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Sample records for a3243g trnaleuuur mutation

  1. [Identification of an ideal noninvasive method to detect A3243G gene mutation in MELAS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-nan; Fang, Fang; Yang, Yan-ling; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Song-tao; Xu, Yu-feng; Pei, Pei; Yuan, Yun; Bu, Ding-fang; Qi, Yu

    2008-12-16

    To identify a better non-invasive method to detect the carrier of mitochondrial A3243G mutation, a cause of mitochondrial encephalopathy-lactic acidosis-stroke like episode (MELAS) syndrome. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood, urine, hair follicle, and saliva of 25 MELAS syndrome patients carrying A3243G mutation and their mothers and other maternal relatives, 33 persons in number, and the muscle tissues from 5 patients obtained by biopsy. A3243G mutation was detected by PCR-RFLP method, and the A3243G mutation ratio was identified by measuring the density of each band and calculation with the software AlphaEase 5.0. A3243G mutations were detected in all tissues of the 25 MELAS patients. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine was 62% +/- 9%, significantly higher than that in the blood [(36% +/- 10%), t = -11.13, P < 0.01]. A3243G mutations were detected in at least one tissue of the 28 maternal relatives. The A3243G mutation rates in their urine samples was 33.0% (5.0% - 70.4%), significantly higher than that in their blood samples [8.0% (0 - 33.3%), z = -4.197, P < 0.01]. There was no significant difference in A3243G mutation ratio among the samples of hair follicle, saliva, and blood. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine is significantly higher than those in blood samples of the patients and their maternal relatives. A noninvasive method, A3243G mutation ratio analysis of urine is superior to that in blood.

  2. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Weiduschat, Nora; Kaufmann, Petra; Mao, Xiangling; Engelstad, Kristin Marie; Hinton, Veronica; DiMauro, Salvatore; De Vivo, Darryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish cerebral metabolic features associated with the A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) and to assess their potential as prognostic biomarkers. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we investigated 135 clinically heterogeneous A3243G mutation carriers and 30 healthy volunteers (HVs) with 1H MRSI. Mutation carriers included 45 patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS); 11 participants who would develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (converters); and 79 participants who would not develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (nonconverters). The groups were compared with respect to MRSI metabolic indices of 1) anaerobic energy metabolism (lactate), 2) neuronal integrity (N-acetyl-l-aspartate [NAA]), 3) mitochondrial function (NAA; lactate), 4) cell energetics (total creatine), and 5) membrane biosynthesis and turnover (total choline [tCho]). Results: Consistent with prior studies, the patients with MELAS had higher lactate (p < 0.001) and lower NAA levels (p = 0.01) than HVs. Unexpectedly, converters showed higher NAA (p = 0.042), tCho (p = 0.004), and total creatine (p = 0.002), in addition to higher lactate levels (p = 0.032), compared with HVs. Compared with nonconverters, converters had higher tCho (p = 0.015). Clinically, converters and nonconverters did not differ at baseline. Lactate and tCho levels were reliable biomarkers for predicting the risk of individual mutation carriers to develop the MELAS phenotype. Conclusions: 1H MRSI assessment of cerebral metabolism in A3243G mutation carriers shows promise in identifying disease biomarkers as well as individuals at risk of developing the MELAS phenotype. PMID:24477106

  3. [Diabetes mellitus associated with the mitochondrial mutation A3243G: frequency and clinical presentation].

    PubMed

    Salles, João Eduardo N; Kalinin, Larissa Bresgunov; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta G; Kasamatsu, Teresa; Moisés, Regina S

    2007-06-01

    Maternal inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) has been related to an A to G transition in the mitochondrial RNA Leu (UUR) at base pair 3243. The prevalence of MIDD in the diabetes population ranges between 0.5-3.0% depending on the ethnic background. To examine the frequency and clinical features of diabetes associated with this mutation in Brazilian patients with glucose intolerance. The study population comprised: 78 type 1 diabetic subjects (group I), 148 patients with type 2 diabetes (group II), 15 patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes and hearing loss (group III) and 492 Japanese Brazilians with varying degrees of glucose intolerance. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes and the A3243G mutation was determined by PCR amplification and Apa 1 digestion. In some individuals DNA was also extracted from buccal mucosa and hair follicles. The 3243 bp mutation was found in three individuals, all from group III, resulting in a prevalence of 0.4%. These subjects had an early age of diagnosis of diabetes, low or normal body mass index and requirement of insulin therapy. In conclusion MIDD is rare in our population and should be investigate in patients with diabetes and deafness.

  4. Evaluation of systemic redox states in patients carrying the MELAS A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Masamichi; Arakawa, Kenichiro; Hamano, Tadanori; Nagata, Miwako; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Kuriyama, Masaru; Koga, Yasutoshi; Yoneda, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the change of systemic redox states in patients carrying the A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA (A3243G), we evaluated oxidative stress and antioxidant activity in the serum of patients. Oxidative stress and antioxidant activity in the serum samples obtained from 14 patients carrying A3243G and from 34 healthy controls were analyzed using the diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests, respectively. The mean d-ROMs level of all patients was significantly greater than that of the controls (p < 0.005), and the mean BAP/d-ROMs ratio of all patients was significantly lower than that of the controls (p < 0.02). In the patients with a history of stroke-like episodes (n = 10), both mean d-ROMs and BAP levels were increased compared with those of the controls (both p < 0.01). The mean BAP level of the patients without a history of stroke-like episodes (n = 4) was significantly decreased compared with that of the controls (p < 0.001), but the mean d-ROMs levels were not significantly different. d-ROMs and BAP tests indicated that patients carrying A3243G are always exposed to underlying oxidative stress, even at a remission state of stroke-like episodes. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Valproic acid aggravates epilepsy due to MELAS in a patient with an A3243G mutation of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Thajeb, Peterus

    2007-03-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common presentations of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). MELAS is typically caused by an A-to-G substitution at nucleotide position 3243 of mitochondrial DNA. Valproic acid, a common anticonvulsant, can actually increase the frequency of seizures in individuals with MELAS. Here, we report a single case-study of a 38-year-old man who presented with focal seizures and had MELAS Syndrome due to the A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation. Manifestation of epilepsia partialis continua was aggravated by use of valproic acid. Convulsions abated after discontinuation of valproic acid. Our experience suggests that valproic acid should be avoided for the treatment of epilepsy in individuals with mitochondrial disease.

  7. A pilot study of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in a sample of Croatian patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Martin-Kleiner, I; Pape-Medvidović, E; Pavlić-Renar, I; Metelko, Z; Kusec, R; Gabrilovac, J; Boranić, M

    2004-12-01

    In this work, patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic mothers were tested for the presence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G. This mutation is associated with the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes), diabetes and deafness. Twenty-two diabetic persons were screened. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes and from swabs of oral mucosa. The mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G was detected using PCR-RFLP test. The mutation was detected in oral mucosal DNA of two patients (but not from lymphocyte DNA). One patient was a man with hearing and visual impairments and proteinuria; the other was a woman having proteinuria but no hearing impairment. The mutation was not detectable in oral mucosal DNA from the control persons: 20 diabetic patients having diabetic fathers and 22 healthy, nondiabetic volunteers. The incidence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in this study of Croatian diabetic patients is in line with data in the literature.

  8. MELAS syndrome with mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene mutation in a Chinese family.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C C; Chen, R S; Chen, C M; Wang, H S; Lee, C C; Pang, C Y; Hsu, H S; Lee, H C; Wei, Y H

    1994-01-01

    The clinical features of a patient in a Chinese family with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome) are reported. The study revealed that hearing and visual impairments and miscarriages may be early clinical presentations in MELAS. A heteroplasmic A to G transition in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene was noted at the nucleotide pair 3243 in the mitochondrial DNA of muscle, blood, and hair follicles of the proband and his maternal relatives. Quantitative analysis of the mutated mitochondrial DNA revealed variable proportions in different tissues and subjects of maternal lineage in the family. Muscle tissue contained a higher proportion of the mutant mitochondria than other tissues examined. The function of the reproductive system of the proband seems to be impaired. In one clinically healthy sibling, the 3243rd point mutation was found in sperm mitochondrial DNA, although sperm motility was not affected. It seems that biochemical defects in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation are tissue specific expressions of the 3243rd point mutation in the mitochondrial DNA of the affected target tissues. Images PMID:8201329

  9. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in diabetes mellitus patients in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suijun; Wu, Songhua; Zheng, Taishan; Yang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaojing; Jia, Weiping; Xiang, Kunsan

    2013-12-01

    Mutations of mitochondrial DNA are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). The present case-control study aimed to investigate the mutations of mitochondrial DNA in DM patients of Chinese Han ethnicity. A total of 770 DM patients and 309 healthy control individuals were enrolled. The mitochondrial DNA was extracted from blood cells and analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. In the diabetes group, there were 13 (1.69%) individuals carrying the mt3243 A → G mutation while none of the healthy control had this mutation. Though the 14709, 3316, 3394, and 12026 mutation variants were identified in 9, 17, 18 and 28 in DM patients respectively, there were no significant differences compared with control group. And the 3256, 8296, 8344, 8363, 3426 and 12258 mutations were not detected in either group. In the diabetes group, two double mutations were identified: A3243G+T3394C and A3243G+A12026G. Our data suggested that mitochondrial gene tRNA(Leu(UUR)) 3243 A → G mutation may be one risk of prevalence of DM and associated with worse clinical status in Chinese Han population. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) C3275T, tRNAGln T4363C and tRNALys A8343G mutations may be associated with PCOS and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Zhang, Cai-Juan; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2018-02-05

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a very prevalent endocrine disease affecting reproductive women. Clinically, patients with this disorder are more vulnerable to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cardiovascular events, as well as metabolic syndrome (MetS). To date, the molecular mechanism underlying PCOS remains largely unknown. Previously, we showed that mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation was an important cause for PCOS. In the current study, we described the clinical and biochemical features of a three-generation pedigree with maternally transmitted MetS, combined with PCOS. A total of three matrilineal relatives exhibited MetS including obesity, high triglyceride (TG) and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, and hypertension. Whereas one patient from the third generation manifestated PCOS. Mutational analysis of the whole mitochondrial genes from the affected individuals identified a set of genetic variations belonging to East Asia haplogroup B4b1c. Among these variants, the homoplasmic C3275T mutation disrupted a highly evolutionary conserved base-pairing (28A-46C) on the variable region of tRNA Leu(UUR) , whereas the T4363C mutation created a new base-pairing (31T-37A) in the anticodon stem of tRNA Gln , furthermore, the A8343G mutation occurred at the very conserved position of tRNA Lys and may result the failure in mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) metabolism. Biochemical analysis revealed the deficiency in mitochondrial functions including lower levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), ATP production and mtDNA copy number, while a significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in polymononuclear leukocytes (PMNs) from the individuals carrying these mt-tRNA mutations, suggesting that these mutations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction that was responsible for the clinical phenotypes. Taken together, our data indicated that mt-tRNA mutations were associated with MetS and PCOS in this

  11. Pathology of mitochondria in MELAS syndrome: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Felczak, Paulina; Lewandowska, Eliza; Stępniak, Iwona; Ołdak, Monika; Pollak, Agnieszka; Lechowicz, Urszula; Pasennik, Elżbieta; Stępień, Tomasz; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa

    Ultrastructural changes in skeletal muscle biopsy in a 24-year-old female patient with clinically suspected mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome are presented. We observed proliferation and/or pleomorphism of mitochondria in skeletal muscle and smooth muscle cells of arterioles, as well as in pericytes of capillaries. Paracrystalline inclusions were found only in damaged mitochondria of skeletal muscle. Genetic testing revealed a point mutation in A3243G tRNALeu(UUR) typical for MELAS syndrome. We conclude that differentiated pathological changes of mitochondria in the studied types of cells may be associated with the different energy requirements of these cells.

  12. AB036. Analysis of human mitochondrial genome mutations of Vietnamese patients tentatively diagnosed with encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nghia, Phan Tuan; Thai, Trinh Hong; Hue, Truong Thi; Van Minh, Nguyen; Khanh, Phung Bao; Hiep, Tran Duc; Anh, Tran Kieu; Loan, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van, Nguyen Thi Hong; Anh, Pham Van; Hung, Cao Vu; Anh, Le Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial genome consists of 16,569 bp, and replicates independently from the nuclear genome. Mutations in mitochondrial genome are usually causative factors of various metabolic disorders, especially those of encephalomyopathy. DNA analysis is the most reliable method for detection of mitochondrial genome mutations, and accordingly an excellent diagnostic tool for mitochondrial mutation-related diseases. In this study, 19 different mitochondrial genome mutations including A3243G, A3251G, T3271C and T3291C (MELAS); A8344G, T8356C and G8363A (MERRF); G3460A, G11778A and T14484C (LHON); T8993G/C and T9176G (Leigh); A1555G (deafness) and A4225G, G4298A, T10010C, T14727C, T14728C, T14709C (encephalomyopathy in general) were analyzed using PCR-RFLP in combination with DNA sequencing. In addition, a real-time PCR method using locked nucleic acid (LNA) Taqman probe was set up for heteroplasmy determination. Screening of 283 tentatively diagnosed encephalomyopathy patients revealed 7 cases of A3243G, 1 case of G11778A, 1 case of A1555G, 1 case of A4225G, 1 case G4298A, and 1 case of 6 bp (ACTCCT/CTCCTA) deletion. Using the LNA Taqman probe real-time PCR, the heteroplasmy of some point mutations was determined and the results support a potential relationship between heteroplasmy level and severity of the disease.

  13. Mitochondrial diabetes: molecular mechanisms and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Maassen, J Antonie; 'T Hart, Leen M; Van Essen, Einar; Heine, Rob J; Nijpels, Giel; Jahangir Tafrechi, Roshan S; Raap, Anton K; Janssen, George M C; Lemkes, Herman H P J

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) associate with various disease states. A few mtDNA mutations strongly associate with diabetes, with the most common mutation being the A3243G mutation in the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNA(Leu,UUR) gene. This article describes clinical characteristics of mitochondrial diabetes and its molecular diagnosis. Furthermore, it outlines recent developments in the pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms leading to a diabetic state. A gradual development of pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction upon aging, rather than insulin resistance, is the main mechanism in developing glucose intolerance. Carriers of the A3243G mutation show during a hyperglycemic clamp at 10 mmol/l glucose a marked reduction in first- and second-phase insulin secretion compared with noncarriers. The molecular mechanism by which the A3243G mutation affects insulin secretion may involve an attenuation of cytosolic ADP/ATP levels leading to a resetting of the glucose sensor in the pancreatic beta-cell, such as in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY)-2 patients with mutations in glucokinase. Unlike in MODY2, which is a nonprogressive form of diabetes, mitochondrial diabetes does show a pronounced age-dependent deterioration of pancreatic function indicating involvement of additional processes. Furthermore, one would expect that all mtDNA mutations that affect ATP synthesis lead to diabetes. This is in contrast to clinical observations. The origin of the age-dependent deterioration of pancreatic function in carriers of the A3243G mutation and the contribution of ATP and other mitochondrion-derived factors such as reactive oxygen species to the development of diabetes is discussed.

  14. Beta-cell function in individuals carrying the mitochondrial tRNA leu (UUR) mutation.

    PubMed

    Salles, João Eduardo; Kasamatsu, Teresa S; Dib, Sérgio A; Moisés, Regina S

    2007-01-01

    To assess the beta-cell function in individuals with mitochondrial DNA A3243G mutation with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or diabetes mellitus (DM). Furthermore, in diabetic individuals, we evaluated the effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on insulin secretory response. Eight mutation-positive individuals with NGT (n = 4) or DM (n = 4) were studied. beta-Cell function was evaluated by C-peptide levels before and after a mixed liquid meal (Sustacal) challenge and by first-phase insulin response. Fasting and Sustacal-stimulated C-peptide levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients than that in controls (area under the curve: 104.1 +/- 75.7 vs 520.8 +/- 173.8, P = 0.001), whereas in individuals with NGT, this response was preserved (area under the curve: 537.8 +/- 74.3 vs 520.8 +/- 179.8, P = 0.87). The duration of diabetes was negatively correlated with fasting C-peptide levels (r = -0.961, P = 0.038). Among the 3 patients with residual insulin secretion, the short-term treatment with coenzyme Q10 (3 months) improved C-peptide levels in 2 of them. The first-phase insulin response was diminished in 2 individuals with NGT, the oldest ones. We showed an impaired insulin secretory capacity in individuals carrying the A3243G mutation, this possibly being the primary defect contributing to the development of DM. In addition, our data suggest that this could be a functional defect.

  15. When should MELAS (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes) be the diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo Soares; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a rare mitochondrial disorder. Diagnostic criteria for MELAS include typical manifestations of the disease: stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (laboratorial or histological) and known mitochondrial DNA gene mutations. Clinical features of MELAS are not necessarily uniform in the early stages of the disease, and correlations between clinical manifestations and physiopathology have not been fully elucidated. It is estimated that point mutations in the tRNALeu(UUR) gene of the DNAmt, mainly A3243G, are responsible for more of 80% of MELAS cases. Morphological changes seen upon muscle biopsy in MELAS include a substantive proportion of ragged red fibers (RRF) and the presence of vessels with a strong reaction for succinate dehydrogenase. In this review, we discuss mainly diagnostic criterion, clinical and laboratory manifestations, brain images, histology and molecular findings as well as some differential diagnoses and current treatments.

  16. Oligonucleotide gap-fill ligation for mutation detection and sequencing in situ

    PubMed Central

    Mignardi, Marco; Mezger, Anja; Qian, Xiaoyan; La Fleur, Linnea; Botling, Johan; Larsson, Chatarina; Nilsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics a great need exists for targeted in situ multiplex nucleic acid analysis as the mutational status can offer guidance for effective treatment. One well-established method uses padlock probes for mutation detection and multiplex expression analysis directly in cells and tissues. Here, we use oligonucleotide gap-fill ligation to further increase specificity and to capture molecular substrates for in situ sequencing. Short oligonucleotides are joined at both ends of a padlock gap probe by two ligation events and are then locally amplified by target-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) preserving spatial information. We demonstrate the specific detection of the A3243G mutation of mitochondrial DNA and we successfully characterize a single nucleotide variant in the ACTB mRNA in cells by in situ sequencing of RCA products generated by padlock gap-fill ligation. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of our assay, we show specific detection of a point mutation in the EGFR gene in fresh frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung cancer samples and confirm the detected mutation by in situ sequencing. This approach presents several advantages over conventional padlock probes allowing simpler assay design for multiplexed mutation detection to screen for the presence of mutations in clinically relevant mutational hotspots directly in situ. PMID:26240388

  17. Correction of the consequences of mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene causing the MELAS syndrome by tRNA import into mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Karicheva, Olga Z.; Kolesnikova, Olga A.; Schirtz, Tom; Vysokikh, Mikhail Y.; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Lombès, Anne; Boucheham, Abdeldjalil; Krasheninnikov, Igor A.; Martin, Robert P.; Entelis, Nina; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA are often associated with incurable human neuromuscular diseases. Among these mutations, an important number have been identified in tRNA genes, including 29 in the gene MT-TL1 coding for the tRNALeu(UUR). The m.3243A>G mutation was described as the major cause of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). This mutation was reported to reduce tRNALeu(UUR) aminoacylation and modification of its anti-codon wobble position, which results in a defective mitochondrial protein synthesis and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes. In the present study, we have tested whether the mitochondrial targeting of recombinant tRNAs bearing the identity elements for human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase can rescue the phenotype caused by MELAS mutation in human transmitochondrial cybrid cells. We demonstrate that nuclear expression and mitochondrial targeting of specifically designed transgenic tRNAs results in an improvement of mitochondrial translation, increased levels of mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes subunits, and significant rescue of respiration. These findings prove the possibility to direct tRNAs with changed aminoacylation specificities into mitochondria, thus extending the potential therapeutic strategy of allotopic expression to address mitochondrial disorders. PMID:21724600

  18. Correction of the consequences of mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene causing the MELAS syndrome by tRNA import into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Karicheva, Olga Z; Kolesnikova, Olga A; Schirtz, Tom; Vysokikh, Mikhail Y; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Lombès, Anne; Boucheham, Abdeldjalil; Krasheninnikov, Igor A; Martin, Robert P; Entelis, Nina; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA are often associated with incurable human neuromuscular diseases. Among these mutations, an important number have been identified in tRNA genes, including 29 in the gene MT-TL1 coding for the tRNA(Leu(UUR)). The m.3243A>G mutation was described as the major cause of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). This mutation was reported to reduce tRNA(Leu(UUR)) aminoacylation and modification of its anti-codon wobble position, which results in a defective mitochondrial protein synthesis and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes. In the present study, we have tested whether the mitochondrial targeting of recombinant tRNAs bearing the identity elements for human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase can rescue the phenotype caused by MELAS mutation in human transmitochondrial cybrid cells. We demonstrate that nuclear expression and mitochondrial targeting of specifically designed transgenic tRNAs results in an improvement of mitochondrial translation, increased levels of mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes subunits, and significant rescue of respiration. These findings prove the possibility to direct tRNAs with changed aminoacylation specificities into mitochondria, thus extending the potential therapeutic strategy of allotopic expression to address mitochondrial disorders.

  19. Whole mitochondrial genome screening in maternally inherited non-syndromic hearing impairment using a microarray resequencing mitochondrial DNA chip.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Marianne; Marlin, Sandrine; Jonard, Laurence; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Baulande, Sylvain; Pierron, Denis; Lacombe, Didier; Duriez, Françoise; Francannet, Christine; Mom, Thierry; Journel, Hubert; Catros, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Faivre, Laurence; Duvillard, Christian; Couderc, Remy; Garabedian, Eréa-Noël; Petit, Christine; Feldmann, Delphine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss either as primary or as predisposing factors. As only a part of the mitochondrial genome is usually explored in deafness, its prevalence is probably under-estimated. Among 1350 families with non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss collected through a French collaborative network, we selected 29 large families with a clear maternal lineage and screened them for known mtDNA mutations in 12S rRNA, tRNASer(UCN) and tRNALeu(UUR) genes. When no mutation could be identified, a whole mitochondrial genome screening was performed, using a microarray resequencing chip: the MitoChip version 2.0 developed by Affymetrix Inc. Known mtDNA mutations was found in nine of the 29 families, which are described in the article: five with A1555G, two with the T7511C, one with 7472insC and one with A3243G mutation. In the remaining 20 families, the resequencing Mitochip detected 258 mitochondrial homoplasmic variants and 107 potentially heteroplasmic variants. Controls were made by direct sequencing on selected fragments and showed a high sensibility of the MitoChip but a low specificity, especially for heteroplasmic variations. An original analysis on the basis of species conservation, frequency and phylogenetic investigation was performed to select the more probably pathogenic variants. The entire genome analysis allowed us to identify five additional families with a putatively pathogenic mitochondrial variant: T669C, C1537T, G8078A, G12236A and G15077A. These results indicate that the new MitoChip platform is a rapid and valuable tool for identification of new mtDNA mutations in deafness.

  20. Two new mutations in the MT-TW gene leading to the disruption of the secondary structure of the tRNA(Trp) in patients with Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Chamkha, Imen; Kammoun, Fatma; Kammoun, Thouraya; Aloulou, Hajer; Hachicha, Mongia; Triki, Chahnez; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2009-07-01

    Leigh syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder occurring in infancy and childhood characterized in most cases by a psychomotor retardation, optic atrophy, ataxia, dystonia, failure to thrive, seizures and respiratory failure. In this study, we performed a systematic sequence analysis of mitochondrial genes associated with LS in Tunisian patients. We sequenced the encoded complex I units: ND2, ND3, ND4, ND5 and ND6 genes and the mitochondrial ATPase 6, tRNA(Val), tRNA(Leu(UUR)), tRNA(Trp) and tRNA(Lys) genes in 10 unrelated patients with Leigh syndrome. We revealed the presence of 34 reported polymorphisms, nine novel nucleotide variants and two new mutations (T5523G and A5559G) in the tested patients. These two mutations were localized in two conserved regions of the tRNA(Trp) and affect, respectively, the D-stem and the T-stem of the mitochondrial tRNA leading to a disruption of the secondary structure of this tRNA. SSP-PCR analysis showed that the T5523G and A5559G mutations were present with respective heteroplasmic rates of 66% and 43 %. We report here the first mutational screening of mitochondrial mutations in Tunisian patients with Leigh syndrome which described two novel mutations associated with this disorder.

  1. Screening of effective pharmacological treatments for MELAS syndrome using yeasts, fibroblasts and cybrid models of the disease.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Moñino, Irene Domínguez; Pereira-Arenas, Sheila; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Cotán, David; De la Mata, Mario; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; De Miguel, Manuel; Bautista Lorite, Juan; Rivas Infante, Eloy; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Navas, Plácido; Jackson, Sandra; Francisci, Silvia; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2012-11-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease most usually caused by point mutations in tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Approximately 80% of cases of MELAS syndrome are associated with a m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR). Currently, no effective treatments are available for this chronic progressive disorder. Treatment strategies in MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases consist of several drugs that diminish the deleterious effects of the abnormal respiratory chain function, reduce the presence of toxic agents or correct deficiencies in essential cofactors. We evaluated the effectiveness of some common pharmacological agents that have been utilized in the treatment of MELAS, in yeast, fibroblast and cybrid models of the disease. The yeast model harbouring the A14G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) gene, which is equivalent to the A3243G mutation in humans, was used in the initial screening. Next, the most effective drugs that were able to rescue the respiratory deficiency in MELAS yeast mutants were tested in fibroblasts and cybrid models of MELAS disease. According to our results, supplementation with riboflavin or coenzyme Q(10) effectively reversed the respiratory defect in MELAS yeast and improved the pathologic alterations in MELAS fibroblast and cybrid cell models. Our results indicate that cell models have great potential for screening and validating the effects of novel drug candidates for MELAS treatment and presumably also for other diseases with mitochondrial impairment. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Screening of effective pharmacological treatments for MELAS syndrome using yeasts, fibroblasts and cybrid models of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Moñino, Irene Domínguez; Pereira-Arenas, Sheila; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Cotán, David; De la Mata, Mario; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; De Miguel, Manuel; Bautista Lorite, Juan; Rivas Infante, Eloy; Álvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Navas, Plácido; Jackson, Sandra; Francisci, Silvia; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease most usually caused by point mutations in tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Approximately 80% of cases of MELAS syndrome are associated with a m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR). Currently, no effective treatments are available for this chronic progressive disorder. Treatment strategies in MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases consist of several drugs that diminish the deleterious effects of the abnormal respiratory chain function, reduce the presence of toxic agents or correct deficiencies in essential cofactors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We evaluated the effectiveness of some common pharmacological agents that have been utilized in the treatment of MELAS, in yeast, fibroblast and cybrid models of the disease. The yeast model harbouring the A14G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) gene, which is equivalent to the A3243G mutation in humans, was used in the initial screening. Next, the most effective drugs that were able to rescue the respiratory deficiency in MELAS yeast mutants were tested in fibroblasts and cybrid models of MELAS disease. KEY RESULTS According to our results, supplementation with riboflavin or coenzyme Q10 effectively reversed the respiratory defect in MELAS yeast and improved the pathologic alterations in MELAS fibroblast and cybrid cell models. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate that cell models have great potential for screening and validating the effects of novel drug candidates for MELAS treatment and presumably also for other diseases with mitochondrial impairment. PMID:22747838

  3. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in Patients With MELAS.

    PubMed

    Sproule, Douglas M; Kaufmann, Petra; Engelstad, Kristen; Starc, Thomas J; Hordof, Allan J; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2007-11-01

    Tissues with high energy demands, such as the heart, are susceptible to the effects of mitochondrial DNA point mutations. To investigate the frequency of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome among a phenotypically and genotypically homogeneous cohort of patients with MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) and the A3243G mutation most commonly associated with MELAS syndrome. Survey. The Pediatric Neuromuscular Disease Center at Columbia University. Patients Thirty patients with the A3243G mutation and MELAS syndrome enrolled in a clinical trial to assess the effect of dichloroacetate on neurologic symptoms. Medical histories and electrocardiograms were reviewed and DNA samples from fibroblasts, urine and cheek epithelial cells, leukocytes, and hair were analyzed to determine mitochondrial mutation abundance and estimate total mutation burden. Four of 30 patients (13%) had a clinical history of, or electrocardiographic findings consistent with, WPW syndrome. In 2 patients, WPW syndrome preceded MELAS syndrome by 15 and 21 years. The tissue burden of mutant mitochondria was similar in patients with (49.4%) and without (39.1%) WPW syndrome. The prevalence of WPW syndrome among patients with MELAS syndrome and the A3243G mutation appears much higher than in the normal population and may become manifest earlier than neurologic symptoms. Patients with WPW syndrome and neurologic abnormalities consistent with MELAS syndrome, such as seizures, deafness, short stature, and stroke, should be screened for the A3243G mutation. Moreover, patients with MELAS syndrome should be monitored for cardiac anomalies including cardiomyopathy and WPW syndrome.

  4. Kidney involvement in MELAS syndrome: Description of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Alcubilla-Prats, Pau; Solé, Manel; Botey, Albert; Grau, Josep Maria; Garrabou, Glòria; Poch, Esteban

    2017-04-21

    MELAS syndrome -myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes- is a maternally-inherited mitochondrial cytopathy related to several mitochondrial DNA mutations, with the A3243G mutation in tRNA Leu gene being the most frequent of them. Apart from its typical symptomatology, patients usually exhibit a maternally-inherited history of neurosensory deafness and insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Recent studies have shown that few patients carrying a A3243G mutation also suffer from renal dysfunction, usually in form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In this study we examine kidney involvement in 2 unrelated patients with a A3243G mutation by genetic testing. Both have a maternally-inherited neurosensory deafness and insulin-dependent T2DM. A renal biopsy was performed in both patients. One patient developed nephrotic proteinuria and renal insufficiency, with FSGS findings being observed in the kidney biopsy, whereas the other suffered from mild proteinuria and renal insufficiency, with non-specific glomerular changes. The presence of FSGS or other kidney involvement accompanied by hereditary neurosensory deafness and T2DM could be suggestive of a A3243G tRNA Leu mutation and should prompt a genetic testing and an evaluation of potential extrarenal involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: maternally inherited diabetes and deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Maassen JA. Mutation in mitochondrial tRNA(Leu)(UUR) gene in a large pedigree with maternally transmitted type II diabetes mellitus ... are genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What ...

  6. Mechanisms of viral mutation.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Domingo-Calap, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    The remarkable capacity of some viruses to adapt to new hosts and environments is highly dependent on their ability to generate de novo diversity in a short period of time. Rates of spontaneous mutation vary amply among viruses. RNA viruses mutate faster than DNA viruses, single-stranded viruses mutate faster than double-strand virus, and genome size appears to correlate negatively with mutation rate. Viral mutation rates are modulated at different levels, including polymerase fidelity, sequence context, template secondary structure, cellular microenvironment, replication mechanisms, proofreading, and access to post-replicative repair. Additionally, massive numbers of mutations can be introduced by some virus-encoded diversity-generating elements, as well as by host-encoded cytidine/adenine deaminases. Our current knowledge of viral mutation rates indicates that viral genetic diversity is determined by multiple virus- and host-dependent processes, and that viral mutation rates can evolve in response to specific selective pressures.

  7. Mutational landscape of yeast mutator strains.

    PubMed

    Serero, Alexandre; Jubin, Claire; Loeillet, Sophie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Nicolas, Alain G

    2014-02-04

    The acquisition of mutations is relevant to every aspect of genetics, including cancer and evolution of species on Darwinian selection. Genome variations arise from rare stochastic imperfections of cellular metabolism and deficiencies in maintenance genes. Here, we established the genome-wide spectrum of mutations that accumulate in a WT and in nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutator strains deficient for distinct genome maintenance processes: pol32Δ and rad27Δ (replication), msh2Δ (mismatch repair), tsa1Δ (oxidative stress), mre11Δ (recombination), mec1Δ tel1Δ (DNA damage/S-phase checkpoints), pif1Δ (maintenance of mitochondrial genome and telomere length), cac1Δ cac3Δ (nucleosome deposition), and clb5Δ (cell cycle progression). This study reveals the diversity, complexity, and ultimate unique nature of each mutational spectrum, composed of punctual mutations, chromosomal structural variations, and/or aneuploidies. The mutations produced in clb5Δ/CCNB1, mec1Δ/ATR, tel1Δ/ATM, and rad27Δ/FEN1 strains extensively reshape the genome, following a trajectory dependent on previous events. It comprises the transmission of unstable genomes that lead to colony mosaicisms. This comprehensive analytical approach of mutator defects provides a model to understand how genome variations might accumulate during clonal evolution of somatic cell populations, including tumor cells.

  8. Renal involvement in MELAS syndrome - a series of 5 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Seidowsky, Alexandre; Hoffmann, Maxime; Glowacki, François; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Devaux, Jean-Philippe; de Sainte Foy, Celia Lessore; Provot, François; Gheerbrant, Jean-Dominique; Hummel, Aurelie; Hazzan, Marc; Dracon, Michel; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Copin, Marie-Christine; Noël, Christian; Buob, David

    2013-12-01

    Renal dysfunction is increasingly recognized as a potential clinical feature of mitochondrial cytopathies such as mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lacticacidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome. Five cases of MELAS syndrome with renal involvement from 4 unrelated families are presented in this case series. Three of the 5 patients had a history of maternally-inherited diabetes and/or deafness. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and arteriolar hyaline thickening were the most striking findings on renal biopsy. In addition to clinical presentation with the typical symptoms of MELAS syndrome, genetic testing in these patients identified the A3243G point mutation in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The diagnosis of MELAS syndrome was thus considered to be unequivocal. The incidence of kidney disease in MELAS syndrome may be underestimated although a study is required to investigate this hypothesis. As the A3243G mtDNA mutation leads to a progressive adult-onset form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), screening for the MELAS A3243G mtDNA mutation should therefore be performed especially in patients with maternally-inherited diabetes or hearing loss presenting with FSGS.

  9. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mutations can make profound impact on the evolution and improvement of a self-pollinated crop such as lettuce. Since it is nontransgenic, mutation breeding is more acceptable to consumers. Combined with genomic advances in new technologies like TILLING, mutagenesis is becoming an even more powerfu...

  10. Genomic mutation consequence calculator.

    PubMed

    Major, John E

    2007-11-15

    The genomic mutation consequence calculator (GMCC) is a tool that will reliably and quickly calculate the consequence of arbitrary genomic mutations. GMCC also reports supporting annotations for the specified genomic region. The particular strength of the GMCC is it works in genomic space, not simply in spliced transcript space as some similar tools do. Within gene features, GMCC can report on the effects on splice site, UTR and coding regions in all isoforms affected by the mutation. A considerable number of genomic annotations are also reported, including: genomic conservation score, known SNPs, COSMIC mutations, disease associations and others. The manual interface also offers link outs to various external databases and resources. In batch mode, GMCC returns a csv file which can easily be parsed by the end user. GMCC is intended to support the many tumor resequencing efforts, but can be useful to any study investigating genomic mutations.

  11. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  12. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  13. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Rates of spontaneous mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, J W; Charlesworth, B; Charlesworth, D; Crow, J F

    1998-01-01

    Rates of spontaneous mutation per genome as measured in the laboratory are remarkably similar within broad groups of organisms but differ strikingly among groups. Mutation rates in RNA viruses, whose genomes contain ca. 10(4) bases, are roughly 1 per genome per replication for lytic viruses and roughly 0.1 per genome per replication for retroviruses and a retrotransposon. Mutation rates in microbes with DNA-based chromosomes are close to 1/300 per genome per replication; in this group, therefore, rates per base pair vary inversely and hugely as genome sizes vary from 6 x 10(3) to 4 x 10(7) bases or base pairs. Mutation rates in higher eukaryotes are roughly 0.1-100 per genome per sexual generation but are currently indistinguishable from 1/300 per cell division per effective genome (which excludes the fraction of the genome in which most mutations are neutral). It is now possible to specify some of the evolutionary forces that shape these diverse mutation rates. PMID:9560386

  15. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  16. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viruses (specifically in riboviruses rather than retroviruses) was constrained by the quality and quantity of available measurements and by the lack of a specific theoretical framework for converting mutation frequencies into mutation rates in this group of organisms. Here, we describe a simple relation between ribovirus mutation frequencies and mutation rates, apply it to the best (albeit far from satisfactory) available data, and observe a central value for the mutation rate per genome per replication of μg ≈ 0.76. (The rate per round of cell infection is twice this value or about 1.5.) This value is so large, and ribovirus genomes are so informationally dense, that even a modest increase extinguishes the population. PMID:10570172

  17. Mutated hilltop inflation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Barun Kumar

    2018-05-01

    In this work we re-investigate pros and cons of mutated hilltop inflation. Applying Hamilton-Jacobi formalism we solve inflationary dynamics and find that inflation goes on along the {W}_{-1} branch of the Lambert function. Depending on the model parameter mutated hilltop model renders two types of inflationary solutions: one corresponds to small inflaton excursion during observable inflation and the other describes large field inflation. The inflationary observables from curvature perturbation are in tune with the current data for a wide range of the model parameter. The small field branch predicts negligible amount of tensor to scalar ratio r˜ O(10^{-4}), while the large field sector is capable of generating high amplitude for tensor perturbations, r˜ O(10^{-1}). Also, the spectral index is almost independent of the model parameter along with a very small negative amount of scalar running. Finally we find that the mutated hilltop inflation closely resembles the α -attractor class of inflationary models in the limit of α φ ≫ 1.

  18. Founder Mutations in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue, Soufir et al. report a founder mutation in the XPC DNA repair gene in 74% of families with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in the Maghreb region (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia) of northern Africa. These patients have a high frequency of skin cancer. The presence of this founder mutation provides an opportunity for genetic counseling and early diagnosis of XP. PMID:20463673

  19. Mutation induction by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, J.; Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.

    1994-10-01

    Mutation induction by heavy ions is compared in yeast and mammalian cells. Since mutants can only be recovered in survivors the influence of inactivation cross sections has to be taken into account. It is shown that both the size of the sensitive cellular site as well as track structure play an important role. Another parameter which influences the probability of mutation induction is repair: Contrary to naive assumptions primary radiation damage does not directly lead to mutations but requires modification to reconstitute the genetic machinery so that mutants can survive. The molecular structure of mutations was analyzed after exposure to deuterons by amplification with the aid of polymerase chain reaction. The results-although preliminary-demonstrate that even with densely ionizing particles a large fraction does not carry big deletions which suggests that point mutations may also be induced by heavy ions.

  20. Monoallelic mutation analysis (MAMA) for identifying germline mutations.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, N; Leach, F S; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    1995-09-01

    Dissection of germline mutations in a sensitive and specific manner presents a continuing challenge. In dominantly inherited diseases, mutations occur in only one allele and are often masked by the normal allele. Here we report the development of a sensitive and specific diagnostic strategy based on somatic cell hybridization termed MAMA (monoallelic mutation analysis). We have demonstrated the utility of this strategy in two different hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, one caused by a defective tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 5 (familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP) and the other caused by a defective mismatch repair gene on chromosome 2 (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, HNPCC).

  1. Application of molecular imaging combined with genetic screening in diagnosing MELAS, diabetes and recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhiping, W; Quwen, L; Hai, Z; Jian, Z; Peiyi, G

    2016-01-01

    We report molecular imaging combined with gene diagnosis in a family with 7 members who carried an A3243G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA and p.Thr 137 Met in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene presented with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes, and recurrent pancreatitis. DNA sequencing was used to detect and validate mitochondrial DNA and PRSS1. We also verified that mitochondrial heterozygous mutations and c.410 C>T mutation causing p.Thr 137 Met could be detected in oral epithelial cells or in urine sediment cells. In addition, molecular imaging was carried out in the affected family members. In this pedigree, MELAS syndrome accompanied by pancreatitis was an important clinical feature, followed by diabetes. Heteroplasmy of the mtDNA A3243G and c.410 C>T mutation of PRSS1 was found in all tissue samples of these patients, but no mutations were found in 520 normal control and normal individuals of the family. However, based on molecular imaging observations, patients with relatively higher lactate/pyruvate levels had more typical and more severe symptoms, particularly those of pancreatic disease (diabetes or pancreatitis). MELAS syndrome may be associated with pancreatitis. For the diagnosis, it is more reasonable to perform molecular imaging combined with gene diagnosis.

  2. Parkinsonism Associated with Glucocerebrosidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Min; Lee, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher's disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). There is increasing evidence that GBA mutations are a genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report herein a family of Koreans exhibiting parkinsonism-associated GBA mutations. Case Report A 44-year-old woman suffering from slowness and paresthesia of the left arm for the previous 1.5years, visited our hospital to manage known invasive ductal carcinoma. During a preoperative evaluation, she was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease and double mutations of S271G and R359X in GBA. Parkinsonian features including low amplitude postural tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and shuffling gait were observed. Genetic analysis also revealed that her older sister, who had also been diagnosed with PD and had been taking dopaminergic drugs for 8-years, also possessed a heterozygote R359X mutation in GBA. 18F-fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane positron-emission tomography in these patients revealed decreased uptake of dopamine transporter in the posterior portion of the bilateral putamen. Conclusions This case study demonstrates Korean familial cases of PD with heterozygote mutation of GBA, further supporting the association between PD and GBA mutation. PMID:21779299

  3. LNK mutations and myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    McMullin, Mary Frances; Cario, Holger

    2016-02-01

    The lymphocyte adaptor protein (LNK) is one of a family of adaptor proteins involved cell signaling and control of B cell populations. It has a critical role in regulation of signaling in hematopoiesis. Lnk negatively regulates cytokine initiated cell signaling and it functions as a negative regulator of the mutant protein in myeloproliferative neoplasms JAK2V617F. A number of mutations in LNK have been described in a variety of myeloproliferative neoplasms some of which have been demonstrated to cause increased cellular proliferation. The majority of mutations occur in exon 2. In a small number of cases idiopathic erythrocytosis with subnormal erythropoietin levels LNK mutations have been found which may account for the clinical phenotype. Thus investigation for LNK mutations should be considered in the investigation of idiopathic erythrocytosis and perhaps other myeloproliferative neoplasms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  5. Mutation testing in Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ellis, P E; Dawson, M; Dixon, M J

    2002-12-01

    To report on a study where 97 subjects were screened for mutations in the Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) gene TCOF1. Ninety-seven subjects with a clinical diagnosis of TCS were screened for potential mutations in TCOF1, by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. In those subjects where potential mutations were detected, sequence analysis was performed to determine the site and type of mutation present. Thirty-six TCS-specific mutations are reported including 27 deletions, six point mutations, two splice junction mutations, and one insertion/deletion. This brings the total number of mutations reported to date to 105. The importance of detection of these mutations is mainly in postnatal diagnosis and genetic counselling. Knowledge of the family specific mutation may also be used in prenatal diagnosis to confirm whether the foetus is affected or not, and give the parents the choice of whether to continue with the pregnancy.

  6. Glucocerebrosidase Mutations in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Grace; deSouza, Ruth-Mary; Balestrino, Roberta; Schapira, Anthony H

    2017-01-01

    Following the discovery of a higher than expected incidence of Parkinson Disease (PD) in Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder, mutations in the glucocerebrocidase (GBA) gene, which encodes a lysosomal enzyme involved in sphingolipid degradation were explored in the context of idiopathic PD. GBA mutations are now known to be the single largest risk factor for development of idiopathic PD. Clinically, on imaging and pharmacologically, GBA PD is almost identical to idiopathic PD, other than certain features that can be identified in the specialist research setting but not in routine clinical practice. In patients with a known GBA mutation, it is possible to monitor for prodromal signs of PD. The clinical similarity with idiopathic PD and the chance to identify PD at a pre-clinical stage provides a unique opportunity to research therapeutic options for early PD, before major irreversible neurodegeneration occurs. However, to date, the molecular mechanisms which lead to this increased PD risk in GBA mutation carriers are not fully elucidated. Experimental models to define the molecular mechanisms and test therapeutic options include cell culture, transgenic mice and other in vivo models amenable to genetic manipulation, such as drosophilia. Some key pathological pathways of interest in the context of GBA mutations include alpha synuclein aggregation, lysosomal-autophagy axis changes and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Therapeutic agents that exploit these pathways are being developed and include the small molecule chaperone Ambroxol. This review aims to summarise the main features of GBA-PD and provide insights into the pathological relevance of GBA mutations on molecular pathways and the therapeutic implications for PD resulting from investigation of the role of GBA in PD.

  7. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  8. Adaptive mutation: has the unicorn landed?

    PubMed

    Foster, P L

    1998-04-01

    Reversion of an episomal Lac- allele during lactose selection has been studied as a model for adaptive mutation. Although recent results show that the mutations that arise during selection are not "adaptive" in the original sense, the mutagenic mechanism that produces these mutations may nonetheless be of evolutionary significance. In addition, a transient mutational state induced in a subpopulation of starving cells could provide a species with a mechanism for adaptive evolution.

  9. Adaptive mutation: has the unicorn landed?

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P L

    1998-01-01

    Reversion of an episomal Lac- allele during lactose selection has been studied as a model for adaptive mutation. Although recent results show that the mutations that arise during selection are not "adaptive" in the original sense, the mutagenic mechanism that produces these mutations may nonetheless be of evolutionary significance. In addition, a transient mutational state induced in a subpopulation of starving cells could provide a species with a mechanism for adaptive evolution. PMID:9560365

  10. Mutation rate evolution in replicator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I Scholes

    2012-11-01

    The mutation rate of an organism is itself evolvable. In stable environments, if faithful replication is costless, theory predicts that mutation rates will evolve to zero. However, positive mutation rates can evolve in novel or fluctuating environments, as analytical and empirical studies have shown. Previous work on this question has focused on environments that fluctuate independently of the evolving population. Here we consider fluctuations that arise from frequency-dependent selection in the evolving population itself. We investigate how the dynamics of competing traits can induce selective pressure on the rates of mutation between these traits. To address this question, we introduce a theoretical framework combining replicator dynamics and adaptive dynamics. We suppose that changes in mutation rates are rare, compared to changes in the traits under direct selection, so that the expected evolutionary trajectories of mutation rates can be obtained from analysis of pairwise competition between strains of different rates. Depending on the nature of frequency-dependent trait dynamics, we demonstrate three possible outcomes of this competition. First, if trait frequencies are at a mutation-selection equilibrium, lower mutation rates can displace higher ones. Second, if trait dynamics converge to a heteroclinic cycle-arising, for example, from "rock-paper-scissors" interactions-mutator strains succeed against non-mutators. Third, in cases where selection alone maintains all traits at positive frequencies, zero and nonzero mutation rates can coexist indefinitely. Our second result suggests that relatively high mutation rates may be observed for traits subject to cyclical frequency-dependent dynamics.

  11. Unusual occurrence of intestinal pseudo obstruction in a patient with maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) and favorable outcome with coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Bergamin, Carla S; Rolim, Luiz Clemente; Dib, Sergio A; Moisés, Regina S

    2008-11-01

    Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) has been related to an A to G transition in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu (UUR) gene at the base pair 3243. This subtype of diabetes is characterized by maternal transmission, young age at onset and bilateral hearing impairment. Besides diabetes and deafness, the main diagnostic features, a wide range of multisystemic symptoms may be associated with the A3243G mutation. Organs that are most metabolically active, such as muscles, myocardium, retina, cochlea, kidney and brain are frequently affected. Gastrointestinal tract symptoms are also common in patients with mitochondrial disease and constipation and diarrhea are the most frequent manifestations. However, there are few prior reports of intestinal pseudo obstruction in MIDD patients. Here we report the case of a patient with MIDD associated with the mtDNA A3243G mutation who developed chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction, and the introduction of Coenzyme Q10 as adjunctive therapy led to a solution of the pseudo obstruction.

  12. WRN Mutation Update: Mutation Spectrum, Patient Registries, and Translational Prospects.

    PubMed

    Yokote, Koutaro; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Lee, Lin; Eirich, Katharina; Takemoto, Minoru; Watanabe, Aki; Koizumi, Naoko; Lessel, Davor; Mori, Takayasu; Hisama, Fuki M; Ladd, Paula D; Angle, Brad; Baris, Hagit; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Ozturk, Sukru; Chateau, Antoinette; Deguchi, Kentaro; Easwar, T K M; Federico, Antonio; Fox, Amy; Grebe, Theresa A; Hay, Beverly; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Seiter, Karen; Streeten, Elizabeth; Piña-Aguilar, Raul E; Poke, Gemma; Poot, Martin; Posmyk, Renata; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Schindler, Detlev; Oshima, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of adult onset phenotypes consistent with an acceleration of intrinsic biological aging. It is caused by pathogenic variants in the WRN gene, which encodes a multifunctional nuclear protein with exonuclease and helicase activities. WRN protein is thought to be involved in optimization of various aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA repair, recombination, replication, and transcription. In this update, we summarize a total of 83 different WRN mutations, including eight previously unpublished mutations identified by the International Registry of Werner Syndrome (Seattle, WA) and the Japanese Werner Consortium (Chiba, Japan), as well as 75 mutations already reported in the literature. The Seattle International Registry recruits patients from all over the world to investigate genetic causes of a wide variety of progeroid syndromes in order to contribute to the knowledge of basic mechanisms of human aging. Given the unusually high prevalence of WS patients and heterozygous carriers in Japan, the major goal of the Japanese Consortium is to develop effective therapies and to establish management guidelines for WS patients in Japan and elsewhere. This review will also discuss potential translational approaches to this disorder, including those currently under investigation. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  13. WRN Mutation Update: Mutation Spectrum, Patient Registries, and Translational Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Koutaro; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Lee, Lin; Eirich, Katharina; Takemoto, Minoru; Watanabe, Aki; Koizumi, Naoko; Lessel, Davor; Mori, Takayasu; Hisama, Fuki M.; Ladd, Paula D.; Angle, Brad; Baris, Hagit; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Ozturk, Sukru; Chateau, Antoinette; Deguchi, Kentaro; Easwar, T.K.M; Federico, Antonio; Fox, Amy; Grebe, Theresa A.; Hay, Beverly; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Seiter, Karen; Streeten, Elizabeth; Piña-Aguilar, Raul E.; Poke, Gemma; Poot, Martin; Posmyk, Renata; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Schindler, Detlev; Oshima, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of adult onset phenotypes consistent with an acceleration of intrinsic biological aging. It is caused by pathogenic variants in the WRN gene, which encodes a multifunctional nuclear protein with exonuclease and helicase activities. WRN protein is thought to be involved in optimization of various aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA repair, recombination, replication, and transcription. In this update, we summarize a total of 83 different WRN mutations, including eight previously unpublished mutations identified by the International Registry of Werner Syndrome (Seattle, WA) and the Japanese Werner Consortium (Chiba, Japan), as well as 75 mutations already reported in the literature. The Seattle International Registry recruits patients from all over the world to investigate genetic causes of a wide variety of progeroid syndromes in order to contribute to the knowledge of basic mechanisms of human aging. Given the unusually high prevalence of WS patients and heterozygous carriers in Japan, the major goal of the Japanese Consortium is to develop effective therapies and to establish management guidelines for WS patients in Japan and elsewhere. This review will also discuss potential translational approaches to this disorder, including those currently under investigation. PMID:27667302

  14. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  15. TCOF1 mutation database: novel mutation in the alternatively spliced exon 6A and update in mutation nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Splendore, Alessandra; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Masotti, Cibele; Morganti, Lucas S C; Passos-Bueno, M Rita

    2005-05-01

    Recently, a novel exon was described in TCOF1 that, although alternatively spliced, is included in the major protein isoform. In addition, most published mutations in this gene do not conform to current mutation nomenclature guidelines. Given these observations, we developed an online database of TCOF1 mutations in which all the reported mutations are renamed according to standard recommendations and in reference to the genomic and novel cDNA reference sequences (www.genoma.ib.usp.br/TCOF1_database). We also report in this work: 1) results of the first screening for large deletions in TCOF1 by Southern blot in patients without mutation detected by direct sequencing; 2) the identification of the first pathogenic mutation in the newly described exon 6A; and 3) statistical analysis of pathogenic mutations and polymorphism distribution throughout the gene.

  16. Neutral evolution of mutational robustness

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Erik; Crutchfield, James P.; Huynen, Martijn

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population’s limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network’s adjacency matrix. Moreover, the average number of neutral mutant neighbors per individual is given by the matrix spectral radius. These results quantify the extent to which populations evolve mutational robustness—the insensitivity of the phenotype to mutations—and thus reduce genetic load. Because the average neutrality is independent of evolutionary parameters—such as mutation rate, population size, and selective advantage—one can infer global statistics of neutral network topology by using simple population data available from in vitro or in vivo evolution. Populations evolving on neutral networks of RNA secondary structures show excellent agreement with our theoretical predictions. PMID:10449760

  17. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome.

    PubMed

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-08-15

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development.

  18. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome

    PubMed Central

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-01-01

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development. PMID:28809811

  19. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guannan; Wu, Ming; Maloneyhuss, Martha A.; Wojcik, John; Durham, Amy C.; Mason, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Angiosarcomas (AS) are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA), that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma. Methods Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3) demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage. Results and conclusions Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease. PMID:29190660

  20. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Wu, Ming; Maloneyhuss, Martha A; Wojcik, John; Durham, Amy C; Mason, Nicola J; Roth, David B

    2017-01-01

    Angiosarcomas (AS) are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA), that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma. Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3) demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage. Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  1. Detection of novel NF1 mutations and rapid mutation prescreening with Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Brinckmann, Anja; Mischung, Claudia; Bässmann, Ingelore; Kühnisch, Jirko; Schuelke, Markus; Tinschert, Sigrid; Nürnberg, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by mutations in the neurofibromin (NF1) gene. Mutation analysis of NF1 is complicated by its large size, the lack of mutation hotspots, pseudogenes and frequent de novo mutations. Additionally, the search for NF1 mutations on the mRNA level is often hampered by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of the mutant allele. In this study we searched for mutations in a cohort of 38 patients and investigated the relationship between mutation type and allele-specific transcription from the wild-type versus mutant alleles. Quantification of relative mRNA transcript numbers was done by Pyrosequencing, a novel real-time sequencing method whose signals can be quantified very accurately. We identified 21 novel mutations comprising various mutation types. Pyrosequencing detected a definite relationship between allelic NF1 transcript imbalance due to NMD and mutation type in 24 of 29 patients who all carried frame-shift or nonsense mutations. NMD was absent in 5 patients with missense and silent mutations, as well as in 4 patients with splice-site mutations that did not disrupt the reading frame. Pyrosequencing was capable of detecting NMD even when the effects were only moderate. Diagnostic laboratories could thus exploit this effect for rapid prescreening for NF1 mutations as more than 60% of the mutations in this gene disrupt the reading frame and are prone to NMD.

