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Sample records for a33 antigen-deficient mice

  1. Active vaccination with vaccinia virus A33 protects mice against lethal vaccinia and ectromelia viruses but not against cowpoxvirus; elucidation of the specific adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Paran, Nir; Lustig, Shlomo; Zvi, Anat; Erez, Noam; Israely, Tomer; Melamed, Sharon; Politi, Boaz; Ben-Nathan, David; Schneider, Paula; Lachmi, Batel; Israeli, Ofir; Stein, Dana; Levin, Reuven; Olshevsky, Udy

    2013-07-10

    Vaccinia virus protein A33 (A33VACV) plays an important role in protection against orthopoxviruses, and hence is included in experimental multi-subunit smallpox vaccines. In this study we show that single-dose vaccination with recombinant Sindbis virus expressing A33VACV, is sufficient to protect mice against lethal challenge with vaccinia virus WR (VACV-WR) and ectromelia virus (ECTV) but not against cowpox virus (CPXV), a closely related orthopoxvirus. Moreover, a subunit vaccine based on the cowpox virus A33 ortholog (A33CPXV) failed to protect against cowpox and only partially protected mice against VACV-WR challenge. We mapped regions of sequence variation between A33VACV and A33CPXVand analyzed the role of such variations in protection. We identified a single protective region located between residues 104-120 that harbors a putative H-2Kd T cell epitope as well as a B cell epitope - a target for the neutralizing antibody MAb-1G10 that blocks spreading of extracellular virions. Both epitopes in A33CPXV are mutated and predicted to be non-functional. Whereas vaccination with A33VACV did not induce in-vivo CTL activity to the predicted epitope, inhibition of virus spread in-vitro, and protection from lethal VACV challenge pointed to the B cell epitope highlighting the critical role of residue L118 and of adjacent compensatory residues in protection. This epitope's critical role in protection, as well as its modifications within the orthopoxvirus genus should be taken in context with the failure of A33 to protect against CPXV as demonstrated here. These findings should be considered when developing new subunit vaccines and monoclonal antibody based therapeutics against orthopoxviruses, especially variola virus, the etiologic agent of smallpox.

  2. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  3. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  4. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  5. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  6. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  7. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of humanised A33 immunoconjugates for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    King, D. J.; Antoniw, P.; Owens, R. J.; Adair, J. R.; Haines, A. M.; Farnsworth, A. P.; Finney, H.; Lawson, A. D.; Lyons, A.; Baker, T. S.

    1995-01-01

    A humanised IgG1/k version of A33 (hA33) has been constructed and expressed with yields up to 700 mg l-1 in mouse myeloma NS0 cells in suspension culture. The equilibrium dissociation constant of hA33 (KD = 1.3 nM) was shown to be equivalent to that of the murine antibody in a cell-binding assay. hA33 labelled with yttrium-90 using the macrocyclic chelator 12N4 (DOTA) was shown to localise very effectively to human colon tumour xenografts in nude mice, with tumour levels increasing as blood concentration fell up to 144 h. A Fab' variant of hA33 with a single hinge thiol group to facilitate chemical cross-linking has also been constructed and expressed with yields of 500 mg l-1. Trimaleimide cross-linkers have been used to produce a trivalent Fab fragment (hA33 TFM) that binds antigen on tumour cells with greater avidity than hA33 IgG. Cross-linkers incorporating 12N4 or 9N3 macrocycles have been used to produce hA33 TFM labelled stably and site specifically with yttrium-90 or indium-111 respectively. These molecules have been used to demonstrate that hA33 TFM is cleared more rapidly than hA33 IgG from the circulation of animals but does not lead to accumulation of these metallic radionuclides in the kidney. 90Y-labelled hA33 TFM therefore appears to be the optimal form of the antibody for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal carcinoma. Images Figure 3 PMID:8519646

  8. Structural and Functional Characterization of Anti-A33 Antibodies Reveal a Potent Cross-Species Orthopoxviruses Neutralizer

    PubMed Central

    Matho, Michael H.; Schlossman, Andrew; Meng, Xiangzhi; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Kaever, Thomas; Buller, Mark; Doronin, Konstantin; Parker, Scott; Peters, Bjoern; Crotty, Shane; Xiang, Yan; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus A33 is an extracellular enveloped virus (EEV)-specific type II membrane glycoprotein that is essential for efficient EEV formation and long-range viral spread within the host. A33 is a target for neutralizing antibody responses against EEV. In this study, we produced seven murine anti-A33 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by immunizing mice with live VACV, followed by boosting with the soluble A33 homodimeric ectodomain. Five A33 specific MAbs were capable of neutralizing EEV in the presence of complement. All MAbs bind to conformational epitopes on A33 but not to linear peptides. To identify the epitopes, we have adetermined the crystal structures of three representative neutralizing MAbs in complex with A33. We have further determined the binding kinetics for each of the three antibodies to wild-type A33, as well as to engineered A33 that contained single alanine substitutions within the epitopes of the three crystallized antibodies. While the Fab of both MAbs A2C7 and A20G2 binds to a single A33 subunit, the Fab from MAb A27D7 binds to both A33 subunits simultaneously. A27D7 binding is resistant to single alanine substitutions within the A33 epitope. A27D7 also demonstrated high-affinity binding with recombinant A33 protein that mimics other orthopoxvirus strains in the A27D7 epitope, such as ectromelia, monkeypox, and cowpox virus, suggesting that A27D7 is a potent cross-neutralizer. Finally, we confirmed that A27D7 protects mice against a lethal challenge with ectromelia virus. PMID:26325270

  9. Biodistribution of 211At-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Ylva; Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Lundqvist, Hans; Jensen, Holger; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Sundin, Anders

    2007-08-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) could be a possible adjuvant treatment method for patients with colorectal carcinoma. The A33 antigen is a promising RIT target, as it is highly and homogenously expressed in 95% of all colorectal carcinomas. In this study, the humanized monoclonal antibody A33 (huA33), targeting the A33 antigen, was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide 211At, and the biodistribution and in vivo targeting ability of the conjugate was investigated in an athymic mouse xenograft model. There was an accumulation of 211At in tumor tissue over time, but no substantial accumulation was seen in any organ apart from the skin and thyroid, indicating no major release of free 211At in vivo. At all time points, the uptake of 211At-huA33 was higher in tumor tissue than in most organs, and at 8 hours postinjection (p.i.), no organ had a higher uptake than tumor tissue. The tumor-to-blood ratio of 211At-huA33 increased with time, reaching 2.5 after 21 hours p.i. The highest absorbed dose was found in the blood, but the tumor received a higher dose than any organ other than the thyroid. An in vivo blocking experiment showed that 211At-huA33 binds specifically to human tumor xenografts in athymic mice. In conclusion, the favorable biodistribution and specific in vivo targeting ability of 211At-huA33 makes it a potential therapeutic agent for the RIT of metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17803442

  10. Comparison of immune responses and resistance to brucellosis in mice vaccinated with Brucella abortus 19 or RB51.

    PubMed

    Stevens, M G; Olsen, S C; Pugh, G W; Brees, D

    1995-01-01

    Immune responses and resistance to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) were measured in mice following vaccination with B. abortus 19 (S19) or the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen-deficient mutant, strain RB51 (SRB51). Live bacteria persisted for 8 weeks in spleens of mice vaccinated with 5 x 10(6) or 5 x 10(8) CFU of SRB51, whereas bacteria persisted for 12 weeks in mice vaccinated with 5 x 10(6) CFU of S19. Mice vaccinated with 5 x 10(6) or 5 x 10(8) CFU of SRB51 had increased resistance to infection with S2308 at 12, 16, and 20 weeks after vaccination, but the resistance was lower than that induced by vaccinating mice with 5 x 10(6) CFU of S19. Spleen cells obtained from mice vaccinated with S19 or SRB51 generally exhibited similar proliferative responses to S2308 bacteria or bacterial proteins (106 to 18 kDa) following challenge of mice with S2308 at 12, 16, or 20 weeks after vaccination. Mice vaccinated with S19 had antibody to S2308 bacteria and S2308 smooth LPS at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after vaccination. In contrast, mice vaccinated with either dose of SRB51 did not produce antibody to S2308 smooth LPS. In addition, only mice vaccinated with the highest dose of SRB51 (5 x 10(8) CFU) had antibody responses to S2308 bacteria, although the responses were lower and less persistent than those in mice vaccinated with S19. Collectively, these results indicate that SRB51-vaccinated mice have similar cell-mediated immune responses to S2308 but lower resistance to infection with S2308 compared with S19-vaccinated mice. The lower resistance in SRB51-vaccinated mice probably resulted from a combination of rapid clearance of SRB51 and an absence of antibodies to S2308 LPS.

  11. Characterization of chimpanzee/human monoclonal antibodies to vaccinia virus A33 glycoprotein and its variola virus homolog in vitro and in a vaccinia virus mouse protection model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaochun; Earl, Patricia; Americo, Jeffrey; Damon, Inger; Smith, Scott K; Yu, Fujuan; Sebrell, Andrew; Emerson, Suzanne; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Gorshkova, Inna; Schuck, Peter; Satterfield, William; Moss, Bernard; Purcell, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Three distinct chimpanzee Fabs against the A33 envelope glycoprotein of vaccinia virus were isolated and converted into complete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with human gamma 1 heavy-chain constant regions. The three MAbs (6C, 12C, and 12F) displayed high binding affinities to A33 (K(d) of 0.14 nM to 20 nM) and may recognize the same epitope, which was determined to be conformational and located within amino acid residues 99 to 185 at the C terminus of A33. One or more of the MAbs were shown to reduce the spread of vaccinia virus as well as variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox) in vitro and to more effectively protect mice when administered before or 2 days after intranasal challenge with virulent vaccinia virus than a previously isolated mouse anti-A33 MAb (1G10) or vaccinia virus immunoglobulin. The protective efficacy afforded by anti-A33 MAb was comparable to that of a previously isolated chimpanzee/human anti-B5 MAb. The combination of anti-A33 MAb and anti-B5 MAb did not synergize the protective efficacy. These chimpanzee/human anti-A33 MAbs may be useful in the prevention and treatment of vaccinia virus-induced complications of vaccination against smallpox and may also be effective in the immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy of smallpox and other orthopoxvirus diseases.

  12. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to Brucella abortus 2308 or RB51 antigens in mice infected with strain 2308, RB51, or 19.

    PubMed

    Stevens, M G; Olsen, S C; Pugh, G W

    1994-10-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation to 22 protein fractions (106 to 18 kDa) of Brucella abortus 2308 or the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen-deficient mutant of 2308, strain RB51, was measured for 20 weeks after infection of mice with strain 2308, RB51, or 19. Throughout the 20-week study, the 22 protein fractions of 2308 and RB51 induced a similar pattern of proliferation when they were incubated with lymphocytes from the infected mice. In addition, during the 20 weeks, lymphocytes from all groups of infected mice exhibited the highest proliferation when the lymphocytes were incubated with 18-kDa or smaller proteins from either 2308 or RB51. Lymphocytes obtained from mice at 6 weeks after infection with strain RB51 or 19 exhibited similar proliferation to the 18-kDa proteins of S2308 or SRB51. Lymphocytes from strain 2308-infected mice did not proliferate to these proteins until 10 weeks after infection, and the responses were similar to those in strain RB51-infected mice but lower than those in strain 19-infected mice. Lymphocytes obtained from mice at 20 weeks after infection with strain 19 or 2308 proliferated to most of the 22 fractions of 2308 or RB51, which contained 106- to 18-kDa proteins. However, lymphocytes obtained from strain RB51-infected mice at 20 weeks did not proliferate to any of these fractions. These results indicate that mice infected with RB51 have less-persistent lymphocyte proliferative responses to 2308 proteins than do mice infected with 2308 or 19. In addition, all 2308 proteins that stimulate lymphocyte proliferation appear to be present in RB51.

  13. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Tebbutt, Niall C; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W; Scott, Andrew M; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K

    2015-08-01

    The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33(-/-) mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33(-/-) mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33(-/-) mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33(-/-) mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33(-/-) mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33(-/-) mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking intestinal

  14. 124I-huA33 Antibody PET of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; O’Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L.; Zanzonico, Pat; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Ruan, Shutian; Kemeny, Nancy E.; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Douglas; Jaggi, Jaspreet S.; Scheinberg, David A.; Gonen, Mithat; Panageas, Katherine S.; Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Old, Lloyd J.; Larson, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Humanized A33 (huA33) is a promising monoclonal antibody that recognizes A33 antigen, which is present in more than 95% of colorectal cancers and in normal bowel. In this study, we took advantage of quantitative PET to evaluate 124I huA33 targeting, biodistribution, and safety in patients with colorectal cancer. We also determined the biodistribution of 124I-huA33 when a large dose of human intravenous IgG (IVIG) was administered to manipulate the Fc receptor or when 124I-huA33 was given via hepatic arterial infusion (HAI). Methods We studied 25 patients with primary or metastatic colorectal cancer; 19 patients had surgical exploration or resection. Patients received a median of 343 MBq (44.4–396 MBq) and 10 mg of 124I-huA33. Nineteen patients received the antibody intravenously and 6 patients via HAI, and 5 patients also received IVIG. Results Ten of 12 primary tumors were visualized in 11 patients. The median concentration in primary colon tumors was 0.016% injected dose per gram, compared with 0.004% in normal colon. The PET-based median ratio of hepatic tumor uptake to normal-liver uptake was 3.9 (range, 1.8–22.2). Quantitation using PET, compared with well counting of serum and tissue, showed little difference. Prominent uptake in bowel hindered tumor identification in some patients. Pharmacokinetics showed that patients receiving IVIG had a significantly shorter serum half-time (41.6 ± 14.0 h) than those without (65.2 ± 9.8 h). There were no differences in clearance rates among the intravenous group, IVIG group, and HAI group, nor was there any difference in serum area under the curve, maximum serum concentration, or volume of distribution. Weak titers of human–anti-human antibodies were observed in 6 of 25 patients. No acute side effects or significant toxicities were associated with huA33. Conclusion Good localization of 124I-huA33 in colorectal cancer with no significant toxicity has been observed. PET-derived 124I concentrations agreed well with

  15. In vitro characterization of 211 At-labeled antibody A33--a potential therapeutic agent against metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Ylva; Orlova, Anna; Sjöström, Anna; Jensen, Holger J; Lundqvist, Hans; Sundin, Anders; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2005-10-01

    The humanized antibody A33 binds to the A33 antigen, expressed in 95% of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. The restricted pattern of expression in normal tissue makes this antigen a possible target for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal micrometastases. In this study, the A33 antibody was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide (211)At using N-succinimidyl para-(tri-methylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The in vitro characteristics of the (211)At-benzoate-A33 conjugate ((211)At-A33) were investigated and found to be similar to those of (125)I-benzoate-A33 ((125)I-A33) in different assays. Both conjugates bound with high affinity to SW1222 cells (K(d) = 1.7 +/- 0.2 nM, and 1.8 +/- 0.1 nM for (211)At-A33 and (125)I-A33, respectively), and both showed good intracellular retention (70% of the radioactivity was still cell associated after 20 hours). The cytotoxic effect of (211)At-A33 was also confirmed. After incubation with (211)At-A33, SW1222 cells had a survival of approximately 0.3% when exposed to some 150 decays per cell (DPC). The cytotoxic effect was found to be dose-dependent, as cells exposed to only 56 DPC had a survival of approximately 5%. The (211)At-A33 conjugate shows promise as a potential radioimmunotherapy agent for treatment of micrometastases originating from colorectal carcinoma. PMID:16248767

  16. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  17. A Case of Premature Ovarian Failure in a 33-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Colao, Emma; Granata, Teresa; Vismara, Marco F. M.; Bombardiere, Francesco; Nocera, Donatella; Luciano, Elisa; Perrotti, Nicola; Malatesta, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess aetiology of a POF in a 33-year-old woman and, if possible, plan a cure. Design. Case report. Setting. medical genetics diagnostic unit in a university hospital. Patient. A 33-year-old woman with premature ovarian failure (POF). Intervention(s). Genetic counseling, karyotyping, FISH study. Result(s). Turner-like diagnosis. Conclusion(s). Most cases of POF remain idiopathic. Turner syndrome can occur in very different phenotypes; cytogenetic and molecular profiling can provide a definitive diagnosis in cases with nonclassical phenotype. PMID:23509644

  18. [Odynophagia, fever and rash in a 33 year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Priego Artero, M; Roca Saumell, C; López-Cacho, F; Monzón, C

    2013-09-01

    Hand-Foot-Mouth disease is a viral exanthematous disease primarily caused by Coxsackie virus that mainly affects children under 10 years-old during the spring or summer. It is a rare disease in adults, and rarer still in the immunocompetent. We report the case of a 33-year-old immunocompetent adult affected bys Hand Foot Mouth disease. PMID:24034766

  19. The MICE luminosity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, A.; Forrest, D.; Soler, F. J. P.

    2013-02-01

    The MICE experiment will provide the first measurement of ionisation cooling, a technique suitable for reducing the transverse emittance of a tertiary muon beam in a future neutrino factory accelerator facility. MICE is presently in the final stages of commissioning its beam line. The MICE luminosity monitor has proved an invaluable tool throughout this process, providing independent measurements of particle rate from the MICE target, normalisation for beam line detectors and verification of simulation codes.

  20. Delayed cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice relies on intrinsic glutathione resource.

    PubMed

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in beta-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer.

  1. Delayed Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice Relies on Intrinsic Glutathione Resource

    PubMed Central

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in β-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer. PMID:20696779

  2. A 33-month-old with fever and altered mental status.

    PubMed

    Lautz, Andrew J; Jenssen, Brian; McGuire, Jennifer; St Geme, Joseph W

    2015-01-01

    A 33-month-old girl presented with 3 days of fever and 1 day of multiple paroxysmal episodes of screaming with apparent unresponsiveness, flexed lower extremities, clenched hands, and upward eye deviation. These events lasted seconds to a minute at a time and occurred only during sleep. She slept peacefully between episodes and was easily awakened. She had a history of mild speech delay and mild intermittent asthma but was otherwise healthy. She was tired-appearing and fussy on examination with dry mucous membranes, but her examination was otherwise normal. A complete blood count with differential and serum levels of sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium were normal, but her bicarbonate level was 12 mmol/L. Her fingerstick glucose level was 69 mg/dL. Urine dipstick was notable for large ketones, and a urine drug screen was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid examination yielded 2 white blood cells and 1040 red blood cells/mm(3) with normal chemistries. A computed tomography (CT) scan of her head was unremarkable, and an abdominal ultrasound demonstrated no evidence of intussusception. Over the course of her hospitalization, these paroxysmal episodes persisted, and she subsequently developed mutism, right-sided weakness, and difficulty swallowing liquids. Here we present her case, diagnostic evaluation, and ultimate diagnosis. PMID:25489012

  3. Bochdalek hernia and repetitive pancreatitis in a 33 year old woman

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Medina Andrade Luis; David, Coot Polanco Reyes; Laura, Medina Andrade; Abraham, Medina Andrade; Stephanie, Serrano Collazos; Grecia, Ortiz Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bochdalek hernia presentation in adulthood is rare. The presentation in newborns is the most common, manifesting with data from respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia, requiring urgent surgical intervention with high morbidity and mortality. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a 33 year old woman admitted in the emergency room with severe abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant and disnea. After physical examination and laboratory test we diagnose mild acute pancreatitis. The patient haven’t colelitiasis by ulstrasound or any risk factor for pancreatitis. Initially she received medical treatment and was discharged after one week. After four weeks she presented the same symptoms in two different occasions, with severe and mild pancreatitis respectively. A computed tomography report a left posterolateral diafragmatic hernia. In spite of the rare association of pancreatitis and Bochdalek hernia, we realized it as the etiology until the second event and planned his surgery. We made a posterolateral torachotomy and diafragmatic plasty with a politetrafluoroetileno mesh and after a 6 months follow up she has coursed asymptomatic. DISCUSSION The high rate of complications in this type of hernia requires us to perform surgical treatment as the hernia is detected. In this case it is prudent medical treatment prior to surgical correction despite this being the origin of the pancreatitis, because the systemic inflammatory response added by the surgical act could result in a higher rate of complications if not performed at the appropriate time. There is no precise rule to determine the type of approach of choice in this type of hernia which thoracotomy or laparotomy may be used. CONCLUSION Bochdalek hernia is a rare find in adults who require treatment immediately after diagnosis because of the high risk of complications. When presented with data from pancreatitis is recommended to complete the medical treatment of pancreatitis before

  4. Macrophage functions in Biozzi mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dockrell, H M; Taverne, J; Lelchuk, R; Depledge, P; Brown, I N; Playfair, J H

    1985-01-01

    The faster degradation of antigen by macrophages in Biozzi low (L) responder mice, compared to Biozzi high (H) responder mice, is thought to be responsible for their lower antibody response. We have measured four functions associated with macrophages to see whether macrophages from L mice were generally more active than those from H mice. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from normal mice were compared with those from groups of mice given Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Propionibacterium acnes. Cells from normal H mice gave a stronger oxidative burst when triggered with phorbol myristate acetate, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells than cells from L mice. Cells from all mice injected with BCG or P. acnes gave a stronger oxidative burst, and were more cytotoxic for tumour cells; again, both responses were higher in H mice than in L mice. By contrast, when groups of mice that had received P. acnes were given endotoxin and bled, higher titres of tumour necrosis factor were found in the sera of L mice. Spleen cells from both lines of mice released similar levels of interleukin-1, both spontaneously and in response to lipopolysaccharide. Our results suggest that these various macrophage responses are expressed independently in H and L mice. PMID:3894222

  5. Equine strangles modelled in mice.

    PubMed

    Chanter, N; Smith, K C; Mumford, J A

    1995-02-01

    Small animal models of Streptococcus equi infection have been confined to parenteral injection of mice which subsequently develop a septicaemia. To devise a model of infection more closely resembling strangles, 4.9 x 10(6) cfu of S. equi were placed on the nares of C3H and Balb/c mice (fifteen of each). Compared with ten uninfected controls, infected mice sneezed more often and their daily weight gain was significantly reduced. Histopathological examination seven days after infection revealed varying degrees of nasopharyngeal and regional lymphoid pathology in twenty two mice. Eleven mice had an early or mild rhinitis in which the nasal epithelium presented microabscesses containing polymorphonuclear leucocytes. Another eleven mice had a suppurative rhinitis or pharyngitis associated in most with regional lymphadenitis; in two mice, abscessated lymph nodes had erupted into perinodal connective tissues. Two mice had a vestibular abscess. The suppurative rhinitis was associated with extensive necrosis of nasal propria which occasionally extended to conchal bone, resulting in osteomyelitis. Multiple bacterial abscesses were seen in the spleen of one mouse. Histological lesions were not detected in control mice or in eight infected mice. S. equi was re-isolated from the nares of fourteen of the twenty two affected mice but not from the eight unaffected challenged mice or control mice. The close resemblance of this model to strangles in horses may justify its further use for the investigation of pathogenesis and protective immunity.

  6. Colorful Kindergarten Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobick, Bryna; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Developing kindergarten lessons can be very challenging, especially at the beginning of the school year when many students are just learning to cut paper and hold crayons. The author's favorite beginning unit of the year is "mice paintings," a practical introduction to drawing, color theory, and painting. This unit also incorporates children's…

  7. Mice and Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Shively; Thompson, Charles L.

    Observations and experiments with mice, developed and tested at the Pennsylvania Advancement School with underachieving boys in grades seven and eight, are described in this teachers' guide which includes copies of student worksheets for exercises needing them. In addition to lists of materials and procedural suggestions, ideas for guiding…

  8. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1%(which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  9. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  10. Immunotherapy toxic in obese mice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    New research shows immunotherapy can cause lethal inflammation in both young and aged mice that are obese. Restricting calories in aged mice protected them from toxicity, and giving young obese mice a drug for autoimmune disease prevented the fatal reactions. PMID:25583780

  11. Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and

  12. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  13. Psychopharmacological Studies in Mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Since 1998, when the laboratory of Medicinal Pharmacology was established in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, I have been interested in psychopharmacological research topics. During this period, we identified a number of novel regulatory mechanisms that control the prefrontal dopamine system through functional interaction between serotonin1A and dopamine D2 receptors or between serotonin1A and σ1 receptors. Our findings suggest that strategies that enhance the prefrontal dopamine system may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We also found that environmental factors during development strongly impact the psychological state in adulthood. Furthermore, we clarified the pharmacological profiles of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors donepezil, galantamine, and rivastigmine, providing novel insights into their mechanisms of action. Finally, we developed the female encounter test, a novel method for evaluating motivation in mice. This simple method should help advance future psychopharmacological research. In this review, we summarize the major findings obtained from our recent studies in mice.

  14. MICE Staging and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2010-03-01

    Ionization cooling will be a key technique for a high-intensity Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a high-precision, staged accelerator experiment being performed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Its goal is the first demonstration, with 0.1% resolution, of the feasibility of reducing the transverse emittance of a beam of muons by ionization cooling in low-Z absorbers. MICE is being staged in the following steps: I. Creating and characterizing a beam of muons; II. Measuring their emittance; III. Systematic comparison of successive measurements; IV. Inserting absorber; V. Reaccelerating longitudinally; and VI. Complete "10%-cooling" test. Step I is currently in progress with Step II to commence next year; completion of Step VI is anticipated in ˜2012.

  15. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  16. Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Leonor I.; Friedman, Lorraine

    1972-01-01

    Virulence and infectivity of nine strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were investigated in groups of mice which were inoculated intranasally or intravenously, and some of each were treated with corticosteroids. Fatal infections were not often seen among untreated mice, but mortality usually occurred when corticosteroids were given, regardless of the route of fungus inoculation. Prior treatment did not uniformly increase the incidence of infection, however; only in the case of intranasally inoculated mice was this effect seen. Most strains appeared to be more virulent when administered intravenously, with the exception of a single strain which, under the influence of corticosteroids, repeatedly displayed greatest virulence when given intranasally. All animals that died early in the course of the disease, irrespective of route of inoculation, always had acute pulmonary lesions and usually no other organ was involved. Animals which died later or were sacrificed always had chronic lung lesions. Whether or not chronically diseased animals had additional organ involvement correlated with how the organisms were administered; intravenously inoculated animals usually had extrapulmonary as well as pulmonary lesions, but lesions of those inoculated intranasally were almost exclusively pulmonary. Corticosteroids did not alter the histologic characteristics of either the acute or the chronic type of lesion, but the lesions of treated animals were usually more extensive. Most of the survivors appeared healthy even when infection was extensive. Images PMID:4637603

  17. A hypermorphic epithelial β-catenin mutation facilitates intestinal tumorigenesis in mice in response to compounding WNT-pathway mutations.

    PubMed

    Buchert, Michael; Rohde, Franziska; Eissmann, Moritz; Tebbutt, Niall; Williams, Ben; Tan, Chin Wee; Owen, Alexander; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Gnann, Alexandra; Orend, Gertraud; Orner, Gayle; Dashwood, Rod H; Heath, Joan K; Ernst, Matthias; Janssen, Klaus-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway occurs in the vast majority of colorectal cancers. However, the outcome of the disease varies markedly from individual to individual, even within the same tumor stage. This heterogeneity is governed to a great extent by the genetic make-up of individual tumors and the combination of oncogenic mutations. In order to express throughout the intestinal epithelium a degradation-resistant β-catenin (Ctnnb1), which lacks the first 131 amino acids, we inserted an epitope-tagged ΔN(1-131)-β-catenin-encoding cDNA as a knock-in transgene into the endogenous gpA33 gene locus in mice. The resulting gpA33(ΔN-Bcat) mice showed an increase in the constitutive Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation that shifts the cell fate towards the Paneth cell lineage in pre-malignant intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, 19% of all heterozygous and 37% of all homozygous gpA33(ΔN-Bcat) mice spontaneously developed aberrant crypt foci and adenomatous polyps, at frequencies and latencies akin to those observed in sporadic colon cancer in humans. Consistent with this, the Wnt target genes, MMP7 and Tenascin-C, which are most highly expressed in benign human adenomas and early tumor stages, were upregulated in pre-malignant tissue of gpA33(ΔN-Bcat) mice, but those Wnt target genes associated with excessive proliferation (i.e. Cdnn1, myc) were not. We also detected diminished expression of membrane-associated α-catenin and increased intestinal permeability in gpA33(ΔN-Bcat) mice in challenge conditions, providing a potential explanation for the observed mild chronic intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to azoxymethane and mutant Apc-dependent tumorigenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that epithelial expression of ΔN(1-131)-β-catenin in the intestine creates an inflammatory microenvironment and co-operates with other mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to facilitate and promote tumorigenesis. PMID:26398937

  18. A hypermorphic epithelial β-catenin mutation facilitates intestinal tumorigenesis in mice in response to compounding WNT-pathway mutations

    PubMed Central

    Buchert, Michael; Rohde, Franziska; Eissmann, Moritz; Tebbutt, Niall; Williams, Ben; Tan, Chin Wee; Owen, Alexander; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Gnann, Alexandra; Orend, Gertraud; Orner, Gayle; Dashwood, Rod H.; Heath, Joan K.; Ernst, Matthias; Janssen, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway occurs in the vast majority of colorectal cancers. However, the outcome of the disease varies markedly from individual to individual, even within the same tumor stage. This heterogeneity is governed to a great extent by the genetic make-up of individual tumors and the combination of oncogenic mutations. In order to express throughout the intestinal epithelium a degradation-resistant β-catenin (Ctnnb1), which lacks the first 131 amino acids, we inserted an epitope-tagged ΔN(1-131)-β-catenin-encoding cDNA as a knock-in transgene into the endogenous gpA33 gene locus in mice. The resulting gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice showed an increase in the constitutive Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation that shifts the cell fate towards the Paneth cell lineage in pre-malignant intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, 19% of all heterozygous and 37% of all homozygous gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice spontaneously developed aberrant crypt foci and adenomatous polyps, at frequencies and latencies akin to those observed in sporadic colon cancer in humans. Consistent with this, the Wnt target genes, MMP7  and Tenascin-C, which are most highly expressed in benign human adenomas and early tumor stages, were upregulated in pre-malignant tissue of gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice, but those Wnt target genes associated with excessive proliferation (i.e. Cdnn1, myc) were not. We also detected diminished expression of membrane-associated α-catenin and increased intestinal permeability in gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice in challenge conditions, providing a potential explanation for the observed mild chronic intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to azoxymethane and mutant Apc-dependent tumorigenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that epithelial expression of ΔN(1-131)-β-catenin in the intestine creates an inflammatory microenvironment and co-operates with other mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to facilitate and promote tumorigenesis. PMID:26398937

  19. Of Mice and Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dewald, Oliver; Ren, Guofeng; Duerr, Georg D.; Zoerlein, Martin; Klemm, Christina; Gersch, Christine; Tincey, Sophia; Michael, Lloyd H.; Entman, Mark L.; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2004-01-01

    Large animal models have provided much of the descriptive data regarding the cellular and molecular events in myocardial infarction and repair. The availability of genetically altered mice may provide a valuable tool for specific cellular and molecular dissection of these processes. In this report we compare closed chest models of canine and mouse infarction/reperfusion qualitatively and quantitatively for temporal, cellular, and spatial differences. Much like the canine model, reperfused mouse hearts are associated with marked induction of endothelial adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines. Reperfused mouse infarcts show accelerated replacement of cardiomyocytes by granulation tissue leading to a thin mature scar at 14 days, when the canine infarction is still cellular and evolving. Infarcted mouse hearts demonstrate a robust but transient postreperfusion inflammatory reaction, associated with a rapid up-regulation of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β. Unlike canine infarcts, infarcted mouse hearts show only transient macrophage infiltration and no significant mast cell accumulation. In correlation, the growth factor for macrophages, M-CSF, shows modest and transient up-regulation in the early days of reperfusion; and the obligate growth factor for mast cells, stem cell factor, SCF, is not induced. In summary, the postinfarction inflammatory response and resultant repair in the mouse heart shares many common characteristics with large mammalian species, but has distinct temporal and qualitative features. These important species-specific differences should be considered when interpreting findings derived from studies using genetically altered mice. PMID:14742270

  20. Xpa knockout mice.

    PubMed

    de Vries, A; van Steeg, H

    1996-10-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group A correcting (XPA) gene encodes a DNA binding zinc-finger protein that recognizes DNA damage. As such the XPA protein participates in the initial step of the process of nucleotide excision repair. The multicomponent nucleotide excision repair pathway is one of the most thoroughly studied mechanisms that defends both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells against the deleterious effects of UV-B and several chemical components. In the absence of nucleotide excision repair common cellular processes like transcription and replication are disturbed by persisting (unrepaired) DNA lesions (adducts), which may lead to the accumulation of gene mutations and ultimately to cancer. Xeroderma pigmentosum patients have a > 2000 fold increased risk to develop skin cancer at sun-exposed areas. Here we describe that XPA-deficient transgenic mice show features that mimic the phenotype found in humans. Furthermore, the possible use of Xpa- and other nucleotide excision repair deficient mice in cancer research will be outlined in more detail. PMID:9110400

  1. Psychopharmacological Studies in Mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Since 1998, when the laboratory of Medicinal Pharmacology was established in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, I have been interested in psychopharmacological research topics. During this period, we identified a number of novel regulatory mechanisms that control the prefrontal dopamine system through functional interaction between serotonin1A and dopamine D2 receptors or between serotonin1A and σ1 receptors. Our findings suggest that strategies that enhance the prefrontal dopamine system may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We also found that environmental factors during development strongly impact the psychological state in adulthood. Furthermore, we clarified the pharmacological profiles of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors donepezil, galantamine, and rivastigmine, providing novel insights into their mechanisms of action. Finally, we developed the female encounter test, a novel method for evaluating motivation in mice. This simple method should help advance future psychopharmacological research. In this review, we summarize the major findings obtained from our recent studies in mice. PMID:27150930

  2. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... to mice that had already begun to lose pigment. They found that the vitiligo-prone mice did ... disorder at all, and 76 percent of normal pigment returned among the vitiligo-affected mice, essentially reversing ...

  3. Comparative biodistribution of the radiohalogenated (Br, I and At) antibody A33. Implications for in vivo dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Anna; Höglund, Johanna; Lubberink, Mark; Lebeda, Ondrej; Gedda, Lars; Lundqvist, Hans; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Sundin, Anders

    2002-08-01

    The alpha-emitter astatine-211 (T(1/2) = 7.2 h) has great potential for use in targeted radionuclide therapy. Its potent alpha-radiation makes (211)At unsuitable for dose planning. Its x-rays can be used for gamma-camera monitoring of the radioactivity distribution during therapy but not for accurate estimation of absorbed dose in critical organs. This study was intended to establish whether the absorbed dose delivered by astatinated antibody could be accurately determined by analogue labeling with radiohalogens, better suited for quantitative measurements in vivo. PET facilitates quantitative pharmacokinetics; possible halogen labels are, e.g., (76)Br (T(1/2) = 16.2 h) and (124)I (T(1/2) = 4.18 d). Antibody A33 was labeled with (76)Br, (125)I and (211)At using N-succinimidyl-p-halobenzoates. The conjugates were co-injected into Sprague-Dawley rats. Radioactivity concentrations in different organs and tissues were measured at three time points. Pharmacokinetic data were used to calculate absorbed doses. (125)I and (76)Br reflected the biokinetics of astatine reasonably well. The absorbed doses in bladder, kidney, pancreas, liver, bone and brain were determined with 10% accuracy. The absorbed doses in stomach, spleen and thyroid were underestimated by a factor 2-3. Positron-emitting analogues can be used to predict the astatine-derived dose in critical organs. Correction factors should be used for stomach, spleen and thyroid. PMID:12396703

  4. HLA-A*33:01 as Protective Allele for Severe Dengue in a Population of Filipino Children

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Edelwisa Segubre; Espino, Fe Esperanza; Perez, Ma. Lucila M.; Bilar, Josie M.; Bajaro, Jemimah Dawn P.; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Baello, Benilda Q; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Hirayama, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is a leading cause of morbidity among children in the Philippines in recent years. In order to investigate the association of HLA Class I and II alleles and dengue disease severity in a cohort of Filipino children, we performed a case control study in 2 hospitals in Metro Manila from June 2008 to December 2009. A total of 250 laboratory confirmed dengue patients and 300 healthy individuals aged 5 to 15 years old were typed for HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles. The frequency of HLA-A*33:01 was significantly decreased in severe dengue (DHF/ DSS; Pc = 0.0016)) and DSS (Pc = 0.0032) compared to the background population. These findings support a previous study that this allele may confer protection against the severe form of dengue and provide the first evidence of HLA association with dengue in the Philippines. Future studies should be directed in investigating the possible mechanisms of protection. PMID:25659158

  5. Association of a 33-kilodalton cysteine proteinase found in corn callus with the inhibition of fall armyworm larval growth.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, B; Siregar, U; Willeford, K O; Luthe, D S; Williams, W P

    1995-01-01

    Protein patterns of callus from corn (Zea mays L.) inbreds that are either resistant or susceptible to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda [J.E. Smith]) were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Fall armyworm larvae reared on callus initiated from resistant inbreds were significantly smaller than those reared on callus of susceptible inbreds. A 33-kD protein found in callus from the resistant inbreds Mp704 and Mp708 was absent in callus from the susceptible inbreds Tx601 and Ab24E. However, a 36-kD protein found in Ab24E callus immunoreacted with polyclonal antibody raised against the 33-kD protein. When Mp704 nonfriable callus changed to friable, larval growth was not inhibited and the 33-kD protein was absent. There was a significant negative correlation between the concentration of the 33-kD protein in the callus and the weight of the larvae feeding on the callus in the F2 progeny of Mp704 x Tx601. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 33-kD protein suggested that it was cysteine proteinase. Purification of the 33- (Mp708) and 36-kD (Ab24E) proteins indicated that they were both cysteine proteinases. The 33-kD cysteine proteinase had 7-fold higher specific activity than the 36-kD enzyme. PMID:7659755

  6. Assessing Cognition in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hölter, Sabine M; Garrett, Lillian; Einicke, Jan; Sperling, Bettina; Dirscherl, Petra; Zimprich, Annemarie; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang

    2015-12-02

    Genetically modified mouse models have proven useful to study learning and memory processes and the neurocircuitry and molecular mechanisms involved, as well as to develop therapies for diseases involving cognitive impairment. A variety of tests have been developed to measure cognition in mice, and here we present those established and regularly used in the German Mouse Clinic. The test paradigms have been carefully chosen according to reliability of results and disease relevance of the cognitive functions assessed. Further criteria were time efficiency and ease of application. All tests assess slightly different but also overlapping or interacting aspects of learning and memory so that they can be used to complement each other in a comprehensive assessment of cognitive function. The five protocols described are for spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze, social discrimination, object recognition, automated assessment of learning and memory using the IntelliCage, and olfactory discrimination learning.

  7. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.; Kaplan, D.M.; / /IIT, Chicago

    2008-11-01

    Muon ionization cooling is the only practical method for preparing high-brilliance beams needed for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen with RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a particle identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. Plans for measurements of emittance and cooling are described.

  8. Climate change: consequences on the pollination of grasses in Perugia (Central Italy). A 33-year-long study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Ghitarrini; Emma, Tedeschini; Veronica, Timorato; Giuseppe, Frenguelli

    2016-06-01

    Many works carried out in the last decades have shown that the pollen season for taxa flowering in winter and spring, in temperate regions, has tended to be earlier, probably due to the continuous rise in temperature. The mean annual temperature in Perugia, Central Italy, was about 0.5 °C higher in the last three decades compared with that registered from 1952 to 1981. The increase of temperature took place mainly in winter and spring, while no significant variation was recorded during the summer and autumn. This scenario shows variations in the timing and behavior of flowering of many spontaneous plants such as grasses, whose phenology is strongly influenced by air temperature. This work reports fluctuations in the airborne grass pollen presence in Perugia over a 33-year period (1982-2014), in order to study the influence of the warming registered in recent years on the behavior of pollen release of this taxon. The grass pollen season in Perugia typically lasts from the beginning of May to late July. The start dates showed a marked trend to an earlier beginning of the season (-0.4 day/year), as well as a strong correlation with the average temperatures of March and April. The peak is reached around 30th May, but the annual pollen index (API) is following a decreasing trend. The correlation between starting dates and spring temperatures could be interesting for the constitution of a forecasting model capable of predicting the presence of airborne grass pollen, helping to plan therapies for allergic people.

  9. A 33 kDa molecular marker of sperm acrosome differentiation and maturation in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Wade, M A; Lin, M

    1999-09-01

    This study was undertaken to identify potential molecular markers of acrosomal biogenesis and post-testicular maturation in marsupials, using the tammar wallaby as a model species. A two-step sperm extraction procedure yielded two protein extracts of apparent acrosomal origin and a tail extract. The extracts were analysed by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Several prominent polypeptide bands (45, 38 and 33 kDa) appeared common to both acrosomal extracts. Antiserum raised against the 33 kDa polypeptide from the inner acrosomal membrane matrix (IAMM) extract showed immunoreactivity with 45, 38 and 33 kDa polypeptides in both acrosomal extracts, indicating that the 33 kDa polypeptide was related to the proteins in the 45 and 38 kDa bands. Therefore, the antiserum was used as a molecular probe. Indirect immuno-fluorescence indicated that the acrosome was the major location of the 33 kDa polypeptide. This contention was confirmed by ultrastructural study: immunogold labelling indicated that the 33 kDa polypeptide associated with acrosomal matrix components throughout acrosomal development in the testes and throughout post-testicular maturation in the epididymis. The label clearly delineated the changing morphology of the maturing marsupial acrosome. This is the first study to use immunocytochemical techniques to chart testicular and post-testicular development of any sperm organelle in a marsupial. As a result of this study, a 33 kDa molecular marker of marsupial acrosome differentiation and maturation has been identified. It may be possible to chart similar events in other marsupial species and identify opportunities for manipulating fertility. PMID:10645248

  10. First wild XXY house mice.

    PubMed

    Hauffe, Heidi C; Giménez, Mabel D; Garagna, Silvia; Searle, Jeremy B

    2010-07-01

    Laboratory house mice (Mus musculus) with the XXY condition can be generated with ease and have been used as a biomedical model. However, although the XXY constitution has been described in humans and many domestic and wild mammal species, and a very large number of wild house mice have been karyotyped previously, no wild individuals of M. musculus with an XXY karyotype have ever been reported. Therefore, it is rather extraordinary that two wild XXY house mice were caught by us on two different farms in northern Italy in 2008. Except for the extra X chromosome, one male had a standard karyotype (2n = 40) and the other, the karyotype of the Cremona metacentric population (2n = 22). In this paper, the phenotype of these two individuals is described. Observations for both of these wild males agree with those of laboratory XXY mice, i.e., they had a normal body mass and appearance, but significantly smaller testes than normal, and no visible germ cells. The incidence of the XXY chromosome anomaly in wild mice (two among 5,123 wild mice surveyed by us and our colleagues, i.e., approximately 0.08% among wild-caught males) is intermediate between that found in male laboratory mice (approximately 0.04%) and that found in male humans (0.2%).

  11. The human SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 genes of solute carrier family 25 encode two mitochondrial pyrimidine nucleotide transporters.

    PubMed

    Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Todisco, Simona; Cirigliano, Angela; Rinaldi, Teresa; Agrimi, Gennaro; Iacobazzi, Vito; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-11-28

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport inorganic anions, amino acids, carboxylates, nucleotides, and coenzymes across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. Here two members of this family, SLC25A33 and SLC25A36, have been thoroughly characterized biochemically. These proteins were overexpressed in bacteria and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Their transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A33 transports uracil, thymine, and cytosine (deoxy)nucleoside di- and triphosphates by an antiport mechanism and SLC25A36 cytosine and uracil (deoxy)nucleoside mono-, di-, and triphosphates by uniport and antiport. Both carriers also transported guanine but not adenine (deoxy)nucleotides. Transport catalyzed by both carriers was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. In confirmation of their identity (i) SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 were found to be targeted to mitochondria and (ii) the phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking RIM2, the gene encoding the well characterized yeast mitochondrial pyrimidine nucleotide carrier, were overcome by expressing SLC25A33 or SLC25A36 in these cells. The main physiological role of SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 is to import/export pyrimidine nucleotides into and from mitochondria, i.e. to accomplish transport steps essential for mitochondrial DNA and RNA synthesis and breakdown.

  12. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  13. Tamoxifen administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Jonathan; Littlewood, Trevor; Soucek, Laura

    2015-03-01

    The strategy of fusing a protein of interest to a hormone-binding domain (HBD) of a steroid hormone receptor allows fine control of the activity of the fused protein. Such fusion proteins are inactive in the absence of ligand, because they are complexed with a variety of intracellular polypeptides. Upon ligand binding, the receptor is released from its inhibitory complex and the fusion protein becomes functional. In the murine estrogen receptor (ER) fusion system, proteins are fused to the HBD of the ER. The system relies on the use of a mutant ER known as ER(TAM). Compared to the wild-type HBD, ER(TAM) has 1000-fold lower affinity for estrogen, yet remains responsive to activation by the synthetic steroid 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Because 4-OHT is expensive, animals can be treated with the cheaper precursor tamoxifen, which is converted into 4-OHT by a liver enzyme. Here we present an overview of the methods used to deliver tamoxifen to mice. The most used method is intraperitoneal injection, because the amount of administered compound can be better controlled, but delivery by oral gavage is also possible. For short-term and immediate-effect studies or when conversion of tamoxifen by the liver is to be avoided, 4-OHT can be used directly. PMID:25734062

  14. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  15. Assessing hoarding in mice.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J

    2006-01-01

    Hoarding is a species-typical behavior shown by rodents, as well as other animals. By hoarding, the rodent secures a food supply for times of emergency (for example, when threatened by a predator) or for times of seasonal adversity such as winter. Scatter hoarding, as seen typically in squirrels and birds, involves placing small caches of food in hidden places, generally underground. Most rodents, however, hoard a supply of food in or near the home base--for example, in 'larders' near the sleeping quarters in a burrow. In the laboratory, measurement of hoarding involves simply weighing the food transported into the home cage from an external source, but the route to that source must be secure and animal-proof; for example, there should be no holes large enough to permit escape of a mouse, and no weak points that could be enlarged by gnawing. A suitable and easily constructed apparatus is described in the protocol. Hoarding has been shown to be sensitive to brain lesions and pharmacological agents, and is a suitable test for species-typical behavior in genetically modified mice.

  16. The MICE Run Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, or a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The new MICE Run Control has been developed to ensure proper sequencing of equipment and use of system resources to protect data quality. A description of this system, its implementation, and performance during recent muon beam data collection will be discussed.

