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Sample records for a3243g trnaleuuur mutation

  1. The A3243G tRNALeu(UUR) mutation induces mitochondrial dysfunction and variable disease expression without dominant negative acting translational defects in complex IV subunits at UUR codons.

    PubMed

    Janssen, George M C; Hensbergen, Paul J; van Bussel, Frans J; Balog, Crina I A; Maassen, J Antonie; Deelder, André M; Raap, Anton K

    2007-10-15

    Mutations in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene are associated with a large variety of human diseases through a largely undisclosed mechanism. The A3243G tRNA(Leu(UUR)) mutation leads to reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins and oxidative phosphorylation activity even when the cells are competent in mitochondrial translation. These two aspects led to the suggestion that a dominant negative factor may underlie the diversity of disease expression. Here we test the hypothesis that A3243G tRNA(Leu(UUR)) generates such a dominant negative gain-of-function defect through misincorporation of amino acids at UUR codons of mtDNA-encoded proteins. Using an anti-complex IV immunocapture technique and mass spectrometry, we show that the mtDNA-encoded cytochrome c oxidase I (COX I) and COX II exist exclusively with the correct amino acid sequences in A3243G cells in a misassembled complex IV. A dominant negative component therefore cannot account for disease phenotype, leaving tissue-specific accumulation by mtDNA segregation as the most likely cause of variable mitochondrial disease expression.

  2. Mitochondrial A3243G mutation results in corneal endothelial polymegathism.

    PubMed

    Bakhoum, Mathieu F; Wu, Wei-Pu; White, Eugenia C; Sengillo, Jesse D; Sanfilippo, Christian; Morcos, Marcelle M; Freund, K Bailey; Perry, Henry D; Sarraf, David; Tsang, Stephen H

    2018-03-01

    The mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G leads to a spectrum of syndromes ranging from MIDD to MELAS. Ocular manifestations include pattern macular dystrophy and concentric perifoveal atrophy. Given the high metabolic demand of corneal endothelial cells, we performed specular biomicroscopy analysis in patients harboring the mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G to assess for the associated presence of corneal endothelial abnormalities. We present a case series with participants from two institutions. Patients diagnosed with macular dystrophy associated with MIDD or MELAS, and the mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G were recruited. Exclusion criteria included a prior diagnosis, or a positive family history, of endothelial corneal dystrophy. Slit-lamp corneal examination and specular biomicroscopy were performed. Corneal endothelial cell count, cell size and polymegathism, and central corneal thickness were assessed. Patients diagnosed with MIDD or MELAS based on clinical history and examination were genetically tested for the mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G using pyrosequencing. Five patients (two male and three female participants) from five different families, and with different ethnic backgrounds, met the inclusion criteria. Their ages ranged from 41 to 60 years. Corneal endothelial changes observed using slit-lamp examination were primarily mild to rare guttata. Specular biomicroscopy displayed mainly polymegathism associated with guttata. The average endothelial cell count was 2358 ± 456 cells per mm 2 , the average endothelial cell size was 442 ± 103 μm 2 and the average central corneal thickness (CCT) was 551 ± 33 μm. These values were similar to that of the average population. The average coefficient of variation (COV), an index of heterogeneity in cell size, was 42.0 ± 4.1%. When compared to the average population, the average COV was significantly higher than predicted for the patients' age. None of the patients had

  3. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation alters the tertiary interaction and function of tRNALeu(UUR).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Wang, Meng; Xue, Ling; Lin, Zhi; He, Qiufen; Shi, Wenwen; Chen, Yaru; Jin, Xiaofen; Li, Haiying; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-08-25

    Several mitochondrial tRNA mutations have been associated with hypertension, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we identified a novel homoplasmic 3253T→C mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) gene in a Han Chinese family with maternally inherited hypertension. The m.3253T→C mutation affected a highly conserved uridine at position 22 at the D-stem of tRNA Leu(UUR) , introducing a G-C base pairing (G13-C22) at the D-stem and a tertiary base pairing (C22-G46) between the D-stem and the variable loop. We therefore hypothesized that the m.3253T→C mutation altered both the structure and function of tRNA Leu(UUR) Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines derived from this Chinese family, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation perturbed the conformation and stability of tRNA Leu(UUR) , as suggested by faster electrophoretic mobility of mutated tRNA relative to the wild-type molecule. Northern blot analysis revealed an ∼45% decrease in the steady-state level of tRNA Leu(UUR) in the mutant cell lines carrying the m.3253T→C mutation, as compared with control cell lines. Moreover, an ∼35% reduction in aminoacylation efficiency of tRNA Leu(UUR) was observed in the m.3253T→C mutant cells. These alterations in tRNA Leu(UUR) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for those polypeptides with a high proportion of Leu(UUR) codons, such as ND6. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation decreased the activities of mitochondrial complexes I and V, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the cells. In conclusion, our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) C3275T, tRNAGln T4363C and tRNALys A8343G mutations may be associated with PCOS and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Zhang, Cai-Juan; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2018-02-05

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a very prevalent endocrine disease affecting reproductive women. Clinically, patients with this disorder are more vulnerable to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cardiovascular events, as well as metabolic syndrome (MetS). To date, the molecular mechanism underlying PCOS remains largely unknown. Previously, we showed that mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation was an important cause for PCOS. In the current study, we described the clinical and biochemical features of a three-generation pedigree with maternally transmitted MetS, combined with PCOS. A total of three matrilineal relatives exhibited MetS including obesity, high triglyceride (TG) and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, and hypertension. Whereas one patient from the third generation manifestated PCOS. Mutational analysis of the whole mitochondrial genes from the affected individuals identified a set of genetic variations belonging to East Asia haplogroup B4b1c. Among these variants, the homoplasmic C3275T mutation disrupted a highly evolutionary conserved base-pairing (28A-46C) on the variable region of tRNA Leu(UUR) , whereas the T4363C mutation created a new base-pairing (31T-37A) in the anticodon stem of tRNA Gln , furthermore, the A8343G mutation occurred at the very conserved position of tRNA Lys and may result the failure in mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) metabolism. Biochemical analysis revealed the deficiency in mitochondrial functions including lower levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), ATP production and mtDNA copy number, while a significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in polymononuclear leukocytes (PMNs) from the individuals carrying these mt-tRNA mutations, suggesting that these mutations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction that was responsible for the clinical phenotypes. Taken together, our data indicated that mt-tRNA mutations were associated with MetS and PCOS in this

  6. Detection and quantification of heteroplasmic mutant mitochondrial DNA by real-time amplification refractory mutation system quantitative PCR analysis: a single-step approach.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ren-Kui; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2004-06-01

    The A3243G mitochondrial tRNA leu(UUR) point mutation causes mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, the most common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorder, and is also found in patients with maternally inherited diabetes and deafness syndrome (MIDD). To correlate disease manifestation with mutation loads, it is necessary to measure the percentage of the A3243G mtDNA mutation. To reliably quantify low proportions of the mutant mtDNA, we developed a real-time amplification refractory mutation system quantitative PCR (ARMS-qPCR) assay. We validated the method with experimental samples containing known proportions of mutant A3243G mtDNA generated by mixing known amounts of cloned plasmid DNA containing either the wild-type or the mutant sequences. A correlation coefficient of 0.9995 between the expected and observed values for the proportions of mutant A3243G in the experimental samples was found. Evaluation of a total of 36 patient DNA samples demonstrated consistent results between PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and real-time ARMS-qPCR. However, the latter method was much more sensitive for detecting low percentages of mutant heteroplasmy. Three samples contained allele-specific oligonucleotide-detectable but RFLP-undetectable mutations. The real-time ARMS-qPCR method provides rapid, reliable, one-step quantitative detection of heteroplasmic mutant mtDNA.

  7. Clinical phenotype, prognosis and mitochondrial DNA mutation load in mitochondrial encephalomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chang; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Chu, Chen-Che; Liou, Chia-Wei; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2002-01-01

    We studied 42 individuals, including 8 patients with either complete or partial syndrome of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), 8 patients with either complete or partial syndrome of myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) and 26 maternal family members who carried either the A3243G or A8344G mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Clinical manifestations and prognosis were followed up in the patients harboring the A3243G or A8344G mutation. The relationship between clinical features and proportions of mutant mtDNAs in muscle biopsies, blood cells and/or hair follicles was studied. In the 8 regularly followed patients with the A3243G mutation, 4 died within 1 month to 7 years due to status epilepticus and/or recurrent stroke-like episodes. Two patients developed marked mental deterioration and 2 remained stationary. All of the patients harboring the A8344G mutation were stable or deteriorated slightly, except for 1 patient who died due to brain herniation after putaminal hemorrhage. The A3243G and A8344G mtDNA mutations were heteroplasmic in the muscle biopsies, blood cells and hair follicles of both the probands and their maternal family members. The mean proportion of A3243G mutant mtDNA in the muscle biopsies of the patients with MELAS syndrome (68.5 +/- 21.3%, range 33-92%) was significantly higher than that of the asymptomatic family members (37.1 +/- 12.6%, range 0-51%). The average proportions of A8344G mutant mtDNA in the muscle biopsies (90.1 +/- 3.9%, range 89-95%) and hair follicles (93.9 +/- 6.4%, range 84-99%) of the patients with MERRF syndrome were also significantly higher than those of the asymptomatic family members (muscle: 40.3 +/- 39.5%, range 1-80%; hair follicles: 51.0 +/- 44.5%, range 0.1-82%). We concluded that measurement of the proportion of mutant mtDNA in muscle biopsies may provide useful information in the identification of symptomatic patients with mitochondrial

  8. Prevalence of mitochondrial tRNA gene mutations and their association with specific clinical phenotypes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of Coimbatore.

    PubMed

    Duraisamy, Pradeepa; Elango, Santhini; Vishwanandha, Vijaya Padma; Balamurugan, Ramanathan

    2010-02-01

    The association of mitochondrial DNA mutation with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is well established. In this study we aimed to assess the frequency of A3243G, A8296G, and other mitochondrial mutations with reference to clinical features in the diabetic population of Coimbatore, India. The study group included 150 patients (89 women and 61 men) with T2DM, whereas the control group included 100 nondiabetic people (59 women and 41 men). Genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction followed by single-strand confirmation polymorphism method. A3243G and A8296G mutations were found to be prevalent in patients with T2DM when compared with the control group. The A3243G mutation was found in two patients, and both these patients showed similar clinical characteristics, thus representing a putative clinical subtype. A8296G mutation was detected in one patient. The same mutation was shared with his mother who was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus (DM) with neuromuscular disorder. The siblings of the patient did not show any symptoms of DM. Lipid profile and urea and creatinine levels were found to be significantly high (10% and 0.064%) in patients with T2DM compared with control subjects. We concluded that the identification of these mitochondrial point mutations indicates a new genetic predisposition of DM in Coimbatore population.

  9. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations associated with deafness.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Ji, Yanchun; Guan, Min-Xin

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial tRNA mutations are one of the important causes of both syndromic and non-syndromic deafness. Of those, syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mutations such as tRNA(Leu(UUR)) 3243A>G are often present in heteroplasmy, while non-syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mutations including tRNA(Ser(UCN)) 7445A>G often occur in homplasmy or in high levels of heteroplasmy. These tRNA mutations are the primary mutations leading to hearing loss. However, other tRNA mutations such as tRNA(Thr) 15927G>A and tRNA(Ser(UCN)) 7444G>A may act in synergy with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations, modulating the phenotypic manifestation of the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations. Theses tRNA mutations cause structural and functional alteration. A failure in tRNA metabolism caused by these tRNA mutations impaired mitochondrial translation and respiration, thereby causing mitochondrial dysfunctions responsible for deafness. These data offer valuable information for the early diagnosis, management and treatment of maternally inherited deafness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

  10. Screening of effective pharmacological treatments for MELAS syndrome using yeasts, fibroblasts and cybrid models of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Moñino, Irene Domínguez; Pereira-Arenas, Sheila; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Cotán, David; De la Mata, Mario; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; De Miguel, Manuel; Bautista Lorite, Juan; Rivas Infante, Eloy; Álvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Navas, Plácido; Jackson, Sandra; Francisci, Silvia; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease most usually caused by point mutations in tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Approximately 80% of cases of MELAS syndrome are associated with a m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR). Currently, no effective treatments are available for this chronic progressive disorder. Treatment strategies in MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases consist of several drugs that diminish the deleterious effects of the abnormal respiratory chain function, reduce the presence of toxic agents or correct deficiencies in essential cofactors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We evaluated the effectiveness of some common pharmacological agents that have been utilized in the treatment of MELAS, in yeast, fibroblast and cybrid models of the disease. The yeast model harbouring the A14G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) gene, which is equivalent to the A3243G mutation in humans, was used in the initial screening. Next, the most effective drugs that were able to rescue the respiratory deficiency in MELAS yeast mutants were tested in fibroblasts and cybrid models of MELAS disease. KEY RESULTS According to our results, supplementation with riboflavin or coenzyme Q10 effectively reversed the respiratory defect in MELAS yeast and improved the pathologic alterations in MELAS fibroblast and cybrid cell models. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate that cell models have great potential for screening and validating the effects of novel drug candidates for MELAS treatment and presumably also for other diseases with mitochondrial impairment. PMID:22747838

  11. Kidney involvement in MELAS syndrome: Description of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Alcubilla-Prats, Pau; Solé, Manel; Botey, Albert; Grau, Josep Maria; Garrabou, Glòria; Poch, Esteban

    2017-04-21

    MELAS syndrome -myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes- is a maternally-inherited mitochondrial cytopathy related to several mitochondrial DNA mutations, with the A3243G mutation in tRNA Leu gene being the most frequent of them. Apart from its typical symptomatology, patients usually exhibit a maternally-inherited history of neurosensory deafness and insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Recent studies have shown that few patients carrying a A3243G mutation also suffer from renal dysfunction, usually in form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In this study we examine kidney involvement in 2 unrelated patients with a A3243G mutation by genetic testing. Both have a maternally-inherited neurosensory deafness and insulin-dependent T2DM. A renal biopsy was performed in both patients. One patient developed nephrotic proteinuria and renal insufficiency, with FSGS findings being observed in the kidney biopsy, whereas the other suffered from mild proteinuria and renal insufficiency, with non-specific glomerular changes. The presence of FSGS or other kidney involvement accompanied by hereditary neurosensory deafness and T2DM could be suggestive of a A3243G tRNA Leu mutation and should prompt a genetic testing and an evaluation of potential extrarenal involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Wilbur A.; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing. PMID:20007845

  13. Mechanisms of viral mutation.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Domingo-Calap, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    The remarkable capacity of some viruses to adapt to new hosts and environments is highly dependent on their ability to generate de novo diversity in a short period of time. Rates of spontaneous mutation vary amply among viruses. RNA viruses mutate faster than DNA viruses, single-stranded viruses mutate faster than double-strand virus, and genome size appears to correlate negatively with mutation rate. Viral mutation rates are modulated at different levels, including polymerase fidelity, sequence context, template secondary structure, cellular microenvironment, replication mechanisms, proofreading, and access to post-replicative repair. Additionally, massive numbers of mutations can be introduced by some virus-encoded diversity-generating elements, as well as by host-encoded cytidine/adenine deaminases. Our current knowledge of viral mutation rates indicates that viral genetic diversity is determined by multiple virus- and host-dependent processes, and that viral mutation rates can evolve in response to specific selective pressures.

  14. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  15. Mutation accumulation and fitness in mutator subpopulations of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Maharjan, Ram P.; Liu, Bin; Li, Yang; Reeves, Peter R.; Wang, Lei; Ferenci, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations in clinical and laboratory settings contain a significant proportion of mutants with elevated mutation rates (mutators). Mutators have a particular advantage when multiple beneficial mutations are needed for fitness, as in antibiotic resistance. Nevertheless, high mutation rates potentially lead to increasing numbers of deleterious mutations and subsequently to the decreased fitness of mutators. To test how fitness changed with mutation accumulation, genome sequencing and fitness assays of nine Escherichia coli mutY mutators were undertaken in an evolving chemostat population at three time points. Unexpectedly, the fitness in members of the mutator subpopulation became constant despite a growing number of mutations over time. To test if the accumulated mutations affected fitness, we replaced each of the known beneficial mutations with wild-type alleles in a mutator isolate. We found that the other 25 accumulated mutations were not deleterious. Our results suggest that isolates with deleterious mutations are eliminated by competition in a continuous culture, leaving mutators with mostly neutral mutations. Interestingly, the mutator–non-mutator balance in the population reversed after the fitness plateau of mutators was reached, suggesting that the mutator–non-mutator ratio in populations has more to do with competition between members of the population than the accumulation of deleterious mutations. PMID:23221876

  16. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  17. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  19. CF Mutation Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Gene Mutations Testing Send Us Your Feedback ... ID=LTD#tabs=0. Accessed September 2012. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screening. Available online at http://www. ...

  20. Rates of spontaneous mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, J W; Charlesworth, B; Charlesworth, D; Crow, J F

    1998-01-01

    Rates of spontaneous mutation per genome as measured in the laboratory are remarkably similar within broad groups of organisms but differ strikingly among groups. Mutation rates in RNA viruses, whose genomes contain ca. 10(4) bases, are roughly 1 per genome per replication for lytic viruses and roughly 0.1 per genome per replication for retroviruses and a retrotransposon. Mutation rates in microbes with DNA-based chromosomes are close to 1/300 per genome per replication; in this group, therefore, rates per base pair vary inversely and hugely as genome sizes vary from 6 x 10(3) to 4 x 10(7) bases or base pairs. Mutation rates in higher eukaryotes are roughly 0.1-100 per genome per sexual generation but are currently indistinguishable from 1/300 per cell division per effective genome (which excludes the fraction of the genome in which most mutations are neutral). It is now possible to specify some of the evolutionary forces that shape these diverse mutation rates. PMID:9560386

  1. KRAS mutations: analytical considerations.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F; Liu, Ta-Chih; Er, Tze-Kiong

    2014-04-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death globally. Significant improvements in survival have been made in patients with metastasis by new therapies. For example, Cetuximab and Panitumumab are monoclonal antibodies that inhibit the epidermal growth receptor (EGFR). KRAS mutations in codon 12 and 13 are the recognized biomarkers that are analyzed in clinics before the administration of anti-EGFR therapy. Genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in KRAS predict a lack of response to Panitumumab and Cetuximab in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC). Notably, it is estimated that 35-45% of CRC patients harbor KRAS mutations. Therefore, KRAS mutation testing should be performed in all individuals with the advanced CRC in order to identify the patients who will not respond to the monoclonal EGFR antibody inhibitors. New techniques for KRAS testing have arisen rapidly, and each technique has advantages and disadvantages. Herein, we review the latest published literature specific to KRAS mutation testing techniques. Since reliability and feasibility are important issues in clinical analyses. Therefore, this review also summarizes the effectiveness and limitations of numerous KRAS mutation testing techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The mutation rate and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A L; Loeb, L A

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the human genome requires that mutations in the germ line be exceptionally rare events. While most mutations are neutral or have deleterious effects, a limited number of mutations are required for adaptation to environmental changes. Drake has provided evidence that DNA-based microbes have evolved a mechanism to yield a common spontaneous mutation rate of approximately 0.003 mutations per genome per replication (Drake 1991). In contrast, mutation rates of RNA viruses are much larger (Holland et al. 1982) and can approach the maximum tolerable deleterious mutation rate of one per genome (Eigen and Schuster 1977; Eigen 1993). Drake calculates that lytic RNA viruses display spontaneous mutation rates of approximately one per genome while most have mutation rates that are approximately 0.1 per genome (Drake 1993). This constancy of germline mutation rates among microbial species need not necessarily mean constancy of the somatic mutation rates. Furthermore, there need not be a constant rate for somatic mutations during development. In this review, we consider mutations in cancer, a pathology in which there appears to be an increase in the rate of somatic mutations throughout the genome. Moreover, within the eukaryotic genome, as in microbes, there are "hot-spots" that exhibit unusually high mutation frequencies. It seems conceivable to us that many tumors contain thousands of changes in DNA sequence. The major question is: how do these mutations arise, and how many are rate-limiting for tumor progression? PMID:9560368

  3. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  4. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  5. Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) analysis of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Little, S

    2001-05-01

    The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base changes or small deletions. ARMS is based on the use of sequence-specific PCR primers that allow amplification of test DNA only when the target allele is contained within the sample. Following an ARMS reaction the presence or absence of a PCR product is diagnostic for the presence or absence of the target allele. The protocols detailed here outline methods that can be used to analyze human genomic DNA for one or more mutations. The Basic Protocol describes the development and application of an ARMS test for a single mutation; the Alternate Protocol extends this to multiplex ARMS for the analysis of two or more mutations. The Support Protocol describes a rapid DNA extraction method from blood or mouthwash samples that yields DNA compatible with the type of tests described. The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base change The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base change.

  6. Mutation induction by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, J.; Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.

    1994-10-01

    Mutation induction by heavy ions is compared in yeast and mammalian cells. Since mutants can only be recovered in survivors the influence of inactivation cross sections has to be taken into account. It is shown that both the size of the sensitive cellular site as well as track structure play an important role. Another parameter which influences the probability of mutation induction is repair: Contrary to naive assumptions primary radiation damage does not directly lead to mutations but requires modification to reconstitute the genetic machinery so that mutants can survive. The molecular structure of mutations was analyzed after exposure to deuterons by amplification with the aid of polymerase chain reaction. The results-although preliminary-demonstrate that even with densely ionizing particles a large fraction does not carry big deletions which suggests that point mutations may also be induced by heavy ions.

  7. Monoallelic mutation analysis (MAMA) for identifying germline mutations.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, N; Leach, F S; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    1995-09-01

    Dissection of germline mutations in a sensitive and specific manner presents a continuing challenge. In dominantly inherited diseases, mutations occur in only one allele and are often masked by the normal allele. Here we report the development of a sensitive and specific diagnostic strategy based on somatic cell hybridization termed MAMA (monoallelic mutation analysis). We have demonstrated the utility of this strategy in two different hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, one caused by a defective tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 5 (familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP) and the other caused by a defective mismatch repair gene on chromosome 2 (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, HNPCC).

  8. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  9. The evolution of protease mutation 76V is associated with protease mutation 46I and gag mutation 431V.

    PubMed

    Knops, Elena; Kemper, Ina; Schülter, Eugen; Pfister, Herbert; Kaiser, Rolf; Verheyen, Jens

    2010-03-13

    Recently, first-line lopinavir failure was observed due to protease mutation 76V. In the present study, we found 76V associated with protease mutation 46I and gag cleavage-site mutation 431V. Longitudinal analysis of patients failing protease inhibitor therapies demonstrated that 76V strictly occurs either together with 46I and/or 431V or in HIV isolates already harbouring one of both mutations. Therefore, all three mutations seem to cooperate in terms of protease inhibitor resistance.

  10. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  11. Mutation testing in Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ellis, P E; Dawson, M; Dixon, M J

    2002-12-01

    To report on a study where 97 subjects were screened for mutations in the Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) gene TCOF1. Ninety-seven subjects with a clinical diagnosis of TCS were screened for potential mutations in TCOF1, by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. In those subjects where potential mutations were detected, sequence analysis was performed to determine the site and type of mutation present. Thirty-six TCS-specific mutations are reported including 27 deletions, six point mutations, two splice junction mutations, and one insertion/deletion. This brings the total number of mutations reported to date to 105. The importance of detection of these mutations is mainly in postnatal diagnosis and genetic counselling. Knowledge of the family specific mutation may also be used in prenatal diagnosis to confirm whether the foetus is affected or not, and give the parents the choice of whether to continue with the pregnancy.

  12. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines’ transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness. PMID:26596348

  13. Calpain-3 mutations in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Balci, Burcu; Aurino, Stefania; Haliloglu, Göknur; Talim, Beril; Erdem, Sevim; Akcören, Zuhal; Tan, Ersin; Caglar, Melda; Richard, Isabelle; Nigro, Vincenzo; Topaloglu, Haluk; Dincer, Pervin

    2006-05-01

    Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2s) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by progressive involvement of the proximal limb girdle muscles; the group includes at least 10 different genetic entities. The calpainopathies (LGMD2A), a subgroup of LGMD2s, are estimated to be the most common forms of LGMD2 in all populations so far investigated. LGMD2A is usually characterized by symmetrical and selective atrophy of pelvic, scapular and trunk muscles and a moderate to gross elevation of serum CK. However, the course is highly variable. It is caused by mutations in the CAPN3 gene, which encodes for the calpain-3 protein. Until now, 161 pathogenic mutations have been found in the CAPN3 gene. In the present study, through screening of 93 unrelated LGMD2 families, we identified 29 families with LGMD2A, 21 (22.6%) of which were identified as having CAPN3 gene mutations. We detected six novel (p.K211N, p.D230G, p.Y322H, p.R698S, p.Q738X, c.2257delGinsAA) and nine previously reported mutations (c.550delA, c.19_23del, c.1746-20C>G, p.R49H, p.R490Q, p.Y336N, p.A702V, p.Y537X, p.R541Q) in the CAPN3 gene. There may be a wide variety of mutations, but clustering of specific mutations (c.550delA: 40%, p.R490Q: 10%) could be used in the diagnostic scheme in Turkey.

  14. Cystic fibrosis mutation testing in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bombieri, C; Pignatti, P F

    2001-01-01

    In Italy, Cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation frequency differences have been observed in different regions. In the northeastern Veneto and Trentino Alto Adige regions, a complete cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene screening in CF patients detected through a newborn screening program has identified about 90% of the mutations. In these two regions, the current detection rate using a CF screening panel containing the 16 most common mutations is 86.6%. CF mutations in some other Italian regions have not been so thoroughly analysed. Available data indicate that a more general national screening panel comprising 31 mutations may detect about 75% of all CF mutations in Italy.

  15. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  16. Rapid evolution of the human mutation spectrum.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kelley; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2017-04-25

    DNA is a remarkably precise medium for copying and storing biological information. This high fidelity results from the action of hundreds of genes involved in replication, proofreading, and damage repair. Evolutionary theory suggests that in such a system, selection has limited ability to remove genetic variants that change mutation rates by small amounts or in specific sequence contexts. Consistent with this, using SNV variation as a proxy for mutational input, we report here that mutational spectra differ substantially among species, human continental groups and even some closely related populations. Close examination of one signal, an increased TCC→TTC mutation rate in Europeans, indicates a burst of mutations from about 15,000 to 2000 years ago, perhaps due to the appearance, drift, and ultimate elimination of a genetic modifier of mutation rate. Our results suggest that mutation rates can evolve markedly over short evolutionary timescales and suggest the possibility of mapping mutational modifiers.

  17. Gefitinib Treatment in EGFR Mutated Caucasian NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Ostoros, Gyula; Cobo, Manuel; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Cole, Rebecca; McWalter, Gael; Walker, Jill; Dearden, Simon; Webster, Alan; Milenkova, Tsveta; McCormack, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the phase IV, open-label, single-arm study NCT01203917, first-line gefitinib 250 mg/d was effective and well tolerated in Caucasian patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (previously published). Here, we report EGFR mutation analyses of plasma-derived, circulating-free tumor DNA. Methods: Mandatory tumor and duplicate plasma (1 and 2) baseline samples were collected (all screened patients; n = 1060). Preplanned, exploratory analyses included EGFR mutation (and subtype) status of tumor versus plasma and between plasma samples. Post hoc, exploratory analyses included efficacy by tumor and plasma EGFR mutation (and subtype) status. Results: Available baseline tumor samples were 1033 of 1060 (118 positive of 859 mutation status known; mutation frequency, 13.7%). Available plasma 1 samples were 803 of 1060 (82 positive of 784 mutation status known; mutation frequency, 10.5%). Mutation status concordance between 652 matched tumor and plasma 1 samples was 94.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.3–96.0) (comparable for mutation subtypes); test sensitivity was 65.7% (95% CI, 55.8–74.7); and test specificity was 99.8% (95% CI, 99.0–100.0). Twelve patients of unknown tumor mutation status were subsequently identified as plasma mutation-positive. Available plasma 2 samples were 803 of 1060 (65 positive of 224 mutation status-evaluable and -known). Mutation status concordance between 224 matched duplicate plasma 1 and 2 samples was 96.9% (95% CI, 93.7–98.7). Objective response rates are as follows: mutation-positive tumor, 70% (95% CI, 60.5–77.7); mutation-positive tumor and plasma 1, 76.9% (95% CI, 65.4–85.5); and mutation-positive tumor and mutation-negative plasma 1, 59.5% (95% CI, 43.5–73.7). Median progression-free survival (months) was 9.7 (95% CI, 8.5–11.0; 61 events) for mutation-positive tumor and 10.2 (95% CI, 8.5–12.5; 36 events) for mutation-positive tumor and plasma 1

  18. Mutation analysis in Turkish phenylketonuria patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ozgüç, M; Ozalp, I; Coşkun, T; Yilmaz, E; Erdem, H; Ayter, S

    1993-01-01

    Forty-four classical PKU patients have been screened for various mutations. The newly identified IVS 10 splicing mutation was found in 32% of the mutant alleles and comprises 74.5% of the mutations that could be typed: 261arg-gln (6.8%), 158arg-gly (2.3%), 252arg-trp (1.1%), 280glu-lys (-), and 272gly-stop (-) were the other mutations that were screened. Images PMID:8445616

  19. Adaptive mutation: has the unicorn landed?

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P L

    1998-01-01

    Reversion of an episomal Lac- allele during lactose selection has been studied as a model for adaptive mutation. Although recent results show that the mutations that arise during selection are not "adaptive" in the original sense, the mutagenic mechanism that produces these mutations may nonetheless be of evolutionary significance. In addition, a transient mutational state induced in a subpopulation of starving cells could provide a species with a mechanism for adaptive evolution. PMID:9560365

  20. WRN Mutation Update: Mutation Spectrum, Patient Registries, and Translational Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Koutaro; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Lee, Lin; Eirich, Katharina; Takemoto, Minoru; Watanabe, Aki; Koizumi, Naoko; Lessel, Davor; Mori, Takayasu; Hisama, Fuki M.; Ladd, Paula D.; Angle, Brad; Baris, Hagit; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Ozturk, Sukru; Chateau, Antoinette; Deguchi, Kentaro; Easwar, T.K.M; Federico, Antonio; Fox, Amy; Grebe, Theresa A.; Hay, Beverly; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Seiter, Karen; Streeten, Elizabeth; Piña-Aguilar, Raul E.; Poke, Gemma; Poot, Martin; Posmyk, Renata; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Schindler, Detlev; Oshima, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of adult onset phenotypes consistent with an acceleration of intrinsic biological aging. It is caused by pathogenic variants in the WRN gene, which encodes a multifunctional nuclear protein with exonuclease and helicase activities. WRN protein is thought to be involved in optimization of various aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA repair, recombination, replication, and transcription. In this update, we summarize a total of 83 different WRN mutations, including eight previously unpublished mutations identified by the International Registry of Werner Syndrome (Seattle, WA) and the Japanese Werner Consortium (Chiba, Japan), as well as 75 mutations already reported in the literature. The Seattle International Registry recruits patients from all over the world to investigate genetic causes of a wide variety of progeroid syndromes in order to contribute to the knowledge of basic mechanisms of human aging. Given the unusually high prevalence of WS patients and heterozygous carriers in Japan, the major goal of the Japanese Consortium is to develop effective therapies and to establish management guidelines for WS patients in Japan and elsewhere. This review will also discuss potential translational approaches to this disorder, including those currently under investigation. PMID:27667302

  1. WRN Mutation Update: Mutation Spectrum, Patient Registries, and Translational Prospects.

    PubMed

    Yokote, Koutaro; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Lee, Lin; Eirich, Katharina; Takemoto, Minoru; Watanabe, Aki; Koizumi, Naoko; Lessel, Davor; Mori, Takayasu; Hisama, Fuki M; Ladd, Paula D; Angle, Brad; Baris, Hagit; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Ozturk, Sukru; Chateau, Antoinette; Deguchi, Kentaro; Easwar, T K M; Federico, Antonio; Fox, Amy; Grebe, Theresa A; Hay, Beverly; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Seiter, Karen; Streeten, Elizabeth; Piña-Aguilar, Raul E; Poke, Gemma; Poot, Martin; Posmyk, Renata; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Schindler, Detlev; Oshima, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of adult onset phenotypes consistent with an acceleration of intrinsic biological aging. It is caused by pathogenic variants in the WRN gene, which encodes a multifunctional nuclear protein with exonuclease and helicase activities. WRN protein is thought to be involved in optimization of various aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA repair, recombination, replication, and transcription. In this update, we summarize a total of 83 different WRN mutations, including eight previously unpublished mutations identified by the International Registry of Werner Syndrome (Seattle, WA) and the Japanese Werner Consortium (Chiba, Japan), as well as 75 mutations already reported in the literature. The Seattle International Registry recruits patients from all over the world to investigate genetic causes of a wide variety of progeroid syndromes in order to contribute to the knowledge of basic mechanisms of human aging. Given the unusually high prevalence of WS patients and heterozygous carriers in Japan, the major goal of the Japanese Consortium is to develop effective therapies and to establish management guidelines for WS patients in Japan and elsewhere. This review will also discuss potential translational approaches to this disorder, including those currently under investigation. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. TCOF1 mutation database: novel mutation in the alternatively spliced exon 6A and update in mutation nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Splendore, Alessandra; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Masotti, Cibele; Morganti, Lucas S C; Passos-Bueno, M Rita

    2005-05-01

    Recently, a novel exon was described in TCOF1 that, although alternatively spliced, is included in the major protein isoform. In addition, most published mutations in this gene do not conform to current mutation nomenclature guidelines. Given these observations, we developed an online database of TCOF1 mutations in which all the reported mutations are renamed according to standard recommendations and in reference to the genomic and novel cDNA reference sequences (www.genoma.ib.usp.br/TCOF1_database). We also report in this work: 1) results of the first screening for large deletions in TCOF1 by Southern blot in patients without mutation detected by direct sequencing; 2) the identification of the first pathogenic mutation in the newly described exon 6A; and 3) statistical analysis of pathogenic mutations and polymorphism distribution throughout the gene.

  3. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  4. Neutral evolution of mutational robustness

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Erik; Crutchfield, James P.; Huynen, Martijn

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population’s limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network’s adjacency matrix. Moreover, the average number of neutral mutant neighbors per individual is given by the matrix spectral radius. These results quantify the extent to which populations evolve mutational robustness—the insensitivity of the phenotype to mutations—and thus reduce genetic load. Because the average neutrality is independent of evolutionary parameters—such as mutation rate, population size, and selective advantage—one can infer global statistics of neutral network topology by using simple population data available from in vitro or in vivo evolution. Populations evolving on neutral networks of RNA secondary structures show excellent agreement with our theoretical predictions. PMID:10449760

  5. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome

    PubMed Central

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-01-01

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development. PMID:28809811

  6. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome.

    PubMed

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-08-15

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development.

  7. Tailoring the metabolism against mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Motter, Adilson E.; Almaas, Eivind; Barabasi, Albert Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    In the post-genomic era, organisms can be modelled at the whole-cell level in silico via steady state methods to describe their metabolic capabilities. We use two such methods, Flux Balance Analysis and Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment to explore the behavior of cells (of E. coli and S. cerevisiae) after severe mutations. We propose experimentally feasible ways of modifying the underlying biochemical reaction network of a mutant cell such that cell functionality, in particular growth rate, is significantly improved.

  8. Mutation Frequency and Spectrum of Mutations Vary at Different Chromosomal Positions of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Juurik, Triinu; Ilves, Heili; Teras, Riho; Ilmjärv, Tanel; Tavita, Kairi; Ukkivi, Kärt; Teppo, Annika; Mikkel, Katren; Kivisaar, Maia

    2012-01-01

    It is still an open question whether mutation rate can vary across the bacterial chromosome. In this study, the occurrence of mutations within the same mutational target sequences at different chromosomal locations of Pseudomonas putida was monitored. For that purpose we constructed two mutation detection systems, one for monitoring the occurrence of a broad spectrum of mutations and transposition of IS element IS1411 inactivating LacI repressor, and another for detecting 1-bp deletions. Our results revealed that both the mutation frequency and the spectrum of mutations vary at different chromosomal positions. We observed higher mutation frequencies when the direction of transcription of the mutational target gene was opposite to the direction of replisome movement in the chromosome and vice versa, lower mutation frequency was accompanied with co-directional transcription and replication. Additionally, asymmetry of frameshift mutagenesis at homopolymeric and repetitive sequences during the leading and lagging-strand replication was found. The transposition frequency of IS1411 was also affected by the chromosomal location of the target site, which implies that regional differences in chromosomal topology may influence transposition of this mobile element. The occurrence of mutations in the P. putida chromosome was investigated both in growing and in stationary-phase bacteria. We found that the appearance of certain mutational hot spots is strongly affected by the chromosomal location of the mutational target sequence especially in growing bacteria. Also, artificial increasing transcription of the mutational target gene elevated the frequency of mutations in growing bacteria. PMID:23119042

  9. Rare beneficial mutations can halt Muller's ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Daniel; Goyal, Sidhartha; Jerison, Elizabeth; Neher, Richard; Shraiman, Boris; Desai, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In viral, bacterial, and other asexual populations, the vast majority of non-neutral mutations are deleterious. This motivates the application of models without beneficial mutations. Here we show that the presence of surprisingly few compensatory mutations halts fitness decay in these models. Production of deleterious mutations is balanced by purifying selection, stabilizing the fitness distribution. However, stochastic vanishing of fitness classes can lead to slow fitness decay (i.e. Muller's ratchet). For weakly deleterious mutations, production overwhelms purification, rapidly decreasing population fitness. We show that when beneficial mutations are introduced, a stable steady state emerges in the form of a dynamic mutation-selection balance. We argue this state is generic for all mutation rates and population sizes, and is reached as an end state as genomes become saturated by either beneficial or deleterious mutations. Assuming all mutations have the same magnitude selective effect, we calculate the fraction of beneficial mutations necessary to maintain the dynamic balance. This may explain the unexpected maintenance of asexual genomes, as in mitochondria, in the presence of selection. This will affect in the statistics of genetic diversity in these populations.

  10. Studies on biological effects of ion beams on lethality, molecular nature of mutation, mutation rate, and spectrum of mutation phenotype for mutation breeding in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shikazono, Naoya; Hase, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Recently, heavy ions or ion beams have been used to generate new mutants or varieties, especially in higher plants. It has been found that ion beams show high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of growth inhibition, lethality, and so on, but the characteristics of ion beams on mutation have not been clearly elucidated. To understand the effect of ion beams on mutation induction, mutation rates were investigated using visible known Arabidopsis mutant phenotypes, indicating that mutation frequencies induced by carbon ions were 20-fold higher than by electrons. In chrysanthemum and carnation, flower-color and flower-form mutants, which are hardly produced by gamma rays or X rays, were induced by ion beams. Novel mutants and their responsible genes, such as UV-B resistant, serrated petals and sepals, anthocyaninless, etc. were induced by ion beams. These results indicated that the characteristics of ion beams for mutation induction are high mutation frequency and broad mutation spectrum and therefore, efficient induction of novel mutants. On the other hand, PCR and sequencing analyses showed that half of all mutants induced by ion beams possessed large DNA alterations, while the rest had point-like mutations. Both mutations induced by ion beams had a common feature that deletion of several bases were predominantly induced. It is plausible that ion beams induce a limited amount of large and irreparable DNA damage, resulting in production of a null mutation that shows a new mutant phenotype.

  11. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  12. Calreticulin Mutations in Bulgarian MPN Patients.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Ivan; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Alaikov, Tzvetan; Spassova, Sylva; Stoimenov, Angel; Naumova, Elissaveta; Shivarov, Velizar; Ivanova, Milena

    2018-01-01

    Somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR are recurrently identified in most of the cases with Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We applied four molecular genetic methods for identification of CALR exon 9 mutations, including high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, Sanger sequencing, semiconductor target genes sequencing and whole exome sequencing. A total of 78 patients with myeloid malignancies were included in the study. We identified 14 CALR exon 9 mutated cases out of 78 studied patients with myeloid malignancies. All mutated patients were diagnosed with MPN being either PMF (n = 7) or ET (n = 7). Nine cases had type 1 mutations and 5 cases had type 2 mutations. CALR exon 9, MPL exon 10 and JAK2 p. V617F were mutually exclusive. There were no statistically significant differences in the hematological parameters between the cases with CALR and JAK2 or MPL mutations. Notably, all four techniques were fully concordant in the detection of CALR mutations. This is one of the few reports on the CALR mutations frequency in South-eastern populations. Our study shows that the frequency and patterns of these mutations is identical to those in the patients' cohorts from Western countries. Besides we demonstrated the utility of four different methods for their detection.

  13. Helical ambivalency induced by point mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutation of amino acid sequences in a protein may have diverse effects on its structure and function. Point mutations of even a single amino acid residue in the helices of the non-redundant database may lead to sequentially identical peptides which adopt different secondary structures in different proteins. However, various physico-chemical factors which govern the formation of these ambivalent helices generated by point mutations of a sequence are not clearly known. Results Sequences generated by point mutations of helices are mapped on to their non-helical counterparts in the SCOP database. The results show that short helices are prone to transform into non-helical conformations upon point mutations. Mutation of amino acid residues by helix breakers preferentially yield non-helical conformations, while mutation with residues of intermediate helix propensity display least preferences for non-helical conformations. Differences in the solvent accessibility of the mutating/mutated residues are found to be a major criteria for these sequences to conform to non-helical conformations. Even with minimal differences in the amino acid distributions of the sequences flanking the helical and non-helical conformations, helix-flanking sequences are found be more solvent accessible. Conclusions All types of mutations from helical to non-helical conformations are investigated. The primary factors attributing such changes in conformation can be: i) type/propensity of the mutating and mutant residues ii) solvent accessibility of the residue at the mutation site iii) context/environment dependence of the flanking sequences. The results from the present study may be used to design de novo proteins via point mutations. PMID:23675772

  14. Impacts of mutation effects and population size on mutation rate in asexual populations: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqian; Mu, Baolin; Huang, Zhuoran; Zhang, Mingjing; Wang, Xiaojuan; Tao, Shiheng

    2010-09-30

    In any natural population, mutation is the primary source of genetic variation required for evolutionary novelty and adaptation. Nevertheless, most mutations, especially those with phenotypic effects, are harmful and are consequently removed by natural selection. For this reason, under natural selection, an organism will evolve to a lower mutation rate. Overall, the action of natural selection on mutation rate is related to population size and mutation effects. Although theoretical work has intensively investigated the relationship between natural selection and mutation rate, most of these studies have focused on individual competition within a population, rather than on competition among populations. The aim of the present study was to use computer simulations to investigate how natural selection adjusts mutation rate among asexually reproducing subpopulations with different mutation rates. The competition results for the different subpopulations showed that a population could evolve to an "optimum" mutation rate during long-term evolution, and that this rate was modulated by both population size and mutation effects. A larger population could evolve to a higher optimum mutation rate than could a smaller population. The optimum mutation rate depended on both the fraction and the effects of beneficial mutations, rather than on the effects of deleterious ones. The optimum mutation rate increased with either the fraction or the effects of beneficial mutations. When strongly favored mutations appeared, the optimum mutation rate was elevated to a much higher level. The competition time among the subpopulations also substantially shortened. Competition at the population level revealed that the evolution of the mutation rate in asexual populations was determined by both population size and mutation effects. The most striking finding was that beneficial mutations, rather than deleterious mutations, were the leading force that modulated the optimum mutation rate. The

  15. Extrachromosomal mutator inducing point mutations and deletions in mitochondrial genome of fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Seitz-Mayr, G; Wolf, K

    1982-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a mutator mutant in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This mutator is of extrachromosomal, very likely mitochondrial, inheritance and acts exclusively on mitochondrial mtDNA. It greatly enhances the frequency of spontaneous mitochondrial drug-resistance mutants compared to the wild type, but it is not obligatory for their occurrence. In contrast, mitochondrial respiratory deficient mutants can only be isolated from mutator strains. It could be shown that this mutator induces point mutations as well as deletions in the mitochondrial genome which lead to respiratory deficiency. This mutator might prove to have a novel function encoded by the mtDNA. Images PMID:6953418

  16. Mutation Spectrum and Phenotypic Features in Noonan Syndrome with PTPN11 Mutations: Definition of Two Novel Mutations.

    PubMed

    Atik, Tahir; Aykut, Ayca; Hazan, Filiz; Onay, Huseyin; Goksen, Damla; Darcan, Sukran; Tukun, Ajlan; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of PTPN11 gene mutations in Noonan syndrome patients and to study the genotype-phenotype associations. In this study, twenty Noonan syndrome patients with PTPN11 mutations were included. The patients underwent a detailed clinical and physical evaluation. To identify inherited cases, parents of all mutation positive patients were analyzed. Thirteen different PTPN11 mutations, two of them being novel, were detected in the study group. These mutations included eleven missense mutations: p.G60A, p.D61N, p.Y62D, p.Y63C, p.E69Q, p.Q79R, p.Y279C,p.N308D, p.N308S, p.M504V, p.Q510R and two novel missense mutations: p.I56V and p.I282M. The frequency of cardiac abnormalities and short stature were found to be 80 % and 80 %, respectively. Mental retardation was not observed in patients having exon 8 mutations. No significant correlations were detected between other phenotypic features and genotypes. By identifying genotype-phenotype correlations, this study provides information on phenotypes observed in NS patients with different PTPN11 mutations.

  17. Driven by Mutations: The Predictive Value of Mutation Subtype in EGFR-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily; Feld, Emily; Horn, Leora

    2017-04-01

    EGFR-mutated NSCLC is a genetically heterogeneous disease that includes more than 200 distinct mutations. The implications of mutational subtype for both prognostic and predictive value are being increasingly understood. Although the most common EGFR mutations-exon 19 deletions or L858R mutations-predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), it is now being recognized that outcomes may be improved in patients with exon 19 deletions. Additionally, 10% of patients will have an uncommon EGFR mutation, and response to EGFR TKI therapy is highly variable depending on the mutation. Given the growing recognition of the genetic and clinical variation seen in this disease, the development of comprehensive bioinformatics-driven tools to both analyze response in uncommon mutation subtypes and inform clinical decision making will be increasingly important. Clinical trials of novel EGFR TKIs should prospectively account for the presence of uncommon mutation subtypes in study design. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of six new Gaucher disease mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, E.; Gelbart, T.; West, C.

    1993-01-01

    The four most common mutations account for 97% of the Gaucher disease-producing alleles in Jewish patients and 75% of the alleles in non-Jewish patients. Although at least 15 other mutations and some examples of gene conversion and/or fusion genes have been described, a number of mutations remain unidentified. We have now identified six new mutations, a deletion of a C at the 72 position of the cDNA, a 481C[yields]T mutation (122p[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 751T [yields] C (212 [sup Tyr[yields]His]), a 1549G [yields] A (478[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 1604G [yields] A (496 [sup Arg[yields]His]), and a 55-bp deletion. All but one ofmore » these were found in single families. The 1604A mutation, however, was observed in four unrelated individuals. 7 refs., 2 tabs.« less

  19. AVPR2 variants and mutations in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: review and missense mutation significance.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias; Milord, Edrice; Gragnoli, Claudia

    2008-12-01

    Almost 90% of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is due to mutations in the arginine-vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2). We retrospectively examined all the published mutations/variants in AVPR2. We planned to perform a comprehensive review of all the AVPR2 mutations/variants and to test whether any amino acid change causing a missense mutation is significantly more or less common than others. We performed a Medline search and collected detailed information regarding all AVPR2 mutations and variants. We performed a frequency comparison between mutated and wild-type amino acids and codons. We predicted the mutation effect or reported it based on published in vitro studies. We also reported the ethnicity of each mutation/variant carrier. In summary, we identified 211 AVPR2 mutations which cause NDI in 326 families and 21 variants which do not cause NDI in 71 NDI families. We described 15 different types of mutations including missense, frameshift, inframe deletion, deletion, insertion, nonsense, duplication, splicing and combined mutations. The missense mutations represent the 55.83% of all the NDI published families. Arginine and tyrosine are significantly (P = 4.07E-08 and P = 3.27E-04, respectively) the AVPR2 most commonly mutated amino acids. Alanine and glutamate are significantly (P = 0.009 and P = 0.019, respectively) the least mutated AVPR2 amino acids. The spectrum of mutations varies from rare gene variants or polymorphisms not causing NDI to rare mutations causing NDI, among which arginine and tyrosine are the most common missense. The AVPR2 mutations are spread world-wide. Our study may serve as an updated review, comprehensive of all AVPR2 variants and specific gene locations. J. Cell. Physiol. 217: 605-617, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Hotspot mutations delineating diverse mutational signatures and biological utilities across cancer types.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tenghui; Wang, Zixing; Zhou, Wanding; Chong, Zechen; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Mills, Gordon B; Chen, Ken

    2016-06-23

    An important step towards personalizing cancer treatment is to integrate heterogeneous evidences to catalog mutational hotspots that are biologically and therapeutically relevant and thus represent where targeted therapy would likely be beneficial. However, existing methods do not sufficiently delineate varying functionality of individual mutations within the same genes. We observed a large discordancy of mutation rates across different mutation subtypes and tumor types, and nominated 702 hotspot mutations in 549 genes in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) by considering context specific mutation characteristics such as genes, cancer types, mutation rates, mutation subtypes and sequence contexts. We observed that hotspot mutations were highly prevalent in Non CpG-island C/G transition and transversion sequence contexts in 10 tumor types, and specific insertion hotspot mutations were enriched in breast cancer and deletion hotspot mutations in colorectal cancer. We found that the hotspot mutations nominated by our approach were significantly more conserved than non-hotspot mutations in the corresponding cancer genes. We also examined the biological significance and pharmacogenomics properties of these hotspot mutations using data in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Cancer Cell-Line Encyclopedia (CCLE), and found that 53 hotspot mutations are independently associated with diverse functional evidences in 1) mRNA and protein expression, 2) pathway activity, or 3) drug sensitivity and 82 were highly enriched in specific tumor types. We highlighted the distinct functional indications of hotspot mutations under different contexts and nominated novel hotspot mutations such as MAP3K4 A1199 deletion, NR1H2 Q175 insertion, and GATA3 P409 insertion as potential biomarkers or drug targets. We identified a set of hotspot mutations across 17 tumor types by considering the background mutation rate variations among genes, tumor subtypes, mutation subtypes, and

  1. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, John T.; Lauring, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    A virus’ mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16) than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24), and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects. PMID:27571422

  2. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Thilly, William G.; Keohavong, Phouthone

    1991-01-01

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  3. DHPLC screening of cystic fibrosis gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ravnik-Glavac, Metka; Atkinson, Andrew; Glavac, Damjan; Dean, Michael

    2002-04-01

    Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) using ion-pairing reverse phase chromatography (IPRPC) columns is a technique for the screening of gene mutations. In order to evaluate the potential utility of this assay method in a clinical laboratory setting, we subjected the PCR products of 73 CF patients known to bear CFTR mutations to this analytic technique. We used thermal denaturation profile parameters specified by the MELT program tool, made available by Stanford University. Using this strategy, we determined an initial analytic sensitivity of 90.4% for any of 73 known CFTR mutations. Most of the mutations not detected by DHPLC under these conditions are alpha-substitutions. This information may eventually help to improve the MELT algorithm. Increasing column denaturation temperatures for one or two degrees above those recommended by the MELT program allowed 100% detection of CFTR mutations tested. By comparing DHPLC methodology used in this study with the recently reported study based on Wavemaker 3.4.4 software (Transgenomic, Omaha, NE) [Le Marechal et al., 2001) and with previous SSCP analysis of CFTR mutations [Ravnik-Glavac et al., 1994] we emphasized differences and similarities in order to refine the DHPLC system and discuss the relationship to the alternative approaches. We conclude that the DHPLC method, under optimized conditions, is highly accurate, rapid, and efficient in detecting mutations in the CFTR gene and may find high utility in screening individuals for CFTR mutations. Hum Mutat 19:374-383, 2002. Published 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Methods for detection of ataxia telangiectasia mutations

    DOEpatents

    Gatti, Richard A.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening large, complex, polyexonic eukaryotic genes such as the ATM gene for mutations and polymorphisms by an improved version of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis that allows electrophoresis of two or three amplified segments in a single lane. The present invention also is directed to new mutations and polymorphisms in the ATM gene that are useful in performing more accurate screening of human DNA samples for mutations and in distinguishing mutations from polymorphisms, thereby improving the efficiency of automated screening methods.

  5. FKRP mutations, including a founder mutation, cause phenotype variability in Chinese patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaona; Yang, Haipo; Wei, Cuijie; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Yanling; Han, Chunxi; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene have been associated with dystroglycanopathies, which are common in Europe but rare in Asia. Our study aimed to retrospectively analyze and characterize the clinical, myopathological and genetic features of 12 Chinese patients with FKRP mutations. Three patients were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C) and nine patients were diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I). Three muscle biopsy specimens had dystrophic changes and reduced glycosylated α-dystroglycan staining, and two showed reduced expression of laminin α2. Two known and 13 novel mutations were identified in our single center cohort. Interestingly, the c.545A>G mutation was found in eight of the nine LGMD2I patients as a founder mutation and this founder mutation in Chinese patients differs from the one seen in European patients. Moreover, patients homozygous for the c.545A>G mutation were clinically asymptomatic, a less severe phenotype than in compound heterozygous patients with the c.545A>G mutation. The 13 novel mutations of FKRP significantly expanded the mutation spectrum of MDC1C and LGMD2I, and the different founder mutations indicate the ethnic difference in FKRP mutations.