  2. Rare beneficial mutations can halt Muller's ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Daniel; Goyal, Sidhartha; Jerison, Elizabeth; Neher, Richard; Shraiman, Boris; Desai, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In viral, bacterial, and other asexual populations, the vast majority of non-neutral mutations are deleterious. This motivates the application of models without beneficial mutations. Here we show that the presence of surprisingly few compensatory mutations halts fitness decay in these models. Production of deleterious mutations is balanced by purifying selection, stabilizing the fitness distribution. However, stochastic vanishing of fitness classes can lead to slow fitness decay (i.e. Muller's ratchet). For weakly deleterious mutations, production overwhelms purification, rapidly decreasing population fitness. We show that when beneficial mutations are introduced, a stable steady state emerges in the form of a dynamic mutation-selection balance. We argue this state is generic for all mutation rates and population sizes, and is reached as an end state as genomes become saturated by either beneficial or deleterious mutations. Assuming all mutations have the same magnitude selective effect, we calculate the fraction of beneficial mutations necessary to maintain the dynamic balance. This may explain the unexpected maintenance of asexual genomes, as in mitochondria, in the presence of selection. This will affect in the statistics of genetic diversity in these populations.

  3. Germline APC mutations in hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Adeline; Sisson, Rebecca; Gupta, Anita; Tiao, Greg; Geller, James I

    2018-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the frequency of germline adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutations in patients with hepatoblastoma (HB) have called into question the clinical value of APC mutation testing on apparently sporadic HB. An Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review of clinical data collected from patients with HB who received APC testing at our institution was conducted. All HB patients seen at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center were eligible for testing. Potential genotype/phenotype correlations were assessed. As of July 2015, 29 patients with HB had received constitutional APC testing. Four (14%) were found to have APC pathogenic truncations of the APC protein and in addition two (7%) had APC missense variants of unknown clinical significance. Two patients (7%) had family histories indicative of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Response to chemotherapy tracked differently in APC pathogenic cases, with a slower imaging response despite an equivalent or slightly faster α-fetoprotein (AFP) response. The prevalence of pathogenic APC variants in apparently sporadic HB may be higher than previously detected. Differences in time to imaging response, despite similar AFP response, may impact surgical planning. All patients with HB warrant germline APC mutation testing for underlying FAP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The effects of mutational processes and selection on driver mutations across cancer types.

    PubMed

    Temko, Daniel; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Severini, Simone; Schuster-Böckler, Benjamin; Graham, Trevor A

    2018-05-10

    Epidemiological evidence has long associated environmental mutagens with increased cancer risk. However, links between specific mutation-causing processes and the acquisition of individual driver mutations have remained obscure. Here we have used public cancer sequencing data from 11,336 cancers of various types to infer the independent effects of mutation and selection on the set of driver mutations in a cancer type. First, we detect associations between a range of mutational processes, including those linked to smoking, ageing, APOBEC and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and the presence of key driver mutations across cancer types. Second, we quantify differential selection between well-known alternative driver mutations, including differences in selection between distinct mutant residues in the same gene. These results show that while mutational processes have a large role in determining which driver mutations are present in a cancer, the role of selection frequently dominates.

  5. Characterization of a mutation commonly associated with persistent stuttering: evidence for a founder mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fedyna, Alison; Drayna, Dennis; Kang, Changsoo

    2010-01-01

    Stuttering is a disorder which affects the fluency of speech. It has been shown to have high heritability, and has recently been linked to mutations in the GNPTAB gene. One such mutation, Glu1200Lys, has been repeatedly observed in unrelated families and individual cases. Eight unrelated individuals carrying this mutation were analyzed in an effort to distinguish whether these arise from repeated mutation at the same site, or whether they represent a founder mutation with a single origin. Results show that all 12 chromosomes carrying this mutation share a common haplotype in this region, indicating it is a founder mutation. Further analysis estimated the age of this allele to be ~572 generations. Construction of a cladogram tracing the mutation through our study sample also supports the founder mutation hypothesis. PMID:20944643

  6. Molecular profiling and sequential somatic mutation shift in hypermutator tumours harbouring POLE mutations.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Ohshima, Keiichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Ohnami, Shumpei; Ohnami, Sumiko; Serizawa, Masakuni; Shimoda, Yuji; Maruyama, Koji; Akiyama, Yasuto; Urakami, Kenichi; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Mochizuki, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2018-06-07

    Defective DNA polymerase ε (POLE) proofreading leads to extensive somatic mutations that exhibit biased mutational properties; however, the characteristics of POLE-mutated tumours remain unclear. In the present study, we describe a molecular profile using whole exome sequencing based on the transition of somatic mutations in 10 POLE-mutated solid tumours that were obtained from 2,042 Japanese patients. The bias of accumulated variations in these mutants was quantified to follow a pattern of somatic mutations, thereby classifying the sequential mutation shift into three periods. During the period prior to occurrence of the aberrant POLE, bare accumulation of mutations in cancer-related genes was observed, whereas PTEN was highly mutated in conjunction with or subsequent to the event, suggesting that POLE and PTEN mutations were responsible for the development of POLE-mutated tumours. Furthermore, homologous recombination was restored following the occurrence of PTEN mutations. Our strategy for estimation of the footprint of somatic mutations may provide new insight towards the understanding of mutation-driven tumourigenesis.

  7. Predictable Phenotypes of Antibiotic Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Knopp, M; Andersson, D I

    2018-05-15

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria represent a major threat to our ability to treat bacterial infections. Two factors that determine the evolutionary success of antibiotic resistance mutations are their impact on resistance level and the fitness cost. Recent studies suggest that resistance mutations commonly show epistatic interactions, which would complicate predictions of their stability in bacterial populations. We analyzed 13 different chromosomal resistance mutations and 10 host strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli to address two main questions. (i) Are there epistatic interactions between different chromosomal resistance mutations? (ii) How does the strain background and genetic distance influence the effect of chromosomal resistance mutations on resistance and fitness? Our results show that the effects of combined resistance mutations on resistance and fitness are largely predictable and that epistasis remains rare even when up to four mutations were combined. Furthermore, a majority of the mutations, especially target alteration mutations, demonstrate strain-independent phenotypes across different species. This study extends our understanding of epistasis among resistance mutations and shows that interactions between different resistance mutations are often predictable from the characteristics of the individual mutations. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria imposes an urgent threat to public health. The ability to forecast the evolutionary success of resistant mutants would help to combat dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Previous studies have shown that the phenotypic effects (fitness and resistance level) of resistance mutations can vary substantially depending on the genetic context in which they occur. We conducted a broad screen using many different resistance mutations and host strains to identify potential epistatic interactions between various types of resistance mutations and to determine the effect of strain

  8. MPL mutation profile in JAK2 mutation-negative patients with myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wanlong; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Xiuqiang; Zhang, Zhong; Yeh, Chen-Hsiung; Uyeji, Jennifer; Albitar, Maher

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (myeloproliferative leukemia, MPL) have been reported in patients with JAK2 V617F-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs). We evaluated the prevalence of MPL mutations relative to JAK2 mutations in patients with suspected MPDs. A total of 2790 patient samples submitted for JAK2 mutation analysis were tested using real-time polymerase chain reaction and bidirectional sequencing of plasma RNA. JAK2 V617F-negative samples were tested for JAK2 exons 12 to 14 mutations, and those with negative results were then tested for mutations in MPL exons 10 and 11. Of the 2790 patients, 529 (18.96%) had V617F, 12 (0.43%) had small insertions or deletions in exon 12, and 7 (0.25%) had other JAK2 mutations in exons 12 to 14. Of the 2242 JAK2 mutation-negative patients, 68 (3.03%) had MPL mutations. W515L was the predominant MPL mutation (n=46; 68%), and 10 (15%) patients had other W515 variants. The remaining MPL mutations (n=12, 17%) were detected at other locations in exons 10 and 11 and included 3 insertion/deletion mutations. The S505N mutation, associated with familial MPD, was detected in 3 patients. Overall, for every 100 V617F mutations in patients with suspected MPDs, there were 12.9 MPL mutations, 2.3 JAK2 exon 12 mutations, and 1.3 JAK2 exons 13 to 14 mutations. These findings suggest that MPL mutation screening should be performed before JAK2 exons 12 to 14 testing in JAK2 V617F-negative patients with suspected MPDs.

  9. Use of mutation spectra analysis software.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I; Kondrashov, F; Glazko, G

    2001-02-01

    The study and comparison of mutation(al) spectra is an important problem in molecular biology, because these spectra often reflect on important features of mutations and their fixation. Such features include the interaction of DNA with various mutagens, the function of repair/replication enzymes, and properties of target proteins. It is known that mutability varies significantly along nucleotide sequences, such that mutations often concentrate at certain positions, called "hotspots," in a sequence. In this paper, we discuss in detail two approaches for mutation spectra analysis: the comparison of mutation spectra with a HG-PUBL program, (FTP: sunsite.unc.edu/pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations/hyperg) and hotspot prediction with the CLUSTERM program (www.itba.mi.cnr.it/webmutation; ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/dbms/clusterm.zip). Several other approaches for mutational spectra analysis, such as the analysis of a target protein structure, hotspot context revealing, multiple spectra comparisons, as well as a number of mutation databases are briefly described. Mutation spectra in the lacI gene of E. coli and the human p53 gene are used for illustration of various difficulties of such analysis. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Analysis and implications of mutational variation.

    PubMed

    Keightley, Peter D; Halligan, Daniel L

    2009-06-01

    Variation from new mutations is important for several questions in quantitative genetics. Key parameters are the genomic mutation rate and the distribution of effects of mutations (DEM), which determine the amount of new quantitative variation that arises per generation from mutation (V(M)). Here, we review methods and empirical results concerning mutation accumulation (MA) experiments that have shed light on properties of mutations affecting quantitative traits. Surprisingly, most data on fitness traits from laboratory assays of MA lines indicate that the DEM is platykurtic in form (i.e., substantially less leptokurtic than an exponential distribution), and imply that most variation is produced by mutations of moderate to large effect. This finding contrasts with results from MA or mutagenesis experiments in which mutational changes to the DNA can be assayed directly, which imply that the vast majority of mutations have very small phenotypic effects, and that the distribution has a leptokurtic form. We compare these findings with recent approaches that attempt to infer the DEM for fitness based on comparing the frequency spectra of segregating nucleotide polymorphisms at putatively neutral and selected sites in population samples. When applied to data for humans and Drosophila, these analyses also indicate that the DEM is strongly leptokurtic. However, by combining the resultant estimates of parameters of the DEM with estimates of the mutation rate per nucleotide, the predicted V(M) for fitness is only a tiny fraction of V(M) observed in MA experiments. This discrepancy can be explained if we postulate that a few deleterious mutations of large effect contribute most of the mutational variation observed in MA experiments and that such mutations segregate at very low frequencies in natural populations, and effectively are never seen in population samples.

  11. Driven by Mutations: The Predictive Value of Mutation Subtype in EGFR-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily; Feld, Emily; Horn, Leora

    2017-04-01

    EGFR-mutated NSCLC is a genetically heterogeneous disease that includes more than 200 distinct mutations. The implications of mutational subtype for both prognostic and predictive value are being increasingly understood. Although the most common EGFR mutations-exon 19 deletions or L858R mutations-predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), it is now being recognized that outcomes may be improved in patients with exon 19 deletions. Additionally, 10% of patients will have an uncommon EGFR mutation, and response to EGFR TKI therapy is highly variable depending on the mutation. Given the growing recognition of the genetic and clinical variation seen in this disease, the development of comprehensive bioinformatics-driven tools to both analyze response in uncommon mutation subtypes and inform clinical decision making will be increasingly important. Clinical trials of novel EGFR TKIs should prospectively account for the presence of uncommon mutation subtypes in study design. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mutation Spectrum and Phenotypic Features in Noonan Syndrome with PTPN11 Mutations: Definition of Two Novel Mutations.

    PubMed

    Atik, Tahir; Aykut, Ayca; Hazan, Filiz; Onay, Huseyin; Goksen, Damla; Darcan, Sukran; Tukun, Ajlan; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of PTPN11 gene mutations in Noonan syndrome patients and to study the genotype-phenotype associations. In this study, twenty Noonan syndrome patients with PTPN11 mutations were included. The patients underwent a detailed clinical and physical evaluation. To identify inherited cases, parents of all mutation positive patients were analyzed. Thirteen different PTPN11 mutations, two of them being novel, were detected in the study group. These mutations included eleven missense mutations: p.G60A, p.D61N, p.Y62D, p.Y63C, p.E69Q, p.Q79R, p.Y279C,p.N308D, p.N308S, p.M504V, p.Q510R and two novel missense mutations: p.I56V and p.I282M. The frequency of cardiac abnormalities and short stature were found to be 80 % and 80 %, respectively. Mental retardation was not observed in patients having exon 8 mutations. No significant correlations were detected between other phenotypic features and genotypes. By identifying genotype-phenotype correlations, this study provides information on phenotypes observed in NS patients with different PTPN11 mutations.

  13. AVPR2 variants and mutations in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: review and missense mutation significance.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias; Milord, Edrice; Gragnoli, Claudia

    2008-12-01

    Almost 90% of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is due to mutations in the arginine-vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2). We retrospectively examined all the published mutations/variants in AVPR2. We planned to perform a comprehensive review of all the AVPR2 mutations/variants and to test whether any amino acid change causing a missense mutation is significantly more or less common than others. We performed a Medline search and collected detailed information regarding all AVPR2 mutations and variants. We performed a frequency comparison between mutated and wild-type amino acids and codons. We predicted the mutation effect or reported it based on published in vitro studies. We also reported the ethnicity of each mutation/variant carrier. In summary, we identified 211 AVPR2 mutations which cause NDI in 326 families and 21 variants which do not cause NDI in 71 NDI families. We described 15 different types of mutations including missense, frameshift, inframe deletion, deletion, insertion, nonsense, duplication, splicing and combined mutations. The missense mutations represent the 55.83% of all the NDI published families. Arginine and tyrosine are significantly (P = 4.07E-08 and P = 3.27E-04, respectively) the AVPR2 most commonly mutated amino acids. Alanine and glutamate are significantly (P = 0.009 and P = 0.019, respectively) the least mutated AVPR2 amino acids. The spectrum of mutations varies from rare gene variants or polymorphisms not causing NDI to rare mutations causing NDI, among which arginine and tyrosine are the most common missense. The AVPR2 mutations are spread world-wide. Our study may serve as an updated review, comprehensive of all AVPR2 variants and specific gene locations. J. Cell. Physiol. 217: 605-617, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Rates of spontaneous mutation among RNA viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, J W

    1993-01-01

    Simple methods are presented to estimate rates of spontaneous mutation from mutant frequencies and population parameters in RNA viruses. Published mutant frequencies yield a wide range of mutation rates per genome per replication, mainly because mutational targets have usually been small and, thus, poor samples of the mutability of the average base. Nevertheless, there is a clear central tendency for lytic RNA viruses (bacteriophage Q beta, poliomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, and influenza A) to display rates of spontaneous mutation of approximately 1 per genome per replication. This rate is some 300-fold higher than previously reported for DNA-based microbes. Lytic RNA viruses thus mutate at a rate close to the maximum value compatible with viability. Retroviruses (spleen necrosis, murine leukemia, Rous sarcoma), however, mutate at an average rate about an order of magnitude lower than lytic RNA viruses. PMID:8387212

  15. Determining Mutation Rates in Bacterial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Rosche, William A.; Foster, Patricia L.

    2010-01-01

    When properly determined, spontaneous mutation rates are a more accurate and biologically meaningful reflection of the underlying mutagenic mechanism than are mutation frequencies. Because bacteria grow exponentially and mutations arise stochastically, methods to estimate mutation rates depend on theoretical models that describe the distribution of mutant numbers among parallel cultures, as in the original Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis. An accurate determination of mutation rate depends on understanding the strengths and limitations of these methods, and how to design fluctuation assays to optimize a given method. In this paper we describe a number of methods to estimate mutation rates, give brief accounts of their derivations, and discuss how they behave under various experimental conditions. PMID:10610800

  16. How mutation affects evolutionary games on graphs

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Benjamin; Traulsen, Arne; Tarnita, Corina E.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary dynamics are affected by population structure, mutation rates and update rules. Spatial or network structure facilitates the clustering of strategies, which represents a mechanism for the evolution of cooperation. Mutation dilutes this effect. Here we analyze how mutation influences evolutionary clustering on graphs. We introduce new mathematical methods to evolutionary game theory, specifically the analysis of coalescing random walks via generating functions. These techniques allow us to derive exact identity-by-descent (IBD) probabilities, which characterize spatial assortment on lattices and Cayley trees. From these IBD probabilities we obtain exact conditions for the evolution of cooperation and other game strategies, showing the dual effects of graph topology and mutation rate. High mutation rates diminish the clustering of cooperators, hindering their evolutionary success. Our model can represent either genetic evolution with mutation, or social imitation processes with random strategy exploration. PMID:21473871

  17. Somatic mutation detection in human biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Olsen, L S; Nielsen, L R; Nexø, B A; Wassermann, K

    1996-06-01

    Somatic cell gene mutation arising in vivo may be considered to be a biomarker for genotoxicity. Assays detecting mutations of the haemoglobin and glycophorin A genes in red blood cells and of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and human leucocyte antigenes in T-lymphocytes are available in humans. This MiniReview describes these assays and their application to studies of individuals exposed to genotoxic agents. Moreover, with the implementation of techniques of molecular biology mutation spectra can now be defined in addition to the quantitation of in vivo mutant frequencies. We describe current screening methods for unknown mutations, including the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, single strand conformation polymorphism analysis, heteroduplex analysis, chemical modification techniques and enzymatic cleavage methods. The advantage of mutation detection as a biomarker is that it integrates exposure and sensitivity in one measurement. With the analysis of mutation spectra it may thus be possible to identify the causative genotoxic agent.

  18. Identification of six new Gaucher disease mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, E.; Gelbart, T.; West, C.

    1993-01-01

    The four most common mutations account for 97% of the Gaucher disease-producing alleles in Jewish patients and 75% of the alleles in non-Jewish patients. Although at least 15 other mutations and some examples of gene conversion and/or fusion genes have been described, a number of mutations remain unidentified. We have now identified six new mutations, a deletion of a C at the 72 position of the cDNA, a 481C[yields]T mutation (122p[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 751T [yields] C (212 [sup Tyr[yields]His]), a 1549G [yields] A (478[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 1604G [yields] A (496 [sup Arg[yields]His]), and a 55-bp deletion. All but one ofmore » these were found in single families. The 1604A mutation, however, was observed in four unrelated individuals. 7 refs., 2 tabs.« less

  19. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Epilepsy caused by CDKL5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Castrén, Maija; Gaily, Eija; Tengström, Carola; Lähdetie, Jaana; Archer, Hayley; Ala-Mello, Sirpa

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been identified in female patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy and severe mental retardation with a Rett-like phenotype. Subsequently CDKL5 mutations were shown to be associated with more diverse phenotypes including mild epilepsy and autism without epilepsy. Furthermore, CDKL5 mutations were found in patients with Angelman-like phenotype. The severity of epilepsy associated with CDKL5 mutations was recently shown to correlate with the type of CDKL5 mutations and epilepsy was identified to involve three distinct sequential stages. Here, we describe the phenotype of a severe form of neurodevelopmental disease in a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation of the CDKL5 gene c.175C > T (p.R59X) affecting the catalytic domain of CDKL5 protein. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene are less common in males and can be associated with a genomic deletion as found in our male patient with a deletion of 0.3 Mb at Xp22.13 including the CDKL5 gene. We review phenotypes associated with CDKL5 mutations and examine putative relationships between the clinical epilepsy phenotype and the type of the mutation in the CDKL5 gene. © 2010 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Myeloid neoplasms with germline DDX41 mutation.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Jesse J C; Hahn, Christopher N; Hiwase, Devendra K; Scott, Hamish S; Brown, Anna L

    2017-08-01

    Recently, DDX41 mutations have been identified both as germline and acquired somatic mutations in families with multiple cases of late-onset myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and/or acute myeloid leukemia. The majority of germline mutations are frameshift mutations suggesting loss of function with DDX41 acting as a tumor suppressor, and there is a common somatic missense mutation found in a majority of germline mutated tumors. Clinically, DDX41 mutations lead to development of high-risk MDS at an age similar to that observed in sporadic cohorts, presenting a unique challenge to hematologists in recognizing the familial context. Functionally, DDX41 has been shown to contribute to multiple pathways and processes including mRNA splicing, innate immunity and rRNA processing. Mutations in DDX41 result in aberrations to each of these in ways that could potentially impact on tumorigenesis-initiation, maintenance or progression. This review discusses the various molecular, clinical and biological aspects of myeloid malignancy predisposition due to DDX41 mutation and highlights how each of these suggest potential therapeutic opportunities through the use of pathway-specific inhibitors.

  2. A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hodis, Eran; Watson, Ian R.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Arold, Stefan T.; Imielinski, Marcin; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Auclair, Daniel; Li, Liren; Place, Chelsea; DiCara, Daniel; Ramos, Alex H.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Voet, Douglas; Saksena, Gordon; Stransky, Nicolas; Onofrio, Robert C.; Winckler, Wendy; Ardlie, Kristin; Wagle, Nikhil; Wargo, Jennifer; Chong, Kelly; Morton, Donald L.; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Chen, Guo; Noble, Michael; Meyerson, Matthew; Ladbury, John E.; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Wagner, Stephan N.; Hoon, Dave S.B.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Getz, Gad; Garraway, Levi A.; Chin, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. We developed a permutation-based framework to address this challenge, employing mutation data from intronic sequences to control for passenger mutational load on a per gene basis. Analysis of large-scale melanoma exome data by this approach discovered six novel melanoma genes (PPP6C, RAC1, SNX31, TACC1, STK19 and ARID2), three of which - RAC1, PPP6C and STK19 - harbored recurrent and potentially targetable mutations. Integration with chromosomal copy number data contextualized the landscape of driver mutations, providing oncogenic insights in BRAF- and NRAS-driven melanoma as well as those without known NRAS/BRAF mutations. The landscape also clarified a mutational basis for RB and p53 pathway deregulation in this malignancy. Finally, the spectrum of driver mutations provided unequivocal genomic evidence for a direct mutagenic role of UV light in melanoma pathogenesis. PMID:22817889

  3. The thyrotropin receptor mutation database: update 2003.

    PubMed

    Führer, Dagmar; Lachmund, Peter; Nebel, Istvan-Tibor; Paschke, Ralf

    2003-12-01

    In 1999 we have created a TSHR mutation database compiling TSHR mutations with their basic characteristics and associated clinical conditions (www.uni-leipzig.de/innere/tshr). Since then, more than 2887 users from 36 countries have logged into the TSHR mutation database and have contributed several valuable suggestions for further improvement of the database. We now present an updated and extended version of the TSHR database to which several novel features have been introduced: 1. detailed functional characteristics on all 65 mutations (43 activating and 22 inactivating mutations) reported to date, 2. 40 pedigrees with detailed information on molecular aspects, clinical courses and treatment options in patients with gain-of-function and loss-of-function germline TSHR mutations, 3. a first compilation of site-directed mutagenesis studies, 4. references with Medline links, 5. a user friendly search tool for specific database searches, user-specific database output and 6. an administrator tool for the submission of novel TSHR mutations. The TSHR mutation database is installed as one of the locus specific HUGO mutation databases. It is listed under index TSHR 603372 (http://ariel.ucs.unimelb.edu.au/~cotton/glsdbq.htm) and can be accessed via www.uni-leipzig.de/innere/tshr.

  4. Methods for detection of ataxia telangiectasia mutations

    DOEpatents

    Gatti, Richard A.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening large, complex, polyexonic eukaryotic genes such as the ATM gene for mutations and polymorphisms by an improved version of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis that allows electrophoresis of two or three amplified segments in a single lane. The present invention also is directed to new mutations and polymorphisms in the ATM gene that are useful in performing more accurate screening of human DNA samples for mutations and in distinguishing mutations from polymorphisms, thereby improving the efficiency of automated screening methods.

  5. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Thilly, William G.; Keohavong, Phouthone

    1991-01-01

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  6. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of a lifetime somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell’s genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This study provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operative in human somatic cells. PMID:26551669

  7. Mutations, mutation rates, and evolution at the hypervariable VNTR loci of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Amy J; Keys, Christine E; Allender, Christopher; Bailey, Ira; Girard, Jessica; Pearson, Talima; Smith, Kimothy L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul

    2007-03-01

    VNTRs are able to discriminate among closely related isolates of recently emerged clonal pathogens, including Yersinia pestis the etiologic agent of plague, because of their great diversity. Diversity is driven largely by mutation but little is known about VNTR mutation rates, factors affecting mutation rates, or the mutational mechanisms. The molecular epidemiological utility of VNTRs will be greatly enhanced when this foundational knowledge is available. Here, we measure mutation rates for 43 VNTR loci in Y. pestis using an in vitro generated population encompassing approximately 96,000 generations. We estimate the combined 43-locus rate and individual rates for 14 loci. A comparison of Y. pestis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 VNTR mutation rates and products revealed a similar relationship between diversity and mutation rate in these two species. Likewise, the relationship between repeat copy number and mutation rate is nearly identical between these species, suggesting a generalized relationship that may be applicable to other species. The single- versus multiple-repeat mutation ratios and the insertion versus deletion mutation ratios were also similar, providing support for a general model for the mutations associated with VNTRs. Finally, we use two small sets of Y. pestis isolates to show how this general model and our estimated mutation rates can be used to compare alternate phylogenies, and to evaluate the significance of genotype matches, near-matches, and mismatches found in empirical comparisons with a reference database.

  8. Mutation Analysis in Classical Phenylketonuria Patients Followed by Detecting Haplotypes Linked to Some PAH Mutations.

    PubMed

    Dehghanian, Fatemeh; Silawi, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed M B

    2017-02-01

    Deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme and elevation of phenylalanine in body fluids cause phenylketonuria (PKU). The gold standard for confirming PKU and PAH deficiency is detecting causal mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons and splicing involved sequences of the PAH gene. Furthermore, haplotype analysis could be considered as an auxiliary approach for detecting PKU causative mutations before direct sequencing of the PAH gene by making comparisons between prior detected mutation linked-haplotypes and new PKU case haplotypes with undetermined mutations. In this study, 13 unrelated classical PKU patients took part in the study detecting causative mutations. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing in all patients. After that, haplotype analysis was performed by studying VNTR and PAHSTR markers (linked genetic markers of the PAH gene) through application of PCR and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutation analysis was performed successfully and the detected mutations were as follows: c.782G>A, c.754C>T, c.842C>G, c.113-115delTCT, c.688G>A, and c.696A>G. Additionally, PAHSTR/VNTR haplotypes were detected to discover haplotypes linked to each mutation. Mutation detection is the best approach for confirming PAH enzyme deficiency in PKU patients. Due to the relatively large size of the PAH gene and high cost of the direct sequencing in developing countries, haplotype analysis could be used before DNA sequencing and mutation detection for a faster and cheaper way via identifying probable mutated exons.

  9. Parkin dosage mutations have greater pathogenicity in familial PD than simple sequence mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, N; Kissell, D K.; Pauciulo, M W.; Halter, C A.; Rudolph, A; Pfeiffer, R F.; Marder, K S.; Foroud, T; Nichols, W C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in both alleles of parkin have been shown to result in Parkinson disease (PD). However, it is unclear whether haploinsufficiency (presence of a mutation in only 1 of the 2 parkin alleles) increases the risk for PD. Methods: We performed comprehensive dosage and sequence analysis of all 12 exons of parkin in a sample of 520 independent patients with familial PD and 263 controls. We evaluated whether presence of a single parkin mutation, either a sequence (point mutation or small insertion/deletion) or dosage (whole exon deletion or duplication) mutation, was found at increased frequency in cases as compared with controls. We then compared the clinical characteristics of cases with 0, 1, or 2 parkin mutations. Results: We identified 55 independent patients with PD with at least 1 parkin mutation and 9 controls with a single sequence mutation. Cases and controls had a similar frequency of single sequence mutations (3.1% vs 3.4%, p = 0.83); however, the cases had a significantly higher rate of dosage mutations (2.6% vs 0%, p = 0.009). Cases with a single dosage mutation were more likely to have an earlier age at onset (50% with onset at ≤45 years) compared with those with no parkin mutations (10%, p = 0.00002); this was not true for cases with only a single sequence mutation (25% with onset at ≤45 years, p = 0.06). Conclusions: Parkin haploinsufficiency, specifically for a dosage mutation rather than a point mutation or small insertion/deletion, is a risk factor for familial PD and may be associated with earlier age at onset. GLOSSARY ADL = Activities of Daily Living; GDS = Geriatric Depression Scale; MLPA = multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination; PD = Parkinson disease; UPDRS = Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale. PMID:19636047

  10. KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cong; Du, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The KRAS oncogene is mutated in approximately 35%-45% of colorectal cancers, and KRAS mutational status testing has been highlighted in recent years. The most frequent mutations in this gene, point substitutions in codons 12 and 13, were validated as negative predictors of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies. Therefore, determining the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples has become an essential tool for managing patients with colorectal cancers. Currently, a variety of detection methods have been established to analyze the mutation status in the key regions of the KRAS gene; however, several challenges remain related to standardized and uniform testing, including the selection of tumor samples, tumor sample processing and optimal testing methods. Moreover, new testing strategies, in combination with the mutation analysis of BRAF, PIK3CA and loss of PTEN proposed by many researchers and pathologists, should be promoted. In addition, we recommend that microsatellite instability, a prognostic factor, be added to the abovementioned concomitant analysis. This review provides an overview of KRAS biology and the recent advances in KRAS mutation testing. This review also addresses other aspects of status testing for determining the appropriate treatment and offers insight into the potential drawbacks of mutational testing. PMID:23066310

  11. Rapid evolution of the human mutation spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kelley; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2017-01-01

    DNA is a remarkably precise medium for copying and storing biological information. This high fidelity results from the action of hundreds of genes involved in replication, proofreading, and damage repair. Evolutionary theory suggests that in such a system, selection has limited ability to remove genetic variants that change mutation rates by small amounts or in specific sequence contexts. Consistent with this, using SNV variation as a proxy for mutational input, we report here that mutational spectra differ substantially among species, human continental groups and even some closely related populations. Close examination of one signal, an increased TCC→TTC mutation rate in Europeans, indicates a burst of mutations from about 15,000 to 2000 years ago, perhaps due to the appearance, drift, and ultimate elimination of a genetic modifier of mutation rate. Our results suggest that mutation rates can evolve markedly over short evolutionary timescales and suggest the possibility of mapping mutational modifiers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24284.001 PMID:28440220

  12. Molecular methods for the detection of mutations.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, C; Marcelino, L A; Conde, A R; Saraiva, C; Giphart-Gassler, M; De Nooij-van Dalen, A G; Van Buuren-van Seggelen, V; Van der Keur, M; May, C A; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R; Steinsgrimsdottir, H; Beare, D; Capulas, E; Armour, J A

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of a collaborative study aimed at developing reliable, direct assays for mutation in human cells. The project used common lymphoblastoid cell lines, both with and without mutagen treatment, as a shared resource to validate the development of new molecular methods for the detection of low-level mutations in the presence of a large excess of normal alleles. As the "gold standard, " hprt mutation frequencies were also measured on the same samples. The methods under development included i) the restriction site mutation (RSM) assay, in which mutations lead to the destruction of a restriction site; ii) minisatellite length-change mutation, in which mutations lead to alleles containing new numbers of tandem repeat units; iii) loss of heterozygosity for HLA epitopes, in which antibodies can be used to direct selection for mutant cells; iv) multiple fluorescence-based long linker arm nucleotides assay (mf-LLA) technology, for the detection of substitutional mutations; v) detection of alterations in the TP53 locus using a (CA) array as the target for the screening; and vi) PCR analysis of lymphocytes for the presence of the BCL2 t(14:18) translocation. The relative merits of these molecular methods are discussed, and a comparison made with more "traditional" methods.

  13. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  14. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    MedlinePlus

    ... tested for this mutation. Should You Be Tested? Genetic testing is only recommended for people with a high risk of having a BRCA mutation. To help determine if you should have test- ing, some of the questions your ob-gyn or other health care profes- sional may ask you include the ...

  15. TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tanasubsinn, Natchaya; Sittiwangkul, Rekwan; Pongprot, Yupada; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Ohazama, Atsushi; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2017-08-01

    Mutations inTFAP2B has been reported in patients with isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and Char syndrome. We performed mutation analysis of TFAP2B in 43 patients with isolated PDA, 7 patients with PDA with other congenital heart defects and 286 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies. The heterozygous c.1006G>A mutation was identified in 20 individuals. Those mutation carriers consisted of 1 patient with term PDA (1/43), 16 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies (16/286; 5.6%), 1 patient with PDA and severe valvular aortic stenosis and tooth agenesis (1/4) and 2 normal controls (2/100; 1%). The mutation is predicted to cause an amino-acid substitution p.Val336Ile in the TFAP2B protein. Tfap2b expression during early mouse tooth development supports the association of TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies. It is hypothesized that this incidence might have been the result of founder effect. Here we report for the first time that TFAP2B mutation is associated with tooth agenesis, microdontia, supernumerary tooth and root maldevelopment. In addition, we also found that TFAP2B mutations, the common causes of PDA in Caucasian, are not the common cause of PDA in Thai population.

  16. Gene mutations in children with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Witt, H

    2001-01-01

    In the last few years, several genes have been identified as being associated with hereditary and idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (CP), i.e. PRSS1, CFTR and SPINK1. In this study, we investigated 164 unrelated children and adolescents with CP for mutations in disease-associated genes by direct DNA sequencing, SSCP, RFLP and melting curve analysis. In 15 patients, we detected a PRSS1 mutation (8 with A16V, 5 with R122H, 2 with N29I), and in 34 patients, a SPINK1 mutation (30 with N34S, 4 with others). SPINK1 mutations were predominantly found in patients without a family history (29/121). Ten patients were homozygous for N34S, SPINK1 mutations were most common in 'idiopathic' CP, whereas patients with 'hereditary' CP predominantly showed a PRSS1 mutation (R122H, N29I). In patients without a family history, the most common PRSS1 mutation was A16V (7/121). In conclusion, our data suggest that CP may be inherited in a dominant, recessive or multigenetic manner as a result of mutations in the above-mentioned or as yet unidentified genes. This challenges the concept of idiopathic CP as a nongenetic disorder and the differentiation between hereditary and idiopathic CP. Therefore, we propose to classify CP as either 'primary CP' (with or without a family history) or 'secondary CP' caused by toxic, metabolic or other factors.

  17. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  18. Methods for Determining Spontaneous Mutation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations arise as a result of cellular processes that act upon or damage DNA. Accurate determination of spontaneous mutation rates can contribute to our understanding of these processes and the enzymatic pathways that deal with them. The methods that are used to calculate mutation rates are based on the model for the expansion of mutant clones originally described by Luria and Delbrück and extended by Lea and Coulson. The accurate determination of mutation rates depends on understanding the strengths and limitations of these methods and how to optimize a fluctuation assay for a given method. This chapter describes the proper design of a fluctuation assay, several of the methods used to calculate mutation rates, and ways to evaluate the results statistically. PMID:16793403

  19. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  20. Survival of mutations arising during invasions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Judith R

    2010-01-01

    When a neutral mutation arises in an invading population, it quickly either dies out or ‘surfs’, i.e. it comes to occupy almost all the habitat available at its time of origin. Beneficial mutations can also surf, as can deleterious mutations over finite time spans. We develop descriptive statistical models that quantify the relationship between the probability that a mutation will surf and demographic parameters for a cellular automaton model of surfing. We also provide a simple analytic model that performs well at predicting the probability of surfing for neutral and beneficial mutations in one dimension. The results suggest that factors – possibly including even abiotic factors – that promote invasion success may also increase the probability of surfing and associated adaptive genetic change, conditioned on such success. PMID:25567912

  1. Survival of mutations arising during invasions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Judith R

    2010-03-01

    When a neutral mutation arises in an invading population, it quickly either dies out or 'surfs', i.e. it comes to occupy almost all the habitat available at its time of origin. Beneficial mutations can also surf, as can deleterious mutations over finite time spans. We develop descriptive statistical models that quantify the relationship between the probability that a mutation will surf and demographic parameters for a cellular automaton model of surfing. We also provide a simple analytic model that performs well at predicting the probability of surfing for neutral and beneficial mutations in one dimension. The results suggest that factors - possibly including even abiotic factors - that promote invasion success may also increase the probability of surfing and associated adaptive genetic change, conditioned on such success.

  2. Elevated germline mutation rate in teenage fathers

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Peter; Hohoff, Carsten; Dunkelmann, Bettina; Schürenkamp, Marianne; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Neuhuber, Franz; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Men age and die, while cells in their germline are programmed to be immortal. To elucidate how germ cells maintain viable DNA despite increasing parental age, we analysed DNA from 24 097 parents and their children, from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. We chose repetitive microsatellite DNA that mutates (unlike point mutations) only as a result of cellular replication, providing us with a natural ‘cell-cycle counter’. We observe, as expected, that the overall mutation rate for fathers is seven times higher than for mothers. Also as expected, mothers have a low and lifelong constant DNA mutation rate. Surprisingly, however, we discover that (i) teenage fathers already set out from a much higher mutation rate than teenage mothers (potentially equivalent to 77–196 male germline cell divisions by puberty); and (ii) ageing men maintain sperm DNA quality similar to that of teenagers, presumably by using fresh batches of stem cells known as ‘A-dark spermatogonia’. PMID:25694621

  3. Elevated germline mutation rate in teenage fathers.

    PubMed

    Forster, Peter; Hohoff, Carsten; Dunkelmann, Bettina; Schürenkamp, Marianne; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Neuhuber, Franz; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2015-03-22

    Men age and die, while cells in their germline are programmed to be immortal. To elucidate how germ cells maintain viable DNA despite increasing parental age, we analysed DNA from 24 097 parents and their children, from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. We chose repetitive microsatellite DNA that mutates (unlike point mutations) only as a result of cellular replication, providing us with a natural 'cell-cycle counter'. We observe, as expected, that the overall mutation rate for fathers is seven times higher than for mothers. Also as expected, mothers have a low and lifelong constant DNA mutation rate. Surprisingly, however, we discover that (i) teenage fathers already set out from a much higher mutation rate than teenage mothers (potentially equivalent to 77-196 male germline cell divisions by puberty); and (ii) ageing men maintain sperm DNA quality similar to that of teenagers, presumably by using fresh batches of stem cells known as 'A-dark spermatogonia'.

  4. The CDC Hemophilia B mutation project mutation list: a new online resource.

    PubMed

    Li, Tengguo; Miller, Connie H; Payne, Amanda B; Craig Hooper, W

    2013-11-01

    Hemophilia B (HB) is caused by mutations in the human gene F9. The mutation type plays a pivotal role in genetic counseling and prediction of inhibitor development. To help the HB community understand the molecular etiology of HB, we have developed a listing of all F9 mutations that are reported to cause HB based on the literature and existing databases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Hemophilia B Mutation Project (CHBMP) mutation list is compiled in an easily accessible format of Microsoft Excel and contains 1083 unique mutations that are reported to cause HB. Each mutation is identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards. The mutation types and the predicted changes in amino acids, if applicable, are also provided. Related information including the location of mutation, severity of HB, the presence of inhibitor, and original publication reference are listed as well. Therefore, our mutation list provides an easily accessible resource for genetic counselors and HB researchers to predict inhibitors. The CHBMP mutation list is freely accessible at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations.

  5. The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List: a New Online Resource

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Amanda B.; Miller, Connie H.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Soucie, J. Michael; Hooper, W. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping efforts in hemophilia A (HA) populations in many countries have identified large numbers of unique mutations in the Factor VIII gene (F8). To assist HA researchers conducting genotyping analyses, we have developed a listing of F8 mutations including those listed in existing locus-specific databases as well as those identified in patient populations and reported in the literature. Each mutation was reviewed and uniquely identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards for coding DNA and predicted protein changes as well as traditional nomenclature based on the mature, processed protein. Listings also include the associated hemophilia severity classified by International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) criteria, associations of the mutations with inhibitors, and reference information. The mutation list currently contains 2,537 unique mutations known to cause HA. HA severity caused by the mutation is available for 2,022 mutations (80%) and information on inhibitors is available for 1,816 mutations (72%). The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List is available at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations for download and search and will be updated quarterly based on periodic literature reviews and submitted reports. PMID:23280990

  6. Mutations affecting gyrase in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, J K; Cabrera-Juárez, E; Albritton, W L; Spikes, D; Mutschler, A

    1985-01-01

    Mutants separately resistant to novobiocin, coumermycin, nalidixic acid, and oxolinic acid contained gyrase activity as measured in vitro that was resistant to the antibiotics, indicating that the mutations represented structural alterations of the enzyme. One Novr mutant contained an altered B subunit of the enzyme, as judged by the ability of a plasmid, pNov1, containing the mutation to complement a temperature-sensitive gyrase B mutation in Escherichia coli and to cause novobiocin resistance in that strain. Three other Novr mutations did not confer antibiotic resistance to the gyrase but appeared to increase the amount of active enzyme in the cell. One of these, novB1, could only act in cis, whereas a new mutation, novC, could act in trans. An RNA polymerase mutation partially substituted for the novB1 mutation, suggesting that novB1 may be a mutation in a promoter region for the B subunit gene. Growth responses of strains containing various combinations of mutations on plasmids or on the chromosome indicated that low-level resistance to novobiocin or coumermycin may have resulted from multiple copies of wild-type genes coding for the gyrase B subunit, whereas high-level resistance required a structural change in the gyrase B gene and was also dependent on alteration in a regulatory region. When there was mismatch at the novB locus, with the novB1 mutation either on a plasmid or the chromosome, and the corresponding wild-type gene present in trans, chromosome to plasmid recombination during transformation was much higher than when the genes matched, probably because plasmid to chromosome recombination, eliminating the plasmid, was inhibited by the mismatch. PMID:2997115

  7. CREBBP mutations in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, Charles G.; Zhang, Jinghui; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Lerach, Stephanie; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Phillips, Letha A.; Heatley, Sue L.; Holmfeldt, Linda; Collins-Underwood, J. Racquel; Ma, Jing; Buetow, Kenneth H.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Baker, Sharyn D.; Brindle, Paul K.; Downing, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a leading cause of death due to disease in young people, but the biologic determinants of treatment failure remain poorly understood. Recent genome-wide profiling of structural DNA alterations in ALL have identified multiple submicroscopic somatic mutations targeting key cellular pathways1,2, and have demonstrated substantial evolution in genetic alterations from diagnosis to relapse3. However, detailed analysis of sequence mutations in ALL has not been performed. To identify novel mutations in relapsed ALL, we resequenced 300 genes in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from 23 patients with ALL. This identified 52 somatic non-synonymous mutations in 32 genes, many of which were novel, including the transcriptional coactivators CREBBP and NCOR1, the transcription factors ERG, SPI1, TCF4 and TCF7L2, components of the Ras signalling pathway, histone genes, genes involved in histone modification (CREBBP and CTCF), and genes previously shown to be targets of recurring DNA copy number alteration in ALL. Analysis of an extended cohort of 71 diagnosis-relapse cases and 270 acute leukaemia cases that did not relapse found that 18.3% of relapse cases had sequence or deletion mutations of CREBBP, which encodes the transcriptional coactivator and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CREB-binding protein (CBP)4. The mutations were either present at diagnosis or acquired at relapse, and resulted in truncated alleles or deleterious substitutions in conserved residues of the HAT domain. Functionally, the mutations impaired histone acetylation and transcriptional regulation of CREBBP targets, including glucocorticoid responsive genes. Several mutations acquired at relapse were detected in subclones at diagnosis, suggesting that the mutations may confer resistance to therapy. These results extend the landscape of genetic alterations in leukaemia, and identify mutations targeting transcriptional and epigenetic regulation as a mechanism

  8. Spectrum of mutations in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in India, with four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Setia, Nitika; Saxena, Renu; Arora, Anjali; Verma, Ishwar C

    2016-12-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a rare but serious, inherited disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by very high total and LDL cholesterol levels from birth. It presents as cutaneous and tendon xanthomas since childhood, with or without cardiac involvement. FH is commonly caused by mutations in three genes, i.e. LDL receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PCSK9. We aimed to determine the spectrum of mutations in cases of homozygous FH in Asian Indians and evaluate if there was any similarity to the mutations observed in Caucasians. Sixteen homozygous FH subjects from eleven families were analyzed for mutations by Sanger sequencing. Large rearrangements in LDLR gene were evaluated by multiplex ligation probe dependent amplification (MLPA) technique. Ten mutations were observed in LDLR gene, of which four mutations were novel. No mutation was detected in ApoB gene and common PCSK9 mutation (p.D374Y). Fourteen cases had homozygous mutations; one had compound heterozygous mutation, while no mutation was detected in one clinically homozygous case. We report an interesting "Triple hit" case with features of homozygous FH. The spectrum of mutations in the Asian Indian population is quite heterogeneous. Of the mutations identified, 40% were novel. No mutation was observed in exons 3, 9 and 14 of LDLR gene, which are considered to be hot spots in studies done on Asian Indians in South Africa. Early detection followed by aggressive therapy, and cascade screening of extended families has been initiated to reduce the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel mutations in GALNT3 causing hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Yancovitch, Alan; Hershkovitz, Dov; Indelman, Margareta; Galloway, Peter; Whiteford, Margo; Sprecher, Eli; Kılıç, Esra

    2011-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is known to be caused by mutations in at least three genes: FGF23, GALNT3 and KL. Two families with two affected members suffering from HFTC were scrutinized for mutations in these candidate genes. We identified in both families homozygous missense mutations affecting highly conserved amino acids in GALNT3. One of the mutations is a novel mutation, whereas the second mutation was reported before in a compound heterozygous state. Our data expand the spectrum of known mutations in GALNT3 and contribute to a better understanding of the phenotypic manifestations of mutations in this gene.

  10. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  11. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S.; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; de, Subhajyoti

    2016-06-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed “duon mutations” due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures.

  12. The Mutational Landscape of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen S.; Kannan, Kasthuri; Roy, David M.; Morris, Luc G.T.; Ganly, Ian; Katabi, Nora; Ramaswami, Deepa; Walsh, Logan A.; Eng, Stephanie; Huse, Jason T.; Zhang, Jianan; Dolgalev, Igor; Huberman, Kety; Heguy, Adriana; Viale, Agnes; Drobnjak, Marija; Leversha, Margaret A.; Rice, Christine E.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Leemans, C. Rene; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Ferris, Robert L.; Seethala, Raja R.; Gross, Benjamin E.; Liang, Yupu; Sinha, Rileen; Peng, Luke; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Turcan, Sevin; Gong, Yongxing; Schultz, Nikolaus; Kim, Seungwon; Chiosea, Simion; Shah, Jatin P.; Sander, Chris; Lee, William; Chan, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) are among the most enigmatic of human malignancies. These aggressive salivary cancers frequently recur and metastasize despite definitive treatment, with no known effective chemotherapy regimen. Here, we determined the ACC mutational landscape and report the exome or whole genome sequences of 60 ACC tumor/normal pairs. These analyses revealed a low exonic somatic mutation rate (0.31 non-silent events/megabase) and wide mutational diversity. Interestingly, mutations selectively involved chromatin state regulators, such as SMARCA2, CREBBP, and KDM6A, suggesting aberrant epigenetic regulation in ACC oncogenesis. Mutations in genes central to DNA damage and protein kinase A signaling also implicate these processes. We observed MYB-NFIB translocations and somatic mutations in MYB-associated genes, solidifying these aberrations as critical events. Lastly, we identified recurrent mutations in the FGF/IGF/PI3K pathway that may potentially offer new avenues for therapy (30%). Collectively, our observations establish a molecular foundation for understanding and exploring new treatments for ACC. PMID:23685749

  13. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining.

    PubMed

    Klein, Artjom; Riazanov, Alexandre; Hindle, Matthew M; Baker, Christopher Jo

    2014-02-25

    Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption.

  14. The SHOX region and its mutations.

    PubMed

    Capone, L; Iughetti, L; Sabatini, S; Bacciaglia, A; Forabosco, A

    2010-06-01

    The short stature homeobox-containing (SHOX) gene lies in the pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) that comprises 2.6 Mb of the short-arm tips of both the X and Y chromosomes. It is known that its heterozygous mutations cause Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) (OMIM #127300), while its homozygous mutations cause a severe form of dwarfism known as Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD) (OMIM #249700). The analysis of 238 LWD patients between 1998 and 2007 by multiple authors shows a prevalence of deletions (46.4%) compared to point mutations (21.2%). On the whole, deletions and point mutations account for about 67% of LWD patients. SHOX is located within a 1000 kb desert region without genes. The comparative genomic analysis of this region between genomes of different vertebrates has led to the identification of evolutionarily conserved non-coding DNA elements (CNE). Further functional studies have shown that one of these CNE downstream of the SHOX gene is necessary for the expression of SHOX; this is considered to be typical "enhancer" activity. Including the enhancer, the overall mutation of the SHOX region in LWD patients does not hold in 100% of cases. Various authors have demonstrated the existence of other CNE both downstream and upstream of SHOX regions. The resulting conclusion is that it is necessary to reanalyze all LWD/LMD patients without SHOX mutations for the presence of mutations in the 5'- and 3'-flanking SHOX regions.

  15. New mutations affecting induced mutagenesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C W; Krauss, B R; Christensen, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previously isolated mutations in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that impair induced mutagenesis were all identified with the aid of tests that either exclusively or predominantly detect base-pair substitutions. To avoid this bias, we have screened 11 366 potentially mutant clones for UV-induced reversion of the frameshift allele, his4-38, and have identified 10 mutants that give much reduced yields of revertants. Complementation and recombination tests show that 6 of these carry mutations at the previously known REV1, REV1 and REV3 loci, while the remaining 4 define 3 new genes, REV4 (2 mutations), REV5 and REV6. The rev4 mutations are readily suppressed in many genetic backgrounds and, like the rev5 mutation, impart only a limited deficiency for induced mutagenesis: it is likely, therefore that the REV4+ and REV5+ gene functions are only remotely concerned with this process. The rev6 mutants have a more general deficiency, however, as well as marked sensitivity to UV and an increased spontaneous mutation rate, properties that suggest the REV6 gene is directly involved in mutation induction. The REV5 gene is located about 1 cM proximal to CYC1 on chromosome X.

  16. Somatic mutations in cancer: Stochastic versus predictable.

    PubMed

    Gold, Barry

    2017-02-01

    The origins of human cancers remain unclear except for a limited number of potent environmental mutagens, such as tobacco and UV light, and in rare cases, familial germ line mutations that affect tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. A significant component of cancer etiology has been deemed stochastic and correlated with the number of stem cells in a tissue, the number of times the stem cells divide and a low incidence of random DNA polymerase errors that occur during each cell division. While somatic mutations occur during each round of DNA replication, mutations in cancer driver genes are not stochastic. Out of a total of 2843 codons, 1031 can be changed to stop codons by a single base substitution in the tumor suppressor APC gene, which is mutated in 76% of colorectal cancers (CRC). However, the nonsense mutations, which comprise 65% of all the APC driver mutations in CRC, are not random: 43% occur at Arg CGA codons, although they represent <3% of the codons. In TP53, CGA codons comprise <3% of the total 393 codons but they account for 72% and 39% of the mutations in CRC and ovarian cancer OVC, respectively. This mutation pattern is consistent with the kinetically slow, but not stochastic, hydrolytic deamination of 5-methylcytosine residues at specific methylated CpG sites to afford T·G mismatches that lead to C→T transitions and stop codons at CGA. Analysis of nonsense mutations in CRC, OVC and a number of other cancers indicates the need to expand the predictable risk factors for cancer to include, in addition to random polymerase errors, the methylation status of gene body CGA codons in tumor suppressor genes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Comprehensive mutation profiling of mucinous gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, Hirofumi; Hosoda, Fumie; Hama, Natsuko; Nakamura, Hiromi; Totoki, Yasushi; Furukawa, Eisaku; Arakawa, Erika; Ohashi, Shoko; Urushidate, Tomoko; Satoh, Hironori; Shimizu, Hiroko; Igarashi, Keiko; Yachida, Shinichi; Katai, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Fukayama, Masashi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Mucinous gastric carcinoma (MGC) is a unique subtype of gastric cancer with a poor survival outcome. Comprehensive molecular profiles and putative therapeutic targets of MGC remain undetermined. We subjected 16 tumour-normal tissue pairs to whole-exome sequencing (WES) and an expanded set of 52 tumour-normal tissue pairs to subsequent targeted sequencing. The latter focused on 114 genes identified by WES. Twenty-two histologically differentiated MGCs (D-MGCs) and 46 undifferentiated MGCs (U-MGCs) were analysed. Chromatin modifier genes, including ARID1A (21%), MLL2 (19%), MLL3 (15%), and KDM6A (7%), were frequently mutated (47%) in MGC. We also identified mutations in potential therapeutic target genes, including MTOR (9%), BRCA2 (9%), BRCA1 (7%), and ERBB3 (6%). RHOA mutation was detected only in 4% of U-MGCs and in no D-MGCs. MYH9 was recurrently (13%) mutated in MGC, with all these being of the U-MGC subtype (p = 0.023). Three U-MGCs harboured MYH9 nonsense mutations. MYH9 knockdown enhanced cell migration and induced intracytoplasmic mucin and cellular elongation. BCOR mutation was associated with improved survival. In U-MGCs, the MLH1 expression status and combined mutation status (TP53/BCL11B or TP53/MLL2) were prognostic factors. A comparative analysis of driver genes revealed that the mutation profile of D-MGC was similar to that of intestinal-type gastric cancer, whereas U-MGC was a distinct entity, harbouring a different mutational profile to intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric cancers. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. JAK and MPL mutations in myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tefferi, Ayalew

    2008-03-01

    The Janus family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and tyrosine kinase 2) transduces signals downstream of type I and II cytokine receptors via signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). JAK3 is important in lymphoid and JAK2 in myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation. The thrombopoietin receptor MPL is one of several JAK2 cognate receptors and is essential for myelopoiesis in general and megakaryopoiesis in particular. Germline loss-of-function (LOF) JAK3 and MPL mutations cause severe combined immunodeficiency and congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, respectively. Germline gain-of-function (GOF) MPL mutation (MPLS505N) causes familial thrombocytosis. Somatic JAK3 (e.g. JAK3A572V, JAK3V722I, JAK3P132T) and fusion JAK2 (e.g. ETV6-JAK2, PCM1-JAK2, BCR-JAK2) mutations have respectively been described in acute megakaryocytic leukemia and acute leukemia/chronic myeloid malignancies. However, current attention is focused on JAK2 (e.g. JAK2V617F, JAK2 exon 12 mutations) and MPL (e.g. MPLW515L/K/S, MPLS505N) mutations associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). A JAK2 mutation, primarily JAK2V617F, is invariably associated with polycythemia vera (PV). The latter mutation also occurs in the majority of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF). MPL mutational frequency in MPNs is substantially less (<10%). In general, despite a certain degree of genotype - phenotype correlations, the prognostic relevance of harbouring one of these mutations, or their allele burden when present, remains dubious. Regardless, based on the logical assumption that amplified JAK-STAT signalling is central to the pathogenesis of PV, ET and PMF, several anti-JAK2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed and are currently being tested in humans with these disorders.