  17. Linkage Disequilibrium in Wild Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Cathy C; Nickerson, Deborah A; Anderson, Amy D; Weir, Bruce S; Livingston, Robert J; Dean, Matthew D; Smith, Kimberly L; Schadt, Eric E; Nachman, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    Crosses between laboratory strains of mice provide a powerful way of detecting quantitative trait loci for complex traits related to human disease. Hundreds of these loci have been detected, but only a small number of the underlying causative genes have been identified. The main difficulty is the extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) in intercross progeny and the slow process of fine-scale mapping by traditional methods. Recently, new approaches have been introduced, such as association studies with inbred lines and multigenerational crosses. These approaches are very useful for interval reduction, but generally do not provide single-gene resolution because of strong LD extending over one to several megabases. Here, we investigate the genetic structure of a natural population of mice in Arizona to determine its suitability for fine-scale LD mapping and association studies. There are three main findings: (1) Arizona mice have a high level of genetic variation, which includes a large fraction of the sequence variation present in classical strains of laboratory mice; (2) they show clear evidence of local inbreeding but appear to lack stable population structure across the study area; and (3) LD decays with distance at a rate similar to human populations, which is considerably more rapid than in laboratory populations of mice. Strong associations in Arizona mice are limited primarily to markers less than 100 kb apart, which provides the possibility of fine-scale association mapping at the level of one or a few genes. Although other considerations, such as sample size requirements and marker discovery, are serious issues in the implementation of association studies, the genetic variation and LD results indicate that wild mice could provide a useful tool for identifying genes that cause variation in complex traits. PMID:17722986

  18. Elevated plus maze for mice.

    PubMed

    Komada, Munekazu; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Although the mouse genome is now completely sequenced, the functions of most of the genes expressed in the brain are not known. The influence of a given gene on a specific behavior can be determined by behavioral analysis of mutant mice. If a target gene is expressed in the brain, behavioral phenotype of the mutant mice could elucidate the genetic mechanism of normal behaviors. The elevated plus maze test is one of the most widely used tests for measuring anxiety-like behavior. The test is based on the natural aversion of mice for open and elevated areas, as well as on their natural spontaneous exploratory behavior in novel environments. The apparatus consists of open arms and closed arms, crossed in the middle perpendicularly to each other, and a center area. Mice are given access to all of the arms and are allowed to move freely between them. The number of entries into the open arms and the time spent in the open arms are used as indices of open space-induced anxiety in mice. Unfortunately, the procedural differences that exist between laboratories make it difficult to duplicate and compare results among laboratories. Here, we present a detailed movie demonstrating our protocol for the elevated plus maze test. In our laboratory, we have assessed more than 90 strains of mutant mice using the protocol shown in the movie. These data will be disclosed as a part of a public database that we are now constructing. Visualization of the protocol will promote better understanding of the details of the entire experimental procedure, allowing for standardization of the protocols used in different laboratories and comparisons of the behavioral phenotypes of various strains of mutant mice assessed using this test.

  19. Fasting of mice: a review.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T L; Kiersgaard, M K; Sørensen, D B; Mikkelsen, L F

    2013-10-01

    Fasting of mice is a common procedure performed in association with many different types of experiments mainly in order to reduce variability in investigatory parameters or to facilitate surgical procedures. However, the effects of fasting not directly related to the investigatory parameters are often ignored. The aim of this review is to present and summarize knowledge about the effects of fasting of mice to facilitate optimization of the fasting procedure for any given study and thereby maximize the scientific outcome and minimize the discomfort for the mice and hence ensure high animal welfare. The results are presented from a number of experimental studies, providing evidence for fasting-induced changes in hormone balance, body weight, metabolism, hepatic enzymes, cardiovascular parameters, body temperature and toxicological responses. A description of relevant normal behaviour and standard physiological parameters is given, concluding that mice are primarily nocturnal and consume two-thirds of their total food intake during the night. It is argued that overnight fasting of mice is not comparable with overnight fasting of humans because the mouse has a nocturnal circadian rhythm and a higher metabolic rate. It is suggested that because many physiological parameters are regulated by circadian rhythms, fasting initiated at different points in the circadian rhythm has different impacts and produces different results.

  20. Holeboard discrimination learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuc, K A; Gregersen, B M; Gannon, K S; Dodart, J-C

    2006-06-01

    We have adapted to mice a holeboard-learning task, which allows simultaneous assessment of spatial working and reference-memory performance. The holeboard apparatus consists of an open-field chamber with a 16-hole floor insert. Across trials, animals have to learn that the same four holes of 16 are always baited. Here, we show that C57BL/6 mice readily acquire this task within 4 days when submitted to six trials per day or within 8 days when submitted to only four trials per day. We also show that C57BL/6, Swiss-Webster, CD-1 and DBA/2 mice acquire this task similarly, despite the fact that some differences could be observed in measures of exploratory activity during habituation and training. Moreover, the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine disrupts learning at doses of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg, although the highest dose appeared to have side-effects. Lastly, we found that amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice have a selective disruption in their working-memory performance only during reversal training (i.e. after a change in the configuration of the baited holes). Overall, our data indicate that this spatial learning task is well adapted to mice and will be useful to characterize spatial memory in various genetic or pharmacological mouse models.

  1. Carotid chemoreceptor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, Machiko; Kostuk, Eric W; Pichard, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Mice are the most suitable species for understanding genetic aspects of postnatal developments of the carotid body due to the availability of many inbred strains and knockout mice. Our study has shown that the carotid body grows differentially in different mouse strains, indicating the involvement of genes. However, the small size hampers investigating functional development of the carotid body. Hypoxic and/or hyperoxic ventilatory responses have been investigated in newborn mice, but these responses are indirect assessment of the carotid body function. Therefore, we need to develop techniques of measuring carotid chemoreceptor neural activity from young mice. Many studies have taken advantage of the knockout mice to understand chemoreceptor function of the carotid body, but they are not always suitable for addressing postnatal development of the carotid body due to lethality during perinatal periods. Various inbred strains with well-designed experiments will provide useful information regarding genetic mechanisms of the postnatal carotid chemoreceptor development. Also, targeted gene deletion is a critical approach.

  2. Practical pathology of aging mice.

    PubMed

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  3. Practical pathology of aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M.

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  4. Progress of the MICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration is based on a simplified version of a neutrino factory cooling channel. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation has been developed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. The muon beamline has been characterized and a preliminary measure of the beam emittance, using a particle-by-particle method with only the TOF detector system, has been performed (MICE STEP I). Data taking for the study of the properties that determine the cooling performance (MICE Step IV) has just started in 2015, while the demonstration of ionization cooling with re-acceleration is foreseen for 2017.

  5. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice.

    PubMed

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-12-02

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. This protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted, plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured via a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running.

  6. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  7. The MICE Particle Identification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; MICE Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at the ISIS accelerator located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, will be the first experiment to study muon cooling at high precision. Demonstration of muon ionization cooling is a major technological step towards the construction of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. A muon beam is produced via pion decay in the MICE beam line within a range of emittances and momenta. Muon purity is assured by a system of detectors for particle identification (PID). We describe briefly the PID system here.

  8. Ultrasonic Songs of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Previously it was shown that male mice, when they encounter female mice or their pheromones, emit ultrasonic vocalizations with frequencies ranging over 30–110 kHz. Here, we show that these vocalizations have the characteristics of song, consisting of several different syllable types, whose temporal sequencing includes the utterance of repeated phrases. Individual males produce songs with characteristic syllabic and temporal structure. This study provides a quantitative initial description of male mouse songs, and opens the possibility of studying song production and perception in an established genetic model organism. PMID:16248680

  9. Influence of diet on survival of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, G; Yunis, E J; Good, R A

    1976-01-01

    The longevity of mice of the (NZB X NZW)F1 (B/W) strain and the DBA/2f strain of mice is dramatically prolonged by dietary restriction. B/W mice are susceptible to, and die at an early age from, immunocomplex nephritis. Mice of the DBA/2f strain are also relatively short-lived. Restriction of caloric intake prolonged life of B/W mice more than did protein restriction. DBA/2f mice showed prolongation of life when the diet was restricted only with respect to protein. Caloric restriction alone prolonged life less in DBA/2f mice than in B/W mice. These observations show that dietary manipulations have profound effects on immunity functions, including inhibition of the development of life-shortening autoimmune disease. PMID:1063408

  10. Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161188.html Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice Treatment might one ... News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to ...

  11. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  12. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-08-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  13. HZE Radiation Leukemogenesis in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanlin

    Radiation exposure is a risk factor for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The Leukemogenesis NSCOR was developed to compare this risk for low LET vs HZE radiations as a means to better assess the leukemia risk to astronauts posed by space radiation. Individual projects within the NSCOR explore HZE radiation leukemogenesis in murine model systems and extend the findings to AML in humans. AML sensitive CBA/CaJ mice have been irradiated with 1 GeV 56 Fe particles at NSRL and with 137 Cs gamma-rays at Colorado State University and followed to 800 days of age for the development of AML. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses of HZE- and gamma-induced AML, including assays for chromosomal aberrations, PU.1 deletion, gene expression, array CGH and microsatellite instability are ongoing. Preliminary data indicate that 56 Fe particles are no more effective in inducing AML or shortening lifespan than gamma-rays. Studies designed to address the individual molecular steps in leukemogenesis and determine the effects of radiation and genetic background on each step have been initiated using knockout mice. Deletion of the PU.1 gene on mouse chromosome 2 is a critical step in this murine model of radiation leukemogenesis. Two of the three HZE-induced AMLs that could be assayed and thirteen of fourteen γ-induced AMLs had PU.1 loss as determined by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH). We have found that AML sensitive CBA/CaJ mice have a higher incidence of Chr. 2 deletion in bone marrow cells following 56 Fe irradiation than AML resistant C57BL/6 mice. This study is being extended to proton irradiated mice. Our preliminary results indicate that microsatellite instability may be common in HZE irradiated progenitor cells. To determine if these cytogenetic changes can be induced in human myeloid progenitor cells by gamma, proton or HZE irradiation we are generating NOD/SCID mice that have been "humanized" by being transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells. We are currently

  14. Measuring motor coordination in mice.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J

    2013-01-01

    Mice are increasingly being used in behavioral neuroscience, largely replacing rats as the behaviorist's animal of choice. Before aspects of behavior such as emotionality or cognition can be assessed, however, it is vital to determine whether the motor capabilities of e.g. a mutant or lesioned mouse allow such an assessment. Performance on a maze task requiring strength and coordination, such as the Morris water maze, might well be impaired in a mouse by motor, rather than cognitive, impairments, so it is essential to selectively dissect the latter from the former. For example, sensorimotor impairments caused by NMDA antagonists have been shown to impair water maze performance(2). Motor coordination has traditionally been assessed in mice and rats by the rotarod test, in which the animal is placed on a horizontal rod that rotates about its long axis; the animal must walk forwards to remain upright and not fall off. Both set speed and accelerating versions of the rotarod are available. The other three tests described in this article (horizontal bar, static rods and parallel bars) all measure coordination on static apparatus. The horizontal bar also requires strength for adequate performance, particularly of the forelimbs as the mouse initially grips the bar just with the front paws. Adult rats do not perform well on tests such as the static rods and parallel bars (personal observations); they appear less well coordinated than mice. I have only tested male rats, however, and male mice seem generally less well coordinated than females. Mice appear to have a higher strength:weight ratio than rats; the Latin name, Mus musculus, seems entirely appropriate. The rotarod, the variations of the foot fault test(12) or the Catwalk (Noldus)(15) apparatus are generally used to assess motor coordination in rats. PMID:23748408

  15. Progress of MICE RFCC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Green, M.; Li, N.; Niinikoski, T.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Bross, A.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Sylvester, C.; Chen, A. B.; Guo, Bin; Li, Liyi; Xu, Fengyu; Cao, Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, Li; Yin, Lixin; Luo, Tianhuan; Summers, Don; Smith, B.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-20

    Recent progress on the design and fabrication of the RFCC (RF and superconducting Coupling Coil) module for the international MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) are reported. The MICE ionization cooling channel has two RFCC modules, each having four 201- MHz normal conducting RF cavities surrounded by one superconducting coupling coil (solenoid) magnet. The magnet is designed to be cooled by three cryocoolers. Fabrication of the RF cavities is complete; preparation for the cavity electro-polishing, low power RF measurements, and tuning are in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Fabrication of the cold mass of the first coupling coil magnet has been completed in China and the cold mass arrived at LBNL in late 2011. Preparations for testing the cold mass are currently under way at Fermilab. Plans for the RFCC module assembly and integration are being developed and are described.

  16. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss; Wiese, Maria; Lundsager, Mia; Buschard, Karsten Stig; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice. PMID:26783537

  17. Antiretroviral restriction factors in mice.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smita; Rein, Alan

    2014-11-26

    One of the most exciting areas in contemporary retrovirus research is the discovery of "restriction factors". These are cellular proteins that act after virus entry to inhibit infection by or replication of retroviruses (and other viruses and intracellular pathogens). We briefly discuss here three antiretroviral restriction factors in mice: Fv1, APOBEC3, and tetherin, touching on both biological and molecular aspects of these restriction systems.

  18. Trace fear conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Smith, Gregory D; Holley, Andrew J

    2014-03-20

    In this experiment we present a technique to measure learning and memory. In the trace fear conditioning protocol presented here there are five pairings between a neutral stimulus and an unconditioned stimulus. There is a 20 sec trace period that separates each conditioning trial. On the following day freezing is measured during presentation of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and trace period. On the third day there is an 8 min test to measure contextual memory. The representative results are from mice that were presented with the aversive unconditioned stimulus (shock) compared to mice that received the tone presentations without the unconditioned stimulus. Trace fear conditioning has been successfully used to detect subtle learning and memory deficits and enhancements in mice that are not found with other fear conditioning methods. This type of fear conditioning is believed to be dependent upon connections between the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. One current controversy is whether this method is believed to be amygdala-independent. Therefore, other fear conditioning testing is needed to examine amygdala-dependent learning and memory effects, such as through the delay fear conditioning.

  19. Lingual deficits in neurotrophin double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nosrat, Irina V; Agerman, Karin; Marinescu, Andrea; Ernfors, Patrik; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2004-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) are members of the neurotrophin family and are expressed in the developing and adult tongue papillae. BDNF null-mutated mice exhibit specific impairments related to innervation and development of the gustatory system while NT-3 null mice have deficits in their lingual somatosensory innervation. To further evaluate the functional specificity of these neurotrophins in the peripheral gustatory system, we generated double BDNF/NT-3 knockout mice and compared the phenotype to BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. Taste papillae morphology was severely distorted in BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice compared to single BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. The deficits were found throughout the tongue and all gustatory papillae. There was a significant loss of fungiform papillae and the papillae were smaller in size compared to BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. Circumvallate papillae in the double knockouts were smaller and did not contain any intraepithelial nerve fibers. BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice exhibited additive losses in both somatosensory and gustatory innervation indicating that BDNF and NT-3 exert specific roles in the innervation of the tongue. However, the additional loss of fungiform papillae and taste buds in BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice compared to single BDNF knockout mice indicate a synergistic functional role for both BDNF-dependent gustatory and NT-3-dependent somatosensory innervations in taste bud and taste papillae innervation and development. PMID:16217617

  20. Idiotypic manipulation in mice: BALB/c mice can express the crossreactive idiotype of A/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M; Leo, O; Hiernaux, J; Urbain, J

    1983-01-01

    The response of A/J mice to arsonate-coupled keyhole limpet hemocyanin is characterized by a crossreactive idiotype (CRIA). CRIA+ antibodies are restricted to the Igh-Ic haplotype and are never expressed in BALB/c mice after immunization with antigen. Studies at the DNA level suggest that the gene encoding the CRIA heavy chain in A/J mice is probably absent in the genome of BALB/c mice. Despite this, using the immunization cascade tool, we have been able to induce the expression of CRIA+ antibodies in BALB/c mice. These studies led to an apparent paradox, whose understanding will provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of the immune system. We suggest that clones secreting CRIA-like Igs in BALB/c mice are "somatic variants" that could arise from gene conversion events. PMID:6576348

  1. Fat and Carbohydrate Preferences in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Anthony; Zukerman, Steven; Glendinning, John I.; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    Trpm5 and α-gustducin are key to the transduction of tastes of sugars, amino acids and bitter compounds. This study investigated the role of these signaling proteins in the preference for fat, starch, and starch-derived polysaccharides (Polycose), using Trpm5 knockout (Trpm5 KO) and α-gustducin knockout (Gust KO) mice. In initial two-bottle tests (24 h/day), Trpm5 KO mice showed no preference for soybean oil emulsions (0.313 - 2.5%), Polycose solutions (0.5 - 4%) or starch suspensions (0.5 - 4%). Gust KO mice displayed an attenuated preference for Polycose, but their preference for soybean oil and starch was comparable to that of C57BL/6J wild-type mice (WT). Gust KO mice preferred starch to Polycose whereas WT mice had the opposite preference. Following extensive experience with soybean oil emulsions (Intralipid) and Polycose solutions, the Trpm5 KO mice developed preferences comparable to the WT mice, although their absolute intakes remained suppressed. Similarly, Gust KO mice developed a strong Polycose preference with experience but they continued to consume less than WT mice. These results implicate α-gustducin and Trpm5 as mediators of polysaccharide taste and Trpm5 in fat taste. The disruption in Polycose, but not starch preference, in Gust KO mice indicates that distinct sensory signaling pathways mediate the response to these carbohydrates,. The experience-induced rescue of fat and Polycose preferences in the KO mice likely reflects the action of a post-oral conditioning mechanism, which functions in the absence of α-gustducin and Trpm5. PMID:17652359

  2. Feeding behavior in dopamine-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Szczypka, Mark S.; Rainey, Mark A.; Kim, Douglas S.; Alaynick, William A.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Mice that cannot make dopamine (DA), a condition caused by the selective inactivation of tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic neurons, are born normal but gradually become hypoactive and hypophagic, and die at 3 weeks of age. We characterized the feeding and locomotor responses of these DA-deficient (DA−/−) mice to 3,4-dihyroxy-l-phenylalanine (l-DOPA) to investigate the relationship between brain DA levels and these complex behaviors. Daily administration of l-DOPA to DA−/− mice stimulated locomotor activity that lasted 6 to 9 hr; during that time the mice consumed most of their daily food and water. The minimal dose of l-DOPA that was sufficient to elicit normal feeding behavior in the DA−/− mice also restored their striatal DA to 9.1% of that in the wild-type (WT) mice at 3 hr; then DA content declined to <1% of WT levels by 24 hr. This dose of l-DOPA induced locomotor activity that exceeded that of treated WT mice by 5- to 7-fold, suggesting that DA−/− mice are supersensitive to DA. Unexpectedly, DA−/− mice manifested a second wave of activity 24 to 48 hr after l-DOPA treatment that was equivalent in magnitude to that of WT mice and independent of DA receptor activation. The DA−/− mice approached, sniffed, and chewed food during this second period of activity, but they ate <10% of that required for sustenance. Therefore, DA−/− mice can execute behaviors necessary to seek and ingest food, but they do not eat enough to survive. PMID:10518589

  3. The Gut Microbiota of Wild Mice.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Laura; Abolins, Stephen; Lenzi, Luca; Bourne, Christian; Riley, Eleanor M; Viney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota profoundly affects the biology of its host. The composition of the microbiota is dynamic and is affected by both host genetic and many environmental effects. The gut microbiota of laboratory mice has been studied extensively, which has uncovered many of the effects that the microbiota can have. This work has also shown that the environments of different research institutions can affect the mouse microbiota. There has been relatively limited study of the microbiota of wild mice, but this has shown that it typically differs from that of laboratory mice (and that maintaining wild caught mice in the laboratory can quite quickly alter the microbiota). There is also inter-individual variation in the microbiota of wild mice, with this principally explained by geographical location. In this study we have characterised the gut (both the caecum and rectum) microbiota of wild caught Mus musculus domesticus at three UK sites and have investigated how the microbiota varies depending on host location and host characteristics. We find that the microbiota of these mice are generally consistent with those described from other wild mice. The rectal and caecal microbiotas of individual mice are generally more similar to each other, than they are to the microbiota of other individuals. We found significant differences in the diversity of the microbiotas among mice from different sample sites. There were significant correlations of microbiota diversity and body weight, a measure of age, body-mass index, serum concentration of leptin, and virus, nematode and mite infection.

  4. Neurodevelopmental effects of lanthanum in mice.

    PubMed

    Briner, W; Rycek, R F; Moellenberndt, A; Dannull, K

    2000-01-01

    Mice were exposed to lanthanum chloride in drinking water at 0, 125, 250, and 500 mg/liter concentration prior to conception, during gestation, and until 30 days postnatally. Developing mice were assessed for the development of swimming and walking behavior and ear and eye opening. At 30 days of age the mice were assessed with a standard neurologic scale. Differences were found in the emergence of swimming and walking behavior and ear and eye opening. Differences were also found for touch response and visual placing responses. The brains of lanthanum-exposed mice were also smaller than controls. These findings indicate that lanthanum is a potential behavioral teratogen. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  5. The Gut Microbiota of Wild Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, Laura; Abolins, Stephen; Lenzi, Luca; Bourne, Christian; Riley, Eleanor M.; Viney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota profoundly affects the biology of its host. The composition of the microbiota is dynamic and is affected by both host genetic and many environmental effects. The gut microbiota of laboratory mice has been studied extensively, which has uncovered many of the effects that the microbiota can have. This work has also shown that the environments of different research institutions can affect the mouse microbiota. There has been relatively limited study of the microbiota of wild mice, but this has shown that it typically differs from that of laboratory mice (and that maintaining wild caught mice in the laboratory can quite quickly alter the microbiota). There is also inter-individual variation in the microbiota of wild mice, with this principally explained by geographical location. In this study we have characterised the gut (both the caecum and rectum) microbiota of wild caught Mus musculus domesticus at three UK sites and have investigated how the microbiota varies depending on host location and host characteristics. We find that the microbiota of these mice are generally consistent with those described from other wild mice. The rectal and caecal microbiotas of individual mice are generally more similar to each other, than they are to the microbiota of other individuals. We found significant differences in the diversity of the microbiotas among mice from different sample sites. There were significant correlations of microbiota diversity and body weight, a measure of age, body-mass index, serum concentration of leptin, and virus, nematode and mite infection. PMID:26258484

  6. Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone Differentially Improve Cognition in Aged Female Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benice, Ted S.; Raber, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Compared with age-matched male mice, female mice experience a more severe age-related cognitive decline (ACD). Since androgens are less abundant in aged female mice compared with aged male mice, androgen supplementation may enhance cognition in aged female mice. To test this, we assessed behavioral performance on a variety of tasks in 22- to…

  7. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  8. Teratogenicity of asbestos in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Tomoko; Hojo, Motoki; Inomata, Akiko; Ogata, Akio; Hirose, Akihiko; Nishimura, Tetsuji; Nakae, Dai

    2014-04-01

    Possible teratogenicity of 3 different asbestos (crocidolite, chrysotile and amosite) was assessed in CD1(ICR) mice. Dams on day 9 of gestation were given a single intraperitoneal administration at dose of 40 mg/kg body weight of asbestos suspended in 2% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose solution in phosphate buffered saline, while dams in the control group were given vehicle (10 ml/kg body weight). Dams and fetuses were examined on day 18 of gestation. To compare with the control group, the mean percentage of live fetuses in implantations in the group given crocidolite and the incidence of dams with early dead fetuses in the groups given chrysotile or amosite were increased. While no external or skeletal malformation was observed in the control group, the incidence of external malformation (mainly reduction deformity of limb) in the group given amosite, and the incidences of skeletal malformation (mainly fusion of vertebrae) in the all dosed groups were significantly increased. The result indicated that asbestos (crocidolite, chrysotile and amosite) have fetotoxicity and teratogenicity in mice.

  9. Transmission ratio distortion in mice.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Mary F

    2003-01-01

    The most studied example of transmission ratio distortion (TRD) in mice is that of the t-complex. This is a variant region of Chromosome 17 which exists as a polymorphism in wild mice. Males heterozygous for a t-haplotype and a normal Chr 17 transmit the t-haplotype to >50% of their young, up to 99%. Homozygous males are sterile. The TRD produced by the t-complex is due to the action of three or more distorter genes (Tcd) on a responder gene (Tcr). t-Haplotypes are maintained intact by crossover suppression induced by four neighboring inversions, the Tcd and Tcr loci lying in different inversions. Sperm formation is normal in t/t males, but sperm function is impaired through gross defects in sperm motility. The responder gene has been identified as a fusion gene formed from a sperm motility kinase and a ribosomal S6 kinase. Three candidate distorter genes have also been identified as genes coding for dynein chains, and thus possibly involved in sperm flagellar function. PMID:14616067

  10. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  11. Transformation During Mixed Pneumococcal Infection of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Conant, James E.; Sawyer, William D.

    1967-01-01

    The recent demonstration by others of transformation during peritoneal infection of mice by two genetically distinct pneumococcal strains supports the notion that transformation may be significant in pneumococcal infection in nature. These studies confirm the occurrence of transformation during mixed infection of mice and define some conditions for its occurrence and its significance. Mice were inoculated with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) donor (small type III capsule, low virulence, streptomycin-susceptible) and recipient (noncapsulated, low virulence, streptomycin-resistant) pneumococci, and the bacteremia in mice that died was evaluated. Transformants (large type III capsule, virulent, streptomycin-resistant) were isolated from up to 80% of mice that died from mixed peritoneal infection. Transformation occurred in mice that received donor and recipient 6 hr apart; hence, active DNA was released and competence developed during growth in vivo. Transformation was detected only with progressive infection by both strains, and then transformants were few in the blood and apparently were not responsible for the death of the animals. In doubly infected mice treated with streptomycin, transformation was enhanced; transformants numerically dominated the bacteremia and seemed to cause the death of the mice. Transformation was also demonstrated for the first time during infection of the respiratory tract. PMID:4381631

  12. Metabolic consequences of timed feeding in mice.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Nurulaini Abu; Salkeld, Mark David; Rattanatray, Leewen; Voultsios, Athena; Varcoe, Tamara Jayne; Boden, Michael James; Kennaway, David John

    2014-04-10

    The time of day at which meals are consumed is known to impact on behaviour as well as physiological systems. In this study we investigated the behavioural and physiological effects of restricting access to food to the light or dark period in mice maintained on either long or short photoperiods. In both photoperiods, wheel running commenced upon the onset of darkness and was generally confined to the period of darkness. Provision of food during light provoked an anticipatory burst of activity several hours before feeding in both photoperiods. After 28 days on the feeding schedule, body weight was unaffected by either photoperiod or feeding time. Plasma insulin was increased and glucose and triglycerides tended to be lower in mice fed during the light period and sampled 2 h after lights off compared to the dark fed mice. Mice fed during the light while on long day length had improved glucose tolerance and whole body insulin tolerance when tested 2 h after lights on. This was not evident in mice kept on the short photoperiod. Because these observations were confounded by the time since their last meal, we undertook a study of glucose tolerance across 24 h in mice on the long photoperiod after a 2 hour food withdrawal. A clear rhythm of glucose tolerance was observed in mice fed during the light period with maximal glucose tolerance just prior to the expected presentation of food and minimal tolerance 2 h before lights off. By contrast, no rhythm in glucose tolerance was observed in the dark fed mice, but maximal glucose tolerance occurred 2 h before lights off. To investigate the evolution of the physiological adaptations, mice on this feeding/photoperiod regime were studied after 7 or 35 days. After 7 days the corticosterone rhythm was not different between light and dark fed mice, but by 35 days peak corticosterone secretion occurred a few hours before food presentation in both groups representing an 8 hour shift. The rhythm of expression of liver Bmal1 mRNA was

  13. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  14. Light/dark transition test for mice.

    PubMed

    Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2006-12-01

    Although all of the mouse genome sequences have been determined, we do not yet know the functions of most of these genes. Gene-targeting techniques, however, can be used to delete or manipulate a specific gene in mice. The influence of a given gene on a specific behavior can then be determined by conducting behavioral analyses of the mutant mice. As a test for behavioral phenotyping of mutant mice, the light/dark transition test is one of the most widely used tests to measure anxiety-like behavior in mice. The test is based on the natural aversion of mice to brightly illuminated areas and on their spontaneous exploratory behavior in novel environments. The test is sensitive to anxiolytic drug treatment. The apparatus consists of a dark chamber and a brightly illuminated chamber. Mice are allowed to move freely between the two chambers. The number of entries into the bright chamber and the duration of time spent there are indices of bright-space anxiety in mice. To obtain phenotyping results of a strain of mutant mice that can be readily reproduced and compared with those of other mutants, the behavioral test methods should be as identical as possible between laboratories. The procedural differences that exist between laboratories, however, make it difficult to replicate or compare the results among laboratories. Here, we present our protocol for the light/dark transition test as a movie so that the details of the protocol can be demonstrated. In our laboratory, we have assessed more than 60 strains of mutant mice using the protocol shown in the movie. Those data will be disclosed as a part of a public database that we are now constructing. Visualization of the protocol will facilitate understanding of the details of the entire experimental procedure, allowing for standardization of the protocols used across laboratories and comparisons of the behavioral phenotypes of various strains of mutant mice assessed using this test.

  15. Transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ and mtDNA mutator mice, but not aged mice, share the same spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Hikari; Suzuki, Michiko; Morishima, Hitomi; Ota, Azusa; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Maeno, Akiteru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-24

    The spectra of phenotypes associated with aging and mitochondrial diseases sometimes appear to overlap with each other. We used aged mice and a mouse model of mitochondrial diseases (transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ with deleted mtDNA) to study whether premature aging phenotypes observed in mtDNA mutator mice are associated with aging or mitochondrial diseases. Here, we provide convincing evidence that all the mice examined had musculoskeletal disorders of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy, which correspond to phenotypes prevalently observed in the elderly. However, precise investigation of musculoskeletal disorders revealed that the spectra of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice were very close to those in mito-miceΔ, but different from those of aged mice. Therefore, mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, but not aged mice, share the spectra of musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. Assessing delay discounting in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting (also intertemporal choice or impulsive choice) is the process by which delayed outcomes, such as delayed food delivery, are valued less than the same outcomes delivered immediately or with a shorter delay. This process is of interest because many psychopathologies, including substance dependence, pathological gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder, are characterized by heightened levels of delay discounting. Some of these disorders are heritable, and data indicate that delay discounting also has a genetic component. To identify the genes underlying the delay discounting decision-making process and genetic correlates of heightened discounting, researchers have used mouse models. This unit describes a protocol for generating delay discounting behavior in mice and discusses analysis techniques for such behavior. PMID:24510779

  17. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  18. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  19. Bodyweight assessment of enamelin null mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert H-L; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Simmer, James P; Wang, Chia-Ning; Hu, Jan C C

    2013-01-01

    The Enam null mice appear to be smaller than wild-type mice, which prompted the hypothesis that enamel defects negatively influence nutritional intake and bodyweight gain (BWG). We compared the BWG of Enam(-/-) and wild-type mice from birth (D0) to Day 42 (D42). Wild-type (WT) and Enam(-/-) (N) mice were given either hard chow (HC) or soft chow (SC). Four experimental groups were studied: WTHC, WTSC, NHC, and NSC. The mother's bodyweight (DBW) and the average litter bodyweight (ALBW) were obtained from D0 to D21. After D21, the pups were separated from the mother and provided the same type of food. Litter bodyweights were measured until D42. ALBW was compared at 7-day intervals using one-way ANOVA, while the influence of DBW on ALBW was analyzed by mixed-model analyses. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on hard chow (NHC) was significantly lower than the two WT groups at D21 and the differences persisted into young adulthood. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on soft chow (NSC) trended lower, but was not significantly different than that of the WT groups. We conclude that genotype, which affects enamel integrity, and food hardness influence bodyweight gain in postnatal and young adult mice. PMID:23509695

  20. Leukemogenesis in heterozygous PU.1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Genik, Paula C; Vyazunova, Irina; Steffen, Leta S; Bacher, Jeffery W; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; McKercher, Scott; Ullrich, Robert L; Fallgren, Christina M; Weil, Michael M; Ray, F Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Most murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemias involve biallelic inactivation of the PU.1 gene, with one allele being lost through a radiation-induced chromosomal deletion and the other allele affected by a recurrent point mutation in codon 235 that is likely to be spontaneous. The short latencies of acute myeloid leukemias occurring in nonirradiated mice engineered with PU.1 conditional knockout or knockdown alleles suggest that once both copies of PU.1 have been lost any other steps involved in leukemogenesis occur rapidly. Yet, spontaneous acute myeloid leukemias have not been reported in mice heterozygous for a PU.1 knockout allele, an observation that conflicts with the understanding that the PU.1 codon 235 mutation is spontaneous. Here we describe experiments that show that the lack of spontaneous leukemia in PU.1 heterozygous knockout mice is not due to insufficient monitoring times or mouse numbers or the genetic background of the knockout mice. The results reveal that spontaneous leukemias that develop in mice of the mixed 129S2/SvPas and C57BL/6 background of knockout mice arise by a pathway that does not involve biallelic PU.1 mutation. In addition, the latency of radiation-induced leukemia in PU.1 heterozygous mice on a genetic background susceptible to radiation-induced leukemia indicates that the codon 235 mutation is not a rate-limiting step in radiation leukemogenesis driven by PU.1 loss.

  1. Retinylamine Benefits Early Diabetic Retinopathy in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Lee, Chieh Allen; Golczak, Marcin; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Antonetti, David A.; Veenstra, Alexander A.; Amengual, Jaume; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests an important role for outer retinal cells in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Here we investigated the effect of the visual cycle inhibitor retinylamine (Ret-NH2) on the development of early DR lesions. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice (male, 2 months old when diabetes was induced) were made diabetic with streptozotocin, and some were given Ret-NH2 once per week. Lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT)-deficient mice and P23H mutant mice were similarly studied. Mice were euthanized after 2 (WT and Lrat−/−) and 8 months (WT) of study to assess vascular histopathology, accumulation of albumin, visual function, and biochemical and physiological abnormalities in the retina. Non-retinal effects of Ret-NH2 were examined in leukocytes treated in vivo. Superoxide generation and expression of inflammatory proteins were significantly increased in retinas of mice diabetic for 2 or 8 months, and the number of degenerate retinal capillaries and accumulation of albumin in neural retina were significantly increased in mice diabetic for 8 months compared with nondiabetic controls. Administration of Ret-NH2 once per week inhibited capillary degeneration and accumulation of albumin in the neural retina, significantly reducing diabetes-induced retinal superoxide and expression of inflammatory proteins. Superoxide generation also was suppressed in Lrat−/− diabetic mice. Leukocytes isolated from diabetic mice treated with Ret-NH2 caused significantly less cytotoxicity to retinal endothelial cells ex vivo than did leukocytes from control diabetics. Administration of Ret-NH2 once per week significantly inhibited the pathogenesis of lesions characteristic of early DR in diabetic mice. The visual cycle constitutes a novel target for inhibition of DR. PMID:26139608

  2. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw Developed in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sil; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Tseng, Han-Ching Helen; Banankhah, Sina; Quje, Davood Talebi; Sayre, James W.; Jewett, Anahid; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), an uncommon co-morbidity in patients treated with bisphosphonates (BP), occurs in the segment of jawbone interfacing oral mucosa. This study aimed to investigate a role of oral mucosal barrier γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of ONJ. Female C57Bl/6J (B6) mice received a bolus zoledronate intravenous injection (ZOL, 540 μg/kg), and their maxillary left first molars were extracted 1 week later. ZOL-treated mice (WT ZOL) delayed oral wound healing with patent open wounds 4 weeks after tooth extraction with characteristic oral epithelial hyperplasia. γδ T cells appeared within the tooth extraction site and hyperplastic epithelium in WT ZOL mice. In ZOL-treated γδ T cell null (Tcrd−/− ZOL) mice, the tooth extraction open wound progressively closed; however, histological ONJ-like lesions were identified in 75 and 60% of WT ZOL and Tcrd−/− ZOL mice, respectively. Although the bone exposure phenotype of ONJ was predominantly observed in WT ZOL mice, Tcrd−/− ZOL mice developed the pustule/fistula disease phenotype. We further addressed the role of γδ T cells from human peripheral blood (h-γδ T cells). When co-cultured with ZOL-pretreated human osteoclasts in vitro, h-γδ T cells exhibited rapid expansion and robust IFN-γ secretion. When h-γδ T cells were injected into ZOL-treated immunodeficient (Rag2−/− ZOL) mice, the oral epithelial hyperplasia developed. However, Rag2−/− ZOL mice did not develop osteonecrosis. The results indicate that γδ T cells are unlikely to influence the core osteonecrosis mechanism; however, they may serve as a critical modifier contributing to the different oral mucosal disease variations of ONJ. PMID:26013832

  3. Vaccination of mice against Mycobacterium leprae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N B; Lowe, A C; Rees, R J; Colston, M J

    1989-01-01

    Intradermal immunization with killed Mycobacterium leprae renders mice immune to infection with viable M. leprae. This protection is long lasting and systemic in that immunization in the left flank results in protection in both the left and right footpads. Immunization with Mycobacterium vaccae was ineffective in protecting mice against M. leprae infection, while Mycobacterium bovis BCG provided partial protection. Mycobacterium habana TMC 5135 (now known as Mycobacterium simiae) was found to be as effective as M. leprae in protecting mice against footpad infection. PMID:2643581

  4. Hexamitiasis in cadmium-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Exon, J H; Patton, N M; Koller, L D

    1975-09-01

    Mortality was observed in 4- to 5-week-old Swiss Webster mice exposed to 300 or 3 ppm cadmium as cadmium chloride in the drinking water. Mice receiving 300 ppm cadium suffered 26% mortality as compared with 7% of those on the low cadmium dose. Death did not occur in control mice. Clinical signs and histopathology established Hexamita muris as the causative agent. Cadmium lesions were not observed. It is suggested that mortality due to hexamitiasis resulted from synergism between cadmium and H muris.

  5. Benzene inhalation produces leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Cronkite, E P; Bullis, J; Inoue, T; Drew, R T

    1984-09-15

    Female C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 300 ppm benzene 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 16 weeks and then held for lifetime observation. Sixty-four weeks after commencement of the study, 10 of 90 exposed mice had died as opposed to only 1 of 88 controls. Of the 10 exposed mice that died, 6 had thymic lymphomas, 2 had unspecified lymphomas, 1 was killed when moribund and found leukemia-free, and 1 was undiagnosed due to autolysis and partial cannibalization. The single dead control animal did not have lymphoma or leukemia. These data provide proof of the leukemogenicity of benzene in female C57Bl/6 mice.

  6. Social transfer of pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Monique L.; Hostetler, Caroline M.; Heinricher, Mary M.; Ryabinin, Andrey E.

    2016-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between the psychosocial environment and the perception and experience of pain, and the mechanisms of the social communication of pain have yet to be elucidated. The present study examined the social communication of pain and demonstrates that “bystander” mice housed and tested in the same room as mice subjected to inflammatory pain or withdrawal from morphine or alcohol develop corresponding hyperalgesia. Olfactory cues mediate the transfer of hyperalgesia to the bystander mice, which can be measured using mechanical, thermal, and chemical tests. Hyperalgesia in bystanders does not co-occur with anxiety or changes in corticosterone and cannot be explained by visually dependent emotional contagion or stress-induced hyperalgesia. These experiments reveal the multifaceted relationship between the social environment and pain behavior and support the use of mice as a model system for investigating these factors. In addition, these experiments highlight the need for proper consideration of how experimental animals are housed and tested. PMID:27774512

  7. Responses of Male C57BL/6N Mice to Observing the Euthanasia of Other Mice.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Gregory P; Bottomley, Michael A; Grobe, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    The AVMA Panel on Euthanasia recommends that sensitive animals should not be present during the euthanasia of others, especially of their own species, but does not provide guidelines on how to identify a sensitive species. To determine if mice are a sensitive species we reviewed literature on empathy in mice, and measured the cardiovascular and activity response of mice observing euthanasia of conspecifics. We studied male 16-wk-old C57BL/6N mice and found no increase in cardiovascular parameters or activity in the response of the mice to observing CO2 euthanasia. Mice observing decapitation had an increase in all values, but this was paralleled by a similar increase during mock decapitations in which no animals were handled or euthanized. We conclude that CO2 euthanasia of mice does not have an impact on other mice in the room, and that euthanasia by decapitation likely only has an effect due to the noise of the guillotine. We support the conceptual idea that mice are both a sensitive species and display empathy, but under the controlled circumstances of the euthanasia procedures used in this study there was no signaling of stress to witnessing inhabitants in the room. PMID:27423146

  8. MICE: a mouse imaging collaboration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, Jacek; Flask, Chris; Wilson, David; Johnson, David; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2006-03-01

    With the ever-increasing complexity of science and engineering, many important research problems are being addressed by collaborative, multidisciplinary teams. We present a web-based collaborative environment for small animal imaging research, called the Mouse Imaging Collaboration Environment (MICE). MICE provides an effective and user-friendly tool for managing and sharing of the terabytes of high-resolution and high-dimension image data generated at small animal imaging core facilities. We describe the design of MICE and our experience in the implementation and deployment of a beta-version baseline-MICE. The baseline-MICE provides an integrated solution from image data acquisition to end-user access and long-term data storage at our UH/Case Small Animal Imaging Resource Center. As image data is acquired from scanners, it is pushed to the MICE server which automatically stores it in a directory structure according to its DICOM metadata. The directory structure reflects imaging modality, principle investigators, animal models, scanning dates and study details. Registered end-users access this imaging data through an authenticated web-interface. Thumbnail images are created by custom scripts running on the MICE server while data down-loading is achieved through standard web-browser ftp. MICE provides a security infrastructure that manages user roles, their access privileges such as read/write, and the right to modify the access privileges. Additional data security measures include a two server paradigm with the Web access server residing outside a network firewall to provide access through the Internet, and the imaging data server - a large RAID storage system supporting flexible backup policies - residing behind the protected firewall with a dedicated link to the Web access server. Direct network link to the RAID storage system outside the firewall other than this dedicated link is not permitted. Establishing the initial image directory structure and letting the

  9. Measuring Local Anaphylaxis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Holly; Killoran, Kristin E.; Mitre, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Allergic responses are the result of the activation of mast cells and basophils, and the subsequent release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators. Exposure to an allergen in a sensitized individual can result in clinical symptoms that vary from minor erythema to life threatening anaphylaxis. In the laboratory, various animal models have been developed to understand the mechanisms driving allergic responses. Herein, we describe a detailed method for measuring changes in vascular permeability to quantify localized allergic responses. The local anaphylaxis assay was first reported in the 1920s, and has been adapted from the technique published by Kojima et al. in 20071. In this assay, mice sensitized to OVA are challenged in the left ear with vehicle and in the right ear with OVA. This is followed by an intravenous injection of Evans Blue dye. Ten min after injecting Evans Blue, the animal is euthanized and the dye that has extravasated into the ears is extracted overnight in formamide. The absorbance of the extracted dye is then quantified with a spectrophotometer. This method reliably results in a visual and quantifiable manifestation of a local allergic response. PMID:25350839

  10. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  11. Metabolic characteristics of long-lived mice.

    PubMed

    Bartke, Andrzej; Westbrook, Reyhan

    2012-01-01

    Genetic suppression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can extend longevity in worms, insects, and mammals. In laboratory mice, mutations with the greatest, most consistent, and best documented positive impact on lifespan are those that disrupt growth hormone (GH) release or actions. These mutations lead to major alterations in IIS but also have a variety of effects that are not directly related to the actions of insulin or insulin-like growth factor I. Long-lived GH-resistant GHR-KO mice with targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene, as well as Ames dwarf (Prop1(df)) and Snell dwarf (Pit1(dw)) mice lacking GH (along with prolactin and TSH), are diminutive in size and have major alterations in body composition and metabolic parameters including increased subcutaneous adiposity, increased relative brain weight, small liver, hypoinsulinemia, mild hypoglycemia, increased adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivity, and reduced serum lipids. Body temperature is reduced in Ames, Snell, and female GHR-KO mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that both Ames dwarf and GHR-KO mice utilize more oxygen per gram (g) of body weight than sex- and age-matched normal animals from the same strain. They also have reduced respiratory quotient, implying greater reliance on fats, as opposed to carbohydrates, as an energy source. Differences in oxygen consumption (VO(2)) were seen in animals fed or fasted during the measurements as well as in animals that had been exposed to 30% calorie restriction or every-other-day feeding. However, at the thermoneutral temperature of 30°C, VO(2) did not differ between GHR-KO and normal mice. Thus, the increased metabolic rate of the GHR-KO mice, at a standard animal room temperature of 23°C, is apparently related to increased energy demands for thermoregulation in these diminutive animals. We suspect that increased oxidative metabolism combined with enhanced fatty acid oxidation contribute to the extended longevity of GHR-KO mice.

  12. Spontaneous nonthymic tumors in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peigen; Westmoreland, Susan V; Jain, Rakesh K; Fukumura, Dai

    2011-06-01

    SCID mice provide an excellent platform for cancer research. Because of their lack of immunity, SCID mice readily succumb to infectious pathogens and therefore must be maintained in an SPF, barrier-protected environment. Although SPF and barrier facilities prevent infection, SCID mice remain prone to premature death due in part to a high prevalence of spontaneous thymic lymphomas. However, little is known about spontaneous nonthymic tumors in SCID mice. We therefore analyzed the incidence of nonthymic tumor in our defined-flora C.B-17/Icr-SCID/Sed mice and examined their histopathologic characteristics. We necropsied 1060 retired SCID breeders (506 males, 554 females; average ages of 325 and 320 d, respectively) and found that 24 mice had developed nonthymic tumors, yielding an incidence of 2.26% (1.78% in males; 2.71% in females). The incidence of nonthymic tumors was substantially lower than that of thymic lymphomas in our retired SCID breeders (12.3% in males; 4.15% in females). Based on histopathology, 9 nonthymic tumors in male SCID mice consisted of 4 salivary gland myoepiteliomas, 2 rhabdomyosarcomas, and 3 cases of leukemia involving multiple organs. Female SCID mice had 15 nonthymic tumors consisting of 8 mammary adenocarcinomas, 4 salivary gland myoepitheliomas, and 1 case each of leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. In addition, we tested in vivo transplantability and characterized the growth behavior of several of these tumors. To our knowledge, this report is the first comprehensive description of spontaneous nonthymic tumors, including 8 myoepitheliomas and 3 rhabdomyosarcomas, from the same SCID mouse colony.

  13. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides against β-catenin protect mice against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Popov, Violeta B; Jornayvaz, Francois R; Akgul, Emin O; Kanda, Shoichi; Jurczak, Michael J; Zhang, Dongyan; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Majumdar, Sachin K; Guigni, Blas; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Bhanot, Sanjay; Shulman, Gerald I; Samuel, Varman T

    2016-03-01

    Although mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway are linked with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in humans, the mechanism is unclear. High-fat-fed male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 wk with a 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to decrease hepatic and adipose expression of β-catenin. β-Catenin mRNA decreased by ≈80% in the liver and by 70% in white adipose tissue relative to control ASO-treated mice. β-Catenin ASO improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased insulin-stimulated whole body glucose metabolism, as assessed during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in awake mice. β-Catenin ASO altered hepatic lipid composition in high-fat-fed mice. There were reductions in hepatic triglyceride (44%, P < 0.05) and diacylglycerol content (60%, P < 0.01) but a 30% increase in ceramide content (P < 0.001). The altered lipid content was attributed to decreased expression of sn-1,2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase and mitochondrial acyl-CoA:glycerol-sn-3-phosphate acyltransferase and an increase in serine palmitoyl transferase. The decrease in cellular diacyglycerol was associated with a 33% decrease in PKCε activation (P < 0.05) and 64% increase in Akt2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05). In summary, Reducing β-catenin expression decreases expression of enzymes involved in hepatic fatty acid esterification, ameliorates hepatic steatosis and lipid-induced insulin resistance.

  14. A 33 million-year record of Late Triassic pCO2 reflects fundamental control of the carbon-cycle by changes in continental distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, M. F.; Wright, J. D.; Kent, D. V.

    2012-12-01

    A ~33 My continuous record of pCO2 spanning the Late Triassic to Earliest Jurassic, based on paleosols from the eastern North American Newark rift basin, shows high pCO2 values near 4500 ± 1400 ppm (at S(z) = 3000 ± 1000 ppm) in the late Carnian, decreasing to ~2000 ± 700 ppm by the late Rhaetian, just before the eruption of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. These data are consistent with the model results of Godderis et al. (2008), who predict falling pCO2 through the Late Triassic as a result of the progressive increase in continental area in the tropical humid belt due to Pangea's slow northward transect. In detail, pCO2 in the Newark corresponds closely to the rate of Northward movement of the Pangean supercontinent, as determined from paleolatitude reconstructions on the Newark Basin Coring Project Cores (Kent and Tauxe, Science, 2005). These observations are more consistent with a weathering-forced driver for long-term variability in atmospheric pCO2 than with the results of simpler mass-balance models (e.g., GEOCARB, and others based on the BLAG hypothesis), wherein trends in pCO2 are forced by changes in the rate of ocean crust production and do not incorporate the effects of dynamical continental geography and lithology. Therefore, we contend that continental weathering rates, which are fundamental expressions of the composition and changing distribution of continental surface area, tightly control the 10^7-year secular changes in pCO2 observed in the Late Triassic. These findings therefore indicate that paleogeography and the rates of change in continental distributions (and lithology) could be the primary driver of Earth's climate on long timescales.