  6. Mutation Analysis in Classical Phenylketonuria Patients Followed by Detecting Haplotypes Linked to Some PAH Mutations.

    PubMed

    Dehghanian, Fatemeh; Silawi, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed M B

    2017-02-01

    Deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme and elevation of phenylalanine in body fluids cause phenylketonuria (PKU). The gold standard for confirming PKU and PAH deficiency is detecting causal mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons and splicing involved sequences of the PAH gene. Furthermore, haplotype analysis could be considered as an auxiliary approach for detecting PKU causative mutations before direct sequencing of the PAH gene by making comparisons between prior detected mutation linked-haplotypes and new PKU case haplotypes with undetermined mutations. In this study, 13 unrelated classical PKU patients took part in the study detecting causative mutations. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing in all patients. After that, haplotype analysis was performed by studying VNTR and PAHSTR markers (linked genetic markers of the PAH gene) through application of PCR and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutation analysis was performed successfully and the detected mutations were as follows: c.782G>A, c.754C>T, c.842C>G, c.113-115delTCT, c.688G>A, and c.696A>G. Additionally, PAHSTR/VNTR haplotypes were detected to discover haplotypes linked to each mutation. Mutation detection is the best approach for confirming PAH enzyme deficiency in PKU patients. Due to the relatively large size of the PAH gene and high cost of the direct sequencing in developing countries, haplotype analysis could be used before DNA sequencing and mutation detection for a faster and cheaper way via identifying probable mutated exons.

  7. Selective sweeps and parallel mutation in the adaptive recovery from deleterious mutation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Denver, Dee R.; Howe, Dana K.; Wilhelm, Larry J.; Palmer, Catherine A.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Stein, Kevin C.; Phillips, Patrick C.; Estes, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Deleterious mutation poses a serious threat to human health and the persistence of small populations. Although adaptive recovery from deleterious mutation has been well-characterized in prokaryotes, the evolutionary mechanisms by which multicellular eukaryotes recover from deleterious mutation remain unknown. We applied high-throughput DNA sequencing to characterize genomic divergence patterns associated with the adaptive recovery from deleterious mutation using a Caenorhabditis elegans recovery-line system. The C. elegans recovery lines were initiated from a low-fitness mutation-accumulation (MA) line progenitor and allowed to independently evolve in large populations (N ∼ 1000) for 60 generations. All lines rapidly regained levels of fitness similar to the wild-type (N2) MA line progenitor. Although there was a near-zero probability of a single mutation fixing due to genetic drift during the recovery experiment, we observed 28 fixed mutations. Cross-generational analysis showed that all mutations went from undetectable population-level frequencies to a fixed state in 10–20 generations. Many recovery-line mutations fixed at identical timepoints, suggesting that the mutations, if not beneficial, hitchhiked to fixation during selective sweep events observed in the recovery lines. No MA line mutation reversions were detected. Parallel mutation fixation was observed for two sites in two independent recovery lines. Analysis using a C. elegans interactome map revealed many predicted interactions between genes with recovery line-specific mutations and genes with previously accumulated MA line mutations. Our study suggests that recovery-line mutations identified in both coding and noncoding genomic regions might have beneficial effects associated with compensatory epistatic interactions. PMID:21036923

  8. Tradescantia stamen hair mutation bioassay.

    PubMed

    Ma, T H; Cabrera, G L; Cebulska-Wasilewska, A; Chen, R; Loarca, F; Vandenberg, A L; Salamone, M F

    1994-10-16

    The Tradescantia stamen hair mutation (Trad-SH) assay (clone 4430) was evaluated for its efficiency and reliability as a screen for mutagens in an IPCS collaborative study on plant systems. Four coded chemicals, i.e. azidoglycerol (AG, 3-azido-1,2-propanediol), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), sodium azide (NaN3) and maleic hydrazide (MH) were distributed by the Radian Corporation to the five laboratories in five different countries for testing mutagenicity. Pink mutations were scored between the 7th and 14th day according to a standard protocol. Test results from the five individual laboratories were analyzed and compared after decoding. One out of the two laboratories that conducted tests on AG demonstrated that AG is a mutagen with genetically effective doses ranging from 50 to 100 micrograms/ml. MH yielded positive responses in all laboratories but no linear dose-response pattern was observed. The effective dose range for MH was between 1 and 45 micrograms/ml. The mutagenicity of MNU was reported by five laboratories in the dose range between 10 and 80 micrograms/ml. NaN3, which exhibited a relatively high degree of toxicity, elicited a positive mutagenic response in three of the five laboratories in which it was tested. As with MNU the effective dose for NaN3 ranged between 3 and 80 micrograms/ml. The results from the current study substantiate the Trad-SH assay as a reliable system for screening chemicals for their potential mutagenic effects. Although the study was carried out exclusively under laboratory conditions, a survey of the current literature would indicate that the Trad-SH assay could be an effective in situ monitor of gaseous, liquid, and radioactive pollutants as well.

  9. Inverse PCR for Point Mutation Introduction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Diogo; Santos, Gustavo; Barroca, Mário; Collins, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Inverse PCR is a powerful tool for the rapid introduction of desired mutations at desired positions in a circular double-stranded DNA sequence. Here, custom-designed mutant primers oriented in the inverse direction are used to amplify the entire circular template with incorporation of the required mutation(s). By careful primer design it can be used to perform such diverse modifications as the introduction of point mutations and multiple mutations, the insertion of new sequences, and even sequence deletions. Three primer formats are commonly used; nonoverlapping, partially overlapping and fully overlapping primers, and here we describe the use of nonoverlapping primers for introduction of a point mutation. Use of such a primer setup in the PCR reaction, with one of the primers containing the desired mismatch mutation, results in the amplification of a linear, double-stranded, mutated product. Methylated template DNA is removed from the nonmethylated PCR product by DpnI digestion and the PCR product is then phosphorylated by polynucleotide kinase treatment before being recircularized by ligation, and transformed to E. coli. This relatively simple site-directed mutagenesis procedure is of major importance in biology and biotechnology today where it is commonly employed for the study and engineering of DNA, RNA, and proteins.

  10. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  11. KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cong; Du, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The KRAS oncogene is mutated in approximately 35%-45% of colorectal cancers, and KRAS mutational status testing has been highlighted in recent years. The most frequent mutations in this gene, point substitutions in codons 12 and 13, were validated as negative predictors of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies. Therefore, determining the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples has become an essential tool for managing patients with colorectal cancers. Currently, a variety of detection methods have been established to analyze the mutation status in the key regions of the KRAS gene; however, several challenges remain related to standardized and uniform testing, including the selection of tumor samples, tumor sample processing and optimal testing methods. Moreover, new testing strategies, in combination with the mutation analysis of BRAF, PIK3CA and loss of PTEN proposed by many researchers and pathologists, should be promoted. In addition, we recommend that microsatellite instability, a prognostic factor, be added to the abovementioned concomitant analysis. This review provides an overview of KRAS biology and the recent advances in KRAS mutation testing. This review also addresses other aspects of status testing for determining the appropriate treatment and offers insight into the potential drawbacks of mutational testing. PMID:23066310

  12. TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tanasubsinn, Natchaya; Sittiwangkul, Rekwan; Pongprot, Yupada; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Ohazama, Atsushi; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2017-08-01

    Mutations inTFAP2B has been reported in patients with isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and Char syndrome. We performed mutation analysis of TFAP2B in 43 patients with isolated PDA, 7 patients with PDA with other congenital heart defects and 286 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies. The heterozygous c.1006G>A mutation was identified in 20 individuals. Those mutation carriers consisted of 1 patient with term PDA (1/43), 16 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies (16/286; 5.6%), 1 patient with PDA and severe valvular aortic stenosis and tooth agenesis (1/4) and 2 normal controls (2/100; 1%). The mutation is predicted to cause an amino-acid substitution p.Val336Ile in the TFAP2B protein. Tfap2b expression during early mouse tooth development supports the association of TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies. It is hypothesized that this incidence might have been the result of founder effect. Here we report for the first time that TFAP2B mutation is associated with tooth agenesis, microdontia, supernumerary tooth and root maldevelopment. In addition, we also found that TFAP2B mutations, the common causes of PDA in Caucasian, are not the common cause of PDA in Thai population.

  13. Molecular methods for the detection of mutations.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, C; Marcelino, L A; Conde, A R; Saraiva, C; Giphart-Gassler, M; De Nooij-van Dalen, A G; Van Buuren-van Seggelen, V; Van der Keur, M; May, C A; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R; Steinsgrimsdottir, H; Beare, D; Capulas, E; Armour, J A

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of a collaborative study aimed at developing reliable, direct assays for mutation in human cells. The project used common lymphoblastoid cell lines, both with and without mutagen treatment, as a shared resource to validate the development of new molecular methods for the detection of low-level mutations in the presence of a large excess of normal alleles. As the "gold standard, " hprt mutation frequencies were also measured on the same samples. The methods under development included i) the restriction site mutation (RSM) assay, in which mutations lead to the destruction of a restriction site; ii) minisatellite length-change mutation, in which mutations lead to alleles containing new numbers of tandem repeat units; iii) loss of heterozygosity for HLA epitopes, in which antibodies can be used to direct selection for mutant cells; iv) multiple fluorescence-based long linker arm nucleotides assay (mf-LLA) technology, for the detection of substitutional mutations; v) detection of alterations in the TP53 locus using a (CA) array as the target for the screening; and vi) PCR analysis of lymphocytes for the presence of the BCL2 t(14:18) translocation. The relative merits of these molecular methods are discussed, and a comparison made with more "traditional" methods.

  14. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew S; Berkovic, Samuel F; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E; Epstein, Michael P; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B; Johnson, Michael R; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R Z; Marson, Anthony G; Mefford, Heather C; Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; O'Brien, Terence J; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Sherr, Elliott H; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K; Bautista, Jocelyn F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E; Knowlton, Robert C; Kossoff, Eric H; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; McGuire, Shannon M; Motika, Paul V; Novotny, Edward J; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M; Parent, Jack M; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott H; Shih, Jerry J; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C; Sullivan, Joseph; Lin Thio, Liu; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P G; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Weisenberg, Judith L; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R

    2013-09-12

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown. Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115). We sequenced the exomes of 264 probands, and their parents, and confirmed 329 de novo mutations. A likelihood analysis showed a significant excess of de novo mutations in the ∼4,000 genes that are the most intolerant to functional genetic variation in the human population (P = 2.9 × 10(-3)). Among these are GABRB3, with de novo mutations in four patients, and ALG13, with the same de novo mutation in two patients; both genes show clear statistical evidence of association with epileptic encephalopathy. Given the relevant site-specific mutation rates, the probabilities of these outcomes occurring by chance are P = 4.1 × 10(-10) and P = 7.8 × 10(-12), respectively. Other genes with de novo mutations in this cohort include CACNA1A, CHD2, FLNA, GABRA1, GRIN1, GRIN2B, HNRNPU, IQSEC2, MTOR and NEDD4L. Finally, we show that the de novo mutations observed are enriched in specific gene sets including genes regulated by the fragile X protein (P < 10(-8)), as has been reported previously for autism spectrum disorders.

  15. Rapid evolution of the human mutation spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kelley; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2017-01-01

    DNA is a remarkably precise medium for copying and storing biological information. This high fidelity results from the action of hundreds of genes involved in replication, proofreading, and damage repair. Evolutionary theory suggests that in such a system, selection has limited ability to remove genetic variants that change mutation rates by small amounts or in specific sequence contexts. Consistent with this, using SNV variation as a proxy for mutational input, we report here that mutational spectra differ substantially among species, human continental groups and even some closely related populations. Close examination of one signal, an increased TCC→TTC mutation rate in Europeans, indicates a burst of mutations from about 15,000 to 2000 years ago, perhaps due to the appearance, drift, and ultimate elimination of a genetic modifier of mutation rate. Our results suggest that mutation rates can evolve markedly over short evolutionary timescales and suggest the possibility of mapping mutational modifiers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24284.001 PMID:28440220

  16. Mitochondrial mutations in maternally inherited hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mutai, Hideki; Watabe, Takahisa; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Ogawa, Kaoru; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2017-03-20

    Although the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations m.1555A > G and m.3243A > G are the primary causes of maternally inherited sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), several other mtDNA mutations are also reported to be associated with SNHL. Screening of m.1555A > G and m.3243A > G mutations was performed for 145 probands. Nine probands fulfilled the following criteria: 1) bilateral and symmetric SNHL, 2) ≥ 4 family members with SNHL with a maternal trait of inheritance in ≥ 2 generations, 3) onset of SNHL before the age of 40 years, 4) high-frequency SNHL, and 5) no record of environmental factors related to SNHL. Sequencing of additional mtDNA regions was performed for five subjects meeting the clinical criteria, but the screening results were negative. Among the nine cases meeting the five clinical criteria detailed above, three had the m.1555A > G mutation in MTRNR1, one had a m.3243A > G mutation in MTTL1, and one case had a m.7511T > C mutation in MTTS1. In the family with the m.7511T > C mutation, penetrance of SNHL among maternally related subjects was 9/17 (53%). The age at onset varied from birth (congenital) to adulthood. Hearing levels varied from normal to moderately impaired, unlike previously reported subjects with this mutation, where some maternal family members presented with profound SNHL. Family members with the m.7511T > C mutation and SNHL did not exhibit any specific clinical characteristics distinct from those of other individuals with SNHL and different mtDNA mutations. Among the 136 probands who did not meet the criteria detailed above, one case had the m.1555A > G mutation, and three cases had the m.3243A > G mutation. Since five of nine probands with the clinical criteria used in this study had mtDNA mutations, these criteria may be helpful for identification of candidate patients likely to have mtDNA mutations.

  17. The mutation spectrum in RECQL4 diseases

    PubMed Central

    Siitonen, H Annika; Sotkasiira, Jenni; Biervliet, Martine; Benmansour, Abdelmadjid; Capri, Yline; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Crandall, Barbara; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Hennekam, Raoul; Herzog, Denise; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Miny, Peter; Plon, Sharon E; Riedl, Stefan; Sarkar, Ajoy; Vargas, Fernando R; Verloes, Alain; Wang, Lisa L; Kääriäinen, Helena; Kestilä, Marjo

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the RECQL4 gene can lead to three clinical phenotypes with overlapping features. All these syndromes, Rothmund–Thomson (RTS), RAPADILINO and Baller–Gerold (BGS), are characterized by growth retardation and radial defects, but RAPADILINO syndrome lacks the main dermal manifestation, poikiloderma that is a hallmark feature in both RTS and BGS. It has been previously shown that RTS patients with RECQL4 mutations are at increased risk of osteosarcoma, but the precise incidence of cancer in RAPADILINO and BGS has not been determined. Here, we report that RAPADILINO patients identified as carriers of the c.1390+2delT mutation (p.Ala420_Ala463del) are at increased risk to develop lymphoma or osteosarcoma (6 out of 15 patients). We also summarize all the published RECQL4 mutations and their associated cancer cases and provide an update of 14 novel RECQL4 mutations with accompanying clinical data. PMID:18716613

  18. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  19. Somatic Mutation Favors the Evolution of Diploidy

    PubMed Central

    Orr, H. A.

    1995-01-01

    Explanations of diploidy have focused on advantages gained from masking deleterious mutations that are inherited. Recent theory has shown that these explanations are flawed. Indeed, we still lack any satisfactory explanation of diploidy in species that are asexual or that recombine only rarely. Here I consider a possibility first suggested by EFROIMSON in 1932, by MULLER in 1964 and by CROW and KIMURA in 1965: diploidy may provide protection against somatic, not inherited, mutations. I both compare the mean fitness of haploid and diploid populations that are asexual and investigate the invasion of ``diploidy'' alleles in sexual populations. When deleterious mutations are partially recessive and somatic mutation is sufficiently common, somatic mutation provides a clear advantage to diploidy in both asexual and sexual species. PMID:7768451

  20. Congenital melanocytic nevi frequently harbor NRAS mutations but no BRAF mutations.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jürgen; Curtin, John A; Pinkel, Dan; Bastian, Boris C

    2007-01-01

    Most melanocytic nevi develop on sun-exposed skin during childhood and adolescence and commonly harbor BRAF mutations or, less frequently, NRAS mutations. A small subset of nevi is present at birth, and therefore must develop independently of UV light. To assess whether these nevi have a different mutation spectrum than those that develop on sun-exposed skin, we determined the BRAF and NRAS mutation frequencies in 32 truly congenital nevi. We found no BRAF mutations, but 81% (26/32) harbored mutations in NRAS. Consistently, seven of 10 (70%) proliferating nodules that developed early in life in congenital nevi showed mutations in NRAS. A separate set of nevi that displayed histological features frequently found in nevi present at birth ("congenital pattern nevi") but lacked a definitive history of presence at birth showed an inverse mutation pattern with common BRAF mutations (20/28 or 71%) and less frequent NRAS mutations (7/28 or 25%). Thus, nevi that develop in utero are genetically distinct from those that develop later, and histopathologic criteria alone are unable to reliably distinguish the two groups. The results are consistent with the finding in melanoma that BRAF mutations are uncommon in neoplasms that develop in the absence of sun-exposure.

  1. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ .

  2. The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List: a New Online Resource

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Amanda B.; Miller, Connie H.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Soucie, J. Michael; Hooper, W. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping efforts in hemophilia A (HA) populations in many countries have identified large numbers of unique mutations in the Factor VIII gene (F8). To assist HA researchers conducting genotyping analyses, we have developed a listing of F8 mutations including those listed in existing locus-specific databases as well as those identified in patient populations and reported in the literature. Each mutation was reviewed and uniquely identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards for coding DNA and predicted protein changes as well as traditional nomenclature based on the mature, processed protein. Listings also include the associated hemophilia severity classified by International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) criteria, associations of the mutations with inhibitors, and reference information. The mutation list currently contains 2,537 unique mutations known to cause HA. HA severity caused by the mutation is available for 2,022 mutations (80%) and information on inhibitors is available for 1,816 mutations (72%). The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List is available at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations for download and search and will be updated quarterly based on periodic literature reviews and submitted reports. PMID:23280990

  3. Mutations as missing data: inferences on the ages and distributions of nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, R

    2001-09-01

    This article describes a new Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method applicable to DNA sequence data, which treats mutations in the genealogy as missing data. The method facilitates inferences regarding the age and identity of specific mutations while taking the full complexities of the mutational process in DNA sequences into account. We demonstrate the utility of the method in three applications. First, we demonstrate how the method can be used to make inferences regarding population genetical parameters such as theta (the effective population size times the mutation rate). Second, we show how the method can be used to estimate the ages of mutations in finite sites models and for making inferences regarding the distribution and ages of nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations. The method is applied to two previously published data sets and we demonstrate that in one of the data sets the average age of nonsynonymous mutations is significantly lower than the average age of synonymous mutations, suggesting the presence of slightly deleterious mutations. Third, we demonstrate how the method in general can be used to evaluate the posterior distribution of a function of a mapping of mutations on a gene genealogy. This application is useful for evaluating the uncertainty associated with methods that rely on mapping mutations on a phylogeny or a gene genealogy.

  4. Invariance (?) of mutational parameters for relative fitness over 400 generations of mutation accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsuba, Chikako; Lewis, Suzanna; Ostrow, Dejerianne G; Salomon, Matthew P; Sylvestre, Laurence; Tabman, Brandon; Ungvari-Martin, Judit; Baer, Charles F

    2012-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that individuals in poor physiologic condition may accumulate mutational damage faster than individuals in good condition. If poor condition results from pre-existing deleterious mutations, the result is "fitness-dependent mutation rate," which has interesting theoretical implications. Here we report a study in which 10 mutation accumulation (MA) lines of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that had previously accumulated mutations for 250 generations under relaxed selection were expanded into sets of "second-order" MA lines and allowed to accumulate mutations for an additional 150 generations. The 10 lines were chosen on the basis of the relative change in fitness over the first 250 generations of MA, five high-fitness lines and five low-fitness lines. On average, the mutational properties (per-generation change in mean relative fitness, mutational variance, and Bateman-Mukai estimates of genomic mutation rate and average mutational effect) of the high-fitness and low-fitness did not differ significantly, and averaged over all lines, the point estimates were extremely close to those of the first-order MA experiment after 200 generations of MA. However, several nonsignificant trends indicate that low-fitness lines may in fact be more likely to suffer mutational damage than high-fitness lines.

  5. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  6. Polymerase epsilon mutations and concomitant β2-microglobulin mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2018-03-20

    Mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon (POLE), an enzyme of DNA synthesis, are involved in a newly described syndrome of colorectal polyposis and cancer, and have been associated with a high mutation burden with or without microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. The exonuclease domain of POLE executes a proofreading function that decreases the mutation rate during DNA replication by an estimated of one to two orders. The high mutation burden resulting from its loss of function could create a load of neo-antigens that would put the neoplastic cells in severe disadvantage of an immune attack if properly presented to the immune system. This paper investigates the mutagenic effect of different POLE mutations in various cancers, in published genomic studies and the effect that these POLE mutations have in selecting for mutations of the β2 microglobulin (B2M) gene involved in antigen presentation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamics and Fate of Beneficial Mutations Under Lineage Contamination by Linked Deleterious Mutations.

    PubMed

    Pénisson, Sophie; Singh, Tanya; Sniegowski, Paul; Gerrish, Philip

    2017-03-01

    Beneficial mutations drive adaptive evolution, yet their selective advantage does not ensure their fixation. Haldane's application of single-type branching process theory showed that genetic drift alone could cause the extinction of newly arising beneficial mutations with high probability. With linkage, deleterious mutations will affect the dynamics of beneficial mutations and might further increase their extinction probability. Here, we model the lineage dynamics of a newly arising beneficial mutation as a multitype branching process. Our approach accounts for the combined effects of drift and the stochastic accumulation of linked deleterious mutations, which we call lineage contamination We first study the lineage-contamination phenomenon in isolation, deriving dynamics and survival probabilities (the complement of extinction probabilities) of beneficial lineages. We find that survival probability is zero when [Formula: see text] where U is deleterious mutation rate and [Formula: see text] is the selective advantage of the beneficial mutation in question, and is otherwise depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by [Formula: see text] We then put the lineage contamination phenomenon into the context of an evolving population by incorporating the effects of background selection. We find that, under the combined effects of lineage contamination and background selection, ensemble survival probability is never zero but is depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is mean selective advantage of beneficial mutations, and [Formula: see text] This factor, and other bounds derived from it, are independent of the fitness effects of deleterious mutations. At high enough mutation rates, lineage contamination can depress fixation probabilities to values that approach zero. This fact suggests that high mutation rates can, perhaps paradoxically, (1) alleviate competition

  8. Fitness is strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect in a microbial mutation accumulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Heilbron, Karl; Toll-Riera, Macarena; Kojadinovic, Mila; MacLean, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary consequences of mutation relies heavily on estimates of the rate and fitness effect of spontaneous mutations generated by mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. We performed a classic MA experiment in which frequent sampling of MA lines was combined with whole genome resequencing to develop a high-resolution picture of the effect of spontaneous mutations in a hypermutator (ΔmutS) strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After ∼644 generations of mutation accumulation, MA lines had accumulated an average of 118 mutations, and we found that average fitness across all lines decayed linearly over time. Detailed analyses of the dynamics of fitness change in individual lines revealed that a large fraction of the total decay in fitness (42.3%) was attributable to the fixation of rare, highly deleterious mutations (comprising only 0.5% of fixed mutations). Furthermore, we found that at least 0.64% of mutations were beneficial and probably fixed due to positive selection. The majority of mutations that fixed (82.4%) were base substitutions and we failed to find any signatures of selection on nonsynonymous or intergenic mutations. Short indels made up a much smaller fraction of the mutations that were fixed (17.4%), but we found evidence of strong selection against indels that caused frameshift mutations in coding regions. These results help to quantify the amount of natural selection present in microbial MA experiments and demonstrate that changes in fitness are strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. Dynamics and Fate of Beneficial Mutations Under Lineage Contamination by Linked Deleterious Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pénisson, Sophie; Singh, Tanya; Sniegowski, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Beneficial mutations drive adaptive evolution, yet their selective advantage does not ensure their fixation. Haldane’s application of single-type branching process theory showed that genetic drift alone could cause the extinction of newly arising beneficial mutations with high probability. With linkage, deleterious mutations will affect the dynamics of beneficial mutations and might further increase their extinction probability. Here, we model the lineage dynamics of a newly arising beneficial mutation as a multitype branching process. Our approach accounts for the combined effects of drift and the stochastic accumulation of linked deleterious mutations, which we call lineage contamination. We first study the lineage-contamination phenomenon in isolation, deriving dynamics and survival probabilities (the complement of extinction probabilities) of beneficial lineages. We find that survival probability is zero when U≳sb, where U is deleterious mutation rate and sb is the selective advantage of the beneficial mutation in question, and is otherwise depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by ∼1−U/sb. We then put the lineage contamination phenomenon into the context of an evolving population by incorporating the effects of background selection. We find that, under the combined effects of lineage contamination and background selection, ensemble survival probability is never zero but is depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by e−εU/s¯b, where s¯b is mean selective advantage of beneficial mutations, and ε=1−e−1≈0.63. This factor, and other bounds derived from it, are independent of the fitness effects of deleterious mutations. At high enough mutation rates, lineage contamination can depress fixation probabilities to values that approach zero. This fact suggests that high mutation rates can, perhaps paradoxically, (1) alleviate competition among beneficial mutations, or (2) potentially even shut

  10. Mutation analysis of Swedish haemophilia B families - high frequency of unique mutations.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, A; Letelier, A; Halldén, C; Ljung, R

    2016-05-01

    Haemophilia B is caused by a heterogeneous spectrum of mutations. Mutation characterization is important in genetic counselling, prenatal diagnosis and to predict risk of inhibitor development. To study the mutation spectrum, frequency of unique recurrent mutations, genotype-phenotype association and inhibitor development in a population-based study of the complete Swedish haemophilia B population. The study included, facilitated by centralized DNA diagnostics, the complete registered Swedish haemophilia B population (113 families: 47 severe, 22 moderate and 44 mild), each represented by a single patient. Mutation characterization was performed by conventional sequencing of all exons and haplotyping by genotyping of single nucleotide variants and microsatellites. A mutation was found in every family: eight had large deletions, three had small deletions (<10 base pair) and 102 had single base pair substitutions (69 missense, 26 nonsense, four splice site and three promoter). Ten novel mutations were found and were predicted to be deleterious. Sixteen mutations (one total gene deletion, 14 substitutions and one acceptor splice site) were present in more than one family. Of the single nucleotide mutations (37/102), 36% arose at CpG sites. Haplotyping of families with identical mutations and present analyses showed that the frequency of unique mutations was at least 65%. Inhibitors developed in 9/47 (19%) patients with severe haemophilia B. The spectrum of haemophilia B mutations reveals at least 65% of the families carry a unique mutation, but with more inhibitor patients than reported internationally, probably as a result of many 'null' mutations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S.; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; de, Subhajyoti

    2016-06-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed “duon mutations” due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures.

  12. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qun-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Morimoto, Sachio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy. PMID:23610579

  13. Sequential acquisition of mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in next-generation sequencing technologies allows us to discover frequent mutations throughout the coding regions of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), potentially providing us with virtually a complete spectrum of driver mutations in this disease. As shown by many study groups these days, such driver mutations are acquired in a gene-specific fashion. For instance, DDX41 mutations are observed in germline cells long before MDS presentation. In blood samples from healthy elderly individuals, somatic DNMT3A and TET2 mutations are detected as age-related clonal hematopoiesis and are believed to be a risk factor for hematological neoplasms. In MDS, mutations of genes such as NRAS and FLT3, designated as Type-1 genes, may be significantly associated with leukemic evolution. Another type (Type-2) of genes, including RUNX1 and GATA2, are related to progression from low-risk to high-risk MDS. Overall, various driver mutations are sequentially acquired in MDS, at a specific time, in either germline cells, normal hematopoietic cells, or clonal MDS cells.

  14. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  15. The mutational spectrum in Waardenburg syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Read, A.P.; Tassabehji, M.; Liu, X.Z.

    1994-09-01

    101 individuals or families with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) or related abnormalities have been screened for mutations in the PAX3 gene. PAX3 mutations were seen in 19 of 35 individuals or families with features of Type I Waardenburg syndrome. None of the 47 Type 2 WS families showed any PAX3 mutation, nor did any of 19 individuals with other neural crest syndromes or pigmentary disturbances. PAX3 mutations included substitutions of highly conserved amino acids, splice site mutations, nonsense mutations and frameshifting deletions or insertions. One patient (with Type 1 WS, mental retardation and growth retardation) had a chromosomal deletion of 7-8more » Mb encompassing the PAX3 gene. Mutations were seen in each of exons 2-6, with a concentration in the 5{prime} part of the paired box (exon 2) and the 3{prime} part of the homeobox (exon 6). There was no evident relation between the molecular change and the clinical manifestations in mutation carriers. We conclude that PAX3 dosage effects very specifically produce dystopia canthorum, the distinguishing feature of Type 1 WS, and variably produce the other features of Type 1 WS depending on genetic background or chance events. Two of the Type 2 families showed linkage to markers from 3p14, the location of the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix-zipper protein which is the homologue of the mouse microphthalmia gene product. It is likely that mutations in MITF cause some but not all Type 2 WS.« less

  16. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma survival.

    PubMed

    Nagore, Eduardo; Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, Sívaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Soriano, Virtudes; Frank, Christoph; Traves, Victor; Quecedo, Esther; Sanjuan-Gimenez, Josefa; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Maria Teresa; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in targeted therapies, the treatment of advanced melanoma remains an exercise in disease management, hence a need for biomarkers for identification of at-risk primary melanoma patients. In this study, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of TERT promoter mutations in primary melanomas. Tumors from 300 patients with stage I/II melanoma were sequenced for TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations. Cumulative curves were drawn for patients with and without mutations with progression-free and melanoma-specific survival as outcomes. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effect of the mutations on survivals. Individually, presence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations associated with poor disease-free and melanoma-specific survival with modification of the effect by the rs2853669 polymorphism within the TERT promoter. Hazard ratio (HR) for simultaneous occurrence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations for disease-free survival was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2-4.4) and for melanoma-specific survival 5.8 (95% CI 1.9-18.3). The effect of the mutations on melanoma-specific survival in noncarriers of variant allele of the polymorphism was significant (HR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4-15.2) but could not be calculated for the carriers due to low number of events. The variant allele per se showed association with increased survival (HR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The data in this study provide preliminary evidence that TERT promoter mutations in combination with BRAF/NRAS mutations can be used to identify patients at risk of aggressive disease and the possibility of refinement of the classification with inclusion of the rs2853669 polymorphism within TERT promoter. © 2016 UICC.

  17. BBS mutational analysis: a strategic approach.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Gail; Deveault, Catherine; Héon, Elise

    2011-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, OMIM 209900) is a rare autosomal recessive, clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder with 15 genes identified. The large amount of coding sequence challenges the cost effectiveness of mutational analysis of BBS. We present our mutational analysis experience (83 BBS families) in the context of the literature published up to September 2010, to provide a comprehensive tabulation of all BBS1-BBS12 mutant alleles and optimize a screening approach. We identified two BBS disease alleles in 76% of probands. Together BBS1, BBS2, BBS10 and BBS12 account for 82.4% of published unrelated alleles. On average 82% of published alleles are private. The 267 published principal mutations were positioned and analysis of their distribution allowed the design of a mutation screening strategy. Starting by screening for recurrent mutations, for example BBS1 M390R (10% of our cohort) and BBS10 C91LfsX5 (6% of our cohort), allowed a capture of 23.5% of the principal mutated alleles. Following a hierarchy of frequently involved exons, subsequent sequencing of the 4 most commonly involved genes, BBS1, BBS10, BBS2 and BBS12 could bring this mutation detection to at least 62%. The 16 most frequently recurring alleles could be identified with the use of simple screening methods such as restriction enzyme digest and ARMS assay and require sequencing in only a few instances. Our results suggest that mutational analysis of such a "rare" genetically heterogeneous condition benefits from pooling of data. This allows the development of efficient and cost-conscious screening mutational analysis strategies.

  18. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Detection ofEGFRGene Mutation by Mutation-oriented LAMP Method.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Kumasaka, Akira; Ando, Tomohiro; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2018-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of molecular therapeutics for non-small cell lung cancer. EGFR gene mutations at codons 746-753 promote constitutive EGFR activation and result in worst prognosis. However, these mutations augment the therapeutic effect of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Therefore, the detection of EGFR gene mutations is important for determining treatment planning. The aim of the study was to establish a method to detect EGFR gene mutations at codons 746-753. EGFR gene mutation at codons 746-753 in six cancer cell lines were investigated. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based procedure was developed, that employed peptide nucleic acid to suppress amplification of the wild-type allele. This mutation-oriented LAMP can amplify the DNA fragment of the EGFR gene with codons 746-753 mutations within 30 min. Moreover, boiled cells can work as template resources. Mutation oriented-LAMP assay for EGFR gene mutation is sensitive on extracted DNA. This procedure would be capable of detecting EGFR gene mutation in sputum, pleural effusion, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid or trans-bronchial lung biopsy by chair side. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Mutations in EZH2 Cause Weaver Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, William T.; Hood, Rebecca L.; Zhan, Shing Hei; Bulman, Dennis E.; Fejes, Anthony P.; Moore, Richard; Mungall, Andrew J.; Eydoux, Patrice; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; An, Jianghong; Marra, Marco A.; Chitayat, David; Boycott, Kym M.; Weaver, David D.; Jones, Steven J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We used trio-based whole-exome sequencing to analyze two families affected by Weaver syndrome, including one of the original families reported in 1974. Filtering of rare variants in the affected probands against the parental variants identified two different de novo mutations in the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2). Sanger sequencing of EZH2 in a third classically-affected proband identified a third de novo mutation in this gene. These data show that mutations in EZH2 cause Weaver syndrome. PMID:22177091

  1. Melanoma: from mutations to medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Hensin; Chin, Lynda; Garraway, Levi A.; Fisher, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma is often considered one of the most aggressive and treatment-resistant human cancers. It is a disease that, due to the presence of melanin pigment, was accurately diagnosed earlier than most other malignancies and that has been subjected to countless therapeutic strategies. Aside from early surgical resection, no therapeutic modality has been found to afford a high likelihood of curative outcome. However, discoveries reported in recent years have revealed a near avalanche of breakthroughs in the melanoma field—breakthroughs that span fundamental understanding of the molecular basis of the disease all the way to new therapeutic strategies that produce unquestionable clinical benefit. These discoveries have been born from the successful fruits of numerous researchers working in many—sometimes-related, although also distinct—biomedical disciplines. Discoveries of frequent mutations involving BRAF(V600E), developmental and oncogenic roles for the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) pathway, clinical efficacy of BRAF-targeted small molecules, and emerging mechanisms underlying resistance to targeted therapeutics represent just a sample of the findings that have created a striking inflection in the quest for clinically meaningful progress in the melanoma field. PMID:22661227

  2. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  3. accuMUlate: A mutation caller designed for mutation accumulation experiments.

    PubMed

    Winter, David J; Wu, Steven H; Howell, Abigail A; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Zufall, Rebecca A; Cartwright, Reed A

    2018-03-16

    Mutation accumulation (MA) is the most widely used method for directly studying the effects of mutation. By sequencing whole genomes from MA lines, researchers can directly study the rate and molecular spectra of spontaneous mutations and use these results to understand how mutation contributes to biological processes. At present there is no software designed specifically for identifying mutations from MA lines. Here we describe accuMUlate, a probabilistic mutation caller that reflects the design of a typical MA experiments while being flexible enough to accommodate properties unique to any particular experiment. accuMUlate is available from https://github.com/dwinter/accuMUlate. david.winter@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  5. Early mutation bursts in colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Siegmund, Kimberly; Marjoram, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is an evolutionary process involving accumulation of mutations, copy number alterations, and cancer stem cell (CSC) division and differentiation. As direct observation of this process is impossible, inference regarding when mutations occur and how stem cells divide is difficult. However, this ancestral information is encoded within the tumor itself, in the form of intratumoral heterogeneity of the tumor cell genomes. Here we present a framework that allows simulation of these processes and estimation of mutation rates at the various stages of tumor development and CSC division patterns for single-gland sequencing data from colorectal tumors. We parameterize the mutation rate and the CSC division pattern, and successfully retrieve their posterior distributions based on DNA sequence level data. Our approach exploits Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), a method that is becoming widely-used for problems of ancestral inference. PMID:28257429

  6. CRB1 mutations in inherited retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Léveillard, Thierry; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Zeitz, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the CRB1 gene are associated with variable phenotypes of severe retinal dystrophies, ranging from Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) to rod-cone dystrophy (also called retinitis pigmentosa (RP)). Moreover, retinal dystrophies resulting from CRB1 mutations may be accompanied by specific fundus features: preservation of the para-arteriolar retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE) and retinal telangiectasia with exudation (also referred to as Coats-like vasculopathy). In this publication we report seven novel mutations and classify over 150 reported CRB1 sequence variants that were found in more that 240 patients. The data from previous reports was used to analyse a potential correlation between CRB1 variants and the clinical features of respective patients. This meta-analysis suggests that the differential phenotype of patients with CRB1 mutations is due to additional modifying factors rather than particular mutant allele combination. PMID:22065545

  7. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  8. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca) PMID:9016528

  9. Effect of Mutation Order on Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nangalia, Jyoti; Silber, Yvonne; Wedge, David C.; Grinfeld, Jacob; Baxter, E. Joanna; Massie, Charles E.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Menon, Suraj; Godfrey, Anna L.; Dimitropoulou, Danai; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carles; Döhner, Konstanze; Harrison, Claire N.; Vassiliou, George S.; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Campbell, Peter J.; Green, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancers result from the accumulation of somatic mutations, and their properties are thought to reflect the sum of these mutations. However, little is known about the effect of the order in which mutations are acquired. METHODS We determined mutation order in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms by genotyping hematopoietic colonies or by means of next-generation sequencing. Stem cells and progenitor cells were isolated to study the effect of mutation order on mature and immature hematopoietic cells. RESULTS The age at which a patient presented with a myeloproliferative neoplasm, acquisition of JAK2 V617F homozygosity, and the balance of immature progenitors were all influenced by mutation order. As compared with patients in whom the TET2 mutation was acquired first (hereafter referred to as “TET2-first patients”), patients in whom the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation was acquired first (“JAK2-first patients”) had a greater likelihood of presenting with polycythemia vera than with essential thrombocythemia, an increased risk of thrombosis, and an increased sensitivity of JAK2-mutant progenitors to ruxolitinib in vitro. Mutation order influenced the proliferative response to JAK2 V617F and the capacity of double-mutant hematopoietic cells and progenitor cells to generate colony-forming cells. Moreover, the hematopoietic stem-and-progenitor-cell compartment was dominated by TET2 single-mutant cells in TET2-first patients but by JAK2–TET2 double-mutant cells in JAK2-first patients. Prior mutation of TET2 altered the transcriptional consequences of JAK2 V617F in a cell-intrinsic manner and prevented JAK2 V617F from up-regulating genes associated with proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The order in which JAK2 and TET2 mutations were acquired influenced clinical features, the response to targeted therapy, the biology of stem and progenitor cells, and clonal evolution in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. (Funded by Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

  10. Characterization of novel entecavir resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Sanae; Murakami, Shuko; Omagari, Katsumi; Matsui, Takeshi; Iio, Etsuko; Isogawa, Masanori; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Karino, Yoshiyasu; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-09-01

    Entecavir (ETV) is approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, but the virus can acquire resistance to the drug. This requires lamivudine resistance mutations (LAMr) and at least one additional mutation. Here, we characterized two novel mutations, rtI163V and rtA186T, associated with viral breakthrough (VBT) in an ETV-refractory patient. HBV from an ETV-refractory patient was sequenced, and newly identified mutations were inserted into a replication-competent clone by mutagenesis. Clones were analyzed for replication efficacy and susceptibility to ETV in vitro. Chimeric mice with human hepatocytes were inoculated with the patient's serum at VBT, and monitored for viral mutation pattern using a next-generation sequencing approach. RtI163V and rtA186T mutations were detected together with LAMr (rtL180M and rtM204V) at VBT. RtA186T plus LAMr reduced susceptibility to ETV more than 111.1-fold compared with the wild-type clone, while rtI163V plus LAMr resulted in a 20.4-fold reduction. RtA186T significantly reduced viral replication efficacy, while the rtI163V mutation rescued it. Interestingly, the viral mutation pattern in the chimeric mice indicated dominant (or selective) proliferation of a clone containing rtI163V and rtA186T mutations plus LAMr under ETV treatment. Three-dimensional docking simulation indicated that rtA186T reduced the binding affinity of the HBV polymerase to ETV. VBT in this ETV-refractory patient is attributable to the novel ETV resistance mutations rtI163V and rtA186T. RtA186T was apparently responsible for ETV resistance but the selection of a clone with the double mutation plus LAMr suggests that rtI163V is required to sustain viral fitness. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genotyping for known Mediterranean alpha-thalassemia point mutations using a multiplex amplification refractory mutation system.

    PubMed

    Lacerra, Giuseppina; Musollino, Gennaro; Di Noce, Francesca; Prezioso, Romeo; Carestia, Clementina

    2007-02-01

    We report the conditions of a multiplex-amplifiction refractory mutation system (ARMS) for genotyping for nine assay for the detection of alpha1 Hb J-Oxford and -alpha3.7 -AC. The method is reproducible, reliable, simple, rapid, inexpensive and provides genotype diagnosis in >70% of point-mutation carriers in Mediterranean countries. Moreover, it allows investigation of the structure of mutated alleles by sequencing ARMS-amplicons.

  12. Mutation specific immunohistochemistry is highly specific for the presence of calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Andrici, Juliana; Farzin, Mahtab; Clarkson, Adele; Sioson, Loretta; Sheen, Amy; Watson, Nicole; Toon, Christopher W; Koleth, Mary; Stevenson, William; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    The identification of somatic calreticulin (CALR) mutations can be used to confirm the diagnosis of a myeloproliferative disorder in Philadelphia chromosome-negative, JAK2 and MPL wild type patients with thrombocytosis. All pathogenic CALR mutations result in an identical C-terminal protein and therefore may be identifiable by immunohistochemistry. We sought to test the sensitivity and specificity of mutation specific immunohistochemistry for pathogenic CALR mutations using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (clone CAL2). Immunohistochemistry for mutant calreticulin was performed on the most recent bone marrow trephine from a cohort of patients enriched for CALR mutations and compared to mutation testing performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by fragment length analysis. Twenty-nine patients underwent both immunohistochemistry and molecular testing. Eleven patients had CALR mutation, and immunohistochemistry was positive in nine (82%). One discrepant case appeared to represent genuine false negative immunohistochemistry. The other may be attributable to a 12 year delay between the bone marrow trephine and the specimen which underwent molecular testing, particularly because a liver biopsy performed at the same time as molecular testing demonstrated positive staining in megakaryocytes in extramedullary haematopoiesis. All 18 cases which lacked CALR mutation demonstrated negative staining. In this population enriched for CALR mutations, the specificity was 100%; sensitivity 82-91%, positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 90-95%. We conclude that mutation specific immunohistochemistry is highly specific for the presence of CALR mutations. Whilst it may not identify all mutations, it may be very valuable in routine clinical care. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Transglutaminase 1 mutations in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: private and recurrent mutations in an isolated population.

    PubMed Central

    Laiho, E; Ignatius, J; Mikkola, H; Yee, V C; Teller, D C; Niemi, K M; Saarialho-Kere, U; Kere, J; Palotie, A

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare, heterogenous keratinization disorder of the skin, classically divided into two clinical subtypes, lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and nonbullous congenital ichthyosiformis erythroderma (CIE). Recently, strong evidence for the involvement of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) in LI has evolved. We have studied ARCI in the isolated Finnish population, in which recessive disorders are often caused by single mutations enriched by a founder effect. Surprisingly, five different mutations of TGM1 (Arg141His, Arg142Cys, Gly217Ser, Val378Leu, and Arg395Leu) were found in Finnish ARCI patients. In addition to affected LI patients, we also identified TGM1 mutations in CIE patients. Moreover, haplotype analysis of the chromosomes carrying the most common mutation, a C-->T transition changing Arg142 to Cys, revealed that the same mutation has been introduced twice in the Finnish population. In addition to this Arg142Cys mutation, three other mutations, in Arg141 and Arg142, have been described elsewhere, in other populations. These findings suggest that this region of TGM1 is more susceptible to mutation. The corresponding amino acid sequence is conserved in other transglutaminases, but, for example, coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) mutations do not cluster in this region. Protein modeling of the Arg142Cys mutation suggested disruption or destabilization of the protein. In transfection studies, the closely related transglutaminase FXIII protein with the corresponding mutation was shown to be susceptible to degradation in COS cells, further supporting evidence of the destabilizing effect of the Arg142Cys mutation in TGM1. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9326318

  14. Comparative mutational analyses of influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Peter Pak-Hang; Rogozin, Igor B.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Ng, Hoi Yee

    2015-01-01

    The error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and external selective pressures are the driving forces for RNA viral diversity. When confounded by selective pressures, it is difficult to assess if influenza A viruses (IAV) that have a wide host range possess comparable or distinct spontaneous mutational frequency in their RdRPs. We used in-depth bioinformatics analyses to assess the spontaneous mutational frequencies of two RdRPs derived from human seasonal (A/Wuhan/359/95; Wuhan) and H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04; VN1203) viruses using the mini-genome system with a common firefly luciferase reporter serving as the template. High-fidelity reverse transcriptase was applied to generate high-quality mutational spectra which allowed us to assess and compare the mutational frequencies and mutable motifs along a target sequence of the two RdRPs of two different subtypes. We observed correlated mutational spectra (τ correlation P < 0.0001), comparable mutational frequencies (H3N2:5.8 ± 0.9; H5N1:6.0 ± 0.5), and discovered a highly mutable motif “(A)AAG” for both Wuhan and VN1203 RdRPs. Results were then confirmed with two recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) viruses that possess RdRP derived from Wuhan or VN1203 (RG-PR8×WuhanPB2, PB1, PA, NP and RG-PR8×VN1203PB2, PB1, PA, NP). Applying novel bioinformatics analysis on influenza mutational spectra, we provide a platform for a comprehensive analysis of the spontaneous mutation spectra for an RNA virus. PMID:25404565

  15. Enzyme-Catalyzed Mutation in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    instance, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are converted by cellular cytochrome P450 enzymes into activated epox- ides, which can then react to form...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0247 TITLE: Enzyme -Catalyzed Mutation in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Reuben Harris CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Enzyme -catalyzed Mutation in Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0247 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Reuben S. Harris

  16. Mutation and catastrophe in the aging genome.

    PubMed

    Milholland, Brandon; Suh, Yousin; Vijg, Jan

    2017-08-01

    In the 1960s, Leslie Orgel proposed what is now known as the error catastrophe theory of aging, arguing that errors in protein translation that reduce the fidelity of the protein-translating enzymes would lead to a feedback loop of increasingly inaccurate protein synthesis, terminating in the death of the organism. This mechanism of aging would be consistent with the exponential increase of mortality observed in humans, but the error catastrophe theory of aging has been generally disregarded by researchers due to a lack of evidence for an age-related increase in protein errors. Another theory of aging, proposed at roughly the same time, is Leo Szilard's two-hit model of somatic mutation accumulation, which assumed a linear increase in mutations over time but explained the nonlinear pattern of human mortality through a mechanism of genetic and cellular redundancy which kept mortality low until the redundancy was exhausted, at which point mortality rapidly rose. Here, we synthesize the two theories, along with the latest advances in genomics research. We propose a new catastrophe theory of aging, this time with somatic mutations as the primary agent of the feedback loop. Similar to protein errors affecting translation itself, somatic mutations in genes involved in DNA replication and repair would lead to a feedback loop of exponentially increasing mutation load. The difference from protein errors is that somatic mutations would mainly affect gene regulatory regions rather than the much smaller part of the genome encoding protein-coding information. Although the self-stimulating accumulation of somatic mutations is not mutually exclusive with the Szilard-based loss of redundancy, we present evidence that suggests that the accumulated mutations themselves could be numerous enough to cause mortality. Finally, we acknowledge the limits of our current knowledge and propose a course of research practices that will help to confirm or refute our model and advance the field

  17. BRAF MUTATIONS IN HAIRY CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Tiacci, Enrico; Trifonov, Vladimir; Schiavoni, Gianluca; Holmes, Antony; Kern, Wolfgang; Martelli, Maria Paola; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Bigerna, Barbara; Pacini, Roberta; Wells, Victoria; Sportoletti, Paolo; Pettirossi, Valentina; Mannucci, Roberta; Elliott, Oliver; Liso, Arcangelo; Ambrosetti, Achille; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Forconi, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Inghirami, Giorgio; Capponi, Monia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Patti, Caterina; Arcaini, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Pileri, Stefano; Haferlach, Claudia; Schnittger, Susanne; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Foà, Robin; Farinelli, Laurent; Haferlach, Torsten; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rabadan, Raul; Falini, Brunangelo

    2013-01-01

    Background Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a well defined clinico-pathological entity whose underlying genetic lesion is still obscure. Methods We searched for HCL-associated mutations by massively parallel sequencing of the whole exome of leukemic and matched normal mononuclear cells purified from the peripheral blood of one patient with HCL. Results Whole exome sequencing identified 5 missense somatic clonal mutations that were confirmed at Sanger sequencing, including a heterozygous V600E mutation involving the BRAF gene. Since the BRAF V600E mutation is oncogenic in other tumors, further analyses were focused on this genetic lesion. Sanger sequencing detected mutated BRAF in 46/46 additional HCL patients (47/47 including the index case; 100%). None of the 193 peripheral B-cell lymphomas/leukemias other than HCL that were investigated carried the BRAF V600E mutation, including 36 cases of splenic marginal zone lymphomas and unclassifiable splenic lymphomas/leukemias. Immunohistological and Western blot studies showed that HCL cells express phospho-MEK and phospho-ERK (the downstream targets of the BRAF kinase), indicating a constitutive activation of the RAF-MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in HCL. In vitro incubation of BRAF-mutated primary leukemic cells from 5 HCL patients with PLX-4720, a specific inhibitor of active BRAF, led to marked decrease of phosphorylated ERK and MEK. Conclusions The BRAF V600E mutation was present in all HCL patients investigated. This finding may have relevant implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis and targeted therapy of HCL (Funded by the Associazione Italiana Ricerca Cancro and others). PMID:21663470

  18. Mechanisms of human minisatellite mutation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Håkan; Rannug, Ulf

    2006-06-25

    Minisatellites are tandem repeat loci, with repeat units ranging in size from 5 bp to 100 bp. The total lengths of repeat arrays vary from about 0.5 kb to 30 kb, and excessive variability in allele length at human minisatellite loci is the result of germline-specific complex recombination events generating new length alleles. Minisatellite alleles also mutate to new lengths in somatic cells, but this occurs at a much lower rate than in the germline. Since recombination is involved in minisatellite mutation, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a suitable model organism that has been employed to further dissect the molecular basis of mutation events at human minisatellites. These studies have shown that the mutational behaviour of a minisatellite in meiosis is not determined by the intrinsic properties of the repeat array, but are highly dependent on the position of the minisatellite in the genome. The processes for minisatellite mutation in yeast and humans are identical in the sense that mutation is indeed driven by meiotic recombination, but differ with regard to the types of structural changes that are generated by the recombination events. Tetrad analyses showed that inter-allelic transfers of repeats occur by conversion and not crossing over, and that several chromatids can be involved in successive recombination events in one meiosis, resulting in mutant alleles in several spores. It has been demonstrated that the genes SPO11 and RAD50, involved in the initiation of recombination events, are required for human minisatellite mutation in yeast meiosis. Intrinsic properties of the repeat array appear to determine the stability of human minisatellites in yeast mitosis, since mitotic mutation rates in yeast are highly variable between minisatellites. The repair genes RAD27 and DNA2 stabilise human minisatellites in yeast mitosis, while RAD5 has no effect on mitotic stability. MSH2 depresses human minisatellite frequency in meiotic cells of yeast.

  19. Simulated coevolution in a mutating ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Martins, J. S.

    2000-03-01

    The bit-string Penna model is used to simulate the competition between an asexual parthenogenetic and a sexual population sharing the same environment. A newborn of either population can mutate and become a part of the other with some probability. In a stable environment the sexual population soon dies out. When an infestation by rapidly mutating genetically coupled parasites is introduced, however, sexual reproduction prevails, as predicted by the so-called Red Queen hypothesis for the evolution of sex.