  19. Mutations in the Norrie disease gene.

    PubMed

    Schuback, D E; Chen, Z Y; Craig, I W; Breakefield, X O; Sims, K B

    1995-01-01

    We report our experience to date in mutation identification in the Norrie disease (ND) gene. We carried out mutational analysis in 26 kindreds in an attempt to identify regions presumed critical to protein function and potentially correlated with generation of the disease phenotype. All coding exons, as well as noncoding regions of exons 1 and 2, 636 nucleotides in the noncoding region of exon 3, and 197 nucleotides of 5' flanking sequence, were analyzed for single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genomic DNA. DNA fragments that showed altered SSCP band mobilities were sequenced to locate the specific mutations. In addition to three previously described submicroscopic deletions encompassing the entire ND gene, we have now identified 6 intragenic deletions, 8 missense (seven point mutations, one 9-bp deletion), 6 nonsense (three point mutations, three single bp deletions/frameshift) and one 10-bp insertion, creating an expanded repeat in the 5' noncoding region of exon 1. Thus, mutations have been identified in a total of 24 of 26 (92%) of the kindreds we have studied to date. With the exception of two different mutations, each found in two apparently unrelated kindreds, these mutations are unique and expand the genotype database. Localization of the majority of point mutations at or near cysteine residues, potentially critical in protein tertiary structure, supports a previous protein model for norrin as member of a cystine knot growth factor family (Meitinger et al., 1993). Genotype-phenotype correlations were not evident with the limited clinical data available, except in the cases of larger submicroscopic deletions associated with a more severe neurologic syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. FLG mutations in ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic eczema: spectrum of mutations and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M

    2010-03-01

    Filaggrin is a key protein involved in skin barrier function. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and have been shown to be major predisposing factors for atopic eczema (AE), initially in European populations. Subsequently, FLG mutations were identified in Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese and Korean populations. It was demonstrated that FLG mutations are closely associated with AE in the Japanese population. Notably, the same FLG mutations identified in the European population were rarely found in Asians. These results exemplify differences in filaggrin population genetics between Europe and Asia. For mutation screening, background information needs to be obtained on prevalent FLG mutations for each geographical population. It is therefore important to establish the global population genetics maps for FLG mutations. Mutations at any site within FLG, even mutations in C-terminal imperfect filaggrin repeats, cause significant reductions in amounts of profilaggrin/filaggrin peptide in patient epidermis as the C-terminal region is essential for proper processing of profilaggrin into filaggrin. Thus, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed in patients with FLG mutations. A restoration of the barrier function seems a feasible and promising strategy for treatment and prevention in individuals with filaggrin deficiency.

  1. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. PMID:26590264

  2. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Detection of EGFR Gene Mutation by Mutation-oriented LAMP Method.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Kumasaka, Akira; Ando, Tomohiro; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2018-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of molecular therapeutics for non-small cell lung cancer. EGFR gene mutations at codons 746-753 promote constitutive EGFR activation and result in worst prognosis. However, these mutations augment the therapeutic effect of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Therefore, the detection of EGFR gene mutations is important for determining treatment planning. The aim of the study was to establish a method to detect EGFR gene mutations at codons 746-753. EGFR gene mutation at codons 746-753 in six cancer cell lines were investigated. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based procedure was developed, that employed peptide nucleic acid to suppress amplification of the wild-type allele. This mutation-oriented LAMP can amplify the DNA fragment of the EGFR gene with codons 746-753 mutations within 30 min. Moreover, boiled cells can work as template resources. Mutation oriented-LAMP assay for EGFR gene mutation is sensitive on extracted DNA. This procedure would be capable of detecting EGFR gene mutation in sputum, pleural effusion, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid or trans-bronchial lung biopsy by chair side. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Energy parasites trigger oncogene mutation.

    PubMed

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Jandová, Anna; Kobilková, Jitka; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Cancer initialization can be explained as a result of parasitic virus energy consumption leading to randomized genome chemical bonding. Analysis of experimental data on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) containing about 12,000 cases of healthy humans, cancer patients and patients with precancerous cervical lesions disclosed that the specific cancer and the non-specific lactate dehydrogenase-elevating (LDH) virus antigen elicit similar responses. The specific antigen is effective only in cancer type of its origin but the non-specific antigen in all examined cancers. CMI results of CIN patients display both healthy and cancer state. The ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the LDH virus parasitizing on energy reduces the ratio of coherent/random oscillations. Decreased effect of coherent cellular electromagnetic field on bonding electrons in biological macromolecules leads to elevating probability of random genome reactions. Overlapping of wave functions in biological macromolecules depends on energy of the cellular electromagnetic field which supplies energy to bonding electrons for selective chemical bonds. CMI responses of cancer and LDH virus antigens in all examined healthy, precancerous and cancer cases point to energy mechanism in cancer initiation. Dependence of the rate of biochemical reactions on biological electromagnetic field explains yet unknown mechanism of genome mutation.

  5. Exome-wide Sequencing Shows Low Mutation Rates and Identifies Novel Mutated Genes in Seminomas.

    PubMed

    Cutcutache, Ioana; Suzuki, Yuka; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Ramgopal, Subhashini; Zhang, Shenli; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Gan, Anna; Lee, Heng Hong; Tay, Su Ting; Ooi, Aikseng; Ong, Choon Kiat; Bolthouse, Jonathan T; Lane, Brian R; Anema, John G; Kahnoski, Richard J; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean; Rozen, Steven G

    2015-07-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors are the most common cancer diagnosed in young men, and seminomas are the most common type of these cancers. There have been no exome-wide examinations of genes mutated in seminomas or of overall rates of nonsilent somatic mutations in these tumors. The objective was to analyze somatic mutations in seminomas to determine which genes are affected and to determine rates of nonsilent mutations. Eight seminomas and matched normal samples were surgically obtained from eight patients. DNA was extracted from tissue samples and exome sequenced on massively parallel Illumina DNA sequencers. Single-nucleotide polymorphism chip-based copy number analysis was also performed to assess copy number alterations. The DNA sequencing read data were analyzed to detect somatic mutations including single-nucleotide substitutions and short insertions and deletions. The detected mutations were validated by independent sequencing and further checked for subclonality. The rate of nonsynonymous somatic mutations averaged 0.31 mutations/Mb. We detected nonsilent somatic mutations in 96 genes that were not previously known to be mutated in seminomas, of which some may be driver mutations. Many of the mutations appear to have been present in subclonal populations. In addition, two genes, KIT and KRAS, were affected in two tumors each with mutations that were previously observed in other cancers and are presumably oncogenic. Our study, the first report on exome sequencing of seminomas, detected somatic mutations in 96 new genes, several of which may be targetable drivers. Furthermore, our results show that seminoma mutation rates are five times higher than previously thought, but are nevertheless low compared to other common cancers. Similar low rates are seen in other cancers that also have excellent rates of remission achieved with chemotherapy. We examined the DNA sequences of seminomas, the most common type of testicular germ cell cancer. Our study identified 96

  6. iMARS--mutation analysis reporting software: an analysis of spontaneous cII mutation spectra.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Claire; Lewis, Paul D

    2006-01-31

    The sensitivity of any mutational assay is determined by the level at which spontaneous mutations occur in the corresponding untreated controls. Establishing the type and frequency at which mutations occur naturally within a test system is essential if one is to draw scientifically sound conclusions regarding chemically induced mutations. Currently, mutation-spectra analysis is laborious and time-consuming. Thus, we have developed iMARS, a comprehensive mutation-spectrum analysis package that utilises routinely used methodologies and visualisation tools. To demonstrate the use and capabilities of iMARS, we have analysed the distribution, types and sequence context of spontaneous base substitutions derived from the cII gene mutation assay in transgenic animals. Analysis of spontaneous mutation spectra revealed variation both within and between the transgenic rodent test systems Big Blue Mouse, MutaMouse and Big Blue Rat. The most common spontaneous base substitutions were G:C-->A:T transitions and G:C-->T:A transversions. All Big Blue Mouse spectra were significantly different from each other by distribution and nearly all by mutation type, whereas the converse was true for the other test systems. Twenty-eight mutation hotspots were observed across all spectra generally occurring in CG, GA/TC, GG and GC dinucleotides. A mutation hotspot at nucleotide 212 occurred at a higher frequency in MutaMouse and Big Blue Rat. In addition, CG dinucleotides were the most mutable in all spectra except two Big Blue Mouse spectra. Thus, spontaneous base-substitution spectra showed more variation in distribution, type and sequence context in Big Blue Mouse relative to spectra derived from MutaMouse and Big Blue Rat. The results of our analysis provide a baseline reference for mutation studies utilising the cII gene in transgenic rodent models. The potential differences in spontaneous base-substitution spectra should be considered when making comparisons between these test systems

  7. A Ruby in the Rubbish: Beneficial Mutations, Deleterious Mutations and the Evolution of Sex

    PubMed Central

    Peck, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    This study presents a mathematical model in which a single beneficial mutation arises in a very large population that is subject to frequent deleterious mutations. The results suggest that, if the population is sexual, then the deleterious mutations will have little effect on the ultimate fate of the beneficial mutation. However, if most offspring are produced asexually, then the probability that the beneficial mutation will be lost from the population may be greatly enhanced by the deleterious mutations. Thus, sexual populations may adapt much more quickly than populations where most reproduction is asexual. Some of the results were produced using computer simulation methods, and a technique was developed that allows treatment of arbitrarily large numbers of individuals in a reasonable amount of computer time. This technique may be of prove useful for the analysis of a wide variety of models, though there are some constraints on its applicability. For example, the technique requires that reproduction can be described by Poisson processes. PMID:8070669

  8. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Ian R.; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P. Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    The advance in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA has enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large number of tumor samples. Here, we review recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates, spectrums, and roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses as well as the challenges ahead translating these genomic data into clinical impacts. PMID:24022702

  9. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  10. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca) PMID:9016528

  11. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  12. Germline Mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Korean Ovarian Cancer Patients: Finding Founder Mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Chul; Heo, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ja-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Park, Hyun; Joo, Won Duk; Lee, Chan; Lee, Je Ho; Lee, Jun Mo; Hwang, Yoon Young; Kim, Seung Jo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the BRCA mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients with or without family history and to find founder mutations in this group. One hundred two patients who underwent a staging operation for pathologically proven epithelial cancer between January 2013 and December 2014 were enrolled. Thirty-two patients declined to analyze BRCA1/2 gene alterations after genetic counseling and pedigree analysis. Lymphocyte specimens from peripheral blood were assessed for BRCA1/2 by direct sequencing. BRCA genetic test results of 70 patients were available. Eighteen BRCA1/2 mutations and 17 unclassified variations (UVs) were found. Five of the BRCA1/2 mutations and 4 of the UVs were not reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core database. One BRCA2 UV (8665_8667delGGA) was strongly suspicious to be a deleterious mutation. BRCA1/2 mutations were identified in 11 (61.1%) of 18 patients with a family history and in 7 (13.5%) of 52 patients without a family history.Candidates for founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were assessed among 39 BRCA1/2 mutations from the present study and from literature reviews. The analysis showed that 1041_1043delAGCinsT (n = 4; 10.2%) and 3746insA (n = 4; 10.2%) were possible BRCA1 founder mutations. Only one of the BRCA2 mutations (5804_5807delTTAA) was repeated twice (n = 2; 5.1%). The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients irrespective of the family history was significantly higher than previously reported. Possible founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were identified.

  13. Effect of Mutation Order on Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nangalia, Jyoti; Silber, Yvonne; Wedge, David C.; Grinfeld, Jacob; Baxter, E. Joanna; Massie, Charles E.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Menon, Suraj; Godfrey, Anna L.; Dimitropoulou, Danai; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carles; Döhner, Konstanze; Harrison, Claire N.; Vassiliou, George S.; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Campbell, Peter J.; Green, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancers result from the accumulation of somatic mutations, and their properties are thought to reflect the sum of these mutations. However, little is known about the effect of the order in which mutations are acquired. METHODS We determined mutation order in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms by genotyping hematopoietic colonies or by means of next-generation sequencing. Stem cells and progenitor cells were isolated to study the effect of mutation order on mature and immature hematopoietic cells. RESULTS The age at which a patient presented with a myeloproliferative neoplasm, acquisition of JAK2 V617F homozygosity, and the balance of immature progenitors were all influenced by mutation order. As compared with patients in whom the TET2 mutation was acquired first (hereafter referred to as “TET2-first patients”), patients in whom the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation was acquired first (“JAK2-first patients”) had a greater likelihood of presenting with polycythemia vera than with essential thrombocythemia, an increased risk of thrombosis, and an increased sensitivity of JAK2-mutant progenitors to ruxolitinib in vitro. Mutation order influenced the proliferative response to JAK2 V617F and the capacity of double-mutant hematopoietic cells and progenitor cells to generate colony-forming cells. Moreover, the hematopoietic stem-and-progenitor-cell compartment was dominated by TET2 single-mutant cells in TET2-first patients but by JAK2–TET2 double-mutant cells in JAK2-first patients. Prior mutation of TET2 altered the transcriptional consequences of JAK2 V617F in a cell-intrinsic manner and prevented JAK2 V617F from up-regulating genes associated with proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The order in which JAK2 and TET2 mutations were acquired influenced clinical features, the response to targeted therapy, the biology of stem and progenitor cells, and clonal evolution in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. (Funded by Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

  14. Factor V Leiden mutation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Normal maternal adaptation to pregnancy significantly increases the risk for thrombus formation. Inherited thrombophilias further increase risk for deep venous thrombosis and adverse outcome in pregnancy. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common inherited thrombophilia, occurring in approximately 5% of the White and 1% of the Black populations. Nurses should be knowledgeable about screening for and diagnosis of factor V Leiden mutation, risk reduction counseling, recommended care of the affected patient, and implications of anticoagulant therapy during the perinatal period.

  15. Mutations in GNA11 in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Van Raamsdonk, Catherine D.; Griewank, Klaus G.; Crosby, Michelle B.; Garrido, Maria C.; Vemula, Swapna; Wiesner, Thomas; Obenauf, Anna C.; Wackernagel, Werner; Green, Gary; Bouvier, Nancy; Sozen, M. Mert; Baimukanova, Gail; Roy, Ritu; Heguy, Adriana; Dolgalev, Igor; Khanin, Raya; Busam, Klaus; Speicher, Michael R.; O’Brien, Joan; Bastian, Boris C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uveal melanoma is the most common intraocular cancer. There are no effective therapies for metastatic disease. Mutations in GNAQ, the gene encoding an alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins, are found in 40% of uveal melanomas. METHODS We sequenced exon 5 of GNAQ and GNA11, a paralogue of GNAQ, in 713 melanocytic neoplasms of different types (186 uveal melanomas, 139 blue nevi, 106 other nevi, and 282 other melanomas). We sequenced exon 4 of GNAQ and GNA11 in 453 of these samples and in all coding exons of GNAQ and GNA11 in 97 uveal melanomas and 45 blue nevi. RESULTS We found somatic mutations in exon 5 (affecting Q209) and in exon 4 (affecting R183) in both GNA11 and GNAQ, in a mutually exclusive pattern. Mutations affecting Q209 in GNA11 were present in 7% of blue nevi, 32% of primary uveal melanomas, and 57% of uveal melanoma metastases. In contrast, we observed Q209 mutations in GNAQ in 55% of blue nevi, 45% of uveal melanomas, and 22% of uveal melanoma metastases. Mutations affecting R183 in either GNAQ or GNA11 were less prevalent (2% of blue nevi and 6% of uveal melanomas) than the Q209 mutations. Mutations in GNA11 induced spontaneously metastasizing tumors in a mouse model and activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. CONCLUSIONS Of the uveal melanomas we analyzed, 83% had somatic mutations in GNAQ or GNA11. Constitutive activation of the pathway involving these two genes appears to be a major contributor to the development of uveal melanoma. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:21083380

  16. Mutational Analysis of Cell Types in TSC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain structure known as tubers in over 80% of TSC patients. Loss of...that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain structure...2000). Comorbid neuropsychological disorders such as autism , mental retardation (MR), pervasive developmental disorder, attention deficit disorder (ADD

  17. [Morphological signs of mitochondrial cytopathy in skeletal muscles and micro-vessel walls in a patient with cerebral artery dissection associated with MELAS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sakharova, A V; Kalashnikova, L A; Chaĭkovskaia, R P; Mir-Kasimov, M F; Nazarova, M A; Pykhtina, T N; Dobrynina, L A; Patrusheva, N L; Patrushev, L I; Protskiĭ, S V

    2012-01-01

    Skin and muscles biopsy specimens of a patient harboring A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA, with dissection of internal carotid and vertebral arteries, associated with MELAS were studied using histochemical and electron-microscopy techniques. Ragged red fibers, regional variability of SDH histochemical reaction, two types of morphologically atypical mitochondria and their aggregation were found in muscle. There was correlation between SDH histochemical staining and number of mitochondria revealed by electron microscopy in muscle tissue. Similar mitochondrial abnormality, their distribution and cell lesions followed by extra-cellular matrix mineralization were found in the blood vessel walls. In line with generalization of cytopathy process caused by gene mutation it can be supposed that changes found in skin and muscle microvessels also exist in large cerebral vessels causing the vessel wall "weakness", predisposing them to dissection.

  18. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070; Wang, Guang-Zhong

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} There exists a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. {yields} This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. {yields} A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot providemore » a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.« less

  19. KIT Mutations Are Common in Testicular Seminomas

    PubMed Central

    Kemmer, Kathleen; Corless, Christopher L.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; McGreevey, Laura; Haley, Andrea; Griffith, Diana; Cummings, Oscar W.; Wait, Cecily; Town, Ajia; Heinrich, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Expression of KIT tyrosine kinase is critical for normal germ cell development and is observed in the majority of seminomas. Activating mutations in KIT are common in gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mastocytosis. In this study we examined the frequency and spectrum of KIT mutations in 54 testicular seminomas, 1 ovarian dysgerminoma and 37 non-seminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT). Fourteen seminomas (25.9%) contained exon 17 point mutations including D816V (6 cases), D816H (3 cases), Y823D (2 cases), and single examples of Y823C, N822K, and T801I. No KIT mutations were found in the ovarian dysgerminoma or the NSGCTs. In transient transfection assays, mutant isoforms D816V, D816H, Y823D, and N822K were constitutively phosphorylated in the absence of the natural ligand for KIT, stem cell factor (SCF). In contrast, activation of T801I and wild-type KIT required SCF. Mutants N822K and Y823D were inhibited by imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, previously STI571) whereas D816V and D816H were both resistant to imatinib mesylate. Biochemical evidence of KIT activation, as assessed by KIT phosphorylation and KIT association with phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase in tumor cell lysates, was largely confined to seminomas with a genomic KIT mutation. These findings suggest that activating KIT mutations may contribute to tumorigenesis in a subset of seminomas, but are not involved in NSGCT. PMID:14695343

  20. Mutation drivers of immunological responses to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Godzik, Adam

    2016-01-01

    In cancer immunology, somatic missense mutations have been mostly studied regarding their role in the generation of neoantigens. However, growing evidence suggests that mutations in certain genes, such as CASP8 or TP53, influence the immune response against a tumor by other mechanisms. Identifying these genes and mechanisms is important because, just as the identification of cancer driver genes led to the development of personalized cancer therapies, a comprehensive catalog of such cancer immunity drivers will aid in the development of therapies aimed at restoring antitumor immunity. Here we present an algorithm, domainXplorer, that can be used to identify potential cancer immunity drivers. To demonstrate its potential, we used it to analyze a dataset of 5,164 tumor samples from TCGA and to identify protein domains whose mutation status correlates with the presence of immune cells in cancer tissue (immune infiltrate). We identified 122 such protein regions including several that belong to proteins with known roles in immune response, such as C2, CD163L1, or FCγR2A. In several cases we show that mutations within the same protein can be associated with more or less immune cell infiltration, depending on the specific domain mutated. These results expand the catalog of potential cancer immunity drivers and highlight the importance of taking into account the structural context of somatic mutations when analyzing their potential association with immune phenotypes. PMID:27401919

  1. Apparent directional selection by biased pleiotropic mutation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2010-07-01

    Pleiotropic effects of deleterious mutations are considered to be among the factors responsible for genetic constraints on evolution by long-term directional selection acting on a quantitative trait. If pleiotropic phenotypic effects are biased in a particular direction, mutations generate apparent directional selection, which refers to the covariance between fitness and the trait owing to a linear association between the number of mutations possessed by individuals and the genotypic values of the trait. The present analysis has shown how the equilibrium mean value of the trait is determined by a balance between directional selection and biased pleiotropic mutations. Assuming that genes act additively both on the trait and on fitness, the total variance-standardized directional selection gradient was decomposed into apparent and true components. Experimental data on mutation bias from the bristle traits of Drosophila and life history traits of Daphnia suggest that apparent selection explains a small but significant fraction of directional selection pressure that is observed in nature; the data suggest that changes induced in a trait by biased pleiotropic mutation (i.e., by apparent directional selection) are easily compensated for by (true) directional selection.

  2. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  3. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Parvari, Ruti; Levitas, Aviva

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes. PMID:22830024

  4. The mutations associated with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Parvari, Ruti; Levitas, Aviva

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  5. Experimental evolution and the dynamics of genomic mutation rate modifiers.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Y; Sniegowski, P D

    2014-11-01

    Because genes that affect mutation rates are themselves subject to mutation, mutation rates can be influenced by natural selection and other evolutionary forces. The population genetics of mutation rate modifier alleles has been a subject of theoretical interest for many decades. Here, we review experimental contributions to our understanding of mutation rate modifier dynamics. Numerous evolution experiments have shown that mutator alleles (modifiers that elevate the genomic mutation rate) can readily rise to high frequencies via genetic hitchhiking in non-recombining microbial populations. Whereas these results certainly provide an explanatory framework for observations of sporadically high mutation rates in pathogenic microbes and in cancer lineages, it is nonetheless true that most natural populations have very low mutation rates. This raises the interesting question of how mutator hitchhiking is suppressed or its phenotypic effect reversed in natural populations. Very little experimental work has addressed this question; with this in mind, we identify some promising areas for future experimental investigation.

  6. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-04-01

    Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6-14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4 months in the mutant group versus 42.4 months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Frequent PIK3CA Mutations in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer with Double Somatic Mismatch Repair Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stacey A.; Turner, Emily H.; Beightol, Mallory B.; Jacobson, Angela; Gooley, Ted A.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Smith, Christina; Scroggins, Sheena; Tait, Jonathan F.; Grady, William M.; Lin, Edward H.; Cohn, David E.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Arnold, Mark W.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pearlman, Rachel; Hampel, Heather; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Double somatic mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have recently been described in colorectal and endometrial cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI) not attributable to MLH1 hypermethylation or germline mutation. We sought to define the molecular phenotype of this newly recognized tumor subtype. Methods From two prospective Lynch syndrome screening studies, we identified patients with colorectal and endometrial tumors harboring ≥2 somatic MMR mutations, but normal germline MMR testing (“double somatic”). We determined the frequencies of tumor PIK3CA, BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, and PTEN mutations by targeted next-generation sequencing and used logistic-regression models to compare them to: Lynch syndrome, MLH1 hypermethylated, and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. We validated our findings using independent datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Results Among colorectal cancer cases, we found that 14/21 (67%) of double somatic cases had PIK3CA mutations vs. 4/18 (22%) Lynch syndrome, 2/10 (20%) MLH1 hypermethylated, and 12/78 (15%) MSS tumors; p<0.0001. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 100% of 13 double somatic endometrial cancers (p=0.04). BRAF mutations were absent in double somatic and Lynch syndrome colorectal tumors. We found highly similar results in a validation cohort from TCGA (113 colorectal, 178 endometrial cancer), with 100% of double somatic cases harboring a PIK3CA mutation (p<0.0001). Conclusions PIK3CA mutations are present in double somatic mutated colorectal and endometrial cancers at substantially higher frequencies than other MSI subgroups. PIK3CA mutation status may better define an emerging molecular entity in colorectal and endometrial cancers, with the potential to inform screening and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27302833

  8. MUTATIONS INDUCED BY URBAN AIR AND DRINKING WATER: DO THEY LEAVE A MUTATIONAL SIGNATURE IN HUMAN TUMORS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutations Induced by Urban Air and Drinking Water: Do They Leave a Mutational Signature in Human Tumors?

    Mutation spectra of complex environmental mixtures have been determined thus far only in Salmonella. We have determined mutation spectra for the particulate organics ...

  9. Spontaneous mutation during the sexual cycle of Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Watters, M.K.; Stadler, D.R.

    The DNA sequences of 42 spontaneous mutations of the mtr gene in Neurospora crassa have been determined. The mutants were selected among sexual spores to represent mutations arising in the sexual cycle. Three sexual-cycle-specific mutational classes are described: hotspot mutants, spontaneous repeat-induced point mutation (RIPs) and mutations occurring during a mutagenic phase of the sexual cycle. Together, these three sexual-cycle-specific mutational classes account for 50% of the mutations in the sexual-cycle mutational spectrum. One third of all mutations occurred at one of two mutational hotspots that predominantly produced tandem duplications of varying lengths with short repeats at their end-points. Neithermore » of the two hotspots are present in the vegetative spectrum, suggesting that sexual-cycle-specific mutational pathways are responsible for their presence in the spectrum. One mutant was observed that appeared to have been RIPed precociously. The usual prerequisite for RIP, a duplication of the affected region, was not present in the parent stocks and was not detected in this mutant. Finally, there is a phase early in the premeiotic sexual cycle that is overrepresented in the generation of mutations. This {open_quotes}peak{close_quotes} appears to represent a phase during which the mutation rate rises significantly. This phase produces a disproportionally high fraction of frame shift mutations. In divisions subsequent to this, the mutation rate appears to be constant. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  10. [Gene mutation analysis of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Ma, Hong-Wei; Li, Fang; Hu, Man; Ren, Shuang; Yu, Ya-Fen; Zhao, Gui-Jie

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of PHEX gene mutations in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), the possible presence of mutational hot spots, and the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Clinical data of 10 children with XLH was retrospectively reviewed. The relationship between gene mutation type and severity of XLH was evaluated. PHEX gene mutations were detected in all 10 children with XLH, including 6 cases of missense mutation, 2 cases of splice site mutation, 1 case of frameshift mutation, and 1 case of nonsense mutation. Two new mutations, c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG, were found. The type of PHEX gene mutation was not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.571 and 0.467), and the mutation site was also not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.400 and 1.000). Missense mutation is the most common type of PHEX gene mutation in children with XLH, and c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG are two new PHEX gene mutations. The type and site of PHEX gene mutation are not associated with the severity of XLH.

  11. Recurrent and founder mutations in the PMS2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Tomsic, Jerneja; Senter, Leigha; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Clendenning, Mark; Vaughn, Cecily P.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Young, Joanne; Samowitz, Wade; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in PMS2 are associated with Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common known cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Mutation detection in PMS2 has been difficult due to the presence of several pseudogenes, but a custom-designed long-range PCR strategy now allows adequate mutation detection. Many mutations are unique. However some mutations are observed repeatedly, across individuals not known to be related, due to the mutation being either recurrent, arising multiple times de novo at hot spots for mutations, or of founder origin, having occurred once in an ancestor. Previously, we observed 36 distinct mutations in a sample of 61 independently ascertained Caucasian probands of mixed European background with PMS2 mutations. Eleven of these mutations were detected in more than one individual not known to be related and of these, six were detected more than twice. These six mutations accounted for 31 (51%) ostensibly unrelated probands. Here we performed genotyping and haplotype analysis in four mutations observed in multiple probands and found two (c.137G>T and exon 10 deletion) to be founder mutations, one (c.903G>T) a probable founder, and one (c.1A>G) where founder mutation status could not be evaluated. We discuss possible explanations for the frequent occurrence of founder mutations in PMS2. PMID:22577899

  12. Recurrent and founder mutations in the PMS2 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, J; Senter, L; Liyanarachchi, S; Clendenning, M; Vaughn, C P; Jenkins, M A; Hopper, J L; Young, J; Samowitz, W; de la Chapelle, A

    2013-03-01

    Germline mutations in PMS2 are associated with Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common known cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Mutation detection in PMS2 has been difficult due to the presence of several pseudogenes, but a custom-designed long-range PCR strategy now allows adequate mutation detection. Many mutations are unique. However, some mutations are observed repeatedly across individuals not known to be related due to the mutation being either recurrent, arising multiple times de novo at hot spots for mutations, or of founder origin, having occurred once in an ancestor. Previously, we observed 36 distinct mutations in a sample of 61 independently ascertained Caucasian probands of mixed European background with PMS2 mutations. Eleven of these mutations were detected in more than one individual not known to be related and of these, six were detected more than twice. These six mutations accounted for 31 (51%) ostensibly unrelated probands. Here, we performed genotyping and haplotype analysis in four mutations observed in multiple probands and found two (c.137G>T and exon 10 deletion) to be founder mutations and one (c.903G>T) a probable founder. One (c.1A>G) could not be evaluated for founder mutation status. We discuss possible explanations for the frequent occurrence of founder mutations in PMS2. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Similar Mutation Rates but Highly Diverse Mutation Spectra in Ascomycete and Basidiomycete Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Long, Hongan; Behringer, Megan G; Williams, Emily; Te, Ronald; Lynch, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Yeast species are extremely diverse and not monophyletic. Because the majority of yeast research focuses on ascomycetes, the mutational determinants of genetic diversity across yeast species are not well understood. By combining mutation-accumulation techniques with whole-genome sequencing, we resolved the genomic mutation rate and spectrum of the oleaginous (oil-producing) ‘red yeast’ Rhodotorula toruloides, the first such study in the fungal phylum Basidiomycota. We find that the mutation spectrum is quite different from what has been observed in all other studied unicellular eukaryotes, but similar to that in most bacteria—a predominance of transitions relative to transversions. Rhodotorula toruloides has a significantly higher A:T→G:C transition rate—possibly elevated by the abundant flanking G/C nucleotides in the GC-rich genome, as well as a much lower G:C→T:A transversion rate. In spite of these striking differences, there are substantial consistencies between R. toruloides and the ascomycete model yeasts: a spontaneous base-substitution mutation rate of 1.90 × 10 −10 per site per cell division as well as an elevated mutation rate at non-methylated 5'CpG3' sites. These results imply the evolution of variable mutation spectra in the face of similar mutation rates in yeasts.

  14. Clustered Mutation Signatures Reveal that Error-Prone DNA Repair Targets Mutations to Active Genes.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2017-07-27

    Many processes can cause the same nucleotide change in a genome, making the identification of the mechanisms causing mutations a difficult challenge. Here, we show that clustered mutations provide a more precise fingerprint of mutagenic processes. Of nine clustered mutation signatures identified from >1,000 tumor genomes, three relate to variable APOBEC activity and three are associated with tobacco smoking. An additional signature matches the spectrum of translesion DNA polymerase eta (POLH). In lymphoid cells, these mutations target promoters, consistent with AID-initiated somatic hypermutation. In solid tumors, however, they are associated with UV exposure and alcohol consumption and target the H3K36me3 chromatin of active genes in a mismatch repair (MMR)-dependent manner. These regions normally have a low mutation rate because error-free MMR also targets H3K36me3 chromatin. Carcinogens and error-prone repair therefore redistribute mutations to the more important regions of the genome, contributing a substantial mutation load in many tumors, including driver mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fitness change in relation to mutation number in spontaneous mutation accumulation lines of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Susanne A.; Böndel, Katharina B.; Ness, Robert W.; Keightley, Peter D.; Colegrave, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although all genetic variation ultimately stems from mutations, their properties are difficult to study directly. Here, we used multiple mutation accumulation (MA) lines derived from five genetic backgrounds of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that have been previously subjected to whole genome sequencing to investigate the relationship between the number of spontaneous mutations and change in fitness from a nonevolved ancestor. MA lines were on average less fit than their ancestors and we detected a significantly negative correlation between the change in fitness and the total number of accumulated mutations in the genome. Likewise, the number of mutations located within coding regions significantly and negatively impacted MA line fitness. We used the fitness data to parameterize a maximum likelihood model to estimate discrete categories of mutational effects, and found that models containing one to two mutational effect categories (one neutral and one deleterious category) fitted the data best. However, the best‐fitting mutational effects models were highly dependent on the genetic background of the ancestral strain. PMID:28884790

  16. Mutation screening of X-chromosomal neuroligin genes: no mutations in 196 autism probands.

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B; Kolozsvari, Debbie; Roberts, Wendy S; Bolton, Patrick F; Gurling, Hugh M D; Scherer, Stephen W

    2004-08-15

    Autism, a childhood neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic component, is currently the focus of considerable attention within the field of human genetics as well many other medical-related disciplines. A recent study has implicated two X-chromosomal neuroligin genes, NLGN3 and NLGN4, as having an etiological role in autism, having identified a frameshift mutation in one gene and a substitution mutation in the other, segregating in multiplex autism spectrum families (Jamain et al. [2003: Nat Genet 34:27-29]). The function of neuroligin as a trigger for synapse formation would suggest that such mutations would likely result in some form of pathological manifestation. Our own study, screening a larger sample of 196 autism probands, failed to identify any mutations that would affect the coding regions of these genes. Our findings suggest that mutations in these two genes are infrequent in autism. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Spectrum of mutations in RARS-T patients includes TET2 and ASXL1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna M; Makishima, Hideki; Bodo, Juraj; Bejanyan, Nelli; Hsi, Eric D; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2010-08-01

    While a majority of patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis harbor JAK2V617F and rarely MPLW515L, JAK2/MPL-negative cases constitute a diagnostic problem. 23 RARS-T cases were investigated applying immunohistochemical phospho-STAT5, sequencing and SNP-A-based karyotyping. Based on the association of TET2/ASXL1 mutations with MDS/MPN we studied molecular pattern of these genes. Two patients harbored ASXL1 and another 2 TET2 mutations. Phospho-STAT5 activation was present in one mutated TET2 and ASXL1 case. JAK2V617F/MPLW515L mutations were absent in TET2/ASXL1 mutants, indicating that similar clinical phenotype can be produced by various MPN-associated mutations and that additional unifying lesions may be present in RARS-T. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonaminoglycoside compounds induce readthrough of nonsense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Damoiseaux, Robert; Nahas, Shareef; Gao, Kun; Hu, Hailiang; Pollard, Julianne M.; Goldstine, Jimena; Jung, Michael E.; Henning, Susanne M.; Bertoni, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Large numbers of genetic disorders are caused by nonsense mutations for which compound-induced readthrough of premature termination codons (PTCs) might be exploited as a potential treatment strategy. We have successfully developed a sensitive and quantitative high-throughput screening (HTS) assay, protein transcription/translation (PTT)–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for identifying novel PTC-readthrough compounds using ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) as a genetic disease model. This HTS PTT-ELISA assay is based on a coupled PTT that uses plasmid templates containing prototypic A-T mutated (ATM) mutations for HTS. The assay is luciferase independent. We screened ∼34,000 compounds and identified 12 low-molecular-mass nonaminoglycosides with potential PTC-readthrough activity. From these, two leading compounds consistently induced functional ATM protein in ATM-deficient cells containing disease-causing nonsense mutations, as demonstrated by direct measurement of ATM protein, restored ATM kinase activity, and colony survival assays for cellular radiosensitivity. The two compounds also demonstrated readthrough activity in mdx mouse myotube cells carrying a nonsense mutation and induced significant amounts of dystrophin protein. PMID:19770270

  19. Fanconi anemia founder mutation in Macedonian patients.

    PubMed

    Madjunkova, Svetlana; Kocheva, Svetlana A; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) and profound cancer predisposition. Approximately 65% of all affected individuals have mutation in the FANCA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A) gene. The mutation spectrum of the FANCA gene is highly heterogeneous. FA-A is usually associated with private FANCA mutations in individual families. We describe 3 unrelated patients with FA with a similar clinical presentation: BMF, renal anomalies and café-au-lait pigmentation without major skeletal abnormality. The molecular analysis of the FANCA gene using the FA MLPA kit P031-A2/P032 FANCA, showed homozygous deletion of exon 3 in all 3 patients. Molecular analysis of the flanking regions of exon 3 precisely defined unique deletion of 2,040 bp and duplication of C (1788_3828dupC). These are the first 3 patients homozygous for deletion of FANCA exon 3 described to date. Although not related, the patients originated from the same Gypsy-like ethnic population. We conclude that c.190-256_283 + 1680del2040 dupC mutation in the FANCA gene is a founder mutation in Macedonian FA patients of Gypsy-like ethnic origin. Our finding has very strong implications for these patients in formulating diagnostic and carrier-screening strategy for BMF and FA and to enable comprehensive genetic counseling. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Urinary tract effects of HPSE2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Helen M; Roberts, Neil A; Hilton, Emma N; McKenzie, Edward A; Daly, Sarah B; Hadfield, Kristen D; Rahal, Jeffery S; Gardiner, Natalie J; Tanley, Simon W; Lewis, Malcolm A; Sites, Emily; Angle, Brad; Alves, Cláudia; Lourenço, Teresa; Rodrigues, Márcia; Calado, Angelina; Amado, Marta; Guerreiro, Nancy; Serras, Inês; Beetz, Christian; Varga, Rita-Eva; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Darlow, John M; Dobson, Mark G; Barton, David E; Hunziker, Manuela; Puri, Prem; Feather, Sally A; Goodship, Judith A; Goodship, Timothy H J; Lambert, Heather J; Cordell, Heather J; Saggar, Anand; Kinali, Maria; Lorenz, Christian; Moeller, Kristina; Schaefer, Franz; Bayazit, Aysun K; Weber, Stefanie; Newman, William G; Woolf, Adrian S

    2015-04-01

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is an autosomal recessive congenital disease featuring grimacing and incomplete bladder emptying. Mutations of HPSE2, encoding heparanase 2, a heparanase 1 inhibitor, occur in UFS, but knowledge about the HPSE2 mutation spectrum is limited. Here, seven UFS kindreds with HPSE2 mutations are presented, including one with deleted asparagine 254, suggesting a role for this amino acid, which is conserved in vertebrate orthologs. HPSE2 mutations were absent in 23 non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder probands and, of 439 families with nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux, only one carried a putative pathogenic HPSE2 variant. Homozygous Hpse2 mutant mouse bladders contained urine more often than did wild-type organs, phenocopying human UFS. Pelvic ganglia neural cell bodies contained heparanase 1, heparanase 2, and leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains-2 (LRIG2), which is mutated in certain UFS families. In conclusion, heparanase 2 is an autonomic neural protein implicated in bladder emptying, but HPSE2 variants are uncommon in urinary diseases resembling UFS. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Novel mutations target distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Giles; Parker, Matthew; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Lu, Charles; Chen, Xiang; Ding, Li; Phoenix, Timothy N.; Hedlund, Erin; Wei, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chalhoub, Nader; Baker, Suzanne J.; Huether, Robert; Kriwacki, Richard; Curley, Natasha; Thiruvenkatam, Radhika; Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Gang; Rusch, Michael; Hong, Xin; Beckford, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Ma, Jing; Easton, John; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Lin, Tong; Li, Shaoyi; Pounds, Stanley; Paugh, Steven; Zhao, David; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Roussel, Martine F.; Finkelstein, David; Ellison, David W.; Lau, Ching C.; Bouffet, Eric; Hassall, Tim; Gururangan, Sridharan; Cohn, Richard; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ochoa, Kerri; Gajjar, Amar; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Zhang, Jinghui; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a malignant childhood brain tumour comprising four discrete subgroups. To identify mutations that drive medulloblastoma we sequenced the entire genomes of 37 tumours and matched normal blood. One hundred and thirty-six genes harbouring somatic mutations in this discovery set were sequenced in an additional 56 medulloblastomas. Recurrent mutations were detected in 41 genes not yet implicated in medulloblastoma: several target distinct components of the epigenetic machinery in different disease subgroups, e.g., regulators of H3K27 and H3K4 trimethylation in subgroup-3 and 4 (e.g., KDM6A and ZMYM3), and CTNNB1-associated chromatin remodellers in WNT-subgroup tumours (e.g., SMARCA4 and CREBBP). Modelling of mutations in mouse lower rhombic lip progenitors that generate WNT-subgroup tumours, identified genes that maintain this cell lineage (DDX3X) as well as mutated genes that initiate (CDH1) or cooperate (PIK3CA) in tumourigenesis. These data provide important new insights into the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma subgroups and highlight targets for therapeutic development. PMID:22722829

  2. Mechanisms of mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Ross L

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, a series of studies have provided genetic insight into the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). It is now known that JAK2V617F mutations are present in 90% of patients with polycythaemia vera (PV), 60% of patients with essential thrombocytosis (ET) and 50% of patients with myelofibrosis (MF). Despite the high prevalence of JAK2V617F mutations in these three myeloid malignancies, several questions remain. For example, how does one mutation contribute to the pathogenesis of three clinically distinct diseases, and how do some patients develop these diseases in the absence of a JAK2V617F mutation? Single nucleotide polymorphisms at various loci and somatic mutations, such as those in MPLW515L/K, TET2 and in exon 12 of JAK2, may also contribute to the pathogenesis of these MPNs. There are likely additional germline and somatic genetic factors important to the MPN phenotype. Additional studies of large MPN and control cohorts with new techniques will help identify these factors.

  3. Identifying pathways affected by cancer mutations.

    PubMed

    Iengar, Prathima

    2017-12-16

    Mutations in 15 cancers, sourced from the COSMIC Whole Genomes database, and 297 human pathways, arranged into pathway groups based on the processes they orchestrate, and sourced from the KEGG pathway database, have together been used to identify pathways affected by cancer mutations. Genes studied in ≥15, and mutated in ≥10 samples of a cancer have been considered recurrently mutated, and pathways with recurrently mutated genes have been considered affected in the cancer. Novel doughnut plots have been presented which enable visualization of the extent to which pathways and genes, in each pathway group, are targeted, in each cancer. The 'organismal systems' pathway group (including organism-level pathways; e.g., nervous system) is the most targeted, more than even the well-recognized signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis, and DNA repair pathway groups. The important, yet poorly-recognized, role played by the group merits attention. Pathways affected in ≥7 cancers yielded insights into processes affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. p53 mutation and expression in lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, D. J.; Thompson, W. D.; Dawson, A. A.; Bennett, B.; Haites, N. E.

    1995-01-01

    Mutation and abnormal expression of p53 was studied in 38 lymphomas [five Hodgkin's disease and 33 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)]. CM1 polyclonal antibody was used to detect overexpression of p53. Three missense mutations were characterised in three cases of NHL after screening exons 5-8 of p53 of all the tumours with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Only two out of three tumours with a missense mutation showed abnormal expression of p53 as measured by CM1. Conversely, seven out of nine tumours with positive CM1 staining had no point mutation demonstrated. Overexpression of p53 in the cases of NHL occurred in three out of twenty four low-grade tumours and five out of nine high-grade tumours (Kiel classification). The results suggest that abnormalities of p53 are commoner in high-grade than low-grade NHL, and that positive immunocytochemistry cannot be used to determine which tumours have mutations of p53. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7599045

  5. Common Variable Immunodeficiency Caused by FANC Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sekinaka, Yujin; Mitsuiki, Noriko; Imai, Kohsuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mitsui-Sekinaka, Kanako; Honma, Kenichi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Arai, Ayako; Yoshida, Kenichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Hira, Asuka; Takata, Minoru; Ohara, Osamu; Ogawa, Seishi; Morio, Tomohiro; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2017-07-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common adult-onset primary antibody deficiency disease due to various causative genes. Several genes, which are known to be the cause of different diseases, have recently been reported as the cause of CVID in patients by performing whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis. Here, we found FANC gene mutations as a cause of adult-onset CVID in two patients. B cells were absent and CD4 + T cells were skewed toward CD45RO + memory T cells. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and signal joint kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (sjKRECs) were undetectable in both patients. Both patients had no anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Using WES, we identified compound heterozygous mutations of FANCE in one patient and homozygous mutation of FANCA in another patient. The impaired function of FANC protein complex was confirmed by a monoubiquitination assay and by chromosome fragility test. We then performed several immunological evaluations including quantitative lymphocyte analysis and TRECs/sjKRECs analysis for 32 individuals with Fanconi anemia (FA). In total, 22 FA patients (68.8%) were found to have immunological abnormalities, suggesting that such immunological findings may be common in FA patients. These data indicate that FANC mutations are involved in impaired lymphogenesis probably by the accumulation of DNA replication stress, leading to CVID. It is important to diagnose FA because it drastically changes clinical management. We propose that FANC mutations can cause isolated immunodeficiency in addition to bone marrow failure and malignancy.

  6. HER2 mutations in lung adenocarcinomas: A report from the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Rathi N; Behera, Madhusmita; Berry, Lynne D; Rossi, Mike R; Kris, Mark G; Johnson, Bruce E; Bunn, Paul A; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2017-11-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) mutations have been reported in lung adenocarcinomas. Herein, the authors describe the prevalence, clinical features, and outcomes associated with HER2 mutations in 1007 patients in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC). Patients with advanced-stage lung adenocarcinomas were enrolled to the LCMC. Tumor specimens were assessed for diagnosis and adequacy; multiplexed genotyping was performed in Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratories to examine 10 oncogenic drivers. The LCMC database was queried for patients with HER2 mutations to access demographic data, treatment history, and vital status. An exploratory analysis was performed to evaluate the survival of patients with HER2 mutations who were treated with HER2-directed therapies. A total of 920 patients were tested for HER2 mutations; 24 patients (3%) harbored exon 20 insertion mutations (95% confidence interval, 2%-4%). One patient had a concurrent mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) amplification. The median age of the patients was 62 years, with a slight predominance of females over males (14 females vs 10 males). The majority of the patients were never-smokers (71%) and presented with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. The median survival for patients who received HER2-targeted therapies (12 patients) was 2.1 years compared with 1.4 years for those who did not (12 patients) (P = .48). Patients with HER2 mutations were found to have inferior survival compared with the rest of the LCMC cohort with other mutations: the median survival was 3.5 years in the LCMC population receiving targeted therapy and 2.4 years for patients not receiving targeted therapy. HER2 mutations were detected in 3% of patients with lung adenocarcinoma in the LCMC. HER2-directed therapies should be investigated in this subgroup of patients. Cancer 2017;123:4099-4105. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Impact of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mutations on Gonococcal Fitness and In Vivo Selection for Compensatory Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Anjali N.; Begum, Afrin A.; Wu, Hong; D'Ambrozio, Jonathan A.; Robinson, James M.; Shafer, William M.; Bash, Margaret C.; Jerse, Ann E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) arise from mutations in gyrA (intermediate resistance) or gyrA and parC (resistance). Here we tested the consequence of commonly isolated gyrA91/95 and parC86 mutations on gonococcal fitness. Methods. Mutant gyrA91/95 and parC86 alleles were introduced into wild-type gonococci or an isogenic mutant that is resistant to macrolides due to an mtrR−79 mutation. Wild-type and mutant bacteria were compared for growth in vitro and in competitive murine infection. Results. In vitro growth was reduced with increasing numbers of mutations. Interestingly, the gyrA91/95 mutation conferred an in vivo fitness benefit to wild-type and mtrR−79 mutant gonococci. The gyrA91/95, parC86 mutant, in contrast, showed a slight fitness defect in vivo, and the gyrA91/95, parC86, mtrR−79 mutant was markedly less fit relative to the parent strains. A ciprofloxacin-resistant (CipR) mutant was selected during infection with the gyrA91/95, parC86, mtrR−79 mutant in which the mtrR−79 mutation was repaired and the gyrA91 mutation was altered. This in vivo–selected mutant grew as well as the wild-type strain in vitro. Conclusions. gyrA91/95 mutations may contribute to the spread of QRNG. Further acquisition of a parC86 mutation abrogates this fitness advantage; however, compensatory mutations can occur that restore in vivo fitness and maintain CipR. PMID:22492860

  8. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  9. Inactivating KISS1 mutation and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Topaloglu, A Kemal; Tello, Javier A; Kotan, L Damla; Ozbek, Mehmet N; Yilmaz, M Bertan; Erdogan, Seref; Gurbuz, Fatih; Temiz, Fatih; Millar, Robert P; Yuksel, Bilgin

    2012-02-16

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the central regulator of gonadotropins, which stimulate gonadal function. Hypothalamic neurons that produce kisspeptin and neurokinin B stimulate GnRH release. Inactivating mutations in the genes encoding the human kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R, formerly called GPR54), neurokinin B (TAC3), and the neurokinin B receptor (TACR3) result in pubertal failure. However, human kisspeptin loss-of-function mutations have not been described, and contradictory findings have been reported in Kiss1-knockout mice. We describe an inactivating mutation in KISS1 in a large consanguineous family that results in failure of pubertal progression, indicating that functional kisspeptin is important for puberty and reproduction in humans. (Funded by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey [TÜBİTAK] and others.).

  10. Effect of Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David; Li, Ying; Wüst, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with approriate trial moves[2], we investigate the effect of different types of mutations on lattice proteins in the HP model. While exact studies have been carried out for short HP proteins[3], the systems we investigate are of much larger size and hence not accessible for exact enumerations. Based on the estimated density of states, we systematically analyse the changes in structure and degeneracy of ground states of particular proteins and measure thermodynamic quantities like the stability of ground states and the specific heat, for example. Both, neutral mutations, which do not change the structure and stability of ground states, as well as critical mutations, which do change the thermodynamic behavior qualitatively, have been observed. Research supported by NSF

  11. Mutations in FLNB cause boomerang dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bicknell, L; Morgan, T; Bonafe, L; Wessels, M; Bialer, M; Willems, P; Cohn, D; Krakow, D; Robertson, S

    2005-01-01

    Boomerang dysplasia (BD) is a perinatal lethal osteochondrodysplasia, characterised by absence or underossification of the limb bones and vertebrae. The BD phenotype is similar to a group of disorders including atelosteogenesis I, atelosteogenesis III, and dominantly inherited Larsen syndrome that we have recently shown to be associated with mutations in FLNB, the gene encoding the actin binding cytoskeletal protein, filamin B. We report the identification of mutations in FLNB in two unrelated individuals with boomerang dysplasia. The resultant substitutions, L171R and S235P, lie within the calponin homology 2 region of the actin binding domain of filamin B and occur at sites that are evolutionarily well conserved. These findings expand the phenotypic spectrum resulting from mutations in FLNB and underline the central role this protein plays during skeletogenesis in humans. PMID:15994868

  12. Mutations in FLNB cause boomerang dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, L S; Morgan, T; Bonafé, L; Wessels, M W; Bialer, M G; Willems, P J; Cohn, D H; Krakow, D; Robertson, S P

    2005-07-01

    Boomerang dysplasia (BD) is a perinatal lethal osteochondrodysplasia, characterised by absence or underossification of the limb bones and vertebrae. The BD phenotype is similar to a group of disorders including atelosteogenesis I, atelosteogenesis III, and dominantly inherited Larsen syndrome that we have recently shown to be associated with mutations in FLNB, the gene encoding the actin binding cytoskeletal protein, filamin B. We report the identification of mutations in FLNB in two unrelated individuals with boomerang dysplasia. The resultant substitutions, L171R and S235P, lie within the calponin homology 2 region of the actin binding domain of filamin B and occur at sites that are evolutionarily well conserved. These findings expand the phenotypic spectrum resulting from mutations in FLNB and underline the central role this protein plays during skeletogenesis in humans.

  13. Pain correlates with germline mutation in schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Justin T; Smith, Miriam J; Walker, James A; Erdin, Serkan; Talkowski, Michael E; Merker, Vanessa L; Ramesh, Vijaya; Cai, Wenli; Harris, Gordon J; Bredella, Miriam A; Seijo, Marlon; Suuberg, Alessandra; Gusella, James F; Plotkin, Scott R

    2018-02-01

    Schwannomatosis has been linked to germline mutations in the SMARCB1 and LZTR1 genes, and is frequently associated with pain.In a cohort study, we assessed the mutation status of 37 patients with clinically diagnosed schwannomatosis and compared to clinical data, whole body MRI (WBMRI), visual analog pain scale, and Short Form 36 (SF-36) bodily pain subscale.We identified a germline mutation in LZTR1 in 5 patients (13.5%) and SMARCB1 in 15 patients (40.5%), but found no germline mutation in 17 patients (45.9%). Peripheral schwannomas were detected in 3 LZTR1-mutant (60%) and 10 SMARCB1-mutant subjects (66.7%). Among those with peripheral tumors, the median tumor number was 4 in the LZTR1 group (median total body tumor volume 30 cc) and 10 in the SMARCB1 group (median volume 85cc), (P=.2915 for tumor number and P = .2289 for volume). mutation was associated with an increased prevalence of spinal schwannomas (100% vs 41%, P = .0197). The median pain score was 3.9/10 in the LZTR1 group and 0.5/10 in the SMARCB1 group (P = .0414), and SF-36 pain-associated quality of life was significantly worse in the LZTR1 group (P = .0106). Pain scores correlated with total body tumor volume (rho = 0.32471, P = .0499), but not with number of tumors (rho = 0.23065, P = .1696).We found no significant difference in quantitative tumor burden between mutational groups, but spinal schwannomas were more common in LZTR1-mutant patients. Pain was significantly higher in LZTR1-mutant than in SMARCB1-mutant patients, though spinal tumor location did not significantly correlate with pain. This suggests a possible genetic association with schwannomatosis-associated pain.

