control region dataset as a forensic database in routine forensic mtDNA analysis and in the investigation of maternal genetic lineages in the Romanian population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeted impairment of thymidine kinase 2 expression in cells induces mitochondrial DNA depletion and reveals molecular mechanisms of compensation of mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Villarroya, Joan, E-mail: joanvillarroya@gmail.com; Institut de Recerca l'Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona; Lara, Mari-Carmen

    Highlights: {yields} We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2{sup -}). {yields} TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. {yields} Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2{sup -} cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. {yields} Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. {yields} Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol {gamma}, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2{sup -} cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed themore » first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase {gamma}, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory

  12. Long-term exposure of mice to nucleoside analogues disrupts mitochondrial DNA maintenance in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulin; Song, Fengli; Gao, Ziyun; Ding, Wei; Qiao, Luxin; Yang, Sufang; Chen, Xi; Jin, Ronghua; Chen, Dexi

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), an integral component of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), was widely used to inhibit HIV replication. Long-term exposure to NRTIs can result in mitochondrial toxicity which manifests as lipoatrophy, lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy and myopathy, as well as polyneuropathy. But the cerebral neurotoxicity of NRTIs is still not well known partly due to the restriction of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the complex microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, the Balb/c mice were administered 50 mg/kg stavudine (D4T), 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT), 50 mg/kg lamivudine (3TC) or 50 mg/kg didanosine (DDI) per day by intraperitoneal injection, five days per week for one or four months, and primary cortical neurons were cultured and exposed to 25 µM D4T, 50 µM AZT, 25 µM 3TC or 25 µM DDI for seven days. Then, single neuron was captured from mouse cerebral cortical tissues by laser capture microdissection. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels of the primary cultured cortical neurons, and captured neurons or glial cells, and the tissues of brains and livers and muscles were analyzed by relative quantitative real-time PCR. The data showed that mtDNA did not lose in both NRTIs exposed cultured neurons and one month NRTIs treated mouse brains. In four months NRTIs treated mice, brain mtDNA levels remained unchanged even if the mtDNA levels of liver (except for 3TC) and muscle significantly decreased. However, mtDNA deletion was significantly higher in the captured neurons from mtDNA unchanged brains. These results suggest that long-term exposure to NRTIs can result in mtDNA deletion in mouse cortical neurons.

  13. Identifications of Captive and Wild Tilapia Species Existing in Hawaii by Mitochondrial DNA Control Region Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Yang, Jinzeng

    2012-01-01

    Background The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive) and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. Conclusions/Significance This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for tilapia species

  14. Genetic Evidence for Elevated Pathogenicity of Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiqin; Picard, Martin; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-10-01

    Increasing clinical and biochemical evidence implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but little is known about the biological basis for this connection. A possible cause of ASD is the genetic variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence, which has yet to be thoroughly investigated in large genomic studies of ASD. Here we evaluated mtDNA variation, including the mixture of different mtDNA molecules in the same individual (i.e., heteroplasmy), using whole-exome sequencing data from mother-proband-sibling trios from simplex families (n = 903) where only one child is affected by ASD. We found that heteroplasmic mutations in autistic probands were enriched at non-polymorphic mtDNA sites (P = 0.0015), which were more likely to confer deleterious effects than heteroplasmies at polymorphic mtDNA sites. Accordingly, we observed a ~1.5-fold enrichment of nonsynonymous mutations (P = 0.0028) as well as a ~2.2-fold enrichment of predicted pathogenic mutations (P = 0.0016) in autistic probands compared to their non-autistic siblings. Both nonsynonymous and predicted pathogenic mutations private to probands conferred increased risk of ASD (Odds Ratio, OR[95% CI] = 1.87[1.14-3.11] and 2.55[1.26-5.51], respectively), and their influence on ASD was most pronounced in families with probands showing diminished IQ and/or impaired social behavior compared to their non-autistic siblings. We also showed that the genetic transmission pattern of mtDNA heteroplasmies with high pathogenic potential differed between mother-autistic proband pairs and mother-sibling pairs, implicating developmental and possibly in utero contributions. Taken together, our genetic findings substantiate pathogenic mtDNA mutations as a potential cause for ASD and synergize with recent work calling attention to their unique metabolic phenotypes for diagnosis and treatment of children with ASD.