  20. ENZYME-CATALYZED MUTATION IN BREAST CANCER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    mechanisms, respectively. Positive results will be significant because they will delineate a major source of mutations and epigenetic changes in breast...mechanisms, respectively. Positive results will be significant because they will delineate a major source of mutations and epigenetic changes in...target of the breast cancer therapeutic tamoxifen) G; Guanine (a DNA and RNA base) MeC; 5-methyl-cytosine (a common epigenetic modification in human

  1. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070; Wang, Guang-Zhong

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} There exists a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. {yields} This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. {yields} A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot providemore » a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.« less

  2. GJB2 mutations in deaf population of Ilam (Western Iran): a different pattern of mutation distribution.

    PubMed

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Mahmoudi, Hamdollah; Ahmadzadeh, Soleiman; Bakhtiyari, Salar

    2016-05-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory defect caused by heterogeneous factors. Up to now, more than 60 mutations in genes have been documented for nonsyndromic hearing loss. Hence, finding the causal gene in affected families could be a laborious and time-consuming process. GJB2 mutations, here, were investigated among deaf subjects of Ilam for the first time. In this study, we studied 62 unrelated patients with non-syndromic autosomal recessive deafness from 62 families. The most common mutation of GJB2, 35delG was checked, followed by direct sequencing of the GJB2 gene for determination of other mutations. In silico analyses were also performed using available software. In nine families, mutations in the connexin 26 gene were observed. In the studied population, R32H was the most common mutation. 35delG, W24X, and R127H were other mutations found in this study. In silico analyses showed pathogenicity of 35delG, R32H, and W24X but not R127H. Low frequency of GJB2 mutations in this population is probably indicative of the fact that other genes may be involved in nonsyndromic hearing loss in Ilam populations. In the other hand, the vicinity of Ilam and Iraq suggests that GJB2 mutations have likely a low frequency in this population.

  3. A novel MERTK mutation causing retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Al-Khersan, Hasenin; Shah, Kaanan P; Jung, Segun C; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi K; Grassi, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited retinal dystrophy. To date, over 80 genes have been implicated in RP. However, the disease demonstrates significant locus and allelic heterogeneity not entirely captured by current testing platforms. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the underlying mutation in a patient with RP without a molecular diagnosis after initial genetic testing. Whole-exome sequencing of the affected proband was performed. Candidate gene mutations were selected based on adherence to expected genetic inheritance pattern and predicted pathogenicity. Sanger sequencing of MERTK was completed on the patient's unaffected mother, affected brother, and unaffected sister to determine genetic phase. Eight sequence variants were identified in the proband in known RP-associated genes. Sequence analysis revealed that the proband was a compound heterozygote with two independent mutations in MERTK, a novel nonsense mutation (c.2179C > T) and a previously reported missense variant (c.2530C > T). The proband's affected brother also had both mutations. Predicted phase was confirmed in unaffected family members. Our study identifies a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK in a family with RP and no prior molecular diagnosis. The present study also demonstrates the clinical value of exome sequencing in determining the genetic basis of Mendelian diseases when standard genetic testing is unsuccessful.

  4. Mutational status of nevus associated-melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Shitara, D.; Tell-Martí, G.; Badenas, C.; Enokihara, M.M.S.S.; Alós, L.; Larque, A.B.; Michalany, Nilceo; Puig-Butille, J.; Carrera, C.; Malvehy, J.; Puig, S.; Bagatin, E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melanoma origin has always been a debated subject, as well as the role of adjacent melanocytic nevi. Epidemiological and histopathological studies point to melanomas arising either de novo or from a nevus. Methods Sixty-one melanomas found in association with a preexisting nevus were microdissected, after careful selection of cell subpopulations and submitted to Sanger sequencing of the BRAF, NRAS, C-KIT, PPP6C, STK19 and RAC1 genes. Each gene was evaluated twice in all samples by sequencing or by sequencing and another confirmation method, allele-specific fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis detection, or by SNaPshot Analysis. Only mutations confirmed via two different molecular methods or twice by sequencing were considered positive. Results The majority of cases presented concordance of mutational status between melanoma and the associated nevus for all 6 genes (40/60; 66.7%). Nine cases presented concomitant BRAF and NRAS mutations, including one case, in which both the melanoma and the adjacent nevus harbored V600E and Q61K double mutations. In two cases, both melanoma and associated nevus, located on acral sites were BRAF mutated, including an acral lentiginous melanoma. Conclusions This is the largest nevus-associated melanoma series molecularly evaluated to our knowledge. The majority of melanomas and adjacent nevi in our sample share the same mutational profile, corroborating the theory that the adjacent nevus and melanoma are clonally related and that melanoma originated within a nevus. PMID:25857817

  5. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  6. NMNAT1 mutations cause Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Marni J; Zhang, Qi; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kannabiran, Chitra; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Chakarova, Christina; Audo, Isabelle; Mackay, Donna S; Zeitz, Christina; Borman, Arundhati Dev; Staniszewska, Magdalena; Shukla, Rachna; Palavalli, Lakshmi; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Waseem, Naushin H; Jalali, Subhadra; Perin, Juan C; Place, Emily; Ostrovsky, Julian; Xiao, Rui; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Consugar, Mark; Webster, Andrew R; Sahel, José-Alain; Moore, Anthony T; Berson, Eliot L; Liu, Qin; Gai, Xiaowu; Pierce, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an infantile-onset form of inherited retinal degeneration characterized by severe vision loss1, 2. Two-thirds of LCA cases are caused by mutations in 17 known disease genes3 (RetNet Retinal Information Network). Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.25G>A, p.Val9Met) in NMNAT1 as likely disease-causing in two siblings of a consanguineous Pakistani kindred affected by LCA. This mutation segregated with disease in their kindred, including in three other children with LCA. NMNAT1 resides in the previously identified LCA9 locus and encodes the nuclear isoform of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis4, 5. Functional studies showed the p.Val9Met mutation decreased NMNAT1 enzyme activity. Sequencing NMNAT1 in 284 unrelated LCA families identified 14 rare mutations in 13 additional affected individuals. These results are the first to link an NMNAT isoform to disease and indicate that NMNAT1 mutations cause LCA. PMID:22842227

  7. New mutations in CMT 1 and HNPP

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberghe, A.; Boucherat, M.; Bonnebouche, C.

    1994-09-01

    The majority of mutations in CMT 1 (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1) are due to a duplication of a 1.5 Mb fragment from chromosome 17 containing the PMP22 myelin gene. In addition, micromutations are found in the genes for PMP22 and myelin Po. We collected data from over one hundred families with a duplication in 17p11.2. In about 10% of these families, a de novo mutation was observed. All parents were clinically examined as normal and correct paternity was confirmed. Some families were informative for polymorphic probes located in the duplicated region, and we could deduce a majority of new mutationsmore » to be from paternal origin. HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) is believed to be the reciprocal product of an unequal crossing over underlying the CMT 1 mutation and is due to a deletion of the 1.5 Mb fragment. One new HNPP mutation was found among 7 deleted HNPP families. This mutation is of paternal origin. Clinically assigned CMT 1 patients without a duplication are screened for micromutations applying the SSCP technique. In one family, a de novo mutation was found in the gene for Po.« less

  8. Sensitive detection of BRAF V600E mutation by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS)-PCR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background BRAF mutations occur in approximately 8% of all human cancers and approach 50% in melanoma and papillary carcinoma of thyroid. These mutations provide potentially valuable diagnostic, prognostic and treatment response prediction markers. A sensitive, specific, low-cost assay to detect these mutations is needed. Results To detect BRAF V600E mutation in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue, we developed a method using Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS)-PCR. This method was designed to amplify three products in a single reaction tube: a 200 bp common product serving as an amplification control, a 144 bp BRAF V600E specific product, and a 97 bp wild-type (wt) specific product. The sensitivity of this method was determined to be as low as 0.5% for the BRAF V600E allele in a wild-type background. This method was successfully validated in 72 thyroid tumors. It detected V600E mutation in 22 out of 33 (67%) of the conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 8 out of 12 (75%) of the tall-cell variant of PTC, whereas none of the 10 follicular variant of PTC showed BRAF V600E mutation. In addition, none of the 14 follicular adenomas and 3 follicular carcinomas had BRAF V600E mutation. As a comparison method, direct dideoxy sequencing found only 27 out of 30 (90%) mutations detected by ARMS-PCR method, suggesting that this ARMS-PCR method has higher sensitivity. Conclusions Our ARMS-PCR method provides a new tool for rapid detection of BRAF V600E mutation. Our results indicate that ARMS-PCR is more sensitive than automated dideoxy sequencing in detecting low BRAF V600E allele burdens in FFPE tumor specimen. The strategy of this ARMS-PCR design may be adapted for early detection of point mutations of a variety of biomarker genes. PMID:24252159

  9. Identification of mutations including de novo mutations in Korean patients with hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Kim, U K; Chae, J J; Kim, D J; Oh, H Y; Kim, B J; Lee, C C

    2001-05-01

    Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder involving the abnormal function of ion channels and it is characterized by paralysis attacks of varying severity, accompanied by a fall in blood potassium levels. Linkage analysis showed that the candidate locus responsible for hypoPP was localized to chromosome 1q31-32, and this locus encoded the muscle dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel alpha(1)-subunit (CACNA1S). So far, three different mutations in CACNA1S gene have been identified in patients with hypoPP: Arg528His, Arg1239His and Arg1239Gly in Caucasian patients. However, there are few reports about the mutations of CACNA1S gene in other races. In this study, four Korean families with five hypoPP patients were screened for mutations of CACNA1S gene with polymerase chain reaction-based restriction analysis and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. To determine the mode of inheritance, haplotype analysis was done with three microsatellite markers (D1S1726, CACNL1A3, and D1S1723). Arg528His mutation was detected in three families, and one family had no known mutations. Moreover, for the first time, we detected de novo Arg528His mutations in two out of three families with hypoPP. Haplotype analysis using three microsatellite markers (D1S1726, CACNL1A3, and D1S1723) suggested the occurrence of de novo Arg528His mutations in two of the three families with Arg528His mutation. Arg528His mutations of CACNA1S, including de novo Arg528His mutations, were found in Korean patients with hypoPP. These results imply that de novo mutation, in addition to non-penetrance, is one of the genetic mechanisms that can explain the previous clinical observation that hypoPP occurs sporadically without family history.

  10. MUTATIONS INDUCED BY URBAN AIR AND DRINKING WATER: DO THEY LEAVE A MUTATIONAL SIGNATURE IN HUMAN TUMORS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutations Induced by Urban Air and Drinking Water: Do They Leave a Mutational Signature in Human Tumors?

    Mutation spectra of complex environmental mixtures have been determined thus far only in Salmonella. We have determined mutation spectra for the particulate organics ...

  11. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation.

    PubMed

    Malarz, Krzysztof

    2007-04-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  12. Clustered Mutation Signatures Reveal that Error-Prone DNA Repair Targets Mutations to Active Genes.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2017-07-27

    Many processes can cause the same nucleotide change in a genome, making the identification of the mechanisms causing mutations a difficult challenge. Here, we show that clustered mutations provide a more precise fingerprint of mutagenic processes. Of nine clustered mutation signatures identified from >1,000 tumor genomes, three relate to variable APOBEC activity and three are associated with tobacco smoking. An additional signature matches the spectrum of translesion DNA polymerase eta (POLH). In lymphoid cells, these mutations target promoters, consistent with AID-initiated somatic hypermutation. In solid tumors, however, they are associated with UV exposure and alcohol consumption and target the H3K36me3 chromatin of active genes in a mismatch repair (MMR)-dependent manner. These regions normally have a low mutation rate because error-free MMR also targets H3K36me3 chromatin. Carcinogens and error-prone repair therefore redistribute mutations to the more important regions of the genome, contributing a substantial mutation load in many tumors, including driver mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving the Performance of Somatic Mutation Identification by Recovering Circulating Tumor DNA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Jovelet, Cécile; Filleron, Thomas; Pedrero, Marion; Motté, Nelly; Boursin, Yannick; Luo, Yufei; Massard, Christophe; Campone, Mario; Levy, Christelle; Diéras, Véronique; Bachelot, Thomas; Garrabey, Julie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lacroix, Ludovic; André, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Celine

    2016-10-15

    DNA extracted from cancer patients' whole blood may contain somatic mutations from circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) fragments. In this study, we introduce cmDetect, a computational method for the systematic identification of ctDNA mutations using whole-exome sequencing of a cohort of tumor and corresponding peripheral whole-blood samples. Through the analysis of simulated data, we demonstrated an increase in sensitivity in calling somatic mutations by combining cmDetect to two widely used mutation callers. In a cohort of 93 breast cancer metastatic patients, cmDetect identified ctDNA mutations in 54% of the patients and recovered somatic mutations in cancer genes EGFR, PIK3CA, and TP53 We further showed that cmDetect detected ctDNA in 89% of patients with confirmed mutated cell-free tumor DNA by plasma analyses (n = 9) within 46 pan-cancer patients. Our results prompt immediate consideration of the use of this method as an additional step in somatic mutation calling using whole-exome sequencing data with blood samples as controls. Cancer Res; 76(20); 5954-61. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Fitness change in relation to mutation number in spontaneous mutation accumulation lines of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Susanne A.; Böndel, Katharina B.; Ness, Robert W.; Keightley, Peter D.; Colegrave, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although all genetic variation ultimately stems from mutations, their properties are difficult to study directly. Here, we used multiple mutation accumulation (MA) lines derived from five genetic backgrounds of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that have been previously subjected to whole genome sequencing to investigate the relationship between the number of spontaneous mutations and change in fitness from a nonevolved ancestor. MA lines were on average less fit than their ancestors and we detected a significantly negative correlation between the change in fitness and the total number of accumulated mutations in the genome. Likewise, the number of mutations located within coding regions significantly and negatively impacted MA line fitness. We used the fitness data to parameterize a maximum likelihood model to estimate discrete categories of mutational effects, and found that models containing one to two mutational effect categories (one neutral and one deleterious category) fitted the data best. However, the best‐fitting mutational effects models were highly dependent on the genetic background of the ancestral strain. PMID:28884790

  15. Spontaneous mutation during the sexual cycle of Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Watters, M.K.; Stadler, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The DNA sequences of 42 spontaneous mutations of the mtr gene in Neurospora crassa have been determined. The mutants were selected among sexual spores to represent mutations arising in the sexual cycle. Three sexual-cycle-specific mutational classes are described: hotspot mutants, spontaneous repeat-induced point mutation (RIPs) and mutations occurring during a mutagenic phase of the sexual cycle. Together, these three sexual-cycle-specific mutational classes account for 50% of the mutations in the sexual-cycle mutational spectrum. One third of all mutations occurred at one of two mutational hotspots that predominantly produced tandem duplications of varying lengths with short repeats at their end-points. Neithermore » of the two hotspots are present in the vegetative spectrum, suggesting that sexual-cycle-specific mutational pathways are responsible for their presence in the spectrum. One mutant was observed that appeared to have been RIPed precociously. The usual prerequisite for RIP, a duplication of the affected region, was not present in the parent stocks and was not detected in this mutant. Finally, there is a phase early in the premeiotic sexual cycle that is overrepresented in the generation of mutations. This {open_quotes}peak{close_quotes} appears to represent a phase during which the mutation rate rises significantly. This phase produces a disproportionally high fraction of frame shift mutations. In divisions subsequent to this, the mutation rate appears to be constant. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  16. Familial hypercholesterolemia mutations in Petrozavodsk: no similarity to St. Petersburg mutation spectrum.

    PubMed

    Komarova, Tatiana Yu; Korneva, Victoria A; Kuznetsova, Tatiana Yu; Golovina, Alexandra S; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Mandelshtam, Michail Yu

    2013-12-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a human monogenic disease induced by a variety of mutations with striking genetic diversity. Despite this variability recurrent mutations occur in each population studied, which allows both elucidating prevalent mutations and developing DNA diagnostic tools for the disease. Recent research of FH in St. Petersburg, Moscow and Novosibirsk (major cities in Russia) demonstrates that each megapolis has its own FH mutation spectrum sharing only small part of mutations with other populations in Russia and Europe. In order to optimize molecular-genetic diagnostic protocols for FH in Russia we studied mutation spectrum in other regions including Petrozavodsk, a smaller town in relatively close proximity to St. Petersburg. The principal method was automated detection of single-strand conformation polymorphism followed by direct PCR amplified DNA sequencing. Twelve different mutations of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were detected in the Petrozavodsk sample (80 patients). Out of these twelve mutations, seven have never been described before (c.192_201delinsGGACTTCA, c. 195_196insT, c. 618 T > G, c. 1340C > G, c. 1686_1693delinsT, c. 1936C > A, c. 2191delG). Other five mutations (c. 58G > A, c. 925_931del, c. 1194C > T, c. 1532 T > C, c. 1920C > T) were previously characterized elsewhere. All new mutations are considered to be a probable cause of the FH in their carriers. Direct evidence of the neutral character of c.58G > A or p. (Gly20Arg) is provided for the first time. Each pathogenic mutation was a trait of its own unique pedigree and so far has not been found in other patients. Strikingly, out of twelve mutations characterized in the Petrozavodsk sample only one mutation, c. 925_931del, has previously been found in patients from St. Petersburg and Finland (most closely located studied populations), suggesting some common roots in origin of these populations in the past or limited

  17. Ontogeny of the barley plant as related to mutation expression and detection of pollen mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, A.L.; Marcus, A.H.; Arenaz, P.

    1981-01-01

    Clustering of mutant pollen grains in a population of normal pollen due to premeiotic mutational events complicates translating mutation frequencies into rates. Embryo ontogeny in barley will be described and used to illustrate the formation of such mutant clusters. The nature of the statistics for mutation frequency will be described from a study of the reversion frequencies of various waxy mutants in barley. Computer analysis by a ''jackknife'' method of the reversion of a waxy mutant treated with the mutagen sodium azide showed a significantly higher reversion frequency than untreated material. Problems of the computer analysis suggest a better experimentalmore » design for pollen mutation experiments. Preliminary work on computer modeling for pollen development and mutation will be described.« less

  18. Ontogeny of the barley plant as related to mutation expression and detection of pollen mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, A.L.; Marcus, A.H.; Arenaz, P.

    1980-05-29

    Clustering of mutant pollen grains in a population of normal pollen due to premeiotic mutational events complicates translating mutation frequencies into rates. Embryo ontogeny in barley will be described and used to illustrate the formation of such mutant clusters. The nature of the statistics for mutation frequency will be described from a study of the reversion frequencies of various waxy mutants in barley. Computer analysis by a jackknife method of the reversion frequencies of a waxy mutant treated with the mutagen sodium azide showed a significantly higher reversion frequency than untreated material. Problems of the computer analysis suggest a bettermore » experimental design for pollen mutation experiments. Preliminary work on computer modeling for pollen development and mutation will be described.« less

  19. Urinary tract effects of HPSE2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Helen M; Roberts, Neil A; Hilton, Emma N; McKenzie, Edward A; Daly, Sarah B; Hadfield, Kristen D; Rahal, Jeffery S; Gardiner, Natalie J; Tanley, Simon W; Lewis, Malcolm A; Sites, Emily; Angle, Brad; Alves, Cláudia; Lourenço, Teresa; Rodrigues, Márcia; Calado, Angelina; Amado, Marta; Guerreiro, Nancy; Serras, Inês; Beetz, Christian; Varga, Rita-Eva; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Darlow, John M; Dobson, Mark G; Barton, David E; Hunziker, Manuela; Puri, Prem; Feather, Sally A; Goodship, Judith A; Goodship, Timothy H J; Lambert, Heather J; Cordell, Heather J; Saggar, Anand; Kinali, Maria; Lorenz, Christian; Moeller, Kristina; Schaefer, Franz; Bayazit, Aysun K; Weber, Stefanie; Newman, William G; Woolf, Adrian S

    2015-04-01

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is an autosomal recessive congenital disease featuring grimacing and incomplete bladder emptying. Mutations of HPSE2, encoding heparanase 2, a heparanase 1 inhibitor, occur in UFS, but knowledge about the HPSE2 mutation spectrum is limited. Here, seven UFS kindreds with HPSE2 mutations are presented, including one with deleted asparagine 254, suggesting a role for this amino acid, which is conserved in vertebrate orthologs. HPSE2 mutations were absent in 23 non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder probands and, of 439 families with nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux, only one carried a putative pathogenic HPSE2 variant. Homozygous Hpse2 mutant mouse bladders contained urine more often than did wild-type organs, phenocopying human UFS. Pelvic ganglia neural cell bodies contained heparanase 1, heparanase 2, and leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains-2 (LRIG2), which is mutated in certain UFS families. In conclusion, heparanase 2 is an autonomic neural protein implicated in bladder emptying, but HPSE2 variants are uncommon in urinary diseases resembling UFS. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. The new mutation theory of phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Nei, Masatoshi

    2007-07-24

    Recent studies of developmental biology have shown that the genes controlling phenotypic characters expressed in the early stage of development are highly conserved and that recent evolutionary changes have occurred primarily in the characters expressed in later stages of development. Even the genes controlling the latter characters are generally conserved, but there is a large component of neutral or nearly neutral genetic variation within and between closely related species. Phenotypic evolution occurs primarily by mutation of genes that interact with one another in the developmental process. The enormous amount of phenotypic diversity among different phyla or classes of organisms is a product of accumulation of novel mutations and their conservation that have facilitated adaptation to different environments. Novel mutations may be incorporated into the genome by natural selection (elimination of preexisting genotypes) or by random processes such as genetic and genomic drift. However, once the mutations are incorporated into the genome, they may generate developmental constraints that will affect the future direction of phenotypic evolution. It appears that the driving force of phenotypic evolution is mutation, and natural selection is of secondary importance.

  1. Common Variable Immunodeficiency Caused by FANC Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sekinaka, Yujin; Mitsuiki, Noriko; Imai, Kohsuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mitsui-Sekinaka, Kanako; Honma, Kenichi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Arai, Ayako; Yoshida, Kenichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Hira, Asuka; Takata, Minoru; Ohara, Osamu; Ogawa, Seishi; Morio, Tomohiro; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2017-07-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common adult-onset primary antibody deficiency disease due to various causative genes. Several genes, which are known to be the cause of different diseases, have recently been reported as the cause of CVID in patients by performing whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis. Here, we found FANC gene mutations as a cause of adult-onset CVID in two patients. B cells were absent and CD4 + T cells were skewed toward CD45RO + memory T cells. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and signal joint kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (sjKRECs) were undetectable in both patients. Both patients had no anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Using WES, we identified compound heterozygous mutations of FANCE in one patient and homozygous mutation of FANCA in another patient. The impaired function of FANC protein complex was confirmed by a monoubiquitination assay and by chromosome fragility test. We then performed several immunological evaluations including quantitative lymphocyte analysis and TRECs/sjKRECs analysis for 32 individuals with Fanconi anemia (FA). In total, 22 FA patients (68.8%) were found to have immunological abnormalities, suggesting that such immunological findings may be common in FA patients. These data indicate that FANC mutations are involved in impaired lymphogenesis probably by the accumulation of DNA replication stress, leading to CVID. It is important to diagnose FA because it drastically changes clinical management. We propose that FANC mutations can cause isolated immunodeficiency in addition to bone marrow failure and malignancy.

  2. Novel mutations target distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Giles; Parker, Matthew; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Lu, Charles; Chen, Xiang; Ding, Li; Phoenix, Timothy N.; Hedlund, Erin; Wei, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chalhoub, Nader; Baker, Suzanne J.; Huether, Robert; Kriwacki, Richard; Curley, Natasha; Thiruvenkatam, Radhika; Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Gang; Rusch, Michael; Hong, Xin; Beckford, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Ma, Jing; Easton, John; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Lin, Tong; Li, Shaoyi; Pounds, Stanley; Paugh, Steven; Zhao, David; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Roussel, Martine F.; Finkelstein, David; Ellison, David W.; Lau, Ching C.; Bouffet, Eric; Hassall, Tim; Gururangan, Sridharan; Cohn, Richard; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ochoa, Kerri; Gajjar, Amar; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Zhang, Jinghui; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a malignant childhood brain tumour comprising four discrete subgroups. To identify mutations that drive medulloblastoma we sequenced the entire genomes of 37 tumours and matched normal blood. One hundred and thirty-six genes harbouring somatic mutations in this discovery set were sequenced in an additional 56 medulloblastomas. Recurrent mutations were detected in 41 genes not yet implicated in medulloblastoma: several target distinct components of the epigenetic machinery in different disease subgroups, e.g., regulators of H3K27 and H3K4 trimethylation in subgroup-3 and 4 (e.g., KDM6A and ZMYM3), and CTNNB1-associated chromatin remodellers in WNT-subgroup tumours (e.g., SMARCA4 and CREBBP). Modelling of mutations in mouse lower rhombic lip progenitors that generate WNT-subgroup tumours, identified genes that maintain this cell lineage (DDX3X) as well as mutated genes that initiate (CDH1) or cooperate (PIK3CA) in tumourigenesis. These data provide important new insights into the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma subgroups and highlight targets for therapeutic development. PMID:22722829

  3. Mutation analysis in 54 propionic acidemia patients.

    PubMed

    Kraus, J P; Spector, E; Venezia, S; Estes, P; Chiang, P W; Creadon-Swindell, G; Müllerleile, S; de Silva, L; Barth, M; Walter, M; Walter, K; Meissner, T; Lindner, M; Ensenauer, R; Santer, R; Bodamer, O A; Baumgartner, M R; Brunner-Krainz, M; Karall, D; Haase, C; Knerr, I; Marquardt, T; Hennermann, J B; Steinfeld, R; Beblo, S; Koch, H G; Konstantopoulou, V; Scholl-Bürgi, S; van Teeffelen-Heithoff, A; Suormala, T; Ugarte, M; Sperl, W; Superti-Furga, A; Schwab, K O; Grünert, S C; Sass, J O

    2012-01-01

    Deficiency of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCC), a dodecamer of alpha and beta subunits, causes inherited propionic acidemia. We have studied, at the molecular level, PCC in 54 patients from 48 families comprised of 96 independent alleles. These patients of various ethnic backgrounds came from research centers and hospitals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The thorough clinical characterization of these patients was described in the accompanying paper (Grünert et al. 2012). In all 54 patients, many of whom originated from consanguineous families, the entire PCCB gene was examined by genomic DNA sequencing and in 39 individuals the PCCA gene was also studied. In three patients we found mutations in both PCC genes. In addition, in many patients RT-PCR analysis of lymphoblast RNA, lymphoblast enzyme assays, and expression of new mutations in E.coli were carried out. Eight new and eight previously detected mutations were identified in the PCCA gene while 15 new and 13 previously detected mutations were found in the PCCB gene. One missense mutation, p.V288I in the PCCB gene, when expressed in E.coli, yielded 134% of control activity and was consequently classified as a polymorphism in the coding region. Numerous new intronic polymorphisms in both PCC genes were identified. This study adds a considerable amount of new molecular data to the studies of this disease.

  4. Deleterious mutation accumulation in organelle genomes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M; Blanchard, J L

    1998-01-01

    It is well established on theoretical grounds that the accumulation of mildly deleterious mutations in nonrecombining genomes is a major extinction risk in obligately asexual populations. Sexual populations can also incur mutational deterioration in genomic regions that experience little or no recombination, i.e., autosomal regions near centromeres, Y chromosomes, and organelle genomes. Our results suggest, for a wide array of genes (transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, and proteins) in a diverse collection of species (animals, plants, and fungi), an almost universal increase in the fixation probabilities of mildly deleterious mutations arising in mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes relative to those arising in the recombining nuclear genome. This enhanced width of the selective sieve in organelle genomes does not appear to be a consequence of relaxed selection, but can be explained by the decline in the efficiency of selection that results from the reduction of effective population size induced by uniparental inheritance. Because of the very low mutation rates of organelle genomes (on the order of 10(-4) per genome per year), the reduction in fitness resulting from mutation accumulation in such genomes is a very long-term process, not likely to imperil many species on time scales of less than a million years, but perhaps playing some role in phylogenetic lineage sorting on time scales of 10 to 100 million years.

  5. Identifying pathways affected by cancer mutations.

    PubMed

    Iengar, Prathima

    2017-12-16

    Mutations in 15 cancers, sourced from the COSMIC Whole Genomes database, and 297 human pathways, arranged into pathway groups based on the processes they orchestrate, and sourced from the KEGG pathway database, have together been used to identify pathways affected by cancer mutations. Genes studied in ≥15, and mutated in ≥10 samples of a cancer have been considered recurrently mutated, and pathways with recurrently mutated genes have been considered affected in the cancer. Novel doughnut plots have been presented which enable visualization of the extent to which pathways and genes, in each pathway group, are targeted, in each cancer. The 'organismal systems' pathway group (including organism-level pathways; e.g., nervous system) is the most targeted, more than even the well-recognized signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis, and DNA repair pathway groups. The important, yet poorly-recognized, role played by the group merits attention. Pathways affected in ≥7 cancers yielded insights into processes affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A quantum mechanical model of adaptive mutation.

    PubMed

    McFadden, J; Al-Khalili, J

    1999-06-01

    The principle that mutations occur randomly with respect to the direction of evolutionary change has been challenged by the phenomenon of adaptive mutations. There is currently no entirely satisfactory theory to account for how a cell can selectively mutate certain genes in response to environmental signals. However, spontaneous mutations are initiated by quantum events such as the shift of a single proton (hydrogen atom) from one site to an adjacent one. We consider here the wave function describing the quantum state of the genome as being in a coherent linear superposition of states describing both the shifted and unshifted protons. Quantum coherence will be destroyed by the process of decoherence in which the quantum state of the genome becomes correlated (entangled) with its surroundings. Using a very simple model we estimate the decoherence times for protons within DNA and demonstrate that quantum coherence may be maintained for biological time-scales. Interaction of the coherent genome wave function with environments containing utilisable substrate will induce rapid decoherence and thereby destroy the superposition of mutant and non-mutant states. We show that this accelerated rate of decoherence may significantly increase the rate of production of the mutated state.

  7. FOXE3 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Plaisancié, J; Ragge, N K; Dollfus, H; Kaplan, J; Lehalle, D; Francannet, C; Morin, G; Colineaux, H; Calvas, P; Chassaing, N

    2018-04-01

    Microphthalmia and anophthalmia (MA) are severe developmental eye anomalies, many of which are likely to have an underlying genetic cause. More than 30 genes have been described, each of which is responsible for a small percentage of these anomalies. Among these, is the FOXE3 gene, which was initially described in individuals with dominantly inherited anterior segment dysgenesis and, subsequently, associated with recessively inherited primary aphakia, sclerocornea and microphthalmia. In this work, we describe 8 individuals presenting with an MA phenotype. Among them, 7 are carrying biallelic recessive FOXE3 mutations and 2 of these have novel mutations: p.(Ala78Thr) and p.(Arg104Cys). The last of our patients is carrying in the heterozygous state the recessive p.(Arg90Leu) mutation in the FOXE3 gene. To further understand FOXE3 involvement in this wide spectrum of ocular anomalies with 2 different patterns of inheritance, we reviewed all individuals with ocular abnormalities described in the literature for which a FOXE3 mutation was identified. This review demonstrates that correlations exist between the mutation type, mode of inheritance and the phenotype severity. Furthermore, understanding the genetic basis of these conditions will contribute to overall understanding of eye development, improve the quality of care, genetic counseling and, in future, gene-based therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations by Ethnicity and Mutation Location in BRCA Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Soley; Jackson, Michelle; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Liu, Diane; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Brandt, Amanda; Woodson, Ashley; Litton, Jennifer; Lu, Karen H; Valero, Vicente; Arun, Banu K

    2015-01-01

    The genotype-phenotype correlations of the specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in multi-ethnic populations in USA have not yet been fully investigated. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of ethnicity at specific mutation locations and breast/ovarian cancer phenotypes. Our cohort included 445 women with different ethnic backgrounds who underwent BRCA genetic testing between 1997 and 2010. Known clinical and pathologic characteristics were compared with Chi-Square Analysis or Fisher's Exact test as appropriate. The three most common mutation locations in BRCA1 (exons 2, 11, and 20) and BRCA2 (exons 10, 11, and 25) genes were chosen. Prevalence of BRCA1 exon 2 mutations were significantly higher in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women compared to Caucasians (41% versus 15%; p = 0.001). Similarly, AJ women with breast cancer were more likely to have BRCA1 exon 2 mutation (47% positivity in AJ women versus 0-12.5% positivity in other ethnicities; p = 0.004). Women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation had the highest probability of having combined breast and ovarian cancers compared to women carrying other exon mutations (p = 0.05). The median age at initial cancer diagnosis, phenotypic features of breast cancer tumors, and overall survival did not vary significantly by ethnicity or mutation location. Our data suggest that ethnicity does not affect age of onset, overall survival or confer different risks of breast and ovarian cancer development in BRCA carriers. These results also suggest that women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation may warrant mutation-specific counseling and be more aggressively managed for risk reduction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mutation Rates, Spectra, and Genome-Wide Distribution of Spontaneous Mutations in Mismatch Repair Deficient Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Gregory I.; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E.

    2013-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  10. Mutation rates, spectra, and genome-wide distribution of spontaneous mutations in mismatch repair deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gregory I; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E

    2013-09-04

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells.

  11. HER2 mutations in lung adenocarcinomas: A report from the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Rathi N; Behera, Madhusmita; Berry, Lynne D; Rossi, Mike R; Kris, Mark G; Johnson, Bruce E; Bunn, Paul A; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2017-11-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) mutations have been reported in lung adenocarcinomas. Herein, the authors describe the prevalence, clinical features, and outcomes associated with HER2 mutations in 1007 patients in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC). Patients with advanced-stage lung adenocarcinomas were enrolled to the LCMC. Tumor specimens were assessed for diagnosis and adequacy; multiplexed genotyping was performed in Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratories to examine 10 oncogenic drivers. The LCMC database was queried for patients with HER2 mutations to access demographic data, treatment history, and vital status. An exploratory analysis was performed to evaluate the survival of patients with HER2 mutations who were treated with HER2-directed therapies. A total of 920 patients were tested for HER2 mutations; 24 patients (3%) harbored exon 20 insertion mutations (95% confidence interval, 2%-4%). One patient had a concurrent mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) amplification. The median age of the patients was 62 years, with a slight predominance of females over males (14 females vs 10 males). The majority of the patients were never-smokers (71%) and presented with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. The median survival for patients who received HER2-targeted therapies (12 patients) was 2.1 years compared with 1.4 years for those who did not (12 patients) (P = .48). Patients with HER2 mutations were found to have inferior survival compared with the rest of the LCMC cohort with other mutations: the median survival was 3.5 years in the LCMC population receiving targeted therapy and 2.4 years for patients not receiving targeted therapy. HER2 mutations were detected in 3% of patients with lung adenocarcinoma in the LCMC. HER2-directed therapies should be investigated in this subgroup of patients. Cancer 2017;123:4099-4105. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developedmore » by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.« less

  13. Deciphering signatures of mutational processes operative in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2013-01-31

    The genome of a cancer cell carries somatic mutations that are the cumulative consequences of the DNA damage and repair processes operative during the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell. Remarkably, these mutational processes are poorly characterized. Global sequencing initiatives are yielding catalogs of somatic mutations from thousands of cancers, thus providing the unique opportunity to decipher the signatures of mutational processes operative in human cancer. However, until now there have been no theoretical models describing the signatures of mutational processes operative in cancer genomes and no systematic computational approaches are available to decipher these mutational signatures. Here, by modeling mutational processes as a blind source separation problem, we introduce a computational framework that effectively addresses these questions. Our approach provides a basis for characterizing mutational signatures from cancer-derived somatic mutational catalogs, paving the way to insights into the pathogenetic mechanism underlying all cancers. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Deciphering Signatures of Mutational Processes Operative in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The genome of a cancer cell carries somatic mutations that are the cumulative consequences of the DNA damage and repair processes operative during the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell. Remarkably, these mutational processes are poorly characterized. Global sequencing initiatives are yielding catalogs of somatic mutations from thousands of cancers, thus providing the unique opportunity to decipher the signatures of mutational processes operative in human cancer. However, until now there have been no theoretical models describing the signatures of mutational processes operative in cancer genomes and no systematic computational approaches are available to decipher these mutational signatures. Here, by modeling mutational processes as a blind source separation problem, we introduce a computational framework that effectively addresses these questions. Our approach provides a basis for characterizing mutational signatures from cancer-derived somatic mutational catalogs, paving the way to insights into the pathogenetic mechanism underlying all cancers. PMID:23318258

  15. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  16. Precise estimates of mutation rate and spectrum in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Siegal, Mark L.; Hall, David W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. The most direct and unbiased method of studying spontaneous mutations is via mutation accumulation (MA) lines. Until recently, MA experiments were limited by the cost of sequencing and thus provided us with small numbers of mutational events and therefore imprecise estimates of rates and patterns of mutation. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify nearly 1,000 spontaneous mutation events accumulated over ∼311,000 generations in 145 diploid MA lines of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MA experiments are usually assumed to have negligible levels of selection, but even mild selection will remove strongly deleterious events. We take advantage of such patterns of selection and show that mutation classes such as indels and aneuploidies (especially monosomies) are proportionately much more likely to contribute mutations of large effect. We also provide conservative estimates of indel, aneuploidy, environment-dependent dominant lethal, and recessive lethal mutation rates. To our knowledge, for the first time in yeast MA data, we identified a sufficiently large number of single-nucleotide mutations to measure context-dependent mutation rates and were able to (i) confirm strong AT bias of mutation in yeast driven by high rate of mutations from C/G to T/A and (ii) detect a higher rate of mutation at C/G nucleotides in two specific contexts consistent with cytosine methylation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24847077

  17. [Rare thalassemia mutations among southern Chinese population].

    PubMed

    Lin, Fen; Yang, Liye; Lin, Min; Zheng, Xiangbian; Lu, Min; Qiu, Meilan; Li, Liejun; Xie, Longxu

    2017-12-10

    To detect rare types of thalassemia mutations among southern Chinese population. Peripheral blood samples from 327 patients from various regions of southern China were collected. The patients were suspected as rare-type thalassemia for their inconsistency between hematological phenotypes and results of routine mutation screening. The samples were further analyzed with GAP-PCR and DNA sequencing. One hundred and eight cases were diagnosed as rare types of thalassemia. Among whom 10 rare α-globin gene mutations including --THAI, HKα, αααanti3.7, αααanti4.2, -α2.8, -α27.6, CD74 GAC>CAC (Hb Q-Thailand), CD30 (-GAG), CD31 AGG>AAG and CD118 (+TCA), and 12 rare β-globin gene mutations including CD37 TGG>TAG, CD39 CAG>TAG/CD39 CAG>TAG, β II-2 (-T), -90(C>T), -31(A>C), -88(C>T), CD7(-A), CD138(+T), CD89-93 (--AGTGAGCTGCACTG), CD54-58 (-TATGGGCAACCCT), Chinese G γ +(A γδβ)0 and Vietnamese HPFH (HPFH-6) were identified. -88(C>T) (HBB: c.-138C>T) and CD39 CAG>TAG (HBB: c.118C>T) were discovered for the first time in Chinese population. CD7(-A) (HBB: c.23delA) and CD138(+T) (HBB: c.416_417insT) were new types of β-globin gene mutations. The present study have enriched the mutation spectrum of thalassemia in southern China, which has provided necessary information for its diagnosis.

  18. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations and disease.

    PubMed

    Yarham, John W; Elson, Joanna L; Blakely, Emma L; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt-) tRNA (MTT) gene mutations are an important cause of human morbidity and are associated with a wide range of pathology, from isolated organ-specific diseases such as myopathy or hearing loss, through to multisystem disorders with encephalopathy, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and life-threatening cardiomyopathy. Our understanding of how MTT mutations cause disease remains poor and progress has been hampered by the complex interaction of genotype with phenotype that can result in patients who harbor the same mutation exhibiting starkly contrasting phenotypes, whereas other (genetically heterogeneous) patients manifest clinically identical syndromes. A further complexity is the highly polymorphic nature of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which must temper any reflex assumptions of pathogenicity for novel MTT substitutions. Nevertheless significant progress is being made and we shall review the methods employed to identify and characterize MTT mutations as pathogenic. Also important is our understanding of the molecular processes involved and we shall discuss the data available on two of the most studied MTT mutations (m.8344A > G and m.3243A > G) as well as other potential pathogenic mechanisms. Knowledge of factors influencing the inheritance of MTT mutations, and therefore the likelihood of disease transmission, is of particular importance to female patients. At present, the factors determining transmission remain elusive, but we shall examine several possible mechanisms and discuss the evidence for each. Finally, a number of different yeast and mouse models are currently used to investigate mitochondrial disease and we will assess the importance of and difficulties associated with each model as well as the future of possible therapies for patients with mitochondrial disease. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. On spatial mutation-selection models

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratiev, Yuri, E-mail: kondrat@math.uni-bielefeld.de; Kutoviy, Oleksandr, E-mail: kutoviy@math.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: kutovyi@mit.edu; Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

    2013-11-15

    We discuss the selection procedure in the framework of mutation models. We study the regulation for stochastically developing systems based on a transformation of the initial Markov process which includes a cost functional. The transformation of initial Markov process by cost functional has an analytic realization in terms of a Kimura-Maruyama type equation for the time evolution of states or in terms of the corresponding Feynman-Kac formula on the path space. The state evolution of the system including the limiting behavior is studied for two types of mutation-selection models.

  20. The study of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  1. Mutational Dynamics of Aroid Chloroplast Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J.; Matthews, Peter J.; Collins, Lesley J.; Hendy, Michael D.; Lockhart, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  2. Optimally, mutation and the evolution of ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, L.; Barton, N. H.

    1993-03-01

    Evolutionary explanations of ageing fall into two classes. Organisms might have evolved the optimal life history, in which survival and fertility late in life are sacrificed for the sake of early reproduction and survival. Alternatively, the life history might be depressed below this optimal compromise by deleterious mutations: because selection against late-acting mutations is weaker, these will impose a greater load on late life. Evidence for the importance of both is emerging, and unravelling their relative importance presents experimentalists with a major challenge.

  3. Clinicopathological characteristics and mutation profiling in primary cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Banu; Akalin, Taner; Kandiloğlu, Gülşen

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of mutations in malignant melanoma varies remarkably according to the subtype of melanoma, and this in itself is affected by racial and geographical factors. Studies screening melanoma case series for different types of mutations are relatively rare. The authors analyzed the frequency of various somatic point mutations of 10 genes in 106 primary cutaneous melanoma cases. The mutations (BRAF, NRAS, KIT, CDKN2A, KRAS, HRAS, PIK3CA, STK11, GNAQ, CTNNB1) were evaluated with real-time PCR-based PCR-Array through allele-specific amplification, and the results were correlated with various clinicopathological characteristics. Mutations were found in 64.2% of the melanomas overall. BRAF (42.5%), NRAS (15.1%), and CDKN2A (13.2%) were the 3 most common mutations. BRAF and NRAS mutations were more frequent in nodular and superficial spreading melanomas (P < 0.001). Associations with BRAF mutation were as follows: male gender [odds ratio (OR) = 2.4], younger age (OR = 2.7), superficial spreading (OR = 15.6) and nodular melanoma (OR = 9.5), trunk localization (OR = 6.3), and intermittent sun exposure (OR = 4.6). A considerable percentage of V600K (44.4%) mutations were found among the BRAF mutations, whereas KIT mutations (3.8%) were less frequent. Multiple mutations were detected in 13.2% of the melanomas. The most common co-occurrences were in the BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A genes. The authors analyzed 10 somatic mutations in the main subtypes of primary cutaneous melanomas from the western region of Turkey. Mutations were found in 64.2% of the melanomas overall. The most common mutations were in the BRAF and NRAS genes. In addition to other less common mutations, a notable number of multiple mutations were encountered. The multiplicity and concurrence of mutations in this study may provide further study areas for personalized targeted therapy.

  4. Mutation profiles of phenylketonuria in Quebec populations: Evidence of stratification and novel mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Mascisch, A.; Scriver, C.R.

    1994-08-01

    Independent phenylketonuria (PKU) chromosomes (n=109) representing 80% of a proband cohort in Quebec province carry 18 different identified mutations in 20 different mutation/haplotype combinations. The study reported here, the third in a series on Quebec populations, was done in the Montreal region and predominantly on French Canadians. It has identified three novel mutations (A309D, D338Y, and 1054/1055delG [352fs]) and one unusual mutation/RFLP haplotype combination (E280K on Hp 2). The relative frequencies and distribution of PKU mutations were then compared in three regions and population subsets (eastern Quebec, French Canadian; western Quebec, French Canadian; and Montreal, non-French Canadian). The distributions ofmore » the prevalent and rare mutations are nonrandom and provide evidence for genetic stratification. The latter and the presence of eight unusual mutation/haplotype combinations in Quebec families with European ancestries (the aforementioned four and M1V, 165T, S349P, and R408W on Hp 1) corroborate demographic and anthropologic evidence, from elsewhere, for different origins of French Canadians in eastern and western Quebec. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.« less

  5. Detection of a novel silent deletion, a missense mutation and a nonsense mutation in TCOF1.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hirotaka; Ariga, Tadashi; Horiuchi, Katsumi; Ishikiriyama, Satoshi; Oyama, Kimie; Otsu, Makoto; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Sakiyama, Yukio

    2008-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a disorder of craniofacial development, that is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene. TCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, and haploinsufficiency of the TCOF1 gene product treacle is proposed to be etiologically involved. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene was done in 10 patients diagnosed with TCS using single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing. Among these 10 patients, a novel 9 bp deletion was found, together with a previously reported 2 bp deletion, a novel missense mutation and a novel nonsense mutation in three different families. Familial studies allowed judgment of whether these abnormal findings were responsible for the TCS phenotype, or not. The 9 bp deletion of three amino acids Lys-Glu-Lys (1378-1380), which was located in the nuclear localization domain of treacle, seemed not essential for the treacle function. In contrast, the novel mutation of Ala26Val is considered to affect the LisH domain, an important domain of treacle. All of the mutations thus far detected in exon 5 have resulted in frameshift, but a nonsense mutation was detected (Lys159Stop). The information obtained in the present study provides additional insights into the functional domains of treacle.

  6. Mutation screening of Chinese Treacher Collins syndrome patients identified novel TCOF1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Guo, Luo; Li, Chen-Long; Shan, Jing; Xu, Hai-Song; Li, Jie-Ying; Sun, Shan; Hao, Shao-Juan; Jin, Lei; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Tian-Yu

    2018-04-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) (OMIM 154500) is a rare congenital craniofacial disorder with an autosomal dominant manner of inheritance in most cases. To date, three pathogenic genes (TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C) have been identified. In this study, we conducted mutational analysis on Chinese TCS patients to reveal a mutational spectrum of known causative genes and show phenotype-genotype data to provide more information for gene counselling and future studies on the pathogenesis of TCS. Twenty-two TCS patients were recruited from two tertiary referral centres, and Sanger sequencing for the coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C was performed. For patients without small variants, further copy number variations (CNVs) analysis was conducted using high-density SNP array platforms. The Sanger sequencing overall mutation detection rate was as high as 86.3% (19/22) for our cohort. Fifteen TCOF1 pathogenic variants, including ten novel mutations, were identified in nineteen patients. No causative mutations in POLR1D and POLR1C genes and no CNVs mutations were detected. A suspected autosomal dominant inheritance case that implies germinal mosaicism was described. Our study confirmed that TCOF1 was the main disease-causing gene for the Chinese TCS population and revealed its mutation spectrum. We also addressed the need for more studies of mosaicism in TCS cases, which could explain the mechanism of autosomal dominant inheritance in TCS cases and benefit the prevention of TCS.

  7. Mutation distributions and clinical correlations of PIK3CA gene mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Ebubekir; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Özer, Ayşe

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most common cancer and the second cause of death among women. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway has a crucial role in the cellular processes such as cell survival, growth, division, and motility. Moreover, oncogenic mutations in the PI3K pathway generally involve the activation phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase-catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation which has been identified in numerous BCa subtypes. In this review, correlations between PIK3CA mutations and their clinicopathological parameters on BCa will be described. It is reported that PIK3CA mutations which have been localized mostly on exon 9 and 20 hot spots are detected 25-40 % in BCa. This relatively high frequency can offer an advantage for choosing the best treatment options for BCa. PIK3CA mutations may be used as biomarkers and have been major focus of drug development in cancer with the first clinical trials of PI3K pathway inhibitors currently in progress. Screening of PIK3CA gene mutations might be useful genetic tests for targeted therapeutics or diagnosis. Increasing data about PIK3CA mutations and its clinical correlations with BCa will help to introduce new clinical applications in the near future.

  8. Tyrosinemia type II: Mutation update, 11 novel mutations and description of 5 independent subjects with a novel founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Peña-Quintana, L; Scherer, G; Curbelo-Estévez, M L; Jiménez-Acosta, F; Hartmann, B; La Roche, F; Meavilla-Olivas, S; Pérez-Cerdá, C; García-Segarra, N; Giguère, Y; Huppke, P; Mitchell, G A; Mönch, E; Trump, D; Vianey-Saban, C; Trimble, E R; Vitoria-Miñana, I; Reyes-Suárez, D; Ramírez-Lorenzo, T; Tugores, A

    2017-09-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, also known as Richner-Hanhart Syndrome, is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the gene encoding hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, leading to the accumulation of tyrosine and its metabolites which cause ocular and skin lesions, that may be accompanied by neurological manifestations, mostly intellectual disability. To update disease-causing mutations and current clinical knowledge of the disease. Genetic and clinical information were obtained from a collection of both unreported and previously reported cases. We report 106 families, represented by 143 individuals, carrying a total of 36 genetic variants, 11 of them not previously known to be associated with the disease. Variants include 3 large deletions, 21 non-synonymous and 5 nonsense amino-acid changes, 5 frameshifts and 2 splice variants. We also report 5 patients from Gran Canaria, representing the largest known group of unrelated families sharing the same P406L mutation. Data analysis did not reveal a genotype-phenotype correlation, but stressed the need of early diagnosis: All patients improved the oculocutaneous lesions after dietary treatment but neurological symptoms prevailed. The discovery of founder mutations in isolated populations, and the benefits of early intervention, should increase diagnostic awareness in newborns. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Controlling the Natural Mutation Process; KONTROLINROVANIE ESTESTVENNOGO MUTATSIONNOGO PROTSESSA

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinin, N.P.

    1960-01-01

    Natural control of mutation processes, the general increase of mutation by the introduction of mutagenic factors, control of gene mutution or of gene numeric ratios, and general or differential depression of natural mutations are discussed, and various published data are reviewed. Studies of streptomycin depression of mutation in drosophila, using 22.469 chromosomes, showed 0.10% mutations with and 0.41% wlthout streptomycin. Studies show a strong depressing effect of streptomycin on chromosome rebuilding in onion (allium). Hence, streptomycia represents one of the new antimutagenic substances capable of influencing natural mutation process. (R.V.J.)

  10. Benchmarking mutation effect prediction algorithms using functionally validated cancer-related missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Martelotto, Luciano G; Ng, Charlotte Ky; De Filippo, Maria R; Zhang, Yan; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Lim, Raymond S; Shen, Ronglai; Norton, Larry; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta

    2014-10-28

    Massively parallel sequencing studies have led to the identification of a large number of mutations present in a minority of cancers of a given site. Hence, methods to identify the likely pathogenic mutations that are worth exploring experimentally and clinically are required. We sought to compare the performance of 15 mutation effect prediction algorithms and their agreement. As a hypothesis-generating aim, we sought to define whether combinations of prediction algorithms would improve the functional effect predictions of specific mutations. Literature and database mining of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) affecting 15 cancer genes was performed to identify mutations supported by functional evidence or hereditary disease association to be classified either as non-neutral (n = 849) or neutral (n = 140) with respect to their impact on protein function. These SNVs were employed to test the performance of 15 mutation effect prediction algorithms. The accuracy of the prediction algorithms varies considerably. Although all algorithms perform consistently well in terms of positive predictive value, their negative predictive value varies substantially. Cancer-specific mutation effect predictors display no-to-almost perfect agreement in their predictions of these SNVs, whereas the non-cancer-specific predictors showed no-to-moderate agreement. Combinations of predictors modestly improve accuracy and significantly improve negative predictive values. The information provided by mutation effect predictors is not equivalent. No algorithm is able to predict sufficiently accurately SNVs that should be taken forward for experimental or clinical testing. Combining algorithms aggregates orthogonal information and may result in improvements in the negative predictive value of mutation effect predictions.

  11. Tumor mutation burden forecasts outcome in ovarian cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Eklund, Aron C; Li, Yang; Liu, Joyce; Szallasi, Zoltan; Matulonis, Ursula A; Richardson, Andrea L; Iglehart, J Dirk; Wang, Zhigang C

    2013-01-01

    Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), independent of other prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Patients with mBRCA-associated cancers and a high Nmut had remarkably favorable PFS and OS. The association with survival was similar in cancers with either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In cancers with wild-type BRCA, tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response in patients with no residual disease after surgery. Tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response and with both PFS and OS in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In the TCGA cohort, low Nmut predicted resistance to chemotherapy, and for shorter PFS and OS, while high Nmut forecasts a remarkably favorable outcome in mBRCA-associated ovarian cancer. Our observations suggest that the total mutation burden coupled with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer is a genomic marker of prognosis and predictor of treatment response. This marker may reflect the degree of deficiency in BRCA-mediated pathways, or the extent of compensation for the deficiency by alternative

  12. Multi-institutional Oncogenic Driver Mutation Analysis in Lung Adenocarcinoma: The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium Experience.