  14. Pain correlates with germline mutation in schwannomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Justin T.; Smith, Miriam J.; Walker, James A.; Erdin, Serkan; Talkowski, Michael E.; Merker, Vanessa L.; Ramesh, Vijaya; Cai, Wenli; Harris, Gordon J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Seijo, Marlon; Suuberg, Alessandra; Gusella, James F.; Plotkin, Scott R.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Schwannomatosis has been linked to germline mutations in the SMARCB1 and LZTR1 genes, and is frequently associated with pain. In a cohort study, we assessed the mutation status of 37 patients with clinically diagnosed schwannomatosis and compared to clinical data, whole body MRI (WBMRI), visual analog pain scale, and Short Form 36 (SF-36) bodily pain subscale. We identified a germline mutation in LZTR1 in 5 patients (13.5%) and SMARCB1 in 15 patients (40.5%), but found no germline mutation in 17 patients (45.9%). Peripheral schwannomas were detected in 3 LZTR1-mutant (60%) and 10 SMARCB1-mutant subjects (66.7%). Among those with peripheral tumors, the median tumor number was 4 in the LZTR1 group (median total body tumor volume 30 cc) and 10 in the SMARCB1 group (median volume 85cc), (P=.2915 for tumor number and P = .2289 for volume). mutation was associated with an increased prevalence of spinal schwannomas (100% vs 41%, P = .0197). The median pain score was 3.9/10 in the LZTR1 group and 0.5/10 in the SMARCB1 group (P = .0414), and SF-36 pain-associated quality of life was significantly worse in the LZTR1 group (P = .0106). Pain scores correlated with total body tumor volume (rho = 0.32471, P = .0499), but not with number of tumors (rho = 0.23065, P = .1696). We found no significant difference in quantitative tumor burden between mutational groups, but spinal schwannomas were more common in LZTR1-mutant patients. Pain was significantly higher in LZTR1-mutant than in SMARCB1-mutant patients, though spinal tumor location did not significantly correlate with pain. This suggests a possible genetic association with schwannomatosis-associated pain. PMID:29384852

  15. The Spectrum of Mutations in Progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang-En; Bird, Thomas D.; Bekris, Lynn M.; Montine, Thomas J.; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Galloway, Nichole M.; Feldman, Howard; Woltjer, Randall; Miller, Carol A.; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Grossman, Murray; McCluskey, Leo; Clark, Christopher M.; Neumann, Manuela; Danek, Adrian; Galasko, Douglas R.; Arnold, Steven E.; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce L.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutation in the progranulin gene (GRN) can cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, it is unclear whether some rare FTD-related GRN variants are pathogenic and whether neurodegenerative disorders other than FTD can also be caused by GRN mutations. Objectives To delineate the range of clinical presentations associated with GRN mutations and to define pathogenic candidacy of rare GRN variants. Design Case-control study. Setting Clinical and neuropathology dementia research studies at 8 academic centers. Participants Four hundred thirty-four patients with FTD, including primary progressive aphasia, semantic dementia, FTD/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), FTD/motor neuron disease, corticobasal syndrome/corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, Pick disease, dementia lacking distinctive histopathology, and pathologically confirmed cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U); and 111 non-FTD cases (controls) in which TDP-43 deposits were a prominent neuropathological feature, including subjects with ALS, Guam ALS and/or parkinsonism dementia complex, Guam dementia, Alzheimer disease, multiple system atrophy, and argyrophilic grain disease. Main Outcome Measures Variants detected on sequencing of all 13 GRN exons and at least 80 base pairs of flanking introns, and their pathogenic candidacy determined by in silico and ex vivo splicing assays. Results We identified 58 genetic variants that included 26 previously unknown changes. Twenty-four variants appeared to be pathogenic, including 8 novel mutations. The frequency of GRN mutations was 6.9% (30 of 434) of all FTD-spectrum cases, 21.4% (9 of 42) of cases with a pathological diagnosis of FTLD-U, 16.0% (28 of 175) of FTD-spectrum cases with a family history of a similar neurodegenerative disease, and 56.2% (9 of 16) of cases of FTLD-U with a family history. Conclusions Pathogenic mutations were found only in FTD-spectrum cases and not in other

  16. Towards linked open gene mutations data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With the advent of high-throughput technologies, a great wealth of variation data is being produced. Such information may constitute the basis for correlation analyses between genotypes and phenotypes and, in the future, for personalized medicine. Several databases on gene variation exist, but this kind of information is still scarce in the Semantic Web framework. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the integration of mutation data in the Linked Open Data infrastructure, part of the Semantic Web framework. We present the development of a mapping from the IARC TP53 Mutation database to RDF and the implementation of servers publishing this data. Methods A version of the IARC TP53 Mutation database implemented in a relational database was used as first test set. Automatic mappings to RDF were first created by using D2RQ and later manually refined by introducing concepts and properties from domain vocabularies and ontologies, as well as links to Linked Open Data implementations of various systems of biomedical interest. Since D2RQ query performances are lower than those that can be achieved by using an RDF archive, generated data was also loaded into a dedicated system based on tools from the Jena software suite. Results We have implemented a D2RQ Server for TP53 mutation data, providing data on a subset of the IARC database, including gene variations, somatic mutations, and bibliographic references. The server allows to browse the RDF graph by using links both between classes and to external systems. An alternative interface offers improved performances for SPARQL queries. The resulting data can be explored by using any Semantic Web browser or application. Conclusions This has been the first case of a mutation database exposed as Linked Data. A revised version of our prototype, including further concepts and IARC TP53 Mutation database data sets, is under development. The publication of variation information as Linked Data opens new perspectives

  17. Towards linked open gene mutations data.

    PubMed

    Zappa, Achille; Splendiani, Andrea; Romano, Paolo

    2012-03-28

    With the advent of high-throughput technologies, a great wealth of variation data is being produced. Such information may constitute the basis for correlation analyses between genotypes and phenotypes and, in the future, for personalized medicine. Several databases on gene variation exist, but this kind of information is still scarce in the Semantic Web framework. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the integration of mutation data in the Linked Open Data infrastructure, part of the Semantic Web framework. We present the development of a mapping from the IARC TP53 Mutation database to RDF and the implementation of servers publishing this data. A version of the IARC TP53 Mutation database implemented in a relational database was used as first test set. Automatic mappings to RDF were first created by using D2RQ and later manually refined by introducing concepts and properties from domain vocabularies and ontologies, as well as links to Linked Open Data implementations of various systems of biomedical interest. Since D2RQ query performances are lower than those that can be achieved by using an RDF archive, generated data was also loaded into a dedicated system based on tools from the Jena software suite. We have implemented a D2RQ Server for TP53 mutation data, providing data on a subset of the IARC database, including gene variations, somatic mutations, and bibliographic references. The server allows to browse the RDF graph by using links both between classes and to external systems. An alternative interface offers improved performances for SPARQL queries. The resulting data can be explored by using any Semantic Web browser or application. This has been the first case of a mutation database exposed as Linked Data. A revised version of our prototype, including further concepts and IARC TP53 Mutation database data sets, is under development.The publication of variation information as Linked Data opens new perspectives: the exploitation of SPARQL searches on

  18. The study of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  19. On spatial mutation-selection models

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratiev, Yuri, E-mail: kondrat@math.uni-bielefeld.de; Kutoviy, Oleksandr, E-mail: kutoviy@math.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: kutovyi@mit.edu; Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

    2013-11-15

    We discuss the selection procedure in the framework of mutation models. We study the regulation for stochastically developing systems based on a transformation of the initial Markov process which includes a cost functional. The transformation of initial Markov process by cost functional has an analytic realization in terms of a Kimura-Maruyama type equation for the time evolution of states or in terms of the corresponding Feynman-Kac formula on the path space. The state evolution of the system including the limiting behavior is studied for two types of mutation-selection models.

  20. Mutational Dynamics of Aroid Chloroplast Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J.; Matthews, Peter J.; Collins, Lesley J.; Hendy, Michael D.; Lockhart, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  1. Mutation screening of Chinese Treacher Collins syndrome patients identified novel TCOF1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Guo, Luo; Li, Chen-Long; Shan, Jing; Xu, Hai-Song; Li, Jie-Ying; Sun, Shan; Hao, Shao-Juan; Jin, Lei; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Tian-Yu

    2018-04-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) (OMIM 154500) is a rare congenital craniofacial disorder with an autosomal dominant manner of inheritance in most cases. To date, three pathogenic genes (TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C) have been identified. In this study, we conducted mutational analysis on Chinese TCS patients to reveal a mutational spectrum of known causative genes and show phenotype-genotype data to provide more information for gene counselling and future studies on the pathogenesis of TCS. Twenty-two TCS patients were recruited from two tertiary referral centres, and Sanger sequencing for the coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C was performed. For patients without small variants, further copy number variations (CNVs) analysis was conducted using high-density SNP array platforms. The Sanger sequencing overall mutation detection rate was as high as 86.3% (19/22) for our cohort. Fifteen TCOF1 pathogenic variants, including ten novel mutations, were identified in nineteen patients. No causative mutations in POLR1D and POLR1C genes and no CNVs mutations were detected. A suspected autosomal dominant inheritance case that implies germinal mosaicism was described. Our study confirmed that TCOF1 was the main disease-causing gene for the Chinese TCS population and revealed its mutation spectrum. We also addressed the need for more studies of mosaicism in TCS cases, which could explain the mechanism of autosomal dominant inheritance in TCS cases and benefit the prevention of TCS.

  2. Detection of a novel silent deletion, a missense mutation and a nonsense mutation in TCOF1.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hirotaka; Ariga, Tadashi; Horiuchi, Katsumi; Ishikiriyama, Satoshi; Oyama, Kimie; Otsu, Makoto; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Sakiyama, Yukio

    2008-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a disorder of craniofacial development, that is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene. TCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, and haploinsufficiency of the TCOF1 gene product treacle is proposed to be etiologically involved. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene was done in 10 patients diagnosed with TCS using single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing. Among these 10 patients, a novel 9 bp deletion was found, together with a previously reported 2 bp deletion, a novel missense mutation and a novel nonsense mutation in three different families. Familial studies allowed judgment of whether these abnormal findings were responsible for the TCS phenotype, or not. The 9 bp deletion of three amino acids Lys-Glu-Lys (1378-1380), which was located in the nuclear localization domain of treacle, seemed not essential for the treacle function. In contrast, the novel mutation of Ala26Val is considered to affect the LisH domain, an important domain of treacle. All of the mutations thus far detected in exon 5 have resulted in frameshift, but a nonsense mutation was detected (Lys159Stop). The information obtained in the present study provides additional insights into the functional domains of treacle.

  3. Advances in computational approaches for prioritizing driver mutations and significantly mutated genes in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is often driven by the accumulation of genetic alterations, including single nucleotide variants, small insertions or deletions, gene fusions, copy-number variations, and large chromosomal rearrangements. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have helped investigators generate massive amounts of cancer genomic data and catalog somatic mutations in both common and rare cancer types. So far, the somatic mutation landscapes and signatures of >10 major cancer types have been reported; however, pinpointing driver mutations and cancer genes from millions of available cancer somatic mutations remains a monumental challenge. To tackle this important task, many methods and computational tools have been developed during the past several years and, thus, a review of its advances is urgently needed. Here, we first summarize the main features of these methods and tools for whole-exome, whole-genome and whole-transcriptome sequencing data. Then, we discuss major challenges like tumor intra-heterogeneity, tumor sample saturation and functionality of synonymous mutations in cancer, all of which may result in false-positive discoveries. Finally, we highlight new directions in studying regulatory roles of noncoding somatic mutations and quantitatively measuring circulating tumor DNA in cancer. This review may help investigators find an appropriate tool for detecting potential driver or actionable mutations in rapidly emerging precision cancer medicine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. [Observation and analysis on mutation of routine STR locus].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-yang; Feng, Wei-jun; Yang, Qin-gen

    2005-05-01

    To observe and analyze the characteristic of mutation at STR locus. 27 mutant genes observed in 1211 paternity testing cases were checked by PAGE-silver stained and PowerPlex 16 System Kit and validated by sequencing. Mutant genes locate on 15 loci. The pattern of mutation was accord with stepwise mutation model. The mutation ratio of male-to-female was 8:1 and correlated to the age of father. Mutation rate is correlated to the geometric mean of the number of homogeneous repeats of locus. The higher the mean, the higher the mutation rate. These loci are not so appropriate for use in paternity testing.

  5. Multi-institutional oncogenic driver mutation analysis in lung adenocarcinoma: The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium experience

    PubMed Central

    Dias-Santagata, Dora; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Chen, Heidi; Fujimoto, Junya; Kugler, Kelly; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Iafrate, A. John; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Bunn, Paul A.; Minna, John D.; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Molecular genetic analyses of lung adenocarcinoma have recently become standard of care for treatment selection. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium was formed to enable collaborative multi-institutional analyses of 10 potential oncogenic driver mutations. Technical aspects of testing, and clinicopathologic correlations are presented. Methods Mutation testing in at least one of 8 genes (EGFR, KRAS, ERBB2, AKT1, BRAF, MEK1, NRAS, PIK3CA) using SNaPshot, mass spectrometry, Sanger sequencing +/− PNA and/or sizing assays, along with ALK and/or MET FISH were performed in 6 labs on 1007 patients from 14 institutions. Results 1007 specimens had mutation analysis performed, and 733 specimens had all 10 genes analyzed. Mutation identification rates did not vary by analytic method. Biopsy and cytology specimens were inadequate for testing in 26% and 35% of cases compared to 5% of surgical specimens. Among the 1007 cases with mutation analysis performed, EGFR, KRAS, ALK, and ERBB2 alterations were detected in 22, 25, 8.5, and 2.4% of cases, respectively. EGFR mutations were highly associated with female sex, Asian race, and never smoking status; and less strongly associated with stage IV disease, presence of bone metastases, and absence of adrenal metastases. ALK rearrangements were strongly associated with never smoking status, and more weakly associated with presence of liver metastases. ERBB2 mutations were strongly associated with Asian race and never smoking status. Two mutations were seen in 2.7% of samples, all but one of which involved one or more of PIK3CA, ALK or MET. Conclusion Multi-institutional molecular analysis across multiple platforms, sample types, and institutions can yield consistent results and novel clinicopathological observations. PMID:25738220

  6. Frequent somatic TERT promoter mutations and CTNNB1 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Chang, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Wook Youn; Lim, So Dug; Kim, Wan Seop; Hwang, Tea Sook; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-10-25

    Genetic alterations of TERT and CTNNB1 have been documented in hepatocellular carcinoma. TERT promoter mutations are the earliest genetic events in the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis related to cirrhosis. However, analyses of TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma tumor samples have not been performed in the Korean population, where hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma is prevalent. In order to identify the role of TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations in the hepatocarcinogenesis and pathogenesis of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma, we performed the sequence analyses in 140 hepatocellular nodules (including 107 hepatocellular carcinomas), and 8 pairs of matched primary and relapsed hepatocellular carcinomas. TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations were only observed in hepatocellular carcinomas but not in precursor lesions. Of 109 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, 41 (39.0%) and 15 (14.6%) harbored TERT and CTNNB1 mutations, respectively. TERT promotermutations were significantly more frequent in hepatocellular carcinomas related to hepatitis C virus infection (5/6; 83.3%) compared to tumors of other etiologies (P = 0.001). In two cases, discordance in TERT promoter mutation status was observed between the primary and the corresponding recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma. The two patients with discordant cases had early relapses. In conclusion, we identified TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations as the most frequent somatic genetic alterations observed in hepatocellular carcinoma, indicating its pivotal role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Furthermore, we suggest the possibility of intratumoral genetic heterogeneity of TERT promoter mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma as indicated by the discordance in TERT promoter mutations between primary and corresponding recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Timing, rates and spectra of human germline mutation.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, Raheleh; Wuster, Arthur; Lindsay, Sarah J; Hardwick, Robert J; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Turki, Saeed Al; Dominiczak, Anna; Morris, Andrew; Porteous, David; Smith, Blair; Stratton, Michael R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations are a driving force behind genome evolution and genetic disease. We investigated genome-wide mutation rates and spectra in multi-sibling families. The mutation rate increased with paternal age in all families, but the number of additional mutations per year differed by more than twofold between families. Meta-analysis of 6,570 mutations showed that germline methylation influences mutation rates. In contrast to somatic mutations, we found remarkable consistency in germline mutation spectra between the sexes and at different paternal ages. In parental germ line, 3.8% of mutations were mosaic, resulting in 1.3% of mutations being shared by siblings. The number of these shared mutations varied significantly between families. Our data suggest that the mutation rate per cell division is higher during both early embryogenesis and differentiation of primordial germ cells but is reduced substantially during post-pubertal spermatogenesis. These findings have important consequences for the recurrence risks of disorders caused by de novo mutations.

  8. Parent-progeny sequencing indicates higher mutation rates in heterozygotes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sihai; Wang, Long; Huang, Ju; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Hurst, Laurence D; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-07-23

    Mutation rates vary within genomes, but the causes of this remain unclear. As many prior inferences rely on methods that assume an absence of selection, potentially leading to artefactual results, we call mutation events directly using a parent-offspring sequencing strategy focusing on Arabidopsis and using rice and honey bee for replication. Here we show that mutation rates are higher in heterozygotes and in proximity to crossover events. A correlation between recombination rate and intraspecific diversity is in part owing to a higher mutation rate in domains of high recombination/diversity. Implicating diversity per se as a cause, we find an ∼3.5-fold higher mutation rate in heterozygotes than in homozygotes, with mutations occurring in closer proximity to heterozygous sites than expected by chance. In a genome that is a patchwork of heterozygous and homozygous domains, mutations occur disproportionately more often in the heterozygous domains. If segregating mutations predispose to a higher local mutation rate, clusters of genes dominantly under purifying selection (more commonly homozygous) and under balancing selection (more commonly heterozygous), might have low and high mutation rates, respectively. Our results are consistent with this, there being a ten times higher mutation rate in pathogen resistance genes, expected to be under positive or balancing selection. Consequently, we do not necessarily need to evoke extremely weak selection on the mutation rate to explain why mutational hot and cold spots might correspond to regions under positive/balancing and purifying selection, respectively.

  9. Mutation Analysis of IDH1/2 Genes in Unselected De novo Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Patients in India - Identification of A Novel IDH2 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Sureshkumar; Sarojam, Santhi; Vijay, Sangeetha; Geetha, Aswathy Chandran; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Narayanan, Geetha; Sreedharan, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    IDH1/2 mutations which result in alternation in DNA methylation pattern are one of the most common methylation associated mutations in Acute myeloid leukaemia. IDH1/2 mutations frequently associated with higher platelet level, normal cytogentics and NPM1 mutations. Here we analyzed IDH1/2 mutations in 200 newly diagnosed unselected Indian adult AML patients and investigated their correlation with clinical, cytogenetic parameters along with cooperating NPM1 mutation. We detected 5.5% and 4% mutations in IDH1/2 genes, respectively. Except IDH2 c.515_516GG>AA mutation, all the other identified mutations were reported mutations. Similar to reported c.515G>A mutation, the novel c.515_516GG>AA mutation replaces 172nd arginine to lysine in the active site of the enzyme. Even though there was a preponderance of IDH1/2 mutations in NK-AML, cytogenetically abnormal patients also harboured IDH1/2 mutations. IDH1 mutations showed significant higher platelet count and NPM1 mutations. IDH2 mutated patients displayed infrequent NPM1 mutations and lower WBC count. All the NPM1 mutations in the IDH1/2 mutated cases showed type A mutation. The present data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations are associated with normal cytogenetics and type A NPM1 mutations in adult Indian AML patients.

  10. Seven functional classes of Barth syndrome mutation.

    PubMed

    Whited, Kevin; Baile, Matthew G; Currier, Pamela; Claypool, Steven M

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Barth syndrome (BTHS), a rare X-linked disease, suffer from skeletal and cardiomyopathy and bouts of cyclic neutropenia. The causative gene encodes tafazzin, a transacylase, which is the major determinant of the final acyl chain composition of the mitochondrial-specific phospholipid, CL. In addition to numerous frame shift and splice-site mutations, 36 missense mutations have been associated with BTHS. Previously, we established a BTHS-mutant panel in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that successfully models 18/21 conserved pathogenic missense mutations and defined the loss-of-function mechanism associated with a subset of the mutant tafazzins. Here, we report the biochemical and cell biological characterization of the rest of the yeast BTHS-mutant panel and in so doing identify three additional modes of tafazzin dysfunction. The largest group of mutant tafazzins is catalytically null, two mutants encode hypomorphic alleles, and another two mutants are temperature sensitive. Additionally, we have expanded the defects associated with previously characterized matrix-mislocalized-mutant tafazzins to include the rapid degradation of aggregation-prone polypeptides that correctly localize to the mitochondrial IMS. In sum, our in-depth characterization of the yeast BTHS-mutant panel has identified seven functional classes of BTHS mutation.

  11. Mutation analysis of Australasian Gaucher disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.V.; Carey, W.F.; Morris, C.P.

    1995-09-25

    We have previously reported phenotype and genotype analyses in 28 Australasian Gaucher patients who were screened for several of the common Gaucher mutations: N370S, L444P, 84GG, and R463C. Horowitz and Zimran have reported that the complex alleles recNciI and recTL, which contain several point mutations including L444P, are relatively common, especially in non-Jewish Gaucher patients. Zimran and Horowitz have also stated that these recombinant alleles could easily be missed by laboratories testing only for the common Gaucher point mutations. Failure to correctly identify these mutations would influence any attempt to correlate genotype with phenotype. We have therefore retested our Gauchermore » patients for recNciI (L444P, A456P, and V46OV) and recTL (D409H, L444P, A456P, and V46OV) by PCR amplification, followed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides. 4 refs.« less

  12. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  13. Smoking, p53 Mutation, and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Don L.; Byers, Lauren A.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    This issue marks the 50th Anniversary of the release of the U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. Perhaps no other singular event has done more to highlight the effects of smoking on the development of cancer. Tobacco exposure is the leading cause of cancers involving the oral cavity, conductive airways and the lung. Owing to the many carcinogens in tobacco smoke, smoking-related malignancies have a high genome-wide burden of mutations, including in the gene encoding for p53. The p53 protein is the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor in cancer, responsible for a range of critical cellular functions that are compromised by the presence of a mutation. Herein we review the epidemiologic connection between tobacco exposure and cancer, the molecular basis of p53 mutation in lung cancer, and the normal molecular and cellular roles of p53 that are abrogated during lung tumor development and progression as defined by in vitro and in vivo studies. We also consider the therapeutic potential of targeting mutant p53 in a clinical setting based upon the cellular role of mutant p53 and data from genetic murine models. PMID:24442106

  14. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  15. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  16. Mutations Altering Chloroplast Ribosome Phenotype in Chlamydomonas, I. Non-Mendelian Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Nicholas W.; Boynton, John E.; Burkholder, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    Uniparentally inherited mutations to antibiotic resistance and dependence in Chlamydomonas reinhardi exhibit an altered chloroplast ribosome phenotype. Genetic studies demonstrate an absolute correlation between the drug resistance or dependence and the ribosome phenotype in two such mutants. Images PMID:5289000

  17. Mitochondrial Mutations in Subjects with Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, Christophe; van Oven, Mannis; Baldi, Pierre; Myers, Richard M.; Barchas, Jack D.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda; Bunney, William E.; Vawter, Marquis P.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage) and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C). Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA. PMID:26011537

  18. Wolfram Syndrome: New Mutations, Different Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lugani, Francesca; Perri, Katia; Russo, Chiara; Tallone, Ramona; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym “DIDMOAD”. The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. Methodology/Principal Findings We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females). Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V) was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. Conclusions/Significance Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10), deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA). PMID:22238590

  19. PPIB mutations cause severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Fleur S; Nesbitt, Isabel M; Zwikstra, Eline H; Nikkels, Peter G J; Piersma, Sander R; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Jimenez, Connie R; Huizer, Margriet; Morsman, Alice C; Cobben, Jan M; van Roij, Mirjam H H; Elting, Mariet W; Verbeke, Jonathan I M L; Wijnaendts, Liliane C D; Shaw, Nick J; Högler, Wolfgang; McKeown, Carole; Sistermans, Erik A; Dalton, Ann; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Pals, Gerard

    2009-10-01

    Deficiency of cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) or prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1(P3H1) has been reported in autosomal-recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). CRTAP, P3H1, and cyclophilin B (CyPB) form an intracellular collagen-modifying complex that 3-hydroxylates proline at position 986 (P986) in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I. This 3-prolyl hydroxylation is decreased in patients with CRTAP and P3H1 deficiency. It was suspected that mutations in the PPIB gene encoding CyPB would also cause OI with decreased collagen 3-prolyl hydroxylation. To our knowledge we present the first two families with recessive OI caused by PPIB gene mutations. The clinical phenotype is compatible with OI Sillence type II-B/III as seen with COL1A1/2, CRTAP, and LEPRE1 mutations. The percentage of 3-hydroxylated P986 residues in patients with PPIB mutations is decreased in comparison to normal, but it is higher than in patients with CRTAP and LEPRE1 mutations. This result and the fact that CyPB is demonstrable independent of CRTAP and P3H1, along with reported decreased 3-prolyl hydroxylation due to deficiency of CRTAP lacking the catalytic hydroxylation domain and the known function of CyPB as a cis-trans isomerase, suggest that recessive OI is caused by a dysfunctional P3H1/CRTAP/CyPB complex rather than by the lack of 3-prolyl hydroxylation of a single proline residue in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I.

  20. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  1. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    López-Causapé, Carla; Cabot, Gabriel; del Barrio-Tofiño, Ester; Oliver, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility) between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms. PMID:29681898

  2. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    López-Causapé, Carla; Cabot, Gabriel; Del Barrio-Tofiño, Ester; Oliver, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility) between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  3. BTKbase, mutation database for X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA).

    PubMed Central

    Vihinen, M; Brandau, O; Brandén, L J; Kwan, S P; Lappalainen, I; Lester, T; Noordzij, J G; Ochs, H D; Ollila, J; Pienaar, S M; Riikonen, P; Saha, B K; Smith, C I

    1998-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the gene coding for Bruton's agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK). A database (BTKbase) of BTK mutations has been compiled and the recent update lists 463 mutation entries from 406 unrelated families showing 303 unique molecular events. In addition to mutations, the database also lists variants or polymorphisms. Each patient is given a unique patient identity number (PIN). Information is included regarding the phenotype including symptoms. Mutations in all the five domains of BTK have been noticed to cause the disease, the most common event being missense mutations. The mutations appear almost uniformly throughout the molecule and frequently affect CpG sites that code for arginine residues. The putative structural implications of all the missense mutations are given in the database. The improved version of the registry having a number of new features is available at http://www. helsinki.fi/science/signal/btkbase.html PMID:9399844

  4. Contribution of TARDBP mutations to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Daoud, H; Valdmanis, P N; Kabashi, E; Dion, P; Dupré, N; Camu, W; Meininger, V; Rouleau, G A

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the TARDBP gene, which encodes the TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43), have been described in individuals with familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We screened the TARDBP gene in 285 French sporadic ALS patients to assess the frequency of TARDBP mutations in ALS. Six individuals had potentially deleterious mutations of which three were novel including a Y374X truncating mutation and P363A and A382P missense mutations. This suggests that TARDBP mutations may predispose to ALS in approximately 2% of the individuals followed in this study. Our findings, combined with those from other collections, brings the total number of mutations in unrelated ALS patients to 17, further suggesting that mutations in the TARDBP gene have an important role in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  5. The topography of mutational processes in breast cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Morganella, Sandro; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Brinkman, Arie B; Martin, Sancha; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Butler, Adam; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Borg, Åke; Sotiriou, Christos; Futreal, P Andrew; Campbell, Peter J; Span, Paul N; Van Laere, Steven; Lakhani, Sunil R; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Thompson, Alastair M; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van de Vijver, Marc J; Martens, John W M; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L; Kong, Gu; Thomas, Gilles; Sale, Julian; Rada, Cristina; Stratton, Michael R; Birney, Ewan; Nik-Zainal, Serena

    2016-05-02

    Somatic mutations in human cancers show unevenness in genomic distribution that correlate with aspects of genome structure and function. These mutations are, however, generated by multiple mutational processes operating through the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell, each composed of specific DNA damage and repair components and leaving its own characteristic mutational signature on the genome. Using somatic mutation catalogues from 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences, here we show that each of 12 base substitution, 2 insertion/deletion (indel) and 6 rearrangement mutational signatures present in breast tissue, exhibit distinct relationships with genomic features relating to transcription, DNA replication and chromatin organization. This signature-based approach permits visualization of the genomic distribution of mutational processes associated with APOBEC enzymes, mismatch repair deficiency and homologous recombinational repair deficiency, as well as mutational processes of unknown aetiology. Furthermore, it highlights mechanistic insights including a putative replication-dependent mechanism of APOBEC-related mutagenesis.

  6. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal cortex area of the ... University of Washington Researchers found that people with schizophrenia have a high number of spontaneous mutations in ...

  7. Dichloroacetate treatment for mitochondrial cytopathy: long-term effects in MELAS.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masato; Yamagata, Takanori; Goto, Tamako; Saito, Shigeko; Momoi, Mariko Y

    2004-10-01

    The long-term effects of the sodium salt of dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were evaluated in four patients with mitochondrial encephalomyelopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) carrying A3243G mutation. Oral administration of DCA in MELAS patients was followed for an average of 5 years 4 months. Serum levels of lactate and pyruvate were maintained at around 10 and 0.6 mg/dl, respectively. Serum levels of DCA were 40-136 microg/ml. Symptoms responding to treatment included persistent headache, abdominal pain, muscle weakness, and stroke-like episodes. In contrast, no improvements in mental status, deafness, short stature, or neuroelectrophysiological findings were observed. Adverse effects included mild liver dysfunction in all patients, hypocalcemia in three and peripheral neuropathy in one. None of these adverse events was severe enough to require discontinuation of treatment. To determine suitable indications for DCA therapy, analysis of many more patients who have undergone DCA administration is required.

  8. Acute auditory agnosia as the presenting hearing disorder in MELAS.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Gabriele; Conti, Guido; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Zampetti, Patrizia; Servidei, Serenella

    2008-12-01

    MELAS is commonly associated with peripheral hearing loss. Auditory agnosia is a rare cortical auditory impairment, usually due to bilateral temporal damage. We document, for the first time, auditory agnosia as the presenting hearing disorder in MELAS. A young woman with MELAS (A3243G mtDNA mutation) suffered from acute cortical hearing damage following a single stroke-like episode, in the absence of previous hearing deficits. Audiometric testing showed marked central hearing impairment and very mild sensorineural hearing loss. MRI documented bilateral, acute lesions to superior temporal regions. Neuropsychological tests demonstrated auditory agnosia without aphasia. Our data and a review of published reports show that cortical auditory disorders are relatively frequent in MELAS, probably due to the strikingly high incidence of bilateral and symmetric damage following stroke-like episodes. Acute auditory agnosia can be the presenting hearing deficit in MELAS and, conversely, MELAS should be suspected in young adults with sudden hearing loss.

  9. Oncogenic PIK3CA mutations occur in epidermal nevi and seborrheic keratoses with a characteristic mutation pattern

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Christian; López-Knowles, Elena; Luis, Nuno M.; Toll, Agustí; Baselga, Eulàlia; Fernández-Casado, Alex; Hernández, Silvia; Ribé, Adriana; Mentzel, Thomas; Stoehr, Robert; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand; Landthaler, Michael; Vogt, Thomas; Pujol, Ramòn M.; Hartmann, Arndt; Real, Francisco X.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations of the p110 α subunit of PI3K (PIK3CA) oncogene have been identified in a broad spectrum of malignant tumors. However, their role in benign or preneoplastic conditions is unknown. Activating FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations are common in benign skin lesions, either as embryonic mutations in epidermal nevi (EN) or as somatic mutations in seborrheic keratoses (SK). FGFR3 mutations are also common in low-grade malignant bladder tumors, where they often occur in association with PIK3CA mutations. Therefore, we examined exons 9 and 20 of PIK3CA and FGFR3 hotspot mutations in EN (n = 33) and SK (n = 62), two proliferative skin lesions lacking malignant potential. Nine of 33 (27%) EN harbored PIK3CA mutations; all cases showed the E545G substitution, which is uncommon in cancers. In EN, R248C was the only FGFR3 mutation identified. By contrast, 10 of 62 (16%) SK revealed the typical cancer-associated PIK3CA mutations E542K, E545K, and H1047R. The same lesions displayed a wide range of FGFR3 mutations. Corresponding unaffected tissue was available for four EN and two mutant SK: all control samples displayed a WT sequence, confirming the somatic nature of the mutations found in lesional tissue. Forty of 95 (42%) lesions showed at least one mutation in either gene. PIK3CA and FGFR3 mutations displayed an independent distribution; 5/95 lesions harbored mutations in both genes. Our findings suggest that, in addition to their role in cancer, oncogenic PIK3CA mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of skin tumors lacking malignant potential. The remarkable genotype–phenotype correlation as observed in this study points to a distinct etiopathogenesis of the mutations in keratinocytes occuring either during fetal development or in adult life. PMID:17673550

  10. Population Heterogeneity in Mutation Rate Increases the Frequency of Higher-Order Mutants and Reduces Long-Term Mutational Load

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Helen K.; Mayer, Stephanie I.; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mutation rate is a crucial evolutionary parameter that has typically been treated as a constant in population genetic analyses. However, the propensity to mutate is likely to vary among co-existing individuals within a population, due to genetic polymorphisms, heterogeneous environmental influences, and random physiological fluctuations. We review the evidence for mutation rate heterogeneity and explore its consequences by extending classic population genetic models to allow an arbitrary distribution of mutation rate among individuals, either with or without inheritance. With this general new framework, we rigorously establish the effects of heterogeneity at various evolutionary timescales. In a single generation, variation of mutation rate about the mean increases the probability of producing zero or many simultaneous mutations on a genome. Over multiple generations of mutation and selection, heterogeneity accelerates the appearance of both deleterious and beneficial multi-point mutants. At mutation-selection balance, higher-order mutant frequencies are likewise boosted, while lower-order mutants exhibit subtler effects; nonetheless, population mean fitness is always enhanced. We quantify the dependencies on moments of the mutation rate distribution and selection coefficients, and clarify the role of mutation rate inheritance. While typical methods of estimating mutation rate will recover only the population mean, analyses assuming mutation rate is fixed to this mean could underestimate the potential for multi-locus adaptation, including medically relevant evolution in pathogenic and cancerous populations. We discuss the potential to empirically parameterize mutation rate distributions, which have to date hardly been quantified. PMID:27836985

  11. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E.; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R.; Göksenin, A. Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication. PMID:25228659

  12. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline

    PubMed Central

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B.; McGowan, Simon J.; Maher, Geoffrey J.; Iqbal, Zamin; Pfeifer, Susanne P.; Turner, Isaac; Burkitt Wright, Emma M. M.; Shorto, Jennifer; Itani, Aysha; Turner, Karen; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.; Goriely, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The RAS proto-oncogene Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS) encodes a small GTPase that transduces signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors to control cellular behavior. Although somatic HRAS mutations have been described in many cancers, germline mutations cause Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed selfish spermatogonial selection. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the levels, in blood and sperm samples, of HRAS mutations at the p.G12 codon and compared the results to changes at the p.A11 codon, at which activating mutations do not occur. The data strongly support the role of selection in determining HRAS mutation levels in sperm, and hence the occurrence of CS, but we also found differences from the mutation pattern in tumorigenesis. First, the relative prevalence of mutations in sperm correlates weakly with their in vitro activating properties and occurrence in cancers. Second, specific tandem base substitutions (predominantly GC>TT/AA) occur in sperm but not in cancers; genomewide analysis showed that this same mutation is also overrepresented in constitutional pathogenic and polymorphic variants, suggesting a heightened vulnerability to these mutations in the germline. We developed a statistical model to show how both intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection contribute to the mutational burden borne by the paternal germline. PMID:24259709

  13. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline.

    PubMed

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B; McGowan, Simon J; Maher, Geoffrey J; Iqbal, Zamin; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Turner, Isaac; Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Shorto, Jennifer; Itani, Aysha; Turner, Karen; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Kerr, Bronwyn; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Goriely, Anne

    2013-12-10

    The RAS proto-oncogene Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS) encodes a small GTPase that transduces signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors to control cellular behavior. Although somatic HRAS mutations have been described in many cancers, germline mutations cause Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed selfish spermatogonial selection. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the levels, in blood and sperm samples, of HRAS mutations at the p.G12 codon and compared the results to changes at the p.A11 codon, at which activating mutations do not occur. The data strongly support the role of selection in determining HRAS mutation levels in sperm, and hence the occurrence of CS, but we also found differences from the mutation pattern in tumorigenesis. First, the relative prevalence of mutations in sperm correlates weakly with their in vitro activating properties and occurrence in cancers. Second, specific tandem base substitutions (predominantly GC>TT/AA) occur in sperm but not in cancers; genomewide analysis showed that this same mutation is also overrepresented in constitutional pathogenic and polymorphic variants, suggesting a heightened vulnerability to these mutations in the germline. We developed a statistical model to show how both intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection contribute to the mutational burden borne by the paternal germline.

  14. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  15. Functional Analysis of Somatic Mutations in Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    antibody cetuximab [11]. Finally, we have developed novel single cell sequencing approaches to uncover EGFR mutational variants in glioblastoma and their...assessed which mutations are epistatic to EGFR or capable of initiating xenograft tumor formation in vivo. Using eVIP, we identified 69% of mutations...analyzed as impactful whereas 31% appear functionally neutral. A subset of the impactful mutations induce xenograft tumor formation in mice and/or

  16. Novel KRAS Gene Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Walid M.; Shawarby, Mohamed A.; Al-Tamimi, Dalal M.; Seth, Arun; Al-Quorain, Abdulaziz; Nemer, Areej M. Al; Albagha, Omar M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling. Results KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%). Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%). They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature. Conclusions Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25412182

  17. Chloroplast mutations induced by 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride are independent of the plastome mutator in Oenothera.

    PubMed

    GuhaMajumdar, M; Baldwin, S; Sears, B B

    2004-02-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for the recessive plastome mutator allele ( pm) show chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) mutation frequencies that are about 1,000-fold higher than spontaneous levels. The pm-encoded gene product has been hypothesized to have a function in cpDNA replication, repair and/or mutation avoidance. Previous chemical mutagenesis experiments with the alkylating agent nitroso-methyl urea (NMU) showed a synergistic effect of NMU on the induction of mutations in the pm line, suggesting an interaction between the pm-encoded gene product and one of the repair systems that corrects alkylation damage. The goal of the experiments described here was to examine whether the pm activity extends to the repair of damage caused by non-alkylating mutagens. To this end, the intercalating mutagen, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride (9AA) was tested for synergism with the plastome mutator. A statistical analysis of the data reported here indicates that the pm-encoded gene product is not involved in the repair of the 9AA-induced mutations. However, the recovery of chlorotic sectors in plants derived from the mutagenized seeds shows that 9AA can act as a mutagen of the chloroplast genome.

  18. Exercise-induced mitochondrial p53 repairs mtDNA mutations in mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Adeel; Khrapko, Konstantin; Flynn, James M; Saleem, Ayesha; De Lisio, Michael; Johnston, Adam P W; Kratysberg, Yevgenya; Samjoo, Imtiaz A; Kitaoka, Yu; Ogborn, Daniel I; Little, Jonathan P; Raha, Sandeep; Parise, Gianni; Akhtar, Mahmood; Hettinga, Bart P; Rowe, Glenn C; Arany, Zoltan; Prolla, Tomas A; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic disorders and transgenic mouse models have shown that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and telomere dysfunction instigate the aging process. Epidemiologically, exercise is associated with greater life expectancy and reduced risk of chronic diseases. While the beneficial effects of exercise are well established, the molecular mechanisms instigating these observations remain unclear. Endurance exercise reduces mtDNA mutation burden, alleviates multisystem pathology, and increases lifespan of the mutator mice, with proofreading deficient mitochondrial polymerase gamma (POLG1). We report evidence for a POLG1-independent mtDNA repair pathway mediated by exercise, a surprising notion as POLG1 is canonically considered to be the sole mtDNA repair enzyme. Here, we show that the tumor suppressor protein p53 translocates to mitochondria and facilitates mtDNA mutation repair and mitochondrial biogenesis in response to endurance exercise. Indeed, in mutator mice with muscle-specific deletion of p53, exercise failed to prevent mtDNA mutations, induce mitochondrial biogenesis, preserve mitochondrial morphology, reverse sarcopenia, or mitigate premature mortality. Our data establish a new role for p53 in exercise-mediated maintenance of the mtDNA genome and present mitochondrially targeted p53 as a novel therapeutic modality for diseases of mitochondrial etiology.

  19. A novel missense-mutation-related feature extraction scheme for 'driver' mutation identification.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hua; Bao, Jiguang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2012-11-15

    It becomes widely accepted that human cancer is a disease involving dynamic changes in the genome and that the missense mutations constitute the bulk of human genetic variations. A multitude of computational algorithms, especially the machine learning-based ones, has consequently been proposed to distinguish missense changes that contribute to the cancer progression ('driver' mutation) from those that do not ('passenger' mutation). However, the existing methods have multifaceted shortcomings, in the sense that they either adopt incomplete feature space or depend on protein structural databases which are usually far from integrated. In this article, we investigated multiple aspects of a missense mutation and identified a novel feature space that well distinguishes cancer-associated driver mutations from passenger ones. An index (DX score) was proposed to evaluate the discriminating capability of each feature, and a subset of these features which ranks top was selected to build the SVM classifier. Cross-validation showed that the classifier trained on our selected features significantly outperforms the existing ones both in precision and robustness. We applied our method to several datasets of missense mutations culled from published database and literature and obtained more reasonable results than previous studies. The software is available online at http://www.methodisthealth.com/software and https://sites.google.com/site/drivermutationidentification/. xzhou@tmhs.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; ...

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutationmore » rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.« less

  1. Diversity of ARSACS mutations in French-Canadians.

    PubMed

    Thiffault, I; Dicaire, M J; Tetreault, M; Huang, K N; Demers-Lamarche, J; Bernard, G; Duquette, A; Larivière, R; Gehring, K; Montpetit, A; McPherson, P S; Richter, A; Montermini, L; Mercier, J; Mitchell, G A; Dupré, N; Prévost, C; Bouchard, J P; Mathieu, J; Brais, B

    2013-01-01

    The growing number of spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (SACS) gene mutations reported worldwide has broadened the clinical phenotype of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). The identification of Quebec ARSACS cases without two known SACS mutation led to the development of a multi-modal genomic strategy to uncover mutations in this large gene and explore phenotype variability. Search for SACS mutations by combining various methods on 20 cases with a classical French-Canadian ARSACS phenotype without two mutations and a group of 104 sporadic or recessive spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause. Western blot on lymphoblast protein from cases with different genotypes was probed to establish if they still expressed sacsin. A total of 12 mutations, including 7 novels, were uncovered in Quebec ARSACS cases. The screening of 104 spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause for 98 SACS mutations did not uncover carriers of two mutations. Compounds heterozygotes for one missense SACS mutation were found to minimally express sacsin. The large number of SACS mutations present even in Quebec suggests that the size of the gene alone may explain the great genotypic diversity. This study does not support an expanding ARSACS phenotype in the French-Canadian population. Most mutations lead to loss of function, though phenotypic variability in other populations may reflect partial loss of function with preservation of some sacsin expression. Our results also highlight the challenge of SACS mutation screening and the necessity to develop new generation sequencing methods to ensure low cost complete gene sequencing.

  2. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test... REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9510 TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test. (a) Scope. This... mutation test uses amino-acid requiring strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli to detect...

  3. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  4. Tobacco Induced Mutations: A Fun, Visually Impressive Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milholland, Rebecca B. R.; Hines, Stefani D.

    2004-01-01

    A modified version "Tobacco Induced Mutations" of Ames assay experiment provides a meaningful context for students to learn about the concept of mutations by using a known carcinogen that is tobacco. This experiment shows toxicological concept of the dose/response relationship and visually demonstrates when a mutation have occurred in bacteria…

  5. Accumulation of Spontaneous Mutations in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hong-An; Paixão, Tiago; Azevedo, Ricardo B. R.; Zufall, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the rate and fitness effects of mutations is essential for understanding the process of evolution. Mutations are inherently difficult to study because they are rare and are frequently eliminated by natural selection. In the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, mutations can accumulate in the germline genome without being exposed to selection. We have conducted a mutation accumulation (MA) experiment in this species. Assuming that all mutations are deleterious and have the same effect, we estimate that the deleterious mutation rate per haploid germline genome per generation is U = 0.0047 (95% credible interval: 0.0015, 0.0125), and that germline mutations decrease fitness by s = 11% when expressed in a homozygous state (95% CI: 4.4%, 27%). We also estimate that deleterious mutations are partially recessive on average (h = 0.26; 95% CI: –0.022, 0.62) and that the rate of lethal mutations is <10% of the deleterious mutation rate. Comparisons between the observed evolutionary responses in the germline and somatic genomes and the results from individual-based simulations of MA suggest that the two genomes have similar mutational parameters. These are the first estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and fitness effects from the eukaryotic supergroup Chromalveolata and are within the range of those of other eukaryotes. PMID:23934880

  6. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 31, 347-364 (1975). (2) Maron, D.M. and Ames, B.N. Revised Methods for the Salmonella Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 113, 173-215 (1983). (3) Gatehouse, D., Haworth... Fluctuation Test to Detect Low Levels of Mutagens. Mutation Research. 38, 33-42 (1976). (10) Hubbard, S.A...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Salmonella/Mammalian-Microsome Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 31, 347-364 (1975). (2) Maron, D.M. and Ames, B.N. Revised Methods for the Salmonella Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 113... Bridges, B.A. Use of a Simplified Fluctuation Test to Detect Low Levels of Mutagens. Mutation Research. 38...

  8. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Salmonella/Mammalian-Microsome Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 31, 347-364 (1975). (2) Maron, D.M. and Ames, B.N. Revised Methods for the Salmonella Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 113... Bridges, B.A. Use of a Simplified Fluctuation Test to Detect Low Levels of Mutagens. Mutation Research. 38...

  9. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Salmonella/Mammalian-Microsome Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 31, 347-364 (1975). (2) Maron, D.M. and Ames, B.N. Revised Methods for the Salmonella Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research. 113... Bridges, B.A. Use of a Simplified Fluctuation Test to Detect Low Levels of Mutagens. Mutation Research. 38...

  10. [Study of gene mutation in 62 hemophilia A children].

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Liu, A G; Zhang, L Q; Zhang, A; Wang, Y Q; Wang, S M; Lu, Y J; Wang, X

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To analyze the mutation type of FⅧ gene in children with hemophilia A and to explore the relationship among hemophilia gene mutation spectrum, gene mutation and clinical phenotype. Method: Sixty-two children with hemophilia A from Department of Pediatric Hematology, Tongji Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology between January 2015 and March 2017 were enrolled. All patients were male, aged from 4 months to 7 years and F Ⅷ activity ranged 0.2%-11.0%. Fifty cases had severe, 10 cases had moderate and 2 cases had mild hemophilia A. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood in hemophilia A children and the target gene fragment was amplified by PCR, in combination with the second generation sequencing, 22 and 1 introns were detected. Negative cases were detected by the second generation sequencing and results were compared with those of the international FⅧ gene mutation database. Result: There were 20 cases (32%) of intron 22 inversion, 2 cases (3%) of intron 1 inversion, 18 cases (29%) of missense mutation, 5 cases (8%) of nonsense mutation, 7 cases (11%) of deletion mutation, 1 case(2%)of splice site mutation, 2 cases (3%) of large fragment deletion and 1 case of insertion mutation (2%). No mutation was detected in 2 cases (3%), and 4 cases (7%) failed to amplify. The correlation between phenotype and genotype showed that the most common gene mutation in severe hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion (20 cases), accounting for 40% of severe patients, followed by 11 cases of missense mutation (22%). The most common mutation in moderate hemophilia A was missense mutation (6 cases), accounting for 60% of moderate patients. Conclusion: The most frequent mutation type in hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion, followed by missense mutation, again for missing mutation. The relationship between phenotype and genotype: the most frequent gene mutation in severe hemophilia A is intron 22 inversion, followed by missense

  11. Familial Mediterranean fever with a single MEFV mutation: comparison of rare and common mutations in a Turkish paediatric cohort.

    PubMed

    Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Kandur, Yasar; Duzova, Ali; Ozkaya, Ozan; Kasapcopur, Ozgür; Baskin, Esra; Fidan, Kibriya; Yalcinkaya, Fatos

    2015-01-01

    Presence of common MEFV gene mutations strengthened the diagnosis of FMF in addition to the typical clinical characteristics of FMF. However, there are also rare mutations. P369S, A744S, R761H, K695R, F479L are the main rare mutations in Turkish population. We aimed to evaluate FMF patients with a single allele MEFV mutation and to compare patients with common and rare mutations. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of FMF patients with a single allele mutation who were followed up between 2008 and 2013 in six centres. We compared the patients with rare and common mutations for disease severity score, frequent exacerbations ( >1 attack per month), long attack period (>3 day), symptoms, age at the onset of symptoms, gender, consanguinity, and family history. Two hundred and seventeen patients (M/F=101/116) with the diagnosis of FMF and single mutation were included. Heterozygote mutations were defined as common (M694V, V726A, M68OI) and rare mutations (A744S, P369S, K695R, R761H, F479L). Sixty-seven patients (27 males, 40 females) had one single rare mutation and 150 (74 males, 76 females) had one single common mutation. No difference was found between the rare and common mutations with respect to the disease severity score. There was no significant difference between common and rare heterozygote form of mutations in terms of disease severity. Patients with typical characteristics of FMF, with some rare mutations (A744S, P369S) should be treated in the same manner as patients with a common mutation.

  12. Whole blood genome-wide expression profiling and network analysis suggest MELAS master regulators.

    PubMed

    Mende, Susanne; Royer, Loic; Herr, Alexander; Schmiedel, Janet; Deschauer, Marcus; Klopstock, Thomas; Kostic, Vladimir S; Schroeder, Michael; Reichmann, Heinz; Storch, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    The heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation A3243G causes the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome as one of the most frequent mitochondrial diseases. The process of reconfiguration of nuclear gene expression profile to accommodate cellular processes to the functional status of mitochondria might be a key to MELAS disease manifestation and could contribute to its diverse phenotypic presentation. To determine master regulatory protein networks and disease-modifying genes in MELAS syndrome. Analyses of whole blood transcriptomes from 10 MELAS patients using a novel strategy by combining classic Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray profiling with regulatory and protein interaction network analyses. Hierarchical cluster analysis elucidated that the relative abundance of mutant mtDNA molecules is decisive for the nuclear gene expression response. Further analyses confirmed not only transcription factors already known to be involved in mitochondrial diseases (such as TFAM), but also detected the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 complex, nuclear factor Y and cAMP responsive element-binding protein-related transcription factors as novel master regulators for reconfiguration of nuclear gene expression in response to the MELAS mutation. Correlation analyses of gene alterations and clinico-genetic data detected significant correlations between A3243G-induced nuclear gene expression changes and mutant mtDNA load as well as disease characteristics. These potential disease-modifying genes influencing the expression of the MELAS phenotype are mainly related to clusters primarily unrelated to cellular energy metabolism, but important for nucleic acid and protein metabolism, and signal transduction. Our data thus provide a framework to search for new pathogenetic concepts and potential therapeutic approaches to treat the MELAS syndrome.

  13. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease–relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Results Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant’s colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Conclusions Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all

  14. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease-relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant's colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all Chinese patients carrying mutations in the EYS

  15. The directed mutation controversy and neo-Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Lenski, R E; Mittler, J E

    1993-01-08

    According to neo-Darwinian theory, random mutation produces genetic differences among organisms whereas natural selection tends to increase the frequency of advantageous alleles. However, several recent papers claim that certain mutations in bacteria and yeast occur at much higher rates specifically when the mutant phenotypes are advantageous. Various molecular models have been proposed that might explain these directed mutations, but the models have not been confirmed. Critics contend that studies purporting to demonstrate directed mutation lack certain controls and fail to account adequately for population dynamics. Further experiments that address these criticisms do not support the existence of directed mutations.

  16. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K V; Sedwick, W David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D; Elston, Robert C; Markowitz, Sanford D; Willis, Joseph E

    2015-01-27

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors.

  17. Relationship between SPOP mutation and breast cancer in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Zhu, L; Tania, M; Xiao, X L; Fu, J J

    2015-10-16

    SPOP protein has been found to have ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutations in SPOP gene have been recently reported in some cancers such as prostate, gastric, colorectal cancer. We investigated SPOP DNA mutation in tumor tissues collected from 70 Chinese female breast cancer patients in Southwestern China by DNA sequencing. The results did not show mutation in our tissue samples, indicating that a mutation in the SPOP gene may not be associated with breast cancer, particularly in Chinese women. This DNA mutation analysis or DNA genotyping may provide useful and important information for genetic counseling and personalized medical treatment for different types of cancers.