  15. Identifications of captive and wild tilapia species existing in Hawaii by mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Yang, Jinzeng

    2012-01-01

    The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive) and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for tilapia species identification. The suspected tilapia hybrids that consist of O. niloticus

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Variant in COX1 Subunit Significantly Alters Energy Metabolism of Geographically Divergent Wild Isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dingley, Stephen D.; Polyak, Erzsebet; Ostrovsky, Julian; Srinivasan, Satish; Lee, Icksoo; Rosenfeld, Amy B.; Tsukikawa, Mai; Xiao, Rui; Selak, Mary A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Kwon, Young Joon; Pagliarini, David J.; Gai, Xiaowu; Schurr, Theodore G.; Hüttemann, Maik; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Falk, Marni J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation can influence the penetrance of complex diseases and climatic adaptation. While studies in geographically defined human populations suggest that mtDNA mutations become fixed when they have conferred metabolic capabilities optimally suited for a specific environment, it has been challenging to definitively assign adaptive functions to specific mtDNA sequence variants in mammals. We investigated whether mtDNA genome variation functionally influences Caenorhabditis elegans wild isolates of distinct mtDNA lineages and geographic origins. We found that, relative to N2 (England) wild-type nematodes, CB4856 wild isolates from a warmer native climate (Hawaii) had a unique p.A12S amino acid substitution in the mtDNA-encoded COX1 core catalytic subunit of mitochondrial complex IV (CIV). Relative to N2, CB4856 worms grown at 20 °C had significantly increased CIV enzyme activity, mitochondrial matrix oxidant burden, and sensitivity to oxidative stress but had significantly reduced lifespan and mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly increased in CB4856 grown at its native temperature of 25 °C. A transmitochondrial cybrid worm strain, chpIR (M, CB4856 > N2), was bred as homoplasmic for the CB4856 mtDNA genome in the N2 nuclear background. The cybrid strain also displayed significantly increased CIV activity, demonstrating that this difference results from the mtDNA-encoded p.A12S variant. However, chpIR (M, CB4856 > N2) worms had significantly reduced median and maximal lifespan relative to CB4856, which may relate to their nuclear– mtDNA genome mismatch. Overall, these data suggest that C. elegans wild isolates of varying geographic origins may adapt to environmental challenges through mtDNA variation to modulate critical aspects of mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:24534730

  17. Conversion at large intergenic regions of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Skelly, P J; Clark-Walker, G D

    1990-04-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA deletion mutants have been used to examine whether base-biased intergenic regions of the genome influence mitochondrial biogenesis. One strain (delta 5.0) lacks a 5-kilobase (kb) segment extending from the proline tRNA gene to the small rRNA gene that includes ori1, while a second strain (delta 3.7) is missing a 3.7-kb region between the genes for ATPase subunit 6 and glutamic acid tRNA that encompasses ori7 plus ori2. Growth of these strains on both fermentable and nonfermentable substrates does not differ from growth of the wild-type strain, indicating that the deletable regions of the genome do not play a direct role in the expression of mitochondrial genes. Examination of whether the 5- or 3.7-kb regions influence mitochondrial DNA transmission was undertaken by crossing strains and examining mitochondrial genotypes in zygotic colonies. In a cross between strain delta 5.0, harboring three active ori elements (ori2, ori3, and ori5), and strain delta 3.7, containing only two active ori elements (ori3 and ori5), there is a preferential recovery of the genome containing two active ori elements (37% of progeny) over that containing three active elements (20%). This unexpected result, suggesting that active ori elements do not influence transmission of respiratory-competent genomes, is interpreted to reflect a preferential conversion of the delta 5.0 genome to the wild type (41% of progeny). Supporting evidence for conversion over biased transmission is shown by preferential recovery of a nonparental genome in the progeny of a heterozygous cross in which both parental molecules can be identified by size polymorphisms.