    PubMed

    Sholl, Lynette M; Aisner, Dara L; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Berry, Lynne D; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Chen, Heidi; Fujimoto, Junya; Kugler, Kelly; Franklin, Wilbur A; Iafrate, A John; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G; Johnson, Bruce E; Bunn, Paul A; Minna, John D; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2015-05-01

    Molecular genetic analyses of lung adenocarcinoma have recently become standard of care for treatment selection. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium was formed to enable collaborative multi-institutional analyses of 10 potential oncogenic driver mutations. Technical aspects of testing and clinicopathologic correlations are presented. Mutation testing in at least one of the eight genes (epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR], KRAS, ERBB2, AKT1, BRAF, MEK1, NRAS, and PIK3CA) using SNaPshot, mass spectrometry, Sanger sequencing+/- peptide nucleic acid and/or sizing assays, along with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and/or MET fluorescence in situ hybridization, were performed in six labs on 1007 patients from 14 institutions. In all, 1007 specimens had mutation analysis performed, and 733 specimens had all 10 genes analyzed. Mutation identification rates did not vary by analytic method. Biopsy and cytology specimens were inadequate for testing in 26% and 35% of cases compared with 5% of surgical specimens. Among the 1007 cases with mutation analysis performed, EGFR, KRAS, ALK, and ERBB2 alterations were detected in 22%, 25%, 8.5%, and 2.4% of cases, respectively. EGFR mutations were highly associated with female sex, Asian race, and never-smoking status; and less strongly associated with stage IV disease, presence of bone metastases, and absence of adrenal metastases. ALK rearrangements were strongly associated with never-smoking status and more weakly associated with presence of liver metastases. ERBB2 mutations were strongly associated with Asian race and never-smoking status. Two mutations were seen in 2.7% of samples, all but one of which involved one or more of PIK3CA, ALK, or MET. Multi-institutional molecular analysis across multiple platforms, sample types, and institutions can yield consistent results and novel clinicopathological observations.

  13. Multi-institutional oncogenic driver mutation analysis in lung adenocarcinoma: The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium experience

    PubMed Central

    Dias-Santagata, Dora; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Chen, Heidi; Fujimoto, Junya; Kugler, Kelly; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Iafrate, A. John; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Bunn, Paul A.; Minna, John D.; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Molecular genetic analyses of lung adenocarcinoma have recently become standard of care for treatment selection. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium was formed to enable collaborative multi-institutional analyses of 10 potential oncogenic driver mutations. Technical aspects of testing, and clinicopathologic correlations are presented. Methods Mutation testing in at least one of 8 genes (EGFR, KRAS, ERBB2, AKT1, BRAF, MEK1, NRAS, PIK3CA) using SNaPshot, mass spectrometry, Sanger sequencing +/− PNA and/or sizing assays, along with ALK and/or MET FISH were performed in 6 labs on 1007 patients from 14 institutions. Results 1007 specimens had mutation analysis performed, and 733 specimens had all 10 genes analyzed. Mutation identification rates did not vary by analytic method. Biopsy and cytology specimens were inadequate for testing in 26% and 35% of cases compared to 5% of surgical specimens. Among the 1007 cases with mutation analysis performed, EGFR, KRAS, ALK, and ERBB2 alterations were detected in 22, 25, 8.5, and 2.4% of cases, respectively. EGFR mutations were highly associated with female sex, Asian race, and never smoking status; and less strongly associated with stage IV disease, presence of bone metastases, and absence of adrenal metastases. ALK rearrangements were strongly associated with never smoking status, and more weakly associated with presence of liver metastases. ERBB2 mutations were strongly associated with Asian race and never smoking status. Two mutations were seen in 2.7% of samples, all but one of which involved one or more of PIK3CA, ALK or MET. Conclusion Multi-institutional molecular analysis across multiple platforms, sample types, and institutions can yield consistent results and novel clinicopathological observations. PMID:25738220

  14. PI3 kinase mutations and mutational load as poor prognostic markers in diffuse glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Draaisma, Kaspar; Wijnenga, Maarten M J; Weenink, Bas; Gao, Ya; Smid, Marcel; Robe, P; van den Bent, Martin J; French, Pim J

    2015-12-23

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics allow diffuse gliomas to be classified based on their genetic changes into distinct prognostic subtypes. However, a systematic analysis of all molecular markers has thus far not been performed; most classification schemes use a predefined and select set of genes/molecular markers. Here, we have analysed the TCGA dataset (combined glioblastoma (GBM) and lower grade glioma (LGG) datasets) to identify all prognostic genetic markers in diffuse gliomas in order to generate a comprehensive classification scheme. Of the molecular markers investigated (all genes mutated at a population frequency >1.7 % and frequent chromosomal imbalances) in the entire glioma dataset, 57 were significantly associated with overall survival. Of these, IDH1 or IDH2 mutations are associated with lowest hazard ratio, which confirms IDH as the most important prognostic marker in diffuse gliomas. Subsequent subgroup analysis largely confirms many of the currently used molecular classification schemes for diffuse gliomas (ATRX or TP53 mutations, 1p19q codeletion). Our analysis also identified PI3-kinase mutations as markers of poor prognosis in IDH-mutated + ATRX/TP53 mutated diffuse gliomas, median survival 3.7 v. 6.3 years (P = 0.02, Hazard rate (HR) 2.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.16 - 7.38). PI3-kinase mutations were also prognostic in two independent datasets. In our analysis, no additional molecular markers were identified that further refine the molecular classification of diffuse gliomas. Interestingly, these molecular classifiers do not fully explain the variability in survival observed for diffuse glioma patients. We demonstrate that tumor grade remains an important prognostic factor for overall survival in diffuse gliomas, even within molecular glioma subtypes. Tumor grade was correlated with the mutational load (the number of non-silent mutations) of the tumor: grade II diffuse gliomas harbour fewer genetic changes than grade

  15. Positive mutations and mutation-dependent Verhulst factor in Penna ageing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    We modify twice the Penna model for biological ageing. First, we introduce back (good) mutations and a memory for them into the model. It allows us to observe an improvement of the species fitness over long-time scales as well as punctuated equilibrium. Second, we adopt a food/space competition factor that depends on the number of accumulated mutations in the individuals genomes, and get rid of the fixed limiting number of allowed mutations. Besides reproducing the main results of the standard model, we also observe a mortality maximum for the oldest old.

  16. Timing, rates and spectra of human germline mutation.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, Raheleh; Wuster, Arthur; Lindsay, Sarah J; Hardwick, Robert J; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Turki, Saeed Al; Dominiczak, Anna; Morris, Andrew; Porteous, David; Smith, Blair; Stratton, Michael R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations are a driving force behind genome evolution and genetic disease. We investigated genome-wide mutation rates and spectra in multi-sibling families. The mutation rate increased with paternal age in all families, but the number of additional mutations per year differed by more than twofold between families. Meta-analysis of 6,570 mutations showed that germline methylation influences mutation rates. In contrast to somatic mutations, we found remarkable consistency in germline mutation spectra between the sexes and at different paternal ages. In parental germ line, 3.8% of mutations were mosaic, resulting in 1.3% of mutations being shared by siblings. The number of these shared mutations varied significantly between families. Our data suggest that the mutation rate per cell division is higher during both early embryogenesis and differentiation of primordial germ cells but is reduced substantially during post-pubertal spermatogenesis. These findings have important consequences for the recurrence risks of disorders caused by de novo mutations.

  17. Calreticulin mutation profile in Indian patients with primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sazawal, Sudha; Singh, Neha; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in Calreticulin (CALR) have been recently discovered in JAK2/MPL unmutated patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) or essential thrombocythemia. Clinical and hematologic features were obtained for 80 patients with PMF. JAK2V617F mutation was analyzed by DNA tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS-PCR). CALR and MPL mutations were identified by bi-directional Sanger sequencing. CALR mutations were detected in 11.2% (9/80) of all PMF patients and 25.7% (9/35) of all JAK2V617F and MPL unmutated patients all of which were Type I mutation or deletions. A novel CALR mutation pattern (c.1241_1288del) was identified in one (1/9) patient. No case of Type II mutations or scattered point mutations was found in any of these patients. Uni-variate analysis at presentation showed that CALR mutations were significantly associated with younger age (P = 0.003) and larger spleen size (P = 0.001). No significant correlation was found between CALR mutation and clinico-hematologic characteristics or international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scoring of the PMF patients. CALR mutations have a distinct molecular profile in Indian patients, different from that of other studies worldwide. Larger prospective studies need to be designed to establish the impact of paucity of Type II mutations in contributing to disease phenotype and prognostic outcome of patients.

  18. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  19. Mutation analysis of Australasian Gaucher disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.V.; Carey, W.F.; Morris, C.P.

    1995-09-25

    We have previously reported phenotype and genotype analyses in 28 Australasian Gaucher patients who were screened for several of the common Gaucher mutations: N370S, L444P, 84GG, and R463C. Horowitz and Zimran have reported that the complex alleles recNciI and recTL, which contain several point mutations including L444P, are relatively common, especially in non-Jewish Gaucher patients. Zimran and Horowitz have also stated that these recombinant alleles could easily be missed by laboratories testing only for the common Gaucher point mutations. Failure to correctly identify these mutations would influence any attempt to correlate genotype with phenotype. We have therefore retested our Gauchermore » patients for recNciI (L444P, A456P, and V46OV) and recTL (D409H, L444P, A456P, and V46OV) by PCR amplification, followed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides. 4 refs.« less

  20. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  1. Wolfram Syndrome: New Mutations, Different Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lugani, Francesca; Perri, Katia; Russo, Chiara; Tallone, Ramona; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym “DIDMOAD”. The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. Methodology/Principal Findings We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females). Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V) was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. Conclusions/Significance Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10), deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA). PMID:22238590

  2. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  3. Properties and rates of germline mutations in humans.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catarina D; Eichler, Evan E

    2013-10-01

    All genetic variation arises via new mutations; therefore, determining the rate and biases for different classes of mutation is essential for understanding the genetics of human disease and evolution. Decades of mutation rate analyses have focused on a relatively small number of loci because of technical limitations. However, advances in sequencing technology have allowed for empirical assessments of genome-wide rates of mutation. Recent studies have shown that 76% of new mutations originate in the paternal lineage and provide unequivocal evidence for an increase in mutation with paternal age. Although most analyses have focused on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), studies have begun to provide insight into the mutation rate for other classes of variation, including copy number variants (CNVs), microsatellites, and mobile element insertions (MEIs). Here, we review the genome-wide analyses for the mutation rate of several types of variants and suggest areas for future research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline.

    PubMed

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B; McGowan, Simon J; Maher, Geoffrey J; Iqbal, Zamin; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Turner, Isaac; Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Shorto, Jennifer; Itani, Aysha; Turner, Karen; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Kerr, Bronwyn; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Goriely, Anne

    2013-12-10

    The RAS proto-oncogene Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS) encodes a small GTPase that transduces signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors to control cellular behavior. Although somatic HRAS mutations have been described in many cancers, germline mutations cause Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed selfish spermatogonial selection. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the levels, in blood and sperm samples, of HRAS mutations at the p.G12 codon and compared the results to changes at the p.A11 codon, at which activating mutations do not occur. The data strongly support the role of selection in determining HRAS mutation levels in sperm, and hence the occurrence of CS, but we also found differences from the mutation pattern in tumorigenesis. First, the relative prevalence of mutations in sperm correlates weakly with their in vitro activating properties and occurrence in cancers. Second, specific tandem base substitutions (predominantly GC>TT/AA) occur in sperm but not in cancers; genomewide analysis showed that this same mutation is also overrepresented in constitutional pathogenic and polymorphic variants, suggesting a heightened vulnerability to these mutations in the germline. We developed a statistical model to show how both intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection contribute to the mutational burden borne by the paternal germline.

  5. Population Heterogeneity in Mutation Rate Increases the Frequency of Higher-Order Mutants and Reduces Long-Term Mutational Load

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Helen K.; Mayer, Stephanie I.; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mutation rate is a crucial evolutionary parameter that has typically been treated as a constant in population genetic analyses. However, the propensity to mutate is likely to vary among co-existing individuals within a population, due to genetic polymorphisms, heterogeneous environmental influences, and random physiological fluctuations. We review the evidence for mutation rate heterogeneity and explore its consequences by extending classic population genetic models to allow an arbitrary distribution of mutation rate among individuals, either with or without inheritance. With this general new framework, we rigorously establish the effects of heterogeneity at various evolutionary timescales. In a single generation, variation of mutation rate about the mean increases the probability of producing zero or many simultaneous mutations on a genome. Over multiple generations of mutation and selection, heterogeneity accelerates the appearance of both deleterious and beneficial multi-point mutants. At mutation-selection balance, higher-order mutant frequencies are likewise boosted, while lower-order mutants exhibit subtler effects; nonetheless, population mean fitness is always enhanced. We quantify the dependencies on moments of the mutation rate distribution and selection coefficients, and clarify the role of mutation rate inheritance. While typical methods of estimating mutation rate will recover only the population mean, analyses assuming mutation rate is fixed to this mean could underestimate the potential for multi-locus adaptation, including medically relevant evolution in pathogenic and cancerous populations. We discuss the potential to empirically parameterize mutation rate distributions, which have to date hardly been quantified. PMID:27836985

  6. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E.; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R.; Göksenin, A. Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication. PMID:25228659

  7. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  8. Novel KRAS Gene Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Walid M.; Shawarby, Mohamed A.; Al-Tamimi, Dalal M.; Seth, Arun; Al-Quorain, Abdulaziz; Nemer, Areej M. Al; Albagha, Omar M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling. Results KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%). Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%). They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature. Conclusions Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25412182

  9. Mechanisms of Mutation in Non-Dividing Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this project, I have been addressing how antibiotic resistance mutations occur in non-, or slowly-growing...mechanisms that occur in non-dividing or stationary-phase cells may generate B-lactam antibiotic resistance mutations. B-lactam antibiotics kill actively...this project is on the mechanisms of chromosomal ampD mutation in stationary-phase E. coli to improve the understanding of how antibiotic resistance mutations

  10. Was the C282Y mutation an Irish Gaelic mutation that the Vikings help disseminate?

    PubMed

    Whittington, C A

    2006-01-01

    The C282Y mutation is held to have arisen in either a Celtic or a Viking ancestor some 60 generations ago. While the Scandinavians have a high frequency of C282Y, the Irish have the highest frequency of the C282Y mutation in the world. However testing of the Irish people for C282Y has been patchy. The true frequency of the C282Y mutation in Ireland and specifically in the relatively isolated western province of Connaught is unknown. Establishment of the C282Y frequency in the Irish male population of Connaught with traditional Irish surnames, a group which has a virtual fixation for Y chromosome R1b3, could help establish C282Y as an Irish mutation. Elucidation of greater C282Y haplotype diversity for the Irish as opposed to the Scandinavians would indicate the Irish as the likely source population for C282Y. Taken together, linking of C282Y to the Irish Gaelic male population of Connaught and establishment of an Irish origin of the C282Y mutation would point to dissemination of the C282Y mutation by Viking raiders and colonizers.

  11. Mutation analysis in Norwegian families with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: founder mutations in ACVRL1.

    PubMed

    Heimdal, K; Dalhus, B; Rødningen, O K; Kroken, M; Eiklid, K; Dheyauldeen, S; Røysland, T; Andersen, R; Kulseth, M A

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease defined by the presence of epistaxis and mucocutaneous telangiectasias and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in internal organs. In most families (~85%), HHT is caused by mutations in the ENG (HHT1) or the ACVRL1 (HHT2) genes. Here, we report the results of genetic testing of 113 Norwegian families with suspected or definite HHT. Variants in ENG and ACVRL1 were found in 105 families (42 ENG, 63 ACVRL1), including six novel variants of uncertain pathogenic significance. Mutation types were similar to previous reports with more missense variants in ACVRL1 and more nonsense, frameshift and splice-site mutations in ENG. Thirty-two variants were novel in this study. The preponderance of ACVRL1 mutations was due to founder mutations, specifically, c.830C>A (p.Thr277Lys), which was found in 24 families from the same geographical area of Norway. We discuss the importance of founder mutations and present a thorough evaluation of missense and splice-site variants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Bartolo, C.; Pearl, D.K.

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5` and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened {approximately} 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncodingmore » regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3` of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3` mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. 71 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  14. Tobacco Induced Mutations: A Fun, Visually Impressive Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milholland, Rebecca B. R.; Hines, Stefani D.

    2004-01-01

    A modified version "Tobacco Induced Mutations" of Ames assay experiment provides a meaningful context for students to learn about the concept of mutations by using a known carcinogen that is tobacco. This experiment shows toxicological concept of the dose/response relationship and visually demonstrates when a mutation have occurred in bacteria…

  15. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. Images Figure 2 PMID:7611292

  16. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases

    PubMed Central

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent. PMID:28767725

  17. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  18. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; ...

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutationmore » rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.« less

  19. Expanding the keratin mutation database: novel and recurrent mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in 28 patients with epidermolytic ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Arin, M J; Oji, V; Emmert, S; Hausser, I; Traupe, H; Krieg, T; Grimberg, G

    2011-02-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) is a hereditary keratinization disorder caused by mutations in the keratin 1 (KRT1) or keratin 10 (KRT10) genes. In most cases of severe EI, heterozygous single point mutations are found at the highly conserved helix boundary motifs of KRT1 and KRT10 that play a critical role in filament formation. The presence of palmoplantar keratoderma suggests KRT1 mutations, whereas KRT10 mutations in most instances give rise to the nonpalmoplantar variants. To identify the underlying mutations in patients with EI and to correlate genotype and phenotype. Mutation analysis was performed in 28 patients with EI by direct sequencing of KRT1 and KRT10 genes. We identified 14 different mutations, of which four have not been published previously. Identification of novel mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in EI allows improved understanding of disease pathogenesis as well as better patient management. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. [Study of gene mutation in 62 hemophilia A children].

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Liu, A G; Zhang, L Q; Zhang, A; Wang, Y Q; Wang, S M; Lu, Y J; Wang, X

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To analyze the mutation type of FⅧ gene in children with hemophilia A and to explore the relationship among hemophilia gene mutation spectrum, gene mutation and clinical phenotype. Method: Sixty-two children with hemophilia A from Department of Pediatric Hematology, Tongji Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology between January 2015 and March 2017 were enrolled. All patients were male, aged from 4 months to 7 years and F Ⅷ activity ranged 0.2%-11.0%. Fifty cases had severe, 10 cases had moderate and 2 cases had mild hemophilia A. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood in hemophilia A children and the target gene fragment was amplified by PCR, in combination with the second generation sequencing, 22 and 1 introns were detected. Negative cases were detected by the second generation sequencing and results were compared with those of the international FⅧ gene mutation database. Result: There were 20 cases (32%) of intron 22 inversion, 2 cases (3%) of intron 1 inversion, 18 cases (29%) of missense mutation, 5 cases (8%) of nonsense mutation, 7 cases (11%) of deletion mutation, 1 case(2%)of splice site mutation, 2 cases (3%) of large fragment deletion and 1 case of insertion mutation (2%). No mutation was detected in 2 cases (3%), and 4 cases (7%) failed to amplify. The correlation between phenotype and genotype showed that the most common gene mutation in severe hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion (20 cases), accounting for 40% of severe patients, followed by 11 cases of missense mutation (22%). The most common mutation in moderate hemophilia A was missense mutation (6 cases), accounting for 60% of moderate patients. Conclusion: The most frequent mutation type in hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion, followed by missense mutation, again for missing mutation. The relationship between phenotype and genotype: the most frequent gene mutation in severe hemophilia A is intron 22 inversion, followed by missense

  1. Familial Mediterranean fever with a single MEFV mutation: comparison of rare and common mutations in a Turkish paediatric cohort.

    PubMed

    Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Kandur, Yasar; Duzova, Ali; Ozkaya, Ozan; Kasapcopur, Ozgür; Baskin, Esra; Fidan, Kibriya; Yalcinkaya, Fatos

    2015-01-01

    Presence of common MEFV gene mutations strengthened the diagnosis of FMF in addition to the typical clinical characteristics of FMF. However, there are also rare mutations. P369S, A744S, R761H, K695R, F479L are the main rare mutations in Turkish population. We aimed to evaluate FMF patients with a single allele MEFV mutation and to compare patients with common and rare mutations. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of FMF patients with a single allele mutation who were followed up between 2008 and 2013 in six centres. We compared the patients with rare and common mutations for disease severity score, frequent exacerbations ( >1 attack per month), long attack period (>3 day), symptoms, age at the onset of symptoms, gender, consanguinity, and family history. Two hundred and seventeen patients (M/F=101/116) with the diagnosis of FMF and single mutation were included. Heterozygote mutations were defined as common (M694V, V726A, M68OI) and rare mutations (A744S, P369S, K695R, R761H, F479L). Sixty-seven patients (27 males, 40 females) had one single rare mutation and 150 (74 males, 76 females) had one single common mutation. No difference was found between the rare and common mutations with respect to the disease severity score. There was no significant difference between common and rare heterozygote form of mutations in terms of disease severity. Patients with typical characteristics of FMF, with some rare mutations (A744S, P369S) should be treated in the same manner as patients with a common mutation.

  2. The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Nuri A; Donohue, Duncan E; Bacolla, Albino; Vasquez, Karen M; Cooper, David N; Mudunuri, Uma; Ivanic, Joseph; Cer, Regina Z; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M; Collins, Jack R; Luke, Brian T

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage in somatic cells originates from both environmental and endogenous sources, giving rise to mutations through multiple mechanisms. When these mutations affect the function of critical genes, cancer may ensue. Although identifying genomic subsets of mutated genes may inform therapeutic options, a systematic survey of tumor mutational spectra is required to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of mutagenesis involved in cancer etiology. Recent studies have presented genome-wide sets of somatic mutations as a 96-element vector, a procedure that only captures the immediate neighbors of the mutated nucleotide. Herein, we present a 32 × 12 mutation matrix that captures the nucleotide pattern two nucleotides upstream and downstream of the mutation. A somatic autosomal mutation matrix (SAMM) was constructed from tumor-specific mutations derived from each of 909 individual cancer genomes harboring a total of 10,681,843 single-base substitutions. In addition, mechanistic template mutation matrices (MTMMs) representing oxidative DNA damage, ultraviolet-induced DNA damage, (5m)CpG deamination, and APOBEC-mediated cytosine mutation, are presented. MTMMs were mapped to the individual tumor SAMMs to determine the maximum contribution of each mutational mechanism to the overall mutation pattern. A Manhattan distance across all SAMM elements between any two tumor genomes was used to determine their relative distance. Employing this metric, 89.5% of all tumor genomes were found to have a nearest neighbor from the same tissue of origin. When a distance-dependent 6-nearest neighbor classifier was used, 10.4% of the SAMMs had an Undetermined tissue of origin, and 92.2% of the remaining SAMMs were assigned to the correct tissue of origin. [corrected]. Thus, although tumors from different tissues may have similar mutation patterns, their SAMMs often display signatures that are characteristic of specific tissues.

  3. Mutations of DNAI1 in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Ceppa, Franck; Kennedy, Marcus P.; Noone, Peadar G.; Carson, Johnny L.; Hazucha, Milan J.; Lori, Adriana; Horvath, Judit; Olbrich, Heike; Loges, Niki T.; Bridoux, Anne-Marie; Pennarun, Gaëlle; Duriez, Bénédicte; Escudier, Estelle; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Chodhari, Rahul; Chung, Eddie M. K.; Morgan, Lucy C.; de Iongh, Robbert U.; Rutland, Jonathan; Pradal, Ugo; Omran, Heymut; Amselem, Serge; Knowles, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, usually autosomal recessive, genetic disorder characterized by ciliary dysfunction, sino-pulmonary disease, and situs inversus. Disease-causing mutations have been reported in DNAI1 and DNAH5 encoding outer dynein arm (ODA) proteins of cilia. Objectives: We analyzed DNAI1 to identify disease-causing mutations in PCD and to determine if the previously reported IVS1+2_3insT (219+3insT) mutation represents a “founder” or “hot spot” mutation. Methods: Patients with PCD from 179 unrelated families were studied. Exclusion mapping showed no linkage to DNAI1 for 13 families; the entire coding region was sequenced in a patient from the remaining 166 families. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed on nasal epithelial RNA in 14 families. Results: Mutations in DNAI1 including 12 novel mutations were identified in 16 of 179 (9%) families; 14 harbored biallelic mutations. Deep intronic splice mutations were not identified by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence of mutations in families with defined ODA defect was 13%; no mutations were found in patients without a defined ODA defect. The previously reported IVS1+2_3insT mutation accounted for 57% (17/30) of mutant alleles, and marker analysis indicates a common founder for this mutation. Seven mutations occurred in three exons (13, 16, and 17); taken together with previous reports, these three exons are emerging as mutation clusters harboring 29% (12/42) of mutant alleles. Conclusions: A total of 10% of patients with PCD are estimated to harbor mutations in DNAI1; most occur as a common founder IVS1+2_3insT or in exons 13, 16, and 17. This information is useful for establishing a clinical molecular genetic test for PCD. PMID:16858015

  4. Sexual selection, germline mutation rate and sperm competition.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; Cuervo, J J

    2003-04-18

    An important component of sexual selection arises because females obtain viability benefits for their offspring from their mate choice. Females choosing extra-pair fertilization generally favor males with exaggerated secondary sexual characters, and extra-pair paternity increases the variance in male reproductive success. Furthermore, females are assumed to benefit from 'good genes' from extra-pair sires. How additive genetic variance in such viability genes is maintained despite strong directional selection remains an evolutionary enigma. We propose that sexual selection is associated with elevated mutation rates, changing the balance between mutation and selection, thereby increasing variance in fitness and hence the benefits to be obtained from good genes sexual selection. Two hypotheses may account for such elevated mutation: (1) Increased sperm production associated with sperm competition may increase mutation rate. (2) Mutator alleles increase mutation rates that are revealed by the expression of condition-dependent secondary sexual characters used by choosy females during their mate choice. M Petrie has independently developed the idea that mutator alleles may account for the maintenance of genetic variation in viability despite strong directional selection. A comparative study of birds revealed a positive correlation between mutation rate at minisatellite loci and extra-pair paternity, but not between mutation rate and relative testes mass which is a measure of relative sperm production. Minisatellite mutation rates were not related to longevity, suggesting a meiotic rather than a mitotic origin of mutations. We found evidence of increased mutation rate in species with more intense sexual selection. Increased mutation was not associated with increased sperm production, and we suggest that species with intense sexual selection may maintain elevated mutation rates because sexual selection continuously benefits viability alleles expressed in condition

  5. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations of TMPRSS3 Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3, one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family. PMID:28246597

  6. Multiple gene mutations, not the type of mutation, are the modifier of left ventricle hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yubao; Wang, Jizheng; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Yilu; Chen, Yi; Sun, Kai; Gao, Shuo; Zhang, Channa; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yin; Feng, Xinxing; Song, Ying; Wu, Yajie; Zhang, Hongju; Jia, Lei; Wang, Hu; Wang, Dong; Yan, Chaowu; Lu, Minjie; Zhou, Xianliang; Song, Lei; Hui, Rutai

    2013-06-01

    Genotype-phenotype correlation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been challenging because of the genetic and clinical heterogeneity. To determine the mutation profile of Chinese patients with HCM and to correlate genotypes with phenotypes, we performed a systematic mutation screening of the eight most commonly mutated genes encoding sarcomere proteins in 200 unrelated Chinese adult patients using direct DNA sequencing. A total of 98 mutations were identified in 102 mutation carriers. The frequency of mutations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3 was 26.0, 18.0, 4.0 and 3.5 % respectively. Among the 200 genotyped HCM patients, 83 harbored a single mutation, and 19 (9.5 %) harbored multiple mutations. The number of mutations was positively correlated with the maximum wall thickness. We found that neither particular gene nor specific mutation was correlated to clinical phenotype. In summary, the frequency of multiple mutations was greater in Chinese HCM patients than in the Caucasian population. Multiple mutations in sarcomere protein may be a risk factor for left ventricular wall thickness.

  7. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations of TMPRSS3 Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3 , one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family.

  8. Rescue of deleterious mutations by the compensatory Y30F mutation in ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jang, Do Soo; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Hong, Bee Hak; Woo, Jae-Sung; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2013-07-01

    Proteins have evolved to compensate for detrimental mutations. However, compensatory mechanisms for protein defects are not well understood. Using ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), we investigated how second-site mutations could recover defective mutant function and stability. Previous results revealed that the Y30F mutation rescued the Y14F, Y55F and Y14F/Y55F mutants by increasing the catalytic activity by 23-, 3- and 1.3-fold, respectively, and the Y55F mutant by increasing the stability by 3.3 kcal/mol. To better understand these observations, we systematically investigated detailed structural and thermodynamic effects of the Y30F mutation on these mutants. Crystal structures of the Y14F/Y30F and Y14F/Y55F mutants were solved at 2.0 and 1.8 previoulsy solved structures of wild-type and other mutant KSIs. Structural analyses revealed that the Y30F mutation partially restored the active-site cleft of these mutant KSIs. The Y30F mutation also increased Y14F and Y14F/Y55F mutant stability by 3.2 and 4.3 kcal/mol, respectively, and the melting temperatures of the Y14F, Y55F and Y14F/Y55F mutants by 6.4°C, 5.1°C and 10.0°C, respectively. Compensatory effects of the Y30F mutation on stability might be due to improved hydrophobic interactions because removal of a hydroxyl group from Tyr30 induced local compaction by neighboring residue movement and enhanced interactions with surrounding hydrophobic residues in the active site. Taken together, our results suggest that perturbed active-site geometry recovery and favorable hydrophobic interactions mediate the role of Y30F as a secondsite suppressor.

  9. Red hair--a desirable mutation?

    PubMed

    Ha, Thomas; Rees, Jonathan L

    2002-07-01

    Red hair is one of the most striking variants of human hair coloration and has historically been of profound social importance. Red hair in man is due to certain loss of function mutations of one of the peptide products of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene, the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R, MIM 155555). Such functional mutations enable the melanocyte to produce red-yellow pheomelanin in preference to the default, black-brown eumelanin. This paper reviews the path of discovery of the MC1R in control of animal coat colour, the subsequent role of MC1R in human physiology and possibly wider role of MC1R in human skin carcinogenesis and human development through history.

  10. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  11. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). PMID:9399843

  12. Nature and mechanism of induction of mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilan, R. A.; Kleinhofs, A.; Konzak, C. F.

    1981-10-01

    New knowledge of the mechanism of mutation induction and the nature of mutations in eukaryotes continues to be developed from experiments involving sodium azide. Azide is a potent mutagen in bacteria and in higher plants but it is weakly mutagenic and not carcinogenic in mammalian systems. It was determined that azide acted through a promutagen or organic metabolite both in barley and bacterial cells. This metabolite was isolated and characterized. During the past year, considerable progress was made in understanding the pathway by which the metabolite is synthesized in barley and bacteria. It can be synthesized in vitro both in bacteria and barley and some additional knowledge of the structure of the metabolite is being revealed through chemical synthesis of the metabolite. Additional information concerning the lack of azide mutagenicity in mammalian cells was developed through the detailed studies of the action of azide and its metabolite from bacteria and barely on sister-chromatid exchanges in mammalian cells.

  13. The directed mutation controversy and neo-Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Lenski, R E; Mittler, J E

    1993-01-08

    According to neo-Darwinian theory, random mutation produces genetic differences among organisms whereas natural selection tends to increase the frequency of advantageous alleles. However, several recent papers claim that certain mutations in bacteria and yeast occur at much higher rates specifically when the mutant phenotypes are advantageous. Various molecular models have been proposed that might explain these directed mutations, but the models have not been confirmed. Critics contend that studies purporting to demonstrate directed mutation lack certain controls and fail to account adequately for population dynamics. Further experiments that address these criticisms do not support the existence of directed mutations.

  14. Exclusive paternal origin of new mutations in Apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moloney, D M; Slaney, S F; Oldridge, M; Wall, S A; Sahlin, P; Stenman, G; Wilkie, A O

    1996-05-01

    Apert syndrome results from one or other of two specific nucleotide substitutions, both C-->G transversions, in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. The frequency of new mutations, estimated as 1 per 65,000 live births, implies germline transversion rates at these two positions are currently the highest known in the human genome. Using a novel application of the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), we have determined the parental origin of the new mutation in 57 Apert families: in every case, the mutation arose from the father. This identifies the biological basis of the paternal age effect for new mutations previously suggested for this disorder.

  15. Critical Single-Point Mutations and Protein Folding Pathways.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Roy

    2007-05-01

    Single-point mutations can have a dramatic effect on protein structure. Treating a mutation as a perturbation of a protein's folded structure may not reveal a significant effect on that structure. The dependence of a protein's structure on a mutation may only be understood when the mutation's effect on the folding pathway is known. A united-residue model (Liwo et al., PNAS, 102, 2367, 2005) was used to study the effect of single-point mutations on protein folding pathways. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NWS07.C1.1

  16. [Connexin 26 mutation and keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome].

    PubMed

    Binder, Barbara; Hennies, Hans Christian; Kraschl, Raimund; Smolle, Josef

    2005-02-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome (KID syndrome) is an extremely rare disorder. Inheritance is autosomal dominant but many cases occur sporadically following a spontaneous mutation. The cause of KID syndrome are missense mutations of the gene GJB2, encoding connexin 26. We clinically studied two cases of KID syndrome and extracted genomic DNA from peripheral blood. The patients showed different heterozygous mutations of the connexin 26 gene and had quite different clinical courses. Both patients showed heterozygous mutations of the connexin 26 gene; a different Cx26 dominant mutation can cause a very different clinical course.

  17. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  18. Persistence of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T.; Aitken, Celia; Asboe, David; Webster, Daniel; Cane, Patricia; Castro, Hannah; Chadwick, David; Churchill, Duncan; Clark, Duncan; Collins, Simon; Delpech, Valerie; Geretti, Anna Maria; Goldberg, David; Hale, Antony; Hué, Stéphane; Kaye, Steve; Kellam, Paul; Lazarus, Linda; Leigh-Brown, Andrew; Mackie, Nicola; Orkin, Chloe; Rice, Philip; Pillay, Deenan; Smit, Erasmus; Templeton, Kate; Tilston, Peter; Tong, William; Williams, Ian; Zhang, Hongyi; Zuckerman, Mark; Greatorex, Jane; Wildfire, Adrian; O'Shea, Siobhan; Mullen, Jane; Mbisa, Tamyo; Cox, Alison; Tandy, Richard; Hale, Tony; Fawcett, Tracy; Hopkins, Mark; Ashton, Lynn; Garcia-Diaz, Ana; Shepherd, Jill; Schmid, Matthias L; Payne, Brendan; Chadwick, David; Hay, Phillip; Rice, Phillip; Paynter, Mary; Clark, Duncan; Bibby, David; Kaye, Steve; Kirk, Stuart; MacLean, Alasdair; Aitken, Celia; Gunson, Rory

    2013-01-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models. PMID:23904291

  19. Selection-mutation process of RNA viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aafif, Amal; Lin, Juan

    1998-02-01

    RNA viruses mutate at a rate 105-106 times faster than their DNA counterparts. This process can be simulated by a continuous stochastic model on a smooth one-dimensional fitness landscape where selection forces the viral quasispecies to climb uphill to higher fitness values. Theoretical results of the model with drift velocity proportional to fitness are fitted to the experimental observations made by Novella et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92, 5841 (1995)].

  20. The point mutation process in proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    An optimized scoring matrix for residue-by-residue comparisons of distantly related protein sequences has been developed. The scoring matrix is based on observed exchanges and mutabilities of amino acids in 1572 closely related sequences derived from a cross-section of protein groups. Very few superimposed or parallel mutations are included in the data. The scoring matrix is most useful for demonstrating the relatedness of proteins between 65 and 85% different.

  1. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, B C; Fathi, A T; DiNardo, C D; Pollyea, D A; Chan, S M; Swords, R

    2017-01-01

    Alterations to genes involved in cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation are implicated in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Recurring mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are detected in approximately 20% of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 5% of adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). IDH proteins are homodimeric enzymes involved in diverse cellular processes, including adaptation to hypoxia, histone demethylation and DNA modification. The IDH2 protein is localized in the mitochondria and is a critical component of the tricarboxylic acid (also called the ‘citric acid' or Krebs) cycle. Both IDH2 and IDH1 (localized in the cytoplasm) proteins catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutant IDH enzymes have neomorphic activity and catalyze reduction of α-KG to the (R) enantiomer of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which is associated with DNA and histone hypermethylation, altered gene expression and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The prognostic significance of mutant IDH (mIDH) is controversial but appears to be influenced by co-mutational status and the specific location of the mutation (IDH1-R132, IDH2-R140, IDH2-R172). Treatments specifically or indirectly targeted to mIDH are currently under clinical investigation; these therapies have been generally well tolerated and, when used as single agents, have shown promise for inducing responses in some mIDH patients when used as first-line treatment or in relapsed or refractory AML or MDS. Use of mIDH inhibitors in combination with drugs with non-overlapping mechanisms of action is especially promising, as such regimens may address the clonal heterogeneity and the multifactorial pathogenic processes involved in mIDH myeloid malignancies. Advances in mutational analysis have made testing more rapid and convenient, and less expensive; such testing should become part of routine diagnostic workup and repeated at

  2. Recessive mutations in CAKUT and VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Westland, Rik; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the complex genetic makeup underlying congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) is of primary importance to improve diagnosis, stratify risk for later-onset complications, and develop therapeutic strategies. Saisawat et al. used homozygosity mapping coupled with next-generation sequencing to identify recessive mutations in TRAP1 in families with isolated CAKUT and with VACTERL association. This study points to a novel player in kidney development, possibly affecting apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling.

  3. Paraoxonase Gene Mutations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ticozzi, Nicola; LeClerc, Ashley Lyn; Keagle, Pamela; Glass, Jonathan D.; Wills, Anne-Marie; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Bosco, Daryl A.; Rodriguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Gellera, Cinzia; Ratti, Antonia; Taroni, Franco; McKenna-Yasek, Diane M.; Sapp, Peter C.; Silani, Vincenzo; Furlong, Clement E.; Brown, Robert H.; Landers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Three clustered, homologous paraoxonase genes (PON1, PON2 and PON3) have roles in preventing lipid oxidation and detoxifying organophosphates. Recent reports describe a genetic association between the PON genes and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We now report that in genomic DNA from individuals with familial and sporadic ALS we have identified at least seven PON gene mutations that are predicted to alter PON function. PMID:20582942

  4. ELOVL5 Mutations Cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia 38

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A.; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases. PMID:25065913

  5. Mutational equilibrium model of genome size evolution.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Dmitri A

    2002-06-01

    The paper describes a mutational equilibrium model of genome size evolution. This model is different from both adaptive and junk DNA models of genome size evolution in that it does not assume that genome size is maintained either by positive or stabilizing selection for the optimum genome size (as in adaptive theories) or by purifying selection against too much junk DNA (as in junk DNA theories). Instead the genome size is suggested to evolve until the loss of DNA through more frequent small deletions is equal to the rate of DNA gain through more frequent long insertions. The empirical basis for this theory is the finding of a strong correlation and of a clear power-function relationship between the rate of mutational DNA loss (per bp) through small deletions and genome size in animals. Genome size scales as a negative 1.3 power function of the deletion rate per nucleotide. Such a relationship is not predicted by either adaptive or junk DNA theories. However, if genome size is maintained at equilibrium by the balance of mutational forces, this empirilical relationship can be readily accommodated. Within this framework, this finding would imply that the rate of DNA gain through large insertions scales up a quarter-power function of genome size. On this view, as genome size grows, the rate of growth through large insertions is increasing as a quarter power function of genome size and the rate of DNA loss through small deletions increases linearly, until eventually, at the stable equilibrium genome size value, rates of growth and loss equal each other. The current data also suggest that the long-term variation is genome size in animals is brought about to a significant extent by changes in the intrinsic rates of DNA loss through small deletions. Both the origin of mutational biases and the adaptive consequences of such a mode of evolution of genome size are discussed. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  6. Better Living with Hyper-Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Myron F.

    2016-01-01

    The simplest forms of mutations, base substitutions, typically have negative consequences, aside from their existential role in evolution and fitness. Hypermutations, mutations on steroids, occurring at frequencies of 10−2 – 10−4 per base pair, straddle a domain between fitness and death, depending on the presence or absence of regulatory constraints. We portray two facets of hypermutation, one in Escherichia coli involving DNA polymerase V (pol V), the other in humans, involving activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID). Pol V is induced as part of the DNA-damage-induced SOS regulon, and is responsible for generating the lion’s share of mutations when catalyzing translesion DNA synthesis (TLS). Four regulatory mechanisms, temporal, internal, conformational, and spatial, activate pol V to copy damaged DNA and then deactivate it. On the flip side of the coin, SOS-induced pols V, IV and II mutate undamaged DNA, thus providing genetic diversity heightening long-term survival and evolutionary fitness. Fitness in humans is principally the domain of a remarkably versatile immune system marked by somatic hypermutations (SHM) in immunoglobulin variable (IgV) regions that ensure antibody (Ab) diversity. AID initiates SHM by deaminating C → U, favoring hot WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs. Since there are large numbers of trinucleotide motif targets throughout IgV, AID must exercise considerable catalytic restraint to avoid attacking such sites repeatedly, which would otherwise compromise diversity. Processive, random, and inefficient AID-catalyzed dC deamination simulates salient features of SHM, yet generates B-cell lymphomas when working at the wrong time in the wrong place. PMID:27273795

  7. Mutational falsetto: intervention outcomes in 45 patients.

    PubMed

    Dagli, M; Sati, I; Acar, A; Stone, R E; Dursun, G; Eryilmaz, A

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of therapeutic intervention in patients with mutational falsetto, by applying perceptual and acoustic analysis before and after voice therapy. Forty-five consecutive patients with mutational falsetto were studied retrospectively. Acoustic analysis (i.e. fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and formants one, two and three) was performed using the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program. Perceptual voice analyses were performed, including graded severity-roughness-breathiness-aesthenicity-strain assessment. Subjects' fundamental frequency, voice formants one, two and three, jitter, and shimmer were greater before than after treatment. There were statistically significant differences between pre- and post-treatment average values for fundamental frequency, jitter and shimmer. There were also statistically significant differences between pre- and post-treatment average values for formants one and two. These results were maintained after six months of follow up, and there was no significant difference between results at three- and six-month follow up. According to perceptual evaluation, each subject's voice had altered from mutational falsetto to chest voice by completion of the intervention. Thus, all of the patients successfully lowered their modal speaking voice to an appropriate level. In the light of objective evaluations, and by applying the study treatment protocol, these results suggest that normal voice can be maintained after intervention, at six months' follow up.

  8. Germ line mutations associated with leukemias.

    PubMed

    Porter, Christopher C

    2016-12-02

    Several genetic syndromes have long been associated with a predisposition to the development of leukemia, including bone marrow failure syndromes, Down syndrome, and Li Fraumeni syndrome. Recent work has better defined the leukemia risk and outcomes in these syndromes. Also, in the last several years, a number of other germ line mutations have been discovered to define new leukemia predisposition syndromes, including ANKRD26, GATA2, PAX5, ETV6, and DDX41 In addition, data suggest that a substantial proportion of patients with therapy related leukemias harbor germ line mutations in DNA damage response genes such as BRCA1/2 and TP53 Recognition of clinical associations, acquisition of a thorough family history, and high index-of-suspicion are critical in the diagnosis of these leukemia predisposition syndromes. Accurate identification of patients with germ line mutations associated with leukemia can have important clinical implications as it relates to management of the leukemia, as well as genetic counseling of family members. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutation detection in X-linked hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, S.M.; Balnaves, M.E.; Rosenthal, A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH), which maps to Xq28, affects about 1 in 30,000 male births. A candidate gene, L1-CAM, which codes for a neural adhesion molecule, mapped to the same region of the X chromosome. Rosenthal et al. (1992) identified a patient with XLH that had aberrant splicing of L1-CAM. A mutation at a potential branch point signal in an intron was identified. The gene has a number of exons and encodes a 4.2 kb mRNA. We isolated RNA from lymphocytes or fibroblasts from five XLH patients. cDNA was synthesized and the gene was amplified in two overlapping fragments, 2.2 kbmore » and 1.7 kb respectively. A nested PCR approach with two rounds of PCR amplification was employed. Patient 900124 did not have a full length 5{prime} fragment and 880022 did not have a full length 3{prime} product. Restriction digestions defined the region of the alteration in the messenger RNA and sequencing in this region showed the loss of exons 10 and 21, respectively. All 5{prime} and 3{prime} products were also digested with several restriction enzymes (e.g., Msp I, Taq I), which have CG in their recognition sites, in the hope that point mutations that alter these restriction enzyme sites might be identified. A point mutation creating an Msp I site was found in patient 930067.« less

  10. Volatile fingerprints of cancer specific genetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Peled, Nir; Barash, Orna; Tisch, Ulrike; Ionescu, Radu; Broza, Yoav Y; Ilouze, Maya; Mattei, Jane; Bunn, Paul A; Hirsch, Fred R; Haick, Hossam

    2013-08-01

    We report on a new concept for profiling genetic mutations of (lung) cancer cells, based on the detection of patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from cell membranes, using an array of nanomaterial-based sensors. In this in-vitro pilot study we have derived a volatile fingerprint assay for representative genetic mutations in cancer cells that are known to be associated with targeted cancer therapy. Five VOCs were associated with the studied oncogenes, using complementary chemical analysis, and were discussed in terms of possible metabolic pathways. The reported approach could lead to the development of novel methods for guiding treatments, so that patients could benefit from safer, more timely and effective interventions that improve survival and quality of life while avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures. Studying clinical samples (tissue/blood/breath) will be required as next step in order to determine whether this cell-line study can be translated into a clinically useful tool. In this novel study, a new concept for profiling genetic mutations of (lung) cancer cells is described, based on the detection of patterns of volatile organic compounds emitted from cell membranes, using an array of nano-gold based sensors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hyperparathyroidism complicating CYP 24A1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Loyer, Camille; Leroy, Clara; Molin, Arnaud; Odou, Marie-Françoise; Huglo, Damien; Lion, Georges; Ernst, Olivier; Hoffmann, Maxime; Porchet, Nicole; Carnaille, Bruno; Pattou, François; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2016-10-01

    CYP24A1 gene mutations induce infantile hypercalcemia, with high 1,25(OH) 2 D contrasting with low PTH levels. The adult phenotype is not well known. Two unrelated adult patients were referred for nephrolithiasis, hypertension, hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, normal 25-OHD levels, and inappropriate PTH levels (22 to 92pg/mL;N: 15-68) suggesting primary hyperparathyroidism, leading to surgery. Hypercalciuria improved despite persistent hypercalcemia, treated with cinacalcet. The ratio 25-OHD 3 /24-25-(OH)2D 3 >100 (N<25) suggested the diagnosis of CYP24A1 mutations which were confirmed through Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, the adult phenotype associated with CYP24A1 mutations can evolve over time from hypercalcemia with suppressed PTH towards hyperparathyroidism with moderately increased PTH level, adenoma and/or slightly increased parathyroid glands. Surgery decreased calciuria and improved kidney function. Cinacalcet was partially effective on hypercalcemia since PTH was inappropriate. This novel phenotype, a phenocopy of hyperparathyroidism, might evolve in few cases towards hyperparathyroidism despite random association of the 2 diseases cannot be excluded. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  15. Mutation analysis of 28 Gaucher disease patients: the Australasian experience.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B D; Nelson, P V; Robertson, E F; Morris, C P

    1994-01-15

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysosomal storage disease. It is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of beta-glucocerebrosidase. Three clinical phenotypes have been described: non-neuronopathic, acute neuronopathic, and subacute neuronopathic. Genomic DNA from 28 Australasian patients of diverse ethnic origin with Gaucher disease was screened for 3 common mutations (1226G, 1448C and 84GG) using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and one uncommon mutation (1504T) by restriction enzyme digestion. Thirty-eight of the 56 independent alleles in these patients were characterized, with 1448C present in 42% and 1226G in 28% of the alleles. The 1226G mutation was associated only with the non-neuronopathic phenotype and 7 of the 15 patients who carried the 1448C mutation developed neuronopathic disease. Three infants who died in the neonatal period following a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative course carried no identifiable mutations. The 84GG mutation was carried by 2 Jewish patients and 1504T was present in one patient. It is now possible to rapidly identify the common Gaucher mutations using ARMS and restriction enzyme digestion, and our findings confirm the heterogeneity of mutations in Gaucher disease. It is also possible to predict in part the phenotypic outcome when screening patients for these mutations. We consider mutation analysis to be of most use in prenatal diagnosis and for carrier detection within affected families.

  16. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spectrum of Mutations in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Genes Among Tunisian Patients.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Nawel; Gómez, Juan; Kammoun, Ikram; Zairi, Ihsen; Amara, Wael Ben; Kachboura, Salem; Kraiem, Sondes; Hammami, Mohamed; Iglesias, Sara; Alonso, Belén; Coto, Eliecer

    2016-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common cardiac genetic disorder associated with heart failure and sudden death. Mutations in the cardiac sarcomere genes are found in approximately half of HCM patients and are more common among cases with a family history of the disease. Data about the mutational spectrum of the sarcomeric genes in HCM patients from Northern Africa are limited. The population of Tunisia is particularly interesting due to its Berber genetic background. As founder mutations have been reported in other disorders. We performed semiconductor chip (Ion Torrent PGM) next generation sequencing of the nine main sarcomeric genes (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, ACTC1, TNNC1, MYL2, MYL3, TPM1) as well as the recently identified as an HCM gene, FLNC, in 45 Tunisian HCM patients. We found sarcomere gene polymorphisms in 12 patients (27%), with MYBPC3 and MYH7 representing 83% (10/12) of the mutations. One patient was homozygous for a new MYL3 mutation and two were double MYBPC3 + MYH7 mutation carriers. Screening of the FLNC gene identified three new mutations, which points to FLNC mutations as an important cause of HCM among Tunisians. The mutational background of HCM in Tunisia is heterogeneous. Unlike other Mendelian disorders, there were no highly prevalent mutations that could explain most of the cases. Our study also suggested that FLNC mutations may play a role on the risk for HCM among Tunisians.

  18. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A mutation screen in patients with Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Bögershausen, Nina; Alanay, Yasemin; Simsek Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Plume, Nadine; Keupp, Katharina; Pohl, Esther; Pawlik, Barbara; Rachwalski, Martin; Milz, Esther; Thoenes, Michaela; Albrecht, Beate; Prott, Eva-Christina; Lehmkühler, Margret; Demuth, Stephanie; Utine, Gülen Eda; Boduroglu, Koray; Frankenbusch, Katja; Borck, Guntram; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Yigit, Gökhan; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is one of the classical, clinically well-known multiple anomalies/mental retardation syndromes, mainly characterized by a very distinctive facial appearance in combination with additional clinical signs such as developmental delay, short stature, persistent fingerpads, and urogenital tract anomalies. In our study, we sequenced all 54 coding exons of the recently identified MLL2 gene in 34 patients with Kabuki syndrome. We identified 18 distinct mutations in 19 patients, 11 of 12 tested de novo. Mutations were located all over the gene and included three nonsense mutations, two splice-site mutations, six small deletions or insertions, and seven missense mutations. We compared frequencies of clinical symptoms in MLL2 mutation carriers versus non-carriers. MLL2 mutation carriers significantly more often presented with short stature and renal anomalies (p = 0.026 and 0.031, respectively), and in addition, MLL2 carriers obviously showed more frequently a typical facial gestalt (17/19) compared with non-carriers (9/15), although this result was not statistically significant (p = 0.1). Mutation-negative patients were subsequently tested for mutations in ten functional candidate genes (e.g. MLL, ASC2, ASH2L, and WDR5), but no convincing causative mutations could be found. Our results indicate that MLL2 is the major gene for Kabuki syndrome with a wide spectrum of de novo mutations and strongly suggest further genetic heterogeneity.

  20. Mutation analysis of 28 gaucher disease patients: The Australasian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.D.; Nelson, P.V.; Robertson, E.F.