  15. Quantification of alcohol drinking patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, Manuela; Leixner, Sarah; Spanagel, Rainer; Bilbao, Ainhoa

    2015-11-01

    The use of mice in alcohol research provides an excellent model system for a better understanding of the genetics and neurobiology of alcohol addiction. Almost 60 years ago, alcohol researchers began to test strains of mice for alcohol preference and intake. In particular, various voluntary alcohol drinking paradigms in the home cage were developed. In mouse models of voluntary oral alcohol consumption, animals have concurrent access to water and either one or several concentrated alcohol solutions in their home cages. Although these models have high face validity, many experimental conditions require a more precise monitoring of alcohol consumption in mice in order to capture the role of specific strains or genes, or any other manipulation on alcohol drinking behavior. Therefore, we have developed a fully automated, highly precise monitoring system for alcohol drinking in mice in the home cage. This system is now commercially available. We show that this drinkometer system allows for detecting differences in drinking behavior (i) in transgenic mice, (ii) following alcohol deprivation, and (iii) following stress applications that are usually not detected by classical home-cage drinking paradigms. In conclusion, our drinkometer system allows disturbance-free and high resolution monitoring of alcohol drinking behavior. In particular, micro-drinking and circadian drinking patterns can be monitored in genetically modified and inbred strains of mice after environmental and pharmacological manipulation, and therefore this system represents an improvement in measuring behavioral features that are of relevance for the development of alcohol use disorders.

  16. A Study of Statistical Errors in MICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, D.; Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will measure ionization cooling from a beam of muons at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The aim of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, due to ionization cooling, of order 10% for a range of emittances and momenta, to an accuracy of 1%. A greater understanding of the statistical (as well as systematic) errors on emittance measurement in MICE is paramount to meeting this goal. This paper describes a study aimed at exploiting the computing power of the Grid to determine the number of muons necessary to meet the scientific goals of MICE. In this study, tens of thousands of G4MICE Monte Carlo simulations were run to determine the scaling laws that govern the fractional change in emittance as a function of the number of muons (N) in the simulation. By varying random conditions, the standard deviation of these distributions was studied as a function of N. The results of the study indicate that, due to the effect of correlations, of order 105 muons are required to meet the goal of MICE for large emittance beams, without which 106 would be required.

  17. Palmoplantar keratoderma in Slurp2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Christopher M.; Procaccia, Shiri; Tran, Deanna; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H.; Larsson, Mikael; Allan, Bernard B.; Young, Lorraine C.; Hong, Cynthia; Tontonoz, Peter; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Beigneux, Anne P.

    2015-01-01

    SLURP1, a member of the Ly6 protein family, is secreted by suprabasal keratinocytes. Mutations in SLURP1 cause a palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) known as mal de Meleda. Another secreted Ly6 protein, SLURP2, is encoded by a gene located ~20 kb downstream from SLURP1. SLURP2 is produced by suprabasal keratinocytes. To investigate the importance of SLURP2, we first examined Slurp2 knockout mice in which exon 2–3 sequences had been replaced with lacZ and neo cassettes. Slurp2−/− mice exhibited hyperkeratosis on the volar surface of the paws (i.e., PPK), increased keratinocyte proliferation, and an accumulation of lipid droplets in the stratum corneum. They also exhibited reduced body weight and hind limb clasping. These phenotypes are very similar to those of Slurp1−/− mice. To solidify a link between Slurp2 deficiency and PPK and to be confident that the disease phenotypes in Slurp2−/− mice were not secondary to the effects of the lacZ and neo cassettes on Slurp1 expression, we created a new line of Slurp2 knockout mice (Slurp2X−/−) in which Slurp2 was inactivated with a simple nonsense mutation. Slurp2X−/− mice exhibited the same disease phenotypes. Thus, Slurp2 deficiency and Slurp1 deficiencies cause the same disease phenotypes. PMID:26967477

  18. Formaldehyde and skin tumorigenesis in Sencar mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, O.H.

    1988-01-01

    Previous experiments involving topical applications of formaldehyde on hairless mouse skin were repeated with SENCAR mice, which are bred for maximum sensitivity to chemical tumorigenesis. Most experimental groups consisted of 32 mice. Topical skin applications of either 100 ..mu..l acetone of about 200 ..mu..l 4% formaldehyde in water twice weekly, resulted in two tumor-bearing animals, each with one small, benign papilloma. A group of 96 mice, treated once with 51.2 ..mu..g DMBA in acetone, developed a total of 107 tumors in 40 tumor-bearing animals. Thus, DMBA is a strong, complete tumorigen also in SENCAR mice. Animals given 51.2 ..mu..g DMBA first and then treated twice weekly with 1% formaldehyde developed a total of 30 tumors in 8 tumor-bearing animals, whereas mice given 51.2 ..mu..g DMBA first, followed by twice weekly treatment with 4% formaldehyde, developed 51 tumors in 15 animals. When two widely accepted, statistical methods were used, there was no significant difference between the groups treated once with DMBA alone and that treated once with DMBA followed by 4% formaldehyde. The results in SENCAR mice confirm that formaldehyde has no skin tumorigenic or carcinogenic potency of its own. It seems doubtful whether it may act as a very weak enhancer of DMBA-induced tumorigenesis, but it has no significant influence on DMBA-induced carcinogenesis.

  19. Septic Mice Are Susceptible to Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Benjamim, Claudia F.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical data underscores the fact that subsequent high mortality rates occur in patients who survive acute septic episodes. Herein, we described a clinically relevant model of experimental sepsis that we believe will allow further investigation of the manner in which the pulmonary innate immune response is modulated after sepsis. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model, whereby the cecum was partially ligated and punctured nine times with a 21-gauge needle. This procedure was associated with 100% mortality at 3 days after surgery. In contrast, when mice subjected to CLP were treated with antibiotic beginning at 8 hours after surgery, and every 12 hours thereafter until 3 days, ∼60% of the mice survived. Interestingly, CLP survivors quickly succumbed (100% mortality) to pulmonary infection when intratracheally challenged, at day 3 after CLP, with viable Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. No mortality was observed in conidia-challenged sham-operated mice. The defective innate immune response against A. fumigatus in CLP mice could not be explained by a failure of neutrophils to infiltrate the lungs. Instead, gene array analysis revealed that several components of the innate immune response, including the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway, were down-regulated. Thus, we describe a system of sepsis-induced innate immune failure in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. PMID:14633632

  20. Characteristics of scratching behavior in ADJM mice (atopic dermatitis from Japanese mice).

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Tasuku; Sato, Takumi; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Inoue, Toshio; Kamei, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of scratching behavior in atopic dermatitis from Japanese mice (ADJM) mice, the effects of some antagonists of pruritogens on this behavior were studied. Both male and female ADJM mice showed frequent scratching behavior around the face, abdomen and back. The number of scratching behavior around the face was greater than on the abdomen and back, and scratching behavior in female mice was significantly more frequent than in male mice. Histamine H1 antagonist, chlorpheniramine, p.o., inhibited this behavior potently and dose-dependently. Histamine H1 antagonist with serotonin 5-TH(5-hydroxytryptamine)2 antagonist, cyproheptadine, also inhibited this behavior. However, NK1 antagonist, aprepitant, p.o., had no significant inhibitory effect even at a dose of 100 mg/kg, p.o., Mu antagonist, naloxone, and kappa agonist, nalfurafine, significantly inhibited this behavior at doses of 0.3 mg/kg, s.c., and 0.01 mg/kg, p.o., respectively. Histamine contents in the skin of ADJM mice were significantly higher than in BALB/c mice. These results strongly indicate that scratching behavior in ADJM mice is related with histamine H1, opioid mu and opioid kappa receptors.

  1. Antidepressant activity of fingolimod in mice

    PubMed Central

    di Nuzzo, Luigi; Orlando, Rosamaria; Tognoli, Cristina; Di Pietro, Paola; Bertini, Giuseppe; Miele, Jessica; Bucci, Domenico; Motolese, Marta; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Mauro, Gianluca; De Lucia, Carmine; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Fabene, Paolo Francesco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that fingolimod, the first oral drug approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), acts as a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and enhances the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS. Both mechanisms are relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of major depression. We examined the antidepressant activity of fingolimod in mice subjected to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), a model of reactive depression endowed with face and pharmacological validity. Chronic treatment with fingolimod (3 mg kg−1, i.p., once a day for 4 weeks) reduced the immobility time in the forced swim test (FST) in a large proportion of CUS mice. This treatment also caused anxiogenic-like effects in the social interaction test without affecting anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze or spatial learning in the water maze. CUS mice showed reduced BDNF levels and enhanced HDAC2 levels in the hippocampus. These changes were reversed by fingolimod exclusively in mice that showed a behavioral response to the drug in the FST. Fingolimod treatment also enhanced H3 histone K14-acetylation and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus of CUS mice. Fingolimod did not affect most of the parameters we have tested in unstressed control mice. The antidepressant-like activity of fingolimod was confirmed in mice chronically treated with corticosterone. These findings show for the first time that fingolimod exerts antidepressant-like effect acting in a “disease-dependent” manner, and raise the interesting possibility that the drug could relieve depressive symptoms in MS patients independently of its disease-modifying effect on MS. PMID:26171219

  2. Demodex musculi Infestation in Genetically Immunomodulated Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter C; Zeiss, Caroline J; Beck, Amanda P; Scholz, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Demodex musculi, a prostigmatid mite that has been reported infrequently in laboratory mice, has been identified with increasing frequency in contemporary colonies of immunodeficient mice. Here we describe 2 episodes of D. musculi infestation with associated clinical signs in various genetically engineered mouse strains, as well as treatment strategies and an investigation into transmissibility and host susceptibility. The first case involved D. musculi associated with clinical signs and pathologic lesions in BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) mice, which have a defect in type 2 helper T cell (Th2) immunity. Subsequent investigation revealed mite transmission to both parental strains (BALB/c-Tg[DO11.10] and BALB/c-Il13(tm)), BALB/c-Il13/Il4(tm), and wild-type BALB/c. All Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) mice remained infested throughout the investigation, and D. musculi were recovered from all strains when they were cohoused with BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) index mice. However, only Il13(tm) and Il13/Il4(tm) mice demonstrated persistent infestation after index mice were removed. Only BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) showed clinical signs, suggesting that the phenotypic dysfunction of Th2 immunity is sufficient for persistent infestation, whereas clinical disease associated with D. musculi appears to be genotype-specific. This pattern was further exemplified in the second case, which involved NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2r(tm1Wjl)/SzJ (NSG) and C;129S4 Rag2(tm1.1Flv) Il2rg(tm1.1Flv)/J mice with varying degrees of blepharitis, conjunctivitis, and facial pruritis. Topical amitraz decreased mite burden but did not eliminate infestation or markedly ameliorate clinical signs. Furthermore, mite burden began to increase by 1 mo posttreatment, suggesting that topical amitraz is an ineffective treatment for D. musculi. These experiences illustrate the need for vigilance regarding opportunistic and uncommon pathogens in rodent colonies, especially among mice with immunologic deficits. PMID:27538858

  3. [The development of Clonorchis sinensis in mice].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-xin; Sun, Yan-hong; Guo, Jia; Yao, Shu-juan; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Chun-jing

    2014-10-01

    Freshwater fish were caught from Nenjiang River in Qiqihaer City, and examined for metacercariae of Clonorchis sinensis by the artificial digestion (pepsin-HCl) method. The metacercariae (35-40) were given orally into stomach to each Kunming mouse of infection group (50 mice). The mice in control group were given the same amount of normal saline. The mice were sacrificed on the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, and 30th day after infection. Worms were collected, fixed and stained with carmine acetate, and observed under microscope. The egg-laying capacity of C. sinensis was observed in mice. 96%(48/50) mice were infected with metacercariae of C. sinensis. The recovery rate of adult worms on the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, and 30th day post-infection was 42.1%, 52.6%, 63.2%, 62.2%, 63.3%, and 63.2%, respectively. The first appearance of eggs in utero and feces was on the 15th and 20th day after infection, respectively. The branch of testis in worms was observed after 20 days of infection. PMID:25726612

  4. Seasonal acclimation of prairie deer mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R. V.; Belknap, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Prairie deer mice responded to long nights by reducing their metabolic rates, core temperatures, thermal conductances and incremental metabolic responses to cold stimulus, while increasing their capacities for nonshivering thermogenesis. Some winter animals spontaneously entered daily torpor in the mornings and thereby further reduced their metabolic rates and core temperatures. Provision of exogenous melatonin (by subdermal implants) mimiced short photoperiod effects on metabolic rates and core temperatures of wild-caught, laboratory maintained animals. Provision of supplemental dietary tryptophan to laboratory animals conditioned to natural light cycles mimiced metabolic effects of long nights in summer animals, and further reduced metabolic rates of winter mice, but did not affect their core temperature levels. Newly caught, laboratory maintained deer mice responded to natural seasonal clues of shortphotoperiod and increased dietary tryptophan by reducing their resting energy requirements through both lower metabolic and lower core temperature levels. Short photoperiod and seasonal change also promoted gonadal involution, and resulted in more socially tolerant huddling by mice with reduced core temperature. Reduced 24-hour LH excretion rates were also observed in winter animals which were exposed to seasonal light cycles at warm (25°C) room temperatures. We propose that seasonal acclimatization involves pineal effects on sex hormone-influenced social behaviors and on resting metabolism. These effects serve to conserve resting energy expenditure and promote hypothermic insulation by wild prairie deer mice.

  5. Spatial learning by mice in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jonathan J.; Harding, Elizabeth; Fortier, Mathilde; James, Benjamin; Donnett, Megan; Kerslake, Alasdair; O’Leary, Alice; Zhang, Ningyu; Jeffery, Kate

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether mice can represent locations distributed throughout three-dimensional space, by developing a novel three-dimensional radial arm maze. The three-dimensional radial maze, or “radiolarian” maze, consists of a central spherical core from which arms project in all directions. Mice learn to retrieve food from the ends of the arms without omitting any arms or re-visiting depleted ones. We show here that mice can learn both a standard working memory task, in which all arms are initially baited, and also a reference memory version in which only a subset are ever baited. Comparison with a two-dimensional analogue of the radiolarian maze, the hexagon maze, revealed equally good working-memory performance in both mazes if all the arms were initially baited, but reduced working and reference memory in the partially baited radiolarian maze. This suggests intact three-dimensional spatial representation in mice over short timescales but impairment of the formation and/or use of long-term spatial memory of the maze. We discuss potential mechanisms for how mice solve the three-dimensional task, and reasons for the impairment relative to its two-dimensional counterpart, concluding with some speculations about how mammals may represent three-dimensional space. PMID:25930216

  6. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice A.; Thomas, David K.; Ong, Luvena L.; Schwartz, Robert E.; Golub, Todd R.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2011-01-01

    “Humanized” mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug–drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of “major” human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications. PMID:21746904

  7. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; et al

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less thanmore » $$\\sim$$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $$f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.« less

  8. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26657007

  9. Spatial learning by mice in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jonathan J; Harding, Elizabeth; Fortier, Mathilde; James, Benjamin; Donnett, Megan; Kerslake, Alasdair; O'Leary, Alice; Zhang, Ningyu; Jeffery, Kate

    2015-08-01

    We tested whether mice can represent locations distributed throughout three-dimensional space, by developing a novel three-dimensional radial arm maze. The three-dimensional radial maze, or "radiolarian" maze, consists of a central spherical core from which arms project in all directions. Mice learn to retrieve food from the ends of the arms without omitting any arms or re-visiting depleted ones. We show here that mice can learn both a standard working memory task, in which all arms are initially baited, and also a reference memory version in which only a subset are ever baited. Comparison with a two-dimensional analogue of the radiolarian maze, the hexagon maze, revealed equally good working-memory performance in both mazes if all the arms were initially baited, but reduced working and reference memory in the partially baited radiolarian maze. This suggests intact three-dimensional spatial representation in mice over short timescales but impairment of the formation and/or use of long-term spatial memory of the maze. We discuss potential mechanisms for how mice solve the three-dimensional task, and reasons for the impairment relative to its two-dimensional counterpart, concluding with some speculations about how mammals may represent three-dimensional space.

  10. Normal keratinized mucosa transplants in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, P; Dabelsteen, E; Reibel, J; Harder, F

    1981-01-01

    Two types of normal keratinized mucosa were transplanted to subcutaneous sites of nude mice of two different strains. 24 intact specimens of clinically normal human palatal mucosa were transplanted to nude mice of the strain nu/nu NC. The transplants were recovered after 42 d with a recovery rate of 96%. Moreover, 22 intact specimens of normal rat forestomach mucosa were transplanted to nude mice of the strain nu/nu BALB/c/BOM. These transplants were recovered after 21 d with a recovery rate of 63%. The histologic features of the transplants were essentially the same as those of the original tissues. However, epithelial outgrowths from the transplants differed with respect to the pattern of keratinization. The outgrowths of human palatal mucosa transplants were essentially unkeratinized, while the outgrowths of the rat forestomach transplants showed continued keratinization.

  11. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  12. Naegleria australiensis: experimental meningoencephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, J F; Aerts, M; Martinez, A J

    1983-01-01

    Naegleria australiensis was recently described as a new species of free-living amoeba pathogenic for mice. Infections of human brain by the free-living amoebae N. fowleri and Acanthamoeba spp. are well known. We here describe the clinicopathological features of experimental infection of the central nervous system of mice by N. australiensis. Weanling mice were inoculated intranasally and intracerebrally. The involvement of the nasal mucosa, olfactory neuroepithelium and lobes, cerebrum and cerebellum was detected in haematoxylin-eosin stained paraffin-embedded sections. Amoebic trophozoites sparsely located throughout the central nervous system were shown better by the immunoperoxidase method. Cysts were not detected. The histopathological changes differ from those produced by N. fowleri, especially in the degree of severity. They may be confused with those caused by Acanthamoeba spp. which usually produced subacute and chronic encephalitis with a prolonged clinical course. PMID:6659050

  13. Payload Processing for Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Experimental payloads flown to the International Space Station provide us with valuable research conducted in a microgravity environment not attainable on earth. The Mice Drawer System is an experiment designed by Thales Alenia Space Italia to study the effects of microgravity on mice. It is designed to fly to orbit on the Space Shuttle Utilization Logistics Flight 2 in October 2008, remain onboard the International Space Station for approximately 100 days and then return to earth on a following Shuttle flight. The experiment apparatus will be housed inside a Double Payload Carrier. An engineering model of the Double Payload Carrier was sent to Kennedy Space Center for a fit check inside both Shuttles, and the rack that it will be installed in aboard the International Space Station. The Double Payload Carrier showed a good fit quality inside each vehicle, and Thales Alenia Space Italia will now construct the actual flight model and continue to prepare the Mice Drawer System experiment for launch.

  14. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  15. The selective advantage of crypsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Vignieri, Sacha N; Larson, Joanna G; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2010-07-01

    The light color of mice that inhabit the sandy dunes of Florida's coast have served as a textbook example of adaptation for nearly a century, despite the fact that the selective advantage of crypsis has never been directly tested or quantified in nature. Using plasticine mouse models of light and dark color, we demonstrate a strong selective advantage for mice that match their local background substrate. Further our data suggest that stabilizing selection maintains color matching within a single habitat, as models that are both lighter and darker than their local environment are selected against. These results provide empirical evidence in support of the hypothesis that visual hunting predators shape color patterning in Peromyscus mice and suggest a mechanism by which selection drives the pronounced color variation among populations. PMID:20163447

  16. Visualizing influenza virus infection in living mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weiqi; Dong, Zhenyuan; Li, Feng; Meng, Weixu; Feng, Liqiang; Niu, Xuefeng; Li, Chufang; Luo, Qinfang; Li, Zhengfeng; Sun, Caijun; Chen, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Preventing and treating influenza virus infection remain a challenge because of incomplete understanding of the host–pathogen interactions, limited therapeutics and lack of a universal vaccine. So far, methods for monitoring the course of infection with influenza virus in real time in living animals are lacking. Here we report the visualization of influenza viral infection in living mice using an engineered replication-competent influenza A virus carrying luciferase reporter gene. After intranasal inoculation, bioluminescence can be detected in the chest and nasopharyngeal passage of living mice. The intensity of bioluminescence in the chest correlates with the dosage of infection and the viral load in the lung. Bioluminescence in the chest of infected mice diminishes on antiviral treatment. This work provides a novel approach that enables real-time study of influenza virus infection and effects of antiviral therapeutics in living animals. PMID:24022374

  17. Multiple Scattering Measurements in the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), under construction at RAL, will test a prototype cooling channel for a future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The cooling channel aims to achieve, using liquid hydrogen absorbers, a 10% reduction in transverse emittance. The change in 4D emittance will be determined with an accuracy of 1% by measuring muons individually. Step IV of MICE will make the first precise emittance-reduction measurements of the experiment. Simulation studies using G4MICE, based on GEANT4, find a significant difference in multiple scattering in low Z materials, compared with the standard expression quoted by the Particle Data Group. Direct measurement of multiple scattering using the scintillating-fibre trackers is found to be possible, but requires the measurement resolution to be unfolded from the data.

  18. The Memory of MICE: The Configuration Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. J.; Colling, D. J.; Hanlet, P.

    2012-12-01

    The configuration database (CDB) is the memory of the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). Its principle aim is to store temporal data associated with the running of the experiment; these data are used throughout the life cycle of experiment, from running the experiment through data analysis. The CDB also serves as a moderator in the MICE state machine by defining allowable operating states of subsystems depending on the overall state of MICE and other subsystems. Master and slave CDBs, with multiple mirrored pair raid arrays, have been set up in different parts of the site to increase resilience, as well as off site backups. Access to the CDB is via a Python API, which communicates with a WSDL interface provided by a web-service on the CDB. The priority is to ensure availability of the CDB in the experiment control room. The master CDB is located in the MICE control where it is only used by the running experiment. In the event of the failure of the master, the slave can easily be promoted to master. Read only access to the CDB for data analysis and reconstruction is provided by the slave which has an up to the minute copy of the data. As MICE is a precision experiment which will measure a 10% muon cooling effect with 1% precision, it is imperative that we minimize our systematic errors; the CDB will ensure reproducible and documented running conditions in a highly resilient manner. A description of the hardware and software used in the the MICE CDB will be described in what follows.

  19. Splenic melanosis in agouti and black mice.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk-Wetula, Dominika; Wieczorek, Justyna; Płonka, Przemysław M

    2015-01-01

    An interesting example of extradermal deposition of melanin in vertebrates, notably in mammals, is splenic melanosis. In particular, if the phenomenon of splenic melanosis is correlated with hair or skin pigmentation, it must reflect the amount and perhaps the quality of pigment produced in hair follicle melanocytes. The present paper is our first study on splenic pigmentation in mice of phenotype agouti. We used untreated mixed background mice C57BL/6;129/SvJ (black - a/a, agouti - A/a, A/A), and as a control - black C57BL/6 and agouti fur from 129/SvJ mice, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) and golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). After euthanasia skin and spleen was evaluated macroscopically, photographed and collected for further analysis using Fontana-Masson and hematoxylin-eosin staining and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at X-band. Spleens of the agouti mice revealed splenic melanosis but were slightly weaker pigmented than their black counterparts, while the presence of pheomelanin was difficult to determine. The fur of both phenotypes was of similar melanin content, with the same tendency as in the spleens. The contribution of pheomelanin in the agouti fur was on the border of detectability by EPR. Histological and EPR analysis confirmed the presence of melanin in the melanotic spleens. The shape of the EPR signal showed a dominance of eumelanin in fur and in melanized spleens in both phenotypes of mice. Therefore, splenic melanosis does reflect the hair follicle pigmentation not only in black, but also in agouti mice. PMID:26291042

  20. Xanthohumol improved cognitive flexibility in young mice.

    PubMed

    Zamzow, Daniel R; Elias, Valerie; Legette, LeeCole L; Choi, Jaewoo; Stevens, J Fred; Magnusson, Kathy R

    2014-12-15

    The protein palmitoylation cycle has been shown to be important for protein signaling and synaptic plasticity. Data from our lab showed a change in the palmitoylation status of certain proteins with age. A greater percentage of the NMDA receptor subunits GluN2A and GluN2B, along with Fyn and PSD95 proteins, were palmitoylated in the old mice. The higher level of protein palmitoylation was also associated with poorer learning scores. Xanthohumol is a prenylated flavonoid that has been shown to increase beta-oxidation in the livers of rodents, decreasing circulating free fatty acids in the serum. What is not known is whether the application of xanthohumol could influence the palmitoylation status of proteins. In this study, young and old mice were fed a diet supplemented with xanthohumol for 8 weeks. Spatial memory was assessed with the Morris water maze and protein palmitoylation quantified. The young xanthohumol-treated mice showed a significant improvement in cognitive flexibility. However, this appeared to be associated with the young control mice, on a defined, phytoestrogen-deficient diet, performing as poorly as the old mice and xanthohumol reversing this effect. The old mice receiving xanthohumol did not significantly improve their learning scores. Xanthohumol treatment was unable to affect the palmitoylation of NMDA receptor subunits and associated proteins assessed in this study. This evidence suggests that xanthohumol may play a role in improving cognitive flexability in young animals, but it appears to be ineffective in adjusting the palmitoylation status of neuronal proteins in aged individuals. PMID:25192637

  1. Analgesic effect of tianeptine in mice.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, I T; Cinar, M G; Aytemir, M; Tuglular, I

    1999-01-01

    The effects of tianeptine, a novel and unusual tricyclic antidepressant drug, on tail-flick and hot-plate tests, which are two thermal analgesia evaluating methods, have been investigated in mice. Tianeptine (5 and 10 mg/kg), para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) (100 mg/kg) and a combination of pCPA and tianeptine (10 mg/kg) or saline were injected to mice intraperitoneally. pCPA (100 mg/kg) was injected 24 h before tianeptine or saline treatment when it was combined with tinaeptine (10 mg/kg) or tested alone. The tail-flick latencies and hot-plate reaction times of the mice were measured between 15th and 180th minutes following injections. Tianeptine (10 mg/kg) exhibited a significant antinociceptive activity that could be measured by both tests as compared to groups which were treated with saline or pCPA alone between 15th and 180th min of the observation period. The lower dose of tianeptine (5 mg/kg) or pCPA (100 mg/kg) did not produce any significant changes on tail-flick latency or hot-plate reaction time of the mice. However, pretreatment with pCPA completely blocked the antinociceptive effect induced by tianeptine (10 mg/kg) in both tests used in the present study. Furthermore, tianeptine (10 mg/kg) did not cause any significant impairment effects on rotarod performance of the mice. Our results suggested that tianeptine has a prominent thermal antinociceptive activity in mice and that increased serotonergic activity may be responsible for the analgesic effect of tianeptine.

  2. Biochemical and microscopic analysis of sperm in copper deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.; Jackson, P.; Allison, S.

    1986-03-01

    The Mottle Brindle Mouse Syndrome is a disease in mice which mimics Menkes Syndrome in humans. Treatment of affected male mice has led to varying survival rates in mice and few attempts have led to the development of virile male offsprings in mice and none in humans. In this study the authors examined sperm produced by Brindle mice in an attempt to ascertain reasons for the observed failure of the Brindle mice to reproduce. Microscopic analysis revealed that sperm counts in these mice are higher than sperm counts of the C57/BL or the C57/6J (normal) mice. Microscopically, sperm from Brindle mice showed changes in the acrosomal and flagellum regions. Motility of these sperm were 10% to 50% that of sperm from normal mice. Biochemically, cytochrome oxidase activity was 10% to 50% of the activity seen in normal mice. Hexokinase activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was equal to that observed in normal mice. These observations suggest that infertility in Brindle male mice is due to an impairment of testicular copper transport which leads to a decline in copper dependent processes.

  3. Social and Sexual Behaivours of Mice in Partial Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aou, Shuji; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Kumei, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Katarzyna; Zeredo, Jorge; Narikiyo, Kimiya; Watanabe, Yuuki

    2012-07-01

    We examined social and sexual behaviours in normal ICR mice, C57BL mice and obese db/db mice lacking leptin receptors in low gravity conditions using parabolic-flight to generate graded levels of partial gravity. Although both normal and obese mice floated with vigorous limb and tail movements when a floor is smooth in microgravity but they were rather stable if a floor is cover by carpet. Obese mice were more stable and socially contacted longer with a partner in low-gravity conditions. When they returned to the home cage after parabolic flights, obese mice started to eat sooner without restless behaviour, while control mice showed restless behaviour without eating. Face grooming, an indicator of stress response, was found more often in the control mice than the obese mice. Obese mice returned to resting condition faster than the control. We also analysed sexual behaviour of ICR mice and C57BL mice but not db/db mice since they are sexually inactive. Social and sexual behaviour could be evaluated in partial gravity conditions to get basic data concerning whether rodents can communicate and reproduce in Moon, Mars and space or not. Supported by Grant-in-Aid for Exploratory Research (JSPS) to S Aou and FY2010 grants from JAXA and Japan Society for Promotion of Science to Y. Kumei.

  4. Aorta Atherosclerosis Lesion Analysis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Sarajo; Yin, Changjun; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Habenicht, Andreas JR

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium-sized arteries. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice are used as experimental models to study human atherosclerosis. ApoE-/- mice are constitutively hyperlipidemic and develop intima plaques that resemble human plaques. Various issues including experimental design for lesion analysis, dietary conditions, isolation of the aorta, staining methods, morphometry, group size, age, the location within the arterial tree, and statistical analyses are important parameters that need to be addressed to obtain robust data. Here, we provide detailed methods to quantify aorta atherosclerosis. PMID:27366759

  5. Pharmacokinetics of memantine in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Beconi, Maria G; Howland, David; Park, Larry; Lyons, Kathryn; Giuliano, Joseph; Dominguez, Celia; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Pacifici, Robert

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate the potential of memantine as a therapeutic agent for Huntington's disease (HD) we have undertaken a series of in vitro, ex vivo and whole animal studies to characterize its pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) in rats and mice. Results from these studies will enable determination of memantine exposures needed to engage the related functional PD marker and help predict the dose regimen for clinical trials to test its proposed mechanism of action; the selective blockade of extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDA receptors. The studies reported here describe the PK of memantine in rats and mice at low (1 mg/kg) and high (10 mg/kg) doses. Our studies indicate that the clearance mechanisms of memantine in rats and mice are different from those in human, and that clearance needs to be taken into account when extrapolating to the human. In rats only, there is a significant metabolic contribution to memantine clearance at lower dose levels. While memantine is primarily cleared renally in all three species, the proportion of total systemic clearance above the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is much higher in rats and mice (~13, 4.5, and 1.4 times higher than GFR in rats, mice, and humans, respectively), suggesting that the contribution of active transport to memantine elimination in rats and mice is more significant than in the human. In rats and mice, memantine had a short half-life (<4 h) and steep Cmax/Cmin ratios (>100). In the human, the half-life of memantine was reported to be very long (60-80 h) with a Cmax/Cmin ratio at steady state concentrations of ~1.5. A small change in the clearance of memantine - for example due to renal impairment or competition for the elimination pathway with a co-administered drug - will likely affect exposure and, therefore, the selectivity of memantine on NMDA receptors . The PK differences observed between these species demonstrate that the PK in mice and rats cannot be directly extrapolated to the human. Further

  6. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  7. Metabolic characteristics of long-lived mice.

    PubMed

    Bartke, Andrzej; Westbrook, Reyhan

    2012-01-01

    Genetic suppression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can extend longevity in worms, insects, and mammals. In laboratory mice, mutations with the greatest, most consistent, and best documented positive impact on lifespan are those that disrupt growth hormone (GH) release or actions. These mutations lead to major alterations in IIS but also have a variety of effects that are not directly related to the actions of insulin or insulin-like growth factor I. Long-lived GH-resistant GHR-KO mice with targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene, as well as Ames dwarf (Prop1(df)) and Snell dwarf (Pit1(dw)) mice lacking GH (along with prolactin and TSH), are diminutive in size and have major alterations in body composition and metabolic parameters including increased subcutaneous adiposity, increased relative brain weight, small liver, hypoinsulinemia, mild hypoglycemia, increased adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivity, and reduced serum lipids. Body temperature is reduced in Ames, Snell, and female GHR-KO mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that both Ames dwarf and GHR-KO mice utilize more oxygen per gram (g) of body weight than sex- and age-matched normal animals from the same strain. They also have reduced respiratory quotient, implying greater reliance on fats, as opposed to carbohydrates, as an energy source. Differences in oxygen consumption (VO(2)) were seen in animals fed or fasted during the measurements as well as in animals that had been exposed to 30% calorie restriction or every-other-day feeding. However, at the thermoneutral temperature of 30°C, VO(2) did not differ between GHR-KO and normal mice. Thus, the increased metabolic rate of the GHR-KO mice, at a standard animal room temperature of 23°C, is apparently related to increased energy demands for thermoregulation in these diminutive animals. We suspect that increased oxidative metabolism combined with enhanced fatty acid oxidation contribute to the extended longevity of GHR-KO mice

  8. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  9. Intravenous infection of mice with Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    May, R G; John, D T

    1982-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri produced fatal meningoencephalitis in mice following intravenous (i.v.) inoculation. Amebae were present in the peripheral circulation for 120 minutes after i.v. inoculation with a dose of 10(7) trophozoites per mouse. Amebae were cultured from and observed in brain (days 1-21), lung (days 1-12), and liver and kidney (days 1-5). Infected mice exhibited weight loss, leukocytosis, reduced lymphocyte/neutrophil ratio, neurologic symptoms, and mortality. Histologically, the disease was characterized by an acute, hemorrhagic, necrotizing meningoencephalitis. Although amebae were detected in tissues other than brain, pathologic involvement of these tissues was minimal.

  10. Behavior of captive white-footed mice.

    PubMed

    Kavanau, J L

    1967-03-31

    Detailed studies of the behavior of captive white-footed mice have cast a number of old problems in new perspectives. Many responses of small captive mammals cannot be interpreted at face value because of severe distortions of behavior that are caused by depriving the wild animal of natural outlets for activity. Confined animals are likely to seize upon and repeatedly exercise virtually any opportunities to modify (and alter their relationships with) their surroundings. In addition they have a strong tendency to counteract nonvolitional and "unexpected" deviations from the status quo. As a result, their responses do not bear an immutable relationship to the nature of the stimulus or other variable being modified; stimuli and activities that are rewarding in certain circumstances are avoided in others. These aspects of behavior have been illustrated by studies of nest occupancy, running in motordriven wheels, and control of intensity of illumination. The results of the control-of-illumination studies suggest the complex interplay of tendencies to modify features of the environment, to avoid conditions imposed compulsorily, and to select preferred levels of illumination. The importance of split-second timing, coordination, and quick reflex actions in the running of activity wheels is indicated by the fact that experienced white-footed mice prefer running in square "wheels" and wheels with hurdles to running in plain round wheels. The relatively conservative behavior of these mice in selecting between multiple sources of food and water and different types of activity wheels suggests the need for careful experimental design in free-choice studies with inexperienced animals. The tendency of trained animals to give some so-called "incorrect" responses even after long experience can be interpreted most reasonably in terms of the adaptive value of a certain degree of variability of behavior in the wild. White-footed mice readily master complex regimes in which several

  11. Blood-stage malaria infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Elased, K; De Souza, J B; Playfair, J H

    1995-01-01

    Infection of mice with blood-stage Plasmodium yoelii and P. chabaudi malaria induced hypoglycaemia in normal mice and normalized the hyperglycaemia of mice made moderately diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ). Injection of parasite supernatants induced hypoglycaemia accompanied by hyperinsulinaemia in normal mice, and in STZ-diabetic mice induced a profound drop in blood glucose and restored insulin secretion; however, severely diabetic mice (two injections of STZ) remained hyperglycaemic with no change in insulin levels. We conclude that malaria infection and parasite-derived molecules lower blood glucose concentration, but only in the presence of some residual pancreatic function. Diabetic mice were less anaemic, exerted a significant control of parasitaemia, and showed enhanced phagocytic activity compared with normal mice. PMID:7882567

  12. Interferon-gamma as an adjuvant in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, A W; Devey, M E; Brown, I N; Richards, C E; Playfair, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have compared interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) with saponin and interleukin-1 (IL-1) as adjuvants for a blood-stage malaria vaccine in mice with various immunological abnormalities. IFN-gamma was particularly effective in Biozzi low antibody responder mice, mice selectively bred to produce antibody of low affinity, and mice depleted of CD4+ T cells. IFN-gamma and other cytokines may be safe adjuvants for use in human immunodeficiency states. PMID:2504662

  13. Generation of Gene Knockout Mice by ES Cell Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Glenn; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    This unit lists and describes protocols used in the production of chimeric mice leading to the generation of gene knockout mice. These protocols include the collection of blastocyst embryos, ES cell injection, and uterine transfer of injected blastocysts. Support protocols in the superovulation of blastocyst donor mice, generation of pseudopregnant recipients, fabrication of glass pipettes, and generation of germline mice are also included. Practical tips and solutions are mentioned to help troubleshoot problems that may occur. PMID:19731226

  14. Color vision: mice see hue too.

    PubMed

    Conway, Bevil R

    2007-06-19

    A transgenic mouse has been generated with three cone types, instead of the normal murine two. Remarkably, some of these mice use the extra cone to make trichromatic color discriminations similar to those that are the basis of human color vision. PMID:17580074

  15. Progress of the MICE experiment at RAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.

    2013-04-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration comprises one cell of the US Neutrino Factory Study II cooling channel. Results obtained on the construction of the beamline and its instrumentation (STEP I) will be reviewed, together with progress towards final measurements of ionization cooling (STEP IV and VI).

  16. Progress with the MICE scintillating fiber trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overton, Edward

    2013-12-01

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a proof of principle demonstration of ionization cooling, for application in a future neutrino factory or muon collider. MICE is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK), where a dedicated beam line has been commissioned to transport particles produced inside the ISIS accelerator facility. The beam emittance will be measured using two scintillating fiber trackers on each side of the cooling channel, which will be mounted inside a 4 T solenoid. As particles pass through the tracker, their position will be measured at 5 stations, each of which provides a position resolution of less than 0.5 mm. The fiber trackers have been validated using cosmic ray tests, which have allowed the light yield to be found. In addition, a spare tracking station was exposed to the MICE beam, which has enabled the tracker readout to be integrated with the MICE DAQ for the first time. This test required the integration gate on the D0 AFE-IIt readout boards to be synchronized with particle arrival by using diagnostic signals from the ISIS accelerator.

  17. Hyperalgesic activity of kisspeptin in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kisspeptin is a neuropeptide known for its role in the hypothalamic regulation of the reproductive axis. Following the recent description of kisspeptin and its 7-TM receptor, GPR54, in the dorsal root ganglia and dorsal horns of the spinal cord, we examined the role of kisspeptin in the regulation of pain sensitivity in mice. Results Immunofluorescent staining in the mouse skin showed the presence of GPR54 receptors in PGP9.5-positive sensory fibers. Intraplantar injection of kisspeptin (1 or 3 nmol/5 μl) induced a small nocifensive response in naive mice, and lowered thermal pain threshold in the hot plate test. Both intraplantar and intrathecal (0.5 or 1 nmol/3 μl) injection of kisspeptin caused hyperalgesia in the first and second phases of the formalin test, whereas the GPR54 antagonist, p234 (0.1 or 1 nmol), caused a robust analgesia. Intraplantar injection of kisspeptin combined with formalin enhanced TRPV1 phosphorylation at Ser800 at the injection site, and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the ipsilateral dorsal horn as compared to naive mice and mice treated with formalin alone. Conclusion These data demonstrate for the first time that kisspeptin regulates pain sensitivity in rodents and suggest that peripheral GPR54 receptors could be targeted by novel drugs in the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:22112588

  18. Focusing solenoids for the MICE cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Rochford, J.H.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    This report describes a design for focusing solenoids for the low beta sections for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). There are three focusing solenoid pairs that will be around the muon absorbers for MICE. The two solenoid coils have an inside diameter of 510 mm, a length of 180 mm, and a thickness of 100 mm. A distance of 260 mm separates the two coils in the pair. The coils are designed to operate at opposite polarity, in order to create a gradient field in the low beta sections of the MICE cooling channel. As result, the force pushing the coil pair apart approaches 270 metric tons when the coils operate close to the short sample current for the superconductor. The forces between the coils will be carried by a support structure that is both on the inside and the outside the coils. During some modes of operation for MICE, the coils may operate at the same polarity, which means that the force between the coils pushes them together. The focusing magnet must be designed for both modes of operation. This support structure for the coils will be part of the focusing magnet quench protection system.

  19. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the heat transfer problems associatedwith a liquid hydrogen absorber for the MICE experiment. This reportdescribes a technique for modeling heat transfer from the outside world,to the abosrber case and in its vacuum vessel, to the hydrogen and theninto helium gas at 14 K. Also presented are the equation for freeconvection cooling of the liquid hydrogen in the absorber.

  20. Immunopathogenesis of environmentally induced lupus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, V M; Satoh, M; Richards, H B; Yoshida, H; Shaw, M; Jennette, J C; Reeves, W H

    1999-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune syndrome defined by clinical and serologic features, including arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and certain autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear ribonucleoprotein (nRNP)/Smith antigen (Sm), DNA, and ribosomal P. Although lupus is considered primarily a genetic disorder, we recently demonstrated the induction of a syndrome strikingly similar to spontaneous lupus in many nonautoimmune strains of mice exposed to the isoprenoid alkane pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane), a component of mineral oil. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane leads to the formation of lipogranulomas consisting of phagocytic cells that have engulfed the oil and collections of lymphocytes. Subsequently, pristane-treated BALB/c and SJL mice develop autoantibodies characteristic of SLE, including anti-nRNP/Sm, antiribosomal P, anti-Su, antichromatin, anti-single-stranded DNA, and anti-double-stranded DNA. This is accompanied by a severe glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition, mesangial or mesangiocapillary proliferation, and proteinuria. All inbred mice examined appear to be susceptible to this novel form of chemically induced lupus. Pristane-induced lupus is the only inducible model of autoimmunity associated with the clinical syndrome as well as with the characteristic serologic abnormalities of SLE. Defining the immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced lupus in mice may provide insight into the causes of spontaneous (idiopathic) lupus and also may lead to information concerning possible risks associated with the ingestion or inhalation of mineral oil and exposure to hydrocarbons in the environment. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10502537

  1. Pentylenetetrazole kindling impairs learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Voigt, J P; Morgenstern, E

    1990-01-01

    Repeated administration of 35 mg/kg body weight pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced a kindling phenomenon and an impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning. In contrast, a single administration of the same dose PTZ had no effect on learning. Kindled mice showed impaired habituation of exploratory activity. The results may be of relevance for antiepileptic drug testing.

  2. Behavioral thermoregulatory response to maitotoxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Yang, Y; Ramsdell, J S

    1998-10-01

    Many types of marine algal toxins induce marked hypothermic responses in mice. However, it is not known if the thermoregulatory response to these toxins results from dysfunction in the control of core temperature (Tc) or is a coordinated response to lower Tc as occurs with a variety of xenobiotic insults. Female CD-1 mice were administered purified maitotoxin (338 ng/kg; IP) and placed in a temperature gradient for 5 h that permitted the selection of ambient temperatures (Ta) ranging between 15 and 37 degrees C. Tc was monitored simultaneously by radiotelemetric probes that were surgically implanted into the abdominal cavity at least one week before maitotoxin injection. Maitotoxin led to a rapid reduction in Tc from 37 to 34 degrees C within 30 min after injection. There was a simultaneous 4 degrees C reduction in Ta selected by mice within 15 min after injection. Selected Ta recovered rapidly, increased above baseline for approximately one hour, then remained near baseline levels for the remainder of the test period in the gradient. Tc remained approximately 1 to 2 degrees C below control levels throughout the test period. In the temperature gradient, mice can select Ta's warm enough to offset the hypothermic effects of maitotoxin. That cooler Ta's are selected initially after maitotoxin injection suggest that the central neural control of body temperature is affected by the toxin. We postulate that the hypothermic response may represent an adaptive response to enhance survival following exposure to polyether toxins. PMID:9723833

  3. Endogenous opiates mediate radiogenic behavioral change. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1983-06-10

    Exposure of C57BL/6J mice to ionizing radiation caused stereotypical locomotor hyperactivity similar to that produced by morphine. Naloxone administration prevented this radiation-induced behavioral activation. These results support the hypothesis that endorphins are involved in some aspects of radiogenic behavioral change.

  4. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogeneis imperfecta mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J. Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J.; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (Po, Po/mg and Po/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased Po and an inability to sustain Po for the 300 ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. PMID:20619344

  5. Bicycle Safety with the Mice Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Jean; Hawkins, Walter

    This 106-page workbook uses a question and answer format to present bicycle safety to students (elementary and/or junior high). The book is extensively illustrated, using a family of mice as characters throughout. Space is provided for students to write responses to questions. Topics covered include history of the bicycle, parts of the bicycle,…

  6. Of Mice and Men: Interdisciplinary Unit. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck Middle School, Cherry Hill, NJ.

    "Of Mice and Men" is developed as an interdisciplinary unit to be team taught by math, science, language arts, and social studies teachers and team guidance counselors. Developed as an individualized program for middle school students, a variety of supplementary materials is provided to exemplify the types of activities suggested for students.…

  7. Effect of ammonia on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Casey, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC /50/ values were determined for Swiss albino male mice exposed to different concentrations of ammonia in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC/50/ for a 30 minute exposure was 21,430 ppm.

  8. Color vision: mice see hue too.

    PubMed

    Conway, Bevil R

    2007-06-19

    A transgenic mouse has been generated with three cone types, instead of the normal murine two. Remarkably, some of these mice use the extra cone to make trichromatic color discriminations similar to those that are the basis of human color vision.

  9. Neural Tube Defects In Mice Exposed To Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Murali K; Werre, Stephen R; Hrubec, Terry C

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2006 we suddenly began to observe neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice. We hypothesized the mice were being exposed unknowingly to a teratogenic agent and investigated the cause. Our results suggested that NTDs were not resulting from bedding material, feed, strain or source of the mice. Additionally, mice were negative for routine and comprehensive screens of pathogens. To further test whether the NTDs resulted from infectious or genetic cause localized to our facility, we obtained three strains of timed pregnant mice from commercial suppliers located in 4 different states. All strains and sources of mice arrived in our laboratory with NTDs, implying that commercially available mice were possibly exposed to a teratogen prior to purchase. Our investigation eventually concluded that exposure to tap water was causing the NTDs. The incidence of NTDs was greatest in purchased mice provided tap water and lowest in purchased mice provided distilled deionized water (DDI). Providing mice DDI water for two generations (F2-DDI) eliminated the NTDs. When F2-DDI mice were provided tap water from three different urban areas prior to breeding, their offspring again developed NTDs. Increased length of exposure to tap water significantly increased the incidence of NTDs. These results indicate that a contaminant in municipal tap water is likely causing NTDs in mice. The unknown teratogen appears to have a wide geographic distribution but has not yet been identified. Water analysis is currently underway to identify candidate contaminants that might be responsible for the malformations. PMID:20549630

  10. Effect of chrysotile asbestos fibers on germ cells of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, P.; Reddy, P.P.

    1986-10-01

    An Indian form of chrysotile asbestos procured from a local asbestos factory (Hyderabad) was tested for its toxic effects on spermatocytes and sperm of mice. Swiss albino male mice were fed orally with chrysotile asbestos suspended in water. The concentration tested was 20 mg/kg/day. Chronic oral administration of chrysotile failed to induce chromosomal aberrations and abnormal sperms in mice.