  18. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  19. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). PMID:9399843

  20. LRIG2 mutations cause urofacial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Helen M; Roberts, Neil A; Burgu, Berk; Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Mermerkaya, Murat; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Lewis, Malcolm A; Olondriz, M Beatriz Orive; Gener, Blanca; Beetz, Christian; Varga, Rita E; Gülpınar, Omer; Süer, Evren; Soygür, Tarkan; Ozçakar, Zeynep B; Yalçınkaya, Fatoş; Kavaz, Aslı; Bulum, Burcu; Gücük, Adnan; Yue, Wyatt W; Erdogan, Firat; Berry, Andrew; Hanley, Neil A; McKenzie, Edward A; Hilton, Emma N; Woolf, Adrian S; Newman, William G

    2013-02-07

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) (or Ochoa syndrome) is an autosomal-recessive disease characterized by congenital urinary bladder dysfunction, associated with a significant risk of kidney failure, and an abnormal facial expression upon smiling, laughing, and crying. We report that a subset of UFS-affected individuals have biallelic mutations in LRIG2, encoding leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 2, a protein implicated in neural cell signaling and tumorigenesis. Importantly, we have demonstrated that rare variants in LRIG2 might be relevant to nonsyndromic bladder disease. We have previously shown that UFS is also caused by mutations in HPSE2, encoding heparanase-2. LRIG2 and heparanase-2 were immunodetected in nerve fascicles growing between muscle bundles within the human fetal bladder, directly implicating both molecules in neural development in the lower urinary tract. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. LRIG2 Mutations Cause Urofacial Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Helen M.; Roberts, Neil A.; Burgu, Berk; Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Dickerson, Jonathan E.; Mermerkaya, Murat; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Lewis, Malcolm A.; Olondriz, M. Beatriz Orive; Gener, Blanca; Beetz, Christian; Varga, Rita E.; Gülpınar, Ömer; Süer, Evren; Soygür, Tarkan; Özçakar, Zeynep B.; Yalçınkaya, Fatoş; Kavaz, Aslı; Bulum, Burcu; Gücük, Adnan; Yue, Wyatt W.; Erdogan, Firat; Berry, Andrew; Hanley, Neil A.; McKenzie, Edward A.; Hilton, Emma N.; Woolf, Adrian S.; Newman, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) (or Ochoa syndrome) is an autosomal-recessive disease characterized by congenital urinary bladder dysfunction, associated with a significant risk of kidney failure, and an abnormal facial expression upon smiling, laughing, and crying. We report that a subset of UFS-affected individuals have biallelic mutations in LRIG2, encoding leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 2, a protein implicated in neural cell signaling and tumorigenesis. Importantly, we have demonstrated that rare variants in LRIG2 might be relevant to nonsyndromic bladder disease. We have previously shown that UFS is also caused by mutations in HPSE2, encoding heparanase-2. LRIG2 and heparanase-2 were immunodetected in nerve fascicles growing between muscle bundles within the human fetal bladder, directly implicating both molecules in neural development in the lower urinary tract. PMID:23313374

  2. ELOVL5 Mutations Cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia 38

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A.; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases. PMID:25065913

  3. The point mutation process in proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    An optimized scoring matrix for residue-by-residue comparisons of distantly related protein sequences has been developed. The scoring matrix is based on observed exchanges and mutabilities of amino acids in 1572 closely related sequences derived from a cross-section of protein groups. Very few superimposed or parallel mutations are included in the data. The scoring matrix is most useful for demonstrating the relatedness of proteins between 65 and 85% different.

  4. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management. PMID:24339558

  5. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  6. A targeted mutational landscape of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Odejide, Oreofe; Weigert, Oliver; Lane, Andrew A.; Toscano, Dan; Lunning, Matthew A.; Kopp, Nadja; Kim, Sunhee; van Bodegom, Diederik; Bolla, Sudha; Schatz, Jonathan H.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hochberg, Ephraim; Louissaint, Abner; Dorfman, David; Stevenson, Kristen; Rodig, Scott J.; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Jacobsen, Eric; Pileri, Stefano A.; Harris, Nancy L.; Ferrero, Simone; Inghirami, Giorgio; Horwitz, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The genetics of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) are very poorly understood. We defined the mutational landscape of AITL across 219 genes in 85 cases from the United States and Europe. We identified ≥2 mutations in 34 genes, nearly all of which were not previously implicated in AITL. These included loss-of-function mutations in TP53 (n = 4), ETV6 (n = 3), CCND3 (n = 2), and EP300 (n = 5), as well as gain-of-function mutations in JAK2 (n = 2) and STAT3 (n = 4). TET2 was mutated in 65 (76%) AITLs, including 43 that harbored 2 or 3 TET2 mutations. DNMT3A mutations occurred in 28 (33%) AITLs; 100% of these also harbored TET2 mutations (P < .0001). Seventeen AITLs harbored IDH2 R172 substitutions, including 15 with TET2 mutations. In summary, AITL is characterized by high frequencies of overlapping mutations in epigenetic modifiers and targetable mutations in a subset of cases. PMID:24345752

  7. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spectrum of Mutations in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Genes Among Tunisian Patients.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Nawel; Gómez, Juan; Kammoun, Ikram; Zairi, Ihsen; Amara, Wael Ben; Kachboura, Salem; Kraiem, Sondes; Hammami, Mohamed; Iglesias, Sara; Alonso, Belén; Coto, Eliecer

    2016-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common cardiac genetic disorder associated with heart failure and sudden death. Mutations in the cardiac sarcomere genes are found in approximately half of HCM patients and are more common among cases with a family history of the disease. Data about the mutational spectrum of the sarcomeric genes in HCM patients from Northern Africa are limited. The population of Tunisia is particularly interesting due to its Berber genetic background. As founder mutations have been reported in other disorders. We performed semiconductor chip (Ion Torrent PGM) next generation sequencing of the nine main sarcomeric genes (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, ACTC1, TNNC1, MYL2, MYL3, TPM1) as well as the recently identified as an HCM gene, FLNC, in 45 Tunisian HCM patients. We found sarcomere gene polymorphisms in 12 patients (27%), with MYBPC3 and MYH7 representing 83% (10/12) of the mutations. One patient was homozygous for a new MYL3 mutation and two were double MYBPC3 + MYH7 mutation carriers. Screening of the FLNC gene identified three new mutations, which points to FLNC mutations as an important cause of HCM among Tunisians. The mutational background of HCM in Tunisia is heterogeneous. Unlike other Mendelian disorders, there were no highly prevalent mutations that could explain most of the cases. Our study also suggested that FLNC mutations may play a role on the risk for HCM among Tunisians.

  9. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Germline cytotoxic lymphocytes defective mutations in Chinese patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Fang; Wang, Mangju; Teng, Wen; Lin, Yuehui; Han, Xiangping; Jin, Fangyuan; Xu, Yuanli; Cao, Panxiang; Fang, Jiancheng; Zhu, Ping; Tong, Chunrong; Liu, Hongxing

    2017-11-01

    Certain patients with lymphoma may harbor mutations in perforin 1 (PRF1), unc-13 homolog D (UNC13D), syntaxin 11 (STX11), STXBP2 (syntaxin binding protein 2) or SH2 domain containing 1A (SH2D1A), which causes functional defects of cytotoxic lymphocytes. Data regarding the association between genetic defects and the development of lymphoma in Chinese patients are limited to date. In the present study, 90 patients with lymphoma were analyzed for UNC13D, PRF1, STXBP2, STX11, SH2D1A and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis. Mutations were observed in 24 (26.67%) patients; 16 patients exhibited mutations in UNC13D, 7 exhibited PRF1 mutations, and 1 exhibited monoallelic mutation in STX11. UNC13D c.2588G>A/p.G863D mutation was detected in 9 patients (10.00%) and in 4/210 controls (1.90%). This mutation was predicted to be pathogenic and it predominantly existed in the Chinese population. These findings suggest that impaired cytotoxic machinery may represent a predisposing factor for the development of lymphoma. Furthermore, these data describe a distinct mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with lymphoma, whereby UNC13D is the most frequently mutated gene. In addition, these findings suggest UNC13D c.2588G>A mutation is a founder mutation in Chinese patients.

  11. Germline cytotoxic lymphocytes defective mutations in Chinese patients with lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Fang; Wang, Mangju; Teng, Wen; Lin, Yuehui; Han, Xiangping; Jin, Fangyuan; Xu, Yuanli; Cao, Panxiang; Fang, Jiancheng; Zhu, Ping; Tong, Chunrong; Liu, Hongxing

    2017-01-01

    Certain patients with lymphoma may harbor mutations in perforin 1 (PRF1), unc-13 homolog D (UNC13D), syntaxin 11 (STX11), STXBP2 (syntaxin binding protein 2) or SH2 domain containing 1A (SH2D1A), which causes functional defects of cytotoxic lymphocytes. Data regarding the association between genetic defects and the development of lymphoma in Chinese patients are limited to date. In the present study, 90 patients with lymphoma were analyzed for UNC13D, PRF1, STXBP2, STX11, SH2D1A and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis. Mutations were observed in 24 (26.67%) patients; 16 patients exhibited mutations in UNC13D, 7 exhibited PRF1 mutations, and 1 exhibited monoallelic mutation in STX11. UNC13D c.2588G>A/p.G863D mutation was detected in 9 patients (10.00%) and in 4/210 controls (1.90%). This mutation was predicted to be pathogenic and it predominantly existed in the Chinese population. These findings suggest that impaired cytotoxic machinery may represent a predisposing factor for the development of lymphoma. Furthermore, these data describe a distinct mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with lymphoma, whereby UNC13D is the most frequently mutated gene. In addition, these findings suggest UNC13D c.2588G>A mutation is a founder mutation in Chinese patients. PMID:29113160

  12. Mutation analysis of 28 gaucher disease patients: The Australasian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.D.; Nelson, P.V.; Robertson, E.F.

    1994-01-15

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysomal storage disease. It is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of {beta}-glucocerrebrosidase. Three clinical phenotypes have been described: non-neuronopathic, acute neuronopathic, and subacuteneuronopathic. Genomic DNA from 28 Australasian patients of diverse ethnic origin with Gaucher disease was screened for 3 common mutations (1226G, 1448C and 84GG) using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and one uncommon mutation (1504T) by restriction enzyme digestion. Thirty-eight of the 56 independent alleles in these patients were characterized, with 1448C present in 42% and 1226G in 28% of the alleles. The 1226G mutation was associatedmore » only with the nonneuronopathic phenotype and 7 of the 15 patients who carried the 1448C mutation developed neuronopathic disease. Three infants who died in the neonatal period following a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative course carried no identifiable mutations. The 84GG mutation was carried by 2 Jewish patients and 1504T was present in one patient. It is now possible to rapidly identify the common Gaucher mutations using ARMS and restriction enzyme digestion, and our findings confirm the heterogeneity of mutations in Gaucher disease. It is also possible to predict in part the phenotypic outcome when screening patients for these mutations. The authors consider mutation analysis to be of most use in prenatal diagnosis and for carrier detection within affected families. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  13. Heterozygous TGFBR2 mutations in Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Collod-Beroud, Gwenaëlle; Akiyama, Takushi; Abifadel, Marianne; Harada, Naoki; Morisaki, Takayuki; Allard, Delphine; Varret, Mathilde; Claustres, Mireille; Morisaki, Hiroko; Ihara, Makoto; Kinoshita, Akira; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Junien, Claudine; Kajii, Tadashi; Jondeau, Guillaume; Ohta, Tohru; Kishino, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Niikawa, Norio; Boileau, Catherine; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2004-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an extracellular matrix disorder with cardinal manifestations in the eye, skeleton, and cardiovascular systems and associated with defects in the fibrillin gene (FBN1) at 15q21.1 1. We previously mapped the second locus for MFS (MFS type 2, MFS2, OMIM *154705), at 3p24.2-p25 in a large French family (MS1)2. Identification of a 3p24.1 chromosomal breakpoint disrupting the TGF-beta receptor 2 gene (TGFBR2) in a Japanese MFS patient led us to consider TGFBR2 as the MSF2 gene. We found a Q508Q mutation of TGFBR2 that resulted in abnormal splicing and segregated with MFS2 in MS1. Three other missense mutations were found in four unrelated probands and were shown by luciferase-assays to lead to loss of function of the TGF-β signaling activity on extracellular matrix formation. These results show that heterozygous mutations in TGFBR2, a putative tumor suppressor gene implicated in several malignancies, are also associated with inherited connective-tissue disorders. PMID:15235604

  14. Mutations in HPSE2 Cause Urofacial Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Hilton, Emma; McKenzie, Edward A.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Lewis, Malcolm; Kerr, Bronwyn; Stuart, Helen; Donnai, Dian; Long, David A.; Burgu, Berk; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Derbent, Murat; Garcia-Minaur, Sixto; Reardon, Willie; Gener, Blanca; Shalev, Stavit; Smith, Rupert; Woolf, Adrian S.; Black, Graeme C.; Newman, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary voiding dysfunction in childhood, manifesting as incontinence, dysuria, and urinary frequency, is a common condition. Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by facial grimacing when attempting to smile and failure of the urinary bladder to void completely despite a lack of anatomical bladder outflow obstruction or overt neurological damage. UFS individuals often have reflux of infected urine from the bladder to the upper renal tract, with a risk of kidney damage and renal failure. Whole-genome SNP mapping in one affected individual defined an autozygous region of 16 Mb on chromosome 10q23-q24, within which a 10 kb deletion encompassing exons 8 and 9 of HPSE2 was identified. Homozygous exonic deletions, nonsense mutations, and frameshift mutations in five further unrelated families confirmed HPSE2 as the causative gene for UFS. Mutations were not identified in four additional UFS patients, indicating genetic heterogeneity. We show that HPSE2 is expressed in the fetal and adult central nervous system, where it might be implicated in controlling facial expression and urinary voiding, and also in bladder smooth muscle, consistent with a role in renal tract morphology and function. Our findings have broader implications for understanding the genetic basis of lower renal tract malformations and voiding dysfunction. PMID:20560210

  15. Investigation of FANCA mutations in Greek patients.

    PubMed

    Selenti, Nikoletta; Sofocleous, Christalena; Kattamis, Antonis; Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Kitsiou, Sophia; Fryssira, Elena; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanouel; Mavrou, Ariadni

    2013-08-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disease characterized by considerable heterogeneity. Fifteen subtypes are currently recognised and deletions of the Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) gene account for more than 65% of FA cases. We report on the results from a cohort of 166 patients referred to the Department of Medical Genetics of Athens University for genetic investigation after the clinical suspicion of FA. For clastogen-induced chromosome damage, cultures were set up with the addition of mitomycin C (MMC) and diepoxybutane (DEB), respectively. Following a positive cytogenetic result, molecular analysis was performed to allow identification of causative mutations in the FANCA gene. A total of 13/166 patients were diagnosed with FA and 8/13 belonged to the FA-A subtype. A novel point mutation was identified in exon 26 of FANCA gene. In our study 62% of FA patients were classified in the FA-A subtype and a point mutation in exon 26 was noted for the first time.

  16. Mutations in HPSE2 cause urofacial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Hilton, Emma; McKenzie, Edward A; Kammerer, Richard A; Lewis, Malcolm; Kerr, Bronwyn; Stuart, Helen; Donnai, Dian; Long, David A; Burgu, Berk; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Derbent, Murat; Garcia-Minaur, Sixto; Reardon, Willie; Gener, Blanca; Shalev, Stavit; Smith, Rupert; Woolf, Adrian S; Black, Graeme C; Newman, William G

    2010-06-11

    Urinary voiding dysfunction in childhood, manifesting as incontinence, dysuria, and urinary frequency, is a common condition. Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by facial grimacing when attempting to smile and failure of the urinary bladder to void completely despite a lack of anatomical bladder outflow obstruction or overt neurological damage. UFS individuals often have reflux of infected urine from the bladder to the upper renal tract, with a risk of kidney damage and renal failure. Whole-genome SNP mapping in one affected individual defined an autozygous region of 16 Mb on chromosome 10q23-q24, within which a 10 kb deletion encompassing exons 8 and 9 of HPSE2 was identified. Homozygous exonic deletions, nonsense mutations, and frameshift mutations in five further unrelated families confirmed HPSE2 as the causative gene for UFS. Mutations were not identified in four additional UFS patients, indicating genetic heterogeneity. We show that HPSE2 is expressed in the fetal and adult central nervous system, where it might be implicated in controlling facial expression and urinary voiding, and also in bladder smooth muscle, consistent with a role in renal tract morphology and function. Our findings have broader implications for understanding the genetic basis of lower renal tract malformations and voiding dysfunction.

  17. KATP Channel Mutations and Neonatal Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kenju; Maejima, Yuko

    2017-09-15

    Since the discovery of the K ATP channel in 1983, numerous studies have revealed its physiological functions. The K ATP channel is expressed in various organs, including the pancreas, brain and skeletal muscles. It functions as a "metabolic sensor" that converts the metabolic status to electrical activity. In pancreatic beta-cells, the K ATP channel regulates the secretion of insulin by sensing a change in the blood glucose level and thus maintains glucose homeostasis. In 2004, heterozygous gain-of-function mutations in the KCNJ11 gene, which encodes the Kir6.2 subunit of the K ATP channel, were found to cause neonatal diabetes. In some mutations, diabetes is accompanied by severe neurological symptoms [developmental delay, epilepsy, neonatal diabetes (DEND) syndrome]. This review focuses on mutations of Kir6.2, the pore-forming subunit and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 1, the regulatory subunit of the K ATP channel, which cause neonatal diabetes/DEND syndrome and also discusses the findings of the pathological mechanisms that are associated with neonatal diabetes, and its neurological features.

  18. Ichthyosis vulgaris: the filaggrin mutation disease.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, J P; Godoy-Gijon, E; Elias, P M

    2013-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) and is characterized clinically by xerosis, scaling, keratosis pilaris, palmar and plantar hyperlinearity, and a strong association with atopic disorders. According to the published studies presented in this review article, FLG mutations are observed in approximately 7·7% of Europeans and 3·0% of Asians, but appear to be infrequent in darker-skinned populations. This clinical review article provides an overview of ichthyosis vulgaris epidemiology, related disorders and pathomechanisms. Not only does ichthyosis vulgaris possess a wide clinical spectrum, recent studies suggest that carriers of FLG mutations may have a generally altered risk of developing common diseases, even beyond atopic disorders. Mechanistic studies have shown increased penetration of allergens and chemicals in filaggrin-deficient skin, and epidemiological studies have found higher levels of hand eczema, irritant contact dermatitis, nickel sensitization and serum vitamin D levels. When relevant, individuals should be informed about an increased risk of developing dermatitis when repeatedly or continuously exposed to nickel or irritants. Moreover, with our current knowledge, individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris should be protected against neonatal exposure to cats to prevent atopic dermatitis and should abstain from smoking to prevent asthma. Finally, they should be advised against excessive exposure to factors that decrease skin barrier functions and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. © 2013 The Authors. BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  20. Simple model of epidemics with pathogen mutation.

    PubMed

    Girvan, Michelle; Callaway, Duncan S; Newman, M E J; Strogatz, Steven H

    2002-03-01

    We study how the interplay between the memory immune response and pathogen mutation affects epidemic dynamics in two related models. The first explicitly models pathogen mutation and individual memory immune responses, with contacted individuals becoming infected only if they are exposed to strains that are significantly different from other strains in their memory repertoire. The second model is a reduction of the first to a system of difference equations. In this case, individuals spend a fixed amount of time in a generalized immune class. In both models, we observe four fundamentally different types of behavior, depending on parameters: (1) pathogen extinction due to lack of contact between individuals; (2) endemic infection; (3) periodic epidemic outbreaks; and (4) one or more outbreaks followed by extinction of the epidemic due to extremely low minima in the oscillations. We analyze both models to determine the location of each transition. Our main result is that pathogens in highly connected populations must mutate rapidly in order to remain viable.

  1. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  2. Novel FANCI mutations in Fanconi anemia with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Savage, Sharon A; Ballew, Bari J; Giri, Neelam; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Ameziane, Najim; de Winter, Johan; Alter, Blanche P

    2016-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutations in DNA repair genes; some of these patients may have features of the VACTERL association. Autosomal recessive mutations in FANCI are a rare cause of FA. We identified FANCI mutations by next generation sequencing in three patients in our FA cohort among several whose mutated gene was unknown. Four of the six mutations are novel and all mutations are likely deleterious to protein function. There are now 16 reported cases of FA due to FANCI of whom 7 have at least 3 features of the VACTERL association (44%). This suggests that the VACTERL association in patients with FA may be seen in patients with FANCI mutations more often than previously recognized. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Identification of Mediterranean mutation in Egyptian favism patients.

    PubMed

    Osman, H G; Zahran, F M; El-Sokkary, A M A; El-Said, A; Sabry, A M

    2014-10-01

    Identify and screen the G6PD Mediterranean mutation in favism patients by applying a Amplification Refractory Mutation System Polymerase Chain Reaction (ARMS-PCR). A total of 114 unrelated Egyptians patients were included in the present study; their ages ranged between (2-9) years with male to female ratio 4.5:1. G6PD activity was determined qualitatively from red cell hemolysate during attack. The G6PD Mediterranean mutation in patients has been identified by ARMS-PCR. G6PD deficiency was detected in 87.7%, (n=100). The frequency of G6PD Mediterranean mutation was (94.7%), (n=108). The association between G6PD deficiency and Mediterranean mutation was a highly significant. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase Mediterranean mutation is one of the most common mutations causing G6PD deficiency among Egyptian children with favism.

  4. Transcription factor mutations in myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Chase, Andrew; Zoi, Katerina; Waghorn, Katherine; Hidalgo-Curtis, Claire; Score, Joannah; Jones, Amy; Grand, Francis; Reiter, Andreas; Hochhaus, Andreas; Cross, Nicholas C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases, caused by either mutation or gene fusion, is of major importance for the development of many hematologic malignancies, particularly myeloproliferative neoplasms. We hypothesized that hitherto unrecognized, cytogenetically cryptic tyrosine kinase fusions may be common in non-classical or atypical myeloproliferative neoplasms and related myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Design and Methods To detect genomic copy number changes associated with such fusions, we performed a systematic search in 68 patients using custom designed, targeted, high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization. Arrays contained 44,000 oligonucleotide probes that targeted 500 genes including all 90 tyrosine kinases plus downstream tyrosine kinase signaling components, other translocation targets, transcription factors, and other factors known to be important for myelopoiesis. Results No abnormalities involving tyrosine kinases were detected; however, nine cytogenetically cryptic copy number imbalances were detected in seven patients, including hemizygous deletions of RUNX1 or CEBPA in two cases with atypical chronic myeloid leukemia. Mutation analysis of the remaining alleles revealed non-mutated RUNX1 and a frameshift insertion within CEBPA. A further mutation screen of 187 patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms identified RUNX1 mutations in 27 (14%) and CEBPA mutations in seven (4%) patients. Analysis of other transcription factors known to be frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia revealed NPM1 mutations in six (3%) and WT1 mutations in two (1%) patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Univariate analysis indicated that patients with mutations had a shorter overall survival (28 versus 44 months, P=0.019) compared with patients without mutations, with the prognosis for cases with CEBPA, NPM1 or WT1 mutations being particularly poor. Conclusions We conclude that mutations of

  5. Mutation analysis of the MECP2 gene in patients of Slavic origin with Rett syndrome: novel mutations and polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zahorakova, Daniela; Rosipal, Robert; Hadac, Jan; Zumrova, Alena; Bzduch, Vladimir; Misovicova, Nadezda; Baxova, Alice; Zeman, Jiri; Martasek, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder in females, is caused mainly by de novo mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). Here we report mutation analysis of the MECP2 gene in 87 patients with RTT from the Czech and Slovak Republics, and Ukraine. The patients, all girls, with classical RTT were investigated for mutations using bi-directional DNA sequencing and conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis analysis of the coding sequence and exon/intron boundaries of the MECP2 gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was performed to confirm the mutations that cause the creation or abolition of the restriction site. Mutation-negative cases were subsequently examined by multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to identify large deletions. Mutation screening revealed 31 different mutations in 68 patients and 12 non-pathogenic polymorphisms. Six mutations have not been previously published: two point mutations (323T>A, 904C>T), three deletions (189_190delGA, 816_832del17, 1069delAGC) and one deletion/inversion (1063_1236del174;1189_1231inv43). MLPA analysis revealed large deletions in two patients. The detection rate was 78.16%. Our results confirm the high frequency of MECP2 mutations in females with RTT and provide data concerning the mutation heterogeneity in the Slavic population.

  6. Characterization of Ribozymes Targeting a Congenital Night Blindness Mutation in Rhodopsin Mutation.

    PubMed

    Conley, Shannon M; Whalen, Patrick; Lewin, Alfred S; Naash, Muna I

    2016-01-01

    The G90D mutation in the rhodopsin gene leads to autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in patients. This occurs because the G90D mutant protein cannot efficiently bind chromophore and is constitutively active. To combat this mutation, we designed and characterized two different hammerhead ribozymes to cleave G90D transcript. In vitro testing showed that the G90D1 ribozyme efficiently and specifically cleaved the mutant transcript while G90D2 cleaved both WT and mutant transcript. AAV-mediated delivery of G90D1 under the control of the mouse opsin promoter (MOP500) to G90D transgenic eyes showed that the ribozyme partially retarded the functional degeneration (as measured by electroretinography [ERG]) associated with this mutation. These results suggest that with additional optimization, ribozymes may be a useful part of the gene therapy knockdown strategy for dominant retinal disease.

  7. BRCA2, EGFR, and NTRK mutations in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers with MSH2 or MLH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Deihimi, Safoora; Lev, Avital; Slifker, Michael; Shagisultanova, Elena; Xu, Qifang; Jung, Kyungsuk; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Ross, Eric A; Xiu, Joanne; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-06-20

    Deficient mismatch repair (MMR) and microsatellite instability (MSI) contribute to ~15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs). We hypothesized MSI leads to mutations in DNA repair proteins including BRCA2 and cancer drivers including EGFR. We analyzed mutations among a discovery cohort of 26 MSI-High (MSI-H) and 558 non-MSI-H CRCs profiled at Caris Life Sciences. Caris-profiled MSI-H CRCs had high mutation rates (50% vs 14% in non-MSI-H, P < 0.0001) in BRCA2. Of 1104 profiled CRCs from a second cohort (COSMIC), MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs showed higher mutation rates in BRCA2 compared to non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (38% vs 6%, P < 0.0000001). BRCA2 mutations in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs included 75 unique mutations not known to occur in breast or pancreatic cancer per COSMIC v73. Only 5 deleterious BRCA2 mutations in CRC were previously reported in the BIC database as germ-line mutations in breast cancer. Some BRCA2 mutations were predicted to disrupt interactions with partner proteins DSS1 and RAD51. Some CRCs harbored multiple BRCA2 mutations. EGFR was mutated in 45.5% of MSH2/MLH1-mutant and 6.5% of non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (P < 0.0000001). Approximately 15% of EGFR mutations found may be actionable through TKI therapy, including N700D, G719D, T725M, T790M, and E884K. NTRK gene mutations were identified in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRC including NTRK1 I699V, NTRK2 P716S, and NTRK3 R745L. Our findings have clinical relevance regarding therapeutic targeting of BRCA2 vulnerabilities, EGFR mutations or other identified oncogenic drivers such as NTRK in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs or other tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

  8. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Boström, Ida Maria; Winbo, Annika; Cederquist, Kristina; Jonasson, Jenni; Jonsson, Björn-Anders; Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Jensen, Steen M; Rydberg, Annika; Norberg, Anna

    2012-10-25

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the

  9. Extent of field change in colorectal cancers with BRAF mutation

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Aaron; Chang, Heidi Sian Ying; Tan, Kok Yang; Sam, Xin Xiu; Khoo, Avery; Choo, Shoa Nian; Nga, Min En; Wan, Wei Keat

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sporadic colorectal cancers with BRAF mutations constitute two distinct subgroups of colorectal cancers. Recent studies have linked the presence of the BRAF mutation to a familial inheritance pattern. This was a proof-of-concept study that aimed to examine: (a) the extent of field change in sporadic colorectal cancers with BRAF mutation; and (b) the extent of resection margins required and the pattern of DNA mismatch repair protein loss in these tumours. METHODS Eight microsatellite instability-high tumours with positive BRAF mutation from an existing histopathological database were selected for BRAF mutation and mismatch repair protein analysis. RESULTS All the resection margins were negative for BRAF mutation. Three tumours had loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expressions, and five tumours had no protein loss. Six peritumoral tissues were negative and one was positive for BRAF mutation. CONCLUSION The results suggest that any early field change effect is restricted to the immediate vicinity of the tumour and is not a pan-colonic phenomenon. Current guidelines on resection margins are adequate for BRAF mutation-positive colorectal cancers. Any suggestion of a hereditary link to these tumours is likely not related to germline BRAF gene mutations. The pattern of protein loss reinforces previous findings for the two subgroups of BRAF mutation-positive colorectal cancers. PMID:28210747

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhimin; Liu, Lina; Li, Mei; Wang, Zhaohui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Qiuping; Cheng, Shihua; Lu, Shen

    2011-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten-RAS (KRAS) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer. We aimed to screen the mutations of both genes in gastric carcinoma to detect the suitability of EGFR TKIs for patients with gastric carcinoma. We screened EGFR mutation in exons 19-21 and KRAS mutation in exon 2 in 58 gastric adenocarcinomas from China using high resolution melting analysis (HRMA). Positive samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Three EGFR missense mutations (5.2%) and 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, Q787Q, 37.9%) were identified. To our knowledge, we report for the first time three mutation patterns of EGFR, Y801C, L858R and G863D, in gastric carcinoma. Two samples with EGFR mutation were mucinous adenocarcinoma. These three samples were collected from male patients aged over 75 years old. The frequency of KRAS mutation was 10.3% (6/58). The exclusiveness of EGFR and KRAS mutations was proven for the first time in gastric cancer. Gastric carcinoma of the mucinous adenocarcinoma type collected from older male patients may harbour EGFR mutations. The small subset of gastric adenocarcinoma patients may respond to EGFR TKIs.

  11. [Maple syrup urine disease and gene mutations in twin neonates].

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Wang, Yu; Li, Cui; Xu, Wei-Wei; Niu, Feng-Hai; Zhang, Di

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the clinical features of one pair of twin neonates with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) in the Chinese Han population and pathogenic mutations in related genes, and to provide guidance for the early diagnosis and treatment of MSUD. The clinical and imaging data of the twin neonates were collected. The peripheral blood samples were collected from the twin neonates and their parents to detect the genes related to MSUD (BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT, and DLD). The loci with gene mutations were identified, and a bioinformatic analysis was performed. Two mutations were detected in the BCKDHB gene, missense mutation c.304G>A (p.Gly102Arg) and nonsense mutation c.331C>T (p.Arg111*), and both of them were heterozygotes. The mutation c.304G>A (p.Gly102Arg) had not been reported in the world. Their father carried the missense mutation c.304G>A (p.Gly102Arg), and their mother carried the nonsense mutation c.331C>T (p.Arg111*). The c.331C>T (p.Arg111*) heterozygous mutation in BCKDHB gene is the pathogenic mutation in these twin neonates and provides a genetic and molecular basis for the clinical features of children with MSUD.

  12. The mutation-drift balance in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David M; Martins, Ayana B; de Aguiar, Marcus A M

    2016-08-07

    In finite populations the action of neutral mutations is balanced by genetic drift, leading to a stationary distribution of alleles that displays a transition between two different behaviors. For small mutation rates most individuals will carry the same allele at equilibrium, whereas for high mutation rates of the alleles will be randomly distributed with frequencies close to one half for a biallelic gene. For well-mixed haploid populations the mutation threshold is μc=1/2N, where N is the population size. In this paper we study how spatial structure affects this mutation threshold. Specifically, we study the stationary allele distribution for populations placed on regular networks where connected nodes represent potential mating partners. We show that the mutation threshold is sensitive to spatial structure only if the number of potential mates is very small. In this limit, the mutation threshold decreases substantially, increasing the diversity of the population at considerably low mutation rates. Defining kc as the degree of the network for which the mutation threshold drops to half of its value in well-mixed populations we show that kc grows slowly as a function of the population size, following a power law. Our calculations and simulations are based on the Moran model and on a mapping between the Moran model with mutations and the voter model with opinion makers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spontaneous Mutation Rate in the Smallest Photosynthetic Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Krasovec, Marc; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation, and knowledge of mutation rates is fundamental for our understanding of all evolutionary processes. High throughput sequencing of mutation accumulation lines has provided genome wide spontaneous mutation rates in a dozen model species, but estimates from nonmodel organisms from much of the diversity of life are very limited. Here, we report mutation rates in four haploid marine bacterial-sized photosynthetic eukaryotic algae; Bathycoccus prasinos, Ostreococcus tauri, Ostreococcus mediterraneus, and Micromonas pusilla. The spontaneous mutation rate between species varies from μ = 4.4 × 10−10 to 9.8 × 10−10 mutations per nucleotide per generation. Within genomes, there is a two-fold increase of the mutation rate in intergenic regions, consistent with an optimization of mismatch and transcription-coupled DNA repair in coding sequences. Additionally, we show that deviation from the equilibrium GC content increases the mutation rate by ∼2% to ∼12% because of a GC bias in coding sequences. More generally, the difference between the observed and equilibrium GC content of genomes explains some of the inter-specific variation in mutation rates. PMID:28379581

  14. Inference of directional selection and mutation parameters assuming equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Claus; Bergman, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    In a classical study, Wright (1931) proposed a model for the evolution of a biallelic locus under the influence of mutation, directional selection and drift. He derived the equilibrium distribution of the allelic proportion conditional on the scaled mutation rate, the mutation bias and the scaled strength of directional selection. The equilibrium distribution can be used for inference of these parameters with genome-wide datasets of "site frequency spectra" (SFS). Assuming that the scaled mutation rate is low, Wright's model can be approximated by a boundary-mutation model, where mutations are introduced into the population exclusively from sites fixed for the preferred or unpreferred allelic states. With the boundary-mutation model, inference can be partitioned: (i) the shape of the SFS distribution within the polymorphic region is determined by random drift and directional selection, but not by the mutation parameters, such that inference of the selection parameter relies exclusively on the polymorphic sites in the SFS; (ii) the mutation parameters can be inferred from the amount of polymorphic and monomorphic preferred and unpreferred alleles, conditional on the selection parameter. Herein, we derive maximum likelihood estimators for the mutation and selection parameters in equilibrium and apply the method to simulated SFS data as well as empirical data from a Madagascar population of Drosophila simulans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Locus-Specific Mutation Databases for Neurodegenerative Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cruts, Marc; Theuns, Jessie; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia (AD&FTLD) and Parkinson disease (PD) Mutation Databases make available curated information of sequence variations in genes causing Mendelian forms of the most common neurodegenerative brain disease AD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and PD. They are established resources for clinical geneticists, neurologists, and researchers in need of comprehensive, referenced genetic, epidemiologic, clinical, neuropathological, and/or cell biological information of specific gene mutations in these diseases. In addition, the aggregate analysis of all information available in the databases provides unique opportunities to extract mutation characteristics and genotype–phenotype correlations, which would be otherwise unnoticed and unexplored. Such analyses revealed that 61.4% of mutations are private to one single family, while only 5.7% of mutations occur in 10 or more families. The five mutations with most frequent independent observations occur in 21% of AD, 43% of FTLD, and 48% of PD families recorded in the Mutation Databases, respectively. Although these figures are inevitably biased by a publishing policy favoring novel mutations, they probably also reflect the occurrence of multiple rare and few relatively common mutations in the inherited forms of these diseases. Finally, with the exception of the PD genes PARK2 and PINK1, all other genes are associated with more than one clinical diagnosis or characteristics thereof. Hum Mutat 33:1340–1344, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22581678

  16. A Theory of Age-Dependent Mutation and Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.; Promislow, Daniel E. L.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show us that the deleterious character of accumulated novel age-specific mutations is reduced and made less variable with increased age. While theories of aging predict that the frequency of deleterious mutations at mutation–selection equilibrium will increase with the mutation's age of effect, they do not account for these age-related changes in the distribution of de novo mutational effects. Furthermore, no model predicts why this dependence of mutational effects upon age exists. Because the nature of mutational distributions plays a critical role in shaping patterns of senescence, we need to develop aging theory that explains and incorporates these effects. Here we propose a model that explains the age dependency of mutational effects by extending Fisher's geometrical model of adaptation to include a temporal dimension. Using a combination of simple analytical arguments and simulations, we show that our model predicts age-specific mutational distributions that are consistent with observations from mutation-accumulation experiments. Simulations show us that these age-specific mutational effects may generate patterns of senescence at mutation–selection equilibrium that are consistent with observed demographic patterns that are otherwise difficult to explain. PMID:18660535

  17. First report of HGD mutations in a Chinese with alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-jia; Guo, Ji-hong; Chen, Wei-jian; Zhao, Rui; Tang, Jin-song; Meng, Xiao-hua; Zhao, Liu; Tu, Ming; He, Xin-yu; Wu, Ling-qian; Zhu, Yi-min

    2013-04-15

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is one of the first prototypic inborn errors in metabolism and the first human disease found to be transmitted via Mendelian autosomal recessive inheritance. It is caused by HGD mutations, which leads to a deficiency in homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) activity. To date, several HGD mutations have been identified as the cause of the prototypic disease across different ethnic populations worldwide. However, in Asia, the HGD mutation is very rarely reported. For the Chinese population, no literature on HGD mutation screening is available to date. In this paper, we describe two novel HGD mutations in a Chinese AKU family, the splicing mutation of IVS7+1G>C, a donor splice site of exon 7, and a missense mutation of F329C in exon 12. The predicted new splicing site of the mutated exon 7 sequence demonstrated a 303bp extension after the mutation site. The F329C mutation most probably disturbed the stability of the conformation of the two loops critical to the Fe(2+) active site of the HGD enzyme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A resolution of the mutation load paradox in humans.

    PubMed

    Lesecque, Yann; Keightley, Peter D; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2012-08-01

    Current information on the rate of mutation and the fraction of sites in the genome that are subject to selection suggests that each human has received, on average, at least two new harmful mutations from its parents. These mutations were subsequently removed by natural selection through reduced survival or fertility. It has been argued that the mutation load, the proportional reduction in population mean fitness relative to the fitness of an idealized mutation-free individual, allows a theoretical prediction of the proportion of individuals in the population that fail to reproduce as a consequence of these harmful mutations. Application of this theory to humans implies that at least 88% of individuals should fail to reproduce and that each female would need to have more than 16 offspring to maintain population size. This prediction is clearly at odds with the low reproductive excess of human populations. Here, we derive expressions for the fraction of individuals that fail to reproduce as a consequence of recurrent deleterious mutation () for a model in which selection occurs via differences in relative fitness, such as would occur through competition between individuals. We show that is much smaller than the value predicted by comparing fitness to that of a mutation-free genotype. Under the relative fitness model, we show that depends jointly on U and the selective effects of new deleterious mutations and that a species could tolerate 10's or even 100's of new deleterious mutations per genome each generation.

  19. Age-related mutations and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mason, CC; Khorashad, JS; Tantravahi, SK; Kelley, TW; Zabriskie, MS; Yan, D; Pomicter, AD; Reynolds, KR; Eiring, AM; Kronenberg, Z; Sherman, RL; Tyner, JW; Dalley, BK; Dao, K-H; Yandell, M; Druker, BJ; Gotlib, J; O’Hare, T; Deininger, MW

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a hematologic malignancy nearly confined to the elderly. Previous studies to determine incidence and prognostic significance of somatic mutations in CMML have relied on candidate gene sequencing, although an unbiased mutational search has not been conducted. As many of the genes commonly mutated in CMML were recently associated with age-related clonal hematopoiesis (ARCH) and aged hematopoiesis is characterized by a myelomonocytic differentiation bias, we hypothesized that CMML and aged hematopoiesis may be closely related. We initially established the somatic mutation landscape of CMML by whole exome sequencing followed by gene-targeted validation. Genes mutated in ⩾ 10% of patients were SRSF2, TET2, ASXL1, RUNX1, SETBP1, KRAS, EZH2, CBL and NRAS, as well as the novel CMML genes FAT4, ARIH1, DNAH2 and CSMD1. Most CMML patients (71%) had mutations in ⩾ 2 ARCH genes and 52% had ⩾ 7 mutations overall. Higher mutation burden was associated with shorter survival. Age-adjusted population incidence and reported ARCH mutation rates are consistent with a model in which clinical CMML ensues when a sufficient number of stochastically acquired age-related mutations has accumulated, suggesting that CMML represents the leukemic conversion of the myelomonocytic-lineage-biased aged hematopoietic system. PMID:26648538

  20. Prevalence of glucocerebrosidase mutations in the Israeli Ashkenazi Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Pasmanik-Chor, M; Borochowitz, Z; Falik-Zaccai, T; Heldmann, K; Carmi, R; Parvari, R; Beit-Or, H; Goldman, B; Peleg, L; Levy-Lahad, E; Renbaum, P; Legum, S; Shomrat, R; Yeger, H; Benbenisti, D; Navon, R; Dror, V; Shohat, M; Magal, N; Navot, N; Eyal, N

    1998-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent inherited disease among Ashkenazi Jews. It is very heterogeneous due to a large number of mutations within the glucocerebrosidase gene, whose impaired activity is the cause for this disease. Aiming at determining Gaucher carrier frequency among the Ashkenazi Jewish population in Israel, 1,208 individuals were molecularly diagnosed for six mutations known to occur among Ashkenazi Jewish Gaucher patients, using the newly developed Pronto Gaucher kit. The following mutations were tested: N370S, 84GG, IVS2+1, D409H, L444P, and V394L. Molecular testing of these mutations also allows identification of the recTL allele. The results indicated that Gaucher carrier frequency is 1:17 within the tested population. The prevalence of N370S carriers is 1:17.5. This implies that approximately 1:1225 Ashkenazi Jews will be homozygous for the N370S mutation. Actually, in our study of 1,208 individuals one was found to be homozygous for the N370S mutation. The actual number of known Ashkenazi Jewish Gaucher patients with this genotype is much lower than that expected according to the frequency of the N370S mutation, suggesting a low penetrance of this mutation. Results of loading experiments in cells homozygous for the N370S mutation, as well as cells homozygous for the L444P and the D409H mutations, exemplified this phenomenon.

  1. Mutation predicts 40 million years of fly wing evolution.

    PubMed

    Houle, David; Bolstad, Geir H; van der Linde, Kim; Hansen, Thomas F

    2017-08-24

    Mutation enables evolution, but the idea that adaptation is also shaped by mutational variation is controversial. Simple evolutionary hypotheses predict such a relationship if the supply of mutations constrains evolution, but it is not clear that constraints exist, and, even if they do, they may be overcome by long-term natural selection. Quantification of the relationship between mutation and phenotypic divergence among species will help to resolve these issues. Here we use precise data on over 50,000 Drosophilid fly wings to demonstrate unexpectedly strong positive relationships between variation produced by mutation, standing genetic variation, and the rate of evolution over the last 40 million years. Our results are inconsistent with simple constraint hypotheses because the rate of evolution is very low relative to what both mutational and standing variation could allow. In principle, the constraint hypothesis could be rescued if the vast majority of mutations are so deleterious that they cannot contribute to evolution, but this also requires the implausible assumption that deleterious mutations have the same pattern of effects as potentially advantageous ones. Our evidence for a strong relationship between mutation and divergence in a slowly evolving structure challenges the existing models of mutation in evolution.

  2. Renal Aplasia in Humans Is Associated with RET Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael A.; Safford, Shawn D.; Reeves, Justin G.; Jackson, Margaret E.; Freemerman, Alex J.

    2008-01-01

    In animal models, kidney formation is known to be controlled by the proteins RET, GDNF, and GFRA1; however, no human studies to date have shown an association between abnormal kidney development and mutation of these genes. We hypothesized that stillborn fetuses with congenital renal agenesis or severe dysplasia would possess mutations in RET, GDNF, or GFRA1. We assayed for mutations in these genes in 33 stillborn fetuses that had bilateral or unilateral renal agenesis (29 subjects) or severe congenital renal dysplasia (4 subjects). Mutations in RET were found in 7 of 19 fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis (37%) and 2 of 10 fetuses (20%) with unilateral agenesis. In two fetuses, there were two different RET mutations found, and a total of ten different sequence variations were identified. We also investigated whether these mutations affected RET activation; in each case, RET phosphorylation was either absent or constitutively activated. A GNDF mutation was identified in only one fetus with unilateral agenesis; this subject also had two RET mutations. No GFRA1 mutations were seen in any fetuses. These data suggest that in humans, mutations in RET and GDNF may contribute significantly to abnormal kidney development. PMID:18252215

  3. Statistical Methods for Identifying Sequence Motifs Affecting Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yicheng; Neeman, Teresa; Yap, Von Bing; Huttley, Gavin A.

    2017-01-01

    Mutation processes differ between types of point mutation, genomic locations, cells, and biological species. For some point mutations, specific neighboring bases are known to be mechanistically influential. Beyond these cases, numerous questions remain unresolved, including: what are the sequence motifs that affect point mutations? How large are the motifs? Are they strand symmetric? And, do they vary between samples? We present new log-linear models that allow explicit examination of these questions, along with sequence logo style visualization to enable identifying specific motifs. We demonstrate the performance of these methods by analyzing mutation processes in human germline and malignant melanoma. We recapitulate the known CpG effect, and identify novel motifs, including a highly significant motif associated with A→G mutations. We show that major effects of neighbors on germline mutation lie within ±2 of the mutating base. Models are also presented for contrasting the entire mutation spectra (the distribution of the different point mutations). We show the spectra vary significantly between autosomes and X-chromosome, with a difference in T→C transition dominating. Analyses of malignant melanoma confirmed reported characteristic features of this cancer, including statistically significant strand asymmetry, and markedly different neighboring influences. The methods we present are made freely available as a Python library https://bitbucket.org/pycogent3/mutationmotif. PMID:27974498

  4. Thailand mutation and variation database (ThaiMUT).

    PubMed

    Ruangrit, Uttapong; Srikummool, Metawee; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Ngamphiw, Chumpol; Chuechote, Suparat; Thaiprasarnsup, Vilasinee; Agavatpanitch, Gallissara; Pasomsab, Ekawat; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chantratita, Wasun; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Limwongse, Chanin; Tongsima, Sissades

    2008-08-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, novel sequencing and genotyping technologies had been utilized to detect mutations. Such mutations have continually been produced at exponential rate by researchers in various communities. Based on the population's mutation spectra, occurrences of Mendelian diseases are different across ethnic groups. A proportion of Mendelian diseases can be observed in some countries at higher rates than others. Recognizing the importance of mutation effects in Thailand, we established a National and Ethnic Mutation Database (NEMDB) for Thai people. This database, named Thailand Mutation and Variation database (ThaiMUT), offers a web-based access to genetic mutation and variation information in Thai population. This NEMDB initiative is an important informatics tool for both research and clinical purposes to retrieve and deposit human variation data. The mutation data cataloged in ThaiMUT database were derived from journal articles available in PubMed and local publications. In addition to collected mutation data, ThaiMUT also records genetic polymorphisms located in drug related genes. ThaiMUT could then provide useful information for clinical mutation screening services for Mendelian diseases and pharmacogenomic researches. ThaiMUT can be publicly accessed from http://gi.biotec.or.th/thaimut.

  5. Hereditary cancer genes are highly susceptible to splicing mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soemedi, Rachel; Maguire, Samantha; Murray, Michael F.; Monaghan, Sean F.

    2018-01-01

    Substitutions that disrupt pre-mRNA splicing are a common cause of genetic disease. On average, 13.4% of all hereditary disease alleles are classified as splicing mutations mapping to the canonical 5′ and 3′ splice sites. However, splicing mutations present in exons and deeper intronic positions are vastly underreported. A recent re-analysis of coding mutations in exon 10 of the Lynch Syndrome gene, MLH1, revealed an extremely high rate (77%) of mutations that lead to defective splicing. This finding is confirmed by extending the sampling to five other exons in the MLH1 gene. Further analysis suggests a more general phenomenon of defective splicing driving Lynch Syndrome. Of the 36 mutations tested, 11 disrupted splicing. Furthermore, analyzing past reports suggest that MLH1 mutations in canonical splice sites also occupy a much higher fraction (36%) of total mutations than expected. When performing a comprehensive analysis of splicing mutations in human disease genes, we found that three main causal genes of Lynch Syndrome, MLH1, MSH2, and PMS2, belonged to a class of 86 disease genes which are enriched for splicing mutations. Other cancer genes were also enriched in the 86 susceptible genes. The enrichment of splicing mutations in hereditary cancers strongly argues for additional priority in interpreting clinical sequencing data in relation to cancer and splicing. PMID:29505604

  6. Mutations Altering Chloroplast Ribosome Phenotype in Chlamydomonas, II. A New Mendelian Mutation*

    PubMed Central

    Boynton, John E.; Gillham, Nicholas W.; Burkholder, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    A new mutation of Chlamydomonas reinhardi, cr-1, is characterized. The mutation exhibits Mendelian inheritance and affects the sedimentation velocity and formation of intact chloroplast ribosomes. The mutant grows reasonably well when supplied with sodium acetate as a carbon source, but poorly when forced to grow photosynthetically using carbon dioxide. Since the mutant cr-1 accumulates large subunits of the chloroplast ribosome, we postulate that it is blocked in the formation of the small subunit. A tentative model explaining the behavior of the several mutants in Chlamydomonas now known to have altered chloroplast ribosomal phenotypes is presented. Images PMID:16591885

  7. Spectrum of rhodopsin mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Joong; Kim, Cinoo; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Hum; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kimm, Kuchan; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations in patients with mutations. Methods The RHO mutations were screened by direct sequencing, and mutation prevalence was measured in patients and controls. The impact of missense mutations to RP was predicted by segregation analysis, peptide sequence alignment, and in silico analysis. The severity of disease in patients with the missense mutations was compared by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic visual field testing. Results Five heterozygous mutations were identified in six of 302 probands with RP, including a novel mutation (c.893C>A, p.A298D) and four known mutations (c.50C>T, p.T17M; c.533A>G, p.Y178C; c.888G>T, p.K296N; and c.1040C>T, p.P347L). The allele frequency of missense mutations was measured in 114 ethnically matched controls. p.A298D, newly identified in a sporadic patient, had never been found in controls and was predicted to be pathogenic. Among the patients with the missense mutations, we observed the most severe phenotype in patients with p.P347L, less severe phenotypes in patients with p.Y178C or p.A298D, and a relatively moderate phenotype in a patient with p.T17M. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum of RHO mutations in Korean RP patients and clinical features that vary according to mutations. Our findings will be useful for understanding these genetic spectra and the genotype–phenotype correlations and will therefore help with predicting disease prognosis and facilitating the development of gene therapy. PMID:21677794

  8. Mutator dynamics in sexual and asexual experimental populations of yeast.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Yevgeniy; Gazzara, Matthew R; Sniegowski, Paul D

    2011-06-07

    In asexual populations, mutators may be expected to hitchhike with associated beneficial mutations. In sexual populations, recombination is predicted to erode such associations, inhibiting mutator hitchhiking. To investigate the effect of recombination on mutators experimentally, we compared the frequency dynamics of a mutator allele (msh2Δ) in sexual and asexual populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutator strains increased in frequency at the expense of wild-type strains in all asexual diploid populations, with some approaching fixation in 150 generations of propagation. Over the same period of time, mutators declined toward loss in all corresponding sexual diploid populations as well as in haploid populations propagated asexually. We report the first experimental investigation of mutator dynamics in sexual populations. We show that a strong mutator quickly declines in sexual populations while hitchhiking to high frequency in asexual diploid populations, as predicted by theory. We also show that the msh2Δ mutator has a high and immediate realized cost that is alone sufficient to explain its decline in sexual populations. We postulate that this cost is indirect; namely, that it is due to a very high rate of recessive lethal or strongly deleterious mutation. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that msh2Δ also has unknown directly deleterious effects on fitness, and that these effects may differ between haploid asexual and sexual populations. Despite these reservations, our results prompt us to speculate that the short-term cost of highly deleterious recessive mutations can be as important as recombination in preventing mutator hitchhiking in sexual populations.

  9. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Methods Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. Results We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. Conclusions COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change. PMID:19390655

  10. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change.

  11. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Kerr, Sarah E; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Graham, Rondell P; Zhang, Lizhi; Highsmith, W Edward; Zhang, Jun; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Halling, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are common in gliomas and help stratify patients with brain cancer into histologic and molecular subtypes. However, these mutations are considered rare in other solid tumors. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma and to assess histopathologic differences between specimens with and without an isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation. We sequenced 94 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cholangiocarcinoma (67 intrahepatic and 27 extrahepatic) assessing for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (codon 132) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (codons 140 and 172) mutations. Multiple histopathologic characteristics were also evaluated and compared with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutation status. Of the 94 evaluated specimens, 21 (22%) had a mutation including 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma than in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (28% versus 7%, respectively; P = .030). The 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations were R132C (n = 9), R132S (n = 2), R132G (n = 2), and R132L (n = 1). The 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations were R172K (n = 5), R172M (n = 1), and R172G (n = 1). Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in tumors with clear cell change (P < .001) and poorly differentiated histology (P = .012). The results of this study show for the first time that isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are mutated in cholangiocarcinoma. The results of this study are encouraging because it identifies a new potential target for genotype-directed therapeutic trials and may represent a potential biomarker for earlier detection of cholangiocarcinoma in a subset of cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  13. Screening for duplications, deletions and a common intronic mutation detects 35% of second mutations in patients with USH2A monoallelic mutations on Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Lenassi, Eva; Luxon, Linda M; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2013-08-08

    Usher Syndrome is the leading cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is divided into three subtypes, of which the most common is Usher type 2, and the USH2A gene accounts for 75-80% of cases. Despite recent sequencing strategies, in our cohort a significant proportion of individuals with Usher type 2 have just one heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A, or no convincing disease-causing mutations across nine Usher genes. The purpose of this study was to improve the molecular diagnosis in these families by screening USH2A for duplications, heterozygous deletions and a common pathogenic deep intronic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. Forty-nine Usher type 2 or atypical Usher families who had missing mutations (mono-allelic USH2A or no mutations following Sanger sequencing of nine Usher genes) were screened for duplications/deletions using the USH2A SALSA MLPA reagent kit (MRC-Holland). Identification of USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was achieved by Sanger sequencing. Mutations were confirmed by a combination of reverse transcription PCR using RNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells or fibroblasts, and by array comparative genomic hybridisation with sequencing across the genomic breakpoints. Eight mutations were identified in 23 Usher type 2 families (35%) with one previously identified heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A. These consisted of five heterozygous deletions, one duplication, and two heterozygous instances of the pathogenic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. No variants were found in the 15 Usher type 2 families with no previously identified disease-causing mutations. In 11 atypical families, none of whom had any previously identified convincing disease-causing mutations, the mutation USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was identified in a heterozygous state in one family. All five deletions and the heterozygous duplication we report here are novel. This is the first time that a duplication in USH2A has been reported as a cause of Usher syndrome. We found that 8 of

  14. Clinical and laboratory survey of 65 Chinese patients with Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-ling; Sun, Fang; Zhang, Yao; Qian, Ning; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhao-xia; Qi, Yu; Xiao, Jiang-xi; Wang, Xiao-ying; Qi, Zhao-yue; Zhang, Yue-hua; Jiang, Yu-wu; Bao, Xin-hua; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xi-ru

    2006-03-05

    Leigh syndrome is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that emerges in infancy and childhood and presents with a clinically heterogeneous variety of neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular disorders. It can result from the inheritance of mutations in either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA. In the current study, we performed a retrospective study in 65 patients in order to investigate the clinical and genetic characteristics of Leigh syndrome in Chinese patients. Sixty-five unrelated cases (35 men and 30 women) who were hospitalized in the past 12 years were reviewed. Diagnosis was based on both the clinical presentation and the characteristic neuropathologic findings of bilateral symmetric necrotizing lesions in the basal ganglia and brain stem as detected using cranial computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The differential diagnosis of organic acidurias and fatty acid beta-oxidation defects were performed. Specific point mutations and deletions in mitochondrial DNA (T8993G, T8993C, T9176C, A8344G, A3243G) were screened by PCR-restriction analysis and Southern blot. The SURF1 gene was sequenced. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed in 17 (26.2%) of the patients. The diagnosis was confirmed by autopsy in 6 (9.2%) patients. The patients had various forms of metabolic encephalomyopathy. Fifty-nine (90.8%) of the patients had the typical neuroradiological features of Leigh syndrome, including symmetrical necrotizing lesions scattered within the basal ganglia, thalamus and brain stem. Twenty (30.8%) patients were confirmed by genetic, biochemical analysis and autopsy. Specific point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in 5 cases (7.7%). Of these, the A8344G mutation was detected in 2 patients. The T8993G, T8993C, and A3243G point mutations were identified in 3 other patients, respectively. SURF1 mutations associated with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency were identified in 8 (12.3%) families by DNA sequencing. A G604C mutation was

  15. Blue Diaper Syndrome and PCSK1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Distelmaier, Felix; Herebian, Diran; Atasever, Claudia; Beck-Woedl, Stefanie; Mayatepek, Ertan; Strom, Tim M; Haack, Tobias B

    2018-04-01

    Blue diaper syndrome (BDS) (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man number 211000) is an extremely rare disorder that was first described in 1964. The characteristic finding is a bluish discoloration of urine spots in the diapers of affected infants. Additional clinical features of the first described patients included diarrhea, inadequate weight gain, hypercalcemia, and nephrocalcinosis. An intestinal defect of tryptophan absorption was postulated as the underlying pathology. However, functional evidence for this theory is lacking. No genetic cause has been identified so far. Here, we report on a boy who presented with neonatal-onset diarrhea, metabolic acidosis, transient hepatopathy, recurrent hypoglycemia, and blue-stained urine spots in his diapers. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of urine samples at different time points demonstrated the constant presence of indigo derivatives, thereby confirming the diagnosis of BDS. Of note, the visibility of indigo derivatives in the urine was highly dependent on the urine's pH. To identify the underlying genetic cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing was performed, leading to the identification of a homozygous frameshift mutation in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 ( PCSK1 ; NM_000439.4: c.679del, p.[Val227Leufs*12]). PCSK1 encodes prohormone convertase 1/3, and mutations within this gene have been reported as a rare cause of early-onset malabsorptive diarrhea and multiple endocrine dysfunction. In our report, we suggest that BDS can be caused by PCSK1 mutations. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Identifying uniformly mutated segments within repeats.