  18. Conversion at large intergenic regions of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Skelly, P J; Clark-Walker, G D

    1990-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA deletion mutants have been used to examine whether base-biased intergenic regions of the genome influence mitochondrial biogenesis. One strain (delta 5.0) lacks a 5-kilobase (kb) segment extending from the proline tRNA gene to the small rRNA gene that includes ori1, while a second strain (delta 3.7) is missing a 3.7-kb region between the genes for ATPase subunit 6 and glutamic acid tRNA that encompasses ori7 plus ori2. Growth of these strains on both fermentable and nonfermentable substrates does not differ from growth of the wild-type strain, indicating that the deletable regions of the genome do not play a direct role in the expression of mitochondrial genes. Examination of whether the 5- or 3.7-kb regions influence mitochondrial DNA transmission was undertaken by crossing strains and examining mitochondrial genotypes in zygotic colonies. In a cross between strain delta 5.0, harboring three active ori elements (ori2, ori3, and ori5), and strain delta 3.7, containing only two active ori elements (ori3 and ori5), there is a preferential recovery of the genome containing two active ori elements (37% of progeny) over that containing three active elements (20%). This unexpected result, suggesting that active ori elements do not influence transmission of respiratory-competent genomes, is interpreted to reflect a preferential conversion of the delta 5.0 genome to the wild type (41% of progeny). Supporting evidence for conversion over biased transmission is shown by preferential recovery of a nonparental genome in the progeny of a heterozygous cross in which both parental molecules can be identified by size polymorphisms. Images PMID:2181277

  19. Excess amino acid polymorphism in mitochondrial DNA: contrasts among genes from Drosophila, mice, and humans.

    PubMed

    Rand, D M; Kann, L M

    1996-07-01

    Recent studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in mammals and Drosophila have shown an excess of amino acid variation within species (replacement polymorphism) relative to the number of silent and replacement differences fixed between species. To examine further this pattern of nonneutral mtDNA evolution, we present sequence data for the ND3 and ND5 genes from 59 lines of Drosophila melanogaster and 29 lines of D. simulans. Of interest are the frequency spectra of silent and replacement polymorphisms, and potential variation among genes and taxa in the departures from neutral expectations. The Drosophila ND3 and ND5 data show no significant excess of replacement polymorphism using the McDonald-Kreitman test. These data are in contrast to significant departures from neutrality for the ND3 gene in mammals and other genes in Drosophila mtDNA (cytochrome b and ATPase 6). Pooled across genes, however, both Drosophila and human mtDNA show very significant excesses of amino acid polymorphism. Silent polymorphisms at ND5 show a significantly higher variance in frequency than replacement polymorphisms, and the latter show a significant skew toward low frequencies (Tajima's D = -1.954). These patterns are interpreted in light of the nearly neutral theory where mildly deleterious amino acid haplotypes are observed as ephemeral variants within species but do not contribute to divergence. The patterns of polymorphism and divergence at charge-altering amino acid sites are presented for the Drosophila ND5 gene to examine the evolution of functionally distinct mutations. Excess charge-altering polymorphism is observed at the carboxyl terminal and excess charge-altering divergence is detected at the amino terminal. While the mildly deleterious model fits as a net effect in the evolution of nonrecombining mitochondrial genomes, these data suggest that opposing evolutionary pressures may act on different regions of mitochondrial genes and genomes.