  11. The Mice Drawer System (MDS) experiment and the space endurance record-breaking mice.

    PubMed

    Cancedda, Ranieri; Liu, Yi; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Tavella, Sara; Biticchi, Roberta; Santucci, Daniela; Schwartz, Silvia; Ciparelli, Paolo; Falcetti, Giancarlo; Tenconi, Chiara; Cotronei, Vittorio; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The Italian Space Agency, in line with its scientific strategies and the National Utilization Plan for the International Space Station (ISS), contracted Thales Alenia Space Italia to design and build a spaceflight payload for rodent research on ISS: the Mice Drawer System (MDS). The payload, to be integrated inside the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation and inside the Express Rack in the ISS during experiment execution, was designed to function autonomously for more than 3 months and to involve crew only for maintenance activities. In its first mission, three wild type (Wt) and three transgenic male mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the control of a bone-specific promoter (PTN-Tg) were housed in the MDS. At the time of launch, animals were 2-months old. MDS reached the ISS on board of Shuttle Discovery Flight 17A/STS-128 on August 28(th), 2009. MDS returned to Earth on November 27(th), 2009 with Shuttle Atlantis Flight ULF3/STS-129 after 91 days, performing the longest permanence of mice in space. Unfortunately, during the MDS mission, one PTN-Tg and two Wt mice died due to health status or payload-related reasons. The remaining mice showed a normal behavior throughout the experiment and appeared in excellent health conditions at landing. During the experiment, the mice health conditions and their water and food consumption were daily checked. Upon landing mice were sacrificed, blood parameters measured and tissues dissected for subsequent analysis. To obtain as much information as possible on microgravity-induced tissue modifications, we organized a Tissue Sharing Program: 20 research groups from 6 countries participated. In order to distinguish between possible effects of the MDS housing conditions and effects due to the near-zero gravity environment, a ground replica of the flight experiment was performed at the University of Genova. Control tissues were collected also from mice maintained on Earth in standard vivarium cages.

  12. The Mice Drawer System (MDS) experiment and the space endurance record-breaking mice.

    PubMed

    Cancedda, Ranieri; Liu, Yi; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Tavella, Sara; Biticchi, Roberta; Santucci, Daniela; Schwartz, Silvia; Ciparelli, Paolo; Falcetti, Giancarlo; Tenconi, Chiara; Cotronei, Vittorio; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The Italian Space Agency, in line with its scientific strategies and the National Utilization Plan for the International Space Station (ISS), contracted Thales Alenia Space Italia to design and build a spaceflight payload for rodent research on ISS: the Mice Drawer System (MDS). The payload, to be integrated inside the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation and inside the Express Rack in the ISS during experiment execution, was designed to function autonomously for more than 3 months and to involve crew only for maintenance activities. In its first mission, three wild type (Wt) and three transgenic male mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the control of a bone-specific promoter (PTN-Tg) were housed in the MDS. At the time of launch, animals were 2-months old. MDS reached the ISS on board of Shuttle Discovery Flight 17A/STS-128 on August 28(th), 2009. MDS returned to Earth on November 27(th), 2009 with Shuttle Atlantis Flight ULF3/STS-129 after 91 days, performing the longest permanence of mice in space. Unfortunately, during the MDS mission, one PTN-Tg and two Wt mice died due to health status or payload-related reasons. The remaining mice showed a normal behavior throughout the experiment and appeared in excellent health conditions at landing. During the experiment, the mice health conditions and their water and food consumption were daily checked. Upon landing mice were sacrificed, blood parameters measured and tissues dissected for subsequent analysis. To obtain as much information as possible on microgravity-induced tissue modifications, we organized a Tissue Sharing Program: 20 research groups from 6 countries participated. In order to distinguish between possible effects of the MDS housing conditions and effects due to the near-zero gravity environment, a ground replica of the flight experiment was performed at the University of Genova. Control tissues were collected also from mice maintained on Earth in standard vivarium cages. PMID:22666312

  13. Lymphocytes from Chronically Stressed Mice Confer Antidepressant-Like Effects to Naive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brachman, Rebecca A.; Lehmann, Michael L.; Maric, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether cells of the adaptive immune system retain the memory of psychosocial stress and thereby alter mood states and CNS function in the host. Lymphocytes from mice undergoing chronic social defeat stress or from unstressed control mice were isolated and adoptively transferred into naive lymphopenic Rag2−/− mice. Changes in affective behavior, hippocampal cell proliferation, microglial activation states, and blood cytokine levels were examined in reconstituted stress-naive mice. The mice receiving lymphocytes from defeated donors showed less anxiety, more social behavior, and increased hippocampal cell proliferation compared with those receiving no cells or cells from unstressed donors. Mice receiving stressed immune cells had reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the blood relative to the other groups, an effect opposite to the elevated donor pro-inflammatory cytokine profile. Furthermore, mice receiving stressed immune cells had microglia skewed toward an anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective M2-like phenotype, an effect opposite the stressed donors' M1-like pro-inflammatory profile. However, stress had no effect on lymphocyte surface marker profiles in both donor and recipient mice. The data suggest that chronic stress-induced changes in the adaptive immune system, contrary to conferring anxiety and depressive behavior, protect against the deleterious effects of stress. Improvement in affective behavior is potentially mediated by reduced peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine load, protective microglial activity, and increased hippocampal cell proliferation. The data identify the peripheral adaptive immune system as putatively involved in the mechanisms underlying stress resilience and a potential basis for developing novel rapid-acting antidepressant therapies. PMID:25632130

  14. The Mice Drawer System (MDS) Experiment and the Space Endurance Record-Breaking Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cancedda, Ranieri; Liu, Yi; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Tavella, Sara; Biticchi, Roberta; Santucci, Daniela; Schwartz, Silvia; Ciparelli, Paolo; Falcetti, Giancarlo; Tenconi, Chiara; Cotronei, Vittorio; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The Italian Space Agency, in line with its scientific strategies and the National Utilization Plan for the International Space Station (ISS), contracted Thales Alenia Space Italia to design and build a spaceflight payload for rodent research on ISS: the Mice Drawer System (MDS). The payload, to be integrated inside the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation and inside the Express Rack in the ISS during experiment execution, was designed to function autonomously for more than 3 months and to involve crew only for maintenance activities. In its first mission, three wild type (Wt) and three transgenic male mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the control of a bone-specific promoter (PTN-Tg) were housed in the MDS. At the time of launch, animals were 2-months old. MDS reached the ISS on board of Shuttle Discovery Flight 17A/STS-128 on August 28th, 2009. MDS returned to Earth on November 27th, 2009 with Shuttle Atlantis Flight ULF3/STS-129 after 91 days, performing the longest permanence of mice in space. Unfortunately, during the MDS mission, one PTN-Tg and two Wt mice died due to health status or payload-related reasons. The remaining mice showed a normal behavior throughout the experiment and appeared in excellent health conditions at landing. During the experiment, the mice health conditions and their water and food consumption were daily checked. Upon landing mice were sacrificed, blood parameters measured and tissues dissected for subsequent analysis. To obtain as much information as possible on microgravity-induced tissue modifications, we organized a Tissue Sharing Program: 20 research groups from 6 countries participated. In order to distinguish between possible effects of the MDS housing conditions and effects due to the near-zero gravity environment, a ground replica of the flight experiment was performed at the University of Genova. Control tissues were collected also from mice maintained on Earth in standard vivarium cages. PMID:22666312

  15. Mice with megabase humanization of their immunoglobulin genes generate antibodies as efficiently as normal mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Andrew J; Macdonald, Lynn E; Stevens, Sean; Karow, Margaret; Dore, Anthony T; Pobursky, Kevin; Huang, Tammy T; Poueymirou, William T; Esau, Lakeisha; Meola, Melissa; Mikulka, Warren; Krueger, Pamela; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Valenzuela, David M; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Yancopoulos, George D

    2014-04-01

    Mice genetically engineered to be humanized for their Ig genes allow for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice), providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human therapeutic antibodies. Unfortunately, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which their genetic humanization was carried out. Heretofore, HumAb mice have been generated by disrupting the endogenous mouse Ig genes and simultaneously introducing human Ig transgenes at a different and random location; KO-plus-transgenic humanization. As we describe in the companion paper, we attempted to make mice that more efficiently use human variable region segments in their humoral responses by precisely replacing 6 Mb of mouse Ig heavy and kappa light variable region germ-line gene segments with their human counterparts while leaving the mouse constant regions intact, using a unique in situ humanization approach. We reasoned the introduced human variable region gene segments would function indistinguishably in their new genetic location, whereas the retained mouse constant regions would allow for optimal interactions and selection of the resulting antibodies within the mouse environment. We show that these mice, termed VelocImmune mice because they were generated using VelociGene technology, efficiently produce human:mouse hybrid antibodies (that are rapidly convertible to fully human antibodies) and have fully functional humoral immune systems indistinguishable from those of WT mice. The efficiency of the VelocImmune approach is confirmed by the rapid progression of 10 different fully human antibodies into human clinical trials.

  16. Adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice reduces mortality in mice infected with human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangning; Li, Xiaoying; Fan, Xiaoxu; Ma, Chunmei; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years of age, and the neurological complications of this virus can lead to death. Until now, no vaccines or drugs have been available for the clinical control of this epidemic. Macrophages can engulf pathogens and mediate a series of host immune responses that play a role in the defence against infectious diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed the localizations of virus in muscle tissues of EV71-infected mice. The macrophages isolated from the adult mice could kill the virus gradually in vitro, as shown using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and virus titration. Co-localisation of lysosomes and virus within macrophages suggested that the lysosomes were possibly responsible for the phagocytosis of EV71. Activation of the macrophages in the peritoneal cavity of mice four days pre-infection reduced the mortality of mice upon lethal EV71 infection. The adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice inhibited virus replication in the muscle tissues of infected mice, and this was followed by a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of mortality, which suggested that the adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult humans represents a potential strategy to treat EV71-infected patients.

  17. NSG Mice Provide a Better Spontaneous Model of Breast Cancer Metastasis than Athymic (Nude) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puchalapalli, Madhavi; Zeng, Xianke; Mu, Liang; Anderson, Aubree; Hix Glickman, Laura; Zhang, Ming; Sayyad, Megan R.; Mosticone Wangensteen, Sierra; Clevenger, Charles V.; Koblinski, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most common cause of mortality in breast cancer patients worldwide. To identify improved mouse models for breast cancer growth and spontaneous metastasis, we examined growth and metastasis of both estrogen receptor positive (T47D) and negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM1315, and CN34BrM) human breast cancer cells in nude and NSG mice. Both primary tumor growth and spontaneous metastases were increased in NSG mice compared to nude mice. In addition, a pattern of metastasis similar to that observed in human breast cancer patients (metastases to the lungs, liver, bones, brain, and lymph nodes) was found in NSG mice. Furthermore, there was an increase in the metastatic burden in NSG compared to nude mice that were injected with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in an intracardiac experimental metastasis model. This data demonstrates that NSG mice provide a better model for studying human breast cancer metastasis compared to the current nude mouse model. PMID:27662655

  18. Chronic treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule reverses dietary induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosick, Peter A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic, low level treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CO-RM), CORM-A1, has been shown to prevent the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic, low level treatment with this CO-RM can reverse established obesity via a mechanism independent of food intake. Dietary induced obese mice were treated with CORM-A1, the inactive compound iCORM-A1, or saline every 48 hours for 30 weeks while maintained on a high fat (60%) diet. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 resulted in a 33% decrease from initial body weight over the 30 week treatment period while treatment with iCORM and saline were associated with 18 and 25% gain in initial body weight over the same time frame. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 did not affect food intake or activity but resulted in a significant increase in metabolism. CORM-A1 treatment also resulted in lower fasting blood glucose, improvement in insulin sensitivity and decreased heptatic steatosis. Chronic treatment with CO releasing molecules can reverse dietary induced obesity and normalize insulin resistance independent of changes in food intake or activity. These findings are likely though a mechanism which increases metabolism. PMID:27144091

  19. Chronic treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule reverses dietary induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosick, Peter A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic, low level treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CO-RM), CORM-A1, has been shown to prevent the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic, low level treatment with this CO-RM can reverse established obesity via a mechanism independent of food intake. Dietary induced obese mice were treated with CORM-A1, the inactive compound iCORM-A1, or saline every 48 hours for 30 weeks while maintained on a high fat (60%) diet. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 resulted in a 33% decrease from initial body weight over the 30 week treatment period while treatment with iCORM and saline were associated with 18 and 25% gain in initial body weight over the same time frame. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 did not affect food intake or activity but resulted in a significant increase in metabolism. CORM-A1 treatment also resulted in lower fasting blood glucose, improvement in insulin sensitivity and decreased heptatic steatosis. Chronic treatment with CO releasing molecules can reverse dietary induced obesity and normalize insulin resistance independent of changes in food intake or activity. These findings are likely though a mechanism which increases metabolism.

  20. Oral lactoferrin protects against experimental candidiasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Alsaedi, Wijdan; Alabdulmohsen, Waad; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fine, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To determine the role of lactoferrin in protecting the oral cavities of mice against Candida albicans infection in lactoferrin knockout (LFKO−/−) mice were compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We also determine the protective role of human lactoferrin in the LFKO−/− mice. Methods and Results Antibiotic treated immunosuppressed mice were inoculated with C. albicans (or sham infection) by oral swab and evaluated for the severity of infection after 7 days of infection. To determine the protective role of hLF, we added 0.3% solution of hLF to the drinking water given to some of the mice. CFU count, scoring of lesions and microscopic observations were carried out to determine the severity of infection. LFKO−/−I mice showed a 2 log (P=0.001) higher CFUs of C. albicans in the oral cavity compared to the WTI mice. LFKO−/−I mice given hLF had a 3 log (P=0.001) reduction in CFUs in the oral cavity compared to untreated LFKO−/−I mice. The severity of infection, observed by light microscopy revealed that the tongue of the LFKO−/−I mice showed more white patches compared to WTI and LFKO−/−I+hLF mice. Scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that more filiform papillae were destroyed in LFKO−/−I mice when compared to WTI or LFKO−/−I +hLF mice. Conclusions Human lactoferrin is important in protecting mice from oral C. albicans infection. Administered hLF may be used to prevent C. albicans infection. Significance and Impact of the Study Human lactoferrin, a multifunctional iron-binding glycoprotein can be used as a therapeutic active ingredient in oral health care products against C. albicans. PMID:25319508

  1. Independence of uniphasic and biphasic audiogenic seizure progressions in mice.

    PubMed

    Reid, H M; Collins, R L

    1989-11-01

    DBA/2J mice were monaurally or binaurally tested for susceptibility to sound-induced seizure. Two seconds following the beginning of running, one group of binaurally tested mice had acoustic stimulation interrupted for 15 s. These mice later seized when the stimulation was readministered. Their seizure progression closely resembled the behavior exhibited by noninterrupted binaurally stimulated mice and did not shift to the biphasic motor pattern of monaurally stimulated subjects. We conclude that the single burst of running of a binaurally tested mouse is qualitatively different from either of the two bursts of running exhibited by monaurally tested mice.

  2. The Results of Tests of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2009-10-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The spectrometer magnets are the largest magnets in both mass and surface area within the MICE ooling channel. Like all of the other magnets in MICE, the spectrometer solenoids are kept cold using 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers. The MICE spectrometer solenoid is quite possibly the largest magnet that has been cooled using small coolers. Two pectrometer magnets have been built and tested. This report discusses the results of current and cooler tests of both magnets.

  3. Characteristics of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Isse, Toyohi; Kitakawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Masanori; Pham, Thi-Thu-Phuong; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2009-11-01

    Acetaldehyde is an intermediate of ethanol oxidation. It covalently binds to DNA, and is known as a carcinogen. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is an important enzyme that oxidizes acetaldehyde. Approximately 45% of Chinese and Japanese individuals have the inactive ALDH2 genotypes (ALDH2*2/*2 and ALDH2*1/*2), and Aldh2 knockout mice appear to be a valid animal model for humans with inactive ALDH2. This review gives an overview of published studies on Aldh2 knockout mice, which were treated with ethanol or acetaldehyde. According to these studies, it was found that Aldh2 -/- mice (Aldh2 knockout mice) are more susceptible to ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced toxicity than Aldh2 +/+ mice (wild type mice). When mice were fed with ethanol, the mortality was increased. When they were exposed to atmospheres containing acetaldehyde, the Aldh2 -/- mice showed more severe toxic symptoms, like weight loss and higher blood acetaldehyde levels, as compared with the Aldh2 +/+ mice. Thus, ethanol and acetaldehyde treatment affects Aldh2 knockout mice more than wild type mice. Based on these findings, it is suggested that ethanol consumption and acetaldehyde inhalation are inferred to pose a higher risk to ALDH2-inactive humans. These results also support that ALDH2-deficient humans who habitually consume alcohol have a higher rate of cancer than humans with functional ALDH2. PMID:19874182

  4. Hepatic immunophenotyping for streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Jeong, Jong-Min; Seo, Wonhyo; Byun, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Won-Il; Yi, Hyon-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence revealed that diabetes induces abnormal immune responses that result in serious complications in organs. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic immunity remains obscure. We evaluated the population and function of hepatic immune cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic mice. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-knockout mice and mice with a depletion of regulatory T cells (DEREG) were used to investigate the migration and role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in hyperglycemic mice. The inflammatory cytokines and hepatic transaminase levels were significantly increased in the hyperglycemic mice. The population and number of infiltrating monocytes, granulocytes, and Tregs were enhanced in the livers of the hyperglycemic mice. Hepatic monocytes other than macrophages showed the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the hyperglycemic mice. The CCR2 knockout and DEREG chimeric mice exhibited increased populations of activated T cells and neutrophils compared to the WT chimeric mice, which promoted hepatic inflammation in the hyperglycemic mice. The migration of CCR2 knockout Tregs into the liver was significantly reduced compared to the WT Tregs. We demonstrated that hyperglycemia contributes to increase in infiltrating monocytes and Tregs, which are associated with hepatic immune dysfunction in mice. CCR2-mediated migration of Tregs regulates hyperglycemia-induced hepatic inflammation. PMID:27464894

  5. Modeling HIV-1 Mucosal Transmission and Prevention in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Veselinovic, Milena; Charlins, Paige; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The new generation humanized mice (hu-mice) that permit continuous de novo generation of human hematopoietic cells have led to novel strategies in studying HIV-1 pathogenesis, prevention and therapies. HIV-1 infection of hu-mice results in chronic viremia and CD4+ T cell loss, thus mimicking key aspects of the disease progression. In addition, the new generation hu-mice are permissive for HIV-1 sexual transmission by vaginal and rectal routes thus allowing in vivo efficacy testing of new anti-HIV-1 drugs for prevention. Two leading models are currently being used, namely the hu-HSC mice and the BLT mice. Here we describe the methodology for generating both hu-HSC and BLT mice and their use in the study of HIV-1 transmission and prevention of infection by topical and oral administration of anti-retroviral drugs. Practical aspects of the methodologies are emphasized.

  6. Effect of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on ICR mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC(50) values were determined for male ICR mice exposed to different concentration of carbon monoxide for 30 min and of nitrogen dioxide for 10 min in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The data indicate that ICR mice are more resistant to these two toxicants than Swiss albino mice. The carbon monoxide LC(50) for a 30-min exposure was about 8,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to 3,570 ppm for Swiss albino mice. The nitrogen dioxide LC(50) for a 10-min exposure was above 2,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to about 1,000 ppm for Swiss albino mice.

  7. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2015-05-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research.

  8. The detector system of the MICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orestano, D.

    2010-05-01

    Muon ionization cooling provides the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance is first measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first one provides a measurement of the outgoing emittance. A particle identification system ensures that the measured muon has not decayed. This paper describes scope and performance of the MICE detector system.

  9. Comprehensive Energy Balance Measurements in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moir, Lee; Bentley, Liz; Cox, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    In mice with altered body composition, establishing whether it is food intake or energy expenditure, or both, that is the major determinant resulting in changed energy balance is important. In order to ascertain where the imbalance is, the acquisition of reproducible data is critical. Therefore, here we provide detailed descriptions of how to determine energy balance in mice. This encompasses protocols for establishing energy intake from home cage measurement of food intake, determining energy lost in feces using bomb calorimetry, and using equations to calculate parameters such as energy intake (EI), digested energy intake (DEI), and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) to determine overall energy balance. We also discuss considerations that should be taken into account when planning these experiments, including diet and sample sizes. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584551

  10. Caffeine lengthens circadian rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ishida, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Although caffeine alters sleep in many animals, whether or not it affects mammalian circadian clocks remains unknown. Here, we found that incubating cultured mammalian cell lines, human osteosarcoma U2OS cells and mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cells, with caffeine lengthened the period of circadian rhythms. Adding caffeine to ex vivo cultures also lengthened the circadian period in mouse liver explants from Per2::Luciferase reporter gene knockin mice, and caused a phase delay in brain slices containing the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the central circadian clock in mammals is located. Furthermore, chronic caffeine consumption ad libitum for a week delayed the phase of the mouse liver clock in vivo under 12 h light-dark conditions and lengthened the period of circadian locomotor rhythms in mice under constant darkness. Our results showed that caffeine alters circadian clocks in mammalian cells in vitro and in the mouse ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:21684260

  11. Progress on the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.; Lau, W.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-06-10

    This report describes the 400 mm warm bore tracker solenoid for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The 2.923 m long tracker solenoid module includes the radiation shutter between the end absorber focus coil modules and the tracker as well as the 2.735 m long magnet cryostat vacuum vessel. The 2.554 m long tracker solenoid cold mass consists of two sections, a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil matching section that matches the uniform field 4 T spectrometer solenoid into the MICE cooling channel. The two tracker magnets are used to provide a uniform magnetic field for the fiber detectors that are used to measure the muon beam emittance at the two ends of the cooling channel. This paper describes the design for the tracker magnet coils and the 4.2 K cryogenic coolers that are used to cool the superconducting magnet. Interfaces between the magnet and the detectors are discussed.

  12. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  13. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2015-01-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research. PMID:25680625

  14. Galactose inhibition of ovulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Swartz, W J; Mattison, D R

    1988-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests an association between galactosemia and premature ovarian failure. In the present study, adult female mice were fed a diet consisting of 50% galactose for either 2, 4, or 6 weeks. At all times there was a decrease in the normal ovulatory response, as evidenced by a reduction in the number of corpora lutea when compared with controls. Additionally, the exposure of galactose-treated mice to a superovulatory regimen of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) failed to induce an increased ovulatory response. Morphologic alterations, such as the increase in interstitial tissue and the appearance of lipofuscin, coupled with the failure to respond to exogenous gonadotropins, suggest that the reduced ovulatory response may be occurring at the level of the ovary. This effect, however, is reversible with cessation of galactose treatment. PMID:3342905

  15. Antidepressant Activity of Brahmi in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kadali, SLDV Ramana Murty; M.C., Das; Rao A.S.R., Srinivasa; Sri G, Karuna

    2014-01-01

    Context: In traditional system of medicine brahmi has been used to enhance memory. Recently it has been reported to have action in psychiatric disorders. With these backgrounds the work has been undertaken to study antidepressant activity of brahmi in albino mice. Aim: To evaluate antidepressant activity of brahmi in experimental models. Materials and Methods: The antidepressant activity was studied in albino mice using forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and shock induced depression (SID). Imipramine (10mg/kg), fluoxetine (30mg/kg) were used as standard drugs and brahmi (10, 20, 30mg/kg) was used as test drug. Results: Brahmi exhibited significant decrease in duration of immobility in FST and reduced the shock induced decrease in activity in SID models. It didn’t show any activity in the TST model. Conclusion: Brahmi has shown antidepressant activity in FST and SID. PMID:24783074

  16. Comprehensive Energy Balance Measurements in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moir, Lee; Bentley, Liz; Cox, Roger D

    2016-09-01

    In mice with altered body composition, establishing whether it is food intake or energy expenditure, or both, that is the major determinant resulting in changed energy balance is important. In order to ascertain where the imbalance is, the acquisition of reproducible data is critical. Therefore, here we provide detailed descriptions of how to determine energy balance in mice. This encompasses protocols for establishing energy intake from home cage measurement of food intake, determining energy lost in feces using bomb calorimetry, and using equations to calculate parameters such as energy intake (EI), digested energy intake (DEI), and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) to determine overall energy balance. We also discuss considerations that should be taken into account when planning these experiments, including diet and sample sizes. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    Background: The immune response is blunted in mice and humans in spaceflight. The effects of hyperoxia in mice alter expression of some of the same immune response genes. If these two conditions are additive, there could be an increased risk of infection in long duration missions. Immunosuppression is seen in healthy astronauts who have flown in space; however little is known about the mechanisms that cause the reduced immunity in spaceflight. Here we examine the role of oxidative stress on mice exposed to periods of high O2 levels mimicking pre-breathing protocols and extravehicular activity (EVA). To prevent decompression sickness, astronauts are exposed to elevated oxygen (hyperoxia) before and during EVA activities. Spaceflight missions may entail up to 24 hours of EVA per crewmember per week to perform construction and maintenance tasks. The effectiveness and success of these missions depends on designing EVA systems and protocols that maximize human performance and efficiency while minimizing health and safety risks for crewmembers. To our knowledge, no studies have been conducted on the immune system under 100% oxygen exposures to determine the potential for immune compromise due to prolonged and repeated EVAs. Methods: Animals were exposed to hyperoxic or control conditions for 8 hours per day over a period of 3 days, initiated 4 hours into the dark cycle (12h dark/12h light), using animal environmental control cabinets and oxygen controller (Biospherix, Lacona, NY). Experimental mice were exposed to 98-100% oxygen as a model for pre-breathing and EVA conditions, while control mice were maintained in chambers supplied with compressed air. These are ground control studies where we use real-time RTPCR (qRTPCR) to measure gene expression of the early immune gene expression during bead activation of splenocytes of normoxic and hyperoxic mice. All procedures were reviewed and approved by the IACUC at Ames Research Center. After the last 8h of hyperoxic exposure

  18. Animal models of anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Dhonnchadha, Brid Nic; Hascöet, Martine

    2007-12-01

    Among the multiple possibilities to study human pathologies, animal models remain one of the most used pathways. They allow to access to unavailable answers in human patients and to learn about mechanisms of action of drugs. Primarily developed with rats, animal models in anxiety have been adapted with a mixed success for mice, an easy-to-use mammal with better genetic possibilities than rats. In this review, we have focused on the most used animal models in anxiety in mice. Both conditioned and unconditioned models are described, to represent all types of animal models of anxiety. Behavioural studies require strong care for variable parameters, linked to environment, handling or paradigm; we have discussed about this topic. Finally, we focused on the consequences of re-exposure to the apparatus. Test-retest procedures can bring in new answers, but should be deeply studied, to revalidate the whole paradigm as an animal model of anxiety.

  19. Running enhances spatial pattern separation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Creer, David J.; Romberg, Carola; Saksida, Lisa M.; van Praag, Henriette; Bussey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that regular exercise improves brain health and promotes synaptic plasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise improves learning, but specific mechanisms of information processing influenced by physical activity are unknown. Here, we report that voluntary running enhanced the ability of adult (3 months old) male C57BL/6 mice to discriminate between the locations of two adjacent identical stimuli. Improved spatial pattern separation in adult runners was tightly correlated with increased neurogenesis. In contrast, very aged (22 months old) mice had impaired spatial discrimination and low basal cell genesis that was refractory to running. These findings suggest that the addition of newly born neurons may bolster dentate gyrus-mediated encoding of fine spatial distinctions. PMID:20133882

  20. Methods to measure olfactory behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Junhui; Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-02-02

    Mice rely on the sense of olfaction to detect food sources, recognize social and mating partners, and avoid predators. Many behaviors of mice, including learning and memory, social interaction, fear, and anxiety are closely associated with their function of olfaction, and behavior tasks designed to evaluate those brain functions may use odors as cues. Accurate assessment of olfaction is not only essential for the study of olfactory system but also critical for proper interpretation of various mouse behaviors, especially learning and memory, emotionality and affect, and sociality. Here we describe a series of behavior experiments that offer multidimensional and quantitative assessments for mouse olfactory function, including olfactory habituation, discrimination, odor preference, odor detection sensitivity, and olfactory memory, with respect to both social and nonsocial odors.

  1. STUDIES ON TRANSMISSIBLE LYMPHOID LEUCEMIA OF MICE.

    PubMed

    Furth, J; Strumia, M

    1931-04-30

    Lymphoid leucemia of the mouse is readily transmitted by intravenous inoculations. The majority of the mice inoculated successfully develop leucemic, a smaller number of them, aleucemic lymphadenosis. The data presented favor the view that leucemic and aleucemic lymphadenosis are essentially the same condition. Leucemia produced by transmission is preceded by an aleucemic stage, in which the lymph nodes and the spleen are uniformly enlarged, and the white blood count and the percentage of lymphocytes are within the normal range but immature lymphocytes are numerous in the circulating blood. Young as well as old mice may develop leucemia if leucotic material enters their circulation. Studies of transmissible leucemia favor the view that leucemia of mammals is a neoplastic disease. The basic problem of leucemia would seem to be determination of the factors that bring about a malignant transformation of lymphoid cells.

  2. Health Evaluation of Experimental Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Tanya; Foltz, Charmaine; Karlsson, Eleanor; Linton, C Garry; Smith, Joanne M

    2012-01-01

    Good science and good animal care go hand in hand. A sick or distressed animal does not produce the reliable results that a healthy and unstressed animal produces. This unit describes the essentials of assessing mouse health, colony health surveillance, common conditions, and determination of appropriate endpoints. Understanding the health and well-being of the mice used in research enables the investigator to optimize research results and animal care. PMID:22822473

  3. Microangiography in Living Mice Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Falei; Wang Yongting; Xie Bohua; Tang Yaohui; Guan Yongjing; Lu Haiyan; Yang Guoyuan; Xie Honglan; Du Guohao; Xiao Tiqiao

    2010-07-23

    Traditionally, there are no methods available to detect the fine morphologic changes of cerebrovasculature in small living animals such as rats and mice. Newly developed synchrotron radiation microangiography can achieve a fine resolution of several micrometers and had provided us with a powerful tool to study the cerebral vasculature in small animals. The purpose of this study is to identify the morphology of cerebrovasculature especially the structure of Lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) in living mice using the synchrotron radiation source at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in Shanghai, China. Adult CD-1 mice weighing 35-40 grams were anesthetized. Nonionic iodine (Omnipaque, 350 mg I /mL) was used as a contrast agent. The study was performed at the BL13W1 beam line at SSRF. The beam line was derived from a storage ring of electrons with an accelerated energy of 3.5 GeV and an average beam current of 200 mA. X-ray energy of 33.3 keV was used to produce the highest contrast image. Images were acquired every 172 ms by a x-ray camera (Photonic-Science VHR 1.38) with a resolution of 13 {mu}m/pixel. The optimal dose of contrast agent is 100 {mu}l per injection and the injecting rate is 33 {mu}l/sec. The best position for imaging is to have the mouse lay on its right or left side, with ventral side facing the X-ray source. We observed the lenticulostriate artery for the first time in living mice. Our result show that there are 4 to 5 lenticulostriate branches originating from the root of middle cerebral artery in each hemisphere. LSAs have an average diameter of 43{+-}6.8 {mu}m. There were no differences between LSAs from the left and right hemisphere (p<0.05). These results suggest that synchrotron radiation may provide a unique tool for experimental stroke research.

  4. MICE data handling on the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyniak, J.; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The international Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate the principle of muon ionisation cooling for the first time, for application to a future Neutrino factory or Muon Collider. The experiment is currently under construction at the ISIS synchrotron at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), UK. In this paper we present a system - the Raw Data Mover, which allows us to store and distribute MICE raw data - and a framework for offline reconstruction and data management. The aim of the Raw Data Mover is to upload raw data files onto a safe tape storage as soon as the data have been written out by the DAQ system and marked as ready to be uploaded. Internal integrity of the files is verified and they are uploaded to the RAL Tier-1 Castor Storage Element (SE) and placed on two tapes for redundancy. We also make another copy at a separate disk-based SE at this stage to make it easier for users to access data quickly. Both copies are check-summed and the replicas are registered with an instance of the LCG File Catalog (LFC). On success a record with basic file properties is added to the MICE Metadata DB. The reconstruction process is triggered by new raw data records filled in by the mover system described above. Off-line reconstruction jobs for new raw files are submitted to RAL Tier-1 and the output is stored on tape. Batch reprocessing is done at multiple MICE enabled Grid sites and output files are shipped to central tape or disk storage at RAL using a custom File Transfer Controller.

  5. Immunomodulatory activities of gemifloxacin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Umair, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Ghafoor, Aamir; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Gemifloxacin is a broad spectrum antibiotic and has shown excellent coverage against a wide variety of microorganisms. In this study, an attempt was made to evaluate the immunomodulatory potential of gemifloxacin in male swiss albino mice in vivo. Materials and Methods: Three doses of gemifloxacin 25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg and 75 mg/kg were used intraperitoneally (IP) for the evaluation of immune responses in mice. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), heamagglutination assay, jerne hemolytic plaque formation assay and cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia assay were performed to evaluate the effect of gemifloxacin on immune responses. Results: DTH assay has shown the significant immune suppressant potential of gemifloxacin at 25 mg/kg dose and 75mg/kg dose. Total leukocyte count (TLC) has shown decrease in leukocyte count (P<0.05) in drug treatment groups before cyclophosphamide administration and significant decrease (P<0.001) in leukocyte count after cyclophosphamide administration as compared to negative control group. Differential leukocyte count (DLC) has shown significant decrease (P<0.001) in percentage count of lymphocytes in 75 mg/kg treatment group in leukopenic mice while increase (P<0.01) in monocytes percentage in 50 mg/kg treatment group in leukopenic mice and increase in neutrophil percentage count (P<0.05) in all treatment groups was observed after cyclophosphamide administration. Humoral immune response is shown to be suppressed in dose dependent manner by both heamagglutination titre values (P<0.001) and jerne hemolytic plaque formation assay (P<0.001). Conclusion: The results of this work clearly demonstrate that gemifloxacin has significant immunomodulatory potential. PMID:27803786

  6. Morphine suppression of ethanol withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Blum, K; Wallace, J E; Schwerter, H A; Eubanks, J D

    1976-01-15

    The acute administration of morphine, alcohol or dopamine results in a pronounced suppression of the convulsions produced by alcohol in mice. The suppressive action of morphine on alcohol withdrawal in the mouse apparently is not a product of morphine intoxication, but rather to some other specific interaction between alcohol and morphine in the central nervous system. The conclusion suggest that dopamine may play a significant role as a modulator in convulsions produced during alcohol withdrawal.

  7. Radioprotectors and Tumors: Molecular Studies in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle Woloschak, David Grdina

    2010-03-10

    This proposal investigated effects of radiation using a set of archival tissues. Main interests of this proposal were to investigate effects of irradiation alone or in the presence or radioprotectors; to investigate these effects on different tissues; and to use/develop molecular biology techniques that would be suitable for work with archived tissues. This work resulted in several manuscripts published or in preparation. Approach for evaluation of gene copy numbers by quantitative real time PCR has been developed and we are striving to establish methods to utilize Q-RT-PCR data to evaluate genomic instability caused by irradiation(s) and accompanying treatments. References: 1. Paunesku D, Paunesku T, Wahl A, Kataoka Y, Murley J, Grdina DJ, Woloschak GE. Incidence of tissue toxicities in gamma ray and fission neutron-exposed mice treated with Amifostine. Int J Radiat Biol. 2008, 84(8):623-34. PMID: 18661379, http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.1080/09553000802241762?cookieSet=1 2. Wang Q, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Tissue and data archives from irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory over a period of four decades, in press in Radiation and Environmental Biophysics. 3. Alcantara M, Paunesku D, Rademaker A, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF TISSUE TOXICITIES IN B6CF1 MICE IRRADIATED WITH FISSION NEUTRONS OR COBALT 60 GAMMA RAYS: Gender modulates accumulation of tissue toxicities caused by low dose rate fractionated irradiation; in preparation; this document has been uploaded as STI product 4. Wang Q, Paunesku T Wanzer B and Woloschak GE. Mitochondrial gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice with lymphoid cancers; in preparation 5. Wang Q, Raha, S, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Evaluation of gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice; in preparation

  8. Cardiac hypertrophy in mice expressing unphosphorylatable phospholemman

    PubMed Central

    Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Pavlovic, Davor; Aughton, Karen; Clark, James E.; Howie, Jacqueline; Fuller, William; Shattock, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevation of intracellular Na in the failing myocardium contributes to contractile dysfunction, the negative force–frequency relationship, and arrhythmias. Although phospholemman (PLM) is recognized to form the link between signalling pathways and Na/K pump activity, the possibility that defects in its regulation contribute to elevation of intracellular Na has not been investigated. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the prevention of PLM phosphorylation in a PLM3SA knock-in mouse (in which PLM has been rendered unphosphorylatable) will exacerbate cardiac hypertrophy and cellular Na overload. Testing this hypothesis should determine whether changes in PLM phosphorylation are simply bystander effects or are causally involved in disease progression. Methods and results In wild-type (WT) mice, aortic constriction resulted in hypophosphorylation of PLM with no change in Na/K pump expression. This under-phosphorylation of PLM occurred at 3 days post-banding and was associated with a progressive decline in Na/K pump current and elevation of [Na]i. Echocardiography, morphometry, and pressure-volume (PV) catheterization confirmed remodelling, dilation, and contractile dysfunction, respectively. In PLM3SA mice, expression of Na/K ATPase was increased and PLM decreased such that net Na/K pump current under quiescent conditions was unchanged (cf. WT myocytes); [Na+]i was increased and forward-mode Na/Ca exchanger was reduced in paced PLM3SA myocytes. Cardiac hypertrophy and Na/K pump inhibition were significantly exacerbated in banded PLM3SA mice compared with banded WT. Conclusions Decreased phosphorylation of PLM reduces Na/K pump activity and exacerbates Na overload, contractile dysfunction, and adverse remodelling following aortic constriction in mice. This suggests a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:25103111

  9. Genetic dissection of puberty in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devesh; Boehm, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    Determining the neural mechanisms controlling gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release is of pivotal importance in understanding central control of reproductive physiology in vertebrates. Targeted genetic manipulation of kisspeptin and GPR54 neurons has provided new insights into the mechanisms modulating GnRH release and thereby regulating hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis activity during reproductive maturation. While conditional ablation of the oestrogen receptor α gene in kisspeptin neurons results in a dramatic advancement of the onset of puberty in female mice, subsequent pubertal maturation is arrested in these animals, as they fail to acquire normal ovulatory cyclicity. These data suggest that two oestrogen receptor α-dependent mechanisms, one a 'brake' and the other an 'accelerator', are sequentially operated in kisspeptin neurons during pubertal development of female mice to gate and then to activate GnRH release. In a different experimental approach, we removed entire kisspeptin neurons from the mouse brain and thus from the neural circuits controlling reproduction. Surprisingly, the onset of puberty in females was unaffected by kisspeptin neuron ablation. Furthermore, the animals attained regular ovulatory cyclicity and were fertile. Consistent with this, female mice lacking neurons that express the kisspeptin receptor GPR54 were also fertile, suggesting female reproductive maturation in the absence of kisspeptin/GPR54 signalling. However, acute kisspeptin neuron ablation in adult mice inhibited fertility, indicating that there is developmental compensation for the loss of kisspeptin neurons during reproductive neural circuit formation. Finally, we showed that kisspeptin neurons become an indispensable part of reproductive neural circuitry in the mouse brain before postnatal day 20.

  10. Gene expression: RNA interference in adult mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Anton P.; Meuse, Leonard; Pham, Thu-Thao T.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Kay, Mark A.

    2002-07-01

    RNA interference is an evolutionarily conserved surveillance mechanism that responds to double-stranded RNA by sequence-specific silencing of homologous genes. Here we show that transgene expression can be suppressed in adult mice by synthetic small interfering RNAs and by small-hairpin RNAs transcribed in vivo from DNA templates. We also show the therapeutic potential of this technique by demonstrating effective targeting of a sequence from hepatitis C virus by RNA interference in vivo.

  11. Connective tissue abnormalities in MRL/1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J C; Cooke, A; Moore, A R; Collins, C; Hay, F; Willoughby, D A

    1986-01-01

    Pathological changes in the connective tissue of the limbs of MRL/1 mice are described. Focal infiltrates of polymorphs or large mononuclear cells, or both, were seen both in synovial lining and subcutaneous tissue. Infiltrates were associated with vasculitis in some cases. Deposits of amorphous material were seen in and around joints and in foot pads. The material was more particulate and refractile than typical 'fibrinoid' and showed a positive Feulgen reaction. It was not surrounded by palisading cells and when seen in synovial tissue was not usually associated with changes in synovial lining cells. No obvious difference was seen between intra-articular and extra-articular lesions. Lesions in subcutaneous tissue occurred exclusively in the foot pads. Lymphocyte infiltration was not prominent at any site and no follicle formation was seen. Of two colonies studied, only one showed a significant increase in lining cell numbers in synovial tissue. Exercised animals had a similar distribution and severity of disease to those of matched controls. All lesions described were distinguishable from non-specific inflammatory lesions in normal control mice and MRL/++ mice on assessment of unmarked sections. The relation between these connective tissue lesions and the changes found in human chronic synovitis is discussed. Images PMID:3729576

  12. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  13. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  14. Drug-induced regeneration in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Strehin, Iossif; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise; Leferovich, John; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Whereas amphibians regenerate lost appendages spontaneously, mammals generally form scars over the injury site through the process of wound repair. The MRL mouse strain is an exception among mammals because it shows a spontaneous regenerative healing trait and so can be used to investigate proregenerative interventions in mammals. We report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a central molecule in the process of regeneration in adult MRL mice. The degradation of HIF-1α protein, which occurs under normoxic conditions, is mediated by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). We used the drug 1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3-carboxylic acid (1,4-DPCA), a PHD inhibitor, to stabilize constitutive expression of HIF-1α protein. A locally injectable hydrogel containing 1,4-DPCA was designed to achieve controlled delivery of the drug over 4 to 10 days. Subcutaneous injection of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel into Swiss Webster mice that do not show a regenerative phenotype increased stable expression of HIF-1α protein over 5 days, providing a functional measure of drug release in vivo. Multiple peripheral subcutaneous injections of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel over a 10-day period led to regenerative wound healing in Swiss Webster mice after ear hole punch injury. Increased expression of the HIF-1α protein may provide a starting point for future studies on regeneration in mammals. PMID:26041709

  15. Parturition failure in mice lacking Mamld1.

    PubMed

    Miyado, Mami; Miyado, Kenji; Katsumi, Momori; Saito, Kazuki; Nakamura, Akihiro; Shihara, Daizou; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki

    2015-10-05

    In mice, the onset of parturition is triggered by a rapid decline in circulating progesterone. Progesterone withdrawal occurs as a result of functional luteolysis, which is characterized by an increase in the enzymatic activity of 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20α-HSD) in the corpus luteum and is mediated by the prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) signaling. Here, we report that the genetic knockout (KO) of Mamld1, which encodes a putative non-DNA-binding regulator of testicular steroidogenesis, caused defective functional luteolysis and subsequent parturition failure and neonatal deaths. Progesterone receptor inhibition induced the onset of parturition in pregnant KO mice, and MAMLD1 regulated the expression of Akr1c18, the gene encoding 20α-HSD, in cultured cells. Ovaries of KO mice at late gestation were morphologically unremarkable; however, Akr1c18 expression was reduced and expression of its suppressor Stat5b was markedly increased. Several other genes including Prlr, Cyp19a1, Oxtr, and Lgals3 were also dysregulated in the KO ovaries, whereas PGF2α signaling genes remained unaffected. These results highlight the role of MAMLD1 in labour initiation. MAMLD1 likely participates in functional luteolysis by regulating Stat5b and other genes, independent of the PGF2α signaling pathway.

  16. Zoopharmacognosy in Diseased Laboratory Mice: Conflicting Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Minesh; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Donglai; Hatkar, Rupal; Marchese, Monica; Sakic, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Zoopharmacognosy denotes a constellation of learned ingestive responses that promote healing and survival of infected or poisoned animals. A similar self-medication phenomenon was reported in diseased laboratory rodents. In particular, a series of studies revealed that autoimmune MRL/lpr mice readily consume solutions paired or laced with cyclophosphamide (CY), an immunosuppressive drug that prevents inflammatory damage to internal organs. However, due to design limitations, it could not be elucidated whether such a response reflects the learned therapeutic effect of CY, or a deficit in sensory input. We presently assess the behavioural effects of prolonged consumption of CY-laced, 16% sucrose solution in a continuous choice paradigm, with tap water available ad lib. Contrary to overall expectation, MRL/lpr mice did not increase their intake of CY with disease progression. Moreover, they ingested lower doses of CY and preferred less CY-laced sucrose solution than age-matched controls. The results obtained could not confirm zoopharmacognosy in diseased MRL/lpr mice, likely due to impaired responsiveness to palatable stimulation, or attenuated survival mechanisms after prolonged inbreeding in captivity. However, by revealing the effectiveness of unrestricted drinking of drug-laced sucrose solution on behavior and immunity, the current study supports broader use of such an administration route in behavioural studies sensitive to external stressors. PMID:24956477

  17. Heart regeneration in adult MRL mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leferovich, John M.; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Samulewicz, Stefan; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Zwas, Donna; Lankford, Edward B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2001-08-01

    The reaction of cardiac tissue to acute injury involves interacting cascades of cellular and molecular responses that encompass inflammation, hormonal signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and compensatory adaptation of myocytes. Myocardial regeneration is observed in amphibians, whereas scar formation characterizes cardiac ventricular wound healing in a variety of mammalian injury models. We have previously shown that the MRL mouse strain has an extraordinary capacity to heal surgical wounds, a complex trait that maps to at least seven genetic loci. Here, we extend these studies to cardiac wounds and demonstrate that a severe transmural, cryogenically induced infarction of the right ventricle heals extensively within 60 days, with the restoration of normal myocardium and function. Scarring is markedly reduced in MRL mice compared with C57BL/6 mice, consistent with both the reduced hydroxyproline levels seen after injury and an elevated cardiomyocyte mitotic index of 10-20% for the MRL compared with 1-3% for the C57BL/6. The myocardial response to injury observed in these mice resembles the regenerative process seen in amphibians.

  18. Superconducting solenoids for the MICE channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Baynham, D.E.; Rockford, J.H.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinin, S.; Palmer, R.B.; Rey, J.M.

    2003-05-01

    This report describes the channel of superconductingsolenoids for the proposed international Muon Ionization CoolingExperiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channelthat is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrinofactory[1]. MICE also consists of two detector solenoids at either end ofthe cooling channel section. The superconducting solenoids for MICEperform three functions. The coupling solenoids, which are largesolenoids around 201.25 MHz RF cavities, couple the muon beam between thefocusing sections as it passes along the cooling channel. The focusingsolenoids are around the liquid hydrogen absorber that reduces themomentum of the muons in all directions. These solenoids generate agradient field along the axis as they reduce the beta of the muon beambefore it enters the absorber. Each detector solenoid system consists offive coils that match the muon beam coming to or from an absorber to a4.0 T uniform solenoidal field section that that contains the particledetectors at the ends of the experiment. There are detector solenoids atthe beginning and at the end of the experiment. This report describes theparameters of the eighteen superconducting coils that make up the MICEmagnetic channel.

  19. Pathogenicity of Yersinia kristensenii for mice.

    PubMed

    Robins-Browne, R M; Cianciosi, S; Bordun, A M; Wauters, G

    1991-01-01

    Forty-seven strains of Yersinia kristensenii from widely differing sources, representing all known O serogroups of this species, were investigated for virulence with a variety of animal and in vitro assays. Twenty-four (51%) of the isolates were lethal for mice pretreated with iron dextran. Mouse-lethal strains occurred predominantly within O serogroups O:11, O:12,25, and O:16. Virulent Y. kristensenii strains generally did not express the virulence-associated phenotype (Ca2+ dependence and binding of Congo red and crystal violet) which characterizes virulent strains of Y. enterocolitica, nor did they carry the Yersinia virulence plasmid. Although all strains hybridized with a DNA probe derived from the inv (invasin) gene of Y. enterocolitica, none was able to invade HEp-2 epithelial cell culture. Y. kristensenii strains were virulent only when inoculated parenterally into iron-loaded mice. Animals infected in this way succumbed rapidly to infection, generally within 24 h. This finding suggested that the pathogenicity of these bacteria may be attributable to a secreted toxin, but a search for such a substance and for other in vitro correlates of pathogenicity was unsuccessful. These observations indicate that some strains of Y. kristensenii kill mice by a mechanism not previously recognized in yersiniae.