    1994-01-15

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysomal storage disease. It is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of {beta}-glucocerrebrosidase. Three clinical phenotypes have been described: non-neuronopathic, acute neuronopathic, and subacuteneuronopathic. Genomic DNA from 28 Australasian patients of diverse ethnic origin with Gaucher disease was screened for 3 common mutations (1226G, 1448C and 84GG) using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and one uncommon mutation (1504T) by restriction enzyme digestion. Thirty-eight of the 56 independent alleles in these patients were characterized, with 1448C present in 42% and 1226G in 28% of the alleles. The 1226G mutation was associatedmore » only with the nonneuronopathic phenotype and 7 of the 15 patients who carried the 1448C mutation developed neuronopathic disease. Three infants who died in the neonatal period following a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative course carried no identifiable mutations. The 84GG mutation was carried by 2 Jewish patients and 1504T was present in one patient. It is now possible to rapidly identify the common Gaucher mutations using ARMS and restriction enzyme digestion, and our findings confirm the heterogeneity of mutations in Gaucher disease. It is also possible to predict in part the phenotypic outcome when screening patients for these mutations. The authors consider mutation analysis to be of most use in prenatal diagnosis and for carrier detection within affected families. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  1. Mutation Update and Review of Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Froese, D Sean; Huemer, Martina; Suormala, Terttu; Burda, Patricie; Coelho, David; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Landolt, Markus A; Kožich, Viktor; Fowler, Brian; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is caused by mutations in the MTHFR gene and results in hyperhomocysteinemia and varying severity of disease, ranging from neonatal lethal to adult onset. Including those described here, 109 MTHFR mutations have been reported in 171 families, consisting of 70 missense mutations, 17 that primarily affect splicing, 11 nonsense mutations, seven small deletions, two no-stop mutations, one small duplication, and one large duplication. Only 36% of mutations recur in unrelated families, indicating that most are "private." The most common mutation is c.1530A>G (numbered from NM_005957.4, p.Lys510 = ) causing a splicing defect, found in 13 families; the most common missense mutation is c.1129C>T (p.Arg377Cys) identified in 10 families. To increase disease understanding, we report enzymatic activity, detected mutations, and clinical onset information (early, <1 year; or late, >1 year) for all published patients available, demonstrating that patients with early onset have less residual enzyme activity than those presenting later. We also review animal models, diagnostic approaches, clinical presentations, and treatment options. This is the first large review of mutations in MTHFR, highlighting the wide spectrum of disease-causing mutations. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Tracey, Martin L.; Heine, Uwe; Maha, George C.; Duncan, George T.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7) mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04 × 10−4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18 × 10−5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77 × 10−5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM) and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM). In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM) mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci. PMID:22645469

  3. Mutation at the human D1S80 minisatellite locus.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Tracey, Martin L; Heine, Uwe; Maha, George C; Duncan, George T

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7) mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04 × 10(-4) and a female mutation rate of 5.18 × 10(-5) with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77 × 10(-5). Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM) and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM). In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM) mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  4. Filaggrin Mutation in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    On, Hye Rang; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Song Ee; Hong, Won Jin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Nomura, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shotaro; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kim, Soo Chan

    2017-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing eczematous inflammatory skin disease. Mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are major predisposing factors for AD. Ethnic differences exist between Asian and European populations in the frequency and spectrum of FLG mutations. Moreover, a distinct set of FLG mutations has been reported in Asian populations. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of FLG mutations in Koreans with AD. We also investigated the association of FLG mutations and clinical features of AD and compared the Korean FLG landscape with that of other East Asian countries. Seventy Korean patients with AD were enrolled in this study. Fourteen FLG mutations previously detected in Korean, Japanese, and Chinese patients were screened by genotyping. Four FLG null mutations (3321delA, K4022X, S3296X, and S2889X) were identified in eleven patients (15.7%). The most commonly detected mutations in Korean patients with AD were 3321delA (n=6, 9.1%) and K4022X (n=3, 4.5%). FLG mutations were significantly associated with elevated IgE (≥200 KIU/L and/or MAST-CLA >3+, p=0.005), palmar hyperlinearity (p<0.001), and a family history of allergic disease (p=0.021). This study expanded our understanding of the landscape of FLG mutations in Koreans and revealed an association between FLG mutations and AD phenotype.

  5. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Donnard, Elisa; Asprino, Paula F; Correa, Bruna R; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C; Navarro, Fabio C P; Perez, Rodrigo O; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M; Strausberg, Robert L; Simpson, Andrew J G; Jardim, Denis L F; Reis, Luiz Fernando L; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Galante, Pedro A F; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2014-10-15

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of "general" immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients.

  6. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  7. Identification of Mediterranean mutation in Egyptian favism patients.

    PubMed

    Osman, H G; Zahran, F M; El-Sokkary, A M A; El-Said, A; Sabry, A M

    2014-10-01

    Identify and screen the G6PD Mediterranean mutation in favism patients by applying a Amplification Refractory Mutation System Polymerase Chain Reaction (ARMS-PCR). A total of 114 unrelated Egyptians patients were included in the present study; their ages ranged between (2-9) years with male to female ratio 4.5:1. G6PD activity was determined qualitatively from red cell hemolysate during attack. The G6PD Mediterranean mutation in patients has been identified by ARMS-PCR. G6PD deficiency was detected in 87.7%, (n=100). The frequency of G6PD Mediterranean mutation was (94.7%), (n=108). The association between G6PD deficiency and Mediterranean mutation was a highly significant. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase Mediterranean mutation is one of the most common mutations causing G6PD deficiency among Egyptian children with favism.

  8. Tumor Mutation Burden Forecasts Outcome in Ovarian Cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Izarzugaza, Jose M. G.; Eklund, Aron C.; Li, Yang; Liu, Joyce; Szallasi, Zoltan; Matulonis, Ursula A.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Iglehart, J. Dirk; Wang, Zhigang C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. Methods and Results The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), independent of other prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Patients with mBRCA-associated cancers and a high Nmut had remarkably favorable PFS and OS. The association with survival was similar in cancers with either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In cancers with wild-type BRCA, tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response in patients with no residual disease after surgery. Conclusions Tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response and with both PFS and OS in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In the TCGA cohort, low Nmut predicted resistance to chemotherapy, and for shorter PFS and OS, while high Nmut forecasts a remarkably favorable outcome in mBRCA-associated ovarian cancer. Our observations suggest that the total mutation burden coupled with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer is a genomic marker of prognosis and predictor of treatment response. This marker may reflect the degree of deficiency in BRCA-mediated pathways, or the extent of

  9. Differential Persistence of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutation Classes

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Sucupira, Maria C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Hartogensis, Wendy; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Kallas, Esper G.; Janini, Luiz M.; Liegler, Teri; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Cortes, Rodrigo; Deeks, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance (TDR) mutations can become replaced over time by emerging wild-type viral variants with improved fitness. The impact of class-specific mutations on this rate of mutation replacement is uncertain. Methods. We studied participants with acute and/or early HIV infection and TDR in 2 cohorts (San Francisco, California, and São Paulo, Brazil). We followed baseline mutations longitudinally and compared replacement rates between mutation classes with use of a parametric proportional hazards model. Results. Among 75 individuals with 195 TDR mutations, M184V/I became undetectable markedly faster than did nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations (hazard ratio, 77.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.7–408.2; P < .0001), while protease inhibitor and NNRTI replacement rates were similar. Higher plasma HIV-1 RNA level predicted faster mutation replacement, but this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 1.71 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, .90–3.25 log10 copies/mL; P = .11). We found substantial person-to-person variability in mutation replacement rates not accounted for by viral load or mutation class (P < .0001). Conclusions. The rapid replacement of M184V/I mutations is consistent with known fitness costs. The long-term persistence of NNRTI and protease inhibitor mutations suggests a risk for person-to-person propagation. Host and/or viral factors not accounted for by viral load or mutation class are likely influencing mutation replacement and warrant further study. PMID:21451005

  10. CNGA3 Mutations in Hereditary Cone Photoreceptor Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wissinger, Bernd; Gamer, Daphne; Jägle, Herbert; Giorda, Roberto; Marx, Tim; Mayer, Simone; Tippmann, Sabine; Broghammer, Martina; Jurklies, Bernhard; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Sener, E. Cumhur; Tatlipinar, Sinan; Hoyng, Carel B.; Castellan, Claudio; Bitoun, Pierre; Andreasson, Sten; Rudolph, Günter; Kellner, Ulrich; Lorenz, Birgit; Wolff, Gerhard; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Schwartz, Marianne; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Apfelstedt-Sylla, Eckart; Zrenner, Eberhart; Salati, Roberto; Sharpe, Lindsay T.; Kohl, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    We recently showed that mutations in the CNGA3 gene encoding the α-subunit of the cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channel cause autosomal recessive complete achromatopsia linked to chromosome 2q11. We now report the results of a first comprehensive screening for CNGA3 mutations in a cohort of 258 additional independent families with hereditary cone photoreceptor disorders. CNGA3 mutations were detected not only in patients with the complete form of achromatopsia but also in incomplete achromats with residual cone photoreceptor function and (rarely) in patients with evidence for severe progressive cone dystrophy. In total, mutations were identified in 53 independent families comprising 38 new CNGA3 mutations, in addition to the 8 mutations reported elsewhere. Apparently, both mutant alleles were identified in 47 families, including 16 families with presumed homozygous mutations and 31 families with two heterozygous mutations. Single heterozygous mutations were identified in six additional families. The majority of all known CNGA3 mutations (39/46) are amino acid substitutions compared with only four stop-codon mutations, two 1-bp insertions and one 3-bp in-frame deletion. The missense mutations mostly affect amino acids conserved among the members of the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel family and cluster at the cytoplasmic face of transmembrane domains (TM) S1 and S2, in TM S4, and in the cGMP-binding domain. Several mutations were identified recurrently (e.g., R277C, R283W, R436W, and F547L). These four mutations account for 41.8% of all detected mutant CNGA3 alleles. Haplotype analysis suggests that the R436W and F547L mutant alleles have multiple origins, whereas we found evidence that the R283W alleles, which are particularly frequent among patients from Scandinavia and northern Italy, have a common origin. PMID:11536077

  11. Transcription factor mutations in myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Chase, Andrew; Zoi, Katerina; Waghorn, Katherine; Hidalgo-Curtis, Claire; Score, Joannah; Jones, Amy; Grand, Francis; Reiter, Andreas; Hochhaus, Andreas; Cross, Nicholas C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases, caused by either mutation or gene fusion, is of major importance for the development of many hematologic malignancies, particularly myeloproliferative neoplasms. We hypothesized that hitherto unrecognized, cytogenetically cryptic tyrosine kinase fusions may be common in non-classical or atypical myeloproliferative neoplasms and related myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Design and Methods To detect genomic copy number changes associated with such fusions, we performed a systematic search in 68 patients using custom designed, targeted, high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization. Arrays contained 44,000 oligonucleotide probes that targeted 500 genes including all 90 tyrosine kinases plus downstream tyrosine kinase signaling components, other translocation targets, transcription factors, and other factors known to be important for myelopoiesis. Results No abnormalities involving tyrosine kinases were detected; however, nine cytogenetically cryptic copy number imbalances were detected in seven patients, including hemizygous deletions of RUNX1 or CEBPA in two cases with atypical chronic myeloid leukemia. Mutation analysis of the remaining alleles revealed non-mutated RUNX1 and a frameshift insertion within CEBPA. A further mutation screen of 187 patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms identified RUNX1 mutations in 27 (14%) and CEBPA mutations in seven (4%) patients. Analysis of other transcription factors known to be frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia revealed NPM1 mutations in six (3%) and WT1 mutations in two (1%) patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Univariate analysis indicated that patients with mutations had a shorter overall survival (28 versus 44 months, P=0.019) compared with patients without mutations, with the prognosis for cases with CEBPA, NPM1 or WT1 mutations being particularly poor. Conclusions We conclude that mutations of

  12. Rare β-Globin Gene Mutations in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ahsan; Ahmed, Suhaib; Ali, Nadir; S Mailk, Hamid; Anees, Mariam; Chuahdry, Altaf H; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the rare β-thalassemia (β-thal) mutations in the Pakistani population. A total of 8716 unrelated Pakistani individuals having children with transfusion-dependent thalassemia were investigated by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) for the previously reported common and rare β-thal mutations. Genomic sequencing of the β-globin gene and its immediate 5' and 3' flanking regions was done where no known mutation was found. Out of the 8716 individuals studied, 88 (1.0%) were not characterized by ARMS-PCR. Genomic sequencing revealed that 67 (0.82%) individuals had 19 different β-thal mutations including one novel mutation (HBB: c.136delT). The remaining 21 (0.26%) individuals did not show any mutation on the β-globin gene and its immediate flanking regions. The characterized alleles included seven (0.09%) in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR), 29 (0.35%) in the coding regions, and 31 (0.38%) in the splice junction regions. HBB: c.92+1G>A and HBB: c.113G>A were the most frequently seen rare mutations. The spectrum of β-thal mutations in the Pakistani population is very diverse. In addition to the already reported mutations, another 19 different types of mutations were found. Interestingly, 21 individuals who had children with transfusion-dependent thalassemia and one known β-thal mutation, did not show any mutation on the β-globin gene. HBB: c.92+1G>A and HBB: c.113G>A are the most frequently seen rare mutations in Pakistan.

  13. Identification of germline genetic mutations in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Kelsen, David P; Ashraf, Asad M; Lowery, Maeve A; Yu, Kenneth H; Reidy, Diane L; Epstein, Andrew S; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert C; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2015-12-15

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. In the current study, the authors sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that are predictive of an inherited predisposition for PAC. A total of 175 consecutive patients with PAC who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 2011 and 2014 were identified. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Among 159 patients with PAC who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95% confidence interval, 9.5%-20.7%), including BRCA2 (13 mutations), BRCA1 (4 mutations), p16 (2 mutations), PALB2 (1 mutation), and Lynch syndrome (4 mutations). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) patients (95 patients) and 7.1% in non-AJ patients (56 patients). In AJ patients with a strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, the mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. The mean age at the time of diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5 years (range, 45-75 years) compared with 64 years (range, 27-87 years) in those not carrying a mutation (P = .02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC (diagnosed at age ≤ 50 years) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to that of individuals who were not mutation carriers (P = .34). Mutation prevalence in patients with early-onset disease (21 patients) was 28.6%, including BRCA1 (2 mutations), p16 (2 mutations), MSH2 (1 mutation), and MLH1 (1 mutation). Mutations in BRCA2 account for > 50% of patients with PAC with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients were found to have high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need

  14. PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type IX: prevalence of deletion mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-04-21

    Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) is important to enable accurate diagnoses and make appropriate therapeutic plans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD type IX. Thirteen Korean patients were tested for PHKA2 mutations using direct sequencing and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. A comprehensive review of the literature on previously reported PHKA2 mutations in other ethnic populations was conducted for comparison. Among 13 patients tested, six unrelated male patients with GSD IX aged 2 to 6 years at the first diagnostic work-up for hepatomegaly with elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were found to have PHKA2 mutations. These patients had different PHKA2 mutations: five were known mutations (c.537 + 5G > A, c.884G > A [p.Arg295His], c.3210_3212delGAG [p.Arg1072del], exon 8 deletion, and exons 27-33 deletion) and one was a novel mutation (exons 18-33 deletion). Notably, the most common type of mutation was gross deletion, in contrast to other ethnic populations in which the most common mutation type was sequence variant. This study expands our knowledge of the PHKA2 mutation spectrum of GSD IX. Considering the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD IX, molecular diagnostic methods for deletions should be conducted in conjunction with direct sequence analysis to enable accurate molecular diagnosis of this disease in the Korean population.

  15. Fitness effects of beneficial mutations: the mutational landscape model in experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Andrea J; Bollback, Jonathan P

    2006-12-01

    The mutational landscape model is a theoretical model describing sequence evolution in natural populations. However, recent experimental work has begun to test its predictions in laboratory populations of microbes. Several of these studies have focused on testing the prediction that the effects of beneficial mutations should be roughly exponentially distributed. The prediction appears to be borne out by most of these studies, at least qualitatively. Another study showed that a modified version of the model was able to predict, with reasonable accuracy, which of a ranked set of beneficial alleles will be fixed next. Although it remains to be seen whether the mutational landscape model adequately describes adaptation in organisms other than microbes, together these studies suggest that adaptive evolution has surprisingly general properties that can be successfully captured by theoretical models.

  16. Characterization of Ribozymes Targeting a Congenital Night Blindness Mutation in Rhodopsin Mutation.

    PubMed

    Conley, Shannon M; Whalen, Patrick; Lewin, Alfred S; Naash, Muna I

    2016-01-01

    The G90D mutation in the rhodopsin gene leads to autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in patients. This occurs because the G90D mutant protein cannot efficiently bind chromophore and is constitutively active. To combat this mutation, we designed and characterized two different hammerhead ribozymes to cleave G90D transcript. In vitro testing showed that the G90D1 ribozyme efficiently and specifically cleaved the mutant transcript while G90D2 cleaved both WT and mutant transcript. AAV-mediated delivery of G90D1 under the control of the mouse opsin promoter (MOP500) to G90D transgenic eyes showed that the ribozyme partially retarded the functional degeneration (as measured by electroretinography [ERG]) associated with this mutation. These results suggest that with additional optimization, ribozymes may be a useful part of the gene therapy knockdown strategy for dominant retinal disease.

  17. TERT promoter mutations and their association with BRAF V600E mutation and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Qu, Shen; Liu, Rengyun; Sheng, Chunjun; Shi, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Guangwu; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Hongyu; Wang, Yangang; Sun, Hui; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xing, Mingzhao

    2014-06-01

    Promoter mutations chr5:1,295,228C>T and chr5:1,295,250C>T (termed C228T and C250T, respectively) in the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been reported in various cancers and need to be further investigated in thyroid cancer. The aim of the study was to explore TERT promoter mutations in various thyroid tumors and examine their relationship with BRAF V600E mutation, iodine intake, and clinicopathological behaviors of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter and BRAF mutations were identified by sequencing genomic DNA of primary thyroid tumors from normal- and high-iodine regions in China, and clinicopathological correlation was analyzed. The C228T mutation was found in 9.6% (39 of 408) of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), C250T was found in 1.7% (7 of 408) of PTC, and they were collectively found in 11.3% (46 of 408) of PTC. C228T was found in 31.8% (7 of 22) and C250T in 4.6% (1 of 22) of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), and they were collectively found in 36.4% (8 of 22) of FTC. No TERT mutation was found in 44 benign thyroid tumors. The two mutations occurred in 3.8% (6 of 158) of BRAF mutation-negative PTC vs 16.0% (40 of 250) of BRAF mutation-positive PTC (P = 5.87 × 10(-4)), demonstrating their association. Unlike BRAF mutation, TERT promoter mutations were not associated with high iodine intake, but they were associated with older patient age, larger tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, and advanced stages III/IV of PTC. Coexisting TERT and BRAF mutations were even more commonly and more significantly associated with clinicopathological aggressiveness. In this large cohort, we found TERT promoter mutations to be common, particularly in FTC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, and associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics.

  18. Prevalence of AIP mutations in a series of Turkish acromegalic patients: are synonymous AIP mutations relevant?

    PubMed

    Karaca, Z; Taheri, S; Tanriverdi, F; Unluhizarci, K; Kelestimur, F

    2015-12-01

    In sporadic acromegaly, overall AIP(mut) prevalence is reported as 3, 4.1 and 16 % in studies carried out across Europe. However, it is not known whether the prevalence shows any changes across different ethnicities. The aim of the study was to identify prevalence of AIP(mut) in a series of Turkish acromegalic patients. Direct sequencing of AIP gene was performed in 92 sporadic acromegalic patients. One patient was found to have a new mutation in exon 6: g67.258,286 (G/A) heterozygote; (GGC/GAC; gly/asp). Apart from this new mutation, previously defined synonymous mutations in AIP gene were detected in seven patients (Exon 4; rs2276020; (GAC/GAT; asp/asp) and six patients were found to have five different intronic mutations in AIP gene which were not previously defined. The patient with pathogenic AIP(mut) presented at a young age and had an aggressive and treatment resistant tumour. The prevalence of AIP(mut) in Turkish patients was found to be 1 % in sporadic acromegaly in the present study. In addition, one synonymous mutation which was previously defined and six new intronic mutations have been described in Turkish acromegalic patients. All acromegalic patients with synonymous AIP(mut) presented with macroadenoma and majority of them had invasive tumour. The prevalence of AIP(mut) in Turkish patients was found to be 1 % in sporadic acromegaly in the present study. This ratio increases when younger age groups are taken into account 6 % among patients <30 years of age at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly. The clinical features of acromegaly, such as having large and invasive tumours, may be affected by the presence of synonymous AIP(mut).

  19. Rilpivirine resistance mutation E138K in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase predisposed by prevalent polymorphic mutations.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Hachiya, Atsuko; Ode, Hirotaka; Nishijima, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Sugiura, Wataru; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Rilpivirine is listed as a recommended or alternative key drug in the current ART guidelines. E138K in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a primary mutation in resistance to rilpivirine, although in vitro experiments showed it confers only <3-fold resistance. An unidentified mechanism could amplify resistance to rilpivirine conferred by E138K. The objective of this study was to reveal the mechanism amplifying rilpivirine resistance conferred by E138K. HIV-1 RT sequences were compared in patients who failed rilpivirine-containing ART virologically. The effects of mutations commonly identified with E138K on rilpivirine susceptibility were analysed by using recombinant HIV-1 variants. Rilpivirine-containing ART was introduced in 162 HIV-1-infected patients at the outpatient clinic of the AIDS Clinical Center (National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan) between May 2012 and June 2015. Virological treatment failure occurred in six of these patients. E138K emerged in three patients while other rilpivirine resistance mutations emerged in the other three patients. I135T/L were identified in only three patients with E138K and existed before the introduction of rilpivirine-containing ART. Analysis of recombinant HIV-1 variants indicated that E138K conferred low-level rilpivirine resistance and that coexistence of I135T/L with E138K amplified the resistance. I135T/L, escape mutations from HLA-B*51/52-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are prevalent in Japan, may predispose HIV-1 to harbour E138K upon failure of rilpivirine-containing ART. The mutation patterns of drug resistance may vary due to baseline polymorphic mutations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Boström, Ida Maria; Winbo, Annika; Cederquist, Kristina; Jonasson, Jenni; Jonsson, Björn-Anders; Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Jensen, Steen M; Rydberg, Annika; Norberg, Anna

    2012-10-25

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the

  1. The rich phase structure of a mutator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.; Yakushkina, Tatiana; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-10-01

    We propose a modification of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of biological molecular evolution to include a mutator gene that causes both an increase in the mutation rate and a change in the fitness landscape. This mutator effect relates to a wide range of biomedical problems. There are three possible phases: mutator phase, mixed phase and non-selective phase. We calculate the phase structure, the mean fitness and the fraction of the mutator allele in the population, which can be applied to describe cancer development and RNA viruses. We find that depending on the genome length, either the normal or the mutator allele dominates in the mixed phase. We analytically solve the model for a general fitness function. We conclude that the random fitness landscape is an appropriate choice for describing the observed mutator phenomenon in the case of a small fraction of mutators. It is shown that the increase in the mutation rates in the regular and the mutator parts of the genome should be set independently; only some combinations of these increases can push the complex biomedical system to the non-selective phase, potentially related to the eradication of tumors.

  2. Mutation predicts 40 million years of fly wing evolution.

    PubMed

    Houle, David; Bolstad, Geir H; van der Linde, Kim; Hansen, Thomas F

    2017-08-24

    Mutation enables evolution, but the idea that adaptation is also shaped by mutational variation is controversial. Simple evolutionary hypotheses predict such a relationship if the supply of mutations constrains evolution, but it is not clear that constraints exist, and, even if they do, they may be overcome by long-term natural selection. Quantification of the relationship between mutation and phenotypic divergence among species will help to resolve these issues. Here we use precise data on over 50,000 Drosophilid fly wings to demonstrate unexpectedly strong positive relationships between variation produced by mutation, standing genetic variation, and the rate of evolution over the last 40 million years. Our results are inconsistent with simple constraint hypotheses because the rate of evolution is very low relative to what both mutational and standing variation could allow. In principle, the constraint hypothesis could be rescued if the vast majority of mutations are so deleterious that they cannot contribute to evolution, but this also requires the implausible assumption that deleterious mutations have the same pattern of effects as potentially advantageous ones. Our evidence for a strong relationship between mutation and divergence in a slowly evolving structure challenges the existing models of mutation in evolution.

  3. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C.

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d.more » We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.« less

  4. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: a rapid stepwise approach.

    PubMed Central

    Zschocke, J; Graham, C A; Carson, D J; Nevin, N C

    1995-01-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, I65T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. PMID:8533759

  5. [Maple syrup urine disease and gene mutations in twin neonates].

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Wang, Yu; Li, Cui; Xu, Wei-Wei; Niu, Feng-Hai; Zhang, Di

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the clinical features of one pair of twin neonates with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) in the Chinese Han population and pathogenic mutations in related genes, and to provide guidance for the early diagnosis and treatment of MSUD. The clinical and imaging data of the twin neonates were collected. The peripheral blood samples were collected from the twin neonates and their parents to detect the genes related to MSUD (BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT, and DLD). The loci with gene mutations were identified, and a bioinformatic analysis was performed. Two mutations were detected in the BCKDHB gene, missense mutation c.304G>A (p.Gly102Arg) and nonsense mutation c.331C>T (p.Arg111*), and both of them were heterozygotes. The mutation c.304G>A (p.Gly102Arg) had not been reported in the world. Their father carried the missense mutation c.304G>A (p.Gly102Arg), and their mother carried the nonsense mutation c.331C>T (p.Arg111*). The c.331C>T (p.Arg111*) heterozygous mutation in BCKDHB gene is the pathogenic mutation in these twin neonates and provides a genetic and molecular basis for the clinical features of children with MSUD.

  6. Statistical Methods for Identifying Sequence Motifs Affecting Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yicheng; Neeman, Teresa; Yap, Von Bing; Huttley, Gavin A.

    2017-01-01

    Mutation processes differ between types of point mutation, genomic locations, cells, and biological species. For some point mutations, specific neighboring bases are known to be mechanistically influential. Beyond these cases, numerous questions remain unresolved, including: what are the sequence motifs that affect point mutations? How large are the motifs? Are they strand symmetric? And, do they vary between samples? We present new log-linear models that allow explicit examination of these questions, along with sequence logo style visualization to enable identifying specific motifs. We demonstrate the performance of these methods by analyzing mutation processes in human germline and malignant melanoma. We recapitulate the known CpG effect, and identify novel motifs, including a highly significant motif associated with A→G mutations. We show that major effects of neighbors on germline mutation lie within ±2 of the mutating base. Models are also presented for contrasting the entire mutation spectra (the distribution of the different point mutations). We show the spectra vary significantly between autosomes and X-chromosome, with a difference in T→C transition dominating. Analyses of malignant melanoma confirmed reported characteristic features of this cancer, including statistically significant strand asymmetry, and markedly different neighboring influences. The methods we present are made freely available as a Python library https://bitbucket.org/pycogent3/mutationmotif. PMID:27974498

  7. Renal Aplasia in Humans Is Associated with RET Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael A.; Safford, Shawn D.; Reeves, Justin G.; Jackson, Margaret E.; Freemerman, Alex J.

    2008-01-01

    In animal models, kidney formation is known to be controlled by the proteins RET, GDNF, and GFRA1; however, no human studies to date have shown an association between abnormal kidney development and mutation of these genes. We hypothesized that stillborn fetuses with congenital renal agenesis or severe dysplasia would possess mutations in RET, GDNF, or GFRA1. We assayed for mutations in these genes in 33 stillborn fetuses that had bilateral or unilateral renal agenesis (29 subjects) or severe congenital renal dysplasia (4 subjects). Mutations in RET were found in 7 of 19 fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis (37%) and 2 of 10 fetuses (20%) with unilateral agenesis. In two fetuses, there were two different RET mutations found, and a total of ten different sequence variations were identified. We also investigated whether these mutations affected RET activation; in each case, RET phosphorylation was either absent or constitutively activated. A GNDF mutation was identified in only one fetus with unilateral agenesis; this subject also had two RET mutations. No GFRA1 mutations were seen in any fetuses. These data suggest that in humans, mutations in RET and GDNF may contribute significantly to abnormal kidney development. PMID:18252215

  8. Hereditary cancer genes are highly susceptible to splicing mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soemedi, Rachel; Maguire, Samantha; Murray, Michael F.; Monaghan, Sean F.

    2018-01-01

    Substitutions that disrupt pre-mRNA splicing are a common cause of genetic disease. On average, 13.4% of all hereditary disease alleles are classified as splicing mutations mapping to the canonical 5′ and 3′ splice sites. However, splicing mutations present in exons and deeper intronic positions are vastly underreported. A recent re-analysis of coding mutations in exon 10 of the Lynch Syndrome gene, MLH1, revealed an extremely high rate (77%) of mutations that lead to defective splicing. This finding is confirmed by extending the sampling to five other exons in the MLH1 gene. Further analysis suggests a more general phenomenon of defective splicing driving Lynch Syndrome. Of the 36 mutations tested, 11 disrupted splicing. Furthermore, analyzing past reports suggest that MLH1 mutations in canonical splice sites also occupy a much higher fraction (36%) of total mutations than expected. When performing a comprehensive analysis of splicing mutations in human disease genes, we found that three main causal genes of Lynch Syndrome, MLH1, MSH2, and PMS2, belonged to a class of 86 disease genes which are enriched for splicing mutations. Other cancer genes were also enriched in the 86 susceptible genes. The enrichment of splicing mutations in hereditary cancers strongly argues for additional priority in interpreting clinical sequencing data in relation to cancer and splicing. PMID:29505604

  9. Age-related mutations and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mason, CC; Khorashad, JS; Tantravahi, SK; Kelley, TW; Zabriskie, MS; Yan, D; Pomicter, AD; Reynolds, KR; Eiring, AM; Kronenberg, Z; Sherman, RL; Tyner, JW; Dalley, BK; Dao, K-H; Yandell, M; Druker, BJ; Gotlib, J; O’Hare, T; Deininger, MW

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a hematologic malignancy nearly confined to the elderly. Previous studies to determine incidence and prognostic significance of somatic mutations in CMML have relied on candidate gene sequencing, although an unbiased mutational search has not been conducted. As many of the genes commonly mutated in CMML were recently associated with age-related clonal hematopoiesis (ARCH) and aged hematopoiesis is characterized by a myelomonocytic differentiation bias, we hypothesized that CMML and aged hematopoiesis may be closely related. We initially established the somatic mutation landscape of CMML by whole exome sequencing followed by gene-targeted validation. Genes mutated in ⩾ 10% of patients were SRSF2, TET2, ASXL1, RUNX1, SETBP1, KRAS, EZH2, CBL and NRAS, as well as the novel CMML genes FAT4, ARIH1, DNAH2 and CSMD1. Most CMML patients (71%) had mutations in ⩾ 2 ARCH genes and 52% had ⩾ 7 mutations overall. Higher mutation burden was associated with shorter survival. Age-adjusted population incidence and reported ARCH mutation rates are consistent with a model in which clinical CMML ensues when a sufficient number of stochastically acquired age-related mutations has accumulated, suggesting that CMML represents the leukemic conversion of the myelomonocytic-lineage-biased aged hematopoietic system. PMID:26648538

  10. Transcranial sonography and functional imaging in glucocerebrosidase mutation Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M J; Hagenah, J; Dhawan, V; Peng, S; Stanley, K; Raymond, D; Deik, A; Gross, S J; Schreiber-Agus, N; Mirelman, A; Marder, K; Ozelius, L J; Eidelberg, D; Bressman, S B; Saunders-Pullman, R

    2013-02-01

    Heterozygous glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations are the leading genetic risk factor for Parkinson disease, yet imaging correlates, particularly transcranial sonography, have not been extensively described. To determine whether GBA mutation heterozygotes with Parkinson disease demonstrate hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, transcranial sonography was performed in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson disease subjects, tested for the eight most common Gaucher disease mutations and the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, and in controls. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose or [(18)F]-fluorodopa positron emission tomography is also reported from a subset of Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations. Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations (n = 23) had a greater median maximal area of substantia nigral echogenicity compared to controls (n = 34, aSNmax = 0.30 vs. 0.18, p = 0.007). There was no difference in median maximal area of nigral echogenicity between Parkinson disease groups defined by GBA and LRRK2 genotype: GBA heterozygotes; GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes (n = 4, aSNmax = 0.27); subjects without LRRK2 or GBA mutations (n = 32, aSNmax = 0.27); LRRK2 heterozygotes/homozygotes without GBA mutations (n = 27, aSNmax = 0.28); and GBA heterozygotes/LRRK2 heterozygotes (n = 4, aSNmax = 0.32, overall p = 0.63). In secondary analyses among Parkinson disease subjects with GBA mutations, maximal area of nigral echogenicity did not differ based on GBA mutation severity or mutation number. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (n = 3) and [(18)F]-fluorodopa (n = 2) positron emission tomography in Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations was consistent with findings in idiopathic Parkinson disease. Both transcranial sonography and positron emission tomography are abnormal in GBA mutation associated Parkinson disease, similar to other Parkinson disease subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2.

    PubMed

    Nangalia, J; Massie, C E; Baxter, E J; Nice, F L; Gundem, G; Wedge, D C; Avezov, E; Li, J; Kollmann, K; Kent, D G; Aziz, A; Godfrey, A L; Hinton, J; Martincorena, I; Van Loo, P; Jones, A V; Guglielmelli, P; Tarpey, P; Harding, H P; Fitzpatrick, J D; Goudie, C T; Ortmann, C A; Loughran, S J; Raine, K; Jones, D R; Butler, A P; Teague, J W; O'Meara, S; McLaren, S; Bianchi, M; Silber, Y; Dimitropoulou, D; Bloxham, D; Mudie, L; Maddison, M; Robinson, B; Keohane, C; Maclean, C; Hill, K; Orchard, K; Tauro, S; Du, M-Q; Greaves, M; Bowen, D; Huntly, B J P; Harrison, C N; Cross, N C P; Ron, D; Vannucchi, A M; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Green, A R

    2013-12-19

    Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. (Funded by the Kay

  12. Spectrum of rhodopsin mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Joong; Kim, Cinoo; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Hum; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kimm, Kuchan; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Lee, Jong-Young

    2011-01-01

    To determine the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with mutations. The RHO mutations were screened by direct sequencing, and mutation prevalence was measured in patients and controls. The impact of missense mutations to RP was predicted by segregation analysis, peptide sequence alignment, and in silico analysis. The severity of disease in patients with the missense mutations was compared by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic visual field testing. Five heterozygous mutations were identified in six of 302 probands with RP, including a novel mutation (c.893C>A, p.A298D) and four known mutations (c.50C>T, p.T17M; c.533A>G, p.Y178C; c.888G>T, p.K296N; and c.1040C>T, p.P347L). The allele frequency of missense mutations was measured in 114 ethnically matched controls. p.A298D, newly identified in a sporadic patient, had never been found in controls and was predicted to be pathogenic. Among the patients with the missense mutations, we observed the most severe phenotype in patients with p.P347L, less severe phenotypes in patients with p.Y178C or p.A298D, and a relatively moderate phenotype in a patient with p.T17M. The results reveal the spectrum of RHO mutations in Korean RP patients and clinical features that vary according to mutations. Our findings will be useful for understanding these genetic spectra and the genotype-phenotype correlations and will therefore help with predicting disease prognosis and facilitating the development of gene therapy.

  13. Spectrum of rhodopsin mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Joong; Kim, Cinoo; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Hum; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kimm, Kuchan; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations in patients with mutations. Methods The RHO mutations were screened by direct sequencing, and mutation prevalence was measured in patients and controls. The impact of missense mutations to RP was predicted by segregation analysis, peptide sequence alignment, and in silico analysis. The severity of disease in patients with the missense mutations was compared by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic visual field testing. Results Five heterozygous mutations were identified in six of 302 probands with RP, including a novel mutation (c.893C>A, p.A298D) and four known mutations (c.50C>T, p.T17M; c.533A>G, p.Y178C; c.888G>T, p.K296N; and c.1040C>T, p.P347L). The allele frequency of missense mutations was measured in 114 ethnically matched controls. p.A298D, newly identified in a sporadic patient, had never been found in controls and was predicted to be pathogenic. Among the patients with the missense mutations, we observed the most severe phenotype in patients with p.P347L, less severe phenotypes in patients with p.Y178C or p.A298D, and a relatively moderate phenotype in a patient with p.T17M. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum of RHO mutations in Korean RP patients and clinical features that vary according to mutations. Our findings will be useful for understanding these genetic spectra and the genotype–phenotype correlations and will therefore help with predicting disease prognosis and facilitating the development of gene therapy. PMID:21677794

  14. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Methods Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. Results We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. Conclusions COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change. PMID:19390655

  15. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change.

  16. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  17. Screening for duplications, deletions and a common intronic mutation detects 35% of second mutations in patients with USH2A monoallelic mutations on Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Lenassi, Eva; Luxon, Linda M; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2013-08-08

    Usher Syndrome is the leading cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is divided into three subtypes, of which the most common is Usher type 2, and the USH2A gene accounts for 75-80% of cases. Despite recent sequencing strategies, in our cohort a significant proportion of individuals with Usher type 2 have just one heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A, or no convincing disease-causing mutations across nine Usher genes. The purpose of this study was to improve the molecular diagnosis in these families by screening USH2A for duplications, heterozygous deletions and a common pathogenic deep intronic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. Forty-nine Usher type 2 or atypical Usher families who had missing mutations (mono-allelic USH2A or no mutations following Sanger sequencing of nine Usher genes) were screened for duplications/deletions using the USH2A SALSA MLPA reagent kit (MRC-Holland). Identification of USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was achieved by Sanger sequencing. Mutations were confirmed by a combination of reverse transcription PCR using RNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells or fibroblasts, and by array comparative genomic hybridisation with sequencing across the genomic breakpoints. Eight mutations were identified in 23 Usher type 2 families (35%) with one previously identified heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A. These consisted of five heterozygous deletions, one duplication, and two heterozygous instances of the pathogenic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. No variants were found in the 15 Usher type 2 families with no previously identified disease-causing mutations. In 11 atypical families, none of whom had any previously identified convincing disease-causing mutations, the mutation USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was identified in a heterozygous state in one family. All five deletions and the heterozygous duplication we report here are novel. This is the first time that a duplication in USH2A has been reported as a cause of Usher syndrome. We found that 8 of

  18. Environmental carcinogens and mutational pathways in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pulliero, A; Godschalk, R; Andreassi, M G; Curfs, D; Van Schooten, F J; Izzotti, A

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with DNA damage in both circulating and vessel-wall cells and DNA adducts derived from exposure to environmental mutagens are abundant in atherosclerotic vessels. Environmental chemical carcinogens identified as risk factor for atherosclerosis include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, beta-naphthoflavone, pyrene, 3-methylcolanthrene), arsenic, cadmium, 1,3-butadiene, cigarette smoke. Accordingly, polymorphisms of genes encoding for phase I/II metabolic reaction and DNA repair are risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although their role is negligible as compared to other risk factors. The pathogenic relevance of mutation-related molecular damage in atherosclerosis has been demonstrated in experimental animal models involving the exposure to chemical mutagens. The relevance of mutation-related events in worsening atherosclerosis prognosis has been demonstrated in human clinical studies mainly as referred to mitochondrial DNA damage. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the occurrence of high level of oxidative damage in blood vessel resulting from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mitochondrial damage is a main endogenous source of oxidative stress whose accumulation causes activation of intrinsic apoptosis through BIRC2 inhibition and cell loss contributing to plaque development and instability. Environmental physical mutagens, including ionizing radiation, are a risk factor for atherosclerosis even at the low exposure dose occurring in case of occupational exposure or the high exposure doses occurring during radiotherapy. Conversely, the role of exciting UV radiation in atherosclerosis is still uncertain. This review summarizes the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the pathogenic role of mutation-related pathway in atherosclerosis examining the underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectrum of mutations in CFTR in Finland: 18 years follow-up study and identification of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Satu; Bonache, Sandra; Casals, Teresa; Monto, Sanni; Savilahti, Erkki; Kere, Juha; Järvelä, Irma

    2005-12-01

    The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) is low in the isolated Finnish population and the Finnish CF mutation spectrum has differed from many European countries. We have analyzed the mutation spectrum and the geographical distribution of CF mutations in Finland covering the last 18 years (1987-2004). A total of 14 mutations were identified; two of them new, 774insT and S589T (G>C at 1,898). The overall coverage of mutations was 97% (99/102 chromosomes). The most frequent mutations were F508del and 394delTT, found in 36% (37/102) and 35% (36/102) of the CF chromosomes respectively. Of the rare mutations, a mutation of presumable Slavic origin, CFTRdele2.3 (21 kb), was enriched in a rural isolate with a frequency of 5,9% (6/102), and a mutation that possibly indicates Swedish influence, 3659delC, was scattered throughout the country with a similar frequency of 5,9% (6/102). G542X, R1162X, R117H, 3732delA, 1,898 + 3A >C, S1196X, S945L, W57R, 774insT and S589T were each identified in a number of chromosomes from one to three. Our observations of the Finnish CF mutation spectrum fit well with the characteristics of Finland as a population of multiple local founder effects.

  20. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C. PMID:28170390

  1. Molecular Characterization of WFS1 in Patients with Wolfram Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Ouweland, Johannes M. W.; Cryns, Kim; Pennings, Ronald J. E.; Walraven, Inge; Janssen, George M. C.; Maassen, J. Antonie; Veldhuijzen, Bernard F. E.; Arntzenius, Alexander B.; Lindhout, Dick; Cremers, Cor W. R. J.; Van Camp, Guy; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.

    2003-01-01

    Wolfram (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness) syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus, and sensorineural hearing impairment. A gene responsible for Wolfram syndrome (WFS1) has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 4 and subsequently mutations in WFS1 have been described. We have screened 12 patients with Wolfram syndrome from nine Dutch families for mutations in the WFS1-coding region by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing. Furthermore, we analyzed the mitochondrial genome for gross abnormalities and the A3243G point mutation in the leucyl-tRNA gene, because Wolfram syndrome shows phenotypic similarities with mitochondrial disease. Seven mutations in WFS1 were identified in six of nine families: two missense mutations, one frameshift mutation, one splice donor site mutation, and three deletions. In addition, a splice variant near the 5′UTR of WFS1 was identified, present in patient as well as control RNA samples in various percentages, alternating the translation initiation consensus sequence. Whether this WFS1 splice variant displays impaired translation efficiency remains to be determined. No MtDNA lesions were identified in any of the Wolfram patients. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of molecular analysis of WFS1 in the refinement of clinical diagnostic criteria for Wolfram syndrome that helps to dissect the clinically overlapping syndromes sharing diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. PMID:12707373

  2. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism due to Novel FGFR1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Akkuş, Gamze; Kotan, Leman Damla; Durmaz, Erdem; Mengen, Eda; Turan, İhsan; Ulubay, Ayça; Gürbüz, Fatih; Yüksel, Bilgin; Tetiker, Tamer; Topaloğlu, A Kemal

    2017-06-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is heterogeneous. Fibroblast growth factor signaling is pivotal in the ontogeny of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons. Loss-of-function mutations in FGFR1 gene cause variable HH phenotypes encompassing pubertal delay to idiopathic HH (IHH) or Kallmann syndrome (KS). As FGFR1 mutations are common, recognizing mutations and associated phenotypes may enhance clinical management. Using a candidate gene approach, we screened 52 IHH/KS patients. We identified three novel (IVS3-1G>C and p.W2X, p.R209C) FGFR1 gene mutations. Despite predictive null protein function, patients from the novel mutation families had normosmic IHH without non-reproductive phenotype. These findings further emphasize the great variability of FGFR1 mutation phenotypes in IHH/KS.

  3. The origin and evolution of mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Welch, John S.; Ley, Timothy J.; Link, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Larson, David E.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wartman, Lukas D.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Liu, Fulu; Xia, Jun; Kandoth, Cyriac; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Dooling, David J.; Wallis, John W.; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle M.; Lu, Charles; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; McGrath, Sean D.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd N.; Walker, Jason R.; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack D.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Klco, Jeffery M.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most mutations in cancer genomes are thought to be acquired after the initiating event, which may cause genomic instability, driving clonal evolution. However, for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), normal karyotypes are common, and genomic instability is unusual. To better understand clonal evolution in AML, we sequenced the genomes of AML samples with a known initiating event (PML-RARA) vs. normal karyotype AML samples, and the exomes of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy people. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the mutations found in AML genomes are actually random events that occurred in HSPCs before they acquired the initiating mutation; the mutational history of that cell is “captured” as the clone expands. In many cases, only one or two additional, cooperating mutations are needed to generate the malignant founding clone. Cells from the founding clone can acquire additional cooperating mutations, yielding subclones that can contribute to disease progression and/or relapse. PMID:22817890

  4. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism due to Novel FGFR1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Akkuş, Gamze; Kotan, Leman Damla; Durmaz, Erdem; Mengen, Eda; Turan, İhsan; Ulubay, Ayça; Gürbüz, Fatih; Yüksel, Bilgin; Tetiker, Tamer; Topaloğlu, A. Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The underlying genetic etiology of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is heterogeneous. Fibroblast growth factor signaling is pivotal in the ontogeny of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons. Loss-of-function mutations in FGFR1 gene cause variable HH phenotypes encompassing pubertal delay to idiopathic HH (IHH) or Kallmann syndrome (KS). As FGFR1 mutations are common, recognizing mutations and associated phenotypes may enhance clinical management. Methods: Using a candidate gene approach, we screened 52 IHH/KS patients. Results: We identified three novel (IVS3-1G>C and p.W2X, p.R209C) FGFR1 gene mutations. Despite predictive null protein function, patients from the novel mutation families had normosmic IHH without non-reproductive phenotype. Conclusion: These findings further emphasize the great variability of FGFR1 mutation phenotypes in IHH/KS. PMID:28008864

  5. [1483 cases of paternity test with STR loci mutation].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Wang, Jun; Jing, Qiang; Xu, Bin; Su, Qin; Li, Yun-Juan; Li, Hui

    2014-02-01

    To observe and analyze the mutation phenomenon of 17 STR loci of PowerPlex 18D Kit in paternity test of Yunnan population. The DNA was extracted by Chelex-100 method. The PowerPlex 18D Kit was used to test 1,483 cases and their conclusions of paternity tests were verified. In the 1,483 cases, 1,047 were parental triplet and 436 were uniparental diad. A total of 2,530 times of meiosis was observed. One STR locus mutation was observed in 24 cases. And 11 mutation loci were found in the 17 STR loci. STR loci mutation is a common phenomenon. We should collect the data of STR loci mutation, choose other good polymorphism, low mutation rate of genetic markers, to ensure that the results are accurate and reliable.

  6. Clusters of Multiple Mutations: Incidence and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kin; Gordenin, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been long understood that mutation distribution across genomic space and in time is not completely random. Indeed, recent surprising discoveries identified multiple simultaneous mutations occurring in tiny regions within chromosomes, while the rest of the genome remains relatively mutation-free. Mechanistic elucidation of these phenomena called mutation showers, mutation clusters, or kataegis is ongoing, in parallel with findings of abundant clustered mutagenesis in cancer genomes. So far, the combination of factors most important for clustered mutagenesis is the induction of DNA lesions with unusually long and persistent single-strand DNA intermediates. In addition to being a fascinating phenomenon, clustered mutagenesis also became an indispensable tool for identifying a previously unrecognized major source of mutation in cancer – APOBEC cytidine deaminases. Future research on clustered mutagenesis carries a promise of shedding light onto important mechanistic details of genome maintenance, with potentially profound implications for human health. PMID:26631512

  7. Methods for detection of subtle mutations in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christina; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik; Guldberg, Per

    2006-07-01

    With the realization that cancer is a genetic disease, detection of mutations in genomic DNA has become an important discipline in many areas of cancer research. Although the publication of the human genome sequence and the immense technological advancements have facilitated the analysis of cancer genomes, detection of mutations in tumor specimens may still be challenging and fraught with technical problems. In this review, we describe current technologies for detection of small DNA mutations, including mutation scanning techniques to search for unknown mutations, and diagnostic techniques to detect known cancer mutations. We outline the principles of the different techniques and discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss critical issues that must be considered before choosing methodology, including sensitivity, specificity, limit of detection, throughput and cost, quantity and quality of template DNA, available equipment, and personnel expertise.

  8. Male mutation rates and the cost of sex for females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Rosemary J.

    1994-05-01

    ALTHOUGH we do not know why sex evolved, the twofold cost of meiosis for females provides a standard against which postulated benefits of sex can be evaluated1. The most reliable benefit is sex's ability to reduce the impact of deleterious mutations2,3. But deleterious mutations may themselves generate a large and previously overlooked female-specific cost of sex. DNA sequence comparisons have confirmed Haldane's suggestion that most mutations arise in the male germ line4,5; recent estimates of α, the ratio of male to female mutation rates, are ten, six and two in humans, primates and rodents, respectively6-8. Consequently, male gametes may give progeny more mutations than the associated sexual recombination eliminates. Here I describe computer simulations showing that the cost of male mutations can easily exceed the benefits of recombination, causing females to produce fitter progeny by parthenogenesis than by mating. The persistence of sexual reproduction by females thus becomes even more problematic.

  9. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutational landscape, clonal evolution patterns, and role of RAS mutations in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koichi; Khiabanian, Hossein; da Silva-Almeida, Ana C.; Tzoneva, Gannie; Abate, Francesco; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Carpenter, Zachary; Penson, Alex; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Eckert, Cornelia; Nicolas, Concepción; Balbin, Milagros; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2016-01-01

    Although multiagent combination chemotherapy is curative in a significant fraction of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 20% of cases relapse and most die because of chemorefractory disease. Here we used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to analyze the mutational landscape at relapse in pediatric ALL cases. These analyses identified numerous relapse-associated mutated genes intertwined in chemotherapy resistance-related protein complexes. In this context, RAS-MAPK pathway-activating mutations in the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) genes were present in 24 of 55 (44%) cases in our series. Interestingly, some leukemias showed retention or emergence of RAS mutant clones at relapse, whereas in others RAS mutant clones present at diagnosis were replaced by RAS wild-type populations, supporting a role for both positive and negative selection evolutionary pressures in clonal evolution of RAS-mutant leukemia. Consistently, functional dissection of mouse and human wild-type and mutant RAS isogenic leukemia cells demonstrated induction of methotrexate resistance but also improved the response to vincristine in mutant RAS-expressing lymphoblasts. These results highlight the central role of chemotherapy-driven selection as a central mechanism of leukemia clonal evolution in relapsed ALL, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized dual role of RAS mutations as drivers of both sensitivity and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27655895

  11. Cystathionine β-Synthase Mutations: Effect of Mutation Topology on Folding and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kožich, Viktor; Sokolová, Jitka; Klatovská, Veronika; Krijt, Jakub; Janošík, Miroslav; Jelínek, Karel; Kraus, Jan P; Cooper, David N

    2010-01-01

    Misfolding of mutant enzymes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. We examined properties of a series of 27 mutant variants, which together represent 70% of known alleles observed in patients with homocystinuria due to CBS deficiency. The median amount of SDS-soluble mutant CBS polypeptides in the pellet after centrifugation of bacterial extracts was increased by 50% compared to the wild type. Moreover, mutants formed on average only 12% of tetramers and their median activity reached only 3% of the wild-type enzyme. In contrast to the wild-type CBS about half of mutants were not activated by S-adenosylmethionine. Expression at 18°C substantially increased the activity of five mutants in parallel with increasing the amounts of tetramers. We further analyzed the role of solvent accessibility of mutants as a determinant of their folding and activity. Buried mutations formed on average less tetramers and exhibited 23 times lower activity than the solvent exposed mutations. In summary, our results show that topology of mutations predicts in part the behavior of mutant CBS, and that misfolding may be an important and frequent pathogenic mechanism in CBS deficiency. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506325

  12. Estimating the scaled mutation rate and mutation bias with site frequency data.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Claus

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of allele frequencies of a large number of biallelic sites is known as "allele-frequency spectrum" or "site-frequency spectrum" (SFS). Without selection and in regions of relatively high recombination rates, sites may be assumed to be independently and identically distributed. With a beta equilibrium distribution of allelic proportions and binomial sampling, a beta-binomial compound likelihood for each site results. The likelihood of the data and the posterior distribution of two parameters, scaled mutation rate θ and mutation bias α, is investigated in the general case and for small scaled mutation rates θ. In the general case, an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is derived to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of both parameters. With an appropriate prior distribution, a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler to integrate the posterior distribution is also derived. As far as I am aware, previous maximum likelihood or Bayesian estimators of θ, explicitly or implicitly assume small scaled mutation rates, i.e., θ≪1. For θ≪1, maximum-likelihood estimators are also derived for both parameters using a Taylor series expansion of the beta-binomial distribution. The estimator of θ is a variant of the Ewens-Watterson estimator and of the maximum likelihood estimator derived with the Poisson Random Field approach. With a conjugate prior distribution, marginal and conditional beta posterior distributions are also derived for both parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Global Characterization of Protein Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the same samples. To date, we have performed...implications for resistance to cancer therapeutics. We have also identified a subset of genes that appear to be recurrently mutated in our discovery set, and...integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the same samples. Body This is a “synergy” project

  14. Global Characterization of Protein Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    prevalence of candidate cancer genes observed here in prostate cancer. (3) Perform integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy...analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the same samples. Body This is a “synergy” project between...However, to perform initial verification/validation studies, we have evaluated the mutation calls for several genes discovered initially by the

  15. Global Characterization of Protein-Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    observed, and assess prevalence; (3) Perform integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the...v) completed CGH assays on 200 prostate cancers; (vi) initiated the integrated analyses of gene expression, copy number and mutation in prostate...histories of individual mutations within the progression of the cancer in which it was observed, and to assess the prevalence of candidate cancer genes

  16. Somatic Mutations and Clonal Hematopoiesis in Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Hosokawa, Kohei; Makishima, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Townsley, Danielle; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sato, Yusuke; Liu, Delong; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Wu, Colin O; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Clemente, Michael J; Kataoka, Keisuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Okuno, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Nagata, Yasunobu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Kon, Ayana; Sanada, Masashi; Scheinberg, Phillip; Miyano, Satoru; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Nakao, Shinji; Young, Neal S; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-07-02

    In patients with acquired aplastic anemia, destruction of hematopoietic cells by the immune system leads to pancytopenia. Patients have a response to immunosuppressive therapy, but myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia develop in about 15% of the patients, usually many months to years after the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. We performed next-generation sequencing and array-based karyotyping using 668 blood samples obtained from 439 patients with aplastic anemia. We analyzed serial samples obtained from 82 patients. Somatic mutations in myeloid cancer candidate genes were present in one third of the patients, in a limited number of genes and at low initial variant allele frequency. Clonal hematopoiesis was detected in 47% of the patients, most frequently as acquired mutations. The prevalence of the mutations increased with age, and mutations had an age-related signature. DNMT3A-mutated and ASXL1-mutated clones tended to increase in size over time; the size of BCOR- and BCORL1-mutated and PIGA-mutated clones decreased or remained stable. Mutations in PIGA and BCOR and BCORL1 correlated with a better response to immunosuppressive therapy and longer and a higher rate of overall and progression-free survival; mutations in a subgroup of genes that included DNMT3A and ASXL1 were associated with worse outcomes. However, clonal dynamics were highly variable and might not necessarily have predicted the response to therapy and long-term survival among individual patients. Clonal hematopoiesis was prevalent in aplastic anemia. Some mutations were related to clinical outcomes. A highly biased set of mutations is evidence of Darwinian selection in the failed bone marrow environment. The pattern of somatic clones in individual patients over time was variable and frequently unpredictable. (Funded by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and others.).