  20. The effectiveness of three regions in mitochondrial genome for aphid DNA barcoding: a case in Lachininae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Jiang, Li-Yun; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial gene COI has been widely used by taxonomists as a standard DNA barcode sequence for the identification of many animal species. However, the COI region is of limited use for identifying certain species and is not efficiently amplified by PCR in all animal taxa. To evaluate the utility of COI as a DNA barcode and to identify other barcode genes, we chose the aphid subfamily Lachninae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) as the focus of our study. We compared the results obtained using COI with two other mitochondrial genes, COII and Cytb. In addition, we propose a new method to improve the efficiency of species identification using DNA barcoding. Three mitochondrial genes (COI, COII and Cytb) were sequenced and were used in the identification of over 80 species of Lachninae. The COI and COII genes demonstrated a greater PCR amplification efficiency than Cytb. Species identification using COII sequences had a higher frequency of success (96.9% in "best match" and 90.8% in "best close match") and yielded lower intra- and higher interspecific genetic divergence values than the other two markers. The use of "tag barcodes" is a new approach that involves attaching a species-specific tag to the standard DNA barcode. With this method, the "barcoding overlap" can be nearly eliminated. As a result, we were able to increase the identification success rate from 83.9% to 95.2% by using COI and the "best close match" technique. A COII-based identification system should be more effective in identifying lachnine species than COI or Cytb. However, the Cytb gene is an effective marker for the study of aphid population genetics due to its high sequence diversity. Furthermore, the use of "tag barcodes" can improve the accuracy of DNA barcoding identification by reducing or removing the overlap between intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence values.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA in Residual Leukemia Cells in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Kathryn; Kusao, Ian; Troelstrup, David; Agsalda, Melissa; Shiramizu, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    This feasibility study was designed to assess the ability to measure mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells that contributed to minimal disease/persistent or residual disease (MD/PRD) from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Increase in mtDNA copies in cancer cells has been suggested to play a role in MD/PRD. CSF as well as blood specimens from 6 children were assayed for MD/PRD and mtDNA copy numbers by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Of 7 MD/PRD-positive specimens, 6 had increased mtDNA copy numbers; while 11 MD/PRD-negative specimens had no increase in mtDNA copy numbers, p < 0.003. This is the first proof-of-concept study to measure mtDNA copy numbers in MD/PRD-positive CSF specimens from children with ALL. Increase of mtDNA copy numbers in MD/PRD childhood ALL cells and its significance as a mechanism for recurrence requires further investigation. Keywords Minimal residual disease; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia; Central nervous system; Cerebrospinal fluid; Mitochondria PMID:21331151

  2. Novel and differential accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in Swedish and vietnamese patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dimberg, Jan; Hong, Thai Trinh; Skarstedt, Marita; Löfgren, Sture; Zar, Niklas; Matussek, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis and aging. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion is one of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations in human tissues and may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion in CRC tissues and its association with clinical factors. We determined the presence of the 4977 bp common deletion in cancer and normal paired tissue samples from 105 Swedish and 88 Vietnamese patients with CRC using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion was shown to be significantly more frequent in normal tissues in comparison with paired cancer tissues in both Swedish and Vietnamese patients. The 4977 bp common deletion was significantly more frequent in cancer tissues of the Vietnamese patients compared to the Swedish patients, and in Vietnamese cancer tissues, the 4977 bp deletion was significantly over represented in those with localized disease compared to those with disseminated disease. Moreover, we detected nine novel mtDNA deletions and found a significantly higher rate of these in CRC tissues in Swedish in comparison to Vietnamese patients. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion seems to have an impact on the clinical outcome of CRC in Vietnamese patients, that the Swedish patients accumulate more of the detected novel deletions in CRC tissue compared to Vietnamese patients probably indicates divergent mechanisms in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  3. Complementation between polymerase- and exonuclease-deficient mitochondrial DNA polymerase mutants in genomically engineered flies

    PubMed Central

    Bratic, Ana; Kauppila, Timo E. S.; Macao, Bertil; Grönke, Sebastian; Siibak, Triinu; Stewart, James B.; Baggio, Francesca; Dols, Jacqueline; Partridge, Linda; Falkenberg, Maria; Wredenberg, Anna; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2015-01-01