  20. Pathogenicity of Yersinia kristensenii for mice.

    PubMed Central

    Robins-Browne, R M; Cianciosi, S; Bordun, A M; Wauters, G

    1991-01-01

    Forty-seven strains of Yersinia kristensenii from widely differing sources, representing all known O serogroups of this species, were investigated for virulence with a variety of animal and in vitro assays. Twenty-four (51%) of the isolates were lethal for mice pretreated with iron dextran. Mouse-lethal strains occurred predominantly within O serogroups O:11, O:12,25, and O:16. Virulent Y. kristensenii strains generally did not express the virulence-associated phenotype (Ca2+ dependence and binding of Congo red and crystal violet) which characterizes virulent strains of Y. enterocolitica, nor did they carry the Yersinia virulence plasmid. Although all strains hybridized with a DNA probe derived from the inv (invasin) gene of Y. enterocolitica, none was able to invade HEp-2 epithelial cell culture. Y. kristensenii strains were virulent only when inoculated parenterally into iron-loaded mice. Animals infected in this way succumbed rapidly to infection, generally within 24 h. This finding suggested that the pathogenicity of these bacteria may be attributable to a secreted toxin, but a search for such a substance and for other in vitro correlates of pathogenicity was unsuccessful. These observations indicate that some strains of Y. kristensenii kill mice by a mechanism not previously recognized in yersiniae. PMID:1987029

  1. Decreased osteoclastogenesis in serotonin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Coudert, Amélie E.; Callebert, Jacques; Geoffroy, Valérie; Côté, Francine; Collet, Corinne; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral serotonin, synthesized by tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1), has been shown to play a key role in several physiological functions. Recently, controversy has emerged about whether peripheral serotonin has any effect on bone density and remodeling.We therefore decided to investigate in detail bone remodeling in growing and mature TPH1 knockout mice (TPH1−/−). Bone resorption in TPH1−/− mice, as assessed by biochemical markers and bone histomorphometry, was markedly decreased at both ages. Using bone marrow transplantation, we present evidence that the decrease in bone resorption in TPH1−/− mice is cell-autonomous. Cultures from TPH1−/− in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator for NF-KB ligand (RANKL) displayed fewer osteoclasts, and the decreased differentiation could be rescued by adding serotonin. Our data also provide evidence that in the presence of RANKL, osteoclast precursors express TPH1 and synthesize serotonin. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of serotonin receptor 1B with SB224289, and of receptor 2A with ketanserin, also reduced the number of osteoclasts. Our findings reveal that serotonin has an important local action in bone, as it can amplify the effect of RANKL on osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22308416

  2. Circadian Behaviour in Neuroglobin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hundahl, Christian A.; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night. PMID:22496809

  3. Generation of knockout mice using engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Jin, Young; Kim, Seokjoong; Lee, Han-Woong

    2014-08-15

    The use of engineered nucleases in one-cell stage mouse embryos is emerging as an efficient alternative to conventional gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These nucleases are designed or reprogrammed to specifically induce double strand breaks (DSBs) at a desired genomic locus, and efficiently introduce mutations by both error-prone and error-free DNA repair mechanisms. Since these mutations frequently result in the loss or alteration of gene function by inserting, deleting, or substituting nucleotide sequences, engineered nucleases are enabling us to efficiently generate gene knockout and knockin mice. Three kinds of engineered endonucleases have been developed and successfully applied to the generation of mutant mice: zinc-finger nuclease (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs). Based on recent advances, here we provide experimentally validated, detailed guidelines for generating non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)-mediated mutant mice by microinjecting TALENs and RGENs into the cytoplasm or the pronucleus of one-cell stage mouse embryos.

  4. Induction of Overt Menstruation in Intact Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Marion; Döcke, Wolf-Dietrich; Müller, Andrea; Menning, Astrid; Röse, Lars; Zollner, Thomas Matthias; Gashaw, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    The complex tissue remodeling process of menstruation is experienced by humans and some primates, whereas most placental mammals, including mice, go through an estrous cycle. How menstruation and the underlying mechanisms evolved is still unknown. Here we demonstrate that the process of menstruation is not just species-specific but also depends on factors which can be induced experimentally. In intact female mice endogenous progesterone levels were raised by the induction of pseudopregnancy. Following an intrauterine oil injection, the decidualization of the endometrium was reliably induced as a prerequisite for menstruation. The natural drop of endogenous progesterone led to spontaneous breakdown of endometrial tissue within an average of 3 days post induction of decidualization. Interestingly, morphological changes such as breakdown and repair of the endometrial layer occurred in parallel in the same uterine horn. Most importantly, endometrial breakdown was accompanied by vaginally visible (overt) bleeding and flushing out of shed tissue comparable to human menstruation. Real-time PCR data clearly showed temporal changes in the expression of multiple factors participating in inflammation, angiogenesis, tissue modulation, proliferation, and apoptosis, as has been described for human menstruating endometrium. In conclusion, human menstruation can be mimicked in terms of extravaginally visible bleeding, tissue remodeling, and gene regulation in naturally non-menstruating species such as intact female mice without the need for an exogenous hormone supply. PMID:22412950

  5. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  6. APP transgenic mice: their use and limitations.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Claudia; Forloni, Gianluigi

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most widespread form of dementia. Its histopathological hallmarks include vascular and extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Gradual decline of cognitive functions linked to progressive synaptic loss makes patients unable to store new information in the earlier stages of the pathology, later becoming completely dependent because they are unable to do even elementary daily life actions. Although more than a hundred years have passed since Alois Alzheimer described the first case of AD, and despite many years of intense research, there are still many crucial points to be discovered in the neuropathological pathway. The development of transgenic mouse models engineered with overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein carrying familial AD mutations has been extremely useful. Transgenic mice present the hallmarks of the pathology, and histological and behavioural examination supports the amyloid hypothesis. As in human AD, extracellular Aβ deposits surrounded by activated astrocytes and microglia are typical features, together with synaptic and cognitive defects. Although animal models have been widely used, they are still being continuously developed in order to recapitulate some missing aspects of the disease. For instance, AD therapeutic agents tested in transgenic mice gave encouraging results which, however, were very disappointing in clinical trials. Neuronal cell death and NFTs typical of AD are much harder to replicate in these mice, which thus offer a fundamental but still imperfect tool for understanding and solving dementia pathology.

  7. Gene Targeting in Mice: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ability to introduce DNA sequences (e.g. genes) of interest into the germline genome has rendered the mouse a powerful and indispensable experimental model in fundamental and medical research. The DNA sequences can be integrated into the genome randomly or into a specific locus by homologous recombination, in order to: (i) delete or insert mutations into genes of interest to determine their function, (ii) introduce human genes into the genome of mice to generate animal models enabling study of human-specific genes and diseases, e.g. mice susceptible to infections by human-specific pathogens of interest, (iii) introduce individual genes or genomes of pathogens (such as viruses) in order to examine the contributions of such genes to the pathogenesis of the parent pathogens, (iv) and last but not least introduce reporter genes that allow monitoring in vivo or ex vivo the expression of genes of interest. Furthermore, the use of recombination systems, such as Cre/loxP or FRT/FLP, enables conditional induction or suppression of gene expression of interest in a restricted period of mouse’s lifetime, in a particular cell type, or in a specific tissue. In this review, we will give an updated summary of the gene targeting technology and discuss some important considerations in the design of gene-targeted mice. PMID:23996268

  8. [Effect of scopolamine on depression in mice].

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng-xue; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2011-04-01

    Based on the report of previous clinical study which showed cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine had antidepressant activity, this study was to investigate the antidepressant activity of scopolamine and explore its effective dose in mice, and to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on the central nervous system and learning/memory ability at its antidepressant effective dose. Tail suspension test, forced swimming test, step-down passive avoidance test and open field test were used to evaluate its effects on mice. Compared with the vehicle control group, single-dose administration of scopolamine (0.1-0.4 mg x kg(-1), ip) significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001) in tail suspension test, and significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.001) in forced swimming test, but had no effect on the step-down latency and errors in step-down passive avoidance test. Scopolamine (0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), ip) had no influence on the locomotor activity in open field test, while at dose of 0.4 mg x kg(-1) significantly increase the locomotor activity. These results showed that scopolamine produced reliable antidepressant effect at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), without impairment on learning and memory, as well as excitory or inhibitory effect on central nervous system in mice.

  9. How do mice follow odor trails?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Trastour, Sophie; Mishra, Shruti; Mathis, Alexander; Murthy, Venkatesh; Brenner, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Mice are excellent at following odor trails e.g. to locate food or to find mates. However, it is not yet understood what navigation strategies they use. In principle, they could either evaluate temporal differences between sniffs or they could use concurrent input from the two nostrils. It is unknown to what extend these two strategies contribute to mice's performance. When mice follow trails, odors evaporate from the ground, are transported by flow in the air, and are then inhaled with the two nostrils. In order to differentiate between the two navigation strategies, we determine what information the mouse receives: first, we calculate the airflow by numerically solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We then determine the spatiotemporal odor concentration from the resulting advection-diffusion equations. Lastly, we determine the odor amount in each nostril by calculating the inhalation volumes using potential flow theory. Taken together, we determine the odor amount in each nostril during each sniff, allowing a detailed study of navigation strategies.

  10. Of mice and (Viking?) men: phylogeography of British and Irish house mice.

    PubMed

    Searle, Jeremy B; Jones, Catherine S; Gündüz, Islam; Scascitelli, Moira; Jones, Eleanor P; Herman, Jeremy S; Rambau, R Victor; Noble, Leslie R; Berry, R J; Giménez, Mabel D; Jóhannesdóttir, Fríoa

    2009-01-22

    The west European subspecies of house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) has gained much of its current widespread distribution through commensalism with humans. This means that the phylogeography of M. m. domesticus should reflect patterns of human movements. We studied restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequence variations in mouse mitochondrial (mt) DNA throughout the British Isles (328 mice from 105 localities, including previously published data). There is a major mtDNA lineage revealed by both RFLP and sequence analyses, which is restricted to the northern and western peripheries of the British Isles, and also occurs in Norway. This distribution of the 'Orkney' lineage fits well with the sphere of influence of the Norwegian Vikings and was probably generated through inadvertent transport by them. To form viable populations, house mice would have required large human settlements such as the Norwegian Vikings founded. The other parts of the British Isles (essentially most of mainland Britain) are characterized by house mice with different mtDNA sequences, some of which are also found in Germany, and which probably reflect both Iron Age movements of people and mice and earlier development of large human settlements. MtDNA studies on house mice have the potential to reveal novel aspects of human history.

  11. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  12. IL-4 Knock out Mice Display Anxiety-like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Morgan L.; Joesting, Jennifer J.; Blevins, Neil A.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Gainey, Stephen J.; Towers, Albert E.; McNeil, Leslie K.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a recognized antecedent and coincident factor when examining the biology of anxiety. Little is known, however, about how reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators impact anxiety. Therefore, mood- cognition- and anxiety-associated/like behaviors were examined in IL-4 knock out (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. In comparison to WT mice, IL-4 KO mice demonstrated decreased burrowing and increased social exploration. No differences were seen in forced swim or saccharine preference testing. IL-4 KO mice had similar performance to WT mice in the Morris water maze and during object location and novel object recognition. In the elevated zero-maze, IL-4 KO mice, in comparison to WT mice, demonstrated anxiety-like behavior. Anxiety-like behavior in IL-4 KO mice was not observed, however, during open-field testing. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-4 KO mice display state, but not trait, anxiety suggesting that reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory bioactives can engender subtypes of anxiety. PMID:25772794

  13. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  14. Kinematics of treadmill locomotion in mice raised in hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Bojados, Mickael; Herbin, Marc; Jamon, Marc

    2013-05-01

    The study compared the motor performance of adult C57Bl/6J mice previously exposed to a 2G gravity environment during different periods of their development. 12 mice were housed in a large diameter centrifuge from the conception to Postnatal day 10 (P10). Another group of 10 mice was centrifuged form P10 to P30, and a third group of 9 mice was centrifuged from conception to P30. Their gait parameters, and kinematics of joint excursions were compared with 11 control mice, at the age of 2 months using a video-radiographic apparatus connected to a motorized treadmill. The mice that returned to Earth gravity level at the age of P10 showed a motor pattern similar to control mice. At variance the two groups that were centrifuged from P10 to P30 showed a different motor pattern with smaller and faster strides to walk at the same velocity as controls. On the other hand all the centrifuged mice showed significant postural changes, particularly with a more extended ankle joint, but the mice centrifuged during the whole experimental period differed even more. Our results showed that the exposure to hypergravity before P10 sufficed to modify the posture, suggesting that postural control starts before the onset of locomotion, whereas the gravity constraint perceived between P10 and P30 conditioned the tuning of quadruped locomotion with long term consequences. These results support the existence of a critical period in the acquisition of locomotion in mice. PMID:23352767

  15. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk. PMID:26456581

  16. IL-4 Knock Out Mice Display Anxiety-Like Behavior.

    PubMed

    Moon, Morgan L; Joesting, Jennifer J; Blevins, Neil A; Lawson, Marcus A; Gainey, Stephen J; Towers, Albert E; McNeil, Leslie K; Freund, Gregory G

    2015-07-01

    Inflammation is a recognized antecedent and coincident factor when examining the biology of anxiety. Little is known, however, about how reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators impact anxiety. Therefore, mood- cognition- and anxiety-associated/like behaviors were examined in IL-4 knock out (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. In comparison to WT mice, IL-4 KO mice demonstrated decreased burrowing and increased social exploration. No differences were seen in forced swim or saccharine preference testing. IL-4 KO mice had similar performance to WT mice in the Morris water maze and during object location and novel object recognition. In the elevated zero-maze, IL-4 KO mice, in comparison to WT mice, demonstrated anxiety-like behavior. Anxiety-like behavior in IL-4 KO mice was not observed, however, during open-field testing. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-4 KO mice display state, but not trait, anxiety suggesting that reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory bioactives can engender subtypes of anxiety.

  17. Adaptation and immunogenicity of Cryptosporidium parvum to immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohide; Tsuge, Yasuko; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Fujino, Takashi; Matsui, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    The adaptation and immunogenisity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Siberian chipmunks (SC1 strain) in immunocompetent (ICR) mice were examined. The oocysts were received to the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice by repeated passage. The oocysts collected from the 18th SCID mice were inoculated to 5 ICR mice. The mice began to shed oocysts from 6 days after inoculation, the patency was 5 days, and the maximum oocysts per gram of feces (OPG) value was 10(4). The maximum of OPG value was gradually increased by successive passage, and finally that in the 22nd mice reached 10(6) (patency: 11 days). It is considered that these results indicate completion of their adaptation to ICR mice. To examine the immunogenicity of C. parvum to ICR mice, 8 groups of 5 mice each were inoculated with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts of SC1 strain, which were collected after adaptation to SCID mice. All groups shed oocysts from 6th day, and their patency was from 8 to 12 days. On the 21st day after the primary infection, these mice were challenged with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts. No oocysts shed from any groups, although 2 control groups shed oocysts from the 6th day, and their OPG values were more than 10(6). These results suggest that this strain has strong immunogenicity against ICR mice. Therefore, the immunological healthy mice were considered a useful experimental model to investigate immunological and drug treatments in the strain of C. parvum.

  18. Lipid metabolism and body composition in Gclm(-/-) mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kendig, Eric L.; Chen, Ying; Krishan, Mansi; Johansson, Elisabet; Schneider, Scott N.; Genter, Mary Beth; Nebert, Daniel W.; Shertzer, Howard G.

    2011-12-15

    In humans and experimental animals, high fat diets (HFD) are associated with risk factors for metabolic diseases, such as excessive weight gain and adiposity, insulin resistance and fatty liver. Mice lacking the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene (Gclm(-/-)) and deficient in glutathione (GSH), are resistant to HFD-mediated weight gain. Herein, we evaluated Gclm-associated regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and glucose and lipid homeostasis. C57BL/6J Gclm(-/-) mice and littermate wild-type (WT) controls received a normal diet or an HFD for 11 weeks. HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not display a decreased respiratory quotient, suggesting that they are unable to process lipid for metabolism. Although dietary energy consumption and intestinal lipid absorption were unchanged in Gclm(-/-) mice, feeding these mice an HFD did not produce excess body weight nor fat storage. Gclm(-/-) mice displayed higher basal metabolic rates resulting from higher activities of liver mitochondrial NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, thus elevating respiration. Although Gclm(-/-) mice exhibited strong systemic and hepatic oxidative stress responses, HFD did not promote glucose intolerance or insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not develop fatty liver, likely resulting from very low expression levels of genes encoding lipid metabolizing enzymes. We conclude that Gclm is involved in the regulation of basal metabolic rate and the metabolism of dietary lipid. Although Gclm(-/-) mice display a strong oxidative stress response, they are protected from HFD-induced excessive weight gain and adipose deposition, insulin resistance and steatosis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not produce body weight and fat gain in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not induce steatosis or insulin resistance in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gclm(-/-) mice have high basal metabolism and mitochondrial

  19. Hyperthermia and the induction of neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Webster, W S; Edwards, M J

    1984-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine some parameters determining the teratogenicity of hyperthermia. Pregnant inbred (C57B1/6J and CBA/Ca/T6) and outbred (QS) mice were partially immersed in a water bath at 43-43.5 degrees C until their core temperature, monitored by a rectal thermister probe, was elevated to 43 degrees C for the inbred mice and 43.5 degrees C for the outbred mice. The procedure was repeated 6 h later. The regimen of 2 heatings was performed over a range of development from pregastrulation to about the 24 somite stage. The mice were killed on day 19, and the fetuses were examined. Exencephaly was the common malformation seen in each strain. It occurred at a maximum incidence of 34% in the QS mice, 14% in the CBA strain, and 20% in C57B1 mice. For the CBA and QS mice 4 to 11-15 somites was the most heat sensitive stage of development for the induction of exencephaly while in the C57B1 mice the preceding 24 hr of development were most sensitive. Control mice were exposed to the same experimental procedure in a water bath at body temperature at the most sensitive stage of development for the strain. There were no instances of exencephaly in the controls. The sex of all fetuses was determined and revealed a high female/male ratio among the fetuses with exencephaly (2.1 for the QS mice, 1.7 for the CBA mice, and 3.1 for the C57B1 mice) compared with a ratio of approximately 1.0 for all fetuses. Analysis in the QS mice indicated that the predominance of female exencephalics was probably due to prenatal loss of male embryos.

  20. Rapamycin selectively alters serum chemistry in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai-Mir, Hooman; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Lee, Hak Joo; Bokov, Alex F.; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Diaz, Vivian; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Richardson, Arlan; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.

    2012-01-01

    The study was undertaken to explore the effect of rapamycin, an anti-inflammatory agent, on the metabolic profile of type 2 diabetic mice. Seven-month-old diabetic db/db mice and their lean littermate non-diabetic controls (db/m) were randomized to receive control chow or chow mixed with rapamycin (2.24 mg/kg/day) (each group n =20, males and females) for 4 months and sacrificed. Serum samples were analyzed for the measurement of glucose, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total cholesterol, total triglyceride, and total protein, using the automated dry chemistry analysis. Rapamycin elevated serum glucose in female diabetic mice. Serum creatinine tended to be higher in diabetic mice but was not affected by rapamycin; there was no difference in BUN levels among the groups. Serum ALP was elevated in diabetic mice and rapamycin lowered it only in female diabetic mice; serum ALT levels were increased in female diabetic mice, unaffected by rapamycin. Serum total protein was elevated in diabetic mice of both genders but was not affected by rapamycin. Diabetic mice from both genders had elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides; rapamycin did not affect serum cholesterol but decreased serum total triglycerides in male diabetic mice. We conclude that rapamycin elicits complex metabolic responses in aging diabetic mice, worsening hyperglycemia in females but improving ALP in female diabetic and total triglycerides in male diabetic mice, respectively. The metabolic effects of rapamycin should be considered while performing studies with rapamycin in mice. PMID:22953036

  1. Rapamycin selectively alters serum chemistry in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai-Mir, Hooman; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Lee, Hak Joo; Bokov, Alex F; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Diaz, Vivian; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Richardson, Arlan; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2012-01-01

    The study was undertaken to explore the effect of rapamycin, an anti-inflammatory agent, on the metabolic profile of type 2 diabetic mice. Seven-month-old diabetic db/db mice and their lean littermate non-diabetic controls (db/m) were randomized to receive control chow or chow mixed with rapamycin (2.24 mg/kg/day) (each group n =20, males and females) for 4 months and sacrificed. Serum samples were analyzed for the measurement of glucose, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total cholesterol, total triglyceride, and total protein, using the automated dry chemistry analysis. Rapamycin elevated serum glucose in female diabetic mice. Serum creatinine tended to be higher in diabetic mice but was not affected by rapamycin; there was no difference in BUN levels among the groups. Serum ALP was elevated in diabetic mice and rapamycin lowered it only in female diabetic mice; serum ALT levels were increased in female diabetic mice, unaffected by rapamycin. Serum total protein was elevated in diabetic mice of both genders but was not affected by rapamycin. Diabetic mice from both genders had elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides; rapamycin did not affect serum cholesterol but decreased serum total triglycerides in male diabetic mice. We conclude that rapamycin elicits complex metabolic responses in aging diabetic mice, worsening hyperglycemia in females but improving ALP in female diabetic and total triglycerides in male diabetic mice, respectively. The metabolic effects of rapamycin should be considered while performing studies with rapamycin in mice. PMID:22953036

  2. Immunization with thyroglobulin induces Graves'-like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    We immunized AKR/N mice with bovine thyroglobulin (Tg) once every 2 weeks and monitored their time-dependent changes in 125I uptake activity in the thyroid glands. After 3 months, anti-Tg antibody was positive in all sera from the immunized mice. Serum free tri-iodothyronine (T3) and free thyroxine (T4) levels in the immunized mice (n=6) were significantly higher than those in the saline injected (control) mice (n=6). Neck counts as well as scintigraphy of the thyroid glands revealed that iodide uptake activity of the immunized mice was not suppressed, but was instead higher than that of the control mice. Two of the six immunized mice showed extremely high iodide uptake activity. The thyroid glands of these two mice were diffusely enlarged and the height of the epithelial cells was also increased. In addition, two mice with high iodide uptake activity produced a high titer of thyroid-stimulating antibody. Additional experiments showed that 4 out of 11 AKR/N mice and 3 out of 10 C57BL6 mice immunized with Tg had high serum free T3/free T4 levels, high 125I uptake activity of the thyroid, and positive thyroid-stimulating antibody activity. Diffuse goiter, thyrotoxicosis, high iodide uptake activity, and positive thyroid-stimulating antibody are the characteristics of Graves' disease. Thus, these mice exhibit the symptoms of Graves' disease. These results suggest that immunization with Tg induces Graves'-like disease in mice and that our methods will provide a new animal model of Graves' disease. PMID:19491147

  3. Immunization with thyroglobulin induces Graves'-like disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2009-08-01

    We immunized AKR/N mice with bovine thyroglobulin (Tg) once every 2 weeks and monitored their time-dependent changes in (125)I uptake activity in the thyroid glands. After 3 months, anti-Tg antibody was positive in all sera from the immunized mice. Serum free tri-iodothyronine (T(3)) and free thyroxine (T(4)) levels in the immunized mice (n=6) were significantly higher than those in the saline injected (control) mice (n=6). Neck counts as well as scintigraphy of the thyroid glands revealed that iodide uptake activity of the immunized mice was not suppressed, but was instead higher than that of the control mice. Two of the six immunized mice showed extremely high iodide uptake activity. The thyroid glands of these two mice were diffusely enlarged and the height of the epithelial cells was also increased. In addition, two mice with high iodide uptake activity produced a high titer of thyroid-stimulating antibody. Additional experiments showed that 4 out of 11 AKR/N mice and 3 out of 10 C57BL6 mice immunized with Tg had high serum free T(3)/free T(4) levels, high (125)I uptake activity of the thyroid, and positive thyroid-stimulating antibody activity. Diffuse goiter, thyrotoxicosis, high iodide uptake activity, and positive thyroid-stimulating antibody are the characteristics of Graves' disease. Thus, these mice exhibit the symptoms of Graves' disease. These results suggest that immunization with Tg induces Graves'-like disease in mice and that our methods will provide a new animal model of Graves' disease. PMID:19491147

  4. Leishmania tropica major in mice: vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice of high genetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G F; Handman, E

    1983-02-01

    BALB/c and BALB/c.H-2b mice are genetically susceptible to development of persistent and severe disease following cutaneous injection of promastigotes of the protozoan parasite, Leishmania tropica major, whereas C57BL/6 are relatively resistant. Resistance in C57BL/6 can be further increased by intraperitoneal injection of living, but not killed, promastigotes prior to cutaneous challenge. Severely diseased BALB/c mice can show resistance to development of a second cutaneous lesion but apparently only in the advanced stages of systemic life-threatening disease. A striking level of resistance to persistent disease has been demonstrated in BALB/c.H-2b mice pre-injected with frozen and thawed L. t. major-infected macrophages of the continuous macrophage cell line IC-21 (H-2b) together with Corynebacterium parvum. No resistance is seen in recipients of either C. parvum or the crude antigen mixture alone. Protection is afforded by intraperitoneal and not subcutaneous injection of crude antigen plus adjuvant. In these vaccination studies all evidence points to the infected macrophage as most appropriate source of 'host-protective' antigens as well as being the most likely target of host-protective immunity. Resistance is expressed in vaccinated mice as minimal signs of cutaneous disease and rapid resolution of any small lesions which do develop. Frozen and thawed promastigotes plus C. parvum will not induce resistance to persistent disease in BALB/c.H-2b mice and preincubation of promastigotes with sera from resistant vaccinated mice does not influence their capacity to cause cutaneous disease. The results provide baseline data for vaccination attempts in genetically susceptible hosts using isolated L. t. major antigens (and, in particular, infected macrophage antigens) and highlight the utility of the intraperitoneal route of injection and the use of the therapeutic biological, C. parvum, as an adjuvant in such studies. PMID:6870673

  5. Contact hypersensitivity response to isophorone diisocyanate in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.L.; Brown, T.A.; Brown, R.D.; Munson, A.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Isophorone diisocyanate was evaluated for its potential as a sensitizing agent for allergic contact hypersensitivity in mice. Female B6C3F1 mice were sensitized with 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0% isophorone diisocyanate and challenged with 3.0% isophorone diisocyanate. Doses of isophorone diisocyanate were selected from assays for primary irritancy. Mice received 20 microliters by direct dermal application, for 5 days, to sites prepared by shaving, dermabrading and, in some mice, with intra dermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The rest period was 7 days. Measurement of the contact hypersensitivity response in mice was by radioisotopic assay two days after challenge and mouse ear swelling one and two days after challenge. Mice demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent contact hypersensitivity responses to isophorone diisocyanate with or without adjuvant pretreatment.

  6. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  7. The Majority of Resorptions in Old Mice Are Euploid

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yong; Liu, X. Johné

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormality is a leading cause of aging-related infertility, spontaneous abortion and congenital birth defects in humans. Karyotype analyses of spontaneously aborted human fetuses reveal high proportions (~50%) being chromosomal abnormal with the majority being trisomies of various chromosomes. As a model organism, mice are widely used for studies of reproduction and reproductive aging. Like older women, older mice exhibit high incidences of early embryo death. However, it is not known if aneuploidy is prevalent amongst resorptions in older mice. We have karyotyped 65 retarded/resorbed fetuses in 10-month-old C57BL/6 mice, and found that 55 (84.6%±8.8%, with 95% confidence) were euploid. Similarly, of 40 such fetuses from 17 month-old C57BL/6 mice, we found 38 (95±7%, with 95% confidence 95%) being euploid. Therefore, aneuploidy is not a leading cause of embryo death in older mice. PMID:26636341

  8. Diet-induced obese mice retain endogenous leptin action.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, Nickki; Mahbod, Parinaz; Rivero, Belen; Norman, Lee Ann; Gertler, Arieh; D'Alessio, David A; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is characterized by hyperleptinemia and decreased response to exogenous leptin. This has been widely attributed to the development of leptin resistance, a state of impaired leptin signaling proposed to contribute to the development and persistence of obesity. To directly determine endogenous leptin activity in obesity, we treated lean and obese mice with a leptin receptor antagonist. The antagonist increased feeding and body weight (BW) in lean mice, but not in obese models of leptin, leptin receptor, or melanocortin-4 receptor deficiency. In contrast, the antagonist increased feeding and BW comparably in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, an increase associated with decreased hypothalamic expression of Socs3, a primary target of leptin. These findings demonstrate that hyperleptinemic DIO mice retain leptin suppression of feeding comparable to lean mice and counter the view that resistance to endogenous leptin contributes to the persistence of DIO in mice.

  9. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, Gregg A; McGinley, Matthew J; McCormick, David A

    2016-03-16

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/-) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/- mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/- mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/- song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene's role in general vocal motor control.

  10. Creation of “Humanized” Mice to Study Human Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Todd; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2010-01-01

    “Humanized” mice are a promising translational model for studying human hematopoiesis and immunity. Their utility has been enhanced by the development of new stocks of immunodeficient hosts, most notably mouse strains such as NOD-scid IL2rγ null mice that lack the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain. These stocks of mice lack adaptive immune function, display multiple defects in innate immunity, and support heightened levels of human hematolymphoid engraftment. Humanized mice can support studies in many areas of immunology, including autoimmunity, transplantation, infectious diseases, and cancer. These models are particularly valuable in experimentation where there is no appropriate small animal model of the human disease, as in the case of certain viral infections. This unit details the creation of humanized mice by engraftment of immunodeficient mice with hematopoietic stem cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells, provides methods for evaluating engraftment, and discusses considerations for choosing the appropriate model system to meet specific goals. PMID:18491294

  11. Neutrophil depletion delays wound repair in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Okawa, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important clinical problems in caring for elderly patients is treatment of pressure ulcers. One component of normal wound healing is the generation of an inflammatory reaction, which is characterized by the sequential infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Neutrophils migrate early in the wound healing process. In aged C57BL/6 mice, wound healing is relatively inefficient. We examined the effects of neutrophil numbers on wound healing in both young and aged mice. We found that the depletion of neutrophils by anti-Gr-1 antibody dramatically delayed wound healing in aged mice. The depletion of neutrophils in young mice had less effect on the kinetics of wound healing. Intravenous G-CSF injection increased the migration of neutrophils to the wound site. While the rate of wound repair did not change significantly in young mice following G-CSF injection, it increased significantly in old mice. PMID:19424869

  12. Behavioral characteristics of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 46-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Imai, Saki; Kano, Makoto; Nonoyama, Keiko; Ebihara, Shizufumi

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified Usp46, which encodes for ubiquitin-specific peptidase 46, as a quantitative trait gene affecting the immobility time of mice in the tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test. The mutation that we identified was a 3-bp deletion coding for lysine (Lys 92), and mice with this mutation (MT mice), as well as Usp46 KO mice exhibited shorter TST immobility times. Behavioral pharmacology suggests that the gamma aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor is involved in regulating TST immobility time. In order to understand how far Usp46 controls behavioral phenotypes, which could be related to mental disorders in humans, we subjected Usp46 MT and KO mice to multiple behavioral tests, including the open field test, ethanol preference test, ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex test, sucrose preference test, novelty-suppressed feeding test, marble burying test, and novel object recognition test. Although behavioral phenotypes of the Usp46 MT and KO mice were not always identical, deficiency of Usp46 significantly affected performance in all these tests. In the open field test, activity levels were lower in Usp46 KO mice than wild type (WT) or MT mice. Both MT and KO mice showed lower ethanol preference and shorter recovery times after ethanol administration. Compared to WT mice, Usp46 MT and KO mice exhibited decreased sucrose preference, took longer latency periods to bite pellets, and buried more marbles in the sucrose preference test, novelty-suppressed feeding test, and marble burying test, respectively. In the novel object recognition test, neither MT nor KO mice showed an increase in exploration of a new object 24 hours after training. These findings indicate that Usp46 regulates a wide range of behavioral phenotypes that might be related to human mental disorders and provides insight into the function of USP46 deubiquitinating enzyme in the neural system. PMID:23472206

  13. Exercise training modifies gut microbiota in normal and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jennifer E; Myslicki, Jason P; Bomhof, Marc R; Belke, Darrell D; Shearer, Jane; Reimer, Raylene A

    2015-07-01

    Cecal microbiota from type 2 diabetic (db/db) and control (db/(+)) mice was obtained following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise activity. qPCR analysis revealed a main effect of exercise, with greater abundance of select Firmicutes species and lower Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. in both normal and diabetic exercised mice compared with sedentary counterparts. Conversely, Bifidobacterium spp. was greater in exercised normal but not diabetic mice (exercise × diabetes interaction). How exercise influences gut microbiota requires further investigation.

  14. True Niacin Deficiency in Quinolinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (PNCs) are involved in over 500 enzyme reactions. PNCs are biosynthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan (L-Trp), as well as the vitamin niacin. Hence, "true" niacin-deficient animals cannot be "created" using nutritional techniques. We wanted to establish a truly niacin-deficient model animal using a protocol that did not involve manipulating dietary L-Trp. We generated mice that are missing the quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) gene. QPRT activity was not detected in qprt(-/-)mice. The qprt(+/+), qprt(+/-) or qprt(-/-) mice (8 wk old) were fed a complete diet containing 30 mg nicotinic acid (NiA) and 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet or an NiA-free diet containing 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet for 23 d. When qprt(-/-)mice were fed a complete diet, food intake and body weight gain did not differ from those of the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice. On the other hand, in the qprt(-/-) mice fed the NiA-free diet, food intake and body weight were reduced to 60% (p<0.01) and 70% (p<0.05) of the corresponding values for the qprt(-/-) mice fed the complete diet at day 23, respectively. The nutritional levels of niacin such as blood and liver NAD concentrations were also lower in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice. Urinary excretion of quinolinic acid was greater in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice (p<0.01). These data suggest that we generated truly niacin-deficient mice. PMID:26598832

  15. Energy intake, oxidative stress and antioxidant in mice during lactation

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, Guo-Xiao; LIN, Jiang-Tao; ZHENG, Wei-Hong; CAO, Jing; ZHAO, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Reproduction is the highest energy demand period for small mammals, during which both energy intake and expenditure are increased to cope with elevated energy requirements of offspring growth and somatic protection. Oxidative stress life history theory proposed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were produced in direct proportion to metabolic rate, resulting in oxidative stress and damage to macromolecules. In the present study, several markers of oxidative stress and antioxidants activities were examined in brain, liver, kidneys, skeletal muscle and small intestine in non-lactating (Non-Lac) and lactating (Lac) KM mice. Uncoupling protein (ucps) gene expression was examined in brain, liver and muscle. During peak lactation, gross energy intake was 254% higher in Lac mice than in Non-Lac mice. Levels of H2O2 of Lac mice were 17.7% higher in brain (P<0.05), but 21.1% (P<0.01) and 14.5% (P<0.05) lower in liver and small intestine than that of Non-Lac mice. Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels of Lac mice were significantly higher in brain, but lower in liver, kidneys, muscle and small intestine than that of Non-Lac mice. Activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) was significantly decreased in brain and liver in the Lac group compared with that in the Non-Lac group. Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) activity of Lac mice was significantly higher in muscle, but lower in kidneys than Non-Lac mice. Ucp4 and ucp5 gene expression of brain was 394% and 577% higher in Lac mice than in Non-Lac mice. These findings suggest that KM mice show tissue-dependent changes in both oxidative stress and antioxidants. Activities of antioxidants may be regulated physiologically in response to the elevated ROS production in several tissues during peak lactation. Regulations of brain ucp4 and ucp5 gene expression may be involved in the prevention of oxidative damage to the tissue. PMID:25855228

  16. Dysregulation of the humoral immune response in old mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, K S; Wang, Y F; Guéret, R; Weksler, M E

    1995-06-01

    The increase in autoantibodies with age of both experimental animals and humans has been thought to reflect a shift in the antibody repertoire from foreign to self antigens. In mice, before immunization, the age-associated increase in antibodies reactive with a prototypic autoantigen, bromelain-treated autologous erythrocytes (BrMRBC), reflected a 3-fold increase in serum IgM and the number of IgM-secreting spleen cells in old compared with young mice. However, the percentage of the IgM-secreting spleen cell repertoire reactive with BrMRBC in old mice was actually approximately 50% that in young mice. In contrast, after immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC), old mice showed a 5-fold increase in the percentage of IgM-secreting cells reactive with BrMRBC while young mice showed no significant increase. The converse is true for the percentage of IgM-secreting spleen cells in old mice specific for SBRC, which is 10% the number generated by young mice. The increased autoantibody response of old mice is not, however, linked to their poor response to the nominal antigen. Thus, immunization with phosphorylcholine (PC) conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an antigen that induces a comparable anti-PC response in old and young mice, also induced more autoantibody forming cells in old than young mice. The increased autoantibody response of old mice after immunization can be accounted for by both an increased number of Ig-secreting spleen cells as well as an increased percentage of the expressed repertoire of IgM-secreting spleen cells that react with autoantigens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Methylphenidate restores novel object recognition in DARPP-32 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Heyser, Charles J; McNaughton, Caitlyn H; Vishnevetsky, Donna; Fienberg, Allen A

    2013-09-15

    Previously, we have shown that Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) knockout mice required significantly more trials to reach criterion than wild-type mice in an operant reversal-learning task. The present study was conducted to examine adult male and female DARPP-32 knockout mice and wild-type controls in a novel object recognition test. Wild-type and knockout mice exhibited comparable behavior during the initial exploration trials. As expected, wild-type mice exhibited preferential exploration of the novel object during the substitution test, demonstrating recognition memory. In contrast, knockout mice did not show preferential exploration of the novel object, instead exhibiting an increase in exploration of all objects during the test trial. Given that the removal of DARPP-32 is an intracellular manipulation, it seemed possible to pharmacologically restore some cellular activity and behavior by stimulating dopamine receptors. Therefore, a second experiment was conducted examining the effect of methylphenidate. The results show that methylphenidate increased horizontal activity in both wild-type and knockout mice, though this increase was blunted in knockout mice. Pretreatment with methylphenidate significantly impaired novel object recognition in wild-type mice. In contrast, pretreatment with methylphenidate restored the behavior of DARPP-32 knockout mice to that observed in wild-type mice given saline. These results provide additional evidence for a functional role of DARPP-32 in the mediation of processes underlying learning and memory. These results also indicate that the behavioral deficits in DARPP-32 knockout mice may be restored by the administration of methylphenidate.

  18. True Niacin Deficiency in Quinolinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (PNCs) are involved in over 500 enzyme reactions. PNCs are biosynthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan (L-Trp), as well as the vitamin niacin. Hence, "true" niacin-deficient animals cannot be "created" using nutritional techniques. We wanted to establish a truly niacin-deficient model animal using a protocol that did not involve manipulating dietary L-Trp. We generated mice that are missing the quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) gene. QPRT activity was not detected in qprt(-/-)mice. The qprt(+/+), qprt(+/-) or qprt(-/-) mice (8 wk old) were fed a complete diet containing 30 mg nicotinic acid (NiA) and 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet or an NiA-free diet containing 2.3 g L-Trp/kg diet for 23 d. When qprt(-/-)mice were fed a complete diet, food intake and body weight gain did not differ from those of the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice. On the other hand, in the qprt(-/-) mice fed the NiA-free diet, food intake and body weight were reduced to 60% (p<0.01) and 70% (p<0.05) of the corresponding values for the qprt(-/-) mice fed the complete diet at day 23, respectively. The nutritional levels of niacin such as blood and liver NAD concentrations were also lower in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice. Urinary excretion of quinolinic acid was greater in the qprt(-/-) mice than in the qprt(+/+) and the qprt(+/-) mice (p<0.01). These data suggest that we generated truly niacin-deficient mice.

  19. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Hoynowski, S. M.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines.

  20. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Chapes, S K; Hoynowski, S M; Woods, K M; Armstrong, J W; Beharka, A A; Iandolo, J J

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines. PMID:8359928

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 15 deficiency impairs liver regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Huang, Jiansheng; Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Williams, Jessica; Shen, Steven; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Richardson, Jason R; Apte, Udayan; Rudnick, David A; Guo, Grace L

    2014-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15 (human homolog, FGF19) is an endocrine FGF highly expressed in the small intestine of mice. Emerging evidence suggests that FGF15 is critical for regulating hepatic functions; however, the role of FGF15 in liver regeneration is unclear. This study assessed whether liver regeneration is altered in FGF15 knockout (KO) mice following 2/3 partial hepatectomy (PHx). The results showed that FGF15 KO mice had marked mortality, with the survival rate influenced by genetic background. Compared with wild-type mice, the KO mice displayed extensive liver necrosis and marked elevation of serum bile acids and bilirubin. Furthermore, hepatocyte proliferation was reduced in the KO mice because of impaired cell cycle progression. After PHx, the KO mice had weaker activation of signaling pathways that are important for liver regeneration, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, nuclear factor-κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Examination of the KO mice at early time points after PHx revealed a reduced and/or delayed induction of immediate-early response genes, including growth-control transcription factors that are critical for liver regeneration. In conclusion, the results suggest that FGF15 deficiency severely impairs liver regeneration in mice after PHx. The underlying mechanism is likely the result of disrupted bile acid homeostasis and impaired priming of hepatocyte proliferation.

  2. Hepatic Src Homology Phosphatase 2 Regulates Energy Balance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoto; Matsuo, Kosuke; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Bakke, Jesse; Matsuo, Izumi; Graham, James; Xi, Yannan; Liu, Siming; Tomilov, Alexey; Tomilova, Natalia; Gray, Susan; Jung, Dae Young; Ramsey, Jon J.; Kim, Jason K.; Cortopassi, Gino; Havel, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase Src homology phosphatase 2 (Shp2) is a negative regulator of hepatic insulin action in mice fed regular chow. To investigate the role of hepatic Shp2 in lipid metabolism and energy balance, we determined the metabolic effects of its deletion in mice challenged with a high-fat diet (HFD). We analyzed body mass, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose tolerance in liver-specific Shp2-deficient mice (referred to herein as LSHKO) and control mice fed HFD. Hepatic Shp2 protein expression is regulated by nutritional status, increasing in mice fed HFD and decreasing during fasting. LSHKO mice gained less weight and exhibited increased energy expenditure compared with control mice. In addition, hepatic Shp2 deficiency led to decreased liver steatosis, enhanced insulin-induced suppression of hepatic glucose production, and impeded the development of insulin resistance after high-fat feeding. At the molecular level, LSHKO exhibited decreased hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation compared with control mice. In addition, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of total and mitochondrial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were enhanced in LSHKO compared with control mice. In line with this observation and the increased energy expenditure of LSHKO, oxygen consumption rate was higher in liver mitochondria of LSHKO compared with controls. Collectively, these studies identify hepatic Shp2 as a novel regulator of systemic energy balance under conditions of high-fat feeding. PMID:22619361

  3. Hepatitis E virus DNA vaccine elicits immunologic memory in mice.

    PubMed

    He, J; Hayes, C G; Binn, L N; Seriwatana, J; Vaughn, D W; Kuschner, R A; Innis, B L

    2001-01-01

    Injection of an expression vector pJHEV containing hepatitis E virus (HEV) structural protein open reading frame 2 gene generates a strong antibody response in BALB/c mice that can bind to and agglutinate HEV. In this study, we tested for immunologic memory in immunized mice whose current levels of IgG to HEV were low or undetectable despite 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine 18 months earlier. Mice previously vaccinated with vector alone were controls. All mice were administered a dose of HEV DNA vaccine to simulate an infectious challenge with HEV. The endpoint was IgG to HEV determined by ELISA. Ten days after the vaccine dose, 5 of 9 mice previously immunized with HEV DNA vaccine had a slight increase in IgG to HEV. By 40 days after the vaccine dose, the level of IgG to HEV had increased dramatically in all 9 mice (108-fold increase in geometric mean titer). In contrast, no control mice became seropositive. These results indicate that mice vaccinated with 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine retain immunologic memory. In response to a small antigenic challenge delivered as DNA, possibly less than delivered by a human infective dose of virus, mice with memory were able to generate high levels of antibody in less time than the usual incubation period of hepatitis E. We speculate that this type of response could protect a human from overt disease.

  4. Murine model of pulmonary mucormycosis in cortisone-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, A R; Halde, C; Vedros, N A

    1982-09-01

    Intranasal inoculation of Rhizomucor pusillus sporangiospores into cortisone-treated mice produced pulmonary and disseminated mucormycosis (phycomycosis). Evidence for infection in cortisone treated mice was obtained by recovery of Rh. pusillus from homogenates of tissue. Confirmation of infection was shown histologically. The 50% infectious dose was 2.4 x 10(2) colony forming units for lung infections and 2.7 x 10(5) colony forming units for brain infections. No evidence of sporangiospore germination was found in tissues of non-cortisone-treated mice although sporangiospores were found throughout pulmonary tissues. In infected tissues of cortisone-treated mice, hyphae were covered with leukocytes and tissue necrosis was extensive.

  5. Plasmin is essential in preventing periodontitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sulniute, Rima; Lindh, Tomas; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Li, Jinan; Ny, Tor

    2011-08-01

    Periodontitis involves bacterial infection, inflammation of the periodontium, degradation of gum tissue, and alveolar bone resorption, which eventually leads to loss of teeth. To study the role of the broad-spectrum protease plasmin in periodontitis, we examined the oral health of plasminogen (Plg)-deficient mice. In wild-type mice, the periodontium was unaffected at all time points studied; in Plg-deficient mice, periodontitis progressed rapidly, within 20 weeks. Morphological study results of Plg-deficient mice revealed detachment of gingival tissue, resorption of the cementum layer, formation of necrotic tissue, and severe alveolar bone degradation. IHC staining showed massive infiltration of neutrophils in the periodontal tissues. Interestingly, doubly deficient mice, lacking both tissue- and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, developed periodontal disease similar to that in Plg-deficient mice; however, mice lacking only tissue- or urokinase-type plasminogen activator remained healthy. Supplementation by injection of Plg-deficient mice with human plasminogen for 10 days led to necrotic tissue absorption, inflammation subsidence, and full regeneration of gum tissues. Notably, there was also partial regrowth of degraded alveolar bone. Taken together, our results show that plasminogen is essential for the maintenance of a healthy periodontium and plays an important role in combating the spontaneous development of chronic periodontitis. Moreover, reversal to healthy status after supplementation of Plg-deficient mice with plasminogen suggests the possibility of using plasminogen for therapy of periodontal diseases.

  6. Sendai viral pneumonia in aged BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, R O; Bhatt, P N; Barthold, S W; Brownstein, D G

    1994-01-01

    Sendai virus (SV) infection in aged BALB/c mice was evaluated as a natural model for age-associated susceptibility to viral pneumonia. Young (2 month-old) and aged (22-24 month-old) BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 100 median pneumonia doses (PD50) of SV and examined at 6, 10, and 20 days by virus titration, immunohistochemistry, histopathology, and serology. The aged mice had significantly higher virus titers in lung, prolonged infection, delayed development, and resolution of pneumonia and significantly lower serum antibody titers. In a second experiment, the responses of young mice were compared to intermediate-aged mice (11-13 and 17-18 months old). The intermediate-aged mice had some characteristics of young mice and others of aged mice. The results indicate that SV infection can be used to study aging-associated susceptibility to a pneumotropic virus in a natural host, and that susceptibility of mice to viral pneumonia increases gradually during aging.