  17. Algorithms for Detecting Significantly Mutated Pathways in Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandin, Fabio; Upfal, Eli; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    Recent genome sequencing studies have shown that the somatic mutations that drive cancer development are distributed across a large number of genes. This mutational heterogeneity complicates efforts to distinguish functional mutations from sporadic, passenger mutations. Since cancer mutations are hypothesized to target a relatively small number of cellular signaling and regulatory pathways, a common approach is to assess whether known pathways are enriched for mutated genes. However, restricting attention to known pathways will not reveal novel cancer genes or pathways. An alterative strategy is to examine mutated genes in the context of genome-scale interaction networks that include both well characterized pathways and additional gene interactions measured through various approaches. We introduce a computational framework for de novo identification of subnetworks in a large gene interaction network that are mutated in a significant number of patients. This framework includes two major features. First, we introduce a diffusion process on the interaction network to define a local neighborhood of "influence" for each mutated gene in the network. Second, we derive a two-stage multiple hypothesis test to bound the false discovery rate (FDR) associated with the identified subnetworks. We test these algorithms on a large human protein-protein interaction network using mutation data from two recent studies: glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas and lung adenocarcinoma samples from the Tumor Sequencing Project. We successfully recover pathways that are known to be important in these cancers, such as the p53 pathway. We also identify additional pathways, such as the Notch signaling pathway, that have been implicated in other cancers but not previously reported as mutated in these samples. Our approach is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate a computationally efficient strategy for de novo identification of statistically significant mutated subnetworks. We

  18. Discovering the sweeping power of point mutations using a GIRAFF.

    PubMed

    Sokurenko, E V

    2001-11-01

    In pathogenic bacteria, point and other simple mutations can provide a strong selective advantage during the course of a single infection. Our understanding of the importance of these randomly occurring mutations has been hampered by a lack of technologies allowing mutation scanning on a genomic scale. Here, a novel technology is described that makes it possible to scan, in a single Southern blot experiment, the sequence identity of genomic regions with a combined length of hundreds of kilobases.

  19. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Thomas; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J Arjan G M; Zwart, Mark P

    2017-08-21

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on the repeatability of selection from standing genetic variation. Different sizes of mutant libraries of antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli, generated by error-prone PCR, were subjected to different antibiotic concentrations. We determined whether populations went extinct or survived, and sequenced the TEM gene of the surviving populations. The distribution of mutations per allele in our mutant libraries followed a Poisson distribution. Extinction patterns could be explained by a simple stochastic model that assumed the sampling of beneficial mutations was key for survival. In most surviving populations, alleles containing at least one known large-effect beneficial mutation were present. These genotype data also support a model which only invokes sampling effects to describe the occurrence of alleles containing large-effect driver mutations. Hence, evolution is largely predictable given cursory knowledge of mutational fitness effects, the mutation rate and population size. There were no clear trends in the repeatability of selected mutants when we considered all mutations present. However, when only known large-effect mutations were considered, the outcome of selection is less repeatable for large libraries, in contrast to expectations. We show experimentally that alleles carrying multiple mutations selected from large libraries confer higher resistance levels relative to alleles with only a known large-effect mutation, suggesting that the scarcity of high-resistance alleles carrying multiple mutations may contribute to the decrease in repeatability at large library sizes.

  20. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Thomas; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Zwart, Mark P.

    2017-10-01

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on the repeatability of selection from standing genetic variation. Different sizes of mutant libraries of antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli, generated by error-prone PCR, were subjected to different antibiotic concentrations. We determined whether populations went extinct or survived, and sequenced the TEM gene of the surviving populations. The distribution of mutations per allele in our mutant libraries followed a Poisson distribution. Extinction patterns could be explained by a simple stochastic model that assumed the sampling of beneficial mutations was key for survival. In most surviving populations, alleles containing at least one known large-effect beneficial mutation were present. These genotype data also support a model which only invokes sampling effects to describe the occurrence of alleles containing large-effect driver mutations. Hence, evolution is largely predictable given cursory knowledge of mutational fitness effects, the mutation rate and population size. There were no clear trends in the repeatability of selected mutants when we considered all mutations present. However, when only known large-effect mutations were considered, the outcome of selection is less repeatable for large libraries, in contrast to expectations. We show experimentally that alleles carrying multiple mutations selected from large libraries confer higher resistance levels relative to alleles with only a known large-effect mutation, suggesting that the scarcity of high-resistance alleles carrying multiple mutations may contribute to the decrease in repeatability at large library sizes.

  1. Short barb: a feather structure mutation in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Fulton, J E; Roberts, C W; Nichols, C R; Cheng, K M

    1982-12-01

    A type of feather structure abnormality in Japanese quail resulting in shortened barbs on contour feathers was found to be controlled by a single autosomal recessive gene, sh (short barb). The mutation was first identified in a full-sib family from the University of British Columbia wild type line. Unlike other feather structure mutations in Japanese quail reported previously in literature, the short barb mutation is not associated with poor reproduction.

  2. Mutations in BOREALIN cause thyroid dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Carré, Aurore; Stoupa, Athanasia; Kariyawasam, Dulanjalee; Gueriouz, Manelle; Ramond, Cyrille; Monus, Taylor; Léger, Juliane; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Sebag, Frédéric; Glaser, Nicolas; Zenaty, Delphine; Nitschke, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Hubert, Laurence; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Munnich, Arnold; Besmond, Claude; Taylor, William; Polak, Michel

    2017-02-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal endocrine disorder and is primarily caused by developmental abnormalities otherwise known as thyroid dysgenesis (TD). We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous family with TD and subsequently sequenced a cohort of 134 probands with TD to identify genetic factors predisposing to the disease. We identified the novel missense mutations p.S148F, p.R114Q and p.L177W in the BOREALIN gene in TD-affected families. Borealin is a major component of the Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) with well-known functions in mitosis. Further analysis of the missense mutations showed no apparent effects on mitosis. In contrast, expression of the mutants in human thyrocytes resulted in defects in adhesion and migration with corresponding changes in gene expression suggesting others functions for this mitotic protein. These results were well correlated with the same gene expression pattern analysed in the thyroid tissue of the patient with BOREALIN-p.R114W. These studies open new avenues in the genetics of TD in humans. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [Recurrent somatic mutation in hairy cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Sári, Eszter; Nagy, Zsolt; Demeter, Judit

    2013-01-27

    Hairy cell leukemia is a mature B-cell non-Hogkin lymphoma characterized by unique clinical, morphological and immunhistochemical features. Patients with hairy cell leukemia usually present with splenomegaly, progressive pancytopenia and a relative indolent clinical course. The diagnosis does not always indicate immediate treatment, as treatment depends on the clinical stage of the leukemia. Asymptomatic disease without progression requires a watchful waiting policy, while other categories usually need treatment. The treatment of choice is purine nucleoside analogues (pentostatin, cladribine) which can achieve complete remission even for decades. Interferon and monoclonal CD20 antibodies can also significantly prolong event-free survival. Unfortunately, only the latter two therapies are easily available in Hungary. Splenectomy, which was suggested as first line treatment before the era of purine nucleoside analogues, is only recommended as a last resort. Although hairy cell leukemia is a well-defined lymphoproliferative disease, sometimes it is difficult to differentiate it from other similar entities such as hairy cell leukema variant, splenic marginal zone lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma etc. Making the correct diagnosis is of utmost importance because of the great difference in treatment modalities. Recently, a somatic mutation was found in all analysed hairy cell leukemia samples, but not in other splenic B-cell lymphomas. This article reviews the significance of this observation and presents the different types of methods for the detection of this mutation.

  4. SETBP1 mutations drive leukemic transformation in ASXL1-mutated MDS.

    PubMed

    Inoue, D; Kitaura, J; Matsui, H; Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Nagamachi, A; Kawabata, K C; Togami, K; Nagase, R; Horikawa, S; Saika, M; Micol, J-B; Hayashi, Y; Harada, Y; Harada, H; Inaba, T; Tien, H-F; Abdel-Wahab, O; Kitamura, T

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in ASXL1 are frequent in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and are associated with adverse survival, yet the molecular pathogenesis of ASXL1 mutations (ASXL1-MT) is not fully understood. Recently, it has been found that deletion of Asxl1 or expression of C-terminal-truncating ASXL1-MTs inhibit myeloid differentiation and induce MDS-like disease in mice. Here, we find that SET-binding protein 1 (SETBP1) mutations (SETBP1-MT) are enriched among ASXL1-mutated MDS patients and associated with increased incidence of leukemic transformation, as well as shorter survival, suggesting that SETBP1-MT play a critical role in leukemic transformation of MDS. We identify that SETBP1-MT inhibit ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of SETBP1, resulting in increased expression. Expression of SETBP1-MT, in turn, inhibited protein phosphatase 2A activity, leading to Akt activation and enhanced expression of posterior Hoxa genes in ASXL1-mutant cells. Biologically, SETBP1-MT augmented ASXL1-MT-induced differentiation block, inhibited apoptosis and enhanced myeloid colony output. SETBP1-MT collaborated with ASXL1-MT in inducing acute myeloid leukemia in vivo. The combination of ASXL1-MT and SETBP1-MT activated a stem cell signature and repressed the tumor growth factor-β signaling pathway, in contrast to the ASXL1-MT-induced MDS model. These data reveal that SETBP1-MT are critical drivers of ASXL1-mutated MDS and identify several deregulated pathways as potential therapeutic targets in high-risk MDS.

  5. Clinical impact of endometrial cancer stratified by genetic mutational profiles, POLE mutation, and microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Haruma, Tomoko; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Haraga, Junko; Nyuya, Akihiro; Nishida, Takeshi; Goel, Ajay; Masuyama, Hisashi; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2018-01-01

    The molecular characterization of endometrial cancer (EC) can facilitate identification of various tumor subtypes. Although EC patients with POLE mutations reproducibly demonstrate better prognosis, the outcome of patients with microsatellite instability (MSI) remains controversial. This study attempted to interrogate whether genetic stratification of EC can identify distinct subsets with prognostic significance. A cohort of 138 EC patients who underwent surgical resection with curative intent was enrolled. Sanger sequencing was used to evaluate mutations in the POLE and KRAS genes. MSI analysis was performed using four mononucleotide repeat markers and methylation status of the MLH1 promoter was measured by a fluorescent bisulfite polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Extensive hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter was observed in 69.6% ECs with MLH1 deficiency and 3.5% with MMR proficiency, but in none of the ECs with loss of other MMR genes (P < .0001). MSI-positive and POLE mutations were found in 29.0% and 8.7% EC patients, respectively. Our MSI analysis showed a sensitivity of 92.7% for EC patients with MMR deficiency, and a specificity of 97.9% for EC patients with MMR proficiency. In univariate and multivariate analyses, POLE mutations and MSI status was significantly associated with progression-free survival (P = 0.0129 and 0.0064, respectively) but not with endometrial cancer-specific survival. This study provides significant evidence that analyses of proofreading POLE mutations and MSI status based on mononucleotide repeat markers are potentially useful biomarkers to identify EC patients with better prognosis.

  6. GJC2 promoter mutations causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Leo; Inoue, Ken; Helman, Guy; Mora, Sara; Maski, Kiran; Soul, Janet S.; Bloom, Miriam; Evans, Sarah H; Goto, Yu-ichi; Caldovic, Ljubica; Hobson, Grace M.; Vanderver, Adeline

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease is a rare hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by autosomal recessive mutations in GJC2, encoding a gap junction protein essential for production of a mature myelin sheath. A previously identified GJC2 mutation (c.-167G>A) in the promoter region is hypothesized to disrupt a putative SOX10 binding site; however, the lack of additional mutations in this region and contradictory functional data have limited the interpretation of this variant. Methods We describe two independent Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease families with a novel promoter region mutation and updated in vitro functional assays. Results A novel GJC2 mutation (c.-170G>A) in the promoter region was identified in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease patients. In vitro functional assays using human GJC2 promoter constructs demonstrated that this mutation and the previously described c.-167G>A mutation similarly diminished the transcriptional activity driven by SOX10 and the binding affinity for SOX10. Interpretation These findings support the role of GJC2 promoter mutations in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. GJC2 promoter region mutation screening should be included in the evaluation of patients with unexplained hypomyelinating leukodystrophies. PMID:24374284

  7. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normalmore » controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.« less

  8. STIL mutation causes autosomal recessive microcephalic lobar holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Altmüller, Janine; Friedrich, Katrin; Barbi, Gotthold; Nürnberg, Peter; Kubisch, Christian; Dobyns, William B; Borck, Guntram

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous midline brain malformation associated with neurologic manifestations including developmental delay, intellectual disability and seizures. Although mutations in the sonic hedgehog gene SHH and more than 10 other genes are known to cause holoprosencephaly, many patients remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here we show that a homozygous truncating mutation of STIL not only causes severe autosomal recessive microcephaly, but also lobar holoprosencephaly in an extended consanguineous Pakistani family. STIL mutations have previously been linked to centrosomal defects in primary microcephaly at the MCPH7 locus. Our results thus expand the clinical phenotypes associated with biallellic STIL mutations to include holoprosencephaly.

  9. Driver mutations in primary myelofibrosis and their implications.

    PubMed

    Szuber, Natasha; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2018-03-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is one of the classic BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Oncogenic driver mutations in PMF include Janus kinase 2, calreticulin (CALR), and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene. These mutations are not only pathogenetically relevant but might also influence disease outcome. Our objective for the current communication is to comprehensively review the distinct phenotypic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications of driver mutations in PMF. The discovery of driver mutations has revolutionized our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and clinical heterogeneity in MPN, including PMF. Recently, there have been further advances in our knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of MPN, particularly pertaining to CALR and its mutation. Moreover, the type and number of additional mutations, their order of acquisition, and their myriad combinatorial interactions with driver mutations may have dynamic pathogenic and clinical consequences. There are also additional data supporting the role of these genetic lesions and their associated allele burdens in modulating clinical features, including outcomes following treatment. Literature exists to support both phenotypic and prognostic correlates of conventional driver mutations in PMF. As the genetic landscape becomes increasingly complex, establishing the functional impact of these mutations and defining their interactions with other molecular, cytogenetic, and extrinsic factors will further our insight and potentially alter our clinical approach.

  10. Mutational Signature Mark Cancer’s Smoking Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil

    2016-11-03

    A broad computational study of cancer genome sequences by Los Alamos National Laboratory with the UK’s Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and other collaborators identifies telltale mutational signatures associated with smoking tobacco. The research demonstrates, for the first time, that smoking increases cancer risk by causing somatic mutations in tissues directly and indirectly exposed to tobacco smoke. The international study was published in the November 4 issue of Science. The analysis shows that tobacco smoking causes mutations leading to cancer by multiple distinct mechanisms, including by damaging DNA in organs and by speeding up a mutational cellular clock.

  11. Mutational landscape and significance across 12 major cancer types.

    PubMed

    Kandoth, Cyriac; McLellan, Michael D; Vandin, Fabio; Ye, Kai; Niu, Beifang; Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Zhang, Qunyuan; McMichael, Joshua F; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Leiserson, Mark D M; Miller, Christopher A; Welch, John S; Walter, Matthew J; Wendl, Michael C; Ley, Timothy J; Wilson, Richard K; Raphael, Benjamin J; Ding, Li

    2013-10-17

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has used the latest sequencing and analysis methods to identify somatic variants across thousands of tumours. Here we present data and analytical results for point mutations and small insertions/deletions from 3,281 tumours across 12 tumour types as part of the TCGA Pan-Cancer effort. We illustrate the distributions of mutation frequencies, types and contexts across tumour types, and establish their links to tissues of origin, environmental/carcinogen influences, and DNA repair defects. Using the integrated data sets, we identified 127 significantly mutated genes from well-known (for example, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase, Wnt/β-catenin and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling pathways, and cell cycle control) and emerging (for example, histone, histone modification, splicing, metabolism and proteolysis) cellular processes in cancer. The average number of mutations in these significantly mutated genes varies across tumour types; most tumours have two to six, indicating that the number of driver mutations required during oncogenesis is relatively small. Mutations in transcriptional factors/regulators show tissue specificity, whereas histone modifiers are often mutated across several cancer types. Clinical association analysis identifies genes having a significant effect on survival, and investigations of mutations with respect to clonal/subclonal architecture delineate their temporal orders during tumorigenesis. Taken together, these results lay the groundwork for developing new diagnostics and individualizing cancer treatment.

  12. FUS mutations in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Broustal, Oriane; Camuzat, Agnès; Guillot-Noël, Lena; Guy, Nathalie; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Deffond, Didier; Lacomblez, Lucette; Golfier, Véronique; Hannequin, Didier; Salachas, François; Camu, William; Didic, Mira; Dubois, Bruno; Meininger, Vincent; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Rapid advances were made in the knowledge of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with the recent identification of TARDBP and FUS mutations in familial ALS. More recently, FUS-positive inclusions were found in a subset of TDP-43-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) prompting us to analyze FUS in FTLD and FTLD-ALS patients. The p.Arg521His mutation was identified in a patient who initially had behavioral disorders and rapidly developed ALS. Although the frequency of mutations is low, our study enlarges the phenotypes associated with FUS mutations and shows that FUS could also play a direct pathogenic role in FTLD spectrum of diseases.

  13. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in pediatric acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Anna K; Miller, David W; Lynch, John A; Lemoff, Andrew S; Cai, Zhongling; Pounds, Stanley B; Radtke, Ina; Yan, Bing; Schuetz, John D; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Ribeiro, Raul C; Raimondi, Susana C; Zhang, Jinghui; Mullighan, Charles G; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Schulman, Brenda A; Downing, James R

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and 2 (IDH2) mutations in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), we sequenced these genes in diagnostic samples from 515 patients (227 AMLs and 288 ALLs). Somatic IDH1/IDH2 mutations were rare in ALL (N=1), but were more common in AML, occurring in 3.5% (IDH1 N=3 and IDH2 N=5), with the frequency higher in AMLs with a normal karyotype (9.8%). The identified IDH1 mutations occurred in codon 132 resulting in replacement of arginine with either cysteine (N=3) or histidine (N=1). By contrast, mutations in IDH2 did not affect the homologous residue but instead altered codon 140, resulting in replacement of arginine with either glutamine (N=4) or tryptophan (N=1). Structural modeling of IDH2 suggested that codon 140 mutations disrupt the enzyme's ability to bind its substrate isocitrate. Accordingly, recombinant IDH2 R140Q/W were unable to carry out the decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), but instead gained the neomorphic activity to reduce α-KG to R(−)-2-hydroxyglutarete (2-HG). Analysis of primary leukemic blasts confirmed high levels of 2-HG in AMLs with IDH1/IDH2 mutations. Interestingly, 3/5 AMLs with IDH2 mutations had FLT3 activating mutations, raising the possibility that these mutations cooperate in leukemogenesis. PMID:21647154

  14. WFS1/wolframin mutations, Wolfram syndrome, and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanim, F; Kirk, J; Latif, F; Barrett, T G

    2001-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is the inherited association of juvenile-onset insulin-dependant diabetes mellitus and progressive bilateral optic atrophy. A nuclear gene, WFS1/wolframin, was identified that segregated with disease status and demonstrated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in WS patients has identified mutations in 90% of patients. Most were compound heterozygotes with private mutations distributed throughout the gene with no obvious hotspots. The private nature of the mutations in WS patients and the low frequencies make it difficult to determine the biological or clinical relevance of these mutations. Mutation screening in patients with psychiatric disorders or diabetes mellitus has also been performed to test the hypothesis that heterozygous carriers of WFS1 gene mutations are at an increased risk following the observation that WS first-degree relatives have a higher frequency of these disorders. Most studies showed no association, however two missense mutations were identified that demonstrated significant association with psychiatric disorders and diabetes mellitus. Population association studies and functional studies of these variants will need to be performed to confirm these preliminary results. The elucidation of functions and functional pathways for the WFS1 gene product and variants will shed light on the effect of such disparate mutations on gene function and their role in the resulting clinical phenotype in WS and associated disorders. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Mutation Analysis in Chinese Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiulian; Liang, Desheng; Liu, Jing; Xue, Jinjie

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominant multisystem developmental disorder and related to mutations of the NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 genes. So far, there has been no report of a mutation analysis in Chinese patients with CdLS, while 12 cases have been clinically described. In the present study, we tried to search for pathogenic mutations of the NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 genes in four patients with CdLS from four unrelated Chinese families. Results: The mutational analysis of the NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 genes by direct sequencing revealed a heterozygous splice-site mutation c.4321G>T(p.V1441L) at exon 20 of NIPBL in proband 2 and a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation c.6589+5G>C at intron 38 of NIPBL in proband 3, which was showed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to generate both the full-length and an alternatively spliced transcript with an exon 38 deletion. Conclusions: This is the first report of the mutation analysis of NIPBL in China and our findings both expand the mutation spectrum of NIPBL and provide data for further understanding of the diverse and variable effects of NIPBL mutations. PMID:22857006

  16. HUMAN KINASES DISPLAY MUTATIONAL HOTSPOTS AT COGNATE POSITIONS WITHIN CANCER.

    PubMed

    Gallion, Jonathan; Wilkins, Angela D; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of driver genes is a major pursuit of cancer genomics, usually based on observing the same mutation in different patients. But the heterogeneity of cancer pathways plus the high background mutational frequency of tumor cells often cloud the distinction between less frequent drivers and innocent passenger mutations. Here, to overcome these disadvantages, we grouped together mutations from close kinase paralogs under the hypothesis that cognate mutations may functionally favor cancer cells in similar ways. Indeed, we find that kinase paralogs often bear mutations to the same substituted amino acid at the same aligned positions and with a large predicted Evolutionary Action. Functionally, these high Evolutionary Action, non-random mutations affect known kinase motifs, but strikingly, they do so differently among different kinase types and cancers, consistent with differences in selective pressures. Taken together, these results suggest that cancer pathways may flexibly distribute a dependence on a given functional mutation among multiple close kinase paralogs. The recognition of this "mutational delocalization" of cancer drivers among groups of paralogs is a new phenomena that may help better identify relevant mechanisms and therefore eventually guide personalized therapy.

  17. Frequent DPH3 promoter mutations in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Denisova, Evgeniya; Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P. Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Akrap, Ivana; Traves, Víctor; García-Casado, Zaida; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Requena, Celia; Sanmartin, Onofre; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Llombart, Beatriz; Guillén, Carlos; Ferrando, Jose; Gimeno, Enrique; Nordheim, Alfred; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports suggested frequent occurrence of cancer associated somatic mutations within regulatory elements of the genome. Based on initial exome sequencing of 21 melanomas, we report frequent somatic mutations in skin cancers in a bidirectional promoter of diphthamide biosynthesis 3 (DPH3) and oxidoreductase NAD-binding domain containing 1 (OXNAD1) genes. The UV-signature mutations occurred at sites adjacent and within a binding motif for E-twenty six/ternary complex factors (Ets/TCF), at −8 and −9 bp from DPH3 transcription start site. Follow up screening of 586 different skin lesions showed that the DPH3 promoter mutations were present in melanocytic nevi (2/114; 2%), melanoma (30/304; 10%), basal cell carcinoma of skin (BCC; 57/137; 42%) and squamous cell carcinoma of skin (SCC; 12/31; 39%). Reporter assays carried out in one melanoma cell line for DPH3 and OXNAD1 orientations showed statistically significant increased promoter activity due to −8/−9CC > TT tandem mutations; although, no effect of the mutations on DPH3 and OXNAD1 transcription in tumors was observed. The results from this study show occurrence of frequent somatic non-coding mutations adjacent to a pre-existing binding site for Ets transcription factors within the directional promoter of DPH3 and OXNAD1 genes in three major skin cancers. The detected mutations displayed typical UV signature; however, the functionality of the mutations remains to be determined. PMID:26416425

  18. Frequent DPH3 promoter mutations in skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Evgeniya; Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Akrap, Ivana; Traves, Víctor; García-Casado, Zaida; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Requena, Celia; Sanmartin, Onofre; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Llombart, Beatriz; Guillén, Carlos; Ferrando, Jose; Gimeno, Enrique; Nordheim, Alfred; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-11-03

    Recent reports suggested frequent occurrence of cancer associated somatic mutations within regulatory elements of the genome. Based on initial exome sequencing of 21 melanomas, we report frequent somatic mutations in skin cancers in a bidirectional promoter of diphthamide biosynthesis 3 (DPH3) and oxidoreductase NAD-binding domain containing 1 (OXNAD1) genes. The UV-signature mutations occurred at sites adjacent and within a binding motif for E-twenty six/ternary complex factors (Ets/TCF), at -8 and -9 bp from DPH3 transcription start site. Follow up screening of 586 different skin lesions showed that the DPH3 promoter mutations were present in melanocytic nevi (2/114; 2%), melanoma (30/304; 10%), basal cell carcinoma of skin (BCC; 57/137; 42%) and squamous cell carcinoma of skin (SCC; 12/31; 39%). Reporter assays carried out in one melanoma cell line for DPH3 and OXNAD1 orientations showed statistically significant increased promoter activity due to -8/-9CC > TT tandem mutations; although, no effect of the mutations on DPH3 and OXNAD1 transcription in tumors was observed. The results from this study show occurrence of frequent somatic non-coding mutations adjacent to a pre-existing binding site for Ets transcription factors within the directional promoter of DPH3 and OXNAD1 genes in three major skin cancers. The detected mutations displayed typical UV signature; however, the functionality of the mutations remains to be determined.

  19. Human Germline Mutation and the Erratic Evolutionary Clock

    PubMed Central

    Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the chronology of human evolution relies on the “molecular clock” provided by the steady accumulation of substitutions on an evolutionary lineage. Recent analyses of human pedigrees have called this understanding into question by revealing unexpectedly low germline mutation rates, which imply that substitutions accrue more slowly than previously believed. Translating mutation rates estimated from pedigrees into substitution rates is not as straightforward as it may seem, however. We dissect the steps involved, emphasizing that dating evolutionary events requires not “a mutation rate” but a precise characterization of how mutations accumulate in development in males and females—knowledge that remains elusive. PMID:27760127

  20. Rapid identification of HEXA mutations in Tay-Sachs patients.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Carole; Dussau, Jeanne; Azouguene, Emilie; Feillet, François; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine

    2010-02-19

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular abnormalities in patients with infantile or later-onset forms of the disease. The complete sequencing of the 14 exons and flanking regions of the HEXA gene was performed with a unique technical condition in 10 unrelated TSD patients. Eleven mutations were identified, including five splice mutations, one insertion, two deletions and three single-base substitutions. Four mutations were novel: two splice mutations (IVS8+5G>A, IVS2+4delAGTA), one missense mutation in exon 6 (c.621T>G (p.D207E)) and one small deletion (c.1211-1212delTG) in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon at residue 429. The c.621T>G missense mutation was found in a patient presenting an infantile form. Its putative role in the pathogenesis of TSD is suspected as residue 207 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat. Moreover, structural modelling predicted changes likely to affect substrate binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The time-saving procedure reported here could be useful for the characterization of Tay-Sachs-causing mutations, in particular in non-Ashkenazi patients mainly exhibiting rare mutations. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Point mutation generates constitutive expression of an inducible eukaryotic gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sumrada, R A; Cooper, T G

    1985-01-01

    We describe the analysis of two cis-dominant mutations that result in constitutive expression of the inducible CAR1 gene from yeast. One mutation results from insertion of a Ty element just upstream from the point where CAR1-specific transcription begins. The other mutation is a C-to-G transversion at position -153. Isolation of this point mutation, outside of the transcribed region of CAR1, suggests that expression of this gene is regulated at transcription. It also demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of analyzing the regulatory sequences of eukaryotic genes on a nucleotide-by-nucleotide basis. Images PMID:2983306

  2. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10−7 mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells. PMID:24732879

  3. Defining "mutation" and "polymorphism" in the era of personal genomics.

    PubMed

    Karki, Roshan; Pandya, Deep; Elston, Robert C; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-07-15

    The growing advances in DNA sequencing tools have made analyzing the human genome cheaper and faster. While such analyses are intended to identify complex variants, related to disease susceptibility and efficacy of drug responses, they have blurred the definitions of mutation and polymorphism. In the era of personal genomics, it is critical to establish clear guidelines regarding the use of a reference genome. Nowadays DNA variants are called as differences in comparison to a reference. In a sequencing project Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and DNA mutations are defined as DNA variants detectable in >1 % or <1 % of the population, respectively. The alternative use of the two terms mutation or polymorphism for the same event (a difference as compared with a reference) can lead to problems of classification. These problems can impact the accuracy of the interpretation and the functional relationship between a disease state and a genomic sequence. We propose to solve this nomenclature dilemma by defining mutations as DNA variants obtained in a paired sequencing project including the germline DNA of the same individual as a reference. Moreover, the term mutation should be accompanied by a qualifying prefix indicating whether the mutation occurs only in somatic cells (somatic mutation) or also in the germline (germline mutation). We believe this distinction in definition will help avoid confusion among researchers and support the practice of sequencing the germline and somatic tissues in parallel to classify the DNA variants thus defined as mutations.

  4. Mutation dynamics and fitness effects followed in single cells.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia; Ollion, Jean; Robert, Jerome; Song, Xiaohu; Matic, Ivan; Elez, Marina

    2018-03-16

    Mutations have been investigated for more than a century but remain difficult to observe directly in single cells, which limits the characterization of their dynamics and fitness effects. By combining microfluidics, time-lapse imaging, and a fluorescent tag of the mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli , we visualized the emergence of mutations in single cells, revealing Poissonian dynamics. Concomitantly, we tracked the growth and life span of single cells, accumulating ~20,000 mutations genome-wide over hundreds of generations. This analysis revealed that 1% of mutations were lethal; nonlethal mutations displayed a heavy-tailed distribution of fitness effects and were dominated by quasi-neutral mutations with an average cost of 0.3%. Our approach has enabled the investigation of single-cell individuality in mutation rate, mutation fitness costs, and mutation interactions. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. Usher syndrome in Denmark: mutation spectrum and some clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Grønskov, Karen; Karstensen, Helena Gásdal; Brox, Vigdis; Nilssen, Øivind; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jensen, Hanne; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2016-09-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic methods. Before Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) became available mutations in nine individuals (1 USH1, 7 USH2, 1 USH3) were identified by Sanger sequencing of USH1C , USH2A or CLRN1 or by Arrayed Primer EXtension (APEX) method. Mutations in 12 individuals (7 USH1, 5 USH2) were found by targeted NGS of ten known USH genes. Five novel pathogenic variants were identified. We combined our data with previously published, and obtained an overview of the USH mutation spectrum in Denmark, including 100 unrelated individuals; 32 with USH1, 67 with USH2, and 1 with USH3. Macular edema was observed in 44 of 117 individuals. Olfactory function was tested in 12 individuals and found to be within normal range in all. Mutations that lead to USH1 were predominantly identified in MYO7A (75%), whereas all mutations in USH2 cases were identified in USH2A . The MYO7A mutation c.93C>A, p.(Cys31*) accounted for 33% of all USH1 mutations and the USH2A c.2299delG, p.(Glu767Serfs*21) variant accounted for 45% of all USH2 mutations in the Danish cohort.

  6. Two novel mutations involved in hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    SciTech Connect

    St-Louis, M.; Poudrier, J.; Phaneuf, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway is the cause of hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1), an autosomal recessive disease. The disease has been reported worldwide. The incidence is much higher in two clusters: the Saguenay- Lac St-Jean region (Quebec, Canada) and in Scandinavia. Seven mutations have been reported in the last two years. Here we describe two new missense mutations identified by direct sequencing of PCR products in two HT1 patients, a Norwegian (patient No. 1) and a French-Canadian (patient No. 2). The first mutation consists of a G to A transition atmore » position 337 of the FAH gene which predicts a change from glycine to serine (G337S). The second mutation is an A to G transition at position 381 which predicts a change from arginine to glycine (R381G). Patient No. 1 seems heterozygous for the G337S mutation and for a splice mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) which was previously described. Patient No. 2 was also found heterozygous for the R381G mutation and for a rare nonsense mutation (E357X) already reported. In vitro transcription and translation were performed on mutant cDNA to demonstrate the responsibility of these two mutations in causing the decreased amount of FAH detected by Western blot analysis.« less

  7. Mutations of NPHP2 and NPHP3 in infantile nephronophthisis.

    PubMed

    Tory, Kálmán; Rousset-Rouvière, Caroline; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Morinière, Vincent; Pawtowski, Audrey; Becker, Céline; Guyot, Claude; Gié, Sophie; Frishberg, Yaacov; Nivet, Hubert; Deschênes, Georges; Cochat, Pierre; Gagnadoux, Marie-France; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Salomon, Rémi

    2009-04-01

    Nephronophthisis is an autosomal recessive chronic tubulointerstitial disease that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in about 10% of cases during infancy. Mutations in the INVS (NPHP2) gene were found in a few patients with infantile nephronophthisis. Mutations of NPHP3, known to be associated with adolescent nephronophthisis, were found in two patients with early-onset ESRD. Here we screened 43 families with infantile nephronophthisis (ESRD less than 5 years of age) for NPHP2 and NPHP3 mutations and determined genotype-phenotype correlations. In this cohort there were 16 families with NPHP2 mutations and NPHP3 mutations in seven. Three patients carried only one heterozygous mutation in NPHP3. ESRD arose during the first 2 years of life in 16 of 18 patients with mutations in NPHP2, but in only two patients with mutations in NPHP3. Renal morphology, characterized by hyper-echogenic kidneys on ultrasound and tubular lesions with interstitial fibrosis on histology, was similar in the two patient groups. The kidney sizes were highly diverse and ultrasound-visualized cysts were present in a minority of cases. Extra-renal anomalies were found in 80% of the entire cohort including hepatic involvement (50%), cardiac valve or septal defects (20%) and recurrent bronchial infections (18%). We show that NPHP3 mutations in both infantile and adolescent nephronophthisis point to a common pathophysiological mechanism despite their different clinical presentations.

  8. Reducing mutation load through sexual selection on males.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Petfield, Donna; Blows, Mark W

    2011-10-01

    Mutation load is a key parameter in evolutionary theories, but relatively little empirical information exists on the mutation load of populations, or the elimination of this load through selection. We manipulated the opportunity for sexual selection within a mutation accumulation divergence experiment to determine how sexual selection on males affected the accumulation of mutations contributing to sexual and nonsexual fitness. Sexual selection prevented the accumulation of mutations affecting male mating success, the target trait, as well as reducing mutation load on productivity, a nonsexual fitness component. Mutational correlations between mating success and productivity (estimated in the absence of sexual selection) were positive. Sexual selection significantly reduced these fitness component correlations. Male mating success significantly diverged between sexual selection treatments, consistent with the fixation of genetic differences. However, the rank of the treatments was not consistent across assays, indicating that the mutational effects on mating success were conditional on biotic and abiotic context. Our experiment suggests that greater insight into the genetic targets of natural and sexual selection can be gained by focusing on mutational rather than standing genetic variation, and on the behavior of trait variances rather than means. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Compound EGFR mutation is frequently detected with co-mutations of actionable genes and associated with poor clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Na; Park, Heae Surng; Hong, Ji Young; Lim, Seri; Youn, Jong Pil; Hwang, Seung Yong; Chang, Yoon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Compound EGFR mutations, defined as double or multiple mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, are frequently detected with advances in sequencing technology but its clinical significance is unclear. This study analyzed 61 cases of EGFR mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing (NGS) based repeated deep sequencing panel of 16 genes that contain actionable mutations and investigated clinical implication of compound EGFR mutations. Compound EGFR mutation was detected in 15 (24.6%) of 61 cases of EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. The majority (12/15) of compound mutations are combination of the atypical mutation and typical mutations such as exon19 deletion, L858R or G719X substitutions, or exon 20 insertion whereas 3 were combinations of rare atypical mutations. The patients with compound mutation showed shorter overall survival than those with simple mutations (83.7 vs. 72.8 mo; P = 0.020, Breslow test). Among the 115 missense mutations discovered in the tested genes, a few number of actionable mutations were detected irrelevant to the subtype of EGFR mutations, including ALK rearrangement, BCL2L11 intron 2 deletion, KRAS c.35G>A, PIK3CA c.1633G>A which are possible target of crizotinib, BH3 mimetics, MEK inhibitors, and PI3K-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, respectively. 31 missense mutations were detected in the cases with simple mutations whereas 84 in those with compound mutation, showing that the cases with compound missense mutation have higher burden of missense mutations (P = 0.001, independent sample t-test). Compound EGFR mutations are detected at a high frequency using NGS-based repeated deep sequencing. Because patients with compound EGFR mutations showed poor clinical outcomes, they should be closely monitored during follow-up.

  10. Compound EGFR mutation is frequently detected with co-mutations of actionable genes and associated with poor clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Na; Park, Heae Surng; Hong, Ji Young; Lim, Seri; Youn, Jong Pil; Hwang, Seung Yong; Chang, Yoon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Compound EGFR mutations, defined as double or multiple mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, are frequently detected with advances in sequencing technology but its clinical significance is unclear. This study analyzed 61 cases of EGFR mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing (NGS) based repeated deep sequencing panel of 16 genes that contain actionable mutations and investigated clinical implication of compound EGFR mutations. Compound EGFR mutation was detected in 15 (24.6%) of 61 cases of EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. The majority (12/15) of compound mutations are combination of the atypical mutation and typical mutations such as exon19 deletion, L858R or G719X substitutions, or exon 20 insertion whereas 3 were combinations of rare atypical mutations. The patients with compound mutation showed shorter overall survival than those with simple mutations (83.7 vs. 72.8 mo; P = 0.020, Breslow test). Among the 115 missense mutations discovered in the tested genes, a few number of actionable mutations were detected irrelevant to the subtype of EGFR mutations, including ALK rearrangement, BCL2L11 intron 2 deletion, KRAS c.35G>A, PIK3CA c.1633G>A which are possible target of crizotinib, BH3 mimetics, MEK inhibitors, and PI3K-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, respectively. 31 missense mutations were detected in the cases with simple mutations whereas 84 in those with compound mutation, showing that the cases with compound missense mutation have higher burden of missense mutations (P = 0.001, independent sample t-test). Compound EGFR mutations are detected at a high frequency using NGS-based repeated deep sequencing. Because patients with compound EGFR mutations showed poor clinical outcomes, they should be closely monitored during follow-up. PMID:26785607

  11. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: revival of Löwdin mutation model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-06-10

    Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C→A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Löwdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Löwdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mutational signature analysis identifies MUTYH deficiency in colorectal cancers and adrenocortical carcinomas: Mutational signature associated with MUTYH deficiency in cancers

    DOE PAGES

    Pilati, Camilla; Shinde, Jayendra; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; ...

    2017-03-29

    Germline alterations in DNA repair genes are implicated in cancer predisposition and can result in characteristic mutational signatures. However, specific mutational signatures associated with base excision repair (BER) defects remain to be characterized. Here, by analysing a series of colorectal cancers (CRCs) using exome sequencing, we identified a particular spectrum of somatic mutations characterized by an enrichment of C > A transversions in NpCpA or NpCpT contexts in three tumours from a MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) patient and in two cases harbouring pathogenic germline MUTYH mutations. In two series of adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), we identified four tumours with a similar signaturemore » also presenting germline MUTYH mutations. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that MUTYH inactivation results in a particular mutational signature, which may serve as a useful marker of BER-related genomic instability in new cancer types.« less

  13. Dosage Mutator Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Novel Mutator Mode-of-Action of the Mph1 DNA Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ang, J. Sidney; Duffy, Supipi; Segovia, Romulo; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause genome instability are considered important predisposing events that contribute to initiation and progression of cancer. Genome instability arises either due to defects in genes that cause an increased mutation rate (mutator phenotype), or defects in genes that cause chromosome instability (CIN). To extend the catalog of genome instability genes, we systematically explored the effects of gene overexpression on mutation rate, using a forward-mutation screen in budding yeast. We screened ∼5100 plasmids, each overexpressing a unique single gene, and characterized the five strongest mutators, MPH1 (mutator phenotype 1), RRM3, UBP12, PIF1, and DNA2. We show that, for MPH1, the yeast homolog of Fanconi Anemia complementation group M (FANCM), the overexpression mutator phenotype is distinct from that of mph1Δ. Moreover, while four of our top hits encode DNA helicases, the overexpression of 48 other DNA helicases did not cause a mutator phenotype, suggesting this is not a general property of helicases. For Mph1 overexpression, helicase activity was not required for the mutator phenotype; in contrast Mph1 DEAH-box function was required for hypermutation. Mutagenesis by MPH1 overexpression was independent of translesion synthesis (TLS), but was suppressed by overexpression of RAD27, a conserved flap endonuclease. We propose that binding of DNA flap structures by excess Mph1 may block Rad27 action, creating a mutator phenotype that phenocopies rad27Δ. We believe this represents a novel mutator mode-of-action and opens up new prospects to understand how upregulation of DNA repair proteins may contribute to mutagenesis. PMID:27585847

  14. [Mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis in families of X-linked agammaglobulinemia caused by BTK gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangdong; Mo, Guiling; Liu, Ning; Tian, Peichao; Chen, Minfang

    2014-05-13

    To evaluate the genetic diagnostic feasibility of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene in three families with X-linked agammagobulinemia (XLA) birth history, mutation analysis and prenatal genetic diagnosis of BTK gene for two families with XLA. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to amplify the regions of exon and exon-intron boundaries of BTK gene in 3 unrelated patients of XLA and their mothers from January 2011 to June 2012. The PCR products were further analyzed by direct sequencing. Prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed by chorionic villus sampling after genotyping of mothers of probands. Three novel mutations of BTK gene were identified in 3 pedigrees of XLA. A missense mutation c.1117C > A (p.L373I) were detected in pedigree 1. The mutation was possible damage by predicting in sillico. A nonsense mutation c.126T > G (p.Y42X) was found in pedigree 2. A single base deletion mutation c.1679delC (p. P560fsX10) was found in pedigree 3. The three mutations, p.L373I, p.Y42X and p. P560fsX10 were novel. The three novel mutations were absent in the 100 normal controls. The male fetus in pedigree 3 was free of mutations identical to the proband and the female fetus in pedigree 2 was a carrier. The two families continued the pregnancies and the infants showed no symptom of XLA after one year old. Three novel mutations were identified. The mutations of p.Y42X and p. P560fsX10 in BTK gene may be the major causes of pedigrees 2 and 3 with XLA. The mutation p.L373I of BTK gene is possibly the cause of pedigree 1 with XLA, but functional verification is needed. For pedigree of XLA, direct sequencing of BTK gene is available for providing genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis.

  15. Analytical validation of BRAF mutation testing from circulating free DNA using the amplification refractory mutation testing system.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw L; Donald, Emma; Ellison, Gillian; Bujac, Sarah; Fletcher, Lynn; Cantarini, Mireille; Brady, Ged; Orr, Maria; Clack, Glen; Ranson, Malcolm; Dive, Caroline; Hughes, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    BRAF mutation testing from circulating free DNA (cfDNA) using the amplification refractory mutation testing system (ARMS) holds potential as a surrogate for tumor mutation testing. Robust assay validation is needed to establish the optimal clinical matrix for measurement and cfDNA-specific mutation calling criteria. Plasma- and serum-derived cfDNA samples from 221 advanced melanoma patients were analyzed for BRAF c.1799T>A (p.V600E) mutation using ARMS in two stages in a blinded fashion. cfDNA-specific mutation calling criteria were defined in stage 1 and validated in stage 2. cfDNA concentrations in serum and plasma, and the sensitivities and specificities of BRAF mutation detection in these two clinical matrices were compared. Sensitivity of BRAF c.1799T>A (p.V600E) mutation detection in cfDNA was increased by using mutation calling criteria optimized for cfDNA (these criteria were adjusted from those used for archival tumor biopsies) without compromising specificity. Sensitivity of BRAF mutation detection in serum was 44% (95% CI, 35% to 53%) and in plasma 52% (95% CI, 43% to 61%). Specificity was 96% (95% CI, 90% to 99%) in both matrices. Serum contains significantly higher total cfDNA than plasma, whereas the proportion of tumor-derived mutant DNA was significantly higher in plasma. Using mutation calling criteria optimized for cfDNA improves sensitivity of BRAF c.1799T>A (p.V600E) mutation detection. The proportion of tumor-derived cfDNA in plasma was significantly higher than in serum. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of the most common G6PD gene mutations in Chinese using amplification refractory mutation system.

    PubMed

    Du, C S; Ren, X; Chen, L; Jiang, W; He, Y; Yang, M

    1999-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is the most common human enzymopathy. To date more than 122 mutations in the G6PD gene have been discovered, among which 12 point mutations are found in the Chinese. The 2 most common mutations, G1388A and G1376T, account for more than 50% of mutations representing various regions and ethnic groups in China. Setting up a simple and accurate method for detecting these mutations is not only useful for studying the frequency of the G6PD genotypes, but also for finding new mutations. The purpose of this study was to find a simple, inexpensive and accurate method for detecting these common mutations. The amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) method was used in this study. Samples from 28 G6PD-deficient males were investigated. The natural and mismatched amplification and restriction enzyme digestion method was used as a standard method to evaluate the nature of the point mutations. Sixteen cases were found carrying the G1388A mutation and 12 the G1376T mutation. Fourteen cases of G1388A and 10 cases of G1376T were confirmed by ARMS. Four cases were not in concordance with the results obtained by the mismatched amplification-restriction enzyme digestion. These 4 cases were then judged by direct PCR sequencing at exon 12. The DNA sequencing data supported the results obtained by ARMS. Thus we concluded that the ARMS is a rapid, simple, inexpensive and accurate method for detecting the most common G6PD gene mutations among the Chinese.

  17. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. Themore » excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.« less

  18. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Ketterling, R P; Vielhaber, E; Bottema, C D; Schaid, D J; Cohen, M P; Sexauer, C L; Sommer, S S

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, we report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by us, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, transitions at the dinucleotide CpG show the largest male predominance (11-fold). In contrast to single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. PMID:8434583

  19. Heterogeneity in phenotype of hyperinsulinism caused by activating glucokinase mutations: a novel mutation and its functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rosa; Gutierrez-Nogués, Ángel; Fernández-Ramos, Concepción; Velayos, Teresa; Vela, Amaia; Navas, María-Ángeles; Castaño, Luis

    2017-06-01

    Mutations in the GCK gene lead to different forms of glucokinase (GCK)-disease, activating mutations cause hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia while inactivating mutations cause monogenic diabetes. Hyperinsulinism (HI) is a heterogeneous condition with a significant genetic component. The major causes are channelopathies, the other forms are rare and being caused by mutations in genes such as GCK. To describe the clinical and genetic presentation of four families with activating GCK mutations, and to explore the pathogenicity of the novel mutation identified through functional studies. Four cases of HI with mutations in GCK were identified. These include one novel mutation (p.Trp99Cys). Functional analysis of the purified mutant fusion protein glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-GCK-p.Trp99Cys demonstrated that p.Trp99Cys is an activating mutation as it induces a higher affinity for glucose and increases the relative activity index more than 11 times. Moreover, the thermal stability of the mutant protein was similar to that of its wild type. All patients were responsive to diazoxide treatment. One of the mutations arose de novo, and two were dominantly inherited, although only one of them from an HI affected parent. The age of presentation in our cases varied widely from the neonatal period to adulthood. The clinical phenotype of the GCK activating mutation carriers was heterogeneous, the severity of symptoms and age at presentation varied markedly between affected individuals, even within the same family. The novel activating GCK mutation (p.Trp99Cys) has a strong activating effect in vitro although it has been identified in one case of a milder and late-onset form of HI. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Identification of EGFR Mutations by Immunohistochemistry with EGFR Mutation-Specific Antibodies in Biopsy and Resection Specimens from Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Hong; Kim, Seung Hoon; Park, Sonya Youngju; Yoo, Jinyoung; Kim, Sung Kyoung; Kim, Hoon Kyo

    2015-10-01

    Mutation-specific antibodies have recently been developed for identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations by immunohistochemistry (IHC). This study was designed to investigate whether the type of specimen (biopsy vs. resection) would make a difference in determining mutation status by IHC, and to evaluate whether biopsies are suitable for detection of mutant EGFR protein. IHC was performed using mutation-specific antibodies for E746-A750 deletion (DEL) and L858R point mutation (L858R) in biopsies and tissue microarrays of resected tumors from 154 patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Results were then compared with DNA sequencing data. Molecular-based assays detected EGFR mutations in 62 patients (40.3%), including 14 (9.1%) with DEL, and 31 (20.1%) with L858R. IHC with two mutation-specific antibodies showed a homogeneous staining pattern, and correctly identified EGFR mutation status in 89% (137/154). Overall (biopsy/resection) sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 75.6% (78.3%/72.7%), 94.5% (90.9%/96.3%), 85% (78.3%/88.9%), and 90.4% (90.9%/89.7%), respectively. Our data showed that IHC using EGFR mutation-specific antibodies is useful for detection of EGFR mutations with high specificity and good sensitivity not only for resection specimens but also for biopsy materials. Therefore, IHC using EGFR mutation-specific antibodies may preclude a second biopsy procedure to obtain additional tissues for identification of EGFR mutations by molecular assays in biopsies from advanced cancer, particularly when tumor cells in the samples are limited.

  1. PIK3CA Mutations are Common in Many Tumor Types and are Often Associated With Other Driver Mutations.

    PubMed

    Stachler, Matthew D; Rinehart, Elizabeth M; Garcia, Elizabeth; Lindeman, Neal I

    2016-01-01

    Genotyping clinical cancer specimens determines a fuller spectrum of mutations that an individual tumor harbors, and thus provides better insight into its molecular pathogenesis. Using genotyping data collected during routine clinical care our objective was to better determine the genomic landscape associated with PIK3CA mutations since much interest has been placed on PIK3CA targeted therapy. We performed multiplexed tumor genotyping within our CLIA-certified clinical laboratory on all consenting cancer patients who presented to the Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Center, regardless of histologic subtype. A total of 3252 cancers were genotyped for 471 mutations in 41 cancer-associated genes (including 23 mutations in PIK3CA), using a PCR-mass spectrometry assay. A total of 288 (9%) samples contained a mutation in PIK3CA, involving 25 different primary sites. In 117 (41%) cases, the PIK3CA mutation was found with at least 1 other mutation, many known oncogenic drivers, while only 7% of the non-PIK3CA mutated cases, when comparing like tumor types, had >1 mutation (P<0.0001). Breast cancers had the highest rate of PIK3CA mutations (34%), which correlated with estrogen receptor + status (P=0.0002). These findings suggest that PIK3CA mutations may be a relatively late event and may function primarily in a supporting/modifying role, and not as a primary driver of oncogenesis. Although further studies are needed, our observations during clinical tumor genotyping suggest that when other pro-oncogenic pathways are mutated along with PIK3CA, then, PIK3CA inhibition alone may not be effective and combination therapy may be warranted.

  2. Dosage Mutator Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Novel Mutator Mode-of-Action of the Mph1 DNA Helicase.

    PubMed

    Ang, J Sidney; Duffy, Supipi; Segovia, Romulo; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Mutations that cause genome instability are considered important predisposing events that contribute to initiation and progression of cancer. Genome instability arises either due to defects in genes that cause an increased mutation rate (mutator phenotype), or defects in genes that cause chromosome instability (CIN). To extend the catalog of genome instability genes, we systematically explored the effects of gene overexpression on mutation rate, using a forward-mutation screen in budding yeast. We screened ∼5100 plasmids, each overexpressing a unique single gene, and characterized the five strongest mutators, MPH1 (mutator phenotype 1), RRM3, UBP12, PIF1, and DNA2 We show that, for MPH1, the yeast homolog of Fanconi Anemia complementation group M (FANCM), the overexpression mutator phenotype is distinct from that of mph1Δ. Moreover, while four of our top hits encode DNA helicases, the overexpression of 48 other DNA helicases did not cause a mutator phenotype, suggesting this is not a general property of helicases. For Mph1 overexpression, helicase activity was not required for the mutator phenotype; in contrast Mph1 DEAH-box function was required for hypermutation. Mutagenesis by MPH1 overexpression was independent of translesion synthesis (TLS), but was suppressed by overexpression of RAD27, a conserved flap endonuclease. We propose that binding of DNA flap structures by excess Mph1 may block Rad27 action, creating a mutator phenotype that phenocopies rad27Δ. We believe this represents a novel mutator mode-of-action and opens up new prospects to understand how upregulation of DNA repair proteins may contribute to mutagenesis. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Detection of EGFR mutations with mutation-specific antibodies in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with mutation-specific antibodies may be an ancillary method of detecting EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients. Methods EGFR mutation status was analyzed by DNA assays, and compared with IHC results in five non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and tumor samples from 78 stage IV NSCLC patients. Results IHC correctly identified del 19 in the H1650 and PC9 cell lines, L858R in H1975, and wild-type EGFR in H460 and A549, as well as wild-type EGFR in tumor samples from 22 patients. IHC with the mAb against EGFR with del 19 was highly positive for the protein in all 17 patients with a 15-bp (ELREA) deletion in exon 19, whereas in patients with other deletions, IHC was weakly positive in 3 cases and negative in 9 cases. IHC with the mAb against the L858R mutation showed high positivity for the protein in 25/27 (93%) patients with exon 21 EGFR mutations (all with L858R) but did not identify the L861Q mutation in the remaining two patients. Conclusions IHC with mutation-specific mAbs against EGFR is a promising method for detecting EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. However these mAbs should be validated with additional studies to clarify their possible role in routine clinical practice for screening EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. PMID:21167064

  4. Mutation analysis in adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency: eight novel mutations in the re-evaluated full ADSL coding sequence.