    Replication errors are the main cause of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and a compelling approach to decrease mutation levels would therefore be to increase the fidelity of the catalytic subunit (POLγA) of the mtDNA polymerase. Here we genomically engineer the tamas locus, encoding fly POLγA, and introduce alleles expressing exonuclease- (exo−) and polymerase-deficient (pol−) POLγA versions. The exo− mutant leads to accumulation of point mutations and linear deletions of mtDNA, whereas pol− mutants cause mtDNA depletion. The mutant tamas alleles are developmentally lethal but can complement each other in trans resulting in viable flies with clonally expanded mtDNA mutations. Reconstitution of human mtDNA replication in vitro confirms that replication is a highly dynamic process where POLγA goes on and off the template to allow complementation during proofreading and elongation. The created fly models are valuable tools to study germ line transmission of mtDNA and the pathophysiology of POLγA mutation disease. PMID:26554610

  4. Studies of Xenopus laevis mitochondrial DNA: D-loop mapping and characterization of DNA-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    In X. laevis oocytes, mitochondrial DNA accumulates to 10/sup 5/ times the somatic cell complement, and is characterized by a high frequency of a triple-stranded displacement hoop structure at the origin of replication. To map the termini of the single strands, it was necessary to correct the nucleotide sequence of the D-loop region. The revised sequence of 2458 nucleotides contains 54 discrepancies in comparison to a previously published sequence. Radiolabeling of the nascent strands of the D-loop structure either at the 5' end or at the 3' end identifies a major species with a length of 1670 nucleotides. Cleavage ofmore » the 5' labeled strands reveals two families of ends located near several matches to an element, designated CSB-1, that is conserved in this location in several vertebrate genomes. Cleavage of 3' labeled strands produced one fragment. The unique 3' end maps to about 15 nucleotides preceding the tRNA/sup Pro/ gene. A search for proteins which may bind to mtDNA in this region to regulate nucleic acid synthesis has identified three activities in lysates of X. laevis mitochondria. The DNA-binding proteins were assayed by monitoring their ability to retard the migration of labeled double- or single-stranded DNA fragments in polyacrylamide gels. The DNA binding preference was determined by competition with an excess of either ds- or ssDNA.« less

  5. Plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA declines in response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Shockett, Penny E; Khanal, Januka; Sitaula, Alina; Oglesby, Christopher; Meachum, William A; Castracane, V Daniel; Kraemer, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Increased plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA (cf-mDNA), a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) produced by cellular injury, contributes to neutrophil activation/inflammation in trauma patients and arises in cancer and autoimmunity. To further understand relationships between cf-mDNA released by tissue injury, inflammation, and health benefits of exercise, we examined cf-mDNA response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise. Seven healthy moderately trained young men (age = 22.4 ± 1.2) completed a treadmill exercise trial for 90 min at 60% VO2 max and a resting control trial. Blood was sampled immediately prior to exercise (0 min = baseline), during (+18, +54 min), immediately after (+90 min), and after recovery (R40). Plasma was analyzed for cf-mDNA, IL-6, and lactate. A significant difference in cf-mDNA response was observed between exercise and control trials, with cf-mDNA levels reduced during exercise at +54 and +90 (with or without plasma volume shift correction). Declines in cf-mDNA were accompanied by increased lactate and followed by an increase in IL-6, suggesting a temporal association with muscle stress and inflammatory processes. Our novel finding of cf-mDNA decline with prolonged moderate treadmill exercise provides evidence for increased clearance from or reduced release of cf-mDNA into the blood with prolonged exercise. These studies contrast with previous investigations involving exhaustive short-term treadmill exercise, in which no change in cf-mDNA levels were reported, and contribute to our understanding of differences between exercise- and trauma-induced inflammation. We propose that transient declines in cf-mDNA may induce health benefits, by reducing systemic inflammation. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  6. High leukocyte mitochondrial DNA content contributes to poor prognosis in glioma patients through its immunosuppressive effect