    PubMed

    Sahinalp, S Cenk; Eichler, Evan; Goldberg, Paul; Berenbrink, Petra; Friedetzky, Tom; Ergun, Funda

    2004-12-01

    Given a long string of characters from a constant size alphabet we present an algorithm to determine whether its characters have been generated by a single i.i.d. random source. More specifically, consider all possible n-coin models for generating a binary string S, where each bit of S is generated via an independent toss of one of the n coins in the model. The choice of which coin to toss is decided by a random walk on the set of coins where the probability of a coin change is much lower than the probability of using the same coin repeatedly. We present a procedure to evaluate the likelihood of a n-coin model for given S, subject a uniform prior distribution over the parameters of the model (that represent mutation rates and probabilities of copying events). In the absence of detailed prior knowledge of these parameters, the algorithm can be used to determine whether the a posteriori probability for n=1 is higher than for any other n>1. Our algorithm runs in time O(l4logl), where l is the length of S, through a dynamic programming approach which exploits the assumed convexity of the a posteriori probability for n. Our test can be used in the analysis of long alignments between pairs of genomic sequences in a number of ways. For example, functional regions in genome sequences exhibit much lower mutation rates than non-functional regions. Because our test provides means for determining variations in the mutation rate, it may be used to distinguish functional regions from non-functional ones. Another application is in determining whether two highly similar, thus evolutionarily related, genome segments are the result of a single copy event or of a complex series of copy events. This is particularly an issue in evolutionary studies of genome regions rich with repeat segments (especially tandemly repeated segments).

  17. Mutational Signatures in Cancer (MuSiCa): a web application to implement mutational signatures analysis in cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gay, Marcos; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Lozano, Juan José; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2018-06-14

    Mutational signatures have been proved as a valuable pattern in somatic genomics, mainly regarding cancer, with a potential application as a biomarker in clinical practice. Up to now, several bioinformatic packages to address this topic have been developed in different languages/platforms. MutationalPatterns has arisen as the most efficient tool for the comparison with the signatures currently reported in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. However, the analysis of mutational signatures is nowadays restricted to a small community of bioinformatic experts. In this work we present Mutational Signatures in Cancer (MuSiCa), a new web tool based on MutationalPatterns and built using the Shiny framework in R language. By means of a simple interface suited to non-specialized researchers, it provides a comprehensive analysis of the somatic mutational status of the supplied cancer samples. It permits characterizing the profile and burden of mutations, as well as quantifying COSMIC-reported mutational signatures. It also allows classifying samples according to the above signature contributions. MuSiCa is a helpful web application to characterize mutational signatures in cancer samples. It is accessible online at http://bioinfo.ciberehd.org/GPtoCRC/en/tools.html and source code is freely available at https://github.com/marcos-diazg/musica .

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations database: review of the "old" and update of the new mutations.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Moradkhani, Kamran; Hwang, Ming Jing; Zuppi, Cecilia; Giardina, Bruno; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-03-15

    In the present paper we have updated the G6PD mutations database, including all the last discovered G6PD genetic variants. We underline that the last database has been published by Vulliamy et al. [1] who analytically reported 140 G6PD mutations: along with Vulliamy's database, there are two main sites, such as http://202.120.189.88/mutdb/ and www.LOVD.nl/MR, where almost all G6PD mutations can be found. Compared to the previous mutation reports, in our paper we have included for each mutation some additional information, such as: the secondary structure and the enzyme 3D position involving by mutation, the creation or abolition of a restriction site (with the enzyme involved) and the conservation score associated with each amino acid position. The mutations reported in the present tab have been divided according to the gene's region involved (coding and non-coding) and mutations affecting the coding region in: single, multiple (at least with two bases involved) and deletion. We underline that for the listed mutations, reported in italic, literature doesn't provide all the biochemical or bio-molecular information or the research data. Finally, for the "old" mutations, we tried to verify features previously reported and, when subsequently modified, we updated the specific information using the latest literature data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C. PMID:28170390

  20. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Bernard, Brady

    2017-02-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C.

  1. NT5E Mutations and Arterial Calcifications

    PubMed Central

    St. Hilaire, Cynthia; Ziegler, Shira G.; Markello, Thomas C.; Brusco, Alfredo; Groden, Catherine; Gill, Fred; Carlson-Donohoe, Hannah; Lederman, Robert J.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yang, Dan; Siegenthaler, Michael P.; Arduino, Carlo; Mancini, Cecilia; Freudenthal, Bernard; Stanescu, Horia C.; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Chaganti, R. Krishna; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Kleta, Robert; Gahl, William A.; Boehm, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Arterial calcifications are associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but the genetic basis of this association is unclear. METHODS We performed clinical, radiographic, and genetic studies in three families with symptomatic arterial calcifications. Single-nucleotide-polymorphism analysis, targeted gene sequencing, quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction assays, Western blotting, enzyme measurements, transduction rescue experiments, and in vitro calcification assays were performed. RESULTS We identified nine persons with calcifications of the lower-extremity arteries and hand and foot joint capsules: all five siblings in one family, three siblings in another, and one patient in a third family. Serum calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D levels were normal. Affected members of Family 1 shared a single 22.4-Mb region of homozygosity on chromosome 6 and had a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.662C→A, p.S221X) in NT5E, encoding CD73, which converts AMP to adenosine. Affected members of Family 2 had a homozygous missense mutation (c.1073G→A, p.C358Y) in NT5E. The proband of Family 3 was a compound heterozygote for c.662C→A and c.1609dupA (p.V537fsX7). All mutations found in the three families result in nonfunctional CD73. Cultured fibroblasts from affected members of Family 1 showed markedly reduced expression of NT5E messenger RNA, CD73 protein, and enzyme activity, as well as increased alkaline phosphatase levels and accumulated calcium phosphate crystals. Genetic rescue experiments normalized the CD73 and alkaline phosphatase activity in patients’ cells, and adenosine treatment reduced the levels of alkaline phosphatase and calcification. CONCLUSIONS We identified mutations in NT5E in members of three families with symptomatic arterial and joint calcifications. This gene encodes CD73, which converts AMP to adenosine, supporting a role for this metabolic pathway in inhibiting ectopic tissue calcification. (Funded by the National Human Genome Research

  2. Sporadic Kindler syndrome with a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Heckler, Gláucia Thomas; Fong, Kenneth; Lai-Cheong, Joey; McGrath, John

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with Kindler syndrome, a rare form of epidermolysis bullosa. Clinically, since childhood, she had widespread pigmentary changes in her skin as well as photosensitivity and fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. The mucosal involvement led to an erosive stomatitis as well as esophageal, anal and vaginal stenoses, requiring surgical intervention. The diagnosis of Kindler syndrome was confirmed by DNA sequencing with compound heterozygosity for a nonsense/frameshift combination of mutations (p.Arg110X; p.Ala289GlyfsX7) in the FERMT1 gene.

  3. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping mutational effects along the evolutionary landscape of HIV envelope

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Sarah K; Overbaugh, Julie

    2018-01-01

    The immediate evolutionary space accessible to HIV is largely determined by how single amino acid mutations affect fitness. These mutational effects can shift as the virus evolves. However, the prevalence of such shifts in mutational effects remains unclear. Here, we quantify the effects on viral growth of all amino acid mutations to two HIV envelope (Env) proteins that differ at >100 residues. Most mutations similarly affect both Envs, but the amino acid preferences of a minority of sites have clearly shifted. These shifted sites usually prefer a specific amino acid in one Env, but tolerate many amino acids in the other. Surprisingly, shifts are only slightly enriched at sites that have substituted between the Envs—and many occur at residues that do not even contact substitutions. Therefore, long-range epistasis can unpredictably shift Env’s mutational tolerance during HIV evolution, although the amino acid preferences of most sites are conserved between moderately diverged viral strains. PMID:29590010

  5. Exome sequencing supports a de novo mutational paradigm for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Roos, J. Louw; Dexheimer, Phillip; Boone, Braden; Plummer, Brooks; Levy, Shawn; Gogos, Joseph A.; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite high heritability, a large fraction of cases with schizophrenia do not have a family history of the disease (sporadic cases). Here, we examine the possibility that rare de novo protein-altering mutations contribute to the genetic component of schizophrenia by sequencing the exome of 53 sporadic cases, 22 unaffected controls and their parents. We identified 40 de novo mutations in 27 patients affecting 40 genes including a potentially disruptive mutation in DGCR2, a gene removed by the recurrent schizophrenia-predisposing 22q11.2 microdeletion. Comparison to rare inherited variants revealed that the identified de novo mutations show a large excess of nonsynonymous changes in cases, as well as a greater potential to affect protein structure and function. Our analysis reveals a major role of de novo mutations in schizophrenia and also a large mutational target, which together provide a plausible explanation for the high global incidence and persistence of the disease. PMID:21822266

  6. Male mutation rates and the cost of sex for females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Rosemary J.

    1994-05-01

    ALTHOUGH we do not know why sex evolved, the twofold cost of meiosis for females provides a standard against which postulated benefits of sex can be evaluated1. The most reliable benefit is sex's ability to reduce the impact of deleterious mutations2,3. But deleterious mutations may themselves generate a large and previously overlooked female-specific cost of sex. DNA sequence comparisons have confirmed Haldane's suggestion that most mutations arise in the male germ line4,5; recent estimates of α, the ratio of male to female mutation rates, are ten, six and two in humans, primates and rodents, respectively6-8. Consequently, male gametes may give progeny more mutations than the associated sexual recombination eliminates. Here I describe computer simulations showing that the cost of male mutations can easily exceed the benefits of recombination, causing females to produce fitter progeny by parthenogenesis than by mating. The persistence of sexual reproduction by females thus becomes even more problematic.

  7. DMD mutation spectrum analysis in 613 Chinese patients with dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruolan; Zhu, Guosheng; Zhu, Huimin; Ma, Ruiyu; Peng, Ying; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophinopathy is a group of inherited diseases caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Within the dystrophinopathy spectrum, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are common X-linked recessive disorders that mainly feature striated muscle necrosis. We combined multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification with Sanger sequencing to detect large deletions/duplications and point mutations in the DMD gene in 613 Chinese patients. A total of 571 (93.1%) patients were diagnosed, including 428 (69.8%) with large deletions/duplications and 143 (23.3%) with point mutations. Deletion/duplication breakpoints gathered mostly in introns 44-55. Reading frame rules could explain 88.6% of deletion mutations. We identified seventy novel point mutations that had not been previously reported. Spectrum expansion and genotype-phenotype analysis of DMD mutations on such a large sample size in Han Chinese population would provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanism underlying dystrophinopathies.

  8. Familial acute necrotizing encephalopathy without RANBP2 mutation: Poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naoko; Higuchi, Yoshihisa; Kimura, Nobusuke; Nozaki, Fumihito; Kumada, Tomohiro; Hoshino, Ai; Saitoh, Makiko; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    Most childhood cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) involve neither family history nor recurrence. ANE occasionally occurs, however, as a familial disorder or recurs in Caucasian patients. A mutation of RAN-binding protein 2 (RANBP2) has been discovered in more than one half of familial or recurrent ANE patients. In contrast, there has been no report of this mutation in East Asia. Here, we report the first sibling cases of typical ANE in Japan, with poor outcome. DNA analysis of genes associated with ANE or other encephalopathies, including RANBP2 and carnitine palmitoyl transferase II (CPT2), indicated neither mutations nor disease-related polymorphisms. On literature review, recurrent or familial ANE without the RANBP2 mutation has a more severe outcome and greater predilection for male sex than that with the RANBP2 mutation. This suggests that there are unknown gene mutations linked to ANE. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutational analysis of the HGO gene in Finnish alkaptonuria patients

    PubMed Central

    de Bernabe, D. B.-V.; Peterson, P.; Luopajarvi, K.; Matintalo, P.; Alho, A.; Konttinen, Y.; Krohn, K.; de Cordoba, S. R.; Ranki, A.

    1999-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU), the prototypic inborn error of metabolism, has recently been shown to be caused by loss of function mutations in the homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase gene (HGO). So far 17 mutations have been characterised in AKU patients of different ethnic origin. We describe three novel mutations (R58fs, R330S, and H371R) and one common AKU mutation (M368V), detected by mutational and polymorphism analysis of the HGO gene in five Finnish AKU pedigrees. The three novel AKU mutations are most likely specific for the Finnish population and have originated recently.


Keywords: alkaptonuria; homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase; Finland PMID:10594001

  11. Interpreting short tandem repeat variations in humans using mutational constraint

    PubMed Central

    Gymrek, Melissa; Willems, Thomas; Reich, David; Erlich, Yaniv

    2017-01-01

    Identifying regions of the genome that are depleted of mutations can reveal potentially deleterious variants. Short tandem repeats (STRs), also known as microsatellites, are among the largest contributors of de novo mutations in humans. However, per-locus studies of STR mutations have been limited to highly ascertained panels of several dozen loci. Here, we harnessed bioinformatics tools and a novel analytical framework to estimate mutation parameters for each STR in the human genome by correlating STR genotypes with local sequence heterozygosity. We applied our method to obtain robust estimates of the impact of local sequence features on mutation parameters and used this to create a framework for measuring constraint at STRs by comparing observed vs. expected mutation rates. Constraint scores identified known pathogenic variants with early onset effects. Our metric will provide a valuable tool for prioritizing pathogenic STRs in medical genetics studies. PMID:28892063

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Yossepowitch, Orit; Olvera, Narciso; Satagopan, Jaya M; Huang, Helen; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Rapaport, Beth; Boyd, Jeff; Offit, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes are associated with an increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers as well as other types of malignancies. The observation of a germline BRCA1 mutation in an index case with a lymphoid neoplasm in the setting of a family history of breast cancer prompted us to explore the role of BRCA germline mutations as lymphoma susceptibility alleles. A panel of 286 DNA samples from Jewish lymphoma patients was analyzed for the three most frequent BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in those of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, and compared to a cohort of 5010 DNA samples from healthy controls. Of the 286 cases, 2 patients carried a germline BRCA mutation; both were diagnosed at an early age with an intermediate grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This data indicate that germline BRCA mutations are not associated with an increased risk for lymphoid malignancies.

  13. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism due to Novel FGFR1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Akkuş, Gamze; Kotan, Leman Damla; Durmaz, Erdem; Mengen, Eda; Turan, İhsan; Ulubay, Ayça; Gürbüz, Fatih; Yüksel, Bilgin; Tetiker, Tamer; Topaloğlu, A Kemal

    2017-06-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is heterogeneous. Fibroblast growth factor signaling is pivotal in the ontogeny of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons. Loss-of-function mutations in FGFR1 gene cause variable HH phenotypes encompassing pubertal delay to idiopathic HH (IHH) or Kallmann syndrome (KS). As FGFR1 mutations are common, recognizing mutations and associated phenotypes may enhance clinical management. Using a candidate gene approach, we screened 52 IHH/KS patients. We identified three novel (IVS3-1G>C and p.W2X, p.R209C) FGFR1 gene mutations. Despite predictive null protein function, patients from the novel mutation families had normosmic IHH without non-reproductive phenotype. These findings further emphasize the great variability of FGFR1 mutation phenotypes in IHH/KS.

  14. "Bad Luck Mutations": DNA Mutations Are not the Whole Answer to Understanding Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E; Carruba, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that many human cancers are generated by intrinsic mechanisms that produce "Bad Luck" mutations by the proliferation of organ-specific adult stem cells. There have been serious challenges to this interpretation, including multiple extrinsic factors thought to be correlated with mutations found in cancers associated with these exposures. While support for both interpretations provides some validity, both interpretations ignore several concepts of the multistage, multimechanism process of carcinogenesis, namely, (1) mutations can be generated by both "errors of DNA repair" and "errors of DNA replication," during the "initiation" process of carcinogenesis; (2) "initiated" stem cells must be clonally amplified by nonmutagenic, intrinsic or extrinsic epigenetic mechanisms; (3) organ-specific stem cell numbers can be modified during in utero development, thereby altering the risk to cancer later in life; and (4) epigenetic tumor promoters are characterized by species, individual genetic-, gender-, developmental state-specificities, and threshold levels to be active; sustained and long-term exposures; and exposures in the absence of antioxidant "antipromoters." Because of the inevitability of some of the stem cells generating "initiating" mutations by either "errors of DNA repair" or "errors of DNA replication," a tumor is formed depending on the promotion phase of carcinogenesis. While it is possible to reduce our frequencies of mutagenic "initiated" cells, one can never reduce it to zero. Because of the extended period of the promotion phase of carcinogenesis, strategies to reduce the appearance of cancers must involve the interruption of the promotion of these initiated cells.

  15. Mutational landscape, clonal evolution patterns, and role of RAS mutations in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koichi; Khiabanian, Hossein; da Silva-Almeida, Ana C.; Tzoneva, Gannie; Abate, Francesco; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Carpenter, Zachary; Penson, Alex; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Eckert, Cornelia; Nicolas, Concepción; Balbin, Milagros; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2016-01-01

    Although multiagent combination chemotherapy is curative in a significant fraction of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 20% of cases relapse and most die because of chemorefractory disease. Here we used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to analyze the mutational landscape at relapse in pediatric ALL cases. These analyses identified numerous relapse-associated mutated genes intertwined in chemotherapy resistance-related protein complexes. In this context, RAS-MAPK pathway-activating mutations in the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) genes were present in 24 of 55 (44%) cases in our series. Interestingly, some leukemias showed retention or emergence of RAS mutant clones at relapse, whereas in others RAS mutant clones present at diagnosis were replaced by RAS wild-type populations, supporting a role for both positive and negative selection evolutionary pressures in clonal evolution of RAS-mutant leukemia. Consistently, functional dissection of mouse and human wild-type and mutant RAS isogenic leukemia cells demonstrated induction of methotrexate resistance but also improved the response to vincristine in mutant RAS-expressing lymphoblasts. These results highlight the central role of chemotherapy-driven selection as a central mechanism of leukemia clonal evolution in relapsed ALL, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized dual role of RAS mutations as drivers of both sensitivity and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27655895

  16. A Novel Missense Mutation of Doublecortin: Mutation Analysis of Korean Patients with Subcortical Band Heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Young-Seon; Kim, Jin-Hee; Heo, Tag; Kim, Eun-Young

    2005-01-01

    The neuronal migration disorders, X-linked lissencephaly syndrome (XLIS) and subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), also called "double cortex", have been linked to missense, nonsense, aberrant splicing, deletion, and insertion mutations in doublecortin (DCX) in families and sporadic cases. Most DCX mutations identified to date are located in two evolutionarily conserved domains. We performed mutation analysis of DCX in two Korean patients with SBH. The SBH patients had mild to moderate developmental delays, drug-resistant generalized seizures, and diffuse thick SBH upon brain MRI. Sequence analysis of the DCX coding region in Patient 1 revealed a c.386 C>T change in exon 3. The sequence variation results in a serine to leucine amino acid change at position 129 (S129L), which has not been found in other family members of Patient 1 or in a large panel of 120 control X-chromosomes. We report here a novel c.386 C>T mutation of DCX that is responsible for SBH. PMID:16100463

  17. Mutation-profile-based methods for understanding selection forces in cancer somatic mutations: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Zou, Yangyun; Liu, Gangbiao; Zhou, Jingqi; Wu, Jingcheng; Zhao, Shimin; Su, Zhixi; Gu, Xun

    2017-08-29

    Human genes exhibit different effects on fitness in cancer and normal cells. Here, we present an evolutionary approach to measure the selection pressure on human genes, using the well-known ratio of the nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rate in both cancer genomes ( C N / C S ) and normal populations ( p N / p S ). A new mutation-profile-based method that adopts sample-specific mutation rate profiles instead of conventional substitution models was developed. We found that cancer-specific selection pressure is quite different from the selection pressure at the species and population levels. Both the relaxation of purifying selection on passenger mutations and the positive selection of driver mutations may contribute to the increased C N / C S values of human genes in cancer genomes compared with the p N / p S values in human populations. The C N / C S values also contribute to the improved classification of cancer genes and a better understanding of the onco-functionalization of cancer genes during oncogenesis. The use of our computational pipeline to identify cancer-specific positively and negatively selected genes may provide useful information for understanding the evolution of cancers and identifying possible targets for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Somatic Mutations and Clonal Hematopoiesis in Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Hosokawa, Kohei; Makishima, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Townsley, Danielle; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sato, Yusuke; Liu, Delong; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Wu, Colin O; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Clemente, Michael J; Kataoka, Keisuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Okuno, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Nagata, Yasunobu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Kon, Ayana; Sanada, Masashi; Scheinberg, Phillip; Miyano, Satoru; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Nakao, Shinji; Young, Neal S; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-07-02

    In patients with acquired aplastic anemia, destruction of hematopoietic cells by the immune system leads to pancytopenia. Patients have a response to immunosuppressive therapy, but myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia develop in about 15% of the patients, usually many months to years after the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. We performed next-generation sequencing and array-based karyotyping using 668 blood samples obtained from 439 patients with aplastic anemia. We analyzed serial samples obtained from 82 patients. Somatic mutations in myeloid cancer candidate genes were present in one third of the patients, in a limited number of genes and at low initial variant allele frequency. Clonal hematopoiesis was detected in 47% of the patients, most frequently as acquired mutations. The prevalence of the mutations increased with age, and mutations had an age-related signature. DNMT3A-mutated and ASXL1-mutated clones tended to increase in size over time; the size of BCOR- and BCORL1-mutated and PIGA-mutated clones decreased or remained stable. Mutations in PIGA and BCOR and BCORL1 correlated with a better response to immunosuppressive therapy and longer and a higher rate of overall and progression-free survival; mutations in a subgroup of genes that included DNMT3A and ASXL1 were associated with worse outcomes. However, clonal dynamics were highly variable and might not necessarily have predicted the response to therapy and long-term survival among individual patients. Clonal hematopoiesis was prevalent in aplastic anemia. Some mutations were related to clinical outcomes. A highly biased set of mutations is evidence of Darwinian selection in the failed bone marrow environment. The pattern of somatic clones in individual patients over time was variable and frequently unpredictable. (Funded by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and others.).

  19. Analysis of TSC1 mutation spectrum in mucosal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; Dai, Jie; Xu, Tianxiao; Yu, Sifan; Yu, Huan; Tang, Huan; Yan, Junya; Wu, Xiaowen; Yu, Jiayi; Chi, Zhihong; Si, Lu; Cui, Chuanliang; Sheng, Xinan; Kong, Yan; Guo, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Mucosal melanoma is a relatively rare subtype of melanoma for which no clearly established therapeutic strategy exists. The genes of the mTOR signalling pathway have drawn great attention as key targets for cancer treatment, including melanoma. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mutation status of the upstream mTOR regulator TSC1 and evaluated its correlation with the clinicopathological features of mucosal melanoma. We collected 91 mucosal melanoma samples for detecting TSC1 mutations. All the coding exons of TSC1 were amplified by PCR and subjected to Sanger sequencing. Expression level of TSC1 encoding protein (hamartin) was detected by immunohistochemistry. The activation of mTOR pathway was determined by evaluating the phosphorylation status of S6RP and 4E-BP1. The overall mutation frequency of TSC1 was found to be 17.6% (16/91 patients). TSC1 mutations were more inclined to occur in advanced mucosal melanoma (stages III and IV). In the 16 patients with TSC1 mutations, 14 different mutations were detected, affecting 11 different exons. TSC1 mutations were correlated with upregulation of S6RP phosphorylation but were unrelated to 4E-BP1 phosphorylation or hamartin expression. Mucosal melanoma patients with TSC1 mutations had a worse outcome than patients without TSC1 mutations (24.0 versus 34.0 months, P = 0.007). Our findings suggest that TSC1 mutations are frequent in mucosal melanoma. TSC1 mutations can activate the mTOR pathway through phospho-S6RP and might be a poor prognostic predictor of mucosal melanoma. Our data implicate the potential significance of TSC1 mutations for effective and specific drug therapy for mucosal melanoma.

  20. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Thomas; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Zwart, Mark P.

    2017-10-01

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on the repeatability of selection from standing genetic variation. Different sizes of mutant libraries of antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli, generated by error-prone PCR, were subjected to different antibiotic concentrations. We determined whether populations went extinct or survived, and sequenced the TEM gene of the surviving populations. The distribution of mutations per allele in our mutant libraries followed a Poisson distribution. Extinction patterns could be explained by a simple stochastic model that assumed the sampling of beneficial mutations was key for survival. In most surviving populations, alleles containing at least one known large-effect beneficial mutation were present. These genotype data also support a model which only invokes sampling effects to describe the occurrence of alleles containing large-effect driver mutations. Hence, evolution is largely predictable given cursory knowledge of mutational fitness effects, the mutation rate and population size. There were no clear trends in the repeatability of selected mutants when we considered all mutations present. However, when only known large-effect mutations were considered, the outcome of selection is less repeatable for large libraries, in contrast to expectations. We show experimentally that alleles carrying multiple mutations selected from large libraries confer higher resistance levels relative to alleles with only a known large-effect mutation, suggesting that the scarcity of high-resistance alleles carrying multiple mutations may contribute to the decrease in repeatability at large library sizes.

  1. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  2. Global Characterization of Protein Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    prevalence of candidate cancer genes observed here in prostate cancer. (3) Perform integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy...analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the same samples. Body This is a “synergy” project between...However, to perform initial verification/validation studies, we have evaluated the mutation calls for several genes discovered initially by the

  3. Global Characterization of Protein Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the same samples. To date, we have performed...implications for resistance to cancer therapeutics. We have also identified a subset of genes that appear to be recurrently mutated in our discovery set, and...integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the same samples. Body This is a “synergy” project

  4. Global Characterization of Protein-Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    observed, and assess prevalence; (3) Perform integrative analyses of somatic mutation with gene expression and copy number change data collected on the...v) completed CGH assays on 200 prostate cancers; (vi) initiated the integrated analyses of gene expression, copy number and mutation in prostate...histories of individual mutations within the progression of the cancer in which it was observed, and to assess the prevalence of candidate cancer genes

  5. Mutational Analysis of Cell Types in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    disorder resulting from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations...cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain structure known as tubers in over 80% of TSC...TSC (Sparagana and Roach, 2000). Comorbid neuropsychological disorders such as autism , mental retardation (MR), pervasive developmental disorder

  6. Clinical implications of mutation analysis in primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    van Woerden, Christiaan S; Groothoff, Jaap W; Wijburg, Frits A; Annink, Carla; Wanders, Ronald J A; Waterham, Hans R

    2004-08-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of glyoxylate metabolism with an extensive clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Although over 50 disease-causing mutations have been identified, the relationship between genotype and clinical outcome remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine this association in order to find clues for improvement of patient care. AGXT mutation analysis and assessment of biochemical characteristics and clinical outcome were performed on patients from a Dutch PH1 cohort. Thirty-three of a cohort of 57 PH1 patients, identified in The Netherlands over a period of 30 years, were analyzed. Ten different mutations were found. The most common mutations were the Gly170Arg, Phe152Ile, and the 33insC mutations, with an allele frequency of 43%, 19%, and 15%, respectively. Homozygous Gly170Arg and Phe152Ile mutations were associated with pyridoxine responsiveness and a preserved renal function over time when treatment was timely initiated. All patients homozygous for the 33insC mutation had end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before the first year of age. In two unrelated patients, a new Val336Asp mutation was found coupled with the Gly170Arg mutation on the minor allele. We also found 3 patients homozygous for a novel Gly82Arg mutation with adverse outcome in 2 of them. Early detection of Gly170Arg and Phe152Ile mutations in PH1 has important clinical implications because of their association with pyridoxine responsiveness and clinical outcome. The association of a homozygous 33insC mutation with severe infantile ESRD, resulting in early deaths in 2 out of 3 cases, warrants a choice for prenatal diagnostics in affected families.

  7. DNMT3A mutations in Chinese childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijing; Cui, Lei; Gao, Chao; Liu, Shuguang; Zhao, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Ruidong; Zheng, Huyong; Wu, Minyuan; Li, Zhigang

    2017-08-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) mutations have been found in approximately 20% of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and in 0% to 1.4% of children with AML, and the hotspots of mutations are mainly located in the catalytic methyltransferase domain, hereinto, mutation R882 accounts for 60%. Although the negative effect of DNMT3A on treatment outcome is well known, the prognostic significance of other DNMT3A mutations in AML is still unclear. Here, we tried to determine the incidence and prognostic significance of DNMT3A mutations in a large cohort in Chinese childhood AML. We detected the mutations in DNMT3A exon 23 by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing in 342 children with AML (0-16 years old) from January 2005 to June 2013, treated on BCH-2003 AML protocol. The correlation of DNMT3A mutations with clinical characteristics, fusion genes, other molecular anomalies (FLT3 internal tandem duplication [FLT3-ITD], Nucleophosmin 1, C-KIT (KIT proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase), and Wilms tumor 1 mutations), and treatment outcome were analyzed. DNMT3A mutations were detected in 4 out of 342 (1.2%) patients. Two patients were PML-RARA positive and 1 patient was FLT3-ITD positive. The mutations in coding sequences included S892S, V912A, R885G, and Q886R. Furthermore, there was 1 intronic mutation (c.2739+55A>C) found in 1 patient. No association of DNMT3A mutations with common clinical features was found. Two patients with DNMT3A mutations died of relapse or complications during treatment. One patient gave up treatment due to remission induction failure in day 33. Only 1 patient achieved continuous complete remission. DNMT3A mutations were rare in Chinese children with AML including PML-RARA positive APL. The mutation positions were different from the hotspots reported in adult AML. DNMT3A mutations may have adverse impact on prognosis of children with AML.

  8. Usher syndrome in Denmark: mutation spectrum and some clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Grønskov, Karen; Karstensen, Helena Gásdal; Brox, Vigdis; Nilssen, Øivind; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jensen, Hanne; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2016-09-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic methods. Before Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) became available mutations in nine individuals (1 USH1, 7 USH2, 1 USH3) were identified by Sanger sequencing of USH1C , USH2A or CLRN1 or by Arrayed Primer EXtension (APEX) method. Mutations in 12 individuals (7 USH1, 5 USH2) were found by targeted NGS of ten known USH genes. Five novel pathogenic variants were identified. We combined our data with previously published, and obtained an overview of the USH mutation spectrum in Denmark, including 100 unrelated individuals; 32 with USH1, 67 with USH2, and 1 with USH3. Macular edema was observed in 44 of 117 individuals. Olfactory function was tested in 12 individuals and found to be within normal range in all. Mutations that lead to USH1 were predominantly identified in MYO7A (75%), whereas all mutations in USH2 cases were identified in USH2A . The MYO7A mutation c.93C>A, p.(Cys31*) accounted for 33% of all USH1 mutations and the USH2A c.2299delG, p.(Glu767Serfs*21) variant accounted for 45% of all USH2 mutations in the Danish cohort.

  9. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12 mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations identified in 12 patients with milder phenotypes were predicted to have no significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the presence of wild-type transcript in 7 out of 9 patients investigated in vivo. Both the in silico predictions and the in vivo results support the hypothesis previously suggested by us and others, that the presence of some wild-type transcript is correlated to a milder phenotype. PMID:21494555

  10. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-04-15

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10(-7) mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells.

  11. Accelerated Mutation Accumulation in Asexual Lineages of a Freshwater Snail

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Maurine; Hehman, Gery; Miller, Joseph T.; Logsdon, John M.; Taylor, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and widespread relative to asexual reproduction, meaning that it must also confer profound advantages in order to persist. One theorized benefit of sex is that it facilitates the clearance of harmful mutations, which would accumulate more rapidly in the absence of recombination. The extent to which ineffective purifying selection and mutation accumulation are direct consequences of asexuality and whether the accelerated buildup of harmful mutations in asexuals can occur rapidly enough to maintain sex within natural populations, however, remain as open questions. We addressed key components of these questions by estimating the rate of mutation accumulation in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple sexual and asexual representatives of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand snail characterized by mixed sexual/asexual populations. We found that increased mutation accumulation is associated with asexuality and occurs rapidly enough to be detected in recently derived asexual lineages of P. antipodarum. Our results demonstrate that increased mutation accumulation in asexuals can differentially affect coexisting and ecologically similar sexual and asexual lineages. The accelerated rate of mutation accumulation observed in asexual P. antipodarum provides some of the most direct evidence to date for a link between asexuality and mutation accumulation and implies that mutational buildup could be rapid enough to contribute to the short-term evolutionary mechanisms that favor sexual reproduction. PMID:19995828

  12. Mutation spectrum of Chinese patients with Bartter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; Lin, Yi; Sun, Qing; Wang, Shujuan; Gao, Yanxia; Shao, Leping

    2017-11-24

    Bartter syndrome (BS) has been rarely reported in Chinese population except for a few case reports. This investigation was aimed to analyze the mutations of the causal genes in sixteen Chinese patients with BS, and review their followup and treatment. Identify mutations by the next generation sequencing and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Clinical characteristics and biochemical findings at the first presentation as well as follow-up were reviewed. 15 different CLCNKB gene mutations were identified in fourteen patients with BS, including 11 novel ones. A novel missense mutation and a novel small deletion were found from SLC12A1 gene. A novel gross deletion was found in CLCNKA gene. A recurrent missense mutation was identified from BSND gene. We found that the whole gene deletion mutation of CLCNKB gene was the most frequent mutation (32%), and the rate of gross deletion was up to 50 percent in this group of Chinese patients. The present study has found 19 mutations, including 14 novel ones, which would enrich the human gene mutation database (HGMD) and provide valuable references to the genetic counseling and diagnosis of the Chinese population.

  13. Mutation spectrum of Chinese patients with Bartter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yue; Lin, Yi; Sun, Qing; Wang, Shujuan; Gao, Yanxia; Shao, Leping

    2017-01-01

    Objective Bartter syndrome (BS) has been rarely reported in Chinese population except for a few case reports. This investigation was aimed to analyze the mutations of the causal genes in sixteen Chinese patients with BS, and review their followup and treatment. Methods Identify mutations by the next generation sequencing and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Clinical characteristics and biochemical findings at the first presentation as well as follow-up were reviewed. Results 15 different CLCNKB gene mutations were identified in fourteen patients with BS, including 11 novel ones. A novel missense mutation and a novel small deletion were found from SLC12A1 gene. A novel gross deletion was found in CLCNKA gene. A recurrent missense mutation was identified from BSND gene. We found that the whole gene deletion mutation of CLCNKB gene was the most frequent mutation (32%), and the rate of gross deletion was up to 50 percent in this group of Chinese patients. Conclusion The present study has found 19 mutations, including 14 novel ones, which would enrich the human gene mutation database (HGMD) and provide valuable references to the genetic counseling and diagnosis of the Chinese population. PMID:29254190

  14. Acquired initiating mutations in early hematopoietic cells of CLL patients.

    PubMed

    Damm, Frederik; Mylonas, Elena; Cosson, Adrien; Yoshida, Kenichi; Della Valle, Véronique; Mouly, Enguerran; Diop, M'boyba; Scourzic, Laurianne; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Davi, Frederick; Lambert, Jérôme; Gautheret, Daniel; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Sutton, Laurent; Dessen, Philippe; Solary, Eric; Akashi, Koichi; Vainchenker, William; Mercher, Thomas; Droin, Nathalie; Ogawa, Seishi; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Bernard, Olivier A

    2014-09-01

    Appropriate cancer care requires a thorough understanding of the natural history of the disease, including the cell of origin, the pattern of clonal evolution, and the functional consequences of the mutations. Using deep sequencing of flow-sorted cell populations from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we established the presence of acquired mutations in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. Mutations affected known lymphoid oncogenes, including BRAF, NOTCH1, and SF3B1. NFKBIE and EGR2 mutations were observed at unexpectedly high frequencies, 10.7% and 8.3% of 168 advanced-stage patients, respectively. EGR2 mutations were associated with a shorter time to treatment and poor overall survival. Analyses of BRAF and EGR2 mutations suggest that they result in deregulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) intracellular signaling. Our data propose disruption of hematopoietic and early B-cell differentiation through the deregulation of pre-BCR signaling as a phenotypic outcome of CLL mutations and show that CLL develops from a pre-leukemic phase. The origin and pathogenic mechanisms of CLL are not fully understood. The current work indicates that CLL develops from pre-leukemic multipotent hematopoietic progenitors carrying somatic mutations. It advocates for abnormalities in early B-cell differentiation as a phenotypic convergence of the diverse acquired mutations observed in CLL. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normalmore » controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.« less

  16. Reduced mutation rate in exons due to differential mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Mularoni, Loris; Muiños, Ferran; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; López-Bigas, Núria

    2017-01-01

    While recent studies have revealed higher than anticipated heterogeneity of mutation rate across genomic regions, mutations in exons and introns are assumed to be generated at the same rate. Here we find fewer somatic mutations in exons than expected based on their sequence content, and demonstrate that this is not due to purifying selection. Moreover, we show that it is caused by higher mismatch repair activity in exonic than in intronic regions. Our findings have important implications for our understanding of mutational and DNA repair processes, our knowledge of the evolution of eukaryotic genes, and practical ramifications for the study of the evolution of both tumors and species. PMID:29106418

  17. Human Germline Mutation and the Erratic Evolutionary Clock

    PubMed Central

    Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the chronology of human evolution relies on the “molecular clock” provided by the steady accumulation of substitutions on an evolutionary lineage. Recent analyses of human pedigrees have called this understanding into question by revealing unexpectedly low germline mutation rates, which imply that substitutions accrue more slowly than previously believed. Translating mutation rates estimated from pedigrees into substitution rates is not as straightforward as it may seem, however. We dissect the steps involved, emphasizing that dating evolutionary events requires not “a mutation rate” but a precise characterization of how mutations accumulate in development in males and females—knowledge that remains elusive. PMID:27760127

  18. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kavuri, Shyam M; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-08-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of patients with colorectal cancer. Introduction of the HER2 mutations S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutants are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab-resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) wild-type (WT) colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX) identified 4 PDXs with HER2 mutations. HER2-targeted therapies were tested on two PDXs. Treatment with a single HER2-targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2-targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2-mutated PDXs. HER2 activating mutations cause EGFR antibody resistance in colorectal cell lines, and PDXs with HER2 mutations show durable tumor regression when treated with dual HER2-targeted therapy. These data provide a strong preclinical rationale for clinical trials targeting HER2 activating mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Mutation dynamics and fitness effects followed in single cells.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia; Ollion, Jean; Robert, Jerome; Song, Xiaohu; Matic, Ivan; Elez, Marina

    2018-03-16

    Mutations have been investigated for more than a century but remain difficult to observe directly in single cells, which limits the characterization of their dynamics and fitness effects. By combining microfluidics, time-lapse imaging, and a fluorescent tag of the mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli , we visualized the emergence of mutations in single cells, revealing Poissonian dynamics. Concomitantly, we tracked the growth and life span of single cells, accumulating ~20,000 mutations genome-wide over hundreds of generations. This analysis revealed that 1% of mutations were lethal; nonlethal mutations displayed a heavy-tailed distribution of fitness effects and were dominated by quasi-neutral mutations with an average cost of 0.3%. Our approach has enabled the investigation of single-cell individuality in mutation rate, mutation fitness costs, and mutation interactions. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Fitness effects of advantageous mutations in evolving Escherichia coli populations

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Marianne; Schlötterer, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The central role of beneficial mutations for adaptive processes in natural populations is well established. Thus, there has been a long-standing interest to study the nature of beneficial mutations. Their low frequency, however, has made this class of mutations almost inaccessible for systematic studies. In the absence of experimental data, the distribution of the fitness effects of beneficial mutations was assumed to resemble that of deleterious mutations. For an experimental proof of this assumption, we used a novel marker system to trace adaptive events in an evolving Escherichia coli culture and to determine the selective advantage of those beneficial mutations. Ten parallel cultures were propagated for about 1,000 generations by serial transfer, and 66 adaptive events were identified. From this data set, we estimate the rate of beneficial mutations to be 4 × 10−9 per cell and generation. Consistent with an exponential distribution of the fitness effects, we observed a large fraction of advantageous mutations with a small effect and only few with large effect. The mean selection coefficient of advantageous mutations in our experiment was 0.02. PMID:11158603

  1. A MELAS syndrome family harboring two mutations in mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung-Ok; Hwang, Jung Hee; Kim, Joonki; Cho, Eun Min; Cho, Sun Young; Hwang, Su Jin; Lee, Hyang Woon; Kim, Song Ja; Chung, Ki Wha

    2008-06-30

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with variable clinical symptoms. Here, from the sequencing of the entire mitochondrial genome, we report a Korean MELAS family harboring two homoplasmic missense mutations, which were reported 9957T>C (Phe251Leu) transition mutation in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 (COX3) gene and a novel 13849A>C (Asn505His) transversion mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene. Neither of these mutations was found in 205 normal controls. Both mutations were identified from the proband and his mother, but not his father. The patients showed cataract symptom in addition to MELAS phenotype. We believe that the 9957T>C mutation is pathogenic, however, the 13849A>C mutation is of unclear significance. It is likely that the 13849A>C mutation might function as the secondary mutation which increase the expressivity of overlapping phenotypes of MELAS and cataract. This study also demonstrates the importance of full sequencing of mtDNA for the molecular genetic understanding of mitochondrial disorders.

  2. A MELAS syndrome family harboring two mutations in mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung-Ok; Hwang, Jung Hee; Kim, Joonki; Cho, Eun Min; Cho, Sun Young; Hwang, Su Jin; Lee, Hyang Woon; Kim, Song Ja

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with variable clinical symptoms. Here, from the sequencing of the entire mitochondrial genome, we report a Korean MELAS family harboring two homoplasmic missense mutations, which were reported 9957T > C (Phe251Leu) transition mutation in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 (COX3) gene and a novel 13849A > C (Asn505His) transversion mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene. Neither of these mutations was found in 205 normal controls. Both mutations were identified from the proband and his mother, but not his father. The patients showed cataract symptom in addition to MELAS phenotype. We believe that the 9957T > C mutation is pathogenic, however, the 13849A > C mutation is of unclear significance. It is likely that the 13849A > C mutation might function as the secondary mutation which increase the expressivity of overlapping phenotypes of MELAS and cataract. This study also demonstrates the importance of full sequencing of mtDNA for the molecular genetic understanding of mitochondrial disorders. PMID:18587274

  3. Muver, a computational framework for accurately calling accumulated mutations.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Adam B; Lujan, Scott A; Lavender, Christopher A; Grimm, Sara A; Kunkel, Thomas A; Fargo, David C

    2018-05-09

    Identification of mutations from next-generation sequencing data typically requires a balance between sensitivity and accuracy. This is particularly true of DNA insertions and deletions (indels), that can impart significant phenotypic consequences on cells but are harder to call than substitution mutations from whole genome mutation accumulation experiments. To overcome these difficulties, we present muver, a computational framework that integrates established bioinformatics tools with novel analytical methods to generate mutation calls with the extremely low false positive rates and high sensitivity required for accurate mutation rate determination and comparison. Muver uses statistical comparison of ancestral and descendant allelic frequencies to identify variant loci and assigns genotypes with models that include per-sample assessments of sequencing errors by mutation type and repeat context. Muver identifies maximally parsimonious mutation pathways that connect these genotypes, differentiating potential allelic conversion events and delineating ambiguities in mutation location, type, and size. Benchmarking with a human gold standard father-son pair demonstrates muver's sensitivity and low false positive rates. In DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae, muver detects multi-base deletions in homopolymers longer than the replicative polymerase footprint at rates greater than predicted for sequential single-base deletions, implying a novel multi-repeat-unit slippage mechanism. Benchmarking results demonstrate the high accuracy and sensitivity achieved with muver, particularly for indels, relative to available tools. Applied to an MMR-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae system, muver mutation calls facilitate mechanistic insights into DNA replication fidelity.

  4. Four novel ELANE mutations in patients with congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kurnikova, Maria; Maschan, Michael; Dinova, Evgeniya; Shagina, Irina; Finogenova, Natalia; Mamedova, Elena; Polovtseva, Tatyana; Shagin, Dmitry; Shcherbina, Anna

    2011-08-01

    Congenital neutropenia is a heterogeneous bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by a maturation arrest of myelopoesis at the promyelocyte/myelocyte stage. Cyclic neutropenia (CyN) and severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) are two main forms of congenital neutropenia. Genetic analysis has shown that heterozygous mutations in the ELANE gene encoding the neutrophil elastase are the major cause of these disorders. We investigated the prevalence of ELANE mutations in a group of 16 patients from 14 families with congenital neutropenia. Five patients had typical manifestations of CyN, and 11 patients had SCN. Seven different heterozygous ELANE mutations were found, including four novel mutations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Mutational Signature Mark Cancer’s Smoking Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil

    A broad computational study of cancer genome sequences by Los Alamos National Laboratory with the UK’s Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and other collaborators identifies telltale mutational signatures associated with smoking tobacco. The research demonstrates, for the first time, that smoking increases cancer risk by causing somatic mutations in tissues directly and indirectly exposed to tobacco smoke. The international study was published in the November 4 issue of Science. The analysis shows that tobacco smoking causes mutations leading to cancer by multiple distinct mechanisms, including by damaging DNA in organs and by speeding up a mutational cellular clock.

  6. Targeted mutation analysis of endometrial clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Lien N; McConechy, Melissa K; Meng, Bo; McIntyre, John B; Ewanowich, Carol; Gilks, Cyril Blake; Huntsman, David G; Köbel, Martin; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2015-04-01

    Endometrial clear cell carcinomas (CCC) constitute fewer than 5% of all carcinomas of the endometrium. Currently, little is known regarding the genetic basis of endometrial CCC. We performed genomic and immunohistochemical analyses on 14 rigorously reviewed pure endometrial CCC. The genomic analysis consisted of sequencing the coding regions of 26 genes implicated previously in endometrial carcinoma. Twelve of 14 tumours displayed a prototypical CCC immunophenotype [napsin A+, hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF1β(+) ) and oestrogen receptor(-) ] and all showed intact mismatch repair protein expression. We detected mutations in 11 of 14 tumours, and there was a predominance of mutations involving genes that are mutated more frequently in endometrial serous carcinomas than in endometrioid carcinomas. Two tumours displayed a prototypical serous carcinoma mutation profile (concurrent TP53 and PPP2R1A mutations, without PTEN, CTNNB1 or ARID1A mutation). No mutations in PTEN, CTNNB1 or POLE were identified. The overall mutation profile of this cohort of endometrial CCC appears to be more serous-like than endometrioid-like, with a minor subset in the TP53-mutated CCC showing serous carcinoma profile. These findings provide new insights into the molecular features of morphologically prototypical endometrial CCC, and underscore the need for further investigations into the oncogenesis of endometrial CCC. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Elucidating the Interdependence of Drug Resistance from Combinations of Mutations.

    PubMed

    Ragland, Debra A; Whitfield, Troy W; Lee, Sook-Kyung; Swanstrom, Ronald; Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2017-11-14

    HIV-1 protease is responsible for the cleavage of 12 nonhomologous sites within the Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol polyproteins in the viral genome. Under the selective pressure of protease inhibition, the virus evolves mutations within (primary) and outside of (secondary) the active site, allowing the protease to process substrates while simultaneously countering inhibition. The primary protease mutations impede inhibitor binding directly, while the secondary mutations are considered accessory mutations that compensate for a loss in fitness. However, the role of secondary mutations in conferring drug resistance remains a largely unresolved topic. We have shown previously that mutations distal to the active site are able to perturb binding of darunavir (DRV) via the protein's internal hydrogen-bonding network. In this study, we show that mutations distal to the active site, regardless of context, can play an interdependent role in drug resistance. Applying eigenvalue decomposition to collections of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions from a series of molecular dynamics simulations of 15 diverse HIV-1 protease variants, we identify sites in the protease where amino acid substitutions lead to perturbations in nonbonded interactions with DRV and/or the hydrogen-bonding network of the protease itself. While primary mutations are known to drive resistance in HIV-1 protease, these findings delineate the significant contributions of accessory mutations to resistance. Identifying the variable positions in the protease that have the greatest impact on drug resistance may aid in future structure-based design of inhibitors.

  8. Frequency of SMARCB1 mutations in familial and sporadic schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miriam J; Wallace, Andrew J; Bowers, Naomi L; Rustad, Cecilie F; Woods, C Geoff; Leschziner, Guy D; Ferner, Rosalie E; Evans, D Gareth R

    2012-05-01

    Mutations of the SMARCB1 gene have been implicated in several human tumour predisposing syndromes. They have recently been identified as an underlying cause of the tumour suppressor syndrome schwannomatosis. There is a much higher rate of mutation detection in familial disease than in sporadic disease. We have carried out extensive genetic testing on a cohort of familial and sporadic patients who fulfilled clinical diagnostic criteria for schwannomatosis. In our current cohort, we identified novel mutations within the SMARCB1 gene and detected several mutations that have been previously identified in other schwannomatosis cohorts. Of the schwannomatosis screens reported to date, including our current dataset, SMARCB1 mutations have been found in 45 % of familial probands and 7 % of sporadic patients. The exon 1 mutation, c.41C >A, and the 3' untranslated region mutation, c.*82C >T, are the most common changes reported in schwannomatosis disease so far, indicating mutation hotspots at both 5' and 3' portions of the gene. SMARCB1 mutations are found in a significant proportion of schwannomatosis patients, but there remains the possibility that further causative genes remain to be found.

  9. Myeloid malignancies: mutations, models and management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia) and acute (acute myeloid leukemia) stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Mutations responsible for these diseases occur in several genes whose encoded proteins belong principally to five classes: signaling pathways proteins (e.g. CBL, FLT3, JAK2, RAS), transcription factors (e.g. CEBPA, ETV6, RUNX1), epigenetic regulators (e.g. ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1, IDH2, SUZ12, TET2, UTX), tumor suppressors (e.g. TP53), and components of the spliceosome (e.g. SF3B1, SRSF2). Large-scale sequencing efforts will soon lead to the establishment of a comprehensive repertoire of these mutations, allowing for a better definition and classification of myeloid malignancies, the identification of new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets, and the development of novel therapies. Given the importance of epigenetic deregulation in myeloid diseases, the use of drugs targeting epigenetic regulators appears as a most promising therapeutic approach. PMID:22823977

  10. Somatic mitochondrial mutation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Burgart, L. J.; Zheng, J.; Shu, Q.; Strickler, J. G.; Shibata, D.

    1995-01-01

    Likely hot spots for mutations are mitochondrial sequences as there is less repair and more damage by carcinogens compared with nuclear sequences. A somatic 50-bp mitochondrial D-loop deletion was detected in four gastric adenocarcinomas. The deletion included the CSB2 region and was flanked by 9-bp direct repeats. The deletion was more frequent in adenocarcinomas arising from the gastroesophageal junction (4/32, 12.5%) compared with more distal tumors (0/45). Topographical analysis revealed the absence of the deletion from normal tissues except in focal portions of smooth muscle in one case. In two cases, apparent mutant homoplasmy was present throughout two tumors, including their metastases. In the two other cases, the mutation was present in only minor focal portions ( < 5%) of their primary tumors. These findings document the presence of somatic mitochondrial alterations in gastric cancer, which may reflect the environmental and genetic influences operative during tumor progression. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7573355

  11. FRAXE mutation analysis in three Spanish families

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, P.; Lopez, I.; Gabarron, J.