    PubMed

    Marie, S; Cuppens, H; Heuterspreute, M; Jaspers, M; Tola, E Z; Gu, X X; Legius, E; Vincent, M F; Jaeken, J; Cassiman, J J; Van den Berghe, G

    1999-01-01

    The deficiency of adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL, also termed adenylosuccinase) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation in body fluids of succinylaminoimidazole-carboxamide riboside (SAICA-riboside) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado). Most ADSL-deficient children display marked psychomotor delay, often accompanied by epilepsy or autistic features, or both, although some patients may be less profoundly retarded. Occasionally, growth retardation and muscular wasting are also present. Up to now, nine missense mutations of the ADSL gene had been reported in six apparently unrelated sibships. In the present study of 10 additional patients with ADSL deficiency, nine point mutations, among which seven unreported missense mutations, and the first splicing error reported in this disorder, have been identified. These mutations have been characterized, taking into account the finding that the cDNA of human ADSL is 75 nucleotides longer at its 5'-end, and encodes a protein of 484 rather than 459 amino acids as previously reported. Five apparently unrelated patients were found to carry a R426H mutation. With the exceptions of the latter mutation, of a R190Q mutation that had been reported previously, and of a K246E mutation that was found in two unrelated patients, all other mutations were found only in a single family.

  5. Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Solano, Angela R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Chan, T L; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Kruse, Torben A; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine M; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C R; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peixoto, Ana; Peruga, Nina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Pradhan, Nisha; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rogers, Mark T; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tan, Yen Y; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J; van der Hout, Annemieke H; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van der Luijt, Rob B; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; Hutten Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cancer-Associated Mutations in Endometriosis without Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anglesio, M.S.; Papadopoulos, N.; Ayhan, A.; Nazeran, T.M.; Noë, M.; Horlings, H.M.; Lum, A.; Jones, S.; Senz, J.; Seckin, T.; Ho, J.; Wu, R.-C.; Lac, V.; Ogawa, H.; Tessier-Cloutier, B.; Alhassan, R.; Wang, A.; Wang, Y.; Cohen, J.D.; Wong, F.; Hasanovic, A.; Orr, N.; Zhang, M.; Popoli, M.; McMahon, W.; Wood, L.D.; Mattox, A.; Allaire, C.; Segars, J.; Williams, C.; Tomasetti, C.; Boyd, N.; Kinzler, K.W.; Gilks, C.B.; Diaz, L.; Wang, T.-L.; Vogelstein, B.; Yong, P.J.; Huntsman, D.G.; Shih, I.-M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endometriosis, defined as the presence of ectopic endometrial stroma and epithelium, affects approximately 10% of reproductive-age women and can cause pelvic pain and infertility. Endometriotic lesions are considered to be benign inflammatory lesions but have cancerlike features such as local invasion and resistance to apoptosis. METHODS We analyzed deeply infiltrating endometriotic lesions from 27 patients by means of exomewide sequencing (24 patients) or cancer-driver targeted sequencing (3 patients). Mutations were validated with the use of digital genomic methods in micro-dissected epithelium and stroma. Epithelial and stromal components of lesions from an additional 12 patients were analyzed by means of a droplet digital polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay for recurrent activating KRAS mutations. RESULTS Exome sequencing revealed somatic mutations in 19 of 24 patients (79%). Five patients harbored known cancer driver mutations in ARID1A, PIK3CA, KRAS, or PPP2R1A, which were validated by Safe-Sequencing System or immunohistochemical analysis. The likelihood of driver genes being affected at this rate in the absence of selection was estimated at P = 0.001 (binomial test). Targeted sequencing and a droplet digital PCR assay identified KRAS mutations in 2 of 3 patients and 3 of 12 patients, respectively, with mutations in the epithelium but not the stroma. One patient harbored two different KRAS mutations, c.35G→T and c.35G→C, and another carried identical KRAS c.35G→A mutations in three distinct lesions. CONCLUSIONS We found that lesions in deep infiltrating endometriosis, which are associated with virtually no risk of malignant transformation, harbor somatic cancer driver mutations. Ten of 39 deep infiltrating lesions (26%) carried driver mutations; all the tested somatic mutations appeared to be confined to the epithelial compartment of endometriotic lesions. PMID:28489996

  7. Beta-thalassaemia mutations in northern India (Delhi).

    PubMed

    Madan, N; Sharma, S; Rusia, U; Sen, S; Sood, S K

    1998-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to define beta-thalassaemia mutations prevalent in northern India (Delhi). Forty six children of beta-thalassaemia major and their families were investigated. DNA was extracted from leucocytes and screened for mutations prevalent in the Indian population. These mutations included 619bp deletion, IVS 1-1 (G-T), IVS 1-5 (G-C), frameshift mutations FS 8/9 (+G), FS 41/42 (-CTTT), Codon 16(-C), Codon 15 (G-A), codon 30 (G-C), IVS 1-110 (G-A) and -88 (C-T). 619 bp deletion mutation was detected directly by amplification of DNA by PCR followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Other mutations were studied by DNA amplification and dot blot hybridization using synthetic normal and mutant oligonucleotide probes labelled at 5' end with gamma-32 P-ATP. Five mutations accounted for all the chromosomes in 46 patients. 619 bp deletion mutation was found to be the commonest mutation (34.8%) followed by IVS 1-5 (G-C) in 22.8 per cent, IVS 1-1 (G-T) in 19.6 per cent, FS 8/9 (+G) in 13 per cent and FS 41/42 (-CTTT) in 9.8 per cent. Nineteen (41.3%) patients were homozygous and 27 (58.7%) double heterozygous for different beta-thalassaemia mutations. This observation of limited number of mutations is significant and will be useful in planning strategies for prenatal diagnosis of beta-thalassaemia in northern India.

  8. HLA haplotypes associated with hemochromatosis mutations in the Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Pacho, Arantza; Mancebo, Esther; del Rey, Manuel J; Castro, Maria J; Oliver, Desamparados; García-Berciano, Miguel; González, Luis; Morales, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Background The present study is an analysis of the frequencies of HLA-A and -B antigens and HLA haplotypes in two groups of individuals homozygous for the two main HFE mutations (C282Y and H63D) and a group heterozygous for the S65C mutation. Methods The study population includes: 1123 healthy individuals, 100 homozygous for the C282Y mutation, 138 homozygous for the H63D mutation and 17 heterozygous for the S65C mutation. HFE and HLA alleles were detected using DNA-based and microlymphocytotoxicity techniques respectively. Results An expected significant association between C282Y and the HLA-A3/B7 haplotype was found, but other HLA haplotypes carrying the -A3 antigen were found: HLA-A3/B62 and HLA-A3/B44. Also, a significant association between H63D mutation and HLA-A29/B44 haplotype was found, and again other HLA haplotypes carrying the HLA-A29 antigen were also found: HLA-A29/B14 and HLA-A29/B62. In addition, the S65C mutation seems to be associated with a HLA haplotype carrying the HLA-A26 antigen. Conclusion These findings clearly suggest that HLA-A3/B7 and HLA-A29/B44 are the ancestral haplotypes from which the C282Y and H63D mutations originated, respectively. The frequencies of these mutations in different populations, their geographical distribution, and the degree of the statistical association to the ancestral haplotypes, suggest that the H63D mutation must have occurred earlier than the C282Y mutation. PMID:15498100

  9. Mutation-Driven Parallel Evolution during Viral Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sackman, Andrew M; McGee, Lindsey W; Morrison, Anneliese J; Pierce, Jessica; Anisman, Jeremy; Hamilton, Hunter; Sanderbeck, Stephanie; Newman, Cayla; Rokyta, Darin R

    2017-12-01

    Convergent evolution has been demonstrated across all levels of biological organization, from parallel nucleotide substitutions to convergent evolution of complex phenotypes, but whether instances of convergence are the result of selection repeatedly finding the same optimal solution to a recurring problem or are the product of mutational biases remains unsettled. We generated 20 replicate lineages allowed to fix a single mutation from each of four bacteriophage genotypes under identical selective regimes to test for parallel changes within and across genotypes at the levels of mutational effect distributions and gene, protein, amino acid, and nucleotide changes. All four genotypes shared a distribution of beneficial mutational effects best approximated by a distribution with a finite upper bound. Parallel adaptation was high at the protein, gene, amino acid, and nucleotide levels, both within and among phage genotypes, with the most common first-step mutation in each background fixing on an average in 7 of 20 replicates and half of the substitutions in two of the four genotypes occurring at shared sites. Remarkably, the mutation of largest beneficial effect that fixed for each genotype was never the most common, as would be expected if parallelism were driven by selection. In fact, the mutation of smallest benefit for each genotype fixed in a total of 7 of 80 lineages, equally as often as the mutation of largest benefit, leading us to conclude that adaptation was largely mutation-driven, such that mutational biases led to frequent parallel fixation of mutations of suboptimal effect. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. JAK mutations in high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, Charles G.; Zhang, Jinghui; Harvey, Richard C.; Collins-Underwood, J. Racquel; Schulman, Brenda A.; Phillips, Letha A.; Tasian, Sarah K.; Loh, Mignon L.; Su, Xiaoping; Liu, Wei; Devidas, Meenakshi; Atlas, Susan R.; Chen, I-Ming; Clifford, Robert J.; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Carroll, William L.; Reaman, Gregory H.; Smith, Malcolm; Downing, James R.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease consisting of distinct clinical and biological subtypes that are characterized by specific chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations. Mutation of genes encoding tyrosine kinases is uncommon in ALL, with the exception of Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL, where the t(9,22)(q34;q11) translocation encodes the constitutively active BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase. We recently identified a poor prognostic subgroup of pediatric BCR-ABL1-negative ALL patients characterized by deletion of IKZF1 (encoding the lymphoid transcription factor IKAROS) and a gene expression signature similar to BCR-ABL1-positive ALL, raising the possibility of activated tyrosine kinase signaling within this leukemia subtype. Here, we report activating mutations in the Janus kinases JAK1 (n = 3), JAK2 (n = 16), and JAK3 (n = 1) in 20 (10.7%) of 187 BCR-ABL1-negative, high-risk pediatric ALL cases. The JAK1 and JAK2 mutations involved highly conserved residues in the kinase and pseudokinase domains and resulted in constitutive JAK-STAT activation and growth factor independence of Ba/F3-EpoR cells. The presence of JAK mutations was significantly associated with alteration of IKZF1 (70% of all JAK-mutated cases and 87.5% of cases with JAK2 mutations; P = 0.001) and deletion of CDKN2A/B (70% of all JAK-mutated cases and 68.9% of JAK2-mutated cases). The JAK-mutated cases had a gene expression signature similar to BCR-ABL1 pediatric ALL, and they had a poor outcome. These results suggest that inhibition of JAK signaling is a logical target for therapeutic intervention in JAK mutated ALL. PMID:19470474

  11. Molecular analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Common mutations and racial difference

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, S.; Hori, T.; Nakashima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine -6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Studies on the molecular basis of MPS IVA have been facilitated following cloning of the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA. In this study we detected mutations from 20 Caucasian and 19 Japanese MPS IVA patients using SSCP system and compared mutations of Caucasian origin with those of Japanese origin. The results showed the presence of 16 various mutations (3 small, deletions, 2 nonsense and 11 missense mutations) for Caucasian patients and 15 (1 deletion, 1 large alteration and 13 missense mutations) formore » Japanese. Moreover, two common mutations existed; one is double gene deletion characteristic for Japanese (6 alleles; 15%) and the other is a point mutation (1113F A{yields}T transition) characteristic for Caucasian (9 alleles; 22.5%). And the clear genotype/phenotype relationship among 1342delCA, IVS1(-2), P151S, Q148X, R386C, I113F, Q473X, W220G, P151L, A291T, R90W, and P77R, for a severe type, G96B N204K and V138A for a milder type, was observed. Only R386 mutation was seen in both of the populations. Further, the precise DNA analysis for double gene deletion of a common double gene deletion has been performed by defining the breakpoints and the results showed that one deletion was caused by homologous recombination due to Alu repetitive sequences and the other was due to nonhomologous recombination of short direct repeat. Haplotype analysis for six alleles with double deletion were different, indicating the different origin of this mutation or the frequent recombination events before a mutational event. Thus the mutations in GALNS gene are very heterogeneous and the racial difference is characteristic.« less

  12. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the modelmore » to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.« less

  13. Fluctuations, Environment, Mutations Accumulation and Ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biecek, Przemysław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    We present a model of evolution of the age structured population based on the Monte Carlo method. We have assumed that the health status of an individual is described by variance of its fluctuations. Each expressed deleterious mutation increases the fluctuations. Additionally, the fluctuations of the environment are superimposed on the fluctuations of individuals in the population. An individual dies if the combination of both stochastic processes trespass the limit (level of homeostasis) set as the model parameter. The genes are switched on chronologically, what leads to accumulating defective genes expressed during the late periods of life in the genetic pool of the population. That results in the specific age structured population, in accordance with the predictions of Medawar's hypothesis of ageing and the results of the Penna model simulations. A decrease of the variation of the environmental noise increases the average expected lifespan of individuals.

  14. [The acoustic analysis of mutational "falsetto"].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaohong; Liu, Yongxiang

    2003-06-01

    Set an objectively scientific foundation for name, diagnosis, therapy and assessment of mutational falsetto. We analyzed the acoustic samples of patients by computer, 15 patients, 12 normal young men, 13 normal young women and 12 normal children were asked to produced comfortable modal vowel/a/ and /i/, sustained 3 seconds. The falsetto /a/ and /i/ were only collected from young men and women. The acoustic parameters were compared between any two groups. Both vowel /a/ and /i/, the fundamental frequency, highest fundamental frequency and lowest fundamental frequency of patients are closed to young women's (P > 0.05). Jitter percent and pitch perturbation quotient is significantly higher than other groups (P < 0.05). Fundamental frequency variation has no significant difference between groups, but the patients mean is higher than others. Shimmer percent and peak-to-peak amplitude variation of patients' vowel /a/ are distinctly greater than other groups. Amplitude perturbation quotient of vowel /a/ has no significance between groups, but the patients' group is higher than others. Shimmer percent, peak-to-peak amplitude variation and amplitude perturbation of vowel /i/ has no significant difference between most groups, but the results of patients are the biggest. Noise to harmonic ratio of falsetto is the lowest among all groups. Voice turbulence index of the patients and falsetto is lower than that of others. Soft phonation index of patients is higher than other groups and near to falsetto, vowel /i/ is more significant than /a/. The children falsetto and the patients have voice break. Mutational "falsetto" is not really falsetto, but rather similar to female's voice. To lower fundamental frequency and improve chest resonance is the key of treatment. Both psychotherapy and voice training are important. We can try to use rigid phonation to treat patients.

  15. CCDC141 Mutations in Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Turan, Ihsan; Hutchins, B Ian; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent; Kotan, L Damla; Gurbuz, Fatih; Ulubay, Ayca; Mengen, Eda; Yuksel, Bilgin; Wray, Susan; Topaloglu, A Kemal

    2017-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons originate outside the central nervous system in the olfactory placode and migrate into the central nervous system, becoming integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Failure of this migration can lead to idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH)/Kallmann syndrome (KS). We have previously shown that CCDC141 knockdown leads to impaired migration of GnRH neurons but not of olfactory receptor neurons. The aim of this study was to further describe the phenotype and prevalence of CCDC141 mutations in IHH/KS. Using autozygosity mapping, candidate gene screening, whole-exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing, those individuals carrying deleterious CDCD141 variants and their phenotypes were determined in a cohort of 120 IHH/KS families. No interventions were made. Our studies revealed nine affected individuals from four independent families in which IHH/KS is associated with inactivating CCDC141 variants, revealing a prevalence of 3.3%. Affected individuals (with the exception of those from family 1 who concomitantly have FEZF1 mutations) have normal olfactory function and anatomically normal olfactory bulbs. Four affected individuals show evidence of clinical reversibility. In three of the families, there was at least one more potentially deleterious variant in other known puberty genes with evidence of allelic heterogeneity within respective pedigrees. These studies confirm that inactivating CCDC141 variants cause normosmic IHH but not KS. This is consistent with our previous in vitro experiments showing exclusively impaired embryonic migration of GnRH neurons upon CCDC141 knockdown. These studies expand the clinical and genetic spectrum of IHH and also attest to the complexity of phenotype and genotype in IHH. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  16. Maternal placenta modulates a deleterious fetal mutation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongen; Pausch, Hubert; Venhoranta, Heli; Rutkowska, Karolina; Wurmser, Christine; Rieblinger, Beate; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Frishman, Dmitrij; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Fries, Ruedi; Andersson, Magnus; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika; Flisikowski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is caused by dysregulation of placental metabolism. Paternally inherited IUGR mutations in the fetus influence maternal physiology via the placenta. However, it is not known whether the maternal placenta also affects the extent of IUGR in such fetuses. In cattle and other ruminants, maternal-fetal communication occurs primarily at the placentomes. We previously identified a 3΄ deletion in the noncoding MER1 repeat containing imprinted transcript 1 (MIMT1) gene that, when inherited from the sire, causes IUGR and late abortion in Ayshire cattle with variable levels of severity. Here, we compared the transcriptome and genomic imprinting in fetal and maternal placentome components of wild-type and MIMT1Del/WT fetuses before IUGR became apparent, to identify key early events. Transcriptome analysis revealed fewer differentially expressed genes in maternal than fetal MIMT1Del/WT placentome. AST1, within the PEG3 domain, was the only gene consistently reduced in IUGR in both fetal and maternal samples. Several genes showed an imprinting pattern associated with IUGR, of which only secernin 3 (SCRN3) and paternally expressed 3 (PEG3) were differentially imprinted in both placentome components. Loss of strictly monoallelic, allele-specific expression (∼80:20) of PEG3 in the maternal MIMT1Del/WT placenta could be associated with incomplete penetrance of MIMT1Del. Our data show that dysregulation of the PEG3 domain is involved in IUGR, but also reveal that maternal placental tissues may affect the penetrance of the paternally inherited IUGR mutation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Fibrillin mutations in the Marfan syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.E.; Wang, M.; Wang, J.

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue manifested by variable and pleiotropic defect in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. We have recently begun to use intron-specific primers that have become available through the International Marfan Syndrome Consortium to screen for fibrillin mutations in MFS patients. Using the genomic PCR-based approach in addition to RT-PCR methodologies, we have identified several novel mutations. A single base insertion was identified in all affected individuals of one family. The insertion of an {open_quote}A{close_quote} at position 1891 in exon 15 causes a premature stop codon and thus amore » truncated polypeptide. The truncated protein of 617 amino acids has an expected molecular weight of 63 kD. Metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation studies are in progress. A C{r_arrow}T transition at position 1634 in exon 12 causing a 5th position Cys to Phe substitution in an EGF-like motif was observed in another MFS patient. Finally, we have identified a G{r_arrow}A transition at the +1 position of the donor splice site that causes the deletion of fibrillin exon 32 in a patient with the neonatal form of MFS. Exon 32 is a precursor EGF-like calcium binding motif that is located in a single stretch of 12 similar domains. We had previously identified the skipping of this exon due to an A{r_arrow}T transversion at the -2 position of the consensus acceptor splice site in another patient with neonatal MFS. The reason that the skipping of exon 32 causes a neonatal lethal MFS phenotype is presently unclear. These studies will help elucidate the role of diverse regions of fibrillin.« less

  18. Polymorphic mutation frequencies of clinical and environmental Stenotrophomonas maltophilia populations.

    PubMed

    Turrientes, María Carmen; Baquero, María Rosario; Sánchez, María Blanca; Valdezate, Sylvia; Escudero, Esther; Berg, Gabrielle; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Martínez, José Luis

    2010-03-01

    Mutation frequencies were studied in 174 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from clinical and nonclinical environments by detecting spontaneous rifampin-resistant mutants in otherwise-susceptible populations. The distribution of mutation frequencies followed a pattern similar to that found for other bacterial species, with a modal value of 1 x 10(-8). Nevertheless, the proportion of isolates showing mutation frequencies below the modal value (hypomutators) was significantly higher for S. maltophilia than those so far reported in other organisms. Low mutation frequencies were particularly frequent among environmental S. maltophilia strains (58.3%), whereas strong mutators were found only among isolates with a clinical origin. These results indicate that clinical environments might select bacterial populations with high mutation frequencies, likely by second-order selection processes. In several of the strong-mutator isolates, functional-complementation assays with a wild-type allele of the mutS gene demonstrated that the mutator phenotype was due to the impairment of MutS activity. In silico analysis of the amino acid changes present in the MutS proteins of these hypermutator strains in comparison with the normomutator isolates suggests that the cause of the defect in MutS might be a H683P amino acid change.

  19. Direct-to-Consumer Test for BRCA Mutations Authorized.

    PubMed

    2018-03-14

    The FDA authorized 23andMe to market the first direct-to-consumer test to check for three BRCA1/2 mutations associated with a higher risk of developing breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. The mutations are most commonly found in about 2% of women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Likelihood-based estimation of microsatellite mutation rates.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, John C; Harbord, Roger M; Boxall, Nicola; Mackay, Ian; Dawson, Gary; Sibly, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Microsatellites are widely used in genetic analyses, many of which require reliable estimates of microsatellite mutation rates, yet the factors determining mutation rates are uncertain. The most straightforward and conclusive method by which to study mutation is direct observation of allele transmissions in parent-child pairs, and studies of this type suggest a positive, possibly exponential, relationship between mutation rate and allele size, together with a bias toward length increase. Except for microsatellites on the Y chromosome, however, previous analyses have not made full use of available data and may have introduced bias: mutations have been identified only where child genotypes could not be generated by transmission from parents' genotypes, so that the probability that a mutation is detected depends on the distribution of allele lengths and varies with allele length. We introduce a likelihood-based approach that has two key advantages over existing methods. First, we can make formal comparisons between competing models of microsatellite evolution; second, we obtain asymptotically unbiased and efficient parameter estimates. Application to data composed of 118,866 parent-offspring transmissions of AC microsatellites supports the hypothesis that mutation rate increases exponentially with microsatellite length, with a suggestion that contractions become more likely than expansions as length increases. This would lead to a stationary distribution for allele length maintained by mutational balance. There is no evidence that contractions and expansions differ in their step size distributions. PMID:12807796

  1. Somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma identified by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Hornick, Jason L; Woda, Bruce; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-08-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of presumed hematopoietic origin showing morphologic and immunophenotypic evidence of histiocytic differentiation. Somatic mutation importance in the pathogenesis or disease progression of histiocytic sarcoma was largely unknown. To identify somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma, we studied 5 histiocytic sarcomas [3 female and 2 male patients; mean age 54.8 (20-72), anatomic sites include lymph node, uterus, and pleura] and matched normal tissues from each patient as germ line controls. Somatic mutations in 50 "Hotspot" oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were examined using next generation sequencing. Three (out of five) histiocytic sarcoma cases carried somatic mutations in BRAF. Among them, G464V [variant frequency (VF) of 43.6 %] and G466R (VF of 29.6 %) located at the P loop potentially interfere with the hydrophobic interaction between P and activating loops and ultimately activation of BRAF. Also detected was BRAF somatic mutation N581S (VF of 7.4 %), which was located at the catalytic loop of BRAF kinase domain: its role in modifying kinase activity was unclear. A similar mutational analysis was also performed on nine acute monocytic/monoblastic leukemia cases, which did not identify any BRAF somatic mutations. Our study detected several BRAF mutations in histiocytic sarcomas, which may be important in understanding the tumorigenesis of this rare neoplasm and providing mechanisms for potential therapeutical opportunities.

  2. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Rikke S.; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G.; Bayly, Marta A.; van Kempen, Marjan J. A.; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Yendle, Simone C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G.; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J.; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated with KCNT1, we examined individuals affected with focal epilepsy or an epileptic encephalopathy for mutations in the gene. We identified KCNT1 mutations in 12 previously unreported patients with focal epilepsy, multifocal epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and in a family with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), in addition to patients with NFLE and MMFSI. In contrast to the 100% penetrance so far reported for KCNT1 mutations, we observed incomplete penetrance. It is notable that we report that the one KCNT1 mutation, p.Arg398Gln, can lead to either of the two distinct phenotypes, ADNFLE or MMFSI, even within the same family. This indicates that genotype–phenotype relationships for KCNT1 mutations are not straightforward. We demonstrate that KCNT1 mutations are highly pleiotropic and are associated with phenotypes other than ADNFLE and MMFSI. KCNT1 mutations are now associated with Ohtahara syndrome, MMFSI, and nocturnal focal epilepsy. They may also be associated with multifocal epilepsy and cardiac disturbances. PMID:26122718

  3. Polymorphic Mutation Frequencies of Clinical and Environmental Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Populations▿

    PubMed Central

    Turrientes, María Carmen; Baquero, María Rosario; Sánchez, María Blanca; Valdezate, Sylvia; Escudero, Esther; Berg, Gabrielle; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Martínez, José Luis

    2010-01-01

    Mutation frequencies were studied in 174 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from clinical and nonclinical environments by detecting spontaneous rifampin-resistant mutants in otherwise-susceptible populations. The distribution of mutation frequencies followed a pattern similar to that found for other bacterial species, with a modal value of 1 × 10−8. Nevertheless, the proportion of isolates showing mutation frequencies below the modal value (hypomutators) was significantly higher for S. maltophilia than those so far reported in other organisms. Low mutation frequencies were particularly frequent among environmental S. maltophilia strains (58.3%), whereas strong mutators were found only among isolates with a clinical origin. These results indicate that clinical environments might select bacterial populations with high mutation frequencies, likely by second-order selection processes. In several of the strong-mutator isolates, functional-complementation assays with a wild-type allele of the mutS gene demonstrated that the mutator phenotype was due to the impairment of MutS activity. In silico analysis of the amino acid changes present in the MutS proteins of these hypermutator strains in comparison with the normomutator isolates suggests that the cause of the defect in MutS might be a H683P amino acid change. PMID:20097818

  4. Somatic mutations in the mitochondria of rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Da Sylva, Tanya R; Connor, Alison; Mburu, Yvonne; Keystone, Edward; Wu, Gillian E

    2005-01-01

    Somatic mutations have a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, particularly cancers. Here we present data supporting a role of mitochondrial somatic mutations in an autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a complex, multifactorial disease with a number of predisposition traits, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) type and early bacterial infection in the joint. Somatic mutations in mitochondrial peptides displayed by MHCs may be recognized as non-self, furthering the destructive immune infiltration of the RA joint. Because many bacterial proteins have mitochondrial homologues, the immune system may be primed against these altered peptides if they mimic bacterial homologues. In addition, somatic mutations may be influencing cellular function, aiding in the acquirement of transformed properties of RA synoviocytes. To test the hypothesis that mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with RA, we focused on the MT-ND1 gene for mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (subunit one of complex I – NADH dehydrogenase) of synoviocyte mitochondria from RA patients, using tissue from osteoarthritis (OA) patients for controls. We identified the mutational burden and amino acid changes in potential epitope regions in the two patient groups. RA synoviocyte mtDNA had about twice the number of mutations as the OA group. Furthermore, some of these changes had resulted in potential non-self MHC peptide epitopes. These results provide evidence for a new role for somatic mutations in mtDNA in RA and predict a role in other diseases. PMID:15987486

  5. Cancer-Associated IDH1 Mutations Produce 2-hydroxyglutarate

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.; White, D; Gross, S

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the enzyme cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are a common feature of a major subset of primary human brain cancers. These mutations occur at a single amino acid residue of the IDH1 active site, resulting in loss of the enzyme's ability to catalyse conversion of isocitrate to {alpha}-ketoglutarate. However, only a single copy of the gene is mutated in tumours, raising the possibility that the mutations do not result in a simple loss of function. Here we show that cancer-associated IDH1 mutations result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of {alpha}-ketoglutarate tomore » R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Structural studies demonstrate that when arginine 132 is mutated to histidine, residues in the active site are shifted to produce structural changes consistent with reduced oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and acquisition of the ability to convert {alpha}-ketoglutarate to 2HG. Excess accumulation of 2HG has been shown to lead to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumours in patients with inborn errors of 2HG metabolism. Similarly, in human malignant gliomas harbouring IDH1 mutations, we find markedly elevated levels of 2HG. These data demonstrate that the IDH1 mutations result in production of the onco-metabolite 2HG, and indicate that the excess 2HG which accumulates in vivo contributes to the formation and malignant progression of gliomas.« less

  6. Key Clinical Features to Identify Girls with "CDKL5" Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothee; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlene; Heron, Delphine; Morel, Marie Ange N'Guyen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ("CDKL5") gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of…

  7. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  8. The topography of mutational processes in breast cancer genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Morganella, Sandro; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Glodzik, Dominik; ...

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in human cancers show unevenness in genomic distribution that correlate with aspects of genome structure and function. These mutations are, however, generated by multiple mutational processes operating through the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell, each composed of specific DNA damage and repair components and leaving its own characteristic mutational signature on the genome. Using somatic mutation catalogues from 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences, here we show that each of 12 base substitution, 2 insertion/deletion (indel) and 6 rearrangement mutational signatures present in breast tissue, exhibit distinct relationships with genomic features relating to transcription,more » DNA replication and chromatin organization. This signature-based approach permits visualization of the genomic distribution of mutational processes associated with APOBEC enzymes, mismatch repair deficiency and homologous recombinational repair deficiency, as well as mutational processes of unknown aetiology. Lastly, it highlights mechanistic insights including a putative replication-dependent mechanism of APOBEC-related mutagenesis.« less

  9. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi, E-mail: Paivi.Peltomaki@Helsinki.Fi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivationmore » of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.« less

  10. Phenotypic Involvement in Females with the FMR1 Gene Mutation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, J. E.; Cheema, A.; Sobesky, W. E.; Gardner, S. C.; Taylor, A. K.; Pennington, B. F.; Hagerman, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated phenotypic effects seen in 114 females with premutation and 41 females (ages 18-58) with full Fragile X mental retardation gene mutation. Those with the full mutation had a greater incidence of hand-flapping, eye contact problems, special education help for reading and math, and grade retention. (Author/CR)

  11. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... point mutations, which involve substitution, addition or deletion of one or a few DNA base pairs. The... features that make them more sensitive for the detection of mutations, including responsive DNA sequences at the reversion sites, increased cell permeability to large molecules and elimination of DNA repair...

  12. Simulated self-organization of death by inherited mutations.

    PubMed

    Sá Martins, Jorge S; Stauffer, Dietrich; Oliveira, Paulo M C de; Oliveira, Suzana Moss de

    2009-12-01

    An agent-based computer simulation of death by inheritable mutations in a changing environment shows a maximal population, or avoids extinction, at some intermediate mutation rate of the individuals. Our results indicate that death seems needed to allow for evolution of the fittest, as required by a changing environment.

  13. Prevention of avoidable mutational diseases: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    About 1% of children are born with a serious disorder which is the direct result of a mutational event in a parent or a more distant ancestor. These disorders, of which several thousand are known, mainly afflict the blood, bone, brain, ear, eye or muscle and the changes are usually irrevocable by the time of diagnosis. Another 1% of individuals will develop a serious genetic disease some time after birth. In addition to these direct consequences of a mutant event, far higher proportions will suffer from the indirect effects of one or several mutations. In view of their chronic and severe nature most of these disorders impose a burden disproportionate to their frequency, and it is sound public health policy to avoid the birth of babies known to have the established mutations and prevent further cases in the immediate or distant future by minimizing the exposure of people at risk to known mutagens. The advantages in permitting certain mutagenic exposures must be assessed against the later costs. Owing to the natural mutation rate and the vast backlog of previous mutations, the prospects of prevention are limited to preventing an increase, rather than to achieving any substantial decrease. This Memorandum describes progress in the ability to dissect and interpret the mutational process, to identify populations at risk, and to evaluate the consequences of the various types of mutational event and emphasizes that the current approach to prevention of mutational disease must involve improving our ability to study populations that appear to be at increased risk. PMID:3488837

  14. Notch1 mutations are drivers of oral tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sian; Brait, Mariana; Agrawal, Nishant; Koch, Wayne; McCord, Christine L.; Riley, David R.; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Jiang, Wei-Wen; Sidransky, David

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of NOTCH1 signaling was recently discovered in head and neck cancer. This study aims to evaluate NOTCH1 alterations in the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and compare the occurrence of these mutations in Chinese and Caucasian populations. We used a high-throughput-PCR-based enrichment technology and next generation sequencing (NGS) to sequence NOTCH1 in 144 samples collected in China. Forty nine samples were normal oral mucosa from patients undergoing oral surgery, 45 were oral leukoplakia biopsies and 50 were chemoradiation naïve OSCC samples with 22 paired-normal tissues from the adjacent unaffected areas. NOTCH1 mutations were found in 54% of primary OSCC and 60% of pre-malignant lesions. Importantly, almost 60% of leukoplakia patients with mutated NOTCH1 carried mutations that were also identified in OSCC, indicating an important role of these clonal events in the progression of early neoplasms. We then compared all known NOTCH1 mutations identified in Chinese OSCC patients with those reported in Caucasians to date. Although we found obvious overlaps in critical regulatory NOTCH1 domains alterations and identified specific mutations shared by both groups, possible gain-of-function mutations were predominantly seen in Chinese population. Our findings demonstrate that pre-malignant lesions display NOTCH1 mutations at an early stage and are thus bona fide drivers of OSCC progression. Moreover, our results reveal that NOTCH1 promotes distinct tumorigenic mechanisms in patients from different ethnical populations. PMID:25406187

  15. Effects of Pathogenic Proline Mutations on Myosin Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Buvoli, Massimo; Buvoli, Ada; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (MPD1) is a genetically dominant myopathy characterized by early and selective weakness of the distal muscles. Mutations in the MYH7 gene encoding for the β-myosin heavy chain are the underlying genetic cause of MPD1. However, their pathogenic mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we measure the biological effects of the R1500P and L1706P MPD1 mutations in different cellular systems. We show that, while the two mutations inhibit myosin self-assembly in non-muscle cells, they do not prevent incorporation of the mutant myosin into sarcomeres. Nevertheless, we find that the L1706P mutation affects proper anti-parallel myosin association by accumulating in the bare zone of the sarcomere. Furthermore, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay (BiFC) shows that the alpha-helix containing the R1500P mutation folds into homodimeric (mutant/mutant) and heterodimeric (mutant/WT) myosin molecules that are competent for sarcomere incorporation. Both mutations also form aggregates consisting of cytoplasmic vacuoles surrounding paracrystalline arrays, and amorphous rod-like inclusions that sequester WT myosin. Myosin aggregates were also detected in transgenic nematodes expressing the R1500P mutation. By showing that the two MPD1 mutations can have dominant effects on distinct components of the contractile apparatus, our data provide the first insights into the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:22155079

  16. Effects of pathogenic proline mutations on myosin assembly.

    PubMed

    Buvoli, Massimo; Buvoli, Ada; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-02-03

    Laing distal myopathy (MPD1) is a genetically dominant myopathy characterized by early and selective weakness of the distal muscles. Mutations in the MYH7 gene encoding for the β-myosin heavy chain are the underlying genetic cause of MPD1. However, their pathogenic mechanisms are currently unknown. Here, we measure the biological effects of the R1500P and L1706P MPD1 mutations in different cellular systems. We show that, while the two mutations inhibit myosin self-assembly in non-muscle cells, they do not prevent incorporation of the mutant myosin into sarcomeres. Nevertheless, we find that the L1706P mutation affects proper antiparallel myosin association by accumulating in the bare zone of the sarcomere. Furthermore, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay shows that the α-helix containing the R1500P mutation folds into homodimeric (mutant/mutant) and heterodimeric [mutant/wild type (WT)] myosin molecules that are competent for sarcomere incorporation. Both mutations also form aggregates consisting of cytoplasmic vacuoles surrounding paracrystalline arrays and amorphous rod-like inclusions that sequester WT myosin. Myosin aggregates were also detected in transgenic nematodes expressing the R1500P mutation. By showing that the two MPD1 mutations can have dominant effects on distinct components of the contractile apparatus, our data provide the first insights into the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metaanalysis of BRAF mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics in primary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Soo Nyung; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2015-06-01

    BRAF mutations occur in some melanomas. We hypothesized that BRAF mutation rates may differ in melanomas found in Asian compared to white populations. We performed a metaanalysis of BRAF mutations and their associations with the clinicopathologic characteristics of primary melanoma (PM), with a subgroup analysis to compare Asian and white patients with PM. The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched up to November 2013. The incidence rates and odds ratios (ORs) of BRAF mutations were calculated using a fixed or random effects model. BRAF mutation was associated with younger age (OR = 1.734; P < .001), trunk location (OR = 2.272; P < .001), non-chronically sun damaged skin (OR = 2.833; P < .001), superficial spreading melanoma (OR = 2.081; P < .001), and advanced melanoma stage (OR = 1.551; P = .003). The incidence of BRAF mutations in Asian patients with PM was half that of white patients with PM, but it was linked to the same clinicopathologic characteristics. Only a small number of studies have been conducted on Asian patients with PMs. The BRAF mutation in PM was associated with age, anatomic site based on ultraviolet radiation exposure, histologic subtype, and advanced stage of melanoma. The clinicopathologic associations with BRAF mutations were similar in Asian and white patients with PM. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of new mutations in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddique, T.; Deng, H.X.; Hentati, A.

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease due to motor neuron death in the cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. Ten percent of ALS cases are familial (FALS). Previously a subset of FALS families have been mapped to chromosome 21 and mutations in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase gene have been identified in those families. Nineteen different mutations at 16 distinct codons have been documented, of which 12 different mutations were identified in our 29 FALS families. These mutations account for about twenty percent of all FALS families screened. The mutations identified in our FALS families are A4V, A4T,more » G37R, G41D, H43R, G85R, G93A, E100G, L106V, I113T, L144F, and V148G. Mutation A4V is the most frequent one which occurred in 14 out of our 29 FALS families. In further screening of our FALS families, two new mutations, V14M and L84V, have been identified. Thus a total of 21 different mutations at 18 distinct codon sites have been identified in SOD1.« less

  19. Exome Sequencing Identifies Potentially Druggable Mutations in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yock Ping; Tan, Lu Ping; Chai, San Jiun; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Choo, Siew Woh; Lim, Paul Vey Hong; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Mohd Kornain, Noor Kaslina; Lum, Chee Lun; Pua, Kin Choo; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Tan, Tee Yong; Teo, Soo Hwang; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-03-03

    In this study, we first performed whole exome sequencing of DNA from 10 untreated and clinically annotated fresh frozen nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and matched bloods to identify somatically mutated genes that may be amenable to targeted therapeutic strategies. We identified a total of 323 mutations which were either non-synonymous (n = 238) or synonymous (n = 85). Furthermore, our analysis revealed genes in key cancer pathways (DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, immune response, lipid signaling) were mutated, of which those in the lipid-signaling pathway were the most enriched. We next extended our analysis on a prioritized sub-set of 37 mutated genes plus top 5 mutated cancer genes listed in COSMIC using a custom designed HaloPlex target enrichment panel with an additional 88 NPC samples. Our analysis identified 160 additional non-synonymous mutations in 37/42 genes in 66/88 samples. Of these, 99/160 mutations within potentially druggable pathways were further selected for validation. Sanger sequencing revealed that 77/99 variants were true positives, giving an accuracy of 78%. Taken together, our study indicated that ~72% (n = 71/98) of NPC samples harbored mutations in one of the four cancer pathways (EGFR-PI3K-Akt-mTOR, NOTCH, NF-κB, DNA repair) which may be potentially useful as predictive biomarkers of response to matched targeted therapies.

  20. Prevalent HBV point mutations and mutation combinations at BCP/preC region and their association with liver disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dake; Ma, Sufang; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Hanqing; Ding, Huiguo; Zeng, Changqing

    2010-09-16

    Mutations in the basic core promoter (BCP) and its adjacent precore (preC) region in HBV genome are common in chronic hepatitis B patients. However, the patterns of mutation combinations in these two regions during chronic infection are less understood. This study focused on single base mutations in BCP and preC region and the multi-mutation patterns observed in chronic HBV infection patients. Total 192 blood samples of chronic HBV infection patients were included. Direct PCR sequencing on the target region of HBV genome was successfully conducted in 157 samples. The rest 35 samples were analyzed by clone sequencing. Only the nucleotide substitutions with their frequencies no less than 10% were included in multi-mutation analysis with the exception for the polymorphic sites between genotypes B and C. Five high frequency mutations (≥10%) were found in BCP and preC region. Thirteen types of multi-mutations in one fragment were observed, among which 3 types were common combinations (≥5%). The top three multi-mutations were A1762T/G1764A (36%), A1762T/G1764A/G1896A (11%) and T1753(A/C)/A1762T/G1764A/G1896A (8%). Patients with multi-mutations in viral genomes (≥3) were more likely to have liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.6-6.0, P = 0.001). G1896A mutation seemed to be involved in liver disease progression independent of the patient age (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.5-8.6; P = 0.004). In addition, patients with more viral mutations detected (≥3) were more likely to be HBeAg negative (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.1-6.4; P = 0.027). Moreover, G1776A mutation was shown to contribute to HBeAg negativity in our study (OR = 8.6, 95% CI: 1.2-44.9; P = 0.01). Patients with advanced liver diseases and with HBeAg negativity more likely have multi-mutations in HBV genomes but with different mutation combination patterns. G1896A mutation appears to be independent of infection history.

  1. Prevalent HBV point mutations and mutation combinations at BCP/preC region and their association with liver disease progression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the basic core promoter (BCP) and its adjacent precore (preC) region in HBV genome are common in chronic hepatitis B patients. However, the patterns of mutation combinations in these two regions during chronic infection are less understood. This study focused on single base mutations in BCP and preC region and the multi-mutation patterns observed in chronic HBV infection patients. Methods Total 192 blood samples of chronic HBV infection patients were included. Direct PCR sequencing on the target region of HBV genome was successfully conducted in 157 samples. The rest 35 samples were analyzed by clone sequencing. Only the nucleotide substitutions with their frequencies no less than 10% were included in multi-mutation analysis with the exception for the polymorphic sites between genotypes B and C. Results Five high frequency mutations (≥10%) were found in BCP and preC region. Thirteen types of multi-mutations in one fragment were observed, among which 3 types were common combinations (≥5%). The top three multi-mutations were A1762T/G1764A (36%), A1762T/G1764A/G1896A (11%) and T1753(A/C)/A1762T/G1764A/G1896A (8%). Patients with multi-mutations in viral genomes (≥3) were more likely to have liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.6-6.0, P = 0.001). G1896A mutation seemed to be involved in liver disease progression independent of the patient age (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.5-8.6; P = 0.004). In addition, patients with more viral mutations detected (≥3) were more likely to be HBeAg negative (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.1-6.4; P = 0.027). Moreover, G1776A mutation was shown to contribute to HBeAg negativity in our study (OR = 8.6, 95% CI: 1.2-44.9; P = 0.01). Conclusions Patients with advanced liver diseases and with HBeAg negativity more likely have multi-mutations in HBV genomes but with different mutation combination patterns. G1896A mutation appears to be independent of infection history. PMID:20846420

  2. PALB2 mutations in BRCA1/2-mutation negative breast and ovarian cancer patients from Poland.

    PubMed

    Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Czarny, Katarzyna; Paczkowska, Katarzyna; Nowakowska, Dorota; Mikula, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2017-03-09

    The PALB2 gene encodes a protein that plays a crucial role in maintaining genomic integrity. Germline inactivating mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The prevalence and spectrum of recurrent PALB2 germline mutations in breast and ovarian cancer patients from Poland is not clearly defined. PALB2 exons were amplified from 460 BRCA1/2-mutation negative women with familial breast and/or ovarian cancer and early-onset breast cancer using AmpliSeq technology and sequenced on an Ion Torrent PGM sequencer. In addition, eight selected variants were genotyped using TaqMan assays in 807 BRCA1/2-mutation negative breast cancer patients and 1690 healthy women. Two recurrent PALB2 mutations, c.172_175delTTGT and c.509_510delGA, were identified, along with one novel mutation, c.347insT. In total, PALB2 pathogenic mutations were detected in 7/460 (1.5%) patients. Furthermore, in breast and/or ovarian cancer patients, several single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were detected in the PALB2 coding region. In an additional group of 807 patients, eight (1%) carriers of two pathogenic mutations, c.172_175delTTGT (0.5%) and c.509_510delGA (0.5%), were identified. The c.509_510delGA mutation was not identified in healthy controls, while c.172_175delTTGT was identified in 4/1690 (0.24%) of control women. Germline mutations in the PALB2 gene were observed at a frequency of approximately 1.5% in Polish breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. Our study confirms two recurrent PALB2 mutations; c.172_175delGA and c.509_510delGA.

  3. Clinicopathologic features and outcomes of patients with lung adenocarcinomas harboring BRAF mutations in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Abberbock, Shira; Berry, Lynne D.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Kwiatkowski, David J; Iafrate, A. John; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Camidge, D. Ross; Sequist, Lecia V.; Haura, Eric B.; Ladanyi, Mark; Kurland, Brenda F.; Kugler, Kelly; Minna, John D; Bunn, Paul A.; Kris, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    (1) PURPOSE The advent of effective targeted therapy in BRAFV600E mutant lung adenocarcinomas necessitates further exploration of the unique clinical features and behavior of advanced stage BRAF mutant lung adenocarcinomas. (2) PATIENTS AND METHODS We reviewed data from patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas enrolled in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium whose tumors underwent testing for mutations in EGFR, KRAS, HER2, AKT1, BRAF, MEK1, NRAS, PIK3CA, ALK translocations, and MET amplification. (3) RESULTS Twenty-one BRAF mutations were identified in 951 patients with adenocarcinomas (2.2%: 95% CI 1.4 to 3.4%); 17 (81%: 95% CI 60 to 92%) were BRAFV600E and 4 were non-BRAFV600E mutations. Among the 733 cases tested for all 10 genes, BRAF mutations were more likely to occur in current or former smokers than most other genotypic abnormalities (BRAF versus sensitizing EGFR: 82% versus 36%, mid-P<0.001; versus ALK: 39%, mid-P=0.003; versus other mutations: 49%, mid-P=0.02; versus patients with more than one oncogenic driver (doubleton): 46%, mid-P=0.04.) The double mutation rate among patients with BRAF mutations was 16%, compared with 5% in patients with other genomic abnormalities (mid-P=0.045). Differences were not found in survival between patients with BRAF mutations and those with other genomic abnormalities (P>0.20). (4) CONCLUSIONS We demonstrate BRAF mutations occur in 2.2% of advanced stage lung adenocarcinomas, were most commonly V600E, were associated with distinct clinicopathologic features compared with other genomic subtypes and a high mutation rate in more than one gene, underscoring the importance of comprehensive genomic profiling in assessing patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:25273224

  4. Novel FLG null mutations in Korean patients with atopic dermatitis and comparison of the mutational spectra in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhong; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Young Min

    2015-09-01

    Filaggrin is essential for the development of the skin barrier. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin have been identified as major predisposing factors for atopic disorders. Molecular analysis of the FLG gene in this study showed nine null and one unclassified mutation in 13 of 81 Korean patients with atopic dermatitis (AD): five novel null mutations (i.e. p.S1405*, c.5671_5672delinsTA, p.W1947*, p.G2025* and p.E3070*); four reported null mutations (i.e. c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022*); and one unclassified mutation (i.e. c.306delAAAGCACAG). These variants are nonsense, premature termination codon or in-frame deletion expected to cause loss-of-function of FLG. Genotype-phenotype correlation is not obvious in Korean AD patients with FLG null mutations. According to a review of the mutational spectra of the FLG gene in the Asian populations, FLG null mutations appeared to be unique in each population but some mutations such as p.R501*, c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022* were commonly found in at least two of the selected Asian populations including Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Singaporean Chinese or Taiwanese. Further investigations on a larger group of Korean AD would be necessary to elucidate its clinical pathogenesis and mutational spectrum related to specific FLG null mutations for AD. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Analysis of any point mutation in DNA. The amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS).

    PubMed

    Newton, C R; Graham, A; Heptinstall, L E; Powell, S J; Summers, C; Kalsheker, N; Smith, J C; Markham, A F

    1989-04-11

    We have improved the "polymerase chain reaction" (PCR) to permit rapid analysis of any known mutation in genomic DNA. We demonstrate a system, ARMS (Amplification Refractory Mutation System), that allows genotyping solely by inspection of reaction mixtures after agarose gel electrophoresis. The system is simple, reliable and non-isotopic. It will clearly distinguish heterozygotes at a locus from homozygotes for either allele. The system requires neither restriction enzyme digestion, allele-specific oligonucleotides as conventionally applied, nor the sequence analysis of PCR products. The basis of the invention is that unexpectedly, oligonucleotides with a mismatched 3'-residue will not function as primers in the PCR under appropriate conditions. We have analysed DNA from patients with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, from carriers of the disease and from normal individuals. Our findings are in complete agreement with allele assignments derived by direct sequencing of PCR products.

  6. Mutation independently affects reproductive traits and dauer larvae development in mutation accumulation lines of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hills, Arthur J; Green, James W M; Harvey, Simon C

    2017-11-01

    Developmental decisions are important in organismal fitness. For the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is naturally found in the ephemeral food patches formed by rotting plant material, correctly committing to dauer or non-dauer larval development is key to genotype survival. To investigate the link between reproductive traits, which will determine how populations grow, and dauer larvae formation, we have analysed these traits in mutation accumulation lines of C. elegans. We find that reproductive traits of individual worms-the total number of progeny and the timing of progeny production-are highly correlated with the population size observed in growing populations. In contrast, we find no relationship between reproduction traits and the number of dauer larvae observed in growing populations. We also do not observe a mutational bias in dauer larvae formation. These results indicate that the control of dauer larvae formation is distinct from the control of reproduction and that differences in dauer larvae formation can evolve rapidly.

  7. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Kunst, Henricus P M; Cascon, Alberto; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gaal, José; Korpershoek, Esther; Hinojar-Gutierrez, Adolfo; Timmers, Henri J L M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Hermsen, Mario A; Suárez, Carlos; Hussain, A Karim; Vriends, Annette H J T; Hes, Frederik J; Jansen, Jeroen C; Tops, Carli M; Corssmit, Eleonora P; de Knijff, Peter; Lenders, Jacques W M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Devilee, Peter; Dinjens, Winand N M; de Krijger, Ronald R; Robledo, Mercedes

    2010-04-01

    Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation carriers, assess the clinical genetic significance of SDHAF2, and describe the associated clinical phenotype. We undertook a multicentre study in Spain and The Netherlands in 443 apparently sporadic patients with paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas who did not have mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB. We analysed DNA of 315 patients for germline mutations of SDHAF2; a subset (n=200) was investigated for gross gene deletions. DNA from a group of 128 tumours was studied for somatic mutations. We also examined a Spanish family with head and neck paragangliomas with a young age of onset for the presence of SDHAF2 mutations, undertook haplotype analysis in this kindred, and assessed their clinical phenotype. We did not identify any germline or somatic mutations of SDHAF2, and no gross gene deletions were noted in the subset of apparently sporadic patients analysed. Investigation of the Spanish family identified a pathogenic germline DNA mutation of SDHAF2, 232G-->A (Gly78Arg), identical to the Dutch kindred. SDHAF2 mutations do not have an important role in phaeochromocytoma and are rare in head and neck paraganglioma. Identification of a second family with the Gly78Arg mutation suggests that this is a crucial residue for the function of SDHAF2. We conclude that SDHAF2 mutation analysis is justified in very young patients with isolated head and neck paraganglioma without mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB, and in individuals with familial antecedents who are negative for mutations in all other risk genes. Dutch Cancer Society, European Union 6th Framework Program, Fondo Investigaciones Sanitarias, Fundación Mutua Madrileña, and Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cáncer. 2010

  8. Characterizing mutation-expression network relationships in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Shila; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Data made available through large cancer consortia like The Cancer Genome Atlas make for a rich source of information to be studied across and between cancers. In recent years, network approaches have been applied to such data in uncovering the complex interrelationships between mutational and expression profiles, but lack direct testing for expression changes via mutation. In this pan-cancer study we analyze mutation and gene expression information in an integrative manner by considering the networks generated by testing for differences in expression in direct association with specific mutations. We relate our findings among the 19 cancers examined to identify commonalities and differences as well as their characteristics. Using somatic mutation and gene expression information across 19 cancers, we generated mutation-expression networks per cancer. On evaluation we found that our generated networks were significantly enriched for known cancer-related genes, such as skin cutaneous melanoma (p<0.01 using Network of Cancer Genes 4.0). Our framework identified that while different cancers contained commonly mutated genes, there was little concordance between associated gene expression changes among cancers. Comparison between cancers showed a greater overlap of network nodes for cancers with higher overall non-silent mutation load, compared to those with a lower overall non-silent mutation load. This study offers a framework that explores network information through co-analysis of somatic mutations and gene expression profiles. Our pan-cancer application of this approach suggests that while mutations are frequently common among cancer types, the impact they have on the surrounding networks via gene expression changes varies. Despite this finding, there are some cancers for which mutation-associated network behaviour appears to be similar: suggesting a potential framework for uncovering related cancers for which similar therapeutic strategies may be applicable. Our

  9. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. Objective: To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA. Materials and methods:    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. Results: We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. Conclusion: BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org. PMID:27547378

  10. Genetic drift, selection and the evolution of the mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Ackerman, Matthew S; Gout, Jean-Francois; Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Thomas, W Kelley; Foster, Patricia L

    2016-10-14

    As one of the few cellular traits that can be quantified across the tree of life, DNA-replication fidelity provides an excellent platform for understanding fundamental evolutionary processes. Furthermore, because mutation is the ultimate source of all genetic variation, clarifying why mutation rates vary is crucial for understanding all areas of biology. A potentially revealing hypothesis for mutation-rate evolution is that natural selection primarily operates to improve replication fidelity, with the ultimate limits to what can be achieved set by the power of random genetic drift. This drift-barrier hypothesis is consistent with comparative measures of mutation rates, provides a simple explanation for the existence of error-prone polymerases and yields a formal counter-argument to the view that selection fine-tunes gene-specific mutation rates.