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Zhang, J; Huang, X; Zhang, J; Zhou, X; Hu, J; Li, G; He, S; Xing, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have indicated significant associations of leukocyte mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number with risk of several malignancies, including glioma. However, whether mtDNA content can predict the clinical outcome of glioma patients has not been investigated. Methods: The mtDNA content of peripheral blood leukocytes from 336 glioma patients was examined using a real-time PCR-based method. Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to examine the association of mtDNA content with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients. To explore the potential mechanism, the immune phenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma concentrations of several cytokines from another 20 glioma patients were detected by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Results: Patients with high mtDNA content showed both poorer OS and PFS than those with low mtDNA content. Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that mtDNA content was an independent prognostic factor for both OS and PFS. Stratified analyses showed that high mtDNA content was significantly associated with poor prognosis of patients with younger age, high-grade glioma or adjuvant radiochemotherapy. Immunological analysis indicated that patients with high mtDNA content had significantly lower frequency of natural killer cells in PBMCs and higher plasma concentrations of interleukin-2 and tumour necrosis factor-α, suggesting an immunosuppression-related mechanism involved in mtDNA-mediated prognosis. Conclusions: Our study for the first time demonstrated that leukocyte mtDNA content could serve as an independent prognostic marker and an indicator of immune functions in glioma patients. PMID:26022928

  7. Origin of mitochondrial DNA diversity of domestic yaks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Songchang; Savolainen, Peter; Su, Jianping; Zhang, Qian; Qi, Delin; Zhou, Jie; Zhong, Yang; Zhao, Xinquan; Liu, Jianquan

    2006-01-01

    Background The domestication of plants and animals was extremely important anthropologically. Previous studies have revealed a general tendency for populations of livestock species to include deeply divergent maternal lineages, indicating that they were domesticated in multiple, independent events from genetically discrete wild populations. However, in water buffalo, there are suggestions that a similar deep maternal bifurcation may have originated from a single population. These hypotheses have rarely been rigorously tested because of a lack of sufficient wild samples. To investigate the origin of the domestic yak (Poephagus grunnies), we analyzed 637 bp of maternal inherited mtDNA from 13 wild yaks (including eight wild yaks from a small population in west Qinghai) and 250 domesticated yaks from major herding regions. Results The domestic yak populations had two deeply divergent phylogenetic groups with a divergence time of > 100,000 yrs BP. We here show that haplotypes clustering with two deeply divergent maternal lineages in domesticated yaks occur in a single, small, wild population. This finding suggests that all domestic yaks are derived from a single wild gene pool. However, there is no clear correlation of the mtDNA phylogenetic clades and the 10 morphological types of sampled yaks indicating that the latter diversified recently. Relatively high diversity was found in Qinghai and Tibet around the current wild distribution, in accordance with previous suggestions that the earliest domestications occurred in this region. Conventional molecular clock estimation led to an unrealistic early dating of the start of the domestication. However, Bayesian estimation of the coalescence time allowing a relaxation of the mutation rate are better in agreement with a domestication during the Holocene as supported by archeological records. Conclusion The information gathered here and the previous studies of other animals show that the demographic histories of domestication

  8. Concept for estimating mitochondrial DNA haplogroups using a maximum likelihood approach (EMMA)☆

    PubMed Central

    Röck, Alexander W.; Dür, Arne; van Oven, Mannis; Parson, Walther

    2013-01-01

    The assignment of haplogroups to mitochondrial DNA haplotypes contributes substantial value for quality control, not only in forensic genetics but also in population and medical genetics. The availability of Phylotree, a widely accepted phylogenetic tree of human mitochondrial DNA lineages, led to the development of several (semi-)automated software solutions for haplogrouping. However, currently existing haplogrouping tools only make use of haplogroup-defining mutations, whereas private mutations (beyond the haplogroup level) can be additionally informative allowing for enhanced haplogroup assignment. This is especially relevant in the case of (partial) control region sequences, which are mainly used in forensics. The present study makes three major contributions toward a more reliable, semi-automated estimation