  7. Behavioral and physiologic responses to caloric restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Overton, J M; Williams, T D

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of the review is to highlight the influences of ambient temperature (T(a)) and caloric restriction (CR) on metabolism, cardiovascular function and behavior in mice. Standard vivarium ambient temperatures (T(a)?23 degrees C) are a mild cold stress for mice requiring elevated metabolic rate and food intake. Increasing T(a) into the zone of thermoneutrality (TMN?29-33 degrees C) markedly reduces food intake, metabolic rate, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure in mice. Mice are members of a diverse, yet unique group of homeothermic animals that respond to thermal and energetic challenges by allowing body temperature (T(b)) to fall to less than 31 degrees C, a condition known as torpor. In mice housed at standard T(a), torpor is induced by a single night of fasting or a few days of CR. The mechanisms responsible for initiating torpor are related to reduced caloric availability, but do not require leptin. Mice housed at TMN and subjected to CR exhibit physiologic reductions in metabolic rate and HR, but do not appear to enter torpor. Finally, mice exhibit differential locomotor activity responses during CR that depends on T(a). At standard T(a), mice display increased light-phase home-cage activity with CR. This response is virtually eliminated when CR is performed at TMN. We suggest that researchers using mice to investigate energy homeostasis and cardiovascular physiology carefully consider the influence of T(a) on physiology and behavior.

  8. Functional recovery in aging mice after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Manwani, Bharti; Liu, Fudong; Xu, Yan; Persky, Rebecca; Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2011-11-01

    Aging is a non-modifiable risk factor for stroke. Since not all strokes can be prevented, a major emerging area of research is the development of effective strategies to enhance functional recovery after stroke. However, in the vast majority of pre-clinical stroke studies, the behavioral tests used to assess functional recovery have only been validated for use in young animals, or are designed for rats. Mice are increasingly utilized in stroke models but well validated behavioral tests designed for rats are not necessarily reproducible in mice. We examined a battery of behavioral tests to evaluate functional recovery in an aging murine model of stroke. We found that the vertical pole, hanging wire and open field can accurately assess acute behavioral impairments after stroke in both young and aging male mice, but animals recover rapidly on these tasks. The corner test can accurately and repeatedly differentiate stroke from sham animals up to 30 days post stroke and can be performed reliably in aging mice. Aging male mice had significantly worse behavioral impairment compared to young male mice in the first two weeks after stroke but eventually recovered to the same degree as young mice. In contrast, chronic infarct size, as measured by ipsilateral cerebral atrophy, was significantly lower in aging male mice compared to young male mice. Reactive gliosis, formation of glial scar, and an enhanced innate immune response was seen in the aging brain and may contribute to the delayed behavioral recovery seen in the aging animals.

  9. Behavioral thermoregulatory responses of single- and group-housed mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Becker, P; Ali, J S

    1998-11-15

    The ambient temperature (Ta) to house and study laboratory rodents is critical for nearly all biomedical studies. The ideal Ta for housing rodents and other animals should be based on their thermoregulatory requirements. However, fundamental information on the behavioral thermoregulatory responses of single- and group-housed rodents is meager. To address this issue, thermoregulatory behavior was assessed in individual and groups of CD-1 mice housed in a temperature gradient. Mice were housed in groups of five or individually while selected Ta and motor activity were monitored. Single- and group-housed mice displayed a circadian oscillation of selected Ta and motor activity with relatively warm T(a)s of approximately 29 degrees C selected during the light phase; during the dark phase selected Ta was reduced by 4 degrees C, whereas motor activity increased. Selected Ta of aged (11 months old) mice housed individually was approximately 1.0 degrees C warmer than the group-housed mice. Thermal preference of younger mice (2 months old) was similar for single- and group-housed animals. The operative Ta of mice housed in standard facilities was estimated by measuring the cooling rate of "phantom" mice modeled from aluminum cylinders. The results show that the typical housing conditions for single- and group-housed mice are cooler than their Ta for ideal thermal comfort. PMID:9855474

  10. Acetylcholine receptor and behavioral deficits in mice lacking apolipoprotein E

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jessica A; Benice, Theodore S; Van Meer, Peter; Park, Byung S; Raber, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is involved in the risk to develop sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since impaired central acetylcholine (ACh) function is a hallmark of AD, apoE may influence ACh function by modulating muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs). To test this hypothesis, mAChR binding was measured in mice lacking apoE and wild type C57BL/6J mice. Mice were also tested on the pre-pulse inhibition, delay eyeblink classical conditioning, and 5-choice serial reaction time tasks, which are all modulated by ACh transmission. Mice were also given scopolamine to challenge central mAChR function. Compared to wild type mice, mice lacking apoE had reduced number of cortical and hippocampal mAChRs. Scopolamine had a small effect on delay eyeblink classical conditioning in wild type mice but a large effect in mice lacking apoE. Mice lacking apoE were also unable to acquire performance on the 5-choice serial reaction time task. These results support a role for apoE in ACh function and suggest that modulation of cortical and hippocampal mAChRs might contribute to genotype differences in scopolamine sensitivity and task acquisition. Impaired apoE functioning may result in cholinergic deficits that contribute to the cognitive impairments seen in AD. PMID:19178986

  11. Partial return yoke for MICE step IV and final step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Plate, S.; Berg, J. S.; Tarrant, J.; Bross, A.

    2015-05-03

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  12. Partial Return Yoke for MICE Step IV and Final Step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, Holger; Plate, Stephen; Berg, J.Scott; Tarrant, Jason; Bross, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  13. Denitrification Genes Regulate Brucella Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung-Hun; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Splitter, Gary A.; Shapleigh, James P.

    2004-01-01

    Brucella is the causative agent of the zoonotic disease brucellosis, which is endemic in many parts of the world. Genome sequencing of B. suis and B. melitensis revealed that both are complete denitrifiers. To learn more about the role of denitrification in these animal pathogens, a study of the role of denitrification in the closely related B. neotomae was undertaken. In contrast to B. suis and B. melitensis, it was found that B. neotomae is a partial denitrifier that can reduce nitrate to nitrite but no further. Examination of the B. neotomae genome showed that a deletion in the denitrification gene cluster resulted in complete loss of nirV and the partial deletion of nirK and nnrA. Even though the nor operon is intact, a norC-lacZ promoter fusion was not expressed in B. neotomae. However, the norC-lacZ fusion was expressed in the related denitrifier Agrobacterium tumefaciens, suggesting that the lack of expression in B. neotomae is due to inactivation of NnrA. A narK-lacZ promoter fusion was found to exhibit nitrate-dependent expression consistent with the partial denitrifier phenotype. Complementation of the deleted region in B. neotomae by using nirK, nirV, and nnrA from B. melitensis restored the ability of B. neotomae to reduce nitrite. There was a significant difference in the death of IRF-1−/− mice when infected with B. neotomae containing nirK, nirV, and nnrA and those infected with wild-type B. neotomae. The wild-type strain killed all the infected mice, whereas most of the mice infected with B. neotomae containing nirK, nirV, and nnrA survived. PMID:15342571

  14. Vocal Ontogeny in Neotropical Singing Mice (Scotinomys)

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Polly; Pasch, Bret; Warren, Ashley L.; Phelps, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Isolation calls produced by dependent young are a fundamental form of communication. For species in which vocal signals remain important to adult communication, the function and social context of vocal behavior changes dramatically with the onset of sexual maturity. The ontogenetic relationship between these distinct forms of acoustic communication is surprisingly under-studied. We conducted a detailed analysis of vocal development in sister species of Neotropical singing mice, Scotinomys teguina and S. xerampelinus. Adult singing mice are remarkable for their advertisement songs, rapidly articulated trills used in long-distance communication; the vocal behavior of pups was previously undescribed. We recorded 30 S. teguina and 15 S. xerampelinus pups daily, from birth to weaning; 23 S. teguina and 11 S. xerampelinus were recorded until sexual maturity. Like other rodent species with poikilothermic young, singing mice were highly vocal during the first weeks of life and stopped vocalizing before weaning. Production of first advertisement songs coincided with the onset of sexual maturity after a silent period of ≧2 weeks. Species differences in vocal behavior emerged early in ontogeny and notes that comprise adult song were produced from birth. However, the organization and relative abundance of distinct note types was very different between pups and adults. Notably, the structure, note repetition rate, and intra-individual repeatability of pup vocalizations did not become more adult-like with age; the highly stereotyped structure of adult song appeared de novo in the first songs of young adults. We conclude that, while the basic elements of adult song are available from birth, distinct selection pressures during maternal dependency, dispersal, and territorial establishment favor major shifts in the structure and prevalence of acoustic signals. This study provides insight into how an evolutionarily conserved form of acoustic signaling provides the raw material for

  15. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  16. Neurobiological changes by cytotoxic agents in mice.

    PubMed

    Seigers, R; Loos, M; Van Tellingen, O; Boogerd, W; Smit, A B; Schagen, S B

    2016-02-15

    Cognitive deficit is a frequently reported side-effect of adjuvant chemotherapy. A large number of animal studies has been performed to examine the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, however, definite conclusions from these studies are restricted due to differences in experimental set-up. We systematically investigated the effects of 6 cytotoxic agents on various neurobiological parameters. C57Bl/6J mice were treated with cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or topotecan. The animals were sacrificed 3 or 15 weeks after treatment and the effect on neurogenesis, blood vessel density, and neuroinflammation was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. None of the cytostatic agents tested affected neurogenesis (cell survival or cell proliferation). Blood vessel density was increased in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex 3 weeks after treatment with docetaxel and doxorubicin compared with control animals. A decrease in the number of microglial cells was observed in the prefrontal cortex after treatment with cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, 5-FU, and topotecan compared with control mice. The observed decrease in microglia cells is indicative of inflammation that occurred after treatment. Overall, the magnitude of the effects was relatively modest. Therefore, we conducted a similar study with topotecan in Abcg2;Abcb1a/b knock out and wildtype FVB mice. Animals were sacrificed 3 weeks after treatment and no notable effect was seen in hippocampal cell differentiation (DCX), microglia activation, or blood vessel density. Perhaps the FVB strain is more resistant to the neurotoxic effects of topotecan which makes this not the correct model to study the mechanism of chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:26602283

  17. JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ossato, A; Vigolo, A; Trapella, C; Seri, C; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Marti, M

    2015-08-01

    Naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist illegally marketed in "Spice" and "herbal blend" for its psychoactive effect greater than those produced by cannabis. In rodents JWH-018 reproduces typical effects of (-)-Δ(9)-THC or Dronabinol® (Δ(9)-THC) such as hypothermia, analgesia, hypolocomotion and akinesia, while its effects on sensorimotor functions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of acute administration of JWH-018 (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.) on sensorimotor functions in male CD-1 mice and to compare its effects with those caused by the administration of Δ(9)-THC (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.). A specific battery of behavioral tests were adopted to investigate effects of cannabinoid agonists on sensorimotor functions (visual, auditory, tactile) and neurological changes (convulsion, myoclonia, hyperreflexia) while video-tracking analysis was used to study spontaneous locomotion. JWH-018 administration inhibited sensorimotor responses at lower doses (0.01-0.1mg/kg), reduced spontaneous locomotion at intermediate/high doses (1-6mg/kg) and induced convulsions, myoclonia and hyperreflexia at high doses (6mg/kg). Similarly, administration of Δ(9)-THC reduced sensorimotor responses in mice but it did not inhibit spontaneous locomotion and it did not induce neurological alterations. All behavioral effects and neurological alterations were prevented by the administration of the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251). For the first time these data demonstrate that JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor responses in mice. This aspect should be carefully evaluated to better understand the potential danger that JWH-018 may pose to public health, with particular reference to decreased performance in driving and hazardous works.

  18. Effects of Hemerocallis on sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Uezu, E

    1998-04-01

    Freeze-dried flowers of the Akinowasuregusa (Hemerocallis fulva L. var. sempervirona M. Hotta), a Hemerocallis genus of the lily family, were fed to C57BL strain mice. The slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep of the Hemerocallis-treated group increased during the dark period. The differences between the control group and the Hemerocallis-treated group were significant (P < 0.05). The Hemerocallis feeding did not cause a change in sleep time during the light period. As a result, there was no significant change in the sleep-time percentage over a 24-h period. PMID:9628113

  19. Gene doping: of mice and men.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H; Christenson, Robert H

    2009-04-01

    Gene doping is the newest threat to the spirit of fair play in sports. Its concept stemmed out from legitimate gene therapy trials, but anti-doping authorities fear that they now may be facing a form of doping that is virtually undetectable and extremely appealing to athletes. This paper presents studies that generated mouse models with outstanding physical performance, by manipulating genes such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), which are likely to be targeted for gene doping. The potential transition from super mice to super athletes will also be discussed, in addition to possible strategies for detection of gene doping. PMID:19272337

  20. Methylarginines in Mice with Experimental Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gilinsky, M A; Sukhovershin, R A; Cherkanova, M S

    2015-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of indexes for the system of endogenous regulation of NO bioavailability. The content of NO synthase inhibitors (monomethylarginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine) in the blood of mice was measured after intraperitoneal injections of a nonionic surfactant poloxamer 407 for 2 and 14 weeks. The concentrations of both methylarginines in animals with atherosclerosis due to 14-week administration of poloxamer were much higher than in control specimens. The amount of arginine and symmetric dimethylarginine practically did not differ from the control. Poloxamer-induced model of atherosclerosis is characterized by increased content of NO synthase inhibitors. These changes contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:26601840

  1. Behavioral characterization of mice lacking Trek channels

    PubMed Central

    Mirkovic, Kelsey; Palmersheim, Jaime; Lesage, Florian; Wickman, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels are thought to underlie background K+ conductance in many cell types. The Trek subfamily of K2P channels consists of three members, Trek1/Kcnk2, Trek2/Kcnk10, and Traak/Kcnk4, all three of which are expressed in the rodent CNS. Constitutive ablation of the Trek1 gene in mice correlates with enhanced sensitivity to ischemia and epilepsy, decreased sensitivity to the effects of inhaled anesthetics, increased sensitivity to thermal and mechanical pain, and resistance to depression. While the distribution of Trek2 mRNA in the CNS is broad, little is known about the relevance of this Trek family member to neurobiology and behavior. Here, we probed the effect of constitutive Trek2 ablation, as well as the simultaneous constitutive ablation of all three Trek family genes, in paradigms that assess motor activity, coordination, anxiety-related behavior, learning and memory, and drug-induced reward-related behavior. No differences were observed between Trek2−/− and Trek1/2/Traak−/− mice in coordination or total distance traveled in an open-field. A gender-dependent impact of Trek ablation on open-field anxiety-related behavior was observed, as female but not male Trek2−/− and Trek1/2/Traak−/− mice spent more time in, and made a greater number of entries into, the center of the open-field than wild-type counterparts. Further evaluation of anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box, however, did not reveal a significant influence of genotype on performance for either gender. Furthermore, Trek−/− mice behaved normally in tests of learning and memory, including contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition, and with respect to opioid-induced motor stimulation and conditioned place preference (CPP). Collectively, these data argue that despite their broad distribution in the CNS, Trek channels exert a minimal influence on a wide-range of behaviors. PMID:22973213

  2. Methylarginines in Mice with Experimental Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gilinsky, M A; Sukhovershin, R A; Cherkanova, M S

    2015-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of indexes for the system of endogenous regulation of NO bioavailability. The content of NO synthase inhibitors (monomethylarginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine) in the blood of mice was measured after intraperitoneal injections of a nonionic surfactant poloxamer 407 for 2 and 14 weeks. The concentrations of both methylarginines in animals with atherosclerosis due to 14-week administration of poloxamer were much higher than in control specimens. The amount of arginine and symmetric dimethylarginine practically did not differ from the control. Poloxamer-induced model of atherosclerosis is characterized by increased content of NO synthase inhibitors. These changes contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

  3. Gene doping: of mice and men.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H; Christenson, Robert H

    2009-04-01

    Gene doping is the newest threat to the spirit of fair play in sports. Its concept stemmed out from legitimate gene therapy trials, but anti-doping authorities fear that they now may be facing a form of doping that is virtually undetectable and extremely appealing to athletes. This paper presents studies that generated mouse models with outstanding physical performance, by manipulating genes such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), which are likely to be targeted for gene doping. The potential transition from super mice to super athletes will also be discussed, in addition to possible strategies for detection of gene doping.

  4. Assessing the welfare of genetically altered mice.

    PubMed

    Wells, D J; Playle, L C; Enser, W E J; Flecknell, P A; Gardiner, M A; Holland, J; Howard, B R; Hubrecht, R; Humphreys, K R; Jackson, I J; Lane, N; Maconochie, M; Mason, G; Morton, D B; Raymond, R; Robinson, V; Smith, J A; Watt, N

    2006-04-01

    In 2003, under the auspices of the main UK funders of biological and biomedical research, a working group was established with a remit to review potential welfare issues for genetically altered (GA) mice, to summarize current practice, and to recommend contemporary best practice for welfare assessments. The working group has produced a report which makes practical recommendations for GA mouse welfare assessment and dissemination of welfare information between establishments using a 'mouse passport'. The report can be found at www.nc3rs.org.uk/GAmice and www.lal.org.uk/gaa and includes templates for the recommended welfare assessment scheme and the mouse passport. An overview is provided below.

  5. Accelerated wound repair in old deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Cohen, B J; Cutler, R G; Roth, G S

    1987-05-01

    The closure of bilateral full thickness cutaneous wounds, made over the back with a sharp paper punch, was measured and assessed histologically in outbred deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). In contrast to inbred C57BL/6J laboratory mice (Mus musculus), in which the rate of wound repair was more rapid in young than in mature or aged mice (Cohen et al., 1987), wound repair in Peromyscus was most rapid in aged animals. Aged Peromyscus (45 to 70 months) achieved 50% closure of cutaneous wounds within 3 to 4 days, whereas mature (23 or 24 months) and young Peromyscus required 5 to 7.7 days to reach the 50% closure level. Histologic indices were compatible with the more rapid rate of closure of the cutaneous wounds in aged Peromyscus. The reasons for the unexpected increase in the rate of wound repair with increasing age in Peromyscus are not clear but stress-related hormonal and cellular factors may play an important role.

  6. Dietary CLA-induced lipolysis is delayed in soy oil-fed mice compared to coconut oil-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ippagunta, S; Angius, Z; Sanda, M; Barnes, K M

    2013-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to cause a reduction in obesity in several species. CLA-induced body fat loss is enhanced when mice are fed coconut oil (CO) and involves increased lipolysis. The objective of this paper was to determine if the CLA-induced lipolysis in mice fed with different oil sources was time-dependent. Mice were fed 7 % soybean oil (SO) or CO diets for 6 week and then supplemented with 0 or 0.5 % CLA for 3, 7, 10 or 14 days. Body fat and ex-vivo lipolysis was determined. Body fat was reduced by CO on day 7 (P < 0.01) and in both CO and SO-fed mice (P < 0.05) in response to CLA on d14. Lipolysis was increased by CLA in CO-fed mice (P < 0.01) but not in SO-fed mice on day 7 and 10, but on day 14 CLA increased lipolysis in both CO- and SO-fed mice (P < 0.001). Expression and activation level of proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis was determined by western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. No significant differences were detected in protein expression. CO-fed mice had greater fatty acid synthase and stearyl CoA desaturase 1 mRNA expression and less acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA expression (P < 0.01). Sterol regulatory binding protein 1c was decreased by CLA in CO-fed mice and increased in SO-fed mice (P < 0.05). Malic enzyme expression was increased by CLA (P < 0.001) and CO (P < 0.01). Therefore, CLA-induced lipolysis occurs more rapidly in CO vs SO-fed mice and lipogenesis is decreased in CO-fed mice with CLA supplementation.

  7. Comparative toxicity of acephate in laboratory mice, white-footed mice and meadow voles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The LD50 (95% confidence limits) of the organophosphorus insecticide acephate was estimated to be 351, 380, and 321 mg/kg (295?416, 280?516, and 266?388 mg/kg) for CD-1 laboratory mice (Mus musculus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), respectively. In a second study, these species were provided mash containing 0, 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for five days. Brain and plasma cholinesterase activities were reduced in a dose-dependent manner to a similar extent in the three species (inhibition of brain acetyl-cholinesterase averaged for each species ranged from 13 to 22% at 25 ppm, 33 to 42% at 100 ppm, and 56 to 57% at 400 ppm). Mash intake, body or liver weight, plasma enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferase), hepatic enzyme activities (aniline hydroxylase, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, and glutathione S-transferase), and cytochrome content (P-450 and b5) were not affected by acephate ingestion, although values differed among species. In a third experiment, mice and voles received 400 ppm acephate for 5 days followed by untreated food for up to 2 weeks. Mean inhibition of brain acetylcholin-esterase for the three species ranged from 47 to 58% on day 5, but by days 12 and 19, activity had recovered to 66 to 76% and 81 to 88% of concurrent control values. These findings indicate that CD-1 laboratory mice, white-footed mice, and meadow voles are equally sensitive to acephate when maintained under uniform laboratory conditions. Several factors (e.g., behavior, food preference, habitat) could affect routes and degree of exposure in the field, thereby rendering some species of wild rodents ecologically more vulnerable to organophosphorus insecticides.

  8. Comparative toxicity of acephate in laboratory mice, white-footed mice, and meadow voles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The LD50 (95% confidence limits) of the organophosphorus insecticide acephate was estimated to be 351, 380, and 321 mg/kg (295?416, 280?516, and 266?388 mg/kg) for CD-1 laboratory mice (Mus musculus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), respectively. In a second study, these species were provided mash containing 0, 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for five days. Brain and plasma cholinesterase activities were reduced in a dose-dependent manner to a similar extent in the three species (inhibition of brain acetyl-cholinesterase averaged for each species ranged from 13 to 22% at 25 ppm, 33 to 42% at 100 ppm, and 56 to 57% at 400 ppm). Mash intake, body or liver weight, plasma enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferase), hepatic enzyme activities (aniline hydroxylase, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, and glutathione S-transferase), and cytochrome content (P-450 and b5) were not affected by acephate ingestion, although values differed among species. In a third experiment, mice and voles received 400 ppm acephate for 5 days followed by untreated food for up to 2 weeks. Mean inhibition of brain acetylcholin-esterase for the three species ranged from 47 to 58% on day 5, but by days 12 and 19, activity had recovered to 66 to 76% and 81 to 88% of concurrent control values. These findings indicate that CD-1 laboratory mice, white-footed mice, and meadow voles are equally sensitive to acephate when maintained under uniform laboratory conditions. Several factors (e.g., behavior, food preference, habitat) could affect routes and degree of exposure in the field, thereby rendering some species of wild rodents ecologically more vulnerable to organophosphorus insecticides.

  9. Origin and course of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in iv/iv mice

    PubMed Central

    ICARDO, JOSÉ M.; COLVEE, ELVIRA

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the origin and distribution of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in mice of the iv/iv strain, which show situs inversus and heterotaxia. The coronary arteries were studied by direct observation of the aortic sinuses with the scanning electron microscope, and by examination of vascular corrosion casts. In the normal mouse, the left and right coronaries (LC, RC) arise from the respective Valsalva sinus and course along the ventricular borders to reach the heart apex. Along this course the coronary arteries give off small branches at perpendicular or acute angles to supply the ventricles. The ventricular septum is supplied by the septal artery, which arises as a main branch from the right coronary. Conus arteries arise from the main coronary trunks, from the septal artery and/or directly from the Valsalva sinus. The vascular casts demonstrate the presence of intercoronary anastomoses. The origin of the coronary arteries was found to be abnormal in 84% of the iv/iv mice. These anomalies included double origin, high take-off, slit-like openings and the presence of a single coronary orifice. These anomalies occurred singly or in any combination, and were independent of heart situs. The septal artery originated from RC in most cases of situs solitus but originated predominantly from LC in situs inversus hearts. Except for this anomalous origin no statistical correlation was found between the coronary anomalies and heart situs or a particular mode of heterotaxia. The coronary anomalies observed in the iv/iv mice are similar to those found in human hearts. Most coronary anomalies appear to be due to defective connections between the aortic root and the developing coronaries. iv/iv mice may therefore constitute a good model to study the development of similar anomalies in the human heart. PMID:11693308

  10. Myeloperoxidase deficiency ameliorates progression of chronic kidney disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Lehners, Alexander; Lange, Sascha; Niemann, Gianina; Rosendahl, Alva; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Oh, Jun; Stahl, Rolf; Ehmke, Heimo; Benndorf, Ralf; Klinke, Anna; Baldus, Stephan; Wenzel, Ulrich Otto

    2014-08-15

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme expressed in neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Beside its well-defined role in innate immune defence, it may also be responsible for tissue damage. To identify the role of MPO in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), we investigated CKD in a model of renal ablation in MPO knockout and wild-type mice. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Mice were followed for 10 wk to evaluate the impact of MPO deficiency on renal morbidity. Renal ablation induced CKD in wild-type mice with increased plasma levels of MPO compared with controls. No difference was found between MPO-deficient and wild-type mice regarding albuminuria 1 wk after renal ablation, indicating similar acute responses to renal ablation. Over the next 10 wk, however, MPO-deficient mice developed significantly less albuminuria and glomerular injury than wild-type mice. This was accompanied by a significantly lower renal mRNA expression of the fibrosis marker genes plasminogen activator inhibitor-I, collagen type III, and collagen type IV as well as matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. MPO-deficient mice also developed less renal inflammation after renal ablation, as indicated by a lower infiltration of CD3-positive T cells and F4/80-positive monocytes/macrophages compared with wild-type mice. In vitro chemotaxis of monocyte/macrophages isolated from MPO-deficient mice was impaired compared with wild-type mice. No significant differences were observed for mortality and blood pressure after renal ablation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that MPO deficiency ameliorates renal injury in the renal ablation model of CKD in mice.

  11. Cognitive dysfunction in mice deficient for TNF- and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Baune, Bernhard T; Wiede, Florian; Braun, Anja; Golledge, Jonathan; Arolt, Volker; Koerner, Heinrich

    2008-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests a role for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) in the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this work was to examine the effect of a deficiency of TNF (TNF(-/-)) and its main receptors (TNF-R1(-/-) and TNF-R2(-/-)) on cognitive function. A standardized survey on cognition-like behavior assessing learning and retention, spatial learning/memory, cognitive flexibility, and learning effectiveness was used in B6.WT and B6.TNF gene targeted mice strains (B6.wild-type, B6.TNF(-/-), B6.TNF-R1(-/-), B6.TNF-R2(-/-) mice). All studied mice strains demonstrated successful exploration and learning processes during the training phases of the tests, which made the specific cognition-like tests valid in these mice strains. In the specific cognition-like tests, the B6.TNF(-/-) mice demonstrated significantly poorer learning and retention in the novel object test compared to B6.WT, B6.TNF-R1(-/-) and B6.TNF-R2(-/-) mice. In addition, spatial learning and learning effectiveness were significantly poorer in B6.TNF(-/-) mice compared to B6.WT mice. Moreover, the moderately impaired cognitive performance with similar degrees in B6.TNF-R1(-/-) or B6.TNF-R2(-/-) mice was generally better than in TNF(-/-) mice but also poorer than in B6.WT mice. While the absence of TNF was correlated with poor cognitive functioning, the deletion of both TNF-receptors was involved in partially reduced cognitive functioning. Low-levels of TNF under non-inflammatory immune conditions appear essential for normal cognitive function. TNF displays an interesting candidate gene for cognitive function. Translational research is required to investigate associations between genetic variants of TNF and cognitive function in healthy subjects and neuropsychiatric samples.

  12. Lumican overexpression exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced renal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Mei; Ma, Ling; Jin, Yu-Nan; Yu, Yan-Qiu

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of lumican in mice with endotoxin-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Lumican transgenic mice and wild‑type mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg) to establish a model of ARF. The mice were sacrificed at 24 h and the blood and renal tissue samples were collected. The value of serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were measured to determine renal function. An ELISA was used to determined the concentrations of renal cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10. The protein expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)κB in renal tissues were assessed using western blot analysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling was performed to monitor apoptosis of renal tissue. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to observe structural changes in the renal tissues. Following the administration of LPS, the SCr and BUN values of mice in the lumican transgenic group were higher compared with those in the control group. The expression levels of renal TLR4, NFκB, TNFα, IL‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10 were upregulated in the lumican transgenic mice compared with those in the wild‑type control group. Apoptosis was detected predominantly on the renal tubule. There was a significant difference in the optical density of apoptotic bodies between the control mice and the lumican transgenic mice. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated more severe renal tissue injury in the lumican transgenic mice compared with that in the control mice. In conclusion, LPS may cause excessive apoptosis in the renal tubular cells via the TLR4 signal transduction pathway, a decrease in the number of renal tubular cells and ARF. Lumican may be important in mice with LPS-induced ARF.

  13. Photic resetting and entrainment in CLOCK-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dallmann, Robert; DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R

    2011-10-01

    Mice lacking the CLOCK protein have a relatively subtle circadian phenotype, including a slightly shorter period in constant darkness, differences in phase resetting after 4-hour light pulses in the early and late night, and a variably advanced phase angle of entrainment in a light-dark (LD) cycle. The present series of experiments was conducted to more fully characterize the circadian phenotype of Clock(-/-) mice under various lighting conditions. A phase-response curve (PRC) to 4-hour light pulses in free-running mice was conducted; the results confirm that Clock(-/-) mice exhibit very large phase advances after 4-hour light pulses in the late subjective night but have relatively normal responses to light at other phases. The abnormal shape of the PRC to light may explain the tendency of CLOCK-deficient mice to begin activity before lights-out when housed in a 12-hour light:12-hour dark lighting schedule. To assess this relationship further, Clock(-/-) and wild-type control mice were entrained to skeleton lighting cycles (1L:23D and 1L:10D:1L:12D). Comparing entrainment under the 2 types of skeleton photoperiods revealed that exposure to 1-hour light in the morning leads to a phase advance of activity onset (expressed the following afternoon) in Clock(-/-) mice but not in the controls. Constant light typically causes an intensity-dependent increase in circadian period in mice, but this did not occur in CLOCK-deficient mice. The failure of Clock(-/-) mice to respond to the period-lengthening effect of constant light likely results from the increased functional impact of light falling in the phase advance zone of the PRC. Collectively, these experiments reveal that alterations in the response of CLOCK-deficient mice to light in several paradigms are likely due to an imbalance in the shape of the PRC to light.

  14. Photoperiod and reproduction in female deer mice

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.M.; Miller, L.L.

    1982-03-01

    Female deer mice were exposed to a short day photoperiod beginning during 1 of 3 stages of life. In the first experiment, exposure to SD during adulthood resulted in a minimal disruption of reproductive condition; many females bore 2 litters after the onset of this treatment. In the second experiment, females reared on SD from weaning matured normally, as measured by vaginal introitus; however, vaginal closure occurred in approximately one-half of these females by 9 weeks of age. In the third experiment, females were born of mothers housed on either an SD or a long day photoperiod, and were continued on the maternal photoperiod until 6 weeks of postnatal age. The SD photoperiod markedly inhibited reproductive maturation as measured by vaginal patency, ovarian weight, and uterine weight. A comparison of reproductive organ weights and vaginal condition provided evidence for the validity of the latter measure as an index of reproductive state. As assayed by the present testing procedure, the sensitivity of the reproductive system to photoperiod decreases as a function of age in female deer mice.

  15. Heart rate reduction and longevity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gent, Sabine; Kleinbongard, Petra; Dammann, Philip; Neuhäuser, Markus; Heusch, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Heart rate correlates inversely with life span across all species, including humans. In patients with cardiovascular disease, higher heart rate is associated with increased mortality, and such patients benefit from pharmacological heart rate reduction. However, cause-and-effect relationships between heart rate and longevity, notably in healthy individuals, are not established. We therefore prospectively studied the effects of a life-long pharmacological heart rate reduction on longevity in mice. We hypothesized, that the total number of cardiac cycles is constant, and that a 15% heart rate reduction might translate into a 15% increase in life span. C57BL6/J mice received either placebo or ivabradine at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day in drinking water from 12 weeks to death. Heart rate and body weight were monitored. Autopsy was performed on all non-autolytic cadavers, and parenchymal organs were evaluated macroscopically. Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 14% (median, interquartile range 12-15%) throughout life, and median life span was increased by 6.2% (p = 0.01). Body weight and macroscopic findings were not different between placebo and ivabradine. Life span was not increased to the same extent as heart rate was reduced, but nevertheless significantly prolonged by 6.2%.

  16. Arctigenin efficiently enhanced sedentary mice treadmill endurance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuan; Zhuang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Yu, Liang; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Physical inactivity is considered as one of the potential risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases, while endurance exercise training could enhance fat oxidation that is associated with insulin sensitivity improvement in obesity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an energy sensor plays pivotal roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis, and its activation could improve glucose uptake, promote mitochondrial biogenesis and increase glycolysis. Recent research has even suggested that AMPK activation contributed to endurance enhancement without exercise. Here we report that the natural product arctigenin from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) strongly increased AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently up-regulated its downstream pathway in both H9C2 and C2C12 cells. It was discovered that arctigenin phosphorylated AMPK via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) and serine/threonine kinase 11(LKB1)-dependent pathways. Mice treadmill based in vivo assay further indicated that administration of arctigenin improved efficiently mice endurance as reflected by the increased fatigue time and distance, and potently enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) related genes expression in muscle tissues. Our results thus suggested that arctigenin might be used as a potential lead compound for the discovery of the agents with mimic exercise training effects to treat metabolic diseases.

  17. Echocardiographic examination in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Rigel, Dean F

    2009-01-01

    Rats and mice are the predominant experimental species in cardiovascular research due to the widespread availability of genetic and transgenic rodent models of heart disease. Phenotyping of these models requires reliable and reproducible methods to noninvasively and serially assess cardiovascular structure and function. However, the small size of rodents has presented a challenge. Many of these challenges have been overcome in recent years due to significant technological advances in echocardiographic capabilities. For example, improved spatial resolution and increased frame rates have allowed more precise and accurate quantification of diminutive structures, myocardial function, and blood flow in mice. Consequently, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) has emerged as a popular and powerful tool for cardiac phenotypic characterization in rodents. This chapter will focus on the use of TTE in rodents for evaluating (1) left ventricular (LV) chamber dimensions and wall thickness, (2) LV mass, (3) global LV systolic and diastolic function, (4) regional LV systolic function by newly developed tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), and (5) hemodynamic parameters. Reliability of these measurements depends on various factors such as the skill and experience of the sonographer and the image analyzer, the type, depth, and duration of anesthesia, and animal characteristics. These topics will also be discussed.

  18. Chronic methamphetamine increases fighting in mice.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Boris P; Schindler, Charles W; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2004-02-01

    A propensity for violent behaviors to develop in chronic methamphetamine (METH) abusers has been noted. The idea that increased aggressiveness might result from chronic METH administration was tested in mice after chronic (long-term intermittent, 8 weeks) or single exposures to the drug. A single injection of METH (6 mg/kg) did not augment fighting. In contrast, chronic METH administration significantly increased the number of animals that initiated bite attacks. This regimen also shortened the latency before the first attack. Latency before the first attack was shorter at 20 h after the METH injection than at 15 min after injection. Locomotor activity was not different at 20 h after METH injection, indicating that increased fighting was not secondary to METH-induced hyperactivity. METH-induced increases in fighting were not related to the duration of persistent sniffing after the initial encounter with an intruder since the duration of this behavior was significantly increased at 15 min after METH but not at 20 h post drug. These results indicate that repeated injections of METH can increase fighting behaviors and also alter social interactions in mice. Thus, intermittent administration of METH might be useful as a pharmacological model to study the biochemical and molecular bases of aggressiveness.

  19. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  20. Behavioral changes in mice following benzene inhalation.

    PubMed

    Evans, H L; Dempster, A M; Snyder, C A

    1981-01-01

    Although benzene is an important occupational health hazard and a carcinogen, the possibility that behavioral changes may forewarn of the later-occurring hematological changes has not been investigated. A time-sampling protocol was used to quantify the occurrence of 7 categories of behavior in the homecage following daily 6-hr exposures to two strains of adult mice (CD1 and C57BL/6J). The behavioral categories were stereotypic behavior, sleeping, resting, eating, grooming, locomotion, and fighting. The inhalation exposures were designed to reflect occupational exposure. Dynamic vapor exposure techniques in standard inhalation chambers were employed. Exposure to 300 or 900 ppm benzene increased the occurrence of eating and grooming and reduced the number of mice that were sleeping or resting. The responses to benzene of both the CD1 and the C57 strains were similar. The positive findings with benzene inhalation indicate the utility of behavioral investigations into the toxicology of inhaled organic solvents. The methods described herein illustrate an objective observation of animal behavior that is capable of documenting toxicity and of guiding detailed follow-up studies aimed at mechanism of action.

  1. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  2. Hyperbaric Hyperoxia Accelerates Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Shigeo; Wada, Eiji; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Ishii, Naokata

    2013-01-01

    Increased oxygen tension influences bone metabolism. This study comprised two main experiments: one aimed to determine the bone mineral apposition and bone formation rates in vivo under hyperbaric hyperoxia (HBO), and the other aimed to evaluate the effects of exposure to HBO on fracture healing. In experiment 1, male mice were exposed to HBO [90 min/day at 90% O2 at 2 atmospheres absolute (ATA) for 5 days]. In experiment 2, an open femur fracture model was created in mice, followed by exposure to HBO 5 times/week (90 min/day at 90% O2 at 2 ATA) for 6 weeks after surgery. In experiment 1, HBO treatment significantly increased the mineral apposition and bone formation rates in the lumbar vertebra and femur and type 1 collagen alpha 1 and alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression in the lumbar vertebra. In experiment 2, at 2 weeks after fracture, the fracture callus was significantly larger in the HBO group than in the non-HBO group. Furthermore, at 4 and 6 weeks after fracture, radiographic findings showed accelerated fracture healing in the HBO group. At 6 weeks after fracture, femur stiffness and maximum load were significantly higher in the HBO group than in the non-HBO group. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and plasma calcium concentrations were not significantly different between groups. These results suggest that exposure to HBO enhances bone anabolism and accelerates fracture healing without causing oxidative DNA damage or disruption of plasma calcium homeostasis. PMID:23967323

  3. Urea Transporter Physiology Studied in Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuechen; Chen, Guangping; Yang, Baoxue

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, there are two types of urea transporters; urea transporter (UT)-A and UT-B. The UT-A transporters are mainly expressed in kidney epithelial cells while UT-B demonstrates a broader distribution in kidney, heart, brain, testis, urinary tract, and other tissues. Over the past few years, multiple urea transporter knockout mouse models have been generated enabling us to explore the physiological roles of the different urea transporters. In the kidney, deletion of UT-A1/UT-A3 results in polyuria and a severe urine concentrating defect, indicating that intrarenal recycling of urea plays a crucial role in the overall capacity to concentrate urine. Since UT-B has a wide tissue distribution, multiple phenotypic abnormalities have been found in UT-B null mice, such as defective urine concentration, exacerbated heart blockage with aging, depression-like behavior, and earlier male sexual maturation. This review summarizes the new insights of urea transporter functions in different organs, gleaned from studies of urea transporter knockout mice, and explores some of the potential pharmacological prospects of urea transporters. PMID:22745630

  4. Anti Transglutaminase Antibodies Cause Ataxia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Sabrina; Lorenzon, Andrea; Sblattero, Daniele; Florian, Fiorella; Stebel, Marco; Marzari, Roberto; Not, Tarcisio; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Ventura, Alessandro; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder characterized by the presence of anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and anti-gliadin antibodies. Amongst the neurological dysfunctions associated with CD, ataxia represents the most common one. Methods We analyzed by immunohistochemistry, the anti-neural reactivity of the serum from 20 CD patients. To determine the role of anti-TG2 antibodies in ataxia, two anti-TG2 single chain variable fragments (scFv), isolated from a phage-display IgA antibody library, were characterized by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, and injected in mice to study their effects on motor coordination. We found that 75% of the CD patient population without evidence of neurological involvement, has circulating anti-neural IgA and/or IgG antibodies. Two anti-TG2 scFvs, cloned from one CD patient, stained blood vessels but only one reacted with neurons. This anti-TG2 antibody showed cross reactivity with the transglutaminase isozymes TG3 and TG6. Intraventricular injection of the anti-TG2 or the anti-TG2/3/6 cross-reactive scFv provoked transient, equally intensive ataxia in mice. Conclusion The serum from CD patients contains anti-TG2, TG3 and TG6 antibodies that may potentially cause ataxia. PMID:20300628

  5. Behavioral characterization of P311 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gregory A.; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Greene, Robert I.; Daniell, Xiaoju; Henry, Stanley C.; Crooks, Kristy R.; Kotloski, Robert; Tessarollo, Lino; Phillips, Lindsey E.; Wetsel, William C.

    2013-01-01

    P311 is an 8-kDa protein that is expressed in many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, cerebellum and olfactory lobes, and is under stringent regulation by developmental, mitogenic and other physiological stimuli. P311 is thought to be involved in the transformation and motility of neural cells; however, its role in normal brain physiology is undefined. To address this point, P311-deficient mice were developed through gene targeting and their behaviors were characterized. Mutants displayed no overt abnormalities, bred normally and had normal survival rates. Additionally, no deficiencies were noted in motor co-ordination, balance, hearing or olfactory discrimination. Nevertheless, P311-deficient mice showed altered behavioral responses in learning and memory. These included impaired responses in social transmission of food preference, Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning. Additionally, mutants displayed altered emotional responses as indicated by decreased freezing in contextual and cued fear conditioning and reduced fear-potentiated startle. Together, these data establish P311 as playing an important role in learning and memory processes and emotional responses. PMID:18616608

  6. Lung adenocarcinomas: comparison between mice and men.

    PubMed

    Popper, Helmut H

    2015-01-01

    A few human tumor types have been modeled in mice using genetic or chemical tools. The final goal of these efforts is to establish models that mimic not only the location and cellular origin of human cancers but also their genetic aberrations and morphologic appearances. The latter has been neglected by most investigators, and comparative histopathology of human versus mouse cancers is not readily available. This issue is exacerbated by the fact that some human malignancies comprise a whole spectrum of cancer subtypes that differ molecularly and morphologically. Lung cancer is a paradigm that appears not only as non-small cell and small-cell lung cancer but comprises a plethora of subtypes with distinct morphologic features. This review discusses species-specific and common morphological features of non-small cell lung cancer in mice and humans. Potential inconsistencies and the need for refined genetic tools are discussed in the context of a comparative analysis between commonly employed RAS-induced mouse tumors and human lung cancers.

  7. Pulsed EPR imaging of nitroxides in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Matsumoto, Shingo; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Dharmaraj, Christopher; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-04-01

    Nitroxides, unlike trityl radicals, have shorter T2s which until now were not detectable in vivo by a time-domain pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer at 300 MHz since their phase memory times were shorter than the spectrometer recovery times. In the current version of the time-domain EPR spectrometer with improved spectrometer recovery times, the feasibility of detecting signals from nitroxide radicals was tested. Among the nitroxides evaluated, deuterated 15N-Tempone ( 15N-PDT) was found to have the longest T2. The signal intensity profile as a function of concentration of these agents was evaluated and a biphasic behavior was observed; beyond a nitroxide concentration of 1.5 mM, signal intensity was found to decrease as a result of self-broadening. Imaging experiments were carried out with 15N-PDT in solutions equilibrated with 0%, 5%, 10%, and 21% oxygen using the single point imaging (SPI) modality in EPR. The image intensity in these tubes was found to depend on the oxygen concentration which in turn influences the T2 of 15N-PDT. In vivo experiments were demonstrated with 15N-PDT in anesthetized mice where the distribution and metabolism of 15N-PDT could be monitored. This study, for the first time shows the capability to image a cell-permeable nitroxide in mice using pulsed EPR in the SPI modality.

  8. Teratogenic Effects of Pregabalin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Leila; Mohammad, Afshar; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Vahdati Mashhadi, Nasser; Moallem, Seyed Adel

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have the potential to affect fetal development throughout pregnancy. Considering the broad therapeutic indications of pregabalin (PGB), its potential teratogenic effects and the levels of homocysteine have been studied. Materials and Methods: Timed-pregnant mice received one of three doses of PGB (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/day) or the vehicle control during organogenesis, intraperitoneally. The litters were stained and examined for malformations. Total homocysteine (tHcy) was measured in serum from the pregnant mice on GD18. Results: The rate of fetus malformations increased significantly in all treated groups as compared to the control group. The abnormalities included limb, vertebral column and craniofacial abnormalities. The most common abnormality was limb deformity. The percentage of fetal resorption significantly increased at higher doses. There was no significant difference in tHcy concentrations between the treated and control groups. Conclusion: Pregabalin may have potential teratogenic effects even in lower doses, however with less intensity than other AEDs. Therefore, it is suggested that great caution should be taken when prescribing it in pregnancy and further investigation for possible mechaninsms. PMID:24379963

  9. Molecular hydrogen attenuates neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  10. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  11. Estrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the estrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysacharide (LPS) models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of estrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised estrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes estrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet to be explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis. PMID:26259151

  12. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  13. Complement deficiency promotes cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Rafail, Stavros; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Foukas, Periklis G; Markiewski, Maciej M; DeAngelis, Robert A; Guariento, Mara; Ricklin, Daniel; Grice, Elizabeth A; Lambris, John D

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex homeostatic response to injury that engages numerous cellular activities, processes, and cell-to-cell interactions. The complement system, an intricate network of proteins with important roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, has been implicated in many physiological processes; however, its role in wound healing remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employ a murine model of excisional cutaneous wound healing and show that C3(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated early stages of wound healing. Reconstitution of C3(-/-) mice with serum from C3(+/+) mice or purified human C3 abrogated the accelerated wound-healing phenotype. Wound histology of C3(-/-) mice revealed a reduction in inflammatory infiltrate compared with C3(+/+) mice. C3 deficiency also resulted in increased accumulation of mast cells and advanced angiogenesis. We further show that mice deficient in the downstream complement effector C5 exhibit a similar wound-healing phenotype, which is recapitulated in C5aR1(-/-) mice, but not C3aR(-/-) or C5aR2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data suggest that C5a signaling through C5aR may in part play a pivotal role in recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells to the wound environment, which in turn could delay the early stages of cutaneous wound healing. These findings also suggest a previously underappreciated role for complement in wound healing, and may have therapeutic implications for conditions of delayed wound healing.

  14. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-02-01

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans. PMID:24477215

  15. Surgical Correction of Rectal Prolapse in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Wilding, Laura A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is a common clinical problem in laboratory mice. This condition may occur spontaneously, develop after genetic manipulations, result from infections with pathogens such as Citrobacter species, or arise secondary to experimental design such as colitis models. The current standard of care at our institution is limited to monitoring mice until tissue becomes ulcerated or necrotic; this strategy often leads to premature euthanasia of valuable animals prior to the study endpoint. Surgical correction of rectal prolapse is performed routinely and with minimal complications in larger species by using manual reduction with placement of a pursestring suture. In this report, we investigated whether the use of a pursestring suture was an effective treatment for mice with rectal prolapse. The procedure includes anesthetizing mice with isoflurane, manually reducing prolapsed tissue, and placing a pursestring suture of 4-0 polydioxanone. We have performed this procedure successfully in 12 mice. Complications included self-trauma, fecal impaction due to lack of defecation, and mutilation of the surgical site by cage mates. Singly housing mice for 7 d postoperatively, applying multimodal analgesia, and releasing the pursestring when indicated eliminated these complications. The surgical repair of rectal prolapses in mice is a minimally invasive procedure that resolves the clinical symptoms of affected animals and reduces the number of mice that are euthanized prematurely prior to the study endpoint.