  11. Mutational Spectrum Analysis of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Pathogenic Implication.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-10-14

    One of the most conspicuous features of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) is the occurrence of dramatic conformation change of individual proteins. We performed a mutational spectrum analysis of disease-causing missense mutations in seven types of NDs at nucleotide and amino acid levels, and compared the results with those of non-NDs. The main findings included: (i) The higher mutation ratio of G:C→T:A transversion to G:C→A:T transition was observed in NDs than in non-NDs, interpreting the excessive guanine-specific oxidative DNA damage in NDs; (ii) glycine and proline had highest mutability in NDs than in non-NDs, which favor the protein conformation change in NDs; (iii) surprisingly low mutation frequency of arginine was observed in NDs. These findings help to understand how mutations may cause NDs.

  12. Mutational Spectrum Analysis of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Pathogenic Implication

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    One of the most conspicuous features of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) is the occurrence of dramatic conformation change of individual proteins. We performed a mutational spectrum analysis of disease-causing missense mutations in seven types of NDs at nucleotide and amino acid levels, and compared the results with those of non-NDs. The main findings included: (i) The higher mutation ratio of G:C→T:A transversion to G:C→A:T transition was observed in NDs than in non-NDs, interpreting the excessive guanine-specific oxidative DNA damage in NDs; (ii) glycine and proline had highest mutability in NDs than in non-NDs, which favor the protein conformation change in NDs; (iii) surprisingly low mutation frequency of arginine was observed in NDs. These findings help to understand how mutations may cause NDs. PMID:26473852

  13. Mutations targeting the coagulation pathway are enriched in brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Cristina; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Melloni, Giorgio E M; Brescia, Paola; Patanè, Monica; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Mustafa, Dana A M; Kros, Johan M; Pollo, Bianca; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Sciandivasci, Angela; Munzone, Elisabetta; DiMeco, Francesco; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Riva, Laura; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2017-07-26

    Brain metastases (BMs) are the most common malignancy of the central nervous system. Recently it has been demonstrated that plasminogen activator inhibitor serpins promote brain metastatic colonization, suggesting that mutations in serpins or other members of the coagulation cascade can provide critical advantages during BM formation. We performed whole-exome sequencing on matched samples of breast cancer and BMs and found mutations in the coagulation pathway genes in 5 out of 10 BM samples. We then investigated the mutational status of 33 genes belonging to the coagulation cascade in a panel of 29 BMs and we identified 56 Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs). The frequency of gene mutations of the pathway was significantly higher in BMs than in primary tumours, and SERPINI1 was the most frequently mutated gene in BMs. These findings provide direction in the development of new strategies for the treatment of BMs.

  14. Exhaustive Database Searching for Amino Acid Mutations in Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid mutations in proteins can be found by searching tandem mass spectra acquired in shotgun proteomics experiments against protein sequences predicted from genomes. Traditionally, unconstrained searches for amino acid mutations have been accomplished by using a sequence tagging approach that combines de novo sequencing with database searching. However, this approach is limited by the performance of de novo sequencing. The Sipros algorithm v2.0 was developed to perform unconstrained database searching using high-resolution tandem mass spectra by exhaustively enumerating all single non-isobaric mutations for every residue in a protein database. The performance of Sipros for amino acid mutation identification exceededmore » that of an established sequence tagging algorithm, Inspect, based on benchmarking results from a Rhodopseudomonas palustris proteomics dataset. To demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for meta-proteomics, Sipros was used to identify amino acid mutations in a natural microbial community in acid mine drainage.« less

  15. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in primary cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Traves, Victor; Becker, Jürgen; Soufir, Nadem; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2014-02-26

    We previously reported a disease segregating causal germline mutation in a melanoma family and recurrent somatic mutations in metastasized tumours from unrelated patients in the core promoter region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. Here we show that the TERT promoter mutations, besides causing an increased gene expression, associate with increased patient age, increased Breslow thickness and tumour ulceration in 287 primary melanomas. The mutations are more frequent at both intermittently and chronically sun-exposed sites than non-exposed sites and tend to co-occur with BRAF and CDKN2A alterations. The association with parameters generally connected with poor outcome, coupled with high recurrence and mechanistic relevance, raises the possibility of the eventual use of TERT promoter mutations in the disease management.

  16. Novel CASK mutations in cases with syndromic microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Cristofoli, Francesca; Devriendt, Koen; Davis, Erica E; Van Esch, Hilde; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2018-04-24

    Mutations in CASK cause a wide spectrum of phenotypes in humans ranging from mild X-linked intellectual disability to a severe microcephaly (MC) and pontocerebellar hypoplasia syndrome. Nevertheless, predicting pathogenicity and phenotypic consequences of novel CASK mutations through the exclusive consideration of genetic information and population-based data remains a challenge. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified four novel CASK mutations in individuals with syndromic MC. To understand the functional consequences of the different point mutations on the development of MC and cerebellar defects we established a transient loss of function zebrafish model, and demonstrate recapitulation of relevant neuroanatomical phenotypes. Furthermore, we utilized in vivo complementation studies to demonstrate that the three point mutations confer a loss of function effect. This work endorses zebrafish as a tractable model to rapidly assess the effect of novel CASK variants on brain development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin; ...

    2016-11-04

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of cancer. Here, we analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5,243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA edi ting by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clock-like mutational process.more » Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.« less

  18. Carcinogenic oestrogens induce respiration deficiency mutation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Stopper, H; Metzler, M

    1991-01-01

    In addition to hormonal activity, genetic damage has been proposed as an important factor in oestrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. However, as short-term tests for oestrogens usually fail to show DNA mutations, lesions other than classic nuclear DNA mutation have to be considered. Oestrogen-induced mitochondrial damage was studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stilbene-type, but not steroidal, oestrogens were found to induce respiration-deficient petite mutation. The effect was inversely correlated with cytotoxicity and required aromatic hydroxyl groups at the stilbene molecule. It only occurred under growth conditions and apparently was not due to the ATPase inhibitory qualities of stilbene oestrogens. Other studies have shown that petite mutation clones, which can be induced by a variety of substances, contain altered mitochondrial DNA. The mechanism of petite mutation induction might be important in tumorigenesis by also acting on nuclear DNA or facilitating carcinogenesis by disturbance of mitochondrial function.

  19. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09207.001 PMID:26374986

  20. A novel mutation in GATA6 causes pancreatic agenesis.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, Diana E; Hughes, Nkecha; Patel, Puja; De León, Diva D

    2015-02-01

    Heterozygous mutations in GATA6 have been linked to pancreatic agenesis and cardiac malformations. The aim of this study was to describe a new mutation in GATA6 in an infant with pancreatic agenesis, associated with truncus arteriosus and absent gallbladder. Clinical data were obtained from chart review. Gene sequencing was performed on genomic DNA. The patient was a female infant diagnosed shortly after birth with a severe cardiac malformation, absent gallbladder, anomalous hepatic blood flow, unilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter, neonatal diabetes, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Despite prolonged intensive management care, she died at 3 months of age because of cardiac complications. Analysis of her genomic DNA revealed a novel missense mutation of GATA6. The novel mutation described in this case extends the list of GATA6 mutations causing pancreatic agenesis and cardiac malformations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. BRCA1 mutations in primary breast and ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Futreal, P.A.; Cochran, C.; Bennett, L.M.

    1994-10-07

    Loss of heterozygosity data from familial tumors suggested that BRCA1, a gene that confers susceptibility to ovarian and early-onset breast cancer, encodes a tumor suppressor. The BRCA1 region is also subject to allelic loss in sporadic breast and ovarian cancers, an indication that BRCA1 mutations may occur somatically in these tumors. The BRCA1 coding region was examined for mutations in primary breast and ovarian tumors that show allele loss at the BRCA1 locus. Mutations were detected in 3 of 32 breast and 1 of 12 ovarian carcinomas; all four mutations were germline alterations and occurred in early-onset cancers. These resultsmore » suggest that mutation of BRCA1 may not be critical in the development of the majority of breast and ovarian cancers that arise in the absence of a mutant germline allele.« less

  2. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Houvras, Yariv; Rubin, Mark A

    2015-09-16

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics.

  3. Familial Mediterranean fever associated pyrin mutations in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Konstantopoulos, K; Kanta, A; Deltas, C; Atamian, V; Mavrogianni, D; Tzioufas, A; Kollainis, I; Ritis, K; Moutsopoulos, H

    2003-01-01

    Patients and methods: 62 patients fulfilling the Tel Hashomer diagnostic criteria for definite (33) or probable (29) FMF diagnosis were studied. Eight point mutations of pyrin gene were tested by standard methods. Of the 62 patients tested, 48 were Greek, four were Jewish, seven were Armenian, and three were Arab. Results: 42 patients were found to be homozygotes for pyrin mutations; 11 patients were found to carry only one of the tested mutations; in nine patients no mutations were detected. Conclusion: Molecular detection of pyrin gene mutations seems useful in confirming suspected cases, and in detecting asymptomatic cases, of Mediterranean fever in Greece. It may also be used as a screening tool within affected families. PMID:12695165

  4. NOD2 gene mutations in ulcerative colitis: useless or misunderstood?

    PubMed

    Freire, Paulo; Cardoso, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Pedro; Donato, Maria M; Ferreira, Manuela; Mendes, Sofia; Ferreira, Ana Margarida; Vasconcelos, Helena; Portela, Francisco; Sofia, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    NOD2 mutations have been linked to an increased risk of Crohn's disease and to some of its phenotypes. The association between NOD2 mutations and susceptibility to ulcerative colitis (UC) remains somewhat controversial and potential correlations between these mutations and UC phenotype have not been studied. To assess whether NOD2 mutations are a risk factor for UC in Portugal and if there are any genotype-phenotype correlations in these patients. The three main NOD2 mutations were searched in 200 patients with UC and in 202 healthy controls. NOD2 mutations were present in 28 patients with UC (14.0 %) and in 27 controls (13.4 %) (p = 0.853). Mutation carriers were more likely to receive steroids during the first year of disease than non-carriers (54.2 % vs. 29.6 %, p = 0.018) and among these patients the need for intravenous administration was more frequent in those with the R702W polymorphism (90.0 % vs. 45.5 %, p = 0.014). In patients with severe colitis admitted for intravenous steroids, a greater proportion of mutation carriers was considered intravenous-steroid refractory and required salvage therapy (90.0 % vs. 38.1 %, p = 0.004). Patients with NOD2 mutation were submitted to colectomy more frequently than non-carriers (17.9 % vs. 4.1 %. p = 0.015). No correlation with the need for immunosuppressants/immunomodulators was found. In the Portuguese population, NOD2 mutations do not increase the risk of UC but are associated with a more aggressive course including greater need of steroids in the first year, increased incidence of intravenous-steroid refractoriness and a higher colectomy rate.

  5. Algorithms and semantic infrastructure for mutation impact extraction and grounding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutation impact extraction is a hitherto unaccomplished task in state of the art mutation extraction systems. Protein mutations and their impacts on protein properties are hidden in scientific literature, making them poorly accessible for protein engineers and inaccessible for phenotype-prediction systems that currently depend on manually curated genomic variation databases. Results We present the first rule-based approach for the extraction of mutation impacts on protein properties, categorizing their directionality as positive, negative or neutral. Furthermore protein and mutation mentions are grounded to their respective UniProtKB IDs and selected protein properties, namely protein functions to concepts found in the Gene Ontology. The extracted entities are populated to an OWL-DL Mutation Impact ontology facilitating complex querying for mutation impacts using SPARQL. We illustrate retrieval of proteins and mutant sequences for a given direction of impact on specific protein properties. Moreover we provide programmatic access to the data through semantic web services using the SADI (Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration) framework. Conclusion We address the problem of access to legacy mutation data in unstructured form through the creation of novel mutation impact extraction methods which are evaluated on a corpus of full-text articles on haloalkane dehalogenases, tagged by domain experts. Our approaches show state of the art levels of precision and recall for Mutation Grounding and respectable level of precision but lower recall for the task of Mutant-Impact relation extraction. The system is deployed using text mining and semantic web technologies with the goal of publishing to a broad spectrum of consumers. PMID:21143808

  6. Mutational Analysis and Clinical Correlation of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrea L.; Borger, Darrell R.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Murphy, Janet E.; Faris, Jason E.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M.; Ellisen, Leif W.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. METHODS Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. RESULTS Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P < .001) and with age ≥56 years (7% vs 0.9%; P = .02). Conversely, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) mutations were associated with colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09–5.27; P = .029). CONCLUSIONS The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. PMID:24500602

  7. Cystic fibrosis in Jews: frequency and mutation distribution.

    PubMed

    Kerem, B; Chiba-Falek, O; Kerem, E

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of cystic fibrosis and the frequency of disease causing mutations varies among different ethnic groups and geographical regions around the world. The Jewish population is comprised of two major ethnic groups. Ashkenazi and Non-Ashkenazi. The latter is further classified according to country of origin. An extreme variability in the disease frequency (from 1:2400-1:39,000) was found among the different Jewish ethnic groups. In the entire Jewish CF population, only 12 mutations were identified that altogether enable the identification of 91% of the CF chromosomes. However, in each Jewish ethnic group, the disease is caused by a different repertoire of a small number of mutations. In several ethnic groups, there is a major CFTR mutation that accounts for at least 48% of the CF chromosomes. High proportion of the CF chromosomes can be identified in Ashkenazi Jews (95%), Jews originating from Tunisia (100%), Libya (91%), Turkey (90%), and Georgia (88%). High frequencies of CFTR mutations were found among infertile males with CBAVD who might not have additional CF clinical characteristics. Of the Jewish males with CBAVD, 77% carried at least one CFTR mutation. The 5T mutation is the major mutation in Jewish CBAVD affecteds accounting for 32% of the chromosomes among Ashkenazi Jews and 36% among the non-Ashkenazi Jews. Five additional CFTR mutations, W1282X (12%), delta F508 (9%), N1303K (3%), D1152H, (5%)), and R117H (1%) were identified among Ashkenazi Jews with CBAVD. Only two mutations, delta F508 and R117H, were found among non-Ashkenazi males with CBAVD. An increased frequency of the 5T allele was also found among Jewish patients with atypical CF presentation, 18% in Ashkenazi, and 10% in non-Ashkenazi Jews. In summary, we present the required information for genetic counseling of Jewish families with typical and atypical CF and for carrier screening of healthy Jewish individuals.

  8. Limitations of hearing screening in newborns with PDS mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Shin, Joong-Wook; Park, Hong-Joon; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Un-Kyung; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-05-01

    SLC26A4 (PDS) mutations are common cause of congenital hearing loss in East Asia. Hearing loss caused by PDS mutations tends to have delayed presentation; thus universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) can be less effective in these patients. We examined the efficiency of newborn hearing screening test in patients with bi-allelic PDS mutations. Forty-three patients with sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Patients had an enlarged vestibular aqueduct and biallelic PDS mutations. Among them, newborn hearing screening test had been performed on 14. The remaining 29 patients did not undergo newborn hearing screening test. Another 15 patients without a PDS mutation but who had sensorineural hearing loss were also recruited as a comparison group. We reviewed the hearing loss history of the children using medical records and parent interviews. Among 14 patients with PDS mutation, four (28.6%) passed newborn hearing screening test in both ears and six (42.9%) passed in one ear. In contrast, only 2 of 15 (13.3%) children without a PDS mutation passed newborn hearing screening test bilaterally. The age at confirmation of bilateral hearing loss in bilateral "pass" patients with PDS mutation was 31.5 ± 17.9 months, which was significantly delayed compared to the age for bilateral "refer" children (1.75 ± 0.96 months) (p<0.05). The UNHS is not an accurate tool for predicting long-term hearing loss in patients with PDS mutations. We recommend that genetic screening be combined with UNHS, particularly in communities with a high prevalence of PDS mutations, to better identify children in need of early habilitation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rattray, Alison; Santoyo, Gustavo; Shafer, Brenda; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3) placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold) correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts). Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  10. Mutational analysis and clinical correlation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea L; Borger, Darrell R; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P; Wo, Jennifer Y; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Wadlow, Raymond C; Zhu, Andrew X; Murphy, Janet E; Faris, Jason E; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, Anthony J; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-05-15

    Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P < .001) and with age ≥56 years (7% vs 0.9%; P = .02). Conversely, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) mutations were associated with colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.27; P = .029). The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  11. Teaching the fluctuation test in silico by using mutate: a program to distinguish between the adaptive and spontaneous mutation hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary aspects of current genetics such as sequence databases, DNA mutations, and hypothesis testing, while introducing the fluctuation test. This seminal experiment was originally performed studying Escherichia coli resistance to the infection by bacteriophage T1. The fluctuation test initiated the modern bacterial genetics that 25 years later ushered in the era of the recombinant DNA. Nowadays we know that some deletions in fhuA, the gene responsible for E. coli membrane receptor of T1, could cause the E. coli resistance to this phage. For the sake of simplicity, we will introduce the assumption that a single mutation generates the resistance to T1. During the practical, the students use the program to download some fhuA gene sequences, manually introduce some stop codon mutations, and design a fluctuation test to obtain data for distinguishing between preadaptative (spontaneous) and induced (adaptive) mutation hypotheses. The program can be launched from a browser or, if preferred, its executable file can be downloaded from http://webs.uvigo.es/acraaj/MutateWeb/Mutate.html. It requires the Java 5.0 (or higher) Runtime Environment (freely available at http://www.java.com). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Teaching the Fluctuation Test "In Silico" by Using Mutate: A Program to Distinguish between the Adaptive and Spontaneous Mutation Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvajal-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary…

  13. Various lamin A/C mutations alter expression profile of mesenchymal stem cells in mutation specific manner.

    PubMed

    Malashicheva, Anna; Bogdanova, Maria; Zabirnyk, Arsenii; Smolina, Natalia; Ignatieva, Elena; Freilikhman, Olga; Fedorov, Anton; Dmitrieva, Renata; Sjöberg, Gunnar; Sejersen, Thomas; Kostareva, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Various mutations in LMNA gene, encoding for nuclear lamin A/C protein, lead to laminopathies and contribute to over ten human disorders, mostly affecting tissues of mesenchymal origin such as fat tissue, muscle tissue, and bones. Recently it was demonstrated that lamins not only play a structural role providing communication between extra-nuclear structures and components of cell nucleus but also control cell fate and differentiation. In our study we assessed the effect of various LMNA mutations on the expression profile of mesenchymal multipotent stem cells (MMSC) during adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. We used lentiviral approach to modify human MMSC with LMNA-constructs bearing mutations associated with different laminopathies--G465D, R482L, G232E, R527C, and R471C. The impact of various mutations on MMSC differentiation properties and expression profile was assessed by colony-forming unit analysis, histological staining, expression of the key differentiation markers promoting adipogenesis and osteogenesis followed by the analysis of the whole set of genes involved in lineage-specific differentiation using PCR expression arrays. We demonstrate that various LMNA mutations influence the differentiation efficacy of MMSC in mutation-specific manner. Each LMNA mutation promotes a unique expression pattern of genes involved in a lineage-specific differentiation and this pattern is shared by the phenotype-specific mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ABCD1 mutations and the X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mutation database: role in diagnosis and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S; Pujol, A; Waterham, H R; van Geel, B M; Boehm, C D; Raymond, G V; Cutting, G R; Wanders, R J; Moser, H W

    2001-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal ABC half-transporter (ALDP) involved in the import of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome. The disease is characterized by a striking and unpredictable variation in phenotypic expression. Phenotypes include the rapidly progressive childhood cerebral form (CCALD), the milder adult form, adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), and variants without neurologic involvement. There is no apparent correlation between genotype and phenotype. In males, unambiguous diagnosis can be achieved by demonstration of elevated levels of VLCFA in plasma. In 15 to 20% of obligate heterozygotes, however, test results are false-negative. Therefore, mutation analysis is the only reliable method for the identification of heterozygotes. Since most X-ALD kindreds have a unique mutation, a great number of mutations have been identified in the ABCD1 gene in the last seven years. In order to catalog and facilitate the analysis of these mutations, we have established a mutation database for X-ALD ( http://www.x-ald.nl). In this review we report a detailed analysis of all 406 X-ALD mutations currently included in the database. Also, we present 47 novel mutations. In addition, we review the various X-ALD phenotypes, the different diagnostic tools, and the need for extended family screening for the identification of new patients. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Solar-UV-signature mutation prefers TCG to CCG: extrapolative consideration from UVA1-induced mutation spectra in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Kumagai, Jun; Ono, Tetsuya; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-08-01

    UVA1 exerts its genotoxicity on mammalian skin by producing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DNA and preferentially inducing solar-UV-signature mutations, C → T base substitution mutations at methylated CpG-associated dipyrimidine (Py-mCpG) sites, as demonstrated previously using a 364 nm laser as a UVA1 source and lacZ-transgenic mice that utilize the transgene as a mutational reporter. In the present study, we confirmed that a broadband UVA1 source induced the same mutation profiles in mouse epidermis as the UVA1 laser, generalizing the previous result from a single 364 nm to a wider wavelength range of UVA1 (340-400 nm). Combined with our previous data on the mutation spectra induced in mouse epidermis by UVB, UVA2 and solar UVR, we proved that the solar-UV-signature mutation is commonly observed in the wavelength range from UVB to UVA, and found that UVA1 induces this mutation more preferentially than the other shorter wavelength ranges. This finding indicates that the solar-UV-signature mutation-causing CPDs, which are known to prefer Py-mCpG sites, could be produced with the energy provided by the longer wavelength region of UVR, suggesting a photochemical reaction through the excitation of pyrimidine bases to energy states that can be accomplished by absorption of even low-energy UVR. On the other hand, the lower proportions of solar-UV-signature mutations observed in the mutation spectra for UVB and solar UVR indicate that the direct photochemical reaction through excited singlet state of pyrimidine bases, which can be accomplished only by high-energy UVR, is also involved in the mutation induction at those shorter wavelengths of UVR. We also found that the solar-UV signature prefers 5'-TCG-3' to 5'-CCG-3' as mutational target sites, consistent with the fact that UVA induces CPDs selectively at thymine-containing dipyrimidine sites and that solar UVR induces them preferably at Py-mCpG sites. However, the mutation spectrum in human p53 gene from non

  16. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Swati; Sethi, Raman; Sundar, Gangadhara; Quah, Thuan Chong; Quah, Boon Long; Lai, Poh San

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59) while only 42.4% (25/59) of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9%) of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1%) in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41) of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59) of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and asymptomatic

  17. Mutation spectrum of POLE and POLD1 mutations in South East Asian women presenting with grade 3 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adele; Kuick, Chik Hong; Wong, Wai Loong; Tham, Jill M; Mansor, Sorsiah; Loh, Eva; Jain, Sudhanshi; Vikas, Nadkarni N; Tan, Sze Huey; Chan, Sock Hoai; Li, Shao Tzu; Chew, Sung Hock; Hong, Wanjin; Ngeow, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Somatic POLE mutations have been found in a subset of endometrioid ECs particularly in FIGO grade 3 tumors while POLD1 mutations are reportedly rare in ECs. While it has been suggested that POLE mutation confers good prognosis, the data remains conflicting. Our study aims to determine the mutation spectrum of somatic and germline POLE and POLD1 gene mutations in South East Asian (SEA) women with FIGO grade 3 endometrioid ECs. Forty-seven patients diagnosed with FIGO grade 3 endometrioid EC, diagnosed between 2009 and 2013 were included. Next generation sequencing (NGS) using formalin fixed embedded (FFPE) tissue was utilized to sequence tumor and matched normal tissue. Tumors were also assessed for other clinicopathologic and microsatellite status phenotype. Survival curves for pathogenic somatic POLE mutated and wild-type tumors were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Pathogenic POLE (somatic or germline) and POLD1 (germline) mutations were detected in 29.7% (14/47) and 4.3% (2/47) patients, respectively. Three pathogenic germline mutations; one POLE and two POLD1 mutations were novel. Pathogenic germline and somatic POLE and POLD1 mutations were associated with 100% recurrence free survival. In contrast, among the wild-type POLE and POLD1 patients, 25% (8/32) had recurrence with 15.6% (5/32) subsequently dying of the disease. Somatic POLE-mutated tumors were more commonly associated with microsatellite stable (MSS) ECs (83% vs 49%; p=0.04) and peritumoral lymphocytic infiltration (75% vs 42%; p=0.05). All tumors with tumoral infiltrating lymphocytes exhibited peritumoral lymphocytic infiltrate but not vice versa. Mutations in POLE and POLD1 in SEA women with grade 3 endometrioid ECs are associated with improved recurrence free survival. Notably, germline mutations in either POLE/POLD1 were seen in 8.5% of patients who will require appropriate genetic counseling regarding risk of developing colorectal carcinoma and on the need for additional surveillance for

  18. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Swati; Sethi, Raman; Sundar, Gangadhara; Quah, Thuan Chong; Quah, Boon Long; Lai, Poh San

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59) while only 42.4% (25/59) of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9%) of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1%) in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41) of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59) of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and asymptomatic

  19. Reduced BRCA1 transcript levels in freshly isolated blood leukocytes from BRCA1 mutation carriers is mutation specific.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Rania; Pettapiece-Phillips, Rachael; Salmena, Leonardo; Kotlyar, Max; Jurisica, Igor; Narod, Steven A; Akbari, Mohammad R; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-08-17

    BRCA1 mutation carriers face a high lifetime risk of developing both breast and ovarian cancer. Haploinsufficiency is thought to predispose these women to cancer by reducing the pool of available BRCA1 transcript and protein, thereby compromising BRCA1 function. Whether or not cancer-free BRCA1 mutation carriers have lower messenger (m)RNA transcript levels in peripheral blood leukocytes has not been evaluated. The primary aim of this study was to characterize an association between BRCA1 mutation status and BRCA1 mRNA leukocyte expression levels among healthy women with a BRCA1 mutation. RNA was extracted from freshly isolated peripheral blood leukocytes of 58 cancer-free, female participants (22 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 36 non-carriers). The expression levels of 236 cancer-associated genes, including BRCA1, were quantified using the Human Cancer Reference gene panel from the Nanostring Technologies nCounter Analysis System. Multivariate modeling demonstrated that carrying a BRCA1 mutation was the most significant predictor of BRCA1 mRNA levels. BRCA1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in BRCA1 mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (146.7 counts vs. 175.1 counts; P = 0.002). Samples with BRCA1 mutations within exon 11 had lower BRCA1 mRNA levels than samples with mutations within the 5' and 3' regions of the BRCA1 gene (122.1 counts vs. 138.9 and 168.6 counts, respectively; P = 0.003). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of gene expression profiles from freshly isolated blood leukocytes revealed that BRCA1 mutation carriers cluster more closely with other BRCA1 mutation carriers than with BRCA1 wild-type samples. Moreover, a set of 17 genes (including BRCA1) previously shown to be involved in carcinogenesis, were differentially expressed between BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers. Overall, these findings support the concept of BRCA1 haploinsufficiency wherein a specific mutation results in dosage-dependent alteration of BRCA1 at the

  20. attG and attC mutations of Agrobacterium tumefaciens are dominant negative mutations that block attachment and virulence.

    PubMed

    Matthysse, Ann G; Jaeckel, Peter; Jeter, Cecelia

    2008-04-01

    The cryptic plasmid (pAT) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens was not required for virulence or attachment to plant surfaces. However, mutations in the attC and attG genes located on pAT caused the bacteria to become avirulent and non-attaching on tomato, carrot, and Bryophyllum daigremontiana. This was the case whether the mutation was in the copy of the genes located on pAT or whether it was carried in a second copy of the attA-G operon located on a plasmid in cells that contained a wild-type copy of pAT. Thus attC and attG mutations are dominant negative mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations block attachment and virulence is unknown.

  1. Mutation analysis and genetic service: the construction and use of national confidential databases of mutations and pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Green, P M; Waseem, N H; Bagnall, R D; Giannelli, F

    The development of rapid mutation screening procedures allows the detection of mutations in large populations. This is particularly useful for inherited diseases of high mutational heterogeneity, such as haemophilia A and B, because the analysis of the very many different natural mutants clearly defines the features that are important to the function of the relevant gene and gene product. Furthermore, the characterization of the mutation in an index person from each affected family may lead to the construction of confidential databases of mutations and pedigrees that allow optimization of genetic service. We report how, motivated by the aforementioned concepts, we have planned and introduced in the UK a national strategy to optimize genetic service in both haemophilias and, in particular, we describe the principles that have guided us.

  2. TET2 gene mutation is unfavorable prognostic factor in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia patients with NPM1+ and FLT3-ITD - mutations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Xu, Yang; Yin, Jia; Tian, Hong; Chen, Suning; Wu, Depei; Sun, Aining

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (cn-AML) is a group of heterogeneous diseases. Gene mutations are increasingly used to assess the prognosis of cn-AML patients and guide risk-adapted treatment. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular genetics characteristics of 373 adult cn-AML patients and explored the relationship between TET2 gene mutations or different genetic mutation patterns and prognosis. We found that 16.1 % of patients had TET2 mutations, 31.6 % had FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITDs), 6.2 % had FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations, 2.4 % had c-KIT mutations, 37.8 % had NPM1 mutations, 11.3 % had WT1 mutations, 5.9 % had RUNX1 mutations, 11.5 % had ASXL1 mutations, 3.8 % had MLL-PTDs, 7.8 % had IDH1 mutations, 7.8 % had NRAS mutations, 12.3 % had IDH2 mutations, 1.6 % had EZH2 mutations, and 14.7 % had DNMT3A mutations, while none had CBL mutations. Gene mutations were detected in 76.94 % (287/373) of all patients. In the NPM1m(+) patients, those with TET2 mutations were associated with a shorter median overall survival (OS) as compared to TET2 wild-type (wt) patients (9.9 vs. 27.0 months, respectively; P = 0.023); Interestingly, the TET2 mutation was identified as an unfavorable prognostic factor and was closely associated with a shorter median OS as compared to TET2-wt (9.5 vs. 32.2 months, respectively; P = 0.013) in the NPM1m(+)/FLT3-ITDm(-) patient group. Thus, identification of TET2 combined with classic NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations allowed us to stratify cn-AML into distinct subtypes.

  3. TP53 mutation and survival in aggressive B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zenz, Thorsten; Kreuz, Markus; Fuge, Maxi; Klapper, Wolfram; Horn, Heike; Staiger, Annette M; Winter, Doris; Helfrich, Hanne; Huellein, Jennifer; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Stein, Harald; Feller, Alfred; Möller, Peter; Schmitz, Norbert; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Siebert, Reiner; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    TP53 is mutated in 20-25% of aggressive B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL). To date, no studies have addressed the impact of TP53 mutations in prospective clinical trial cohorts. To evaluate the impact of TP53 mutation to current risk models in aggressive B-NHL, we investigated TP53 gene mutations within the RICOVER-60 trial. Of 1,222 elderly patients (aged 61-80 years) enrolled in the study and randomized to six or eight cycles of CHOP-14 with or without Rituximab (NCT00052936), 265 patients were analyzed for TP53 mutations. TP53 mutations were demonstrated in 63 of 265 patients (23.8%). TP53 mutation was associated with higher LDH (65% vs. 37%; p < 0.001), higher international prognostic index-Scores (IPI 4/5 27% vs. 12%; p = 0.025) and B-symptoms (41% vs. 24%; p = 0.011). Patients with TP53 mutation were less likely to obtain a complete remission CR/CRu (CR unconfirmed) 61.9% (mut) vs. 79.7% (wt) (p = 0.007). TP53 mutations were associated with decreased event-free (EFS), progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (median observation time of 40.2 months): the 3 year EFS, PFS and OS were 42% (vs. 60%; p = 0.012), 42% (vs. 67.5%; p < 0.001) and 50% (vs. 76%; p < 0.001) for the TP53 mutation group. In a Cox proportional hazard analysis adjusting for IPI-factors and treatment arms, TP53 mutation was shown to be an independent predictor of EFS (HR 1.5), PFS (HR 2.0) and OS (HR 2.3; p < 0.001). TP53 mutations are independent predictors of survival in untreated patients with aggressive CD20+ lymphoma. TP53 mutations should be considered for risk models in DLBCL and strategies to improve outcome for patients with mutant TP53 must be developed. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Mutations associated with drug resistance and prevalence of vaccine escape mutations in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Maria Isabel Magalhães A; Pacheco, Sidelcina Rugieri; Stocker, Andreas; Schinoni, Maria Isabel; Paraná, Raymundo; Reis, Mitermayer G; Silva, Luciano K

    2017-10-01

    The Brazilian public health system (SUS) has provided antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis B treatment for over 10 years, but a system for monitoring for drug-related resistance mutations is not available. Determine the presence of HBV mutations associated with resistance to nucleos(t)ide analogs among 81 patients with chronic HBV infection in Salvador-BA-Brazil. HBV-DNA was PCR amplified with primers deduced from the rt domain at the HBV P gene, the sequence extended 1032 bp (from amino acid 1 to 344-rt domain). Those sequences were submitted to the HBV drug resistance database to retrieve each mutation according to the genotype. HBV genotype A1 (85.2%) was the most prevalent, followed by genotype A2 (4.9%), F (6.2%), and C1, D2, and D4 (1.2% each). Six patients (7%) exhibited resistance mutations to LAM, ETV, and TDF: two with patterns L180M + M204V and four with other different patterns: L80I + L180M + M204I; L80V + L180M + M204V; M204I; A194T. All of these mutations were present in patients with genotype A (four A1 and two A2). In addition, four mutations in gene S (three cases with the sI195M mutation and one with the W196L mutation), were detected, corresponding to a rate of 6% of vaccine escape mutations. Althougth the small sample size, an association was found between the occurrence of HBV resistance mutations and HBeAg positivity, co-infection with HIV and a history of treatment for HBV and/or HIV. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Germline mutations in SUFU cause Gorlin syndrome-associated childhood medulloblastoma and redefine the risk associated with PTCH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miriam J; Beetz, Christian; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; O'Sullivan, James; Anderson, Beverley; Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Bholah, Zaynab; Oudit, Deemesh; Cheesman, Edmund; Kelsey, Anna; McCabe, Martin G; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth R

    2014-12-20

    Heterozygous germline PTCH1 mutations are causative of Gorlin syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma), but detection rates > 70% have rarely been reported. We aimed to define the causative mutations in individuals with Gorlin syndrome without PTCH1 mutations. We undertook exome sequencing on lymphocyte DNA from four unrelated individuals from families with Gorlin syndrome with no PTCH1 mutations found by Sanger sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), or RNA analysis. A germline heterozygous nonsense mutation in SUFU was identified in one of four exomes. Sanger sequencing of SUFU in 23 additional PTCH1-negative Gorlin syndrome families identified a SUFU mutation in a second family. Copy-number analysis of SUFU by MLPA revealed a large heterozygous deletion in a third family. All three SUFU-positive families fulfilled diagnostic criteria for Gorlin syndrome, although none had odontogenic jaw keratocysts. Each SUFU-positive family included a single case of medulloblastoma, whereas only two (1.7%) of 115 individuals with Gorlin syndrome and a PTCH1 mutation developed medulloblastoma. We demonstrate convincing evidence that SUFU mutations can cause classical Gorlin syndrome. Our study redefines the risk of medulloblastoma in Gorlin syndrome, dependent on the underlying causative gene. Previous reports have found a 5% risk of medulloblastoma in Gorlin syndrome. We found a < 2% risk in PTCH1 mutation-positive individuals, with a risk up to 20× higher in SUFU mutation-positive individuals. Our data suggest childhood brain magnetic resonance imaging surveillance is justified in SUFU-related, but not PTCH1-related, Gorlin syndrome. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Identification of EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, and ALK gene rearrangement in cytological specimens of primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guoping; Wong, Rebecca; Chhieng, David; Levy, Gillian H; Gettinger, Scott N; Herbst, Roy S; Puchalski, Jonathan T; Homer, Robert J; Hui, Pei

    2013-09-01

    The identification of molecular alterations has an important therapeutic implication in patients with lung adenocarcinomas. In the current study, the authors evaluated their experience with the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement using cytological specimens of primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 54 cases of lung adenocarcinomas (11 primary and 43 metastatic tumors) in which molecular tests were performed were retrieved. Molecular tests were performed on the cell block material of 19 effusions and 35 fine-needle aspirates. EGFR mutation was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction sequencing analysis of exons 18, 19, 20, and 21. KRAS mutation was tested using polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of codons 12 and 13. ALK gene rearrangement was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization using an ALK break apart probe. Molecular tests were successful in 49 of 54 cases (91%). Evaluation of EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, and ALK gene rearrangement were performed in 49 cases, 14 cases, and 22 cases, respectively. EGFR mutations were found in 14 of 49 cases (29%), including 5 primary and 9 metastatic tumors. Three metastatic/recurrent adenocarcinomas demonstrated an additional EGFR T790M mutation that was not identified in the original specimens. KRAS mutation was detected in 3 of 14 cases (21%) including 1 primary and 2 metastatic tumors. ALK gene rearrangement was evident in 3 of 22 cases (14%), all of which were metastatic tumors. The results of the current study have demonstrated the feasibility of using cytological specimens for EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, and ALK gene rearrangement analysis. Repeating molecular testing in metastatic/recurrent lung adenocarcinomas may uncover newly acquired molecular alterations. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  7. Cornelia de Lange individuals with new and recurrent SMC1A mutations enhance delineation of mutation repertoire and phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Gervasini, Cristina; Russo, Silvia; Cereda, Anna; Parenti, Ilaria; Masciadri, Maura; Azzollini, Jacopo; Melis, Daniela; Aravena, Teresa; Doray, Bérénice; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Garavelli, Livia; Selicorni, Angelo; Larizza, Lidia

    2013-11-01

    We report on the clinical and molecular characterization of eight patients, one male and seven females, with clinical diagnosis of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), who were found to carry distinct mutations of the SMC1A gene. Five of the eight mutations are novel, with two involving amino acid residues previously described as altered in a different way. The other three have been reported each in a single case. Comparison of pairs of individuals with the same mutation indicates only partial overlap of their clinical phenotypes. The following novel missense mutations, all affecting highly conserved amino acid residues, were found: p.R398G in the N-terminal coiled-coil domain, p.V651M in the C-terminal coiled-coil/hinge junction, p.R693G in the C-terminal coiled-coil, and p.N1166T and p.L1189F in the C-terminal ABC cassette. The latter is localized in the H-loop, and represents the first mutation involving a functional motif of SMC1A protein. The effect of the mutations on SMC1A protein function has been predicted using four bioinformatic tools. All mutations except p.V651M were scored as pathogenic by three or four of the tools. p.V651M was found in the only male individual of our cohort, who presented with the most severe phenotype. This raises the issue of gender effect when addressing mutation-phenotype correlation for genes such as SMC1A, which incompletely escapes X-inactivation. Our clinical and molecular findings expand the total number of characterized SMC1A-mutated patients (from 44 to 52) and the restricted repertoire of SMC1A mutations (from 29 to 34), contributing to the molecular and clinical signature of SMC1A-based CdLS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. NPHS1 gene mutations confirm congenital nephrotic syndrome in four Brazilian cases: A novel mutation is described.

    PubMed

    Guaragna, Mara S; Cleto, Thaís Lira; Souza, Marcela Lopes; Lutaif, Anna Cristina G B; de Castro, Luiz Cláudio Gonçalves; Penido, Maria Goretti Moreira Guimarães; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa T; Belangero, Vera M S; Guerra-Junior, Gil; De Mello, Maricilda P

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in NPHS1 gene are a common cause of congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS). The disorder is characterized by massive proteinuria that manifests in utero or in the neonatal period during the first 3 months of life. NPHS1 encodes nephrin, a member of the immunoglobulin family of cell adhesion molecules and the main protein expressed at the renal slit diaphragm. Currently, there are approximately 250 mutations described in the NPHS1 gene distributed among all nephrin domains. The main objective of this study was to perform the analysis of the NPHS1 gene in patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome in order to determine the molecular cause of the disease. Direct sequencing of NPHS1 gene in four children was performed. Each patient was heterozygous for two pathogenic mutations disclosing the molecular cause of the disease in 100% of the cases. We identified six different mutations, consisting of one in-frame deletion, one frameshift, and four missense substitutions. The p.Val736Met mutation that is described here for the first time was considered pathogenic by different mutation predictive algorithms. Regardless of the type of mutation, three patients had a bad outcome and died Despite the small size of the cohort, this study contributed to the increasing number of deleterious mutations in the NPHS1 gene by describing a new mutation. Also, since we identified NPHS1 pathogenic mutations as the cause of the disease in all cases analyzed, it might be a frequent cause of CNS in the South Eastern region of Brazil, although the analysis of a larger sample is required to obtain more indicative epidemiological data. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  9. Prevalence of EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer in Uruguayan Population

    PubMed Central

    Touya, Diego; Bertoni, Bernardo; Osinaga, Eduardo; Varangot, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background Incorporation of molecular analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene into routine clinical practice represents a milestone for personalized therapy of the non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the genetic testing of EGFR mutations has not yet become a routine clinical practice in developing countries. In view of different prevalence of such mutations among different ethnicities and geographic regions, as well as the limited existing data from Latin America, our aim was to study the frequency of major types of activating mutations of the EGFR gene in NSCLC patients from Uruguay. Methods We examined EGFR mutations in exons 18 through 21 in 289 NSCLC Uruguayan patients by PCR-direct sequencing. Results EGFR mutations were detected in 53 of the 289 (18.3%) patients, more frequently in women (23.4%) than in men (14.5%). The distribution by exon was similar to that generally reported in the literature. Conclusions This first epidemiological study of EGFR mutations in Uruguay reveals a wide spectrum of mutations and an overall prevalence of 18.3%. The background ethnic structure of the Uruguayan population could play an important role in explaining our findings. PMID:28744312

  10. Variation in RNA Virus Mutation Rates across Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Marine; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10−6 to 10−4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r) and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10−5 s/n/r). Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1–21%) did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature. PMID:24465205

  11. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  12. A novel FBN1 mutation causes autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Liu, Xiaoqi; Guo, Xiaoxin; Liu, Liping; Jiang, Linxin; Wang, Qi; Gong, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an inherited and systemic disorder. It has been reported that mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1) account for ~90% of autosomal dominant cases of MFS. This study was conducted to screen mutations of FBN1 in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant MFS; four individuals including two patients with MFS were recruited. The family members underwent complete physical, cardiovascular and ophthalmologic examinations. Genomic DNA samples were collected from the family along with 383 unrelated healthy subjects. FBN1 coding regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by direct sequencing. SIFT and PolyPhen-2 were used to predict the possible structural and functional alterations of the protein. A novel heterozygous mutation c.1708 T>G (p.C570G) in exon 14 was identified, which led to a substitution of cysteine by glycine at codon 570 (p.C570G). The mutation was identified as being associated with the MFS phenotype in the affected members of this family. However, the unaffected family members and the 383 normal controls lacked the mutation. Multiple sequence alignment of the human FBN1 protein revealed that this novel mutation occurred within a highly conserved region of the FBN1 protein across different species and may induce structural alterations in this functional domain. The spectrum of MFS-associated mutations in the FBN1 gene has been enriched from this study; this may improve understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of MFS. PMID:28944857

  13. [Fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in topoisomerase genes of Salmonella typhimurium isolates].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunchang; Pei, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiumei

    2004-09-01

    Mutations in topoisomerase genes were main cause of the resistence of Salmonella typhimurium to fluoroquinolone. The MICs of three Salmonella typhimurium isolates X2, X7, X11 to ciprofloxacin were above 32 microg/ml, 0.38 microg/ml and 0.023 microg/ml, respectively. The genetic alterations in four topoisomerase genes, gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE were detected by multiplex PCR amplimer conformation analysis in these three strains. X2 isolate showed both gyrA mutations (Ser83-->Phe, Asp87-->Asn) and parC mutation (Ser80-->Arg). X7 isolate showed a single gyrA mutation (Ser83-->Phe) and X11 isolate had no changes in all of the four quinolone resistance genes, gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. X7 isolate with a single gyrA mutation was less resistant to ciprofloxacin than X2 with double gyrA mutations and an additional parC mutation. GyrA and parC genes play important role of the resistance of Salmonella typhimurium to ciprofloxacin.

  14. MECP2 mutations in Malaysian Rett syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Fong, C B; Thong, M K; Sam, C K; Mohamed Noor, M N; Ariffin, R

    2009-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by normal neurological development followed by progressive developmental regression. The X-linked dominant inheritance of RS has been mapped to the gene that encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MECP2) at Xq28. In the present study, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) was used to detect mutations in the MECP2 gene in 20 Malaysian RS patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out to amplify the MECP2 coding exons 2, 3, and 4 in a total of eight reactions (exons 2, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 4c, 4d and 4e). Subsequently, PCR products were analysed by DHPLC. Mutations in the MECP2 gene were detected in 13 of the 20 (65 percent) RS patients. 11 patients had mutations in exons 3b and 4a and six patients had mutations in exon 4c. These mutations were mainly concentrated in the methyl-CpG-binding domain and the transcriptional-repression domain. Through the use of post-PCR high-performance liquid chromatography, 65 percent of 20 RS patients were found to have mutation(s) in the MECP2.

  15. Order Matters: The Order of Somatic Mutations Influences Cancer Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kent, David G; Green, Anthony R

    2017-04-03

    Cancers evolve as a consequence of multiple somatic lesions, with competition between subclones and sequential subclonal evolution. Some driver mutations arise either early or late in the evolution of different individual tumors, suggesting that the final malignant properties of a subclone reflect the sum of mutations acquired rather than the order in which they arose. However, very little is known about the cellular consequences of altering the order in which mutations are acquired. Recent studies of human myeloproliferative neoplasms show that the order in which individual mutations are acquired has a dramatic impact on the cell biological and molecular properties of tumor-initiating cells. Differences in clinical presentation, complications, and response to targeted therapy were all observed and implicate mutation order as an important player in cancer biology. These observations represent the first demonstration that the order of mutation acquisition influences stem and progenitor cell behavior and clonal evolution in any cancer. Thus far, the impact of different mutation orders has only been studied in hematological malignancies, and analogous studies of solid cancers are now required. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Mutation analysis of UBE3A in Angelman syndrome patients.

    PubMed Central

    Malzac, P; Webber, H; Moncla, A; Graham, J M; Kukolich, M; Williams, C; Pagon, R A; Ramsdell, L A; Kishino, T; Wagstaff, J

    1998-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is caused by chromosome 15q11-q13 deletions of maternal origin, by paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) 15, by imprinting defects, and by mutations in the UBE3A gene. UBE3A encodes a ubiquitin-protein ligase and shows brain-specific imprinting. Here we describe UBE3A coding-region mutations detected by SSCP analysis in 13 AS individuals or families. Two identical de novo 5-bp duplications in exon 16 were found. Among the other 11 unique mutations, 8 were small deletions or insertions predicted to cause frameshifts, 1 was a mutation to a stop codon, 1 was a missense mutation, and 1 was predicted to cause insertion of an isoleucine in the hect domain of the UBE3A protein, which functions in E2 binding and ubiquitin transfer. Eight of the cases were familial, and five were sporadic. In two familial cases and one sporadic case, mosaicism for UBE3A mutations was detected: in the mother of three AS sons, in the maternal grandfather of two AS first cousins, and in the mother of an AS daughter. The frequencies with which we detected mutations were 5 (14%) of 35 in sporadic cases and 8 (80%) of 10 in familial cases. PMID:9585605

  17. Characterization of resistance mutations against HCV ketoamide protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiao; Bogen, Stephane; Chase, Robert; Girijavallabhan, V; Guo, Zhuyan; Njoroge, F George; Prongay, Andrew; Saksena, Anil; Skelton, Angela; Xia, Ellen; Ralston, Robert

    2008-03-01

    An issue of clinical importance in the development of new antivirals for HCV is emergence of resistance. Several resistance loci to ketoamide inhibitors of the NS3/4A protease have been identified (residues V36, T54, R155, A156, and V170) by replicon and clinical studies. Using SCH 567312, a more potent protease inhibitor derived from SCH 503034 (boceprevir) series, we identified two new positions (Q41 and F43) that confer resistance to the ketoamide class. The catalytic efficiency of protease enzymes was not affected by most resistance mutations, whereas replicon fitness varied with specific mutations. SCH 503034 and another ketoamide inhibitor, VX-950 (telaprevir), showed moderate losses of activity against most resistance mutations (< or =10-fold); the highest resistance level was conferred by mutations at A156 locus. Although SCH 503034 and VX-950 bind similarly to the active site, differences in resistance level were observed with specific mutations. Changes at V36 and R155 had more severe impact on VX-950, whereas mutations at Q41, F43 and V170 conferred higher resistance to SCH 503034. Structural analysis of resistance mutations on inhibitor binding is discussed.

  18. Distinct Viral and Mutational Spectrum of Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mundo, Lucia; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Fuligni, Fabio; Rossi, Maura; Zairis, Sakellarios; Gazaneo, Sara; De Falco, Giulia; Lazzi, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Amato, Teresa; Marasco, Elena; Etebari, Maryam; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Ndede, Isaac; Patel, Kirtika; Chumba, David; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) is primarily found in children in equatorial regions and represents the first historical example of a virus-associated human malignancy. Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and MYC translocations are hallmarks of the disease, it is unclear whether other factors may contribute to its development. We performed RNA-Seq on 20 eBL cases from Uganda and showed that the mutational and viral landscape of eBL is more complex than previously reported. First, we found the presence of other herpesviridae family members in 8 cases (40%), in particular human herpesvirus 5 and human herpesvirus 8 and confirmed their presence by immunohistochemistry in the adjacent non-neoplastic tissue. Second, we identified a distinct latency program in EBV involving lytic genes in association with TCF3 activity. Third, by comparing the eBL mutational landscape with published data on sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL), we detected lower frequencies of mutations in MYC, ID3, TCF3 and TP53, and a higher frequency of mutation in ARID1A in eBL samples. Recurrent mutations in two genes not previously associated with eBL were identified in 20% of tumors: RHOA and cyclin F (CCNF). We also observed that polyviral samples showed lower numbers of somatic mutations in common altered genes in comparison to sBL specimens, suggesting dual mechanisms of transformation, mutation versus virus driven in sBL and eBL respectively. PMID:26468873

  19. Inferring Stabilizing Mutations from Protein Phylogenies: Application to Influenza Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Glassman, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    One selection pressure shaping sequence evolution is the requirement that a protein fold with sufficient stability to perform its biological functions. We present a conceptual framework that explains how this requirement causes the probability that a particular amino acid mutation is fixed during evolution to depend on its effect on protein stability. We mathematically formalize this framework to develop a Bayesian approach for inferring the stability effects of individual mutations from homologous protein sequences of known phylogeny. This approach is able to predict published experimentally measured mutational stability effects (ΔΔG values) with an accuracy that exceeds both a state-of-the-art physicochemical modeling program and the sequence-based consensus approach. As a further test, we use our phylogenetic inference approach to predict stabilizing mutations to influenza hemagglutinin. We introduce these mutations into a temperature-sensitive influenza virus with a defect in its hemagglutinin gene and experimentally demonstrate that some of the mutations allow the virus to grow at higher temperatures. Our work therefore describes a powerful new approach for predicting stabilizing mutations that can be successfully applied even to large, complex proteins such as hemagglutinin. This approach also makes a mathematical link between phylogenetics and experimentally measurable protein properties, potentially paving the way for more accurate analyses of molecular evolution. PMID:19381264

  20. Mapping Challenging Mutations by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Harold E.; Fabritius, Amy S.; Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Golden, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing provides a rapid and powerful method for identifying mutations on a global scale, and has spurred a renewed enthusiasm for classical genetic screens in model organisms. The most commonly characterized category of mutation consists of monogenic, recessive traits, due to their genetic tractability. Therefore, most of the mapping methods for mutation identification by whole-genome sequencing are directed toward alleles that fulfill those criteria (i.e., single-gene, homozygous variants). However, such approaches are not entirely suitable for the characterization of a variety of more challenging mutations, such as dominant and semidominant alleles or multigenic traits. Therefore, we have developed strategies for the identification of those classes of mutations, using polymorphism mapping in Caenorhabditis elegans as our model for validation. We also report an alternative approach for mutation identification from traditional recombinant crosses, and a solution to the technical challenge of sequencing sterile or terminally arrested strains where population size is limiting. The methods described herein extend the applicability of whole-genome sequencing to a broader spectrum of mutations, including classes that are difficult to map by traditional means. PMID:26945029