    Very little is known about the phenotype of FRAXE-positive individuals and the relation between the genotype/phenotype and genotype/cytogenetic expression. We describe three families with normal and mildly affected individuals and a severely retarded male expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus or presenting different expansions at the CGG FRAXE triplet. In addition, we analyze the FRAXE mutation in sperm DNA from a retarded male carrier with a handicapped daughter expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus. Mental status in FRAXE individuals is highly variable and, although mild mental retardation is observed in most cases, several carrier males are apparently normal. It seemsmore » that methylation is not as strictly associated with size of CGG triplets in the FRAXE locus as in FRAXA, and it is possible that normal carrier individuals with fully methylated increments in lymphocytes have a certain proportion of unmethylated alleles in the critical (i.e., neural) tissues. FRAXE mutation is apparently similar to FRAXA in that males with somatic large methylated increments are carriers of small unmethylated ones in germinal cells. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.« less

  12. Clinical impact of endometrial cancer stratified by genetic mutational profiles, POLE mutation, and microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Haruma, Tomoko; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Haraga, Junko; Nyuya, Akihiro; Nishida, Takeshi; Goel, Ajay; Masuyama, Hisashi; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2018-01-01

    The molecular characterization of endometrial cancer (EC) can facilitate identification of various tumor subtypes. Although EC patients with POLE mutations reproducibly demonstrate better prognosis, the outcome of patients with microsatellite instability (MSI) remains controversial. This study attempted to interrogate whether genetic stratification of EC can identify distinct subsets with prognostic significance. A cohort of 138 EC patients who underwent surgical resection with curative intent was enrolled. Sanger sequencing was used to evaluate mutations in the POLE and KRAS genes. MSI analysis was performed using four mononucleotide repeat markers and methylation status of the MLH1 promoter was measured by a fluorescent bisulfite polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Extensive hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter was observed in 69.6% ECs with MLH1 deficiency and 3.5% with MMR proficiency, but in none of the ECs with loss of other MMR genes (P < .0001). MSI-positive and POLE mutations were found in 29.0% and 8.7% EC patients, respectively. Our MSI analysis showed a sensitivity of 92.7% for EC patients with MMR deficiency, and a specificity of 97.9% for EC patients with MMR proficiency. In univariate and multivariate analyses, POLE mutations and MSI status was significantly associated with progression-free survival (P = 0.0129 and 0.0064, respectively) but not with endometrial cancer-specific survival. This study provides significant evidence that analyses of proofreading POLE mutations and MSI status based on mononucleotide repeat markers are potentially useful biomarkers to identify EC patients with better prognosis.

  13. Mutational signature analysis identifies MUTYH deficiency in colorectal cancers and adrenocortical carcinomas: Mutational signature associated with MUTYH deficiency in cancers

    DOE PAGES

    Pilati, Camilla; Shinde, Jayendra; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; ...

    2017-03-29

    Germline alterations in DNA repair genes are implicated in cancer predisposition and can result in characteristic mutational signatures. However, specific mutational signatures associated with base excision repair (BER) defects remain to be characterized. Here, by analysing a series of colorectal cancers (CRCs) using exome sequencing, we identified a particular spectrum of somatic mutations characterized by an enrichment of C > A transversions in NpCpA or NpCpT contexts in three tumours from a MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) patient and in two cases harbouring pathogenic germline MUTYH mutations. In two series of adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), we identified four tumours with a similar signaturemore » also presenting germline MUTYH mutations. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that MUTYH inactivation results in a particular mutational signature, which may serve as a useful marker of BER-related genomic instability in new cancer types.« less

  14. Mutational signature analysis identifies MUTYH deficiency in colorectal cancers and adrenocortical carcinomas: Mutational signature associated with MUTYH deficiency in cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Pilati, Camilla; Shinde, Jayendra; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    Germline alterations in DNA repair genes are implicated in cancer predisposition and can result in characteristic mutational signatures. However, specific mutational signatures associated with base excision repair (BER) defects remain to be characterized. Here, by analysing a series of colorectal cancers (CRCs) using exome sequencing, we identified a particular spectrum of somatic mutations characterized by an enrichment of C > A transversions in NpCpA or NpCpT contexts in three tumours from a MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) patient and in two cases harbouring pathogenic germline MUTYH mutations. In two series of adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), we identified four tumours with a similar signaturemore » also presenting germline MUTYH mutations. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that MUTYH inactivation results in a particular mutational signature, which may serve as a useful marker of BER-related genomic instability in new cancer types.« less

  15. Dosage Mutator Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Novel Mutator Mode-of-Action of the Mph1 DNA Helicase.

    PubMed

    Ang, J Sidney; Duffy, Supipi; Segovia, Romulo; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Mutations that cause genome instability are considered important predisposing events that contribute to initiation and progression of cancer. Genome instability arises either due to defects in genes that cause an increased mutation rate (mutator phenotype), or defects in genes that cause chromosome instability (CIN). To extend the catalog of genome instability genes, we systematically explored the effects of gene overexpression on mutation rate, using a forward-mutation screen in budding yeast. We screened ∼5100 plasmids, each overexpressing a unique single gene, and characterized the five strongest mutators, MPH1 (mutator phenotype 1), RRM3, UBP12, PIF1, and DNA2 We show that, for MPH1, the yeast homolog of Fanconi Anemia complementation group M (FANCM), the overexpression mutator phenotype is distinct from that of mph1Δ. Moreover, while four of our top hits encode DNA helicases, the overexpression of 48 other DNA helicases did not cause a mutator phenotype, suggesting this is not a general property of helicases. For Mph1 overexpression, helicase activity was not required for the mutator phenotype; in contrast Mph1 DEAH-box function was required for hypermutation. Mutagenesis by MPH1 overexpression was independent of translesion synthesis (TLS), but was suppressed by overexpression of RAD27, a conserved flap endonuclease. We propose that binding of DNA flap structures by excess Mph1 may block Rad27 action, creating a mutator phenotype that phenocopies rad27Δ. We believe this represents a novel mutator mode-of-action and opens up new prospects to understand how upregulation of DNA repair proteins may contribute to mutagenesis. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Analysis of gene mutations among South Indian patients with maple syrup urine disease: identification of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M P; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Vasudevan, D M

    2013-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is predominantly caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes, which encode for the E1alpha, E1beta and E2 subunits of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, respectively. Because disease causing mutations play a major role in the development of the disease, prenatal diagnosis at gestational level may have significance in making decisions by parents. Thus, this study was aimed to screen South Indian MSUD patients for mutations and assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. Thirteen patients diagnosed with MSUD by conventional biochemical screening such as urine analysis by DNPH test, thin layer chromatography for amino acids and blood amino acid quantification by HPLC were selected for mutation analysis. The entire coding regions of the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes were analyzed for mutations by PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. BCKDHA and BCKDHB mutations were seen in 43% of the total ten patients, while disease-causing DBT gene mutation was observed only in 14%. Three patients displayed no mutations. Novel mutations were c.130C>T in BCKDHA gene, c. 599C>T and c.121_122delAC in BCKDHB gene and c.190G>A in DBT gene. Notably, patients harbouring these mutations were non-responsive to thiamine supplementation and other treatment regimens and might have a worse prognosis as compared to the patients not having such mutations. Thus, identification of these mutations may have a crucial role in the treatment as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms in MSUD.

  17. Analytical validation of BRAF mutation testing from circulating free DNA using the amplification refractory mutation testing system.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw L; Donald, Emma; Ellison, Gillian; Bujac, Sarah; Fletcher, Lynn; Cantarini, Mireille; Brady, Ged; Orr, Maria; Clack, Glen; Ranson, Malcolm; Dive, Caroline; Hughes, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    BRAF mutation testing from circulating free DNA (cfDNA) using the amplification refractory mutation testing system (ARMS) holds potential as a surrogate for tumor mutation testing. Robust assay validation is needed to establish the optimal clinical matrix for measurement and cfDNA-specific mutation calling criteria. Plasma- and serum-derived cfDNA samples from 221 advanced melanoma patients were analyzed for BRAF c.1799T>A (p.V600E) mutation using ARMS in two stages in a blinded fashion. cfDNA-specific mutation calling criteria were defined in stage 1 and validated in stage 2. cfDNA concentrations in serum and plasma, and the sensitivities and specificities of BRAF mutation detection in these two clinical matrices were compared. Sensitivity of BRAF c.1799T>A (p.V600E) mutation detection in cfDNA was increased by using mutation calling criteria optimized for cfDNA (these criteria were adjusted from those used for archival tumor biopsies) without compromising specificity. Sensitivity of BRAF mutation detection in serum was 44% (95% CI, 35% to 53%) and in plasma 52% (95% CI, 43% to 61%). Specificity was 96% (95% CI, 90% to 99%) in both matrices. Serum contains significantly higher total cfDNA than plasma, whereas the proportion of tumor-derived mutant DNA was significantly higher in plasma. Using mutation calling criteria optimized for cfDNA improves sensitivity of BRAF c.1799T>A (p.V600E) mutation detection. The proportion of tumor-derived cfDNA in plasma was significantly higher than in serum. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Solano, Angela R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Chan, T L; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Kruse, Torben A; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine M; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C R; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peixoto, Ana; Peruga, Nina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Pradhan, Nisha; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rogers, Mark T; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tan, Yen Y; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J; van der Hout, Annemieke H; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van der Luijt, Rob B; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; Hutten Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Detection of EGFR mutations with mutation-specific antibodies in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with mutation-specific antibodies may be an ancillary method of detecting EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients. Methods EGFR mutation status was analyzed by DNA assays, and compared with IHC results in five non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and tumor samples from 78 stage IV NSCLC patients. Results IHC correctly identified del 19 in the H1650 and PC9 cell lines, L858R in H1975, and wild-type EGFR in H460 and A549, as well as wild-type EGFR in tumor samples from 22 patients. IHC with the mAb against EGFR with del 19 was highly positive for the protein in all 17 patients with a 15-bp (ELREA) deletion in exon 19, whereas in patients with other deletions, IHC was weakly positive in 3 cases and negative in 9 cases. IHC with the mAb against the L858R mutation showed high positivity for the protein in 25/27 (93%) patients with exon 21 EGFR mutations (all with L858R) but did not identify the L861Q mutation in the remaining two patients. Conclusions IHC with mutation-specific mAbs against EGFR is a promising method for detecting EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. However these mAbs should be validated with additional studies to clarify their possible role in routine clinical practice for screening EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. PMID:21167064

  20. Homozygous HAX1 mutations in severe congenital neutropenia patients with sporadic disease: a novel mutation in two unrelated British kindreds.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradley N; Ancliff, Phil J; Pizzey, Arnold; Khwaja, Asim; Linch, David C; Gale, Rosemary E

    2009-03-01

    Patients with autosomal dominant (AD), sporadic and X-linked severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) may have mutations in the elastase 2 (ELA2) or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) genes. Homozygous mutations in the HAX1 gene have recently been reported in autosomal recessive (AR) cases of primarily Middle-Eastern descent and the original Kostmann family. We screened 109 predominantly Caucasian SCN kindreds for mutations in these genes; 33 (30%) had 24 different ELA2 mutations, five of them novel, two kindreds (2%) had WAS mutations and four kindreds (4%) had three different HAX1 mutations, two of them novel. One HAX1 mutation (p.Ser43LeufsX11) was found in an AR Ashkenazi Jewish kindred, the other (p.Glu31LysfsX54) in two unrelated British patients with sporadic disease. Microsatellite analysis of the HAX1 locus revealed a common haplotype (maximum distance 4.1 Megabases) for the p.Glu31LysfsX54 patients, suggesting a possible ancestral founder. In functional assays, the level of spontaneous and staurosporine-induced apoptosis was increased in neutrophils from both p.Ser43LeufsX11 patients but not a p.Glu31LysfsX54 patient, suggesting the possible presence of modifying factors. The low incidence of HAX1 mutations in our study suggests that the frequency may vary between racial groups but suggests that irrespective of inheritance or racial origin, SCN patients should be screened for HAX1 mutations.

  1. Rapid BRAF mutation tests in patients with advanced melanoma: comparison of immunohistochemistry, Droplet Digital PCR, and the Idylla Mutation Platform

    PubMed Central

    Bisschop, Cornelis; ter Elst, Arja; Bosman, Lisette J.; Platteel, Inge; Jalving, Mathilde; van den Berg, Anke; Diepstra, Arjan; van Hemel, Bettien; Diercks, Gilles F.H.; Hospers, Geke A.P.

    2018-01-01

    BRAF mutational testing has become a common practice in the diagnostic process of patients with advanced melanoma. Although time-consuming, DNA sequencing techniques are the current gold standard for mutational testing. However, in certain clinical situations, a rapid test result is required. In this study, the performance of three rapid BRAF mutation tests was compared. Thirty-nine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanoma tissue samples collected between 2007 and 2014 at a single center were included. These samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using the anti-BRAF-V600E (VE1) mouse monocolonal antibody (BRAF-VE1 IHC), a V600E-specific Droplet Digital PCR Test, and the Idylla BRAF- Mutation Test (Idylla). Results were compared with the results of conventional BRAF mutation testing, performed using high-resolution melting analysis followed by Sanger sequencing. Next-generation sequencing was performed on samples with discordant results. The Idylla test and Droplet Digital PCR Test correctly identified all mutated and wild-type samples. BRAF-VE1 IHC showed one discordant result. The Idylla test could identify BRAF-V600 mutations other than BRAF-V600E and was the fastest and least laborious test. The Idylla Mutation Test is the most suitable test for rapid BRAF testing in clinical situations on the basis of the broad coverage of treatment-responsive mutations and the fast procedure without the need to perform a DNA isolation step. PMID:29232304

  2. Detection of IDH1 R132H mutation in acute myeloid leukemia by mutation-specific immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Byers, Richard; Hornick, Jason L; Tholouli, Eleni; Kutok, Jeffery; Rodig, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    IDH1 mutations are present but are uncommon in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and although prognostically favorable in gliomas their clinical significance in AML is unclear. Some have associated IDH1 mutations with inferior outcome, whereas others found no association with prognosis. Complicating these analyses is the need to sequence IDH1 from leukemic blasts, which is technically challenging and not yet routine. Mutation-specific antibodies enable robust, cost-effective detection of mutations in routine biopsy samples. Immunohistochemistry for the R132H mutation-specific antibody was performed in a tissue microarray containing 159 cases of AML, detecting the R132H mutation in 7 cases (4.4%). Positivity was associated with intermediate risk cytogenetics. Our results demonstrate an association between the R132H IDH1 mutation and intermediate risk cytogenetics in AML, suggesting that R132H IDH1 mutation may be associated with improved clinical outcome and demonstrate the feasibility of using mutation-specific antibodies to genotype and subclassify AML.

  3. Experimental design to evaluate directed adaptive mutation in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bordonaro, Michael; Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-12-09

    We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system and have limited preliminary data

  4. Glucokinase gene mutations (MODY 2) in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Kanthimathi, Sekar; Jahnavi, Suresh; Balamurugan, Kandasamy; Ranjani, Harish; Sonya, Jagadesan; Goswami, Soumik; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Mohan, Viswanathan; Radha, Venkatesan

    2014-03-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the glucokinase (GCK) gene cause a hyperglycemic condition termed maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) 2 or GCK-MODY. This is characterized by mild, stable, usually asymptomatic, fasting hyperglycemia that rarely requires pharmacological intervention. The aim of the present study was to screen for GCK gene mutations in Asian Indian subjects with mild hyperglycemia. Of the 1,517 children and adolescents of the population-based ORANGE study in Chennai, India, 49 were found to have hyperglycemia. These children along with the six patients referred to our center with mild hyperglycemia were screened for MODY 2 mutations. The GCK gene was bidirectionally sequenced using BigDye(®) Terminator v3.1 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) chemistry. In silico predictions of the pathogenicity were carried out using the online tools SIFT, Polyphen-2, and I-Mutant 2.0 software programs. Direct sequencing of the GCK gene in the patients referred to our Centre revealed one novel mutation, Thr206Ala (c.616A>G), in exon 6 and one previously described mutation, Met251Thr (c.752T>C), in exon 7. In silico analysis predicted the novel mutation to be pathogenic. The highly conserved nature and critical location of the residue Thr206 along with the clinical course suggests that the Thr206Ala is a MODY 2 mutation. However, we did not find any MODY 2 mutations in the 49 children selected from the population-based study. Hence prevalence of GCK mutations in Chennai is <1:1,517. This is the first study of MODY 2 mutations from India and confirms the importance of considering GCK gene mutation screening in patients with mild early-onset hyperglycemia who are negative for β-cell antibodies.

  5. Ultraviolet-Sensitive Mutator Strain of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Eli C.

    1973-01-01

    An ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive mutator gene, mutU, was identified in Escherichia coli K-12. The mutation mutU4 is very close to uvrD, between metE and ilv, on the E. coli chromosome. It was recessive as a mutator and as a UV-sensitive mutation. The frequency of reversion of trpA46 on an F episome was increased by mutU4 on the chromosome. The mutator gene did not increase mutation frequencies in virulent phages or in lytically grown phage λ. The mutU4 mutation predominantly induced transitional base changes. Mutator strains were normal for recombination and host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated phage T1. They were normally resistant to methyl methanesulfonate and were slightly more sensitive to gamma irradiation than Mut+ strains. UV irradiation induced mutations in a mutU4 strain, and phage λ was UV-inducible. Double mutants containing mutU4 and recA, B, or C were extremely sensitive to UV irradiation; a mutU4 uvrA6 double mutant was only slightly more sensitive than a uvrA6 strain. The mutU4 uvrA6 and mutU4 recA, B, or C double mutants had mutation rates similar to that of a mutU4 strain. Two UV-sensitive mutators, mut-9 and mut-10, isolated by Liberfarb and Bryson in E. coli B/UV, were found to be co-transducible with ilv in the same general region as mutU4. PMID:4345920

  6. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, M A; Argente, J; Chernausek, S; Gracia, R; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Hopp, M; Pérez-Jurado, L; Rosenbloom, A; Toledo, S P; Francke, U

    1993-01-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), we analyzed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. We amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71 + 1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, we determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations we identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. We conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8488849

  7. High mutation rates limit evolutionary adaptation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Mutation is fundamental to evolution, because it generates the genetic variation on which selection can act. In nature, genetic changes often increase the mutation rate in systems that range from viruses and bacteria to human tumors. Such an increase promotes the accumulation of frequent deleterious or neutral alleles, but it can also increase the chances that a population acquires rare beneficial alleles. Here, we study how up to 100-fold increases in Escherichia coli’s genomic mutation rate affect adaptive evolution. To do so, we evolved multiple replicate populations of asexual E. coli strains engineered to have four different mutation rates for 3000 generations in the laboratory. We measured the ability of evolved populations to grow in their original environment and in more than 90 novel chemical environments. In addition, we subjected the populations to whole genome population sequencing. Although populations with higher mutation rates accumulated greater genetic diversity, this diversity conveyed benefits only for modestly increased mutation rates, where populations adapted faster and also thrived better than their ancestors in some novel environments. In contrast, some populations at the highest mutation rates showed reduced adaptation during evolution, and failed to thrive in all of the 90 alternative environments. In addition, they experienced a dramatic decrease in mutation rate. Our work demonstrates that the mutation rate changes the global balance between deleterious and beneficial mutational effects on fitness. In contrast to most theoretical models, our experiments suggest that this tipping point already occurs at the modest mutation rates that are found in the wild. PMID:29702649

  8. A weighted exact test for mutually exclusive mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leiserson, Mark D.M.; Reyna, Matthew A.; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The somatic mutations in the pathways that drive cancer development tend to be mutually exclusive across tumors, providing a signal for distinguishing driver mutations from a larger number of random passenger mutations. This mutual exclusivity signal can be confounded by high and highly variable mutation rates across a cohort of samples. Current statistical tests for exclusivity that incorporate both per-gene and per-sample mutational frequencies are computationally expensive and have limited precision. Results: We formulate a weighted exact test for assessing the significance of mutual exclusivity in an arbitrary number of mutational events. Our test conditions on the number of samples with a mutation as well as per-event, per-sample mutation probabilities. We provide a recursive formula to compute P-values for the weighted test exactly as well as a highly accurate and efficient saddlepoint approximation of the test. We use our test to approximate a commonly used permutation test for exclusivity that conditions on per-event, per-sample mutation frequencies. However, our test is more efficient and it recovers more significant results than the permutation test. We use our Weighted Exclusivity Test (WExT) software to analyze hundreds of colorectal and endometrial samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, which are two cancer types that often have extremely high mutation rates. On both cancer types, the weighted test identifies sets of mutually exclusive mutations in cancer genes with fewer false positives than earlier approaches. Availability and Implementation: See http://compbio.cs.brown.edu/projects/wext for software. Contact: braphael@cs.brown.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27587696

  9. SGCE mutations cause psychiatric disorders: clinical and genetic characterization

    PubMed Central

    Peall, Kathryn J.; Smith, Daniel J.; Kurian, Manju A.; Wardle, Mark; Waite, Adrian J.; Hedderly, Tammy; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Smith, Martin; Whone, Alan; Pall, Hardev; White, Cathy; Lux, Andrew; Jardine, Philip; Bajaj, Narinder; Lynch, Bryan; Kirov, George; O’Riordan, Sean; Samuel, Michael; Lynch, Timothy; King, Mary D.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Warner, Thomas T.; Blake, Derek J.; Owen, Michael J.; Morris, Huw R.

    2014-01-01

    Myoclonus dystonia syndrome is a childhood onset hyperkinetic movement disorder characterized by predominant alcohol responsive upper body myoclonus and dystonia. A proportion of cases are due to mutations in the maternally imprinted SGCE gene. Previous studies have suggested that patients with SGCE mutations may have an increased rate of psychiatric disorders. We established a cohort of patients with myoclonus dystonia syndrome and SGCE mutations to determine the extent to which psychiatric disorders form part of the disease phenotype. In all, 89 patients with clinically suspected myoclonus dystonia syndrome were recruited from the UK and Ireland. SGCE was analysed using direct sequencing and for copy number variants. In those patients where no mutation was found TOR1A (GAG deletion), GCH1, THAP1 and NKX2-1 were also sequenced. SGCE mutation positive cases were systematically assessed using standardized psychiatric interviews and questionnaires and compared with a disability-matched control group of patients with alcohol responsive tremor. Nineteen (21%) probands had a SGCE mutation, five of which were novel. Recruitment of family members increased the affected SGCE mutation positive group to 27 of whom 21 (77%) had psychiatric symptoms. Obsessive–compulsive disorder was eight times more likely (P < 0.001) in mutation positive cases, compulsivity being the predominant feature (P < 0.001). Generalized anxiety disorder (P = 0.003) and alcohol dependence (P = 0.02) were five times more likely in mutation positive cases than tremor controls. SGCE mutations are associated with a specific psychiatric phenotype consisting of compulsivity, anxiety and alcoholism in addition to the characteristic motor phenotype. SGCE mutations are likely to have a pleiotropic effect in causing both motor and specific psychiatric symptoms. PMID:23365103

  10. Molecular analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Common mutations and racial difference

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, S.; Hori, T.; Nakashima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine -6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Studies on the molecular basis of MPS IVA have been facilitated following cloning of the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA. In this study we detected mutations from 20 Caucasian and 19 Japanese MPS IVA patients using SSCP system and compared mutations of Caucasian origin with those of Japanese origin. The results showed the presence of 16 various mutations (3 small, deletions, 2 nonsense and 11 missense mutations) for Caucasian patients and 15 (1 deletion, 1 large alteration and 13 missense mutations) formore » Japanese. Moreover, two common mutations existed; one is double gene deletion characteristic for Japanese (6 alleles; 15%) and the other is a point mutation (1113F A{yields}T transition) characteristic for Caucasian (9 alleles; 22.5%). And the clear genotype/phenotype relationship among 1342delCA, IVS1(-2), P151S, Q148X, R386C, I113F, Q473X, W220G, P151L, A291T, R90W, and P77R, for a severe type, G96B N204K and V138A for a milder type, was observed. Only R386 mutation was seen in both of the populations. Further, the precise DNA analysis for double gene deletion of a common double gene deletion has been performed by defining the breakpoints and the results showed that one deletion was caused by homologous recombination due to Alu repetitive sequences and the other was due to nonhomologous recombination of short direct repeat. Haplotype analysis for six alleles with double deletion were different, indicating the different origin of this mutation or the frequent recombination events before a mutational event. Thus the mutations in GALNS gene are very heterogeneous and the racial difference is characteristic.« less

  11. Cancer-Associated Mutations in Endometriosis without Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anglesio, M.S.; Papadopoulos, N.; Ayhan, A.; Nazeran, T.M.; Noë, M.; Horlings, H.M.; Lum, A.; Jones, S.; Senz, J.; Seckin, T.; Ho, J.; Wu, R.-C.; Lac, V.; Ogawa, H.; Tessier-Cloutier, B.; Alhassan, R.; Wang, A.; Wang, Y.; Cohen, J.D.; Wong, F.; Hasanovic, A.; Orr, N.; Zhang, M.; Popoli, M.; McMahon, W.; Wood, L.D.; Mattox, A.; Allaire, C.; Segars, J.; Williams, C.; Tomasetti, C.; Boyd, N.; Kinzler, K.W.; Gilks, C.B.; Diaz, L.; Wang, T.-L.; Vogelstein, B.; Yong, P.J.; Huntsman, D.G.; Shih, I.-M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endometriosis, defined as the presence of ectopic endometrial stroma and epithelium, affects approximately 10% of reproductive-age women and can cause pelvic pain and infertility. Endometriotic lesions are considered to be benign inflammatory lesions but have cancerlike features such as local invasion and resistance to apoptosis. METHODS We analyzed deeply infiltrating endometriotic lesions from 27 patients by means of exomewide sequencing (24 patients) or cancer-driver targeted sequencing (3 patients). Mutations were validated with the use of digital genomic methods in micro-dissected epithelium and stroma. Epithelial and stromal components of lesions from an additional 12 patients were analyzed by means of a droplet digital polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay for recurrent activating KRAS mutations. RESULTS Exome sequencing revealed somatic mutations in 19 of 24 patients (79%). Five patients harbored known cancer driver mutations in ARID1A, PIK3CA, KRAS, or PPP2R1A, which were validated by Safe-Sequencing System or immunohistochemical analysis. The likelihood of driver genes being affected at this rate in the absence of selection was estimated at P = 0.001 (binomial test). Targeted sequencing and a droplet digital PCR assay identified KRAS mutations in 2 of 3 patients and 3 of 12 patients, respectively, with mutations in the epithelium but not the stroma. One patient harbored two different KRAS mutations, c.35G→T and c.35G→C, and another carried identical KRAS c.35G→A mutations in three distinct lesions. CONCLUSIONS We found that lesions in deep infiltrating endometriosis, which are associated with virtually no risk of malignant transformation, harbor somatic cancer driver mutations. Ten of 39 deep infiltrating lesions (26%) carried driver mutations; all the tested somatic mutations appeared to be confined to the epithelial compartment of endometriotic lesions. PMID:28489996

  12. Standard Mutation Nomenclature in Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Gulley, Margaret L.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Wilson, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    To translate basic research findings into clinical practice, it is essential that information about mutations and variations in the human genome are communicated easily and unequivocally. Unfortunately, there has been much confusion regarding the description of genetic sequence variants. This is largely because research articles that first report novel sequence variants do not often use standard nomenclature, and the final genomic sequence is compiled over many separate entries. In this article, we discuss issues crucial to clear communication, using examples of genes that are commonly assayed in clinical laboratories. Although molecular diagnostics is a dynamic field, this should not inhibit the need for and movement toward consensus nomenclature for accurate reporting among laboratories. Our aim is to alert laboratory scientists and other health care professionals to the important issues and provide a foundation for further discussions that will ultimately lead to solutions. PMID:17251329

  13. ALK mutation and inhibition in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tri; Gerber, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of precision medicine in non-small cell lung cancer has remarkably altered the direction of research and improved clinical outcomes. The identification of molecular subsets with differential response to targeted therapies began with the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor mutated tumors in subsets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Emboldened by unprecedented response rates to kinase inhibitors seen in that subset, the oncologic community searched for other molecular subsets featuring oncogene addiction. An early result of this search was the discovery of NSCLC driven by activating rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. In an astoundingly brief period following the recognition of ALK-positive NSCLC, details of the biology, clinicopathologic features, development of targeted inhibitors, mechanisms of therapeutic resistance, and new generations of treatment were elucidated. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathologic features, diagnostic approach, treatment options, resistance mechanisms, and future research areas for ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:27637426

  14. The topography of mutational processes in breast cancer genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Morganella, Sandro; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Glodzik, Dominik; ...

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in human cancers show unevenness in genomic distribution that correlate with aspects of genome structure and function. These mutations are, however, generated by multiple mutational processes operating through the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell, each composed of specific DNA damage and repair components and leaving its own characteristic mutational signature on the genome. Using somatic mutation catalogues from 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences, here we show that each of 12 base substitution, 2 insertion/deletion (indel) and 6 rearrangement mutational signatures present in breast tissue, exhibit distinct relationships with genomic features relating to transcription,more » DNA replication and chromatin organization. This signature-based approach permits visualization of the genomic distribution of mutational processes associated with APOBEC enzymes, mismatch repair deficiency and homologous recombinational repair deficiency, as well as mutational processes of unknown aetiology. Lastly, it highlights mechanistic insights including a putative replication-dependent mechanism of APOBEC-related mutagenesis.« less

  15. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  16. Lethal mutagenesis: targeting the mutator phenotype in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2010-10-01

    The evolution of cancer and RNA viruses share many similarities. Both exploit high levels of genotypic diversity to enable extensive phenotypic plasticity and thereby facilitate rapid adaptation. In order to accumulate large numbers of mutations, we have proposed that cancers express a mutator phenotype. Similar to cancer cells, many viral populations, by replicating their genomes with low fidelity, carry a substantial mutational load. As high levels of mutation are potentially deleterious, the viral mutation frequency is thresholded at a level below which viral populations equilibrate in a traditional mutation-selection balance, and above which the population is no longer viable, i.e., the population undergoes an error catastrophe. Because their mutation frequencies are fine-tuned just below this error threshold, viral populations are susceptible to further increases in mutational load and, recently this phenomenon has been exploited therapeutically by a concept that has been termed lethal mutagenesis. Here we review the application of lethal mutagenesis to the treatment of HIV and discuss how lethal mutagenesis may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of solid cancers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. De novo mutations in regulatory elements in neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Short, Patrick J.; McRae, Jeremy F.; Gallone, Giuseppe; Sifrim, Alejandro; Won, Hyejung; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Wright, Caroline F.; Firth, Helen V; FitzPatrick, David R.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2018-01-01

    We previously estimated that 42% of patients with severe developmental disorders carry pathogenic de novo mutations in coding sequences. The role of de novo mutations in regulatory elements affecting genes associated with developmental disorders, or other genes, has been essentially unexplored. We identified de novo mutations in three classes of putative regulatory elements in almost 8,000 patients with developmental disorders. Here we show that de novo mutations in highly evolutionarily conserved fetal brain-active elements are significantly and specifically enriched in neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified a significant twofold enrichment of recurrently mutated elements. We estimate that, genome-wide, 1-3% of patients without a diagnostic coding variant carry pathogenic de novo mutations in fetal brain-active regulatory elements and that only 0.15% of all possible mutations within highly conserved fetal brain-active elements cause neurodevelopmental disorders with a dominant mechanism. Our findings represent a robust estimate of the contribution of de novo mutations in regulatory elements to this genetically heterogeneous set of disorders, and emphasize the importance of combining functional and evolutionary evidence to identify regulatory causes of genetic disorders. PMID:29562236

  18. Mutation Accumulation, Soft Selection and the Middle-Class Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.; Hall, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The “middle-class neighborhood” is a breeding design intended to allow new mutations to accumulate by lessening the effects of purifying selection through the elimination of among-line fitness variation. We show that this design effectively applies soft selection to the experimental population, potentially causing biased estimates of mutational effects if social effects contribute to fitness. PMID:19448272

  19. Exome Sequencing Identifies Potentially Druggable Mutations in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yock Ping; Tan, Lu Ping; Chai, San Jiun; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Choo, Siew Woh; Lim, Paul Vey Hong; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Mohd Kornain, Noor Kaslina; Lum, Chee Lun; Pua, Kin Choo; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Tan, Tee Yong; Teo, Soo Hwang; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-03-03

    In this study, we first performed whole exome sequencing of DNA from 10 untreated and clinically annotated fresh frozen nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and matched bloods to identify somatically mutated genes that may be amenable to targeted therapeutic strategies. We identified a total of 323 mutations which were either non-synonymous (n = 238) or synonymous (n = 85). Furthermore, our analysis revealed genes in key cancer pathways (DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, immune response, lipid signaling) were mutated, of which those in the lipid-signaling pathway were the most enriched. We next extended our analysis on a prioritized sub-set of 37 mutated genes plus top 5 mutated cancer genes listed in COSMIC using a custom designed HaloPlex target enrichment panel with an additional 88 NPC samples. Our analysis identified 160 additional non-synonymous mutations in 37/42 genes in 66/88 samples. Of these, 99/160 mutations within potentially druggable pathways were further selected for validation. Sanger sequencing revealed that 77/99 variants were true positives, giving an accuracy of 78%. Taken together, our study indicated that ~72% (n = 71/98) of NPC samples harbored mutations in one of the four cancer pathways (EGFR-PI3K-Akt-mTOR, NOTCH, NF-κB, DNA repair) which may be potentially useful as predictive biomarkers of response to matched targeted therapies.

  20. Determining mutation density using Restriction Enzyme Sequence Comparative Analysis (RESCAN)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The average mutation density of a mutant population is a major consideration when developing resources for the efficient, cost-effective implementation of reverse genetics methods such as Targeting of Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING). Reliable estimates of mutation density can be achieved ...

  1. Genetic mutations in human rectal cancers detected by targeted sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jun; Gao, Jinglong; Mao, Zhijun; Wang, Jianhua; Li, Jianhui; Li, Wensheng; Lei, Yu; Li, Shuaishuai; Wu, Zhuo; Tang, Chuanning; Jones, Lindsey; Ye, Hua; Lou, Feng; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Zhang, Enke

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is widespread with significant mortality. Both inherited and sporadic mutations in various signaling pathways influence the development and progression of the cancer. Identifying genetic mutations in CRC is important for optimal patient treatment and many approaches currently exist to uncover these mutations, including next-generation sequencing (NGS) and commercially available kits. In the present study, we used a semiconductor-based targeted DNA-sequencing approach to sequence and identify genetic mutations in 91 human rectal cancer samples. Analysis revealed frequent mutations in KRAS (58.2%), TP53 (28.6%), APC (16.5%), FBXW7 (9.9%) and PIK3CA (9.9%), and additional mutations in BRAF, CTNNB1, ERBB2 and SMAD4 were also detected at lesser frequencies. Thirty-eight samples (41.8%) also contained two or more mutations, with common combination mutations occurring between KRAS and TP53 (42.1%), and KRAS and APC (31.6%). DNA sequencing for individual cancers is of clinical importance for targeted drug therapy and the advantages of such targeted gene sequencing over other NGS platforms or commercially available kits in sensitivity, cost and time effectiveness may aid clinicians in treating CRC patients in the near future.

  2. Key Clinical Features to Identify Girls with "CDKL5" Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothee; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlene; Heron, Delphine; Morel, Marie Ange N'Guyen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ("CDKL5") gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of…

  3. Phenotypic Involvement in Females with the FMR1 Gene Mutation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, J. E.; Cheema, A.; Sobesky, W. E.; Gardner, S. C.; Taylor, A. K.; Pennington, B. F.; Hagerman, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated phenotypic effects seen in 114 females with premutation and 41 females (ages 18-58) with full Fragile X mental retardation gene mutation. Those with the full mutation had a greater incidence of hand-flapping, eye contact problems, special education help for reading and math, and grade retention. (Author/CR)

  4. EGFR Mutation Testing Practices within the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Keith M.; Utomo, Ahmad; Rajadurai, Pathmanathan; Tran, Van Khanh; Du, Xiang; Chou, Teh-Ying; Enriquez, Ma. Luisa D.; Lee, Geon Kook; Iqbal, Jabed; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Hagiwara, Koichi; Liang, Zhiyong; Normanno, Nicola; Park, Keunchil; Toyooka, Shinichi; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Waring, Paul; Zhang, Li; McCormack, Rose; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Itoh, Yohji; Sugeno, Masatoshi; Mok, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutation-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients necessitates accurate, timely testing. Although EGFR mutation testing has been adopted by many laboratories in Asia, data are lacking on the proportion of NSCLC patients tested in each country, and the most commonly used testing methods. Methods: A retrospective survey of records from NSCLC patients tested for EGFR mutations during 2011 was conducted in 11 Asian Pacific countries at 40 sites that routinely performed EGFR mutation testing during that period. Patient records were used to complete an online questionnaire at each site. Results: Of the 22,193 NSCLC patient records surveyed, 31.8% (95% confidence interval: 31.2%–32.5%) were tested for EGFR mutations. The rate of EGFR mutation positivity was 39.6% among the 10,687 cases tested. The majority of samples were biopsy and/or cytology samples (71.4%). DNA sequencing was the most commonly used testing method accounting for 40% and 32.5% of tissue and cytology samples, respectively. A pathology report was available only to 60.0% of the sites, and 47.5% were not members of a Quality Assurance Scheme. Conclusions: In 2011, EGFR mutation testing practices varied widely across Asia. These data provide a reference platform from which to improve the molecular diagnosis of NSCLC, and EGFR mutation testing in particular, in Asia. PMID:25376513

  5. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Rikke S.; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G.; Bayly, Marta A.; van Kempen, Marjan J. A.; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Yendle, Simone C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G.; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J.; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated with KCNT1, we examined individuals affected with focal epilepsy or an epileptic encephalopathy for mutations in the gene. We identified KCNT1 mutations in 12 previously unreported patients with focal epilepsy, multifocal epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and in a family with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), in addition to patients with NFLE and MMFSI. In contrast to the 100% penetrance so far reported for KCNT1 mutations, we observed incomplete penetrance. It is notable that we report that the one KCNT1 mutation, p.Arg398Gln, can lead to either of the two distinct phenotypes, ADNFLE or MMFSI, even within the same family. This indicates that genotype–phenotype relationships for KCNT1 mutations are not straightforward. We demonstrate that KCNT1 mutations are highly pleiotropic and are associated with phenotypes other than ADNFLE and MMFSI. KCNT1 mutations are now associated with Ohtahara syndrome, MMFSI, and nocturnal focal epilepsy. They may also be associated with multifocal epilepsy and cardiac disturbances. PMID:26122718

  6. The identification of HESX1 mutations in Kallmann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Newbern, Kayce; Natrajan, Nithya; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Chorich, Lynn .P.; Halvorson, Lisa; Cameron, Richard S.; Layman, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if HESX1 mutations are present in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH)/Kallmann syndrome (KS). HESX1 mutations have previously been characterized in patients with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD), isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), and combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD). We hypothesized that IHH/KS represents a milder phenotypic variant of SOD. Design PCR-based DNA sequencing was performed on 217 well-characterized IHH/KS patients. Putative missense mutations were analyzed by sorting intolerant from tolerant (SIFT) and Clustal Ω. Setting An academic medical center Patients 217 IHH/KS and 192 controls Interventions DNA was extracted from patients and controls; genotype/phenotype comparisons were made Main Outcome Measures DNA sequence of HESX1, SIFT analysis, and ortholog alignment Results Two novel heterozygous missense mutations (p.H42Y and p.V75L) and previously reported heterozygous missense mutation p.Q6H in HESX1 were identified in 3/217 (1.4%) patients. All were males with KS. Both p.Q6H and p.H42Y were predicted to be deleterious by SIFT, while p.V75L was conserved in 8/9 species. No other IHH/KS gene mutations were present. Conclusions HESX1 mutations may cause KS in addition to more severe phenotypes. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of HESX1 mutations in humans, thereby broadening its role in development. PMID:23465708

  7. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation as a therapeutic target in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Han, Catherine H; Batchelor, Tracy T

    2017-06-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH) are important enzymes that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), producing NADPH in the process. More than 80% of low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastoma (GBM) harbor an IDH mutation. IDH mutations involve the catalytic pocket of the enzyme and lead to a neomorphic ability to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) while oxidizing NADPH to NADP+. 2HG is considered as an 'oncometabolite' which is thought to be responsible for many, if not all, biologic effects of IDH mutations. 2HG accumulation competitively inhibits α-KG-dependent dioxygenases, including histone lysine demethylases and DNA demethylases, resulting in a hypermethylation phenotype with alterations in cellular epigenetic status as well as a block in cellular differentiation. IDH mutations have been suggested as an important early event in tumorigenesis, however it remains unclear whether IDH mutation by itself causes cancer or if it requires other oncogenic events to initiate tumorigenesis. Significant efforts have been made to better understand the mechanisms of IDH mutations in tumor initiation and progression, and to develop targeted therapies for IDH-mutated tumors. This review provides an overview of the function of mutant IDH, and the current understanding of the role IDH mutations play in gliomagenesis. In addition, several potential therapeutic strategies for IDH-mutant gliomas, including mutant IDH inhibitors which have entered clinical evaluation in glioma patients, will be discussed.

  8. Cancer-associated TERT promoter mutations abrogate telomerase silencing

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Kunitoshi; Johnson, Joshua Z; Vogan, Jacob M; Wagner, Tina; Boyle, John M; Hockemeyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter are the most frequent non-coding mutations in cancer, but their molecular mechanism in tumorigenesis has not been established. We used genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells with physiological telomerase expression to elucidate the mechanism by which these mutations contribute to human disease. Surprisingly, telomerase-expressing embryonic stem cells engineered to carry any of the three most frequent TERT promoter mutations showed only a modest increase in TERT transcription with no impact on telomerase activity. However, upon differentiation into somatic cells, which normally silence telomerase, cells with TERT promoter mutations failed to silence TERT expression, resulting in increased telomerase activity and aberrantly long telomeres. Thus, TERT promoter mutations are sufficient to overcome the proliferative barrier imposed by telomere shortening without additional tumor-selected mutations. These data establish that TERT promoter mutations can promote immortalization and tumorigenesis of incipient cancer cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07918.001 PMID:26194807

  9. Interpreting the Dependence of Mutation Rates on Age and Time

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ziyue; Wyman, Minyoung J.; Sella, Guy; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Mutations can originate from the chance misincorporation of nucleotides during DNA replication or from DNA lesions that arise between replication cycles and are not repaired correctly. We introduce a model that relates the source of mutations to their accumulation with cell divisions, providing a framework for understanding how mutation rates depend on sex, age, and cell division rate. We show that the accrual of mutations should track cell divisions not only when mutations are replicative in origin but also when they are non-replicative and repaired efficiently. One implication is that observations from diverse fields that to date have been interpreted as pointing to a replicative origin of most mutations could instead reflect the accumulation of mutations arising from endogenous reactions or exogenous mutagens. We further find that only mutations that arise from inefficiently repaired lesions will accrue according to absolute time; thus, unless life history traits co-vary, the phylogenetic “molecular clock” should not be expected to run steadily across species. PMID:26761240

  10. Evolution of Local Mutation Rate and Its Determinants.

    PubMed

    Terekhanova, Nadezhda V; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Soldatov, Ruslan A; Bazykin, Georgii A

    2017-05-01

    Mutation rate varies along the human genome, and part of this variation is explainable by measurable local properties of the DNA molecule. Moreover, mutation rates differ between orthologous genomic regions of different species, but the drivers of this change are unclear. Here, we use data on human divergence from chimpanzee, human rare polymorphism, and human de novo mutations to predict the substitution rate at orthologous regions of non-human mammals. We show that the local mutation rates are very similar between human and apes, implying that their variation has a strong underlying cryptic component not explainable by the known genomic features. Mutation rates become progressively less similar in more distant species, and these changes are partially explainable by changes in the local genomic features of orthologous regions, most importantly, in the recombination rate. However, they are much more rapid, implying that the cryptic component underlying the mutation rate is more ephemeral than the known genomic features. These findings shed light on the determinants of mutation rate evolution. local mutation rate, molecular evolution, recombination rate. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma identified by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Hornick, Jason L; Woda, Bruce; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-08-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of presumed hematopoietic origin showing morphologic and immunophenotypic evidence of histiocytic differentiation. Somatic mutation importance in the pathogenesis or disease progression of histiocytic sarcoma was largely unknown. To identify somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma, we studied 5 histiocytic sarcomas [3 female and 2 male patients; mean age 54.8 (20-72), anatomic sites include lymph node, uterus, and pleura] and matched normal tissues from each patient as germ line controls. Somatic mutations in 50 "Hotspot" oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were examined using next generation sequencing. Three (out of five) histiocytic sarcoma cases carried somatic mutations in BRAF. Among them, G464V [variant frequency (VF) of 43.6 %] and G466R (VF of 29.6 %) located at the P loop potentially interfere with the hydrophobic interaction between P and activating loops and ultimately activation of BRAF. Also detected was BRAF somatic mutation N581S (VF of 7.4 %), which was located at the catalytic loop of BRAF kinase domain: its role in modifying kinase activity was unclear. A similar mutational analysis was also performed on nine acute monocytic/monoblastic leukemia cases, which did not identify any BRAF somatic mutations. Our study detected several BRAF mutations in histiocytic sarcomas, which may be important in understanding the tumorigenesis of this rare neoplasm and providing mechanisms for potential therapeutical opportunities.

  12. Cancer-associated IDH1 mutations produce 2-hydroxyglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lenny; White, David W.; Gross, Stefan; Bennett, Bryson D.; Bittinger, Mark A.; Driggers, Edward M.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Jin, Shengfang; Keenan, Marie C.; Marks, Kevin M.; Prins, Robert M.; Ward, Patrick S.; Yen, Katharine E.; Liau, Linda M.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thompson, Craig B.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Su, Shinsan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mutations in the enzyme cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are a common feature of a major subset of primary human brain cancers. These mutations occur at a single amino acid residue of the IDH1 active site resulting in loss of the enzyme’s ability to catalyze conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, only a single copy of the gene is mutated in tumors, raising the possibility that the mutations do not result in a simple loss of function. Here we show that cancer-associated IDH1 mutations result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of α-ketoglutarate to R(−)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Structural studies demonstrate that when R132 is mutated to histidine, residues in the active site are shifted to produce structural changes consistent with reduced oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and acquisition of the ability to convert α-ketoglutarate to 2HG. Excess accumulation of 2HG has been shown to lead to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumors in patients with inborn errors of 2HG metabolism. Similarly, in human malignant gliomas harboring IDH1 mutations, we find dramatically elevated levels of 2HG. These data demonstrate that the IDH1 mutations result in production of the onco-metabolite 2HG, and suggest that the excess 2HG which accumulates in vivo contributes to the formation and malignant progression of gliomas. PMID:19935646

  13. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-01

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers. PMID:27880943

  14. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-03

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers.

  15. Exome Sequencing Identifies Potentially Druggable Mutations in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Yock Ping; Tan, Lu Ping; Chai, San Jiun; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Choo, Siew Woh; Lim, Paul Vey Hong; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Mohd Kornain, Noor Kaslina; Lum, Chee Lun; Pua, Kin Choo; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Tan, Tee Yong; Teo, Soo Hwang; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we first performed whole exome sequencing of DNA from 10 untreated and clinically annotated fresh frozen nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and matched bloods to identify somatically mutated genes that may be amenable to targeted therapeutic strategies. We identified a total of 323 mutations which were either non-synonymous (n = 238) or synonymous (n = 85). Furthermore, our analysis revealed genes in key cancer pathways (DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, immune response, lipid signaling) were mutated, of which those in the lipid-signaling pathway were the most enriched. We next extended our analysis on a prioritized sub-set of 37 mutated genes plus top 5 mutated cancer genes listed in COSMIC using a custom designed HaloPlex target enrichment panel with an additional 88 NPC samples. Our analysis identified 160 additional non-synonymous mutations in 37/42 genes in 66/88 samples. Of these, 99/160 mutations within potentially druggable pathways were further selected for validation. Sanger sequencing revealed that 77/99 variants were true positives, giving an accuracy of 78%. Taken together, our study indicated that ~72% (n = 71/98) of NPC samples harbored mutations in one of the four cancer pathways (EGFR-PI3K-Akt-mTOR, NOTCH, NF-κB, DNA repair) which may be potentially useful as predictive biomarkers of response to matched targeted therapies. PMID:28256603

  16. Preleukemic and second-hit mutational events in an acute myeloid leukemia patient with a novel germline RUNX1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Isaac Ks; Lee, Joanne; Ng, Christopher; Kosmo, Bustamin; Chiu, Lily; Seah, Elaine; Mok, Michelle Meng Huang; Tan, Karen; Osato, Motomi; Chng, Wee-Joo; Yan, Benedict; Tan, Lip Kun

    2018-01-01

    Germline mutations in the RUNX1 transcription factor give rise to a rare autosomal dominant genetic condition classified under the entity: Familial Platelet Disorders with predisposition to Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (FPD/AML). While several studies have identified a myriad of germline RUNX1 mutations implicated in this disorder, second-hit mutational events are necessary for patients with hereditary thrombocytopenia to develop full-blown AML. The molecular picture behind this process remains unclear. We describe a patient of Malay descent with an unreported 7-bp germline RUNX1 frameshift deletion, who developed second-hit mutations that could have brought about the leukaemic transformation from a pre-leukaemic state. These mutations were charted through the course of the treatment and stem cell transplant, showing a clear correlation between her clinical presentation and the mutations present. The patient was a 27-year-old Malay woman who presented with AML on the background of hereditary thrombocytopenia affecting her father and 3 brothers. Initial molecular testing revealed the same novel RUNX1 mutation in all 5 individuals. The patient received standard induction, consolidation chemotherapy, and a haploidentical stem cell transplant from her mother with normal RUNX1 profile. Comprehensive genomic analyses were performed at diagnosis, post-chemotherapy and post-transplant. A total of 8 mutations ( RUNX1 , GATA2 , DNMT3A , BCORL1 , BCOR , 2 PHF6 and CDKN2A ) were identified in the pre-induction sample, of which 5 remained ( RUNX1 , DNMT3A , BCORL1 , BCOR and 1 out of 2 PHF6 ) in the post-treatment sample and none were present post-transplant. In brief, the 3 mutations which were lost along with the leukemic cells at complete morphological remission were most likely acquired leukemic driver mutations that were responsible for the AML transformation from a pre-leukemic germline RUNX1 -mutated state. On the contrary, the 5 mutations that persisted post

  17. [Hyperuricemia and gene mutations: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Fabio; Falconi, Daniela; De Prisco, Ornella; Maurizio, Gherzi; Marazzi, Federico; Marengo, Marita; Serra, Ilaria; Tamagnone, Michela; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca; Pasini, Barbara; Formica, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequently found in nephrology. The case presented may be useful to clarify some pathogenetic aspects. It is a patient of 18 years, hyperuricaemic. Non-consanguineous parents, hyperuricemia in the paternal line, not neuropsychiatric disorders in the family. Delay in neuromotor acquisitions, average intellectual disabilities, anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive personality traits. Normal renal function and renal ultrasound. Evidence of hyperuricemia in 2015. Never gouty episodes and / or lithiasis, initiated allopurinol 100 mg on alternate days, with no side effects, urea in the control range, slightly below normal uricuria. Given the complex clinical, he carried out a genetic analysis of array-CGH. He showed a deletion on the short arm of chromosome 3 (3p12.3) and a duplication of the long arm of chromosome 1 (19q13-42). The deletion 3p12.3 (paternal inheritance), involves the ROBO2 gene. Duplication 19q13.42, (maternal inheritance), includes NLRP12, DPRX, ZNF331 genes. The ROBO2 gene with its mutation, is associated with vesicoureteral reflux. The NLRP12 gene encodes proteins called "Nalps", forming a subfamily of proteins "CATERPILLAR". Many "Nalps" as well as the "Nalps 12" have an N-terminal domain (DYP) with a purin. Since uric acid is a byproduct of purine metabolism, considered the familiarity, we believe that we can hypothesize that the mutations found. In particular those concerning the NLRP-12 gene, may have a role in the presence of hyperuricemia. We believe that in patients with hyperuricemia, associated with a particular impairment of neurological picture, it is likely that there is a subtended common genetic deficiency. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  18. Mitochondrial pathogenic mutations are population-specific.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2010-12-31

    Surveying deleterious variation in human populations is crucial for our understanding, diagnosis and potential treatment of human genetic pathologies. A number of recent genome-wide analyses focused on the prevalence of segregating deleterious alleles in the nuclear genome. However, such studies have not been conducted for the mitochondrial genome. We present a systematic survey of polymorphisms in the human mitochondrial genome, including those predicted to be deleterious and those that correspond to known pathogenic mutations. Analyzing 4458 completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes we characterize the genetic diversity of different types of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in African (L haplotypes) and non-African (M and N haplotypes) populations. We find that the overall level of polymorphism is higher in the mitochondrial compared to the nuclear genome, although the mitochondrial genome appears to be under stronger selection as indicated by proportionally fewer nonsynonymous than synonymous substitutions. The African mitochondrial genomes show higher heterozygosity, a greater number of polymorphic sites and higher frequencies of polymorphisms for synonymous, benign and damaging polymorphism than non-African genomes. However, African genomes carry significantly fewer SNPs that have been previously characterized as pathogenic compared to non-African genomes. Finding SNPs classified as pathogenic to be the only category of polymorphisms that are more abundant in non-African genomes is best explained by a systematic ascertainment bias that favours the discovery of pathogenic polymorphisms segregating in non-African populations. This further suggests that, contrary to the common disease-common variant hypothesis, pathogenic mutations are largely population-specific and different SNPs may be associated with the same disease in different populations. Therefore, to obtain a comprehensive picture of the deleterious variability in the human population, as well as

  19. CCDC141 Mutations in Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Turan, Ihsan; Hutchins, B Ian; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent; Kotan, L Damla; Gurbuz, Fatih; Ulubay, Ayca; Mengen, Eda; Yuksel, Bilgin; Wray, Susan; Topaloglu, A Kemal

    2017-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons originate outside the central nervous system in the olfactory placode and migrate into the central nervous system, becoming integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Failure of this migration can lead to idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH)/Kallmann syndrome (KS). We have previously shown that CCDC141 knockdown leads to impaired migration of GnRH neurons but not of olfactory receptor neurons. The aim of this study was to further describe the phenotype and prevalence of CCDC141 mutations in IHH/KS. Using autozygosity mapping, candidate gene screening, whole-exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing, those individuals carrying deleterious CDCD141 variants and their phenotypes were determined in a cohort of 120 IHH/KS families. No interventions were made. Our studies revealed nine affected individuals from four independent families in which IHH/KS is associated with inactivating CCDC141 variants, revealing a prevalence of 3.3%. Affected individuals (with the exception of those from family 1 who concomitantly have FEZF1 mutations) have normal olfactory function and anatomically normal olfactory bulbs. Four affected individuals show evidence of clinical reversibility. In three of the families, there was at least one more potentially deleterious variant in other known puberty genes with evidence of allelic heterogeneity within respective pedigrees. These studies confirm that inactivating CCDC141 variants cause normosmic IHH but not KS. This is consistent with our previous in vitro experiments showing exclusively impaired embryonic migration of GnRH neurons upon CCDC141 knockdown. These studies expand the clinical and genetic spectrum of IHH and also attest to the complexity of phenotype and genotype in IHH. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  20. VPS35 Mutations in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Wider, Christian; Ross, Owen A.; Dachsel, Justus C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Lincoln, Sarah J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Cobb, Stephanie A.; Wilhoite, Greggory J.; Bacon, Justin A.; Behrouz, Bahareh; Melrose, Heather L.; Hentati, Emna; Puschmann, Andreas; Evans, Daniel M.; Conibear, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Aasly, Jan O.; Burkhard, Pierre R.; Djaldetti, Ruth; Ghika, Joseph; Hentati, Faycal; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Lynch, Tim; Melamed, Eldad; Rajput, Alex; Rajput, Ali H.; Solida, Alessandra; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Vingerhoets, François; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genetic causes for Mendelian disorders has been based on the collection of multi-incident families, linkage analysis, and sequencing of genes in candidate intervals. This study describes the application of next-generation sequencing technologies to a Swiss kindred presenting with autosomal-dominant, late-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The family has tremor-predominant dopa-responsive parkinsonism with a mean onset of 50.6 ± 7.3 years. Exome analysis suggests that an aspartic-acid-to-asparagine mutation within vacuolar protein sorting 35 (VPS35 c.1858G>A; p.Asp620Asn) is the genetic determinant of disease. VPS35 is a central component of the retromer cargo-recognition complex, is critical for endosome-trans-golgi trafficking and membrane-protein recycling, and is evolutionarily highly conserved. VPS35 c.1858G>A was found in all affected members of the Swiss kindred and in three more families and one patient with sporadic PD, but it was not observed in 3,309 controls. Further sequencing of familial affected probands revealed only one other missense variant, VPS35 c.946C>T; (p.Pro316Ser), in a pedigree with one unaffected and two affected carriers, and thus the pathogenicity of this mutation remains uncertain. Retromer-mediated sorting and transport is best characterized for acid hydrolase receptors. However, the complex has many types of cargo and is involved in a diverse array of biologic pathways from developmental Wnt signaling to lysosome biogenesis. Our study implicates disruption of VPS35 and retromer-mediated trans-membrane protein sorting, rescue, and recycling in the neurodegenerative process leading to PD. PMID:21763482

  1. Mutation independently affects reproductive traits and dauer larvae development in mutation accumulation lines of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hills, Arthur J; Green, James W M; Harvey, Simon C

    2017-11-01

    Developmental decisions are important in organismal fitness. For the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is naturally found in the ephemeral food patches formed by rotting plant material, correctly committing to dauer or non-dauer larval development is key to genotype survival. To investigate the link between reproductive traits, which will determine how populations grow, and dauer larvae formation, we have analysed these traits in mutation accumulation lines of C. elegans. We find that reproductive traits of individual worms-the total number of progeny and the timing of progeny production-are highly correlated with the population size observed in growing populations. In contrast, we find no relationship between reproduction traits and the number of dauer larvae observed in growing populations. We also do not observe a mutational bias in dauer larvae formation. These results indicate that the control of dauer larvae formation is distinct from the control of reproduction and that differences in dauer larvae formation can evolve rapidly.