  16. Peromyscus leucopus mice: a potential animal model for haematological studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2014-10-01

    Peromyscus leucopus mice share physical similarities with laboratory mice Mus musculus (MM) but have higher agility and longer lifespan. We compared domesticated P. leucopus linville (PLL) and M. musculus C57BL/6 (MMB6) mice for cellular composition of peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM) and spleen. PLL mice had significantly fewer platelets and significantly more monocytes in the blood, and notably fewer megakaryocytes in the BM. Spleens of PLL mice were significantly smaller, with 50% fewer cells and reduced 'red pulp'. There was no obvious haematological change in PLL mice between 2-8 and 16-26 months of age, except for a significant increase in blood monocytes. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content showed no change with age but differed significantly between different cell types. Treating two to eight month-old PLL mice with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine in drinking water for three months did not affect cellular ROS content, but increased blood leucocytes especially the concentration of monocytes. The low platelets, low megakaryocytes, high monocytes and low splenic erythropoiesis in PLL mice resemble human measurements better than the values seen in MMB6. PMID:25116892

  17. Peromyscus leucopus mice: a potential animal model for haematological studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2014-10-01

    Peromyscus leucopus mice share physical similarities with laboratory mice Mus musculus (MM) but have higher agility and longer lifespan. We compared domesticated P. leucopus linville (PLL) and M. musculus C57BL/6 (MMB6) mice for cellular composition of peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM) and spleen. PLL mice had significantly fewer platelets and significantly more monocytes in the blood, and notably fewer megakaryocytes in the BM. Spleens of PLL mice were significantly smaller, with 50% fewer cells and reduced 'red pulp'. There was no obvious haematological change in PLL mice between 2-8 and 16-26 months of age, except for a significant increase in blood monocytes. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content showed no change with age but differed significantly between different cell types. Treating two to eight month-old PLL mice with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine in drinking water for three months did not affect cellular ROS content, but increased blood leucocytes especially the concentration of monocytes. The low platelets, low megakaryocytes, high monocytes and low splenic erythropoiesis in PLL mice resemble human measurements better than the values seen in MMB6.

  18. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-02-01

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans.

  19. REVIEW - Thermal Physiology of Laboratory Mice: Defining Thermoneutrality

    EPA Science Inventory

    In terms of total number of publications, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has emerged as the most popular test subject in biomedical research. Mice are used as models to study obesity, diabetes, eNS diseases and variety of other pathologies. Mice are classified as homeotherms...

  20. Bone Growth and Turnover in Progesterone Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jamie C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-01-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and microcomputed tomography analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 wk of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain, and tibia longitudinal bone growth were normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total, cancellous, and cortical bone mass were increased in the humerus of 12-wk-old PRKO mice, whereas cortical and cancellous bone mass in the tibia was normal. At 26 wk of age, cancellous bone area in the proximal tibia metaphysis of PRKO mice was 153% greater than age matched wild-type mice. The improved cancellous bone balance in 6-month-old PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice is not essential for bone growth and turnover. However, at some skeletal sites, PR signaling attenuates the accumulation of cortical and cancellous bone mass during adolescence. PMID:18276762

  1. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  2. Cordyceps sinensis mycelium protects mice from group A streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Chih; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Huang, Robert Y; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Sheu, Chia-Chin; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2005-08-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) infection can cause severe invasive diseases, including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Cordyceps sinensis, a Chinese herbal medicine, is an immunomodulator. In this study the air-pouch bacterial inoculation model was used to investigate the protective efficacy of C. sinensis mycelium extract against GAS infection. Force-feeding mice with C. sinensis mycelium extract for 3 consecutive days before GAS infection increased the survival rate and reduced local skin-tissue injury compared with mice fed PBS. Bacterial numbers in the air pouch exudates from C. sinensis-treated mice were lower than those from PBS-treated mice. Blood and organs in PBS-treated mice showed bacterial dissemination, but those in C. sinensis-treated mice did not. Three days of pretreatment with C. sinensis extract followed by C. sinensis treatment every other day after GAS infection resulted in 100% survival. The post-GAS-infection levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and blood urea nitrogen in the sera of C. sinensis-treated mice were lower than those of PBS-treated mice. Taken together, these results show that C. sinensis mycelium extract protects by decreasing bacterial growth and dissemination, thereby increasing mouse survival rate. IL-12 and IFN-gamma expression and macrophage phagocytic activity also increased after C. sinensis treatment. PMID:16014434

  3. `Mice In Space': evaluation of a new housing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Mitchell; Liu, Yi; Serradj, Nadjet; Salanova, Michele; Touma, Chadi; Poursaberi, Ahmad; Jamon, Marc; Blottner, Dieter; Cancedda, Ranieri; Giuliani, Alessandra; Rustichelli, Franco; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Vico, Lawrence; D'Hooge, Rudi; Falcetti, Giancarlo; Berckmans, Daniel

    In this project a cage design is being proposed in which mice can be housed in a microgravity environment. The objective of this paper is to describe and evaluate the proposed cage design, by investigating the micro-environment within such a MIS cage, and to quantify the difference in activity between single and double housed mice by using integrated cameras in the top covers of the cages and quantifying the differences in stress levels by fecal hormone extraction. By assessing the gradients in air circulation in the cage, it can be visualized that high air flow gradients exist within the MIS cage. Measuring the 3D temperature distribution showed small temperature gradients, being maximum 0.1 C. Single housed MIS mice showed significant different body weight compared to double housed MIS mice and controls (p¡0.05). The effect of individual or double housing on activity was quantified with images recorded during 25 day trials. There was a significantly difference observed as single housed show significant more activity compared to double housed mice (p¡0.05). No significant difference was found in stress levels between MIS housed mice and control mice. The technical description in this paper should allow researchers to be informed about the possibilities that will come available to do mice experimentations in space. Keywords: mouse, spaceflight, animal housing, cage design, micro environment

  4. Preference for and discrimination of paintings by mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    I measured preference for paintings (Renoir vs. Picasso or Kandinsky vs. Mondrian) in mice. In general mice did not display a painting preference except for two mice: one preferred Renoir to Picasso, and the other preferred Kandinsky to Mondrian. Thereafter, I examined discrimination of paintings with new mice. When exposure to paintings of one artist was associated with an injection of morphine (3.0 mg/kg), mice displayed conditioned preference for those paintings, showing discrimination of paintings by Renoir from those by Picasso, and paintings by Kandinsky from those by Mondrian after the conditioning. They also exhibited generalization of the preference to novel paintings of the artists. After conditioning with morphine for a set of paintings consisting of two artists, mice showed discrimination between two sets of paintings also from the two artists but not in association with morphine. These results suggest that mice can discriminate not only between an artist's style but also among paintings of the same artist. When mice were trained to discriminate a pair of paintings by Kandinsky and Renoir in an operant chamber equipped with a touch screen, they showed transfer of the discrimination to new pairs of the artists, but did not show transfer of discrimination of paintings by other artists, suggesting generalization.

  5. Preference for and Discrimination of Paintings by Mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    I measured preference for paintings (Renoir vs. Picasso or Kandinsky vs. Mondrian) in mice. In general mice did not display a painting preference except for two mice: one preferred Renoir to Picasso, and the other preferred Kandinsky to Mondrian. Thereafter, I examined discrimination of paintings with new mice. When exposure to paintings of one artist was associated with an injection of morphine (3.0 mg/kg), mice displayed conditioned preference for those paintings, showing discrimination of paintings by Renoir from those by Picasso, and paintings by Kandinsky from those by Mondrian after the conditioning. They also exhibited generalization of the preference to novel paintings of the artists. After conditioning with morphine for a set of paintings consisting of two artists, mice showed discrimination between two sets of paintings also from the two artists but not in association with morphine. These results suggest that mice can discriminate not only between an artist’s style but also among paintings of the same artist. When mice were trained to discriminate a pair of paintings by Kandinsky and Renoir in an operant chamber equipped with a touch screen, they showed transfer of the discrimination to new pairs of the artists, but did not show transfer of discrimination of paintings by other artists, suggesting generalization. PMID:23762346

  6. Artificially reared mice exhibit anxiety-like behavior in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hidemi; Harauma, Akiko; Kato, Maki; Ootomo, Yuki; Hatanaka, Erisa; Moriguchi, Toru

    2016-07-29

    It is important to establish experimental animal techniques that are applicable to the newborn and infant phases for nutrition and pharmacological studies. Breeding technology using the artificial suckling method without breast milk is very effective for the study of newborn nutrition. Using this method, we separated newborn mice from dams within 48 h of birth and provided them with artificial milk. We evaluated mouse anxiety levels after early postnatal maternal separation. Artificially reared mice were subjected to elevated plus-maze tests to assess emotional behavior at 9 weeks of age. Artificially reared mice showed a significantly lower frequency of entries and dipping into the open arms of the maze compared with dam-reared mice. This result indicates that the anxiety level of artificially reared mice was higher than that of dam-reared mice. Moreover, the concentration of monoamines in the brain was determined after the behavioral experiment. The hippocampal norepinephrine, serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the artificially reared mice were significantly higher than those of the dam-reared mice. These results suggest that maternal-offspring interactions are extremely important for the emotional development of newborn infants during the lactation period. In future studies, it is necessary to consider the environmental factors and conditions that minimize the influence of artificial rearing on emotional behavior.

  7. Artificially reared mice exhibit anxiety-like behavior in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hidemi; Harauma, Akiko; Kato, Maki; Ootomo, Yuki; Hatanaka, Erisa; Moriguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    It is important to establish experimental animal techniques that are applicable to the newborn and infant phases for nutrition and pharmacological studies. Breeding technology using the artificial suckling method without breast milk is very effective for the study of newborn nutrition. Using this method, we separated newborn mice from dams within 48 h of birth and provided them with artificial milk. We evaluated mouse anxiety levels after early postnatal maternal separation. Artificially reared mice were subjected to elevated plus-maze tests to assess emotional behavior at 9 weeks of age. Artificially reared mice showed a significantly lower frequency of entries and dipping into the open arms of the maze compared with dam-reared mice. This result indicates that the anxiety level of artificially reared mice was higher than that of dam-reared mice. Moreover, the concentration of monoamines in the brain was determined after the behavioral experiment. The hippocampal norepinephrine, serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the artificially reared mice were significantly higher than those of the dam-reared mice. These results suggest that maternal-offspring interactions are extremely important for the emotional development of newborn infants during the lactation period. In future studies, it is necessary to consider the environmental factors and conditions that minimize the influence of artificial rearing on emotional behavior. PMID:26948536

  8. Antistress, Adoptogenic Activity of Sida cordifolia Roots in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sumanth, Meera; Mustafa, S S

    2009-05-01

    Ethanol extract of roots of Sida cordifolia was evaluated for antistress, adaptogenic activity using cold restraint stress and swim endurance in mice. Mice pretreated with extract of Sida cordifolia showed significant improvement in the swim duration and reduced the elevated WBC, blood glucose and plasma cortisone.

  9. Oxygen effects on mortality of mice infected with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrick, E. J.; Somerson, N. L.; Weiss, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Diplococcus pneumoniae were held at 1 atm in either hypoxic (12%), hyperoxic (75%), or a normal (21%) oxygen environment. Mortality rates indicated prolongation of survival in hypoxia and shortened survival in hyperoxia. Exposure of mice to the experimental gas mixtures prior to inoculation did not alter the results.

  10. The effect of some drugs on acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamadto, H H; Rashed, S M; Marii, N E; Sobhy, M M; el-Ridi, A M; el-Fakahany, A F

    1989-12-01

    The effect of some chemotherapeutics, on the course of acute toxoplasmosis in experimentally infected mice was studied. Obtained results showed that, praziquantel, levamisole had no effect on acute toxoplasmosis, while trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and clindamycin showed some prophylactic effect on acute toxoplasmosis in mice. PMID:2788673

  11. A 33-year-old male patient with paternal derived duplication of 14q11.2-14q22.1~22.3: clinical course, phenotypic and genotypic findings.

    PubMed

    Wannenmacher, Bardo; Mitter, Diana; Kießling, Franziska; Liehr, Thomas; Weise, Anja; Siekmeyer, Manuela; Kiess, Wieland

    2016-05-01

    We report on a 33-year-old patient with mosaic interstitial duplication on chromosome 14q11.2-14q22.1~22.3 with severe physical and mental retardation and multiple dysmorphisms. This patient was admitted to our pediatric hospital due to severe dehydration and malnutrition as a result of food refusal. It is an actual phenomenon that patients with severe inborn clinical problems nowadays survive due to progress and care of modern medicine. Nevertheless, transition from pediatric care to adult medicine seems to remain a challenging problem. We demonstrate the clinical course as well as clinical and genetic findings of this adult patient. Comparisons are made to previously reported cases with mosaic trisomy 14 involving a proximal interstitial duplication on the long arm of chromosome 14. PMID:26824977

  12. Quercetin 3-rhamnoside exerts antiinfluenza A virus activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwa Jung; Song, Jae Hyoung; Kwon, Dur Han

    2012-03-01

    Our previous report showed that quercetin 3-rhamnoside (Q3R) possessed antiviral activity against influenza A/WS/33 virus in vitro. The present study evaluated the effect of Q3R on influenza A/WS/33 virus infected mice. Mice orally treated with Q3R (6.25 mg/kg per dose) at 2 h before and once daily for 6 days after influenza virus infection showed significant decreases in weight loss, and decreased mortality. Lung virus titers of mice killed at 6 days after infection were about 2000 times lower than that of the placebo-treated control mice and about two times lower than that for the oseltamivir-treated mice. Furthermore, histological evaluation showed that administration of Q3R delayed the development and progression of pulmonary lesions. Therefore, Q3R could be an attractive lead for the development of antiviral agents against influenza virus.

  13. Immunofluorescence studies of disseminated Hantaan virus infection of suckling mice.

    PubMed

    Kurata, T; Tsai, T F; Bauer, S P; McCormick, J B

    1983-07-01

    Hantaan virus, the etiological agent of Korean hemorrhagic fever, was inoculated intracerebrally or intraperitoneally into suckling mice, and the course of the infection was followed by infectivity titration and immunofluorescence studies. Mice became ill and were moribund by 13 to 14 days postinfection. In mice inoculated either intracerebrally or intraperitoneally, virus antigen was present in brain, heart, lungs, liver, and kidney. Less consistently, specific fluorescence was observed in spleen, pituitary gland, thymus, lymph nodes, adrenal, pancreas, salivary glands, trigeminal ganglia, adipose tissue, intestine, and muscle. In all of these tissues, the primary target of infection was the capillary endothelium. In mice inoculated intracerebrally, virus antigen was present mainly in choroid plexus, hippocampal nuclei, and meninges, but in mice inoculated intraperitoneally, central nervous system infection was marked by antigen accumulation in cortical nuclei and thalamus.

  14. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Naoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Furushima, Kenryo; Takamune, Kazufumi; Li, Zhenghua; Abe, Shin-ichi; Aizawa, Shin-ichi; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1+/− male mice. Healthy Prm1+/− offspring were then produced by transferring blastocysts obtained via in vitro fertilization using zona-free oocytes and sperm from Prm1+/− mice. This result suggests that sperm lacking Prm1 can generate offspring despite being abnormally shaped and having destabilised DNA, decondensed chromatin and a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. Nevertheless, these mice showed little derangement of expression profiles. PMID:27250771

  15. Anomalies in the hormonal status of athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Köpf-Maier, P; Mboneko, V F

    1990-01-01

    The serum levels of hormones that are known to influence growth, development, and differentiation of the skin and its appendages were analyzed in female haired (NMRI) and nude (NMRI, nu/nu) mice. Whereas the concentrations of testosterone, prolactin, and triiodothyronine did not differ in nude animals from those found in normal mice of the same age in the anestrous phase of the sexual cycle, the serum levels of estradiol, progesterone, and thyroxine were found in female nude mice at significantly lower levels than in normally haired animals. These results point to a hormonal situation that contributes to the poor fertility of homozygous (nu/nu) female mice and may promote impairment of growth and differentiation of skin and hair, resulting in the macroscopic nudity of athymic, nude mice. PMID:2370246

  16. Chronic carbon monoxide inhalation during pregnancy augments uterine artery blood flow and uteroplacental vascular growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Carolina C; Casselman, Richard; Murphy, Malia S Q; Adamson, S Lee; Sled, John G; Smith, Graeme N

    2013-10-15

    End-tidal breath carbon monoxide (CO) is abnormally low in women with preeclampsia (PE), while women smoking during pregnancy have shown an increase in CO levels and a 33% lower incidence of PE. This effect may be, in part, due to lowered sFLT1 plasma levels in smokers, and perhaps low-level CO inhalation can attenuate the development of PE in high-risk women. Our previous work showed maternal chronic CO exposure (<300 ppm) throughout gestation had no maternal or fetal deleterious effects in mice. Our current study evaluated the uteroplacental vascular effects in CD-1 maternal mice that inhaled CO (250 ppm) both chronically, gestation day (GD) 0.5 to 18.5, and acutely, 2.5 h on each of GD 10.5 and 14.5. We demonstrated, using microultrasound measurements of blood velocity and microcomputed tomography imaging of the uteroplacental vasculature, that chronic maternal exposure to CO doubled uterine artery blood flow and augmented uteroplacental vascular diameters and branching. This finding may be of benefit to women with PE, as they exhibit uteroplacental vascular compromise. The ratio of VEGF protein to its FLT1 receptor was increased in the placenta, suggesting a shift to a more angiogenic state; however, maternal circulating levels of VEGF, sFLT1, and their ratio were not significantly changed. Doppler blood velocities in the maternal uterine artery and fetal umbilical artery and vein were unaltered. This study provides in vivo evidence that chronic inhalation of 250 ppm CO throughout gestation augments uterine blood flow and uteroplacental vascular growth, changes that may protect against the subsequent development of preeclampsia.

  17. Thyroxine and triiodothyronine levels in Snell mice.

    PubMed

    van Buul-Offers, S; Hackeng, W H; Schopman, W

    1983-03-01

    Since no data are available concerning thyroid hormone levels in Snell dwarf mice from birth on, a cross-sectional study was performed of L-thyroxine (T4) and L-triiodothyronine (T3) levels in blood or serum as a function of age of several litters, starting at birth. In normal Snell mice T4 levels in blood and serum are changing with age. T4 increases during the first 2 weeks of age and declines thereafter, until adult levels of about 50 nmol/l are reached at 21 days of age. Serum T3 values are in the range of 2-3 nmol/l. They do not show such an age-related pattern. From birth on in each litter there was a clear separation between animals with low T4 levels in blood and the others. This separation was possible at all subsequent days until 9 days of age, when dwarfs can be recognized by eye. Above that age the low T4 values were associated with dwarfism. This suggests that dwarfs are hypothyroid already at birth. Serum T3 in dwarfs falls below the normal range only after 4 weeks of age, resulting in a lower T4/T3 ratio than normal. The half life time of exogenous T4 in serum of dwarfs is in the range of 13-18 h and not different from normal. For T3 t1/2 is 9.5-11.1 h. Dwarf mice become euthyroid by treatment with 0.1 microgram T4 per day. 1 microgram T4 was needed to reach a physiological level of T3. These data suggest that the peripheral conversion of T4 to T3 is slower in dwarfs than in normals. Treatment with hGH, prolactin, glucagon, insulin, testosterone and oestradiol had no influence on serum T4. As expected TSH was stimulatory. Similar results were obtained for serum T3, with the exception of prolactin which caused slightly increased levels of serum T3. PMID:6402874

  18. Neutrino Factory Targets and the MICE Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Walaron, Kenneth Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The future of particle physics in the next 30 years must include detailed study of neutrinos. The first proof of physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics is evident in results from recent neutrino experiments which imply that neutrinos have mass and flavour mixing. The Neutrino Factory is the leading contender to measure precisely the neutrino mixing parameters to probe beyond the Standard Model physics. Significantly, one must look to measure the mixing angle θ13 and investigate the possibility of leptonic CP violation. If found this may provide a key insight into the origins of the matter/anti- matter asymmetry seen in the universe, through the mechanism of leptogenesis. The Neutrino Factory will be a large international multi-billion dollar experiment combining novel new accelerator and long-baseline detector technology. Arguably the most important and costly features of this facility are the proton driver and cooling channel. This thesis will present simulation work focused on determining the optimal proton driver energy to maximise pion production and also simulation of the transport of this pion °ux through some candidate transport lattices. Bench-marking of pion cross- sections calculated by MARS and GEANT4 codes to measured data from the HARP experiment is also presented. The cooling channel aims to reduce the phase-space volume of the decayed muon beam to a level that can be e±ciently injected into the accelerator system. The Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) hosted by the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK is a proof-of-principle experiment aimed at measuring ionisation cooling. The experiment will run parasitically to the ISIS accelerator and will produce muons from pion decay. The MICE beamline provides muon beams of variable emittance and momentum to the MICE experiment to enable measurement of cooling over a wide range of beam conditions. Simulation work in the design of this beamline is presented in this thesis as

  19. Silver nanoparticles cause complications in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Park, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kang, Min-Hee; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much interest and have been used for antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, and antiangiogenic applications because of their unique properties. The increased usage of AgNPs leads to a potential hazard to human health. However, the potential effects of AgNPs on animal models are not clear. This study was designed to investigate the potential impact of AgNPs on pregnant mice. Methods The synthesis of AgNPs was performed using culture extracts of Bacillus cereus. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. AgNPs were administrated into pregnant mice via intravenous infusion at 1.0 mg/kg doses at 6.5 days postcoitum (dpc). At 13.5, 15.5, and 17.5 dpc, the pregnant mice were euthanized, and the embryo and placenta were isolated. The meiotic status of oocytes was evaluated. DNA methylation studies were performed, and aberrant imprinting disrupted fetal, placental, and postnatal development. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and Western blot were used to analyze various gene expressions. Results The synthesized AgNPs were uniformly distributed and were spherical in shape with an average size of 8 nm. AgNPs exposure increased the meiotic progression of female germ cells in the fetal mouse ovaries, and maternal AgNP exposure significantly disrupted imprinted gene expression in 15.5 dpc embryos and placentas, such as Ascl2, Snrpn, Kcnq1ot1, Peg3, Zac1, H19, Igf2r, and Igf2; DNA methylation studies revealed that AgNPs exposure significantly altered the methylation levels of differentially methylated regions of Zac1. Conclusion The results from this study indicated that early exposure to AgNPs has the potential to disrupt fetal and postnatal health through epigenetic changes in the embryo and abnormal development of the placenta. These results can contribute to research involved in the safe use of

  20. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Andersson, Annica; Windahl, Sara H; Farman, Helen H; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Islander, Ulrika; Sjögren, Klara

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx) results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L) strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para) or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix) given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh) treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  1. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Soenjaya, Y; Foster, B L; Nociti, F H; Ao, M; Holdsworth, D W; Hunter, G K; Somerman, M J; Goldberg, H A

    2015-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp(-/-)) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp(-/-) mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp(-/-) and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro-computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp(-/-) mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp(-/-) mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp(-/-) mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp(-/-) mice. Bsp(-/-) incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the

  2. Distribution of manganese and other biometals in flatiron mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Ah; Elkhader, Jamal A; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2016-02-01

    Flatiron (ffe) mice display features of "ferroportin disease" or Type IV hereditary hemochromatosis. While it is known that both Fe and Mn metabolism are impaired in flatiron mice, the effects of ferroportin (Fpn) deficiency on physiological distribution of these and other biometals is unknown. We hypothesized that Fe, Mn, Zn and/or Cu distribution would be altered in ffe/+ compared to wild-type (+/+) mice. ICP-MS analysis showed that Mn, Zn and Cu levels were significantly reduced in femurs from ffe/+ mice. Bone deposits reflect metal accumulation, therefore these data indicate that Mn, Zn and Cu metabolism are affected by Fpn deficiency. The observations that muscle Cu, lung Mn, and kidney Cu and Zn levels were reduced in ffe/+ mice support the idea that metal metabolism is impaired. While all four biometals appeared to accumulate in brains of flatiron mice, significant gender effects were observed for Mn and Zn levels in male ffe/+ mice. Metals were higher in olfactory bulbs of ffe/+ mice regardless of gender. To further study brain metal distribution, (54)MnCl2 was administered by intravenous injection and total brain (54)Mn was measured over time. At 72 h, (54)Mn was significantly greater in brains of ffe/+ mice compared to +/+ mice while blood (54)Mn was cleared to the same levels by 24 h. Taken together, these results indicate that Fpn deficiency decreases Mn trafficking out of the brain, alters body Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu levels, and promotes metal accumulation in olfactory bulbs.

  3. Peripheral Surgical Wounding and Age-Dependent Neuroinflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

  4. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  5. Interleukin-1 deficiency prolongs ovarian lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Uri-Belapolsky, Shiri; Shaish, Aviv; Eliyahu, Efrat; Grossman, Hadas; Levi, Mattan; Chuderland, Dana; Ninio-Many, Lihi; Hasky, Noa; Shashar, David; Almog, Tal; Kandel-Kfir, Michal; Harats, Dror; Shalgi, Ruth; Kamari, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Oocyte endowment dwindles away during prepubertal and adult life until menopause occurs, and apoptosis has been identified as a central mechanism responsible for oocyte elimination. A few recent reports suggest that uncontrolled inflammation may adversely affect ovarian reserve. We tested the possible role of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 in the age-related exhaustion of ovarian reserve using IL-1α and IL-1β–KO mice. IL-1α–KO mice showed a substantially higher pregnancy rate and litter size compared with WT mice at advanced age. The number of secondary and antral follicles was significantly higher in 2.5-mo-old IL-1α–KO ovaries compared with WT ovaries. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone, a putative marker of ovarian reserve, was markedly higher in IL-1α–KO mice from 2.5 mo onward, along with a greater ovarian response to gonadotropins. IL-1β–KO mice displayed a comparable but more subtle prolongation of ovarian lifespan compared with IL-1α–KO mice. The protein and mRNA of both IL-1α and IL-1β mice were localized within the developing follicles (oocytes and granulosa cells), and their ovarian mRNA levels increased with age. Molecular analysis revealed decreased apoptotic signaling [higher B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) and lower BCL-2–associated X protein levels], along with a marked attenuation in the expression of genes coding for the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in ovaries of IL-1α–KO mice compared with WT mice. Taken together, IL-1 emerges as an important participant in the age-related exhaustion of ovarian reserve in mice, possibly by enhancing the expression of inflammatory genes and promoting apoptotic pathways. PMID:25114230

  6. Salty taste deficits in CALHM1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, Michael G; Ellis, Hillary T; Aleman, Tiffany R; Downing, Arnelle; Marambaud, Philippe; Foskett, J Kevin; Dana, Rachel M; McCaughey, Stuart A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic ablation of calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate from Type 2 taste cells, severely compromises the behavioral and electrophysiological responses to tastes detected by G protein-coupled receptors, such as sweet and bitter. However, the contribution of CALHM1 to salty taste perception is less clear. Here, we evaluated several salty taste-related phenotypes of CALHM1 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) controls: 1) In a conditioned aversion test, CALHM1 WT and KO mice had similar NaCl avoidance thresholds. 2) In two-bottle choice tests, CALHM1 WT mice showed the classic inverted U-shaped NaCl concentration-preference function but CALHM1 KO mice had a blunted peak response. 3) In brief-access tests, CALHM1 KO mice showed less avoidance than did WT mice of high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, NH(4)Cl, and sodium lactate (NaLac). Amiloride further ameliorated the NaCl avoidance of CALHM1 KO mice, so that lick rates to a mixture of 1000 mM NaCl + 10 µM amiloride were statistically indistinguishable from those to water. 4) Relative to WT mice, CALHM1 KO mice had reduced chorda tympani nerve activity elicited by oral application of NaCl, NaLac, and sucrose but normal responses to HCl and NH(4)Cl. Chorda tympani responses to NaCl and NaLac were amiloride sensitive in WT but not KO mice. These results reinforce others demonstrating that multiple transduction pathways make complex, concentration-dependent contributions to salty taste perception. One of these pathways depends on CALHM1 to detect hypertonic NaCl in the mouth and signal the aversive taste of concentrated salt.

  7. The endothelial glycocalyx in syndecan-1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Savery, Michele D; Jiang, John X; Park, Pyong Woo; Damiano, Edward R

    2013-05-01

    The existence of a hydrodynamically relevant endothelial glycocalyx has been established in capillaries, venules, and arterioles in vivo. The glycocalyx is thought to consist primarily of membrane-bound proteoglycans with glycosaminoglycan side-chains, membrane-bound glypicans, and adsorbed plasma proteins. The proteoglycans found on the luminal surface of endothelial cells are syndecans-1, -2, and -4, and glypican-1. The extent to which any of these proteins might serve to anchor the glycocalyx to the endothelium has not yet been determined. To test whether syndecan-1, in particular, is an essential anchoring protein, we performed experiments to determine the hydrodynamically relevant glycocalyx thickness in syndecan-1 deficient (Sdc1(-/-)) mice. Micro-particle image velocimetry data were collected using a previously described method. Microviscometric analysis of these data consistently revealed the existence of a hydrodynamically relevant endothelial glycocalyx in Sdc1(-/-) mice in vivo. The mean glycocalyx thickness found in Sdc1(-/-) mice was 0.45±0.10 μm (N=15), as compared with 0.54±0.12 μm (N=11) in wild-type (WT) mice (p=0.03). The slightly thinner glycocalyx observed in Sdc1(-/-) mice relative to WT mice may be due to the absence of syndecan-1. These findings show that healthy Sdc1(-/-) mice are able to synthesize and maintain a hydrodynamically relevant glycocalyx, which indicates that syndecan-1 is not an essential anchoring protein for the glycocalyx in Sdc1(-/-) mice. This may also be the case for WT mice; however, Sdc1(-/-) mice might adapt to the lack of syndecan-1 by increasing the expression of other proteoglycans. In any case, syndecan-1 does not appear to be a prerequisite for the existence of an endothelial glycocalyx.

  8. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  9. Salty taste deficits in CALHM1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, Michael G; Ellis, Hillary T; Aleman, Tiffany R; Downing, Arnelle; Marambaud, Philippe; Foskett, J Kevin; Dana, Rachel M; McCaughey, Stuart A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic ablation of calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate from Type 2 taste cells, severely compromises the behavioral and electrophysiological responses to tastes detected by G protein-coupled receptors, such as sweet and bitter. However, the contribution of CALHM1 to salty taste perception is less clear. Here, we evaluated several salty taste-related phenotypes of CALHM1 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) controls: 1) In a conditioned aversion test, CALHM1 WT and KO mice had similar NaCl avoidance thresholds. 2) In two-bottle choice tests, CALHM1 WT mice showed the classic inverted U-shaped NaCl concentration-preference function but CALHM1 KO mice had a blunted peak response. 3) In brief-access tests, CALHM1 KO mice showed less avoidance than did WT mice of high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, NH(4)Cl, and sodium lactate (NaLac). Amiloride further ameliorated the NaCl avoidance of CALHM1 KO mice, so that lick rates to a mixture of 1000 mM NaCl + 10 µM amiloride were statistically indistinguishable from those to water. 4) Relative to WT mice, CALHM1 KO mice had reduced chorda tympani nerve activity elicited by oral application of NaCl, NaLac, and sucrose but normal responses to HCl and NH(4)Cl. Chorda tympani responses to NaCl and NaLac were amiloride sensitive in WT but not KO mice. These results reinforce others demonstrating that multiple transduction pathways make complex, concentration-dependent contributions to salty taste perception. One of these pathways depends on CALHM1 to detect hypertonic NaCl in the mouth and signal the aversive taste of concentrated salt. PMID:24846212

  10. Metabolomic profiling of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wettersten, Hiromi I; Ganti, Sheila; Weiss, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is one of the newcomers among the "omics" techniques, perhaps also constituting the most relevant for the study of pathophysiological conditions. Metabolomics may indeed yield not only disease-specific biomarkers but also profound insights into the etiology and progression of a variety of human disorders. Various metabolomic approaches are currently available to study oncogenesis and tumor progression in vivo, in murine tumor models. Many of these models rely on the xenograft of human cancer cells into immunocompromised mice. Understanding how the metabolism of these cells evolves in vivo is critical to evaluate the actual pertinence of xenograft models to human pathology. Here, we discuss various tumor xenograft models and methods for their metabolomic profiling to provide a short guide to investigators interested in this field of research. PMID:24924138

  11. Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

  12. MICE, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Ionization Cooling is the only practical solution to preparing high brilliance muon beams for a neutrino factory or muon collider. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It is characterized by exquisite emittance determination by 6D measurement of individual particles, a cooling section comprising 23 MV of acceleration at 200 MHz and 3 liquid hydrogen absorbers totaling 1m of liquid hydrogen on the path of 140-240 MeV/c muons. Thebeam has already been commissioned successfully and first measurements of beam emittance performed. We are setting up for the final high precision emittance determination and the measurements of cooling in Li Hydrogen. The design offers opportunities to observe cooling with various absorbers and several optics configurations. Results will be compared with detailed simulations of cooling channel performance to ensure full understanding of the cooling process. Progress towards the full cooling experiment with RF re-acceleration will also be reported.

  13. An Outbreak of Hexamitiasis in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, G.; Loew, F. M.

    1970-01-01

    Hexamitiasis was encountered in a breeding colony of C3H/HeJ mice. The disease was observed in animals under three weeks of age. It was characterized clinically by retarded development, hunched attitude, lethargy, and in some cases by diarrhea and death. Lesions were noted particularly in the duodenum. The intestinal contents were watery and foamy. Histologically, cyst-like formations due to the dilation of the glands of Lieberkühn were seen together with inflammatory reaction in the lamina propria and sloughing of the epithelium. The infection was controlled by the routine administration of dimetridazole in the drinking water. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4249099

  14. Investigating mechanisms of myopia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pardue, Machelle T.; Stone, Richard A.; Iuvone, P. Michael

    2013-01-01

    While genetic and environmental factors have been shown to control visually-guided eye growth and influence myopia development, investigations into the intersection of these two factors in controlling refractive development have been limited by the lack of a genetically modifiable animal model. Technological advances have now made it possible to assess refractive state and ocular biometry in the small mouse eye and therefore to exploit the many genetic mouse mutants to investigate mechanisms of visually-guided eye growth. This review considers the benefits and challenges of studying refractive development in mice, compares the results of refractive error and ocular biometry from wild-type strains and genetic models in normal laboratory visual environments or with disrupted visual input, and discusses some of the remaining challenges in interpreting data from the mouse to validate and standardize methods between labs. PMID:23305908

  15. Lipofuscinogenesis in mice early treated with centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Nandy, K

    1978-08-01

    Previous studies in our and other laboratories indicated that there is a reduction in the neuronal lipofuscin in old rodents after several weeks of treatment with centrophenoxine. The present study investigates whether this chemical can prevent pigment formation if given early in life before the onset of pigmentogenesis. The study shows that the drug did not stop lipofuscin formation in 1 month old mice. But there was a consistent decrease in the pigment in the neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the treated animals compared to the age-matched controls. The degree of reduction was largely dependent on the duration of the treatment and a significant diminution was noted after treatment for five months or more.

  16. Pathogenesis of rotavirus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Little, L M; Shadduck, J A

    1982-01-01

    Three parameters of rotavirus infection, i.e., clinical disease, viral antigen in infected intestines, and infectious virus in feces, were assessed in infant mice nursed by mothers with or without preexisting rotavirus antibody. Diarrhea was the only consistent sign of clinical disease, and its course followed that of infection by about 1 day. Infected intestinal epithelial cells, except crypt cells, were observed by immunofluorescence microscopy in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon. Infection progressed in a proximal-to-distal direction with time. Viral antigen appeared in intestinal tissue later, was present in lower amounts, and disappeared sooner from infants nursed by mothers with preexisting rotavirus antibody, indicating that protection was passively transferred to these infants although the course of clinical disease was not changed. Images PMID:6292110

  17. Closed-Loop Optogenetic Intervention in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oijala, Mikko; Soltesz, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic interventions offer novel ways of probing, in a temporally specific manner, the roles of specific cell types in neuronal network functions of awake, behaving animals. Despite the unique potential for temporally specific optogenetic interventions in disease states, a major hurdle in its broad application to unpredictable brain states in a laboratory setting is constructing a real-time responsive system. We recently created a closed-loop system for stopping spontaneous seizures in chronically epileptic mice using optogenetic intervention. This system performs with very high sensitivity and specificity, and the strategy is relevant not only to epilepsy, but can also be used to react in real time, with optogenetic or other interventions, to diverse brain states. The protocol presented here is highly modular and requires variable time to perform. We describe the basic construction of a complete system, and include our downloadable custom closed-loop detection software which can be employed for this purpose. PMID:23845961

  18. Reproductive toxicity of brazilein in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lei, Fan; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Shuang; Wang, Yu-Gang; Feng, Tian-Shi; Li, Hui-Ying; Li, Hui-Yu; Zhan, Hong-Lei; Xing, Dong-Ming; DU, Li-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Brazilein is an active small molecular compound extracted from Caesalpinia sappan L. with favorable pharmacological properties on immune system, cardiovascular system, and nervous system. C. sappan has been used as a traditional medicine in China for hundreds of years for various diseases. However, the general reproductive toxicity of brazilein is still unknown. The purpose of the present study was to thoroughly evaluate the general reproductive toxicity of brazilein in ICR mice to support the future drug development and modernization of this potent traditional Chinese medicine. The results showed that, although no apparent toxicity on the reproducibility of the male was observed, brazilein might cause considerable risks to the fetuses and females as indicated by the ratios of dead fetuses and reabsorptions. In conclusion, our results from the present study provided some useful insights about the safety profile of brazilein, suggesting that brazilein should be used with caution in pregnant women. PMID:27473962

  19. Tumor angiogenesis in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Alani, Rhoda M; Silverthorn, Courtney F; Orosz, Kate

    2004-06-01

    Over the past decade much research has focused on understanding the molecular pathways that regulate the development of a tumor-associated vasculature. In 1999, Lyden and colleagues showed that mice deficient in one to three Id1 or Id3 alleles could not support the growth of tumor xenografts due to defects in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Three recently published manuscripts have now re-examined the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature using more clinically relevant tumor model systems. Remarkably, all three studies have found strikingly different results compared to the original xenograft data published in 1999. Below we review the current understanding of the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature given the most recent data and suggest ways in which animal tumor model systems might be put to better use to provide more clinically relevant information.

  20. Hmga2 promoter analysis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, John F; Rustighi, Alessandra; Tessari, Michela A; Liu, Jun; Braghetta, Paola; Sgarra, Riccardo; Stebel, Marco; Bressan, Giorgio M; Altruda, Fiorella; Giancotti, Vincenzo; Chada, Kiran; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2003-10-01

    HMGA2(2) belongs to the high mobility group A (HMGA) family of architectural transcription factors which participate in a wide variety of nuclear processes ranging from transcription to recombination, playing an important role in chromatin remodelling. HMGA2 is expressed during embryogenesis but not by adult somatic tissues, yet it becomes re-expressed following neoplastic transformation. A role in development is underscored by the finding that the inactivation of the Hmga2 gene is responsible for the murine pygmy phenotype. To elucidate mechanisms that control HMGA2 expression, we have previously cloned the gene and identified functional elements involved in its regulation. In this paper, transgenic mice were generated to define genomic regions involved in Hmga2 developmental and tissue-specific transcriptional regulation. A genomic region from -8.1 to -3.7kb upstream from the initiation site has been found to recapitulate most of the spatial and temporal endogenous Hmga2 gene expression. PMID:13679031

  1. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi . E-mail: tkhoda.epgn@tmd.ac.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-10-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones.

  2. Mice as a model for homeopathy research.

    PubMed

    Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2009-10-01

    Mice (Mus musculus) have been used as a model for homeopathy research in relation to cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in our laboratory for the last three decades. Initially, anti-radiation activities of several potentized homeopathic drugs were tested against suitable controls by taking into consideration several cytogenetic endpoints. Subsequently, anti-cytotoxic, anti-genotoxic and anti-oxidative stress effects of some homeopathic drugs were tested against several chemical toxic metalloids and metal compounds. Modern techniques including Western blot, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, UV-spectroscopy, HPLC, FTIR, NMR, RT-PCR etc were deployed to understand the possible mechanisms and pathways of action of potentized homeopathic drugs. We hypothesise that one way by which potentized homeopathic drugs act is through regulatory action on gene expression.

  3. Metabolomic profiling of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wettersten, Hiromi I; Ganti, Sheila; Weiss, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is one of the newcomers among the "omics" techniques, perhaps also constituting the most relevant for the study of pathophysiological conditions. Metabolomics may indeed yield not only disease-specific biomarkers but also profound insights into the etiology and progression of a variety of human disorders. Various metabolomic approaches are currently available to study oncogenesis and tumor progression in vivo, in murine tumor models. Many of these models rely on the xenograft of human cancer cells into immunocompromised mice. Understanding how the metabolism of these cells evolves in vivo is critical to evaluate the actual pertinence of xenograft models to human pathology. Here, we discuss various tumor xenograft models and methods for their metabolomic profiling to provide a short guide to investigators interested in this field of research.

  4. Application of Humanized Mice in Immunological Research.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenwei; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the development of humanized mouse models and their general applications in biomedical research greatly accelerated the translation of outcomes obtained from basic research into potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in clinic. In this chapter, we firstly present an overview on the history and current progress of diverse humanized mouse models and then focus on those equipped with reconstituted human immune system. The update advancement in the establishment of humanized immune system mice and their applications in the studies of the development of human immune system and the pathogenesis of multiple human immune-related diseases are intensively reviewed here, while the shortcoming and perspective of these potent tools are discussed as well. As a valuable bridge across the gap between bench work and clinical trial, progressive humanized mouse models will undoubtedly continue to play an indispensable role in the wide area of biomedical research.

  5. Chronic Activation of FXR in Transgenic Mice Caused Perinatal Toxicity and Sensitized Mice to Cholesterol Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiuqiong; Inaba, Yuka; Lu, Peipei; Xu, Meishu; He, Jinhan; Zhao, Yueshui; Guo, Grace L.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; de la Vega, Rona; Evans, Rhobert W.; Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4, or NR1H4) is highly expressed in the liver and intestine. Previous reports have suggested beneficial functions of FXR in the homeostasis of bile acids, lipids, and glucose, as well as in promoting liver regeneration and inhibiting carcinogenesis. To investigate the effect of chronic FXR activation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and tissue specifically express the activated form of FXR in the liver and intestine. Unexpectedly, the transgenic mice showed several intriguing phenotypes, including partial neonatal lethality, growth retardation, and spontaneous liver toxicity. The transgenic mice also displayed heightened sensitivity to a high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatotoxicity but resistance to the gallstone formation. The phenotypes were transgene specific, because they were abolished upon treatment with doxycycline to silence the transgene expression. The perinatal toxicity, which can be rescued by a maternal vitamin supplement, may have resulted from vitamin deficiency due to low biliary bile acid output as a consequence of inhibition of bile acid formation. Our results also suggested that the fibroblast growth factor-inducible immediate-early response protein 14 (Fn14), a member of the proinflammatory TNF family, is a FXR-responsive gene. However, the contribution of Fn14 induction in the perinatal toxic phenotype of the transgenic mice remains to be defined. Because FXR is being explored as a therapeutic target, our results suggested that a chronic activation of this nuclear receptor may have an unintended side effect especially during the perinatal stage. PMID:25719402

  6. Hair transplantation in mice: Challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Azar Z; Rufaut, Nicholas W; Morrison, Wayne A; Dilley, Rodney J; Knudsen, Russle; Jones, Leslie N; Sinclair, Rodney D

    2016-07-01

    Hair follicle cells contribute to wound healing, skin circulation, and skin diseases including skin cancer, and hair transplantation is a useful technique to study the participation of hair follicle cells in skin homeostasis and wound healing. Although hair follicle transplantation is a well-established human hair-restoration procedure, follicular transplantation techniques in animals have a number of shortcomings and have not been well described or optimized. To facilitate the study of follicular stem and progenitor cells and their interaction with surrounding skin, we have established a new murine transplantation model, similar to follicular unit transplantation in humans. Vibrissae from GFP transgenic mice were harvested, flip-side microdissected, and implanted individually into needle hole incisions in the back skin of immune-deficient nude mice. Grafts were evaluated histologically and the growth of transplanted vibrissae was observed. Transplanted follicles cycled spontaneously and newly formed hair shafts emerged from the skin after 2 weeks. Ninety percent of grafted vibrissae produced a hair shaft at 6 weeks. After pluck-induced follicle cycling, growth rates were equivalent to ungrafted vibrissae. Transplanted vibrissae with GFP-positive cells were easily identified in histological sections. We established a follicular vibrissa transplantation method that recapitulates human follicular unit transplantation. This method has several advantages over current protocols for animal hair transplantation. The method requires no suturing and minimizes the damage to donor follicles and recipient skin. Vibrissae are easier to microdissect and transplant than pelage follicles and, once transplanted, are readily distinguished from host pelage hair. This facilitates measurement of hair growth. Flip-side hair follicle microdissection precisely separates donor follicular tissue from interfollicular tissue and donor cells remain confined to hair follicles. This makes it

  7. Oxytocin decreases sweet taste sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael S; Perea-Martinez, Isabel; Abouyared, Marianne; St John, Steven J; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2015-03-15

    Oxytocin (OXT) suppresses food intake and lack of OXT leads to overconsumption of sucrose. Taste bud cells were recently discovered to express OXT-receptor. In the present study we tested whether administering OXT to wild-type mice affects their licking behavior for tastants in a paradigm designed to be sensitive to taste perception. We injected C57BL/6J mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 10mg/kg OXT and assayed their brief-access lick responses, motivated by water deprivation, to NaCl (300mM), citric acid (20mM), quinine (0.3mM), saccharin (10mM), and a mix of MSG and IMP (100mM and 0.5mM respectively). OXT had no effect on licking for NaCl, citric acid, or quinine. A possible effect of OXT on saccharin and MSG+IMP was difficult to interpret due to unexpectedly low lick rates to water (the vehicle for all taste solutions), likely caused by the use of a high OXT dose that suppressed licking and other behaviors. A subsequent experiment focused on another preferred tastant, sucrose, and employed a much lower OXT dose (0.1mg/kg). This modification, based on our measurements of plasma OXT following i.p. injection, permitted us to elevate plasma [OXT] sufficiently to preferentially activate taste bud cells. OXT at this low dose significantly reduced licking responses to 0.3M sucrose, and overall shifted the sucrose concentration - behavioral response curves rightward (mean EC50saline=0.362M vs. EC50OXT=0.466M). Males did not differ from females under any condition in this study. We propose that circulating oxytocin is another factor that modulates taste-based behavior.

  8. Biochemical and histopathological changes in nephrectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Al Banchaabouchi, M; Marescau, B; D'Hooge, R; Van Marck, E; Van Daele, A; Levillain, O; De Deyn, P P

    1998-03-01

    Renal failure is characterized by the retention of nitrogenous metabolites such as urea, creatinine (CTN) and other guanidino compounds (GCs), uric acid, and hippuric acid, which could be related to the clinical syndrome associated with renal insufficiency. A model of renal failure has been developed in male C57BL x Swiss-Webster mice using nephrectomy (NX) and/or arterial ligation. A sham group (group A) and two nephrectomized groups, group B (one kidney removed) and group C (one kidney removed and ligation of the contralateral anterior artery branch), were studied. Ten days postsurgery, morphological and functional indices of renal failure were investigated. Nephrectomized mice manifested features of renal failure like polyuria and wasting. CTN clearance (CTN[Cl]) decreased by +/-26% in group B and +/-33% in group C as compared with the control values. Marked increases in the plasma concentration of guanidinosuccinic acid ([GSA] fourfold) and guanidine ([G] twofold) were observed in the experimental animals. CTN and alpha-keto-delta-guanidinovaleric acid (alpha-keto-delta-GVA) reached levels of, respectively, 1.5-fold and twofold those of controls. Urinary GSA excretion increased and guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) excretion decreased about twofold in group C. GSA increases (2.6-fold) were also observed in the brain in group C, in addition to a significant increase of G (2.5-fold) and gamma-guanidinobutyric acid ([GBA] 1.5-fold). Finally, the extent of NX was found to be 45.2% in group B and 71.4% in group C. Light microscopy revealed an expansion and increase in cellularity of the mesangium of the glomeruli, particularly in group C. A significant correlation (r = .574, P < .0001) was found between CTN(Cl) and the degree of NX as calculated from the remaining functional area. These data suggest that the model can be used as a tool for further pathophysiological and/or behavioral investigations of renal failure.

  9. Behavioral characterization of system xc- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Featherstone, David E

    2014-05-15

    The slc7a11 gene encodes xCT, an essential component of 'system xc-', a plasma membrane exchanger that imports cystine and exports glutamate. Slc7a11 is expressed primarily in the brain, but its role there is not clear. We performed behavioral tests on two different strains of homozygous slc7a11 mutant mice ('sut' and 'xCT'), as well as heteroallelic offspring of these two strains ('xCT/sut') and their associated genetic backgrounds. Homozygous sut mutant males showed reduced spontaneous alternation in spontaneous alternation tasks as well as reduced movement in an open field maze, but xCT and xCT/sut strains did not show significant changes in these tasks compared to appropriate controls. Neither xCT nor sut mutants showed differences from controls in rotarod tests. Female behavioral phenotypes were independent of estrus cycle stage. To ensure that homozygous xCT, sut, and xCT/sut strains all represent protein null alleles, we measured whole brain xCT protein levels using immunoblots. xCT, sut and xCT/sut strains showed no detectable xCT protein expression, confirming them as null alleles. Previously published microdialysis experiments showed reduced striatal glutamate in xCT mutants. Using the same methods, we measured reduced interstitial glutamate levels in the striatum but not cerebellum of sut mutants. However, we detected no glutamate change in the striatum or cerebellum of sut/xCT mice. We detected no changes in whole brain EAAT-1, -2, or -3 expression. We conclude that the behavioral and chemical differences exist between slc7a11 mutant strains, but we were unable to definitively attribute any of these differences to loss of system xc-.

  10. Wound Healing Activity of Silibinin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Rojalini; Pattnaik, Ashok K.; Pradhan, Kishanta K.; Mehta, Beena K.; Pattanayak, Shakti P.; Banerjee, Sugato

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silibinin is a semi-purified fraction of silymarin contained in milk thistle (Silybum marianum Asteraceae). Primarily known for its hepatoprotective actions, silymarin may also stimulate epithelialization and reduce inflammation in excision wound. Previous studies show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial actions of silibinin. However, wound healing property of silibinin is not well studied. Objective: This study investigates wound healing activity of silibinin topical formulation. Materials and Methods: Wound healing activity of 0.2% silibinin gel was assessed by incision and excision wound models in mice. Animals were divided into gel base, silibinin gel, and Mega Heal gel® treated groups with six animals in each group. Wound contraction, wound tissue tensile strength, and hydroxyproline content were measured, and histopathological evaluation of wound tissue of all the above treatment groups was carried out. Results: Application of 0.2% silibinin hydrogel for 8 days led to 56.3% wound contraction compared to 64.6% using standard Mega Heal gel with a subsequent increase in hydroxyproline content, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) over control animals showing 33.2% contraction. After 14 days, percentage of contraction reached 96.1%, 97.6%, and 86.7%, respectively. Wound tissue tensile strength with silibinin (223.55 ± 3.82 g) and standard (241.38 ± 2.49 g) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than control (174.06 ± 5.75 g). Histopathology of silibinin and standard gel treated wound tissue showed more fibroblasts, fewer macrophage infiltration, and well-formed collagen fibers. Conclusion: Here, we show potent wound healing activity of silibinin hydrogel formulation. SUMMARY 0.2% silibinin hydrogel showed potent wound healing activity in incision and excision wound models in mice. Abbreviations Used: ROS: Reactive oxygen species PMID:27695272

  11. Mercury-induced autoimmunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Hultman, Per

    2002-10-01

    We have studied the effect of gender, genetics, and toxicokinetics on immune parameters in mercury-induced autoimmunity in mice. Data strongly suggest that the mechanism for mercury-induced autoimmunity involves modification of the autoantigen fibrillarin by mercury followed by a T-cell-dependent immune response driven by the modified fibrillarin. Mice with different H-2 haplotypes were treated with (203)HgCl(2) in a dose of 0.5-16 mg Hg/L drinking water for 10 weeks. Whole-body accumulation and renal accumulation of mercury were assessed. Serum antinuclear antibodies were used to evaluate the autoimmune response, and serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) to study effects on T-helper cells of type 2. Strains with a susceptible H-2 haplotype developed autoantibodies to the nucleolar protein fibrillarin (AFA) in a dose-dependent pattern within 2 weeks. The substantially lower whole-body and organ mercury level needed to induce AFA in the susceptible A.SW strain compared with the H-2 congenic B10.S strain demonstrates that genetic factors outside the H-2 region modify the autoimmune response. Mouse strains without the susceptible haplotype did not develop any autoimmune reaction irrespective of dose and organ deposition of mercury. In susceptible mouse strains, males and females had different thresholds for induction of autoimmune reactions. In susceptible strains, serum IgE increased dose dependently and reached a maximum after 1-2.5 weeks. A susceptible H-2 haplotype is therefore a prerequisite for the autoimmune response. Mercury exposure will modulate the response, qualitatively through the existence of dose-related thresholds for autoimmune response and quantitatively as increasing doses cause increasing autoimmune response. Further, gender and non-H-2 genes modulate both the induction and subsequent development of AFA. Induction of IgE seems not to be mechanistically linked to the AFA response.

  12. Wound Healing Activity of Silibinin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Rojalini; Pattnaik, Ashok K.; Pradhan, Kishanta K.; Mehta, Beena K.; Pattanayak, Shakti P.; Banerjee, Sugato

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silibinin is a semi-purified fraction of silymarin contained in milk thistle (Silybum marianum Asteraceae). Primarily known for its hepatoprotective actions, silymarin may also stimulate epithelialization and reduce inflammation in excision wound. Previous studies show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial actions of silibinin. However, wound healing property of silibinin is not well studied. Objective: This study investigates wound healing activity of silibinin topical formulation. Materials and Methods: Wound healing activity of 0.2% silibinin gel was assessed by incision and excision wound models in mice. Animals were divided into gel base, silibinin gel, and Mega Heal gel® treated groups with six animals in each group. Wound contraction, wound tissue tensile strength, and hydroxyproline content were measured, and histopathological evaluation of wound tissue of all the above treatment groups was carried out. Results: Application of 0.2% silibinin hydrogel for 8 days led to 56.3% wound contraction compared to 64.6% using standard Mega Heal gel with a subsequent increase in hydroxyproline content, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) over control animals showing 33.2% contraction. After 14 days, percentage of contraction reached 96.1%, 97.6%, and 86.7%, respectively. Wound tissue tensile strength with silibinin (223.55 ± 3.82 g) and standard (241.38 ± 2.49 g) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than control (174.06 ± 5.75 g). Histopathology of silibinin and standard gel treated wound tissue showed more fibroblasts, fewer macrophage infiltration, and well-formed collagen fibers. Conclusion: Here, we show potent wound healing activity of silibinin hydrogel formulation. SUMMARY 0.2% silibinin hydrogel showed potent wound healing activity in incision and excision wound models in mice. Abbreviations Used: ROS: Reactive oxygen species

  13. Chronic toxicity study of cyclohexanone in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Lijinsky, W; Kovatch, R M

    1986-10-01

    A 2-year chronic toxicity assay of cyclohexanone (CAS: 108-94-1) was conducted in F344 rats and (C57BL/6 X C3H)F1 mice by administering a solution of cyclohexanone in drinking water. Two concentrations were given to rats, 6,500 and 3,300 ppm (wt/vol). Male mice received 13,000 and 6,500 ppm, while female mice were given three concentrations, 25,000, 13,000, and 6,500 ppm. Each treatment group consisted of 50 or 52 male and 50 or 52 female rats or mice, except 47 male mice treated with the highest dose and 41 female mice treated with the highest dose, and there was a group of untreated controls of each species. Survival and weight gain were similar to those of controls at the lowest cyclohexanone dose in both sexes of both species, but weight gain was depressed at all of the higher doses. Survival was good (greater than 80% at 90 wk) in all groups except in female mice at the 2 highest doses; at 25,000 ppm of cyclohexanone, only 50% of mice lived beyond 1 year. Most of the neoplasms in the treated groups did not differ significantly in number from those in the controls. Male rats receiving 3,300 ppm cyclohexanone had a 13% incidence of adrenal cortex adenomas (7 animals) compared with an incidence of 2% in controls; the incidence of this neoplasm did not increase in the male rats receiving 6,500 ppm or in the female rats given either dose. The mice had a statistically significant increase in incidence of lymphomas-leukemias among the females given 6,500 ppm, but not among the groups given higher doses of cyclohexanone. Male mice given 6,500 ppm cyclohexanone showed an increased incidence of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas, 50% versus 32.5% in controls, but the incidence of these neoplasms was only 37% in the male mice given 13,000 ppm cyclohexanone. The incidence of lymphomas in male mice and of hepatocellular neoplasms in female mice given cyclohexanone did not differ from that in the controls. The evidence for carcinogenic activity of cyclohexanone is

  14. Increased sensitivity to kindling in mice lacking TSP1.

    PubMed

    Mendus, D; Rankin-Gee, E K; Mustapha, M; Porter, B E

    2015-10-01

    The development of a hyperexcitable neuronal network is thought to be a critical event in epilepsy. Thrombospondins (TSPs) regulate synaptogenesis by binding the neuronal α2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. TSPs regulate synapse formation during development and in the mature brain following injury. It is unclear if TSPs are involved in hyperexcitability that contributes to the development of epilepsy. Here we explore the development of epilepsy using a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model in mice lacking TSP1 and TSP2. Unexpectedly, we found increased sensitivity to PTZ kindling in mice lacking TSP1, while mice lacking TSP2 kindled similar to wild-type. We found that the increased seizure susceptibility in the TSP1 knockout (KO) mice was not due to a compensatory increase in TSP2 mRNA as TSP1/2 KO mice were sensitive to PTZ, similar to the TSP1 KO mice. Furthermore, there were similar levels of TGF-B signal activation during kindling in the TSP1 KO mice compared to wild-type. We observed decreased expression of voltage-dependent calcium channel subunit CACNA2D1 mRNA in TSP1, TSP2, and TSP1/2 KO mice. Decreased CACNA2D2 mRNA was only detected in mice that lacked TSP1 and α2δ-1/2 protein levels in the cortex were lower in the TSP 1/2 KO mice. CACNA2D2 knockout mice have spontaneous seizures and increased PTZ seizure susceptibility. Here we report similar findings, TSP1, and TSP1/2 KO mice have low levels of CACNA2D2 mRNA expression and α2δ-1/2 receptor level in the cortex, and are more susceptible to seizures. CACNA2D2 mutations in mice and humans can cause epilepsy. Our data suggest TSP1 in particular may control CACNA2D2 levels and could be a modifier of seizure susceptibility.

  15. Cardiovascular manifestations of renovascular hypertension in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sonu; Engel, Sean; Osman, Mazen; Al-Saiegh, Yousif; Wongjarupong, Asarn; Grande, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Type 2 diabetes is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the United States. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is commonly observed in diabetic patients and impacts the rate of renal and cardiovascular disease progression. We sought to test the hypothesis that renovascular hypertension, induced by unilateral renal artery stenosis, exacerbates cardiac remodeling in leptin-deficient (db/db) mice, which serves as a model of human type II diabetes. Methods. We employed a murine model of renovascular hypertension through placement of a polytetrafluoroethylene cuff on the right renal artery in db/db mice. We studied 109 wild-type (non-diabetic, WT) and 95 db/db mice subjected to renal artery stenosis (RAS) or sham surgery studied at 1, 2, 4, and 6+ weeks following surgery. Cardiac remodeling was assessed by quantitative analysis of the percent of myocardial surface area occupied by interstitial fibrosis tissue, as delineated by trichrome stained slides. Aortic pathology was assessed by histologic sampling of grossly apparent structural abnormalities or by section of ascending aorta of vessels without apparent abnormalities. Results. We noted an increased mortality in db/db mice subjected to RAS. The mortality rate of db/db RAS mice was about 23.5%, whereas the mortality rate of WT RAS mice was only 1.5%. Over 60% of mortality in the db/db mice occurred in the first two weeks following RAS surgery. Necropsy showed massive intrathoracic hemorrhage associated with aortic dissection, predominantly in the ascending aorta and proximal descending aorta. Aortas from db/db RAS mice showed more smooth muscle dropout, loss of alpha smooth muscle actin expression, medial disruption, and hemorrhage than aortas from WT mice with RAS. Cardiac tissue from db/db RAS mice had more fibrosis than did cardiac tissue from WT RAS mice. Conclusions. db/db mice subjected to RAS are prone to develop fatal aortic dissection, which is not observed in WT mice with RAS. The db

  16. Mineral uptake by the femora of older female X-linked hypophosphatemic (HYP) mice but not older male HYP mice.

    PubMed

    Brault, B A; Meyer, M H; Meyer, R A; Iorio, R J

    1987-09-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mice are a model of human sex-linked vitamin D-resistant rickets. Young adult Hyp mice are characterized by osteomalacia and decreased bone mineral content. However, older heterozygous Hyp female mice increase in bone mineral content with age so that by one year of age the bone mass/mm femoral length equals or exceeds normal females. To test for the occurrence of this mineral accretion in Hyp male mice and in homozygous Hyp female mice, femora from all 3 Hyp genotypes as well as normal male and female mice were analyzed at various ages from one to 52 weeks of age. Compared to normal mice, all three Hyp genotypes were depressed in bone ash, femoral length, and ash/length ratio at 13 weeks of age. After that age the femora of both heterozygous and homozygous Hyp females showed a slow mineral accretion and, by 52 weeks of age, a normal ash/length ratio. However, the femora of Hyp males, as well as those of normal males, failed to increase in bone mineral content or ash/length ratio after 13 weeks of age. The differences between male and female Hyp mice could not be explained by differences in the plasma levels of calcium, phosphate, or alkaline phosphatase. Increased bone mineral content in older Hyp mice was seen in both heterozygous and homozygous females but not in hemizygous males. Thus, the basis for this increase is not incomplete dominance of the Hyp gene in females nor the Lyon hypothesis. The accretion of mineral in older female Hyp mice despite lifelong reduced plasma phosphate levels suggests that there are factors other than phosphate that also regulate mineral accretion in this bone disease.

  17. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum–iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia. PMID:26381017

  18. Oxidative Stress-Dependent Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Gamez-Mendez, Ana María; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial Endothelium vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agonists play a key role in regulation of vascular tone. In this study, we evaluated coronary vascular response in an 8 weeks diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice model. Coronary perfusion pressure in response to acetylcholine in isolated hearts from obese mice showed increased vasoconstriction and reduced vasodilation responses compared with control mice. Vascular nitric oxide assessed in situ with DAF-2 DA showed diminished levels in coronary arteries from obese mice in both basal and acetylcholine-stimulated conditions. Also, released prostacyclin was decreased in heart perfusates from obese mice, along with plasma tetrahydrobiopterin level and endothelium nitric oxide synthase dimer/monomer ratio. Obesity increased thromboxane A2 synthesis and oxidative stress evaluated by superoxide and peroxynitrite levels, compared with control mice. Obese mice treated with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reversed all parameters to normal levels. These results suggest that after 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, the increase in oxidative stress lead to imbalance in vasoactive substances and consequently to endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries.

  19. Hhip haploinsufficiency sensitizes mice to age-related emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Yun, Jeong; Qiu, Weiliang; Guo, Feng; Huang, Chunfang; Mancini, John Dominic; Gupta, Kushagra; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Naing, Zun Zar Chi; Zhang, Li; Perrella, Mark A; Owen, Caroline A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Genetic variants in Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) have consistently been associated with the susceptibility to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary function levels, including the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), in general population samples by genome-wide association studies. However, in vivo evidence connecting Hhip to age-related FEV1 decline and emphysema development is lacking. Herein, using Hhip heterozygous mice (Hhip(+/-)), we observed increased lung compliance and spontaneous emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice starting at 10 mo of age. This increase was preceded by increases in oxidative stress levels in the lungs of Hhip(+/-) vs. Hhip(+/+) mice. To our knowledge, these results provide the first line of evidence that HHIP is involved in maintaining normal lung function and alveolar structures. Interestingly, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine treatment in mice starting at age of 5 mo improved lung function and prevented emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice, suggesting that N-acetyl cysteine treatment limits the progression of age-related emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice. Therefore, reduced lung function and age-related spontaneous emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice may be caused by increased oxidative stress levels in murine lungs as a result of haploinsufficiency of Hhip. PMID:27444019

  20. Altered neurotransmission in the mesolimbic reward system of Girk mice.

    PubMed

    Arora, Devinder; Haluk, Desirae M; Kourrich, Saïd; Pravetoni, Marco; Fernández-Alacid, Laura; Nicolau, Joel C; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    Mice lacking the Girk2 subunit of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ (Girk) channels exhibit dopamine-dependent hyperactivity and elevated responses to drugs that stimulate dopamine neurotransmission. The dopamine-dependent phenotypes seen in Girk2(-/-) mice could reflect increased intrinsic excitability of or diminished inhibitory feedback to midbrain dopamine neurons, or secondary adaptations triggered by Girk2 ablation. We addressed these possibilities by evaluating Girk(-/-) mice in behavioral, electrophysiological, and cell biological assays centered on the mesolimbic dopamine system. Despite differences in the contribution of Girk1 and Girk2 subunits to Girk signaling in midbrain dopamine neurons, Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice exhibited comparable baseline hyperactivities and enhanced responses to cocaine. Girk ablation also correlated with altered afferent input to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Dopamine neurons from Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice exhibited elevated glutamatergic neurotransmission, paralleled by increased synaptic levels of alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate glutamate receptors. In addition, synapse density, alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor levels, and glutamatergic neurotransmission were elevated in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens from Girk1(-/-) and Girk2(-/-) mice. We conclude that dopamine-dependent phenotypes in Girk2(-/-) mice are not solely attributable to a loss of Girk signaling in dopamine neurons, and likely involve secondary adaptations facilitating glutamatergic signaling in the mesolimbic reward system. PMID:20557431

  1. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  2. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  3. Immunomodulatory and antioxidative activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yu; Feng, Cui-ping; Li, Xing; Chang, Ming-chang; Meng, Jun-long; Xu, Li-jing

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the immune activation and reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides (CMP) in vivo, 24 male and 24 female Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. The mice in the four experimental groups were administered 0 (normal control), 50, 100, or 200mg/kg/d body weight CMP via gavage. After 30 days, the viscera index, leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, immunoglobulin (IgG) levels, and biochemical parameters were measured. The effect of CMP on the expression of tumor necrosis (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-1β in the spleens of experimental mice was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the administration of CMP improved the immune function in mice, significantly increased the spleen and thymus indices, the spleen lymphocyte activity, the total quantity of white blood cells, and IgG function in mice serum. CMP exhibited significant antioxidative activity in mice, and decreased malondialdehyde levels in vivo. CMP upregulated the expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β mRNA in high-dose groups compared to that observed for the control mice. We can thus conclude that CMP effectively improved the immune function through protection against oxidative stress. CMP thus shows potential for development as drugs and health supplements. PMID:26853825

  4. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-09-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens.

  5. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on Arterial Contractile Responses in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jia; Ren, Xin-Ling; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine if hindlimb unweighting in mice alters arterial contractile responses. Sixteen male C57B/6 mice and 16 male Chinese Kunming mice were divided into control and 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting groups, respectively. Using isolated arterial rings from different arteries of mouse, effects of 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting on arterial contractile responsiveness were examined in vitro. The results showed that, in arterial rings from both C57B/6 and Chinese Kunming mice, maximum isometric contractile tensions evoked by either KCl or phenylephrine were significantly lower in abdominal aortic, mesenteric arterial and femoral arterial rings from hindlimb unweighting, compared to control mice. However, the maximal contractile responses of common carotid rings to KCl and PE were not significantly different between control and hindlimb unweighting groups. The sensitivity (EC(sub 50)) of all arteries to KCl or PE showed no significant differences between control and hindlimb unweighting mice. These data indicated that 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting results in a reduced capacity of the arterial smooth muscle of the hindquarter to develop tension. In addition, the alterations in arterial contractile responses caused by hindlimb unweighting in mice are similar as those in rats. Our work suggested that hindlimb unweighting mouse model may be used as a model for the study of postflight cardiovascular deconditioning.

  6. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  7. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  8. Reduced Uterine Perfusion Pressure (RUPP) Model of Preeclampsia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fushima, Tomofumi; Sekimoto, Akiyo; Minato, Takahiro; Ito, Takuya; Oe, Yuji; Kisu, Kiyomi; Sato, Emiko; Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Ito, Sadayoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced hypertension with proteinuria that typically develops after 20 weeks of gestation. A reduction in uterine blood flow causes placental ischemia and placental release of anti-angiogenic factors such as sFlt-1 followed by PE. Although the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model is widely used in rats, investigating the role of genes on PE using genetically engineered animals has been problematic because it has been difficult to make a useful RUPP model in mice. To establish a RUPP model of PE in mice, we bilaterally ligated ovarian vessels distal to ovarian branches, uterine vessels, or both in ICR-strain mice at 14.5 days post coitum (dpc). Consequently, these mice had elevated BP, increased urinary albumin excretion, severe endotheliosis, and mesangial expansion. They also had an increased incidence of miscarriage and premature delivery. Embryonic weight at 18.5 dpc was significantly lower than that in sham mice. The closer to the ligation site the embryos were, the higher the resorption rate and the lower the embryonic weight. The phenotype was more severe in the order of ligation at the ovarian vessels < uterine vessels < both. Unlike the RUPP models described in the literature, this model did not constrict the abdominal aorta, which allowed BP to be measured with a tail cuff. This novel RUPP model in mice should be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of PE in genetically engineered mice and for evaluating new therapies for PE. PMID:27187738

  9. Phenotype of cloned mice: development, behavior, and physiology.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Akutsu, Hidenori; Woods, Stephen C; Kondo, Sylvia; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Sakai, Randall R

    2003-11-01

    Cloning technology has potential to be a valuable tool in basic research, clinical medicine, and agriculture. However, it is critical to determine the consequences of this technique in resulting offspring before widespread use of the technology. Mammalian cloning using somatic cells was first demonstrated in sheep in 1997 and since then has been extended to a number of other species. We examined development, behavior, physiology, and longevity in B6C3F1 female mice cloned from adult cumulus cells. Control mice were naturally fertilized embryos subjected to the same in vitro manipulation and culture conditions as clone embryos. Clones attained developmental milestones similar to controls. Activity level, motor ability and coordination, and learning and memory skills of cloned mice were comparable with controls. Interestingly, clones gained more body weight than controls during adulthood. Increased body weight was attributable to higher body fat and was associated with hyperleptinemia and hyperinsulinemia indicating that cloned mice are obese. Cloned mice were not hyperphagic as adults and had hypersensitive leptin and melanocortin signaling systems. Longevity of cloned mice was comparable with that reported by the National Institute on Aging and the causes of death were typical for this strain of mouse. These studies represent the first comprehensive set of data to characterize cloned mice and provide critical information about the long-term effects of somatic cell cloning. PMID:14610260

  10. Subchronic exposure of mice to Love Canal soil contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Silkworth, J.B.; McMartin, D.N.; Rej, R.; Narang, R.S.; Stein, V.B.; Briggs, R.G.; Kaminsky, L.S.

    1984-04-01

    The health hazard potential of soil collected from the surface of the Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, New York, was assessed in 90-day exposure studies. Female CD-1 mice were exposed to two concentrations of the volatile components of 1 kg of soil with and without direct soil contact. Control mice were identically housed but without soil. The soil was replaced weekly and 87 compounds were detected in the air in the cages above fresh and 7-day-old soil as analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The concentration of many of these compounds decreased during the 7-day exposure cycle. Histopathologic, hematologic, and serum enzyme studies followed necropsy of all mice. There was no mortality of mice exposed for up to 90 days under any condition. Thymus and spleen weights relative to body weight were increased after 4 weeks of exposure by inhalation but not after 8 or 12 weeks of exposure. alpha-, beta-, and delta- Benzenehexachlorides , pentachlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene were detected in liver tissue from these animals. Mice exposed to 5- to 10-fold elevated concentration of volatiles had increased body and relative kidney weights. There was no chemically induced lesion in any animal exposed only to the volatile soil contaminants. Mice exposed by direct contact with the soil without elevated volatile exposure had increased body (10%) and relative liver weights (169%). Centrolobular hepatocyte hypertrophy, which involved 40 to 70% of the lobules, was observed in all mice in this group.

  11. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A; Hill, Tracy L; Welch, Ian D; Beier, Frank

    2016-07-26

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα's potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear.

  12. Resveratrol Protects the Brain of Obese Mice from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Shraddha D.; Kumar, Sruthi; Wilson, David N.; Tamura, Leslie; Geetha, Thangiah; Mathews, Suresh T.; Huggins, Kevin W.; Broderick, Tom L.; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a polyphenolic phytoalexin that exerts cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antioxidant effects. Recently it has been shown that obesity is associated with an increase in cerebral oxidative stress levels, which may enhance neurodegeneration. The present study evaluates the neuroprotective action of resveratrol in brain of obese (ob/ob) mice. Resveratrol was administered orally at the dose of 25 mg kg−1 body weight daily for three weeks to lean and obese mice. Resveratrol had no effect on body weight or blood glucose levels in obese mice. Lipid peroxides were significantly increased in brain of obese mice. The enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and nonenzymatic antioxidants tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and glutathione were decreased in obese mice brain. Administration of resveratrol decreased lipid peroxide levels and upregulated the antioxidant activities in obese mice brain. Our findings indicate a neuroprotective effect of resveratrol by preventing oxidative damage in brain tissue of obese mice. PMID:24163719

  13. Assessment of Dental Fluorosis in Mmp20+/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, R.; Tye, C.E.; Arun, A.; MacDonald, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Abrazinski, T.; Everett, E.T.; Whitford, G.M.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20+/− mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F−) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20+/− mice had F− tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20+/+ mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F−-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20+/− mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis. PMID:21386097

  14. Assessment of dental fluorosis in Mmp20 +/- mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Tye, C E; Arun, A; MacDonald, D; Chatterjee, A; Abrazinski, T; Everett, E T; Whitford, G M; Bartlett, J D

    2011-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20 (+/-) mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F(-)) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20 (+/-) mice had F(-) tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20 (+/+) mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F(-)-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20 (+/-) mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis.

  15. ACUTE HEPATIC NECROSIS INDUCED BY BRUCELLA INFECTION IN HYPERTHYROID MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, G. Mary; Spink, Wesley W.

    1959-01-01

    When small numbers of Brucella melitensis were inoculated into ABC mice, occasional hepatic granulomas without necrosis were demonstrated. The greatest multiplication of brucellae was detected in the spleens. Because it had been previously observed that ACTH or cortisone markedly accelerated the multiplication of brucellae in the livers of infected mice with destruction of liver cells, it was considered that triiodothyronine might likewise exaggerate a brucella infection by stimulating endogenous adrenal secretion. Although adrenal hypertrophy was produced, infection of mice treated with triiodothyronine resulted in severe hepatic necrosis or infarcts without the multiplication of brucellae in either the livers or spleens. The lesions were not encountered in untreated infected mice or in control mice treated with triiodothyronine. The necrosis was associated with minimal inflammatory reaction. The necrosis was not induced in mice treated with triiodothyronine and given brucella endotoxin. The precise genesis of the acute hepatic necrosis cited in these experiments remains undefined. Triiodothyronine did not cause deaths in mice infected with Br. melitensis. The infection was neither enhanced nor suppressed. PMID:13803714

  16. Microwave effects on learning and memory in mice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luttges, M.W.

    1980-09-30

    The effects of microwave irradiation were assessed on learning memory in mice. Also, preliminary studies were completed to begin an assessment of underlying physiological mechanisms related to the observed microwave effects on behavior. Using a resonant microwave irradiation chamber in which mice were exposed following daily training to 3GHz pulsed microwave at approximately 18m W/sq cm average power levels, small but reliable increases in performance were documented. All treatments were delivered posttrial for a 15 min. period. Sham-treated mice were treated in the same manner as exposed mice except that no radiation was delivered. Repeated replications with different aged animals produced the same effects. The microwave facilitation was observed in both automated active avoidance testing and in single-trial, passive avoidance testing. The modest facilitation effect was observed when the mice were tested at 20 days after original training. Using a different irradiation chamber, the studies were repeated. The new chamber used an impedance matched horn in which the mice were restrained in a constant orientation relative to the microwave fields. In this test configuration the mice received an average power level of 22mW/sq cm. Once again, small but reliable amounts of performance facilitation were observed.

  17. Telmisartan regresses left ventricular hypertrophy in caveolin-1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kreiger, Marta H; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Teutsch, Christine; Kauser, Katalin; Sessa, William C.

    2011-01-01

    The role of angiotensin II (Ang II) in promoting cardiac hypertrophy is well known, however the role of the Ang II in a spontaneous model of hypertrophy in mice lacking the protein caveolin-1 (Cav- KO) has not been explored. In this study, WT and Cav-1 KO mice were treated with angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), telmisartan, and cardiac function assessed by echocardiography. Treatment of Cav-1 KO mice with telmisartan significantly improved cardiac function compared to age-matched, vehicle treated Cav-1 KO mice, while telmisartan did not affected cardiac function in WT mice. Both left ventricular (LV) weight to body weight ratios and LV to tibial length ratios were also reverted by telmisartan in Cav-1 KO but not WT mice. LV hypertrophy was associated with increased expression of natriuretic peptides-A and –B, β-myosin heavy chain and TGF-β and telmisartan treatment normalized the expression of these genes. Telmisartan reduced the expression of collagen genes (Col1A and Col3A) and associated perivascular fibrosis in intramyocardial vessels in Cav-1 KO mice. In conclusion, telmisartan treatment reduces indexes of cardiac hypertrophy in this unique genetic model of spontaneous LV hypertrophy. PMID:20585312

  18. Telmisartan regresses left ventricular hypertrophy in caveolin-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Marta H; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Teutsch, Christine; Kauser, Katalin; Sessa, William C

    2010-11-01

    The role of angiotensin II (Ang II) in promoting cardiac hypertrophy is well known; however, its role in a spontaneous model of hypertrophy in mice lacking the protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1 KO) has not been explored. In this study, WT and Cav-1 KO mice were treated with angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), telmisartan (Telm), and cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography. Treatment of Cav-1 KO mice with Telm significantly improved cardiac function compared with age-matched vehicle-treated Cav-1 KO mice, whereas Telm did not affect cardiac function in WT mice. Both left ventricular (LV) weight to body weight ratios and LV to tibial length ratios were also reverted by Telm in Cav-1 KO but not in WT mice. LV hypertrophy was associated with increased expression of natriuretic peptides A and B, β-myosin heavy chain and TGF-β, and Telm treatment normalized the expression of these genes. Telm reduced the expression of collagen genes (Col1A and Col3A) and associated perivascular fibrosis in intramyocardial vessels in Cav-1 KO mice. In conclusion, Telm treatment reduces indexes of cardiac hypertrophy in this unique genetic model of spontaneous LV hypertrophy. PMID:20585312

  19. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shirine E.; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A.; Hill, Tracy L.; Welch, Ian D.; Beier, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα’s potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear. PMID:27457421

  20. Immune complex processing in C1q-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nash, J T; Taylor, P R; Botto, M; Norsworthy, P J; Davies, K A; Walport, M J

    2001-02-01

    Complement and Fcgamma receptors are known to mediate the processing of immune complexes (IC), and abnormalities in these mechanisms may predispose to the development of lupus. We explored the processing of IC in mice deficient in complement component C1q. 125I-labelled IC comprising Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)/human anti-HBsAg (HBsAg/Ab) were injected intravenously and the sites of IC clearance determined by direct counting of organ uptake at various time points. The liver and spleen were the main sites of IC uptake in all mice. The splenic uptake of IC was significantly reduced in the C1q-deficient mice compared with the control mice. C1q-deficient mice also exhibited an initial accelerated hepatic uptake of IC similar to that seen in human subjects with hypocomplementaemia. The hepatic localization of IC at later time points was similar in both groups of mice. These data in mice are consistent with previous observations in humans that confirm that the classical pathway of complement plays an important role in the appropriate processing of IC in vivo.

  1. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-09-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum-iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia.

  2. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-09-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens. PMID:7642292

  3. Metformin Reduces Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Mi; Jang, An Hee; Kim, Hyojin; Lee, Kyu Hwa; Kim, Young Whan

    2016-09-01

    Metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. We investigated whether metformin has an inhibitory effect on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. A total of 62 mice were divided into 5 groups: control, metformin (100 mg/kg), BLM, and BLM with metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg). Metformin was administered to the mice orally once a day from day 1. We sacrificed half of the mice on day 10 and collected the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from their left lungs. The remaining mice were sacrificed and analyzed on day 21. The right lungs were harvested for histological analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers were determined via analysis of the harvested lungs on day 21. The mice treated with BLM and metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg) showed significantly lower levels of inflammatory cells in the BALF compared with the BLM-only mice on days 10 and 21. The histological examination revealed that the metformin treatment led to a greater reduction in inflammation than the treatment with BLM alone. The mRNA levels of collagen, collagen-1, procollagen, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor-β in the metformin-treated mice were lower than those in the BLM-only mice on day 21, although statistical significance was observed only in the case of procollagen due to the small number of live mice in the BLM-only group. Additionally, treatment with metformin reduced fibrosis to a greater extent than treatment with BLM alone. Metformin suppresses the inflammatory and fibrotic processes of BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. PMID:27510385

  4. Inactivation of TNF-α ameliorates diabetic neuropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Isamu; Terashima, Tomoya; Katagi, Miwako; Oi, Jiro; Urabe, Hiroshi; Sanada, Mitsuru; Kawai, Hiromichi; Chan, Lawrence; Yasuda, Hitoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a potent proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. We inactivated TNF-α to determine if it is a valid therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. We effected the inactivation in diabetic neuropathy using two approaches: by genetic inactivation of TNF-α (TNF-α−/− mice) or by neutralization of TNF-α protein using the monoclonal antibody infliximab. We induced diabetes using streptozotocin in wild-type and TNF-α−/− mice. We measured serum TNF-α concentration and the level of TNF-α mRNA in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and evaluated nerve function by a combination of motor (MNCV) and sensory (SNCV) nerve conduction velocities and tail flick test, as well as cytological analysis of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) and immunostaining of DRG for NF-κB p65 serine-276 phosphorylated and cleaved caspase-3. Compared with nondiabetic mice, TNF-α+/+ diabetic mice displayed significant impairments of MNCV, SNCV, tail flick test, and IENFD as well as increased expression of NF-κB p65 and cleaved caspase-3 in their DRG. In contrast, although nondiabetic TNF-α−/− mice showed mild abnormalities of IENFD under basal conditions, diabetic TNF-α−/− mice showed no evidence of abnormal nerve function tests compared with nondiabetic mice. A single injection of infliximab in diabetic TNF-α+/+ mice led to suppression of the increased serum TNF-α and amelioration of the electrophysiological and biochemical deficits for at least 4 wk. Moreover, the increased TNF-α mRNA expression in diabetic DRG was also attenuated by infliximab, suggesting infliximab's effects may involve the local suppression of TNF-α. Infliximab, an agent currently in clinical use, is effective in targeting TNF-α action and expression and amelioration of diabetic neuropathy in mice. PMID:21810933

  5. State Machine Operation of the MICE Cooling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  6. Feeding-elicited cataplexy in orexin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erika L.; Baumann, Christian R.; Cano, Georgina; Scammell, Thomas E.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin signaling have sudden episodes of atonia and paralysis during active wakefulness. These events strongly resemble cataplexy, episodes of sudden muscle weakness triggered by strong positive emotions in people with narcolepsy, but it remains unknown whether murine cataplexy is triggered by positive emotions. To determine whether positive emotions elicit murine cataplexy, we placed orexin knockout (KO) mice on a scheduled feeding protocol with regular or highly palatable food. Baseline sleep/wake behavior was recorded with ad lib regular chow. Mice were then placed on a scheduled feeding protocol in which they received 60% of their normal amount of chow 3 hr after dark onset for the next 10 days. Wild-type and KO mice rapidly entrained to scheduled feeding with regular chow, with more wake and locomotor activity prior to the feeding time. On day 10 of scheduled feeding, orexin KO mice had slightly more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and more cataplexy in the second half of the dark period, when they may have been foraging for residual food. To test whether more palatable food increases cataplexy, mice were then switched to scheduled feeding with an isocaloric amount of Froot Loops, a food often used as a reward in behavioral studies. With this highly palatable food, orexin KO mice had much more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and throughout the dark period. The increase in cataplexy with scheduled feeding, especially with highly palatable food, suggests that positive emotions may trigger cataplexy in mice, just as in people with narcolepsy. Establishing this connection helps validate orexin KO mice as an excellent model of human narcolepsy and provides an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms that trigger cataplexy. PMID:19362119

  7. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked fasting hyperinsulinemia was seen for p55(-)/-p75(-)/- males between 12 and 16 wk of feeding the high-fat diet. Insulin levels were four times greater than wild-type mice. In contrast, p55(-)/- and p75(-)/- mice exhibited insulin levels that were similar or reduced, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, high-fat diet-fed p75(-)/- mice had the lowest body weights and leptin levels, and improved insulin sensitivity. Obese (db/db) mice, which are not responsive to leptin, were used to study the role of p55 in severe obesity. Male p55(-)/-db/db mice exhibited threefold higher insulin levels and twofold lower glucose levels at 20 wk of age than control db/db expressing p55. All db/db mice remained severely insulin resistant based on fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Our data do not support the concept that TNF, acting via its receptors, is a major contributor to obesity-associated insulin resistance. In fact, data suggest that the two TNF receptors work in concert to protect against diabetes. PMID:9664082

  8. Lack of Dystrophin Affects Bronchial Epithelium in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Giuseppe; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Pace, Elisabetta; Pace, Andrea; Mudò, Giuseppa; Crescimanno, Grazia; Belluardo, Natale; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-10-01

    Mild exercise training may positively affect the course of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Training causes mild bronchial epithelial injury in both humans and mice, but no study assessed the effects of exercise in mdx mice, a well known model of DMD. The airway epithelium was examined in mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx) mice, and in wild type (WT, C57BL/10ScSc) mice either under sedentary conditions (mdx-SD, WT-SD) or during mild exercise training (mdx-EX, WT-EX). At baseline, and after 30 and 45 days of training (5 d/wk for 6 weeks), epithelial morphology and markers of regeneration, apoptosis, and cellular stress were assessed. The number of goblet cells in bronchial epithelium was much lower in mdx than in WT mice under all conditions. At 30 days, epithelial regeneration (PCNA positive cells) was higher in EX than SD animals in both groups; however, at 45 days, epithelial regeneration decreased in mdx mice irrespective of training, and the percentage of apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells was higher in mdx-EX than in WT-EX mice. Epithelial expression of HSP60 (marker of stress) progressively decreased, and inversely correlated with epithelial apoptosis (r = -0.66, P = 0.01) only in mdx mice. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice appears associated with defective epithelial differentiation, and transient epithelial regeneration during mild exercise training. Hence, lack of dystrophin might impair repair in bronchial epithelium, with potential clinical consequences in DMD patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2218-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Procedures for Behavioral Experiments in Head-Fixed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zengcai V.; Hires, S. Andrew; Li, Nuo; O'Connor, Daniel H.; Komiyama, Takaki; Ophir, Eran; Huber, Daniel; Bonardi, Claudia; Morandell, Karin; Gutnisky, Diego; Peron, Simon; Xu, Ning-long; Cox, James; Svoboda, Karel

    2014-01-01

    The mouse is an increasingly prominent model for the analysis of mammalian neuronal circuits. Neural circuits ultimately have to be probed during behaviors that engage the circuits. Linking circuit dynamics to behavior requires precise control of sensory stimuli and measurement of body movements. Head-fixation has been used for behavioral research, particularly in non-human primates, to facilitate precise stimulus control, behavioral monitoring and neural recording. However, choice-based, perceptual decision tasks by head-fixed mice have only recently been introduced. Training mice relies on motivating mice using water restriction. Here we describe procedures for head-fixation, water restriction and behavioral training for head-fixed mice, with a focus on active, whisker-based tactile behaviors. In these experiments mice had restricted access to water (typically 1 ml/day). After ten days of water restriction, body weight stabilized at approximately 80% of initial weight. At that point mice were trained to discriminate sensory stimuli using operant conditioning. Head-fixed mice reported stimuli by licking in go/no-go tasks and also using a forced choice paradigm using a dual lickport. In some cases mice learned to discriminate sensory stimuli in a few trials within the first behavioral session. Delay epochs lasting a second or more were used to separate sensation (e.g. tactile exploration) and action (i.e. licking). Mice performed a variety of perceptual decision tasks with high performance for hundreds of trials per behavioral session. Up to four months of continuous water restriction showed no adverse health effects. Behavioral performance correlated with the degree of water restriction, supporting the importance of controlling access to water. These behavioral paradigms can be combined with cellular resolution imaging, random access photostimulation, and whole cell recordings. PMID:24520413

  10. Pulmonary effects of inhaled diesel exhaust in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Mainelis, Gediminas; Turpin, Barbara J.; Ridgely, Sherritta; Laumbach, Robert J.; Kipen, Howard M.; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Veleeparambil, Manoj; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary morbidity and mortality resulting from exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) increases with age. The present studies analyzed potential mechanisms underlying increased susceptibility of the elderly to PM using diesel exhaust (DE) as a model. Mice (2 m and 18 m) were exposed to DE (0, 300, and 1000 μg/m3) for 3 h once (single) or 3 h/day for 3 days (repeated). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), serum and lung tissue were collected 0 and 24 h later. Exposure to DE resulted in structural alterations in the lungs of older but not younger mice, including patchy thickening of the alveolar septa and inflammatory cell localization in alveolar spaces. These effects were most pronounced 24 h after a single exposure to the higher dose of DE. Significant increases in BAL nitrogen oxides were also noted in older mice, as well as expression of lipocalin 24p3, an oxidative stress marker in the lung with no effects in younger mice. Following DE inhalation, expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) was upregulated in lungs of both younger and older mice; however, this was attenuated in older animals. Whereas exposure to DE resulted in increases in lung Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in both older and younger mice, IL-8 increased only in older animals. In younger mice, constitutive expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) decreased after DE exposure, while in older mice, constitutive MnSOD was not detectable and DE had no effect on expression of this antioxidant. Taken together, these results suggest that altered generation of inflammatory mediators and MnSOD may contribute to increased susceptibility of older mice to inhaled DE. PMID:19729031

  11. Spontaneous sleep and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Eva; Kapás, Levente; Sun, Yuxiang; Smith, Roy G; Krueger, James M

    2007-07-01

    Ghrelin is well known for its feeding and growth hormone-releasing actions. It may also be involved in sleep regulation; intracerebroventricular administration and hypothalamic microinjections of ghrelin stimulate wakefulness in rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin, together with neuropeptide Y and orexin form a food intake-regulatory circuit. We hypothesized that this circuit also promotes arousal. To further investigate the role of ghrelin in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness, we characterized spontaneous and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups of mice exhibited similar diurnal rhythms with more sleep and less wakefulness during the light period. In ghrelin KO mice, spontaneous wakefulness and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) were slightly elevated, and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) was reduced. KO mice had more fragmented NREMS than WT mice, as indicated by the shorter and greater number of NREMS episodes. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREMS and REMS and biphasic changes in electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (EEG SWA) in both genotypes. Ghrelin KO mice recovered from NREMS and REMS loss faster, and the delayed reduction in EEG SWA, occurring after sleep loss-enhanced increases in EEG SWA, was shorter-lasting compared with WT mice. These findings suggest that the basic sleep-wake regulatory mechanisms in ghrelin KO mice are not impaired and they are able to mount adequate rebound sleep in response to a homeostatic challenge. It is possible that redundancy in the arousal systems of the brain or activation of compensatory mechanisms during development allow for normal sleep-wake regulation in ghrelin KO mice. PMID:17409264

  12. Characterization of mice lacking the gene for cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chun-Min; Samuelson, Linda C; Chambers, James Brad; King, Alexandra; Heiman, Justin; Jandacek, Ronald J; Sakai, Randall R; Benoit, Stephen C; Raybould, Helen E; Woods, Stephen C; Tso, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    CCK acts peripherally as a satiating peptide released during meals in response to lipid feeding and centrally functions in the modulation of feeding, exploratory, and memory activities. The present study determined metabolic parameters, food intake, anxiety-like behaviors, and cognitive function in mice lacking the CCK gene. We studied intestinal fat absorption, body composition, and food intake of CCK knockout (CCK-KO) mice by using the noninvasive measurement of intestinal fat absorption along with quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) imaging and the DietMax system, respectively. Additionally, exploratory and memory capacities were assessed by monitoring running wheel activity and conducting elevated plus-maze and Morris water-maze tests with these mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) littermate controls, CCK-KO mice had normal food intake, fat absorption, body weight, and body mass. CCK-KO mice ate more food than control animals during the light period and less food during the dark period. Energy expenditure was unchanged between the genotypes; however, CCK-KO mice displayed greater fatty acid oxidation. CCK-KO mice were as active as WT animals in the running wheel test. CCK-KO mice spent more time in the closed arms of an elevated plus-maze, indicative of increased anxiety. Additionally, CCK-KO mice exhibited attenuated performance in a passive avoidance task and impaired spatial memory in the Morris water maze test. We conclude that CCK is involved in metabolic rate and is important for memory and exploration. CCK is intimately involved in multiple processes related to cognitive function and food intake regulation. PMID:18160529

  13. Pulmonary effects of inhaled diesel exhaust in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Mainelis, Gediminas; Turpin, Barbara J.; Ridgely, Sherritta; Laumbach, Robert J.; Kipen, Howard M.; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Veleeparambil, Manoj; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2009-12-15

    Pulmonary morbidity and mortality resulting from exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) increases with age. The present studies analyzed potential mechanisms underlying increased susceptibility of the elderly to PM using diesel exhaust (DE) as a model. Mice (2 m and 18 m) were exposed to DE (0, 300, and 1000 mug/m{sup 3}) for 3 h once (single) or 3 h/day for 3 days (repeated). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), serum and lung tissue were collected 0 and 24 h later. Exposure to DE resulted in structural alterations in the lungs of older but not younger mice, including patchy thickening of the alveolar septa and inflammatory cell localization in alveolar spaces. These effects were most pronounced 24 h after a single exposure to the higher dose of DE. Significant increases in BAL nitrogen oxides were also noted in older mice, as well as expression of lipocalin 24p3, an oxidative stress marker in the lung with no effects in younger mice. Following DE inhalation, expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFalpha) was upregulated in lungs of both younger and older mice; however, this was attenuated in older animals. Whereas exposure to DE resulted in increases in lung Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in both older and younger mice, IL-8 increased only in older animals. In younger mice, constitutive expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) decreased after DE exposure, while in older mice, constitutive MnSOD was not detectable and DE had no effect on expression of this antioxidant. Taken together, these results suggest that altered generation of inflammatory mediators and MnSOD may contribute to increased susceptibility of older mice to inhaled DE.

  14. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  15. The design, construction and performance of the MICE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, C. N.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P. J.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Dobbs, A.; Leaver, J.; Long, K. R.; Shepherd, B.; Adams, D.; Capocci, E.; McCarron, E.; Tarrant, J.

    2013-03-01

    The pion-production target that serves the MICE Muon Beam consists of a titanium cylinder that is dipped into the halo of the ISIS proton beam. The design and construction of the MICE target system are described along with the quality-assurance procedures, electromagnetic drive and control systems, the readout electronics, and the data-acquisition system. The performance of the target is presented together with the particle rates delivered to the MICE Muon Beam. Finally, the beam loss in ISIS generated by the operation of the target is evaluated as a function of the particle rate, and the operating parameters of the target are derived.

  16. Serospecific protection of mice against intranasal infection with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A; Gorringe, A R; Funnell, S G; Fernandez, M

    1989-08-01

    The ability of