  2. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Kunst, Henricus P M; Cascon, Alberto; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gaal, José; Korpershoek, Esther; Hinojar-Gutierrez, Adolfo; Timmers, Henri J L M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Hermsen, Mario A; Suárez, Carlos; Hussain, A Karim; Vriends, Annette H J T; Hes, Frederik J; Jansen, Jeroen C; Tops, Carli M; Corssmit, Eleonora P; de Knijff, Peter; Lenders, Jacques W M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Devilee, Peter; Dinjens, Winand N M; de Krijger, Ronald R; Robledo, Mercedes

    2010-04-01

    Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation carriers, assess the clinical genetic significance of SDHAF2, and describe the associated clinical phenotype. We undertook a multicentre study in Spain and The Netherlands in 443 apparently sporadic patients with paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas who did not have mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB. We analysed DNA of 315 patients for germline mutations of SDHAF2; a subset (n=200) was investigated for gross gene deletions. DNA from a group of 128 tumours was studied for somatic mutations. We also examined a Spanish family with head and neck paragangliomas with a young age of onset for the presence of SDHAF2 mutations, undertook haplotype analysis in this kindred, and assessed their clinical phenotype. We did not identify any germline or somatic mutations of SDHAF2, and no gross gene deletions were noted in the subset of apparently sporadic patients analysed. Investigation of the Spanish family identified a pathogenic germline DNA mutation of SDHAF2, 232G-->A (Gly78Arg), identical to the Dutch kindred. SDHAF2 mutations do not have an important role in phaeochromocytoma and are rare in head and neck paraganglioma. Identification of a second family with the Gly78Arg mutation suggests that this is a crucial residue for the function of SDHAF2. We conclude that SDHAF2 mutation analysis is justified in very young patients with isolated head and neck paraganglioma without mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB, and in individuals with familial antecedents who are negative for mutations in all other risk genes. Dutch Cancer Society, European Union 6th Framework Program, Fondo Investigaciones Sanitarias, Fundación Mutua Madrileña, and Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cáncer. 2010

  3. Characterizing mutation-expression network relationships in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Shila; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Data made available through large cancer consortia like The Cancer Genome Atlas make for a rich source of information to be studied across and between cancers. In recent years, network approaches have been applied to such data in uncovering the complex interrelationships between mutational and expression profiles, but lack direct testing for expression changes via mutation. In this pan-cancer study we analyze mutation and gene expression information in an integrative manner by considering the networks generated by testing for differences in expression in direct association with specific mutations. We relate our findings among the 19 cancers examined to identify commonalities and differences as well as their characteristics. Using somatic mutation and gene expression information across 19 cancers, we generated mutation-expression networks per cancer. On evaluation we found that our generated networks were significantly enriched for known cancer-related genes, such as skin cutaneous melanoma (p<0.01 using Network of Cancer Genes 4.0). Our framework identified that while different cancers contained commonly mutated genes, there was little concordance between associated gene expression changes among cancers. Comparison between cancers showed a greater overlap of network nodes for cancers with higher overall non-silent mutation load, compared to those with a lower overall non-silent mutation load. This study offers a framework that explores network information through co-analysis of somatic mutations and gene expression profiles. Our pan-cancer application of this approach suggests that while mutations are frequently common among cancer types, the impact they have on the surrounding networks via gene expression changes varies. Despite this finding, there are some cancers for which mutation-associated network behaviour appears to be similar: suggesting a potential framework for uncovering related cancers for which similar therapeutic strategies may be applicable. Our

  4. Clinical phenotype of 5 females with a CDKL5 mutation.

    PubMed

    Stalpers, Xenia L; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Yntema, Helger G; Verrips, Aad

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin dependent kinase like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been reported in approximately 80 patients since the first description in 2003. The clinical presentation partly corresponds with Rett syndrome, considering clinical features as intellectual disability, hypotonia, and poor visual, language, and motor development. However, these patients do not meet the consensus criteria for Rett syndrome since they lack the clear period of regression. Furthermore, in contrast to Rett syndrome, patients with CDKL5 mutations, have seizures or infantile spasms starting in the first weeks of life. We present clinical phenotype of 5 girls having a mutation in the CDKL5 gene. All mutations are novel and are pathogenic since they either lead to a frameshift in the reading frame or affect a consensus splice site. Four of the mutations are detected de novo in the affected girl.

  5. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09207.001 PMID:26374986

  6. Familial Mediterranean fever associated pyrin mutations in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Konstantopoulos, K; Kanta, A; Deltas, C; Atamian, V; Mavrogianni, D; Tzioufas, A; Kollainis, I; Ritis, K; Moutsopoulos, H

    2003-01-01

    Patients and methods: 62 patients fulfilling the Tel Hashomer diagnostic criteria for definite (33) or probable (29) FMF diagnosis were studied. Eight point mutations of pyrin gene were tested by standard methods. Of the 62 patients tested, 48 were Greek, four were Jewish, seven were Armenian, and three were Arab. Results: 42 patients were found to be homozygotes for pyrin mutations; 11 patients were found to carry only one of the tested mutations; in nine patients no mutations were detected. Conclusion: Molecular detection of pyrin gene mutations seems useful in confirming suspected cases, and in detecting asymptomatic cases, of Mediterranean fever in Greece. It may also be used as a screening tool within affected families. PMID:12695165

  7. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin; ...

    2016-11-04

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of cancer. Here, we analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5,243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA edi ting by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clock-like mutational process.more » Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.« less

  8. Mastocytosis: a mutated KIT receptor induced myeloproliferative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anindya; Ghosh, Joydeep; Kapur, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Although more than 90% systemic mastocytosis (SM) patients express gain of function mutations in the KIT receptor, recent next generation sequencing has revealed the presence of several additional genetic and epigenetic mutations in a subset of these patients, which confer poor prognosis and inferior overall survival. A clear understanding of how genetic and epigenetic mutations cooperate in regulating the tremendous heterogeneity observed in these patients will be essential for designing effective treatment strategies for this complex disease. In this review, we describe the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients with mastocytosis, the nature of relatively novel mutations identified in these patients, therapeutic strategies to target molecules downstream from activating KIT receptor and finally we speculate on potential novel strategies to interfere with the function of not only the oncogenic KIT receptor but also epigenetic mutations seen in these patients. PMID:26158763

  9. Mutation-selection equilibrium in games with multiple strategies.

    PubMed

    Antal, Tibor; Traulsen, Arne; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Tarnita, Corina E; Nowak, Martin A

    2009-06-21

    In evolutionary games the fitness of individuals is not constant but depends on the relative abundance of the various strategies in the population. Here we study general games among n strategies in populations of large but finite size. We explore stochastic evolutionary dynamics under weak selection, but for any mutation rate. We analyze the frequency dependent Moran process in well-mixed populations, but almost identical results are found for the Wright-Fisher and Pairwise Comparison processes. Surprisingly simple conditions specify whether a strategy is more abundant on average than 1/n, or than another strategy, in the mutation-selection equilibrium. We find one condition that holds for low mutation rate and another condition that holds for high mutation rate. A linear combination of these two conditions holds for any mutation rate. Our results allow a complete characterization of nxn games in the limit of weak selection.

  10. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of cancer. Here, we analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5,243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA edi ting by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clock-like mutational process.more » Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.« less

  11. CADASIL with a novel NOTCH3 mutation (Cys478Tyr).

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Kokoro; Irioka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2015-03-01

    Recently, an increasing number of NOTCH3 mutations have been described to cause cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Here, we report 2 CADASIL patients from a Japanese family, who were found to possess a novel NOTCH3 mutation. The proband only had chronic headache, and her mother had previously suffered a minor stroke. Although the patients' clinical symptoms were mild, their distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features suggested CADASIL. Genetic analysis revealed that both patients had a novel heterozygous NOTCH3 mutation (p.Cys478Tyr) leading to stereotypical cysteine loss. The present finding suggests that genetic testing for NOTCH3 mutations in patients with distinctive MRI features, even if the symptoms are as mild as chronic headache, should help to broaden the mutational and clinical spectrum of CADASIL. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling Autism by SHANK Gene Mutations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Shank family proteins (Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3) are synaptic scaffolding proteins that organize an extensive protein complex at the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Recent human genetic studies indicate that SHANK family genes (SHANK1, SHANK2, and SHANK3) are causative genes for idiopathic autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Neurobiological studies of Shank mutations in mice support a general hypothesis of synaptic dysfunction in the pathophysiology of ASD. However, the molecular diversity of SHANK family gene products, as well as the heterogeneity in human and mouse phenotypes, pose challenges to modeling human SHANK mutations. Here, we review the molecular genetics of SHANK mutations in human ASD and discuss recent findings where such mutations have been modeled in mice. Conserved features of synaptic dysfunction and corresponding behaviors in Shank mouse mutants may help dissect the pathophysiology of ASD, but also highlight divergent phenotypes that arise from different mutations in the same gene. PMID:23583105

  13. Glutamate receptor mutations in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Soto, David; Altafaj, Xavier; Sindreu, Carlos; Bayés, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission have long been associated with psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders (PNDD), but only recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing have allowed interrogation of the prevalence of mutations in glutamate receptors (GluR) among afflicted individuals. In this review we discuss recent work describing GluR mutations in the context of PNDDs. Although there are no strict relationships between receptor subunit or type and disease, some interesting preliminary conclusions have arisen. Mutations in genes coding for ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, which are central to synaptic transmission and plasticity, are mostly associated with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. In contrast, mutations of metabotropic GluRs, having a role on modulating neural transmission, are preferentially associated with psychiatric disorders. Also, the prevalence of mutations among GluRs is highly heterogeneous, suggesting a critical role of certain subunits in PNDD pathophysiology. The emerging bias between GluR subtypes and specific PNDDs may have clinical implications.

  14. MLH1 mutations differentially affect meiotic functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Eva R; Shcherbakova, Polina V; Kunkel, Thomas A; Borts, Rhona H

    2003-01-01

    To test whether missense mutations in the cancer susceptibility gene MLH1 adversely affect meiosis, we examined 14 yeast MLH1 mutations for effects on meiotic DNA transactions and gamete viability in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations analogous to those associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or those that reduce Mlh1p interactions with ATP or DNA all impair replicative mismatch repair as measured by increased mutation rates. However, their effects on meiotic heteroduplex repair, crossing over, chromosome segregation, and gametogenesis vary from complete loss of meiotic functions to no meiotic defect, and mutants defective in one meiotic process are not necessarily defective in others. DNA binding and ATP binding but not ATP hydrolysis are required for meiotic crossing over. The results reveal clear separation of different Mlh1p functions in mitosis and meiosis, and they suggest that some, but not all, MLH1 mutations may be a source of human infertility. PMID:12618391

  15. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  16. Similar Mutation Rates but Highly Diverse Mutation Spectra in Ascomycete and Basidiomycete Yeasts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-24

    Te, and Michael Lynch Department of Biology , Indiana University, Bloomington, IN *Corresponding author: E-mail: longhongan@gmail.com. Accepted...GBE The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access...fungal mutation spectrum. Supplementary Material Supplementary data are available at Genome Biology and Evolution online. Acknowledgments This research

  17. A deletion mutation in GJB6 cooperating with a GJB2 mutation in trans in non-syndromic deafness: A novel founder mutation in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Lerer, I; Sagi, M; Ben-Neriah, Z; Wang, T; Levi, H; Abeliovich, D

    2001-11-01

    A deletion of at least 140 kb starting approximately 35kb upstream (telomeric) to the GJB2 (CX26) gene was identified in 7 patients from 4 unrelated Jewish Ashkenazi families with non-syndromic hearing loss. These patients were heterozygous for one of the common mutations 167delT or 35delG in the GJB2 gene in trans to the deletion. The deletion started at 5' side of the GJB6 (CX30) gene including the first exon and it did not affect the integrity of the GJB2 gene. The deletion mutation segregated together with the hearing loss, and was not found in a control group of 100 Ashkenazi individuals. We suggest that the deletion is a recessive mutation causing hearing loss in individuals that are double heterozygous for the deletion and for a mutation in the GJB2 gene. The effect of the deletion mutation could be due to a digenic mode of inheritance of GJB2 and GJB6 genes that encode two different connexins; connexin 26 and connexin 30, or it may abolish control elements that are important in the expression of the GJB2 gene in the cochlea. Regardless which of the options is valid, it is apparent that the deletion mutation provides a new insight into connexin function in the auditory system. The deletion mutation was on the same haplotypic background in all the families, and therefore is a founder mutation that increases the impact of GJB2 in the etiology of prelingual recessive non-syndromic hearing loss in the Ashkenazi population. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Emergence of MPLW515 mutation in a patient with CALR deletion: Evidence of secondary acquisition of MPL mutation in the CALR clone.

    PubMed

    Partouche, Nicolas; Conejero, Carole; Barathon, Quentin; Moroch, Julien; Tulliez, Michel; Cordonnier, Catherine; Giraudier, Stephane

    2018-02-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are characterized by transduction pathway recognized as mutually exclusive molecular abnormalities such as BCR-ABL translocation, JAK2V617F or JAK2 exon 12 mutations, MPL w515, and CALR mutations. However, in some rare cases, associations of such mutations are found in 1 patient. This can be related to 2 pathologies (at least 2 different clones harboring 2 mutations) or associated mutations in 1 clone. We describe here such an association of CALR and MPL mutations in a patient harboring the second mutation in a subclone during the phenotypic evolution of the myeloproliferative neoplasms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Heterozygous ABCC8 mutations are a cause of MODY.

    PubMed

    Bowman, P; Flanagan, S E; Edghill, E L; Damhuis, A; Shepherd, M H; Paisey, R; Hattersley, A T; Ellard, S

    2012-01-01

    The ABCC8 gene encodes the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) subunit of the pancreatic beta cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel. Inactivating mutations cause congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and activating mutations cause transient neonatal diabetes (TNDM) or permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM) that can usually be treated with sulfonylureas. Sulfonylurea sensitivity is also a feature of HNF1A and HNF4A MODY, but patients referred for genetic testing with clinical features of these types of diabetes do not always have mutations in the HNF1A/4A genes. Our aim was to establish whether mutations in the ABCC8 gene cause MODY that is responsive to sulfonylurea therapy. We sequenced the ABCC8 gene in 85 patients with a BMI <30 kg/m², no family history of neonatal diabetes and who were deemed sensitive to sulfonylureas by the referring clinician or were sulfonylurea-treated. All had tested negative for mutations in the HNF1A and HNF4A genes. ABCC8 mutations were found in seven of the 85 (8%) probands. Four patients were heterozygous for previously reported mutations and four novel mutations, E100K, G214R, Q485R and N1245D, were identified. Only four probands fulfilled MODY criteria, with two diagnosed after 25 years and one patient, who had no family history of diabetes, as a result of a proven de novo mutation. ABCC8 mutations can cause MODY in patients whose clinical features are similar to those with HNF1A/4A MODY. Therefore, sequencing of ABCC8 in addition to the known MODY genes should be considered if such features are present, to facilitate optimal clinical management of these patients.

  20. Alcohol consumption and breast tumor mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Platek, Mary E; Shields, Peter G; Tan, Duanjun; Marian, Catalin; Bonner, Matthew R; McCann, Susan E; Nie, Jing; Wilding, Gregory E; Ambrosone, Christine; Millen, Amy E; Trevisan, Maurizio; Russell, Marcia; Nochajski, Thomas H; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2010-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are frequent in breast tumors, but the etiology of these mutations is unknown. We hypothesized that these mutations are associated with exposures that affect oxidative stress such as alcohol metabolism. Using archived tumor blocks from incident breast cancer cases in a case control study, the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) study, analysis of mtDNA mutations was conducted on 128 breast cancer cases selected based on extremes of alcohol intake. Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) was used to screen the entire mtDNA genome and sequencing was completed for all TTGE positive samples. Case-case comparisons were completed using unconditional logistic regression to determine the relative prevalence of the mutations by exposures including alcohol consumption, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) genotype, nutrient intake related to oxidative stress and established breast cancer risk factors. Somatic mtDNA mutations were found in 60 of the 128 tumors examined. There were no differences in the prevalence of mtDNA mutations by alcohol consumption, MnSOD genotype or dietary intake. The likelihood of mtDNA mutations was reduced among those with a positive family history for breast cancer (OR = 0.33, CI = 0.12-0.92), among postmenopausal women who used hormone replacement therapy (OR = 0.46, CI = 0.19-1.08, P = 0.08) and was increased for ER negative tumors (OR = 2.05, CI = 0.95-4.43, P = 0.07). Consistent with previous studies, we found that mtDNA mutations are a frequent occurrence in breast tumors. An understanding of the etiology of mtDNA mutations may provide insight into breast carcinogenesis.

  1. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rattray, Alison; Santoyo, Gustavo; Shafer, Brenda; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3) placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold) correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts). Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  2. Clinical significance of somatic mutation in unexplained blood cytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gallì, Anna; Travaglino, Erica; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Rizzo, Ettore; Molteni, Elisabetta; Elena, Chiara; Ferretti, Virginia Valeria; Catricalà, Silvia; Bono, Elisa; Todisco, Gabriele; Bianchessi, Antonio; Rumi, Elisa; Zibellini, Silvia; Pietra, Daniela; Boveri, Emanuela; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ogawa, Seishi; Cazzola, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Unexplained blood cytopenias, in particular anemia, are often found in older persons. The relationship between these cytopenias and myeloid neoplasms like myelodysplastic syndromes is currently poorly defined. We studied a prospective cohort of patients with unexplained cytopenia with the aim to estimate the predictive value of somatic mutations for identifying subjects with, or at risk of, developing a myeloid neoplasm. The study included a learning cohort of 683 consecutive patients investigated for unexplained cytopenia, and a validation cohort of 190 patients referred for suspected myeloid neoplasm. Using granulocyte DNA, we looked for somatic mutations in 40 genes that are recurrently mutated in myeloid malignancies. Overall, 435/683 patients carried a somatic mutation in at least 1 of these genes. Carrying a somatic mutation with a variant allele frequency ≥0.10, or carrying 2 or more mutations, had a positive predictive value for diagnosis of myeloid neoplasm equal to 0.86 and 0.88, respectively. Spliceosome gene mutations and comutation patterns involving TET2, DNMT3A, or ASXL1 had positive predictive values for myeloid neoplasm ranging from 0.86 to 1.0. Within subjects with inconclusive diagnostic findings, carrying 1 or more somatic mutations was associated with a high probability of developing a myeloid neoplasm during follow-up (hazard ratio = 13.9, P < .001). The predictive values of mutation analysis were confirmed in the independent validation cohort. The findings of this study indicate that mutation analysis on peripheral blood granulocytes may significantly improve the current diagnostic approach to unexplained cytopenia and more generally the diagnostic accuracy of myeloid neoplasms. PMID:28424163

  3. An evolutionary reduction principle for mutation rates at multiple Loci.

    PubMed

    Altenberg, Lee

    2011-06-01

    A model of mutation rate evolution for multiple loci under arbitrary selection is analyzed. Results are obtained using techniques from Karlin (Evolutionary Biology, vol. 14, pp. 61-204, 1982) that overcome the weak selection constraints needed for tractability in prior studies of multilocus event models.A multivariate form of the reduction principle is found: reduction results at individual loci combine topologically to produce a surface of mutation rate alterations that are neutral for a new modifier allele. New mutation rates survive if and only if they fall below this surface-a generalization of the hyperplane found by Zhivotovsky et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 1079-1083, 1994) for a multilocus recombination modifier. Increases in mutation rates at some loci may evolve if compensated for by decreases at other loci. The strength of selection on the modifier scales in proportion to the number of germline cell divisions, and increases with the number of loci affected. Loci that do not make a difference to marginal fitnesses at equilibrium are not subject to the reduction principle, and under fine tuning of mutation rates would be expected to have higher mutation rates than loci in mutation-selection balance.Other results include the nonexistence of 'viability analogous, Hardy-Weinberg' modifier polymorphisms under multiplicative mutation, and the sufficiency of average transmission rates to encapsulate the effect of modifier polymorphisms on the transmission of loci under selection. A conjecture is offered regarding situations, like recombination in the presence of mutation, that exhibit departures from the reduction principle. Constraints for tractability are: tight linkage of all loci, initial fixation at the modifier locus, and mutation distributions comprising transition probabilities of reversible Markov chains.

  4. Mapping Polymerization and Allostery of Hemoglobin S Using Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Weinkam, Patrick; Sali, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin is a complex system that undergoes conformational changes in response to oxygen, allosteric effectors, mutations, and environmental changes. Here, we study allostery and polymerization of hemoglobin and its variants by application of two previously described methods: (i) AllosMod for simulating allostery dynamics given two allosterically related input structures and (ii) a machine-learning method for dynamics- and structure-based prediction of the mutation impact on allostery (Weinkam et al. J. Mol. Biol. 2013), now applicable to systems with multiple coupled binding sites such as hemoglobin. First, we predict the relative stabilities of substates and microstates of hemoglobin, which are determined primarily by entropy within our model. Next, we predict the impact of 866 annotated mutations on hemoglobin’s oxygen binding equilibrium. We then discuss a subset of 30 mutations that occur in the presence of the sickle cell mutation and whose effects on polymerization have been measured. Seven of these HbS mutations occur in three predicted druggable binding pockets that might be exploited to directly inhibit polymerization; one of these binding pockets is not apparent in the crystal structure but only in structures generated by AllosMod. For the 30 mutations, we predict that mutation-induced conformational changes within a single tetramer tend not to significantly impact polymerization; instead, these mutations more likely impact polymerization by directly perturbing a polymerization interface. Finally, our analysis of allostery allows us to hypothesize why hemoglobin evolved to have multiple subunits and a persistent low frequency sickle cell mutation. PMID:23957820

  5. Algorithms and semantic infrastructure for mutation impact extraction and grounding.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jonas B; Naderi, Nona; Witte, René; Riazanov, Alexandre; Kouznetsov, Alexandre; Baker, Christopher J O

    2010-12-02

    Mutation impact extraction is a hitherto unaccomplished task in state of the art mutation extraction systems. Protein mutations and their impacts on protein properties are hidden in scientific literature, making them poorly accessible for protein engineers and inaccessible for phenotype-prediction systems that currently depend on manually curated genomic variation databases. We present the first rule-based approach for the extraction of mutation impacts on protein properties, categorizing their directionality as positive, negative or neutral. Furthermore protein and mutation mentions are grounded to their respective UniProtKB IDs and selected protein properties, namely protein functions to concepts found in the Gene Ontology. The extracted entities are populated to an OWL-DL Mutation Impact ontology facilitating complex querying for mutation impacts using SPARQL. We illustrate retrieval of proteins and mutant sequences for a given direction of impact on specific protein properties. Moreover we provide programmatic access to the data through semantic web services using the SADI (Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration) framework. We address the problem of access to legacy mutation data in unstructured form through the creation of novel mutation impact extraction methods which are evaluated on a corpus of full-text articles on haloalkane dehalogenases, tagged by domain experts. Our approaches show state of the art levels of precision and recall for Mutation Grounding and respectable level of precision but lower recall for the task of Mutant-Impact relation extraction. The system is deployed using text mining and semantic web technologies with the goal of publishing to a broad spectrum of consumers.

  6. CHEK2 mutations and the risk of papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Siołek, Monika; Cybulski, Cezary; Gąsior-Perczak, Danuta; Kowalik, Artur; Kozak-Klonowska, Beata; Kowalska, Aldona; Chłopek, Małgorzata; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Pałyga, Iwona; Walczyk, Agnieszka; Lizis-Kolus, Katarzyna; Sun, Ping; Lubiński, Jan; Narod, Steven A; Góźdż, Stanisław

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the cell cycle checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) tumor suppressor gene are associated with multi-organ cancer susceptibility including cancers of the breast and prostate. A genetic association between thyroid and breast cancer has been suggested, however little is known about the determinants of this association. To characterize the association of CHEK2 mutations with thyroid cancer, we genotyped 468 unselected patients with papillary thyroid cancer and 468 (matched) cancer-free controls for four founder mutations of CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2 + 1G>A, del5395 and I157T). We compared the family histories reported by patients with a CHEK2 mutation to those of non-carriers. A CHEK2 mutation was seen in 73 of 468 (15.6%) unselected patients with papillary thyroid cancer, compared to 28 of 460 (6.0%) age- and sex-matched controls (OR 3.3; p < 0.0001). A truncating mutation (IVS2 + 1G>A, 1100delC or del5395) was associated with a higher risk of thyroid cancer (OR = 5.7; p = 0.006), than was the missense mutation I157T (OR = 2.8; p = 0.0001). CHEK2 mutation carriers reported a family history of breast cancer 2.2 times more commonly than non-carriers (16.4% vs.8.1%; p = 0.05). A CHEK2 mutation was found in seven of 11 women (63%) with multiple primary cancers of the breast and thyroid (OR = 10; p = 0.0004). These results suggest that CHEK2 mutations predispose to thyroid cancer, familial aggregations of breast and thyroid cancer and to double primary cancers of the breast and thyroid. © 2015 UICC.

  7. Validation of high-resolution DNA melting analysis for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene: identification of novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Laure; Diebold, Bertrand; Leroux, Céline; Maurey, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Delahaye, Andre; Dulac, Olivier; Metreau, Julia; Melikishvili, Gia; Toutain, Annick; Rivier, François; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been predominantly described in epileptic encephalopathies of female, including infantile spasms with Rett-like features. Up to now, detection of mutations in this gene was made by laborious, expensive and/or time consuming methods. Here, we decided to validate high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene. Firstly, using a large DNA bank consisting to 34 samples carrying different mutations and polymorphisms, we validated our analytical conditions to analyse the different exons and flanking intronic sequences of the CDKL5 gene by HRMA. Secondly, we screened CDKL5 by both HRMA and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) in a cohort of 135 patients with early-onset seizures. Our results showed that point mutations and small insertions and deletions can be reliably detected by HRMA. Compared to dHPLC, HRMA profiles are more discriminated, thereby decreasing unnecessary sequencing. In this study, we identified eleven novel sequence variations including four pathogenic mutations (2.96% prevalence). HRMA appears cost-effective, easy to set up, highly sensitive, non-toxic and rapid for mutation screening, ideally suited for large genes with heterogeneous mutations located along the whole coding sequence, such as the CDKL5 gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Teaching the Fluctuation Test "In Silico" by Using Mutate: A Program to Distinguish between the Adaptive and Spontaneous Mutation Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvajal-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary…

  9. Teaching the fluctuation test in silico by using mutate: a program to distinguish between the adaptive and spontaneous mutation hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary aspects of current genetics such as sequence databases, DNA mutations, and hypothesis testing, while introducing the fluctuation test. This seminal experiment was originally performed studying Escherichia coli resistance to the infection by bacteriophage T1. The fluctuation test initiated the modern bacterial genetics that 25 years later ushered in the era of the recombinant DNA. Nowadays we know that some deletions in fhuA, the gene responsible for E. coli membrane receptor of T1, could cause the E. coli resistance to this phage. For the sake of simplicity, we will introduce the assumption that a single mutation generates the resistance to T1. During the practical, the students use the program to download some fhuA gene sequences, manually introduce some stop codon mutations, and design a fluctuation test to obtain data for distinguishing between preadaptative (spontaneous) and induced (adaptive) mutation hypotheses. The program can be launched from a browser or, if preferred, its executable file can be downloaded from http://webs.uvigo.es/acraaj/MutateWeb/Mutate.html. It requires the Java 5.0 (or higher) Runtime Environment (freely available at http://www.java.com). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  11. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Swati; Sethi, Raman; Sundar, Gangadhara; Quah, Thuan Chong; Quah, Boon Long; Lai, Poh San

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59) while only 42.4% (25/59) of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9%) of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1%) in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41) of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59) of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and asymptomatic

  12. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Swati; Sethi, Raman; Sundar, Gangadhara; Quah, Thuan Chong; Quah, Boon Long; Lai, Poh San

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59) while only 42.4% (25/59) of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9%) of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1%) in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41) of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59) of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and asymptomatic

  13. Simultaneous mutation detection of three homoeologous genes in wheat by High Resolution Melting analysis and Mutation Surveyor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chongmei; Vincent, Kate; Sharp, Peter

    2009-12-04

    TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) is a powerful tool for reverse genetics, combining traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput PCR-based mutation detection to discover induced mutations that alter protein function. The most popular mutation detection method for TILLING is a mismatch cleavage assay using the endonuclease CelI. For this method, locus-specific PCR is essential. Most wheat genes are present as three similar sequences with high homology in exons and low homology in introns. Locus-specific primers can usually be designed in introns. However, it is sometimes difficult to design locus-specific PCR primers in a conserved region with high homology among the three homoeologous genes, or in a gene lacking introns, or if information on introns is not available. Here we describe a mutation detection method which combines High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis of mixed PCR amplicons containing three homoeologous gene fragments and sequence analysis using Mutation Surveyor software, aimed at simultaneous detection of mutations in three homoeologous genes. We demonstrate that High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis can be used in mutation scans in mixed PCR amplicons containing three homoeologous gene fragments. Combining HRM scanning with sequence analysis using Mutation Surveyor is sensitive enough to detect a single nucleotide mutation in the heterozygous state in a mixed PCR amplicon containing three homoeoloci. The method was tested and validated in an EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate)-treated wheat TILLING population, screening mutations in the carboxyl terminal domain of the Starch Synthase II (SSII) gene. Selected identified mutations of interest can be further analysed by cloning to confirm the mutation and determine the genomic origin of the mutation. Polyploidy is common in plants. Conserved regions of a gene often represent functional domains and have high sequence similarity between homoeologous loci. The method described here

  14. Reduced BRCA1 transcript levels in freshly isolated blood leukocytes from BRCA1 mutation carriers is mutation specific.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Rania; Pettapiece-Phillips, Rachael; Salmena, Leonardo; Kotlyar, Max; Jurisica, Igor; Narod, Steven A; Akbari, Mohammad R; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-08-17

    BRCA1 mutation carriers face a high lifetime risk of developing both breast and ovarian cancer. Haploinsufficiency is thought to predispose these women to cancer by reducing the pool of available BRCA1 transcript and protein, thereby compromising BRCA1 function. Whether or not cancer-free BRCA1 mutation carriers have lower messenger (m)RNA transcript levels in peripheral blood leukocytes has not been evaluated. The primary aim of this study was to characterize an association between BRCA1 mutation status and BRCA1 mRNA leukocyte expression levels among healthy women with a BRCA1 mutation. RNA was extracted from freshly isolated peripheral blood leukocytes of 58 cancer-free, female participants (22 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 36 non-carriers). The expression levels of 236 cancer-associated genes, including BRCA1, were quantified using the Human Cancer Reference gene panel from the Nanostring Technologies nCounter Analysis System. Multivariate modeling demonstrated that carrying a BRCA1 mutation was the most significant predictor of BRCA1 mRNA levels. BRCA1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in BRCA1 mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (146.7 counts vs. 175.1 counts; P = 0.002). Samples with BRCA1 mutations within exon 11 had lower BRCA1 mRNA levels than samples with mutations within the 5' and 3' regions of the BRCA1 gene (122.1 counts vs. 138.9 and 168.6 counts, respectively; P = 0.003). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of gene expression profiles from freshly isolated blood leukocytes revealed that BRCA1 mutation carriers cluster more closely with other BRCA1 mutation carriers than with BRCA1 wild-type samples. Moreover, a set of 17 genes (including BRCA1) previously shown to be involved in carcinogenesis, were differentially expressed between BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers. Overall, these findings support the concept of BRCA1 haploinsufficiency wherein a specific mutation results in dosage-dependent alteration of BRCA1 at the

  15. Detection of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation R132H in myelodysplastic syndrome by mutation-specific antibody and direct sequencing.

    PubMed

    Andrulis, Mindaugas; Capper, David; Luft, Thomas; Hartmann, Christian; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; von Deimling, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Sequencing of the acute myeloid leukemia genome revealed somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1. Acute myeloid leukemia frequently develops from myelodysplastic syndrome. In order to test whether myelodysplastic syndrome also carries isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutations, we stained a series of bone marrow samples from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome using an antibody specific for the R132H mutation. Three out of 71 patients exhibited antibody binding to myeloid precursor cells. The presence of the R132H mutation was confirmed by DNA sequencing. We demonstrated that isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutations occur in myelodysplasia preceding acute myeloid leukemia and that the R132H alteration can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TP53 mutation and survival in aggressive B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zenz, Thorsten; Kreuz, Markus; Fuge, Maxi; Klapper, Wolfram; Horn, Heike; Staiger, Annette M; Winter, Doris; Helfrich, Hanne; Huellein, Jennifer; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Stein, Harald; Feller, Alfred; Möller, Peter; Schmitz, Norbert; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Siebert, Reiner; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    TP53 is mutated in 20-25% of aggressive B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL). To date, no studies have addressed the impact of TP53 mutations in prospective clinical trial cohorts. To evaluate the impact of TP53 mutation to current risk models in aggressive B-NHL, we investigated TP53 gene mutations within the RICOVER-60 trial. Of 1,222 elderly patients (aged 61-80 years) enrolled in the study and randomized to six or eight cycles of CHOP-14 with or without Rituximab (NCT00052936), 265 patients were analyzed for TP53 mutations. TP53 mutations were demonstrated in 63 of 265 patients (23.8%). TP53 mutation was associated with higher LDH (65% vs. 37%; p < 0.001), higher international prognostic index-Scores (IPI 4/5 27% vs. 12%; p = 0.025) and B-symptoms (41% vs. 24%; p = 0.011). Patients with TP53 mutation were less likely to obtain a complete remission CR/CRu (CR unconfirmed) 61.9% (mut) vs. 79.7% (wt) (p = 0.007). TP53 mutations were associated with decreased event-free (EFS), progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (median observation time of 40.2 months): the 3 year EFS, PFS and OS were 42% (vs. 60%; p = 0.012), 42% (vs. 67.5%; p < 0.001) and 50% (vs. 76%; p < 0.001) for the TP53 mutation group. In a Cox proportional hazard analysis adjusting for IPI-factors and treatment arms, TP53 mutation was shown to be an independent predictor of EFS (HR 1.5), PFS (HR 2.0) and OS (HR 2.3; p < 0.001). TP53 mutations are independent predictors of survival in untreated patients with aggressive CD20+ lymphoma. TP53 mutations should be considered for risk models in DLBCL and strategies to improve outcome for patients with mutant TP53 must be developed. © 2017 UICC.

  17. Low Base-Substitution Mutation Rate in the Germline Genome of the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-15

    generations of mutation accumulation (MA). We applied an existing mutation-calling pipeline and developed a new probabilistic mutation detection approach...noise introduced by mismapped reads. We used both our new method and an existing mutation-calling pipeline (Sung, Tucker, et al. 2012) to analyse the...and larger MA experiments will be required to confidently estimate the mutational spectrum of a species with such a low mutation rate. Materials and

  18. Germline mutations in SUFU cause Gorlin syndrome-associated childhood medulloblastoma and redefine the risk associated with PTCH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miriam J; Beetz, Christian; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; O'Sullivan, James; Anderson, Beverley; Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Bholah, Zaynab; Oudit, Deemesh; Cheesman, Edmund; Kelsey, Anna; McCabe, Martin G; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth R

    2014-12-20

    Heterozygous germline PTCH1 mutations are causative of Gorlin syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma), but detection rates > 70% have rarely been reported. We aimed to define the causative mutations in individuals with Gorlin syndrome without PTCH1 mutations. We undertook exome sequencing on lymphocyte DNA from four unrelated individuals from families with Gorlin syndrome with no PTCH1 mutations found by Sanger sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), or RNA analysis. A germline heterozygous nonsense mutation in SUFU was identified in one of four exomes. Sanger sequencing of SUFU in 23 additional PTCH1-negative Gorlin syndrome families identified a SUFU mutation in a second family. Copy-number analysis of SUFU by MLPA revealed a large heterozygous deletion in a third family. All three SUFU-positive families fulfilled diagnostic criteria for Gorlin syndrome, although none had odontogenic jaw keratocysts. Each SUFU-positive family included a single case of medulloblastoma, whereas only two (1.7%) of 115 individuals with Gorlin syndrome and a PTCH1 mutation developed medulloblastoma. We demonstrate convincing evidence that SUFU mutations can cause classical Gorlin syndrome. Our study redefines the risk of medulloblastoma in Gorlin syndrome, dependent on the underlying causative gene. Previous reports have found a 5% risk of medulloblastoma in Gorlin syndrome. We found a < 2% risk in PTCH1 mutation-positive individuals, with a risk up to 20× higher in SUFU mutation-positive individuals. Our data suggest childhood brain magnetic resonance imaging surveillance is justified in SUFU-related, but not PTCH1-related, Gorlin syndrome. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Activating PIK3CA mutations coexist with BRAF or NRAS mutations in a limited fraction of melanomas.

    PubMed

    Manca, Antonella; Lissia, Amelia; Capone, Mariaelena; Ascierto, Paolo A; Botti, Gerardo; Caracò, Corrado; Stanganelli, Ignazio; Colombino, Maria; Sini, MariaCristina; Cossu, Antonio; Palmieri, Giuseppe

    2015-01-28

    Activated PI3K-AKT pathway may contribute to decrease sensitivity to inhibitors of key pathogenetic effectors (mutated BRAF, active NRAS or MEK) in melanoma. Functional alterations are deeply involved in PI3K-AKT activation, with a minimal role reported for mutations in PIK3CA, the catalytic subunit of the PI3K gene. We here assessed the prevalence of the coexistence of BRAF/NRAS and PIK3CA mutations in a series of melanoma samples. A total of 245 tumor specimens (212 primary melanomas and 33 melanoma cell lines) was screened for mutations in BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA genes by automated direct sequencing. Overall, 110 (44.9%) samples carried mutations in BRAF, 26 (10.6%) in NRAS, and 24 (9.8%) in PIK3CA. All identified PIK3CA mutations have been reported to induce PI3K activation; those detected in cultured melanomas were investigated for their interference with the antiproliferative activity of the BRAF-mutant inhibitor vemurafenib. A reduced suppression in cell growth was observed in treated cells carrying both BRAF and PIK3CA mutations as compared with those presenting a mutated BRAF only. Among the analysed melanomas, 12/245 (4.9%) samples presented the coexistence of PIK3CA and BRAF/NRAS mutations. Our study further suggests that PIK3CA mutations account for a small fraction of PI3K pathway activation and have a limited impact in interfering with the BRAF/NRAS-driven growth in melanoma.

  20. Comparison of next-generation sequencing mutation profiling with BRAF and IDH1 mutation-specific immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Kausar J; Luthra, Rajalakshmi; Patel, Keyur P; Singh, Rajesh R; Goswami, Rashmi; Aldape, Ken D; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Routbort, Mark J

    2015-04-01

    Mutation-specific antibodies for BRAF V600E and IDH1 R132H offer convenient immunohistochemical (IHC) assays to detect these mutations in tumors. Previous studies using these antibodies have shown high sensitivity and specificity, but use in routine diagnosis with qualitative assessment has not been well studied. In this retrospective study, we reviewed BRAF and IDH1 mutation-specific IHC results compared with separately obtained clinical next-generation sequencing results. For 67 tumors with combined IDH1 IHC and mutation data, IHC was unequivocally reported as positive or negative in all cases. Sensitivity of IHC for IDH1 R132H was 98% and specificity was 100% compared with mutation status. Four IHC-negative samples showed non-R132H IDH1 mutations including R132C, R132G, and P127T. For 128 tumors with combined BRAF IHC and mutation data, IHC was positive in 33, negative in 82, and equivocal in 13 tumors. The sensitivity of IHC was 97% and specificity was 99% when including only unequivocally positive or negative results. If equivocal IHC cases were included in the analysis as negative, sensitivity fell to 81%. If equivocal cases were classified as positive, specificity dropped to 91%. Eight IHC-negative samples showed non-V600E BRAF mutations including V600K, N581I, V600M, and K601E. We conclude that IHC for BRAF V600E and IDH1 R132H is relatively sensitive and specific, but there is a discordance rate that is not trivial. In addition, a significant proportion of patients harbor BRAF non-V600E or IDH1 non-R132H mutations not detectable by IHC, potentially limiting utility of IHC screening for BRAF and IDH1 mutations.

  1. Presence of calreticulin mutations in JAK2-negative polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Broséus, Julien; Park, Ji-Hye; Carillo, Serge; Hermouet, Sylvie; Girodon, François

    2014-12-18

    Calreticulin (CALR) mutations have been reported in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)- and myeloproliferative leukemia (MPL)-negative essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. In contrast, no CALR mutations have ever been reported in the context of polycythemia vera (PV). Here, we describe 2 JAK2(V617F)-JAK2(exon12)-negative PV patients who presented with a CALR mutation in peripheral granulocytes at the time of diagnosis. In both cases, the CALR mutation was a 52-bp deletion. Single burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) from 1 patient were grown in vitro and genotyped: the same CALR del 52-bp mutation was noted in 31 of the 37 colonies examined; 30 of 31 BFU-E were heterozygous for CALR del 52 bp, and 1 of 31 BFU-E was homozygous for CALR del 52 bp. In summary, although unknown mutations leading to PV cannot be ruled out, our results suggest that CALR mutations can be associated with JAK2-negative PV. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Order Matters: The Order of Somatic Mutations Influences Cancer Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kent, David G; Green, Anthony R

    2017-04-03

    Cancers evolve as a consequence of multiple somatic lesions, with competition between subclones and sequential subclonal evolution. Some driver mutations arise either early or late in the evolution of different individual tumors, suggesting that the final malignant properties of a subclone reflect the sum of mutations acquired rather than the order in which they arose. However, very little is known about the cellular consequences of altering the order in which mutations are acquired. Recent studies of human myeloproliferative neoplasms show that the order in which individual mutations are acquired has a dramatic impact on the cell biological and molecular properties of tumor-initiating cells. Differences in clinical presentation, complications, and response to targeted therapy were all observed and implicate mutation order as an important player in cancer biology. These observations represent the first demonstration that the order of mutation acquisition influences stem and progenitor cell behavior and clonal evolution in any cancer. Thus far, the impact of different mutation orders has only been studied in hematological malignancies, and analogous studies of solid cancers are now required. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Prevalence of EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer in Uruguayan Population

    PubMed Central

    Touya, Diego; Bertoni, Bernardo; Osinaga, Eduardo; Varangot, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background Incorporation of molecular analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene into routine clinical practice represents a milestone for personalized therapy of the non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the genetic testing of EGFR mutations has not yet become a routine clinical practice in developing countries. In view of different prevalence of such mutations among different ethnicities and geographic regions, as well as the limited existing data from Latin America, our aim was to study the frequency of major types of activating mutations of the EGFR gene in NSCLC patients from Uruguay. Methods We examined EGFR mutations in exons 18 through 21 in 289 NSCLC Uruguayan patients by PCR-direct sequencing. Results EGFR mutations were detected in 53 of the 289 (18.3%) patients, more frequently in women (23.4%) than in men (14.5%). The distribution by exon was similar to that generally reported in the literature. Conclusions This first epidemiological study of EGFR mutations in Uruguay reveals a wide spectrum of mutations and an overall prevalence of 18.3%. The background ethnic structure of the Uruguayan population could play an important role in explaining our findings. PMID:28744312

  5. Novel Gardos channel mutations linked to dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (xerocytosis).

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta; Manna, Francesco; Shmukler, Boris E; Gambale, Antonella; Vitiello, Giuseppina; De Rosa, Gianluca; Brugnara, Carlo; Alper, Seth L; Snyder, L Michael; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHSt) is an autosomal dominant congenital hemolytic anemia with moderate splenomegaly and often compensated hemolysis. Affected red cells are characterized by a nonspecific cation leak of the red cell membrane, reflected in elevated sodium content, decreased potassium content, elevated MCHC and MCV, and decreased osmotic fragility. The majority of symptomatic DHSt cases reported to date have been associated with gain-of-function mutations in the mechanosensitive cation channel gene, PIEZO1. A recent study has identified two families with DHSt associated with a single mutation in the KCNN4 gene encoding the Gardos channel (KCa3.1), the erythroid Ca(2+) -sensitive K(+) channel of intermediate conductance, also expressed in many other cell types. We present here, in the second report of DHSt associated with KCNN4 mutations, two previously undiagnosed DHSt families. Family NA exhibited the same de novo missense mutation as that recently described, suggesting a hot spot codon for DHSt mutations. Family WO carried a novel, inherited missense mutation in the ion transport domain of the channel. The patients' mild hemolytic anemia did not improve post-splenectomy, but splenectomy led to no serious thromboembolic events. We further characterized the expression of KCNN4 in the mutated patients and during erythroid differentiation of CD34+ cells and K562 cells. We also analyzed KCNN4 expression during mouse embryonic development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Molecular and clinical aspects of GHRH receptor mutations.

    PubMed

    Corazzini, Valentina; Salvatori, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor (GHRHR) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family. It binds GHRH resulting in somatotroph cell proliferation and stimulation of GH secretion. Mutations in the gene encoding for GHRHR (GHRHR, OMIM No. 139191) are being reported with increasing frequency in familial isolated GH deficiency. To date, the reported GHRHR mutations include eight missense, seven splice, three microdeletions, and two non-sense mutations. One promoter mutation has also been reported. Most of these mutations show a recessive mode of inheritance. The phenotype includes reduced but not absent serum GH, with abnormal response to a variety of stimuli, and low serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, resulting in proportionate growth failure which becomes evident in the first year of life. These patients respond well to GH replacement therapy. Phenotypical observations coming from some unusually large kindreds with untreated GH deficiency due to homozygous GHRHR mutations have allowed the study of the consequences of lifetime lack of GH. This chapter reviews the structure and the role of the GHRHR together with the clinical aspects associated with its mutations. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Age-related cancer mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Welch, John S.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. We analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals within The Cancer Genome Atlas, and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia/lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5–6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant, initiating events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion. PMID:25326804

  8. [Fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in topoisomerase genes of Salmonella typhimurium isolates].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunchang; Pei, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiumei

    2004-09-01

    Mutations in topoisomerase genes were main cause of the resistence of Salmonella typhimurium to fluoroquinolone. The MICs of three Salmonella typhimurium isolates X2, X7, X11 to ciprofloxacin were above 32 microg/ml, 0.38 microg/ml and 0.023 microg/ml, respectively. The genetic alterations in four topoisomerase genes, gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE were detected by multiplex PCR amplimer conformation analysis in these three strains. X2 isolate showed both gyrA mutations (Ser83-->Phe, Asp87-->Asn) and parC mutation (Ser80-->Arg). X7 isolate showed a single gyrA mutation (Ser83-->Phe) and X11 isolate had no changes in all of the four quinolone resistance genes, gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. X7 isolate with a single gyrA mutation was less resistant to ciprofloxacin than X2 with double gyrA mutations and an additional parC mutation. GyrA and parC genes play important role of the resistance of Salmonella typhimurium to ciprofloxacin.

  9. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  10. Mutational spectrum of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Amr, Khalda; Messaoud, Olfa; El Darouti, Mohamad; Abdelhak, Sonia; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by hyperphotosensitivity, DNA repair defects and a predisposition to skin cancers. The most frequently occurring type worldwide is the XP group A (XPA). There is a close relationship between the clinical features that ranged from severe to mild form and the mutational site in XPA gene. The aim of this study is to carry out the mutational analysis in Egyptian patients with XP-A. This study was carried out on four unrelated Egyptian XP-A families. Clinical features were examined and direct sequencing of the coding region of XPA gene was performed in patients and their parents. Direct sequencing of the whole coding region of the XPA gene revealed the identification of two homozygous nonsense mutations: (c.553C >T; p.(Gln185)) and (c.331G>T; p.(Glu111)), which create premature, stop codon and a homodeletion (c.374delC: p.Thr125Ilefs 15) that leads to frameshift and premature translation termination. We report the identification of one novel XPA gene mutation and two known mutations in four unrelated Egyptian families with Xermoderma pigmentosum. All explored patients presented severe neurological abnormalities and have mutations located in the DNA binding domain. This report gives insight on the mutation spectrum of XP-A in Egypt. This would provide a valuable tool for early diagnosis of this severe disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Shyam M.; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M.; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A.; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of colorectal cancer patients. Introduction of the HER2 mutations, S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M, into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutations are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors, neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) WT colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX’s) identified 4 PDX’s with HER2 mutations. HER2 targeted therapies were tested on two PDX’s. Treatment with a single HER2 targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2 targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2 mutated PDX’s. PMID:26243863

  12. Intronic splicing mutations in PTCH1 cause Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bholah, Zaynab; Smith, Miriam J; Byers, Helen J; Miles, Emma K; Evans, D Gareth; Newman, William G

    2014-09-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the tumour suppressor PTCH1. Routine clinical genetic testing, by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, identifies a mutation in 60-90 % of cases. We undertook RNA analysis on lymphocytes from ten individuals diagnosed with Gorlin syndrome, but without known PTCH1 mutations by exonic sequencing or MLPA. Two altered PTCH1 transcripts were identified. Genomic DNA sequence analysis identified an intron 7 mutation c.1068-10T>A, which created a strong cryptic splice acceptor site, leading to an intronic insertion of eight bases; this is predicted to create a frameshift p.(His358Alafs*12). Secondly, a deep intronic mutation c.2561-2057A>G caused an inframe insertion of 78 intronic bases in the cDNA transcript, leading to a premature stop codon p.(Gly854fs*3). The mutations are predicted to cause loss of function of PTCH1, consistent with its tumour suppressor function. The findings indicate the importance of RNA analysis to detect intronic mutations in PTCH1 not identified by routine screening techniques.

  13. Recurrent and functional regulatory mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rheinbay, Esther; Parasuraman, Prasanna; Grimsby, Jonna; Tiao, Grace; Engreitz, Jesse M; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Rodriguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Rosenberg, Mara; Hess, Julian; Stewart, Chip; Maruvka, Yosef E; Stojanov, Petar; Cortes, Maria L; Seepo, Sara; Cibulskis, Carrie; Tracy, Adam; Pugh, Trevor J; Lee, Jesse; Zheng, Zongli; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, A John; Boehm, Jesse S; Gabriel, Stacey B; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R; Baselga, Jose; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Shioda, Toshi; Bernards, Andre; Lander, Eric S; Getz, Gad

    2017-07-06

    Genomic analysis of tumours has led to the identification of hundreds of cancer genes on the basis of the presence of mutations in protein-coding regions. By contrast, much less is known about cancer-causing mutations in non-coding regions. Here we perform deep sequencing in 360 primary breast cancers and develop computational methods to identify significantly mutated promoters. Clear signals are found in the promoters of three genes. FOXA1, a known driver of hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, harbours a mutational hotspot in its promoter leading to overexpression through increased E2F binding. RMRP and NEAT1, two non-coding RNA genes, carry mutations that affect protein binding to their promoters and alter expression levels. Our study shows that promoter regions harbour recurrent mutations in cancer with functional consequences and that the mutations occur at similar frequencies as in coding regions. Power analyses indicate that more such regions remain to be discovered through deep sequencing of adequately sized cohorts of patients.

  14. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2015-12-01

    To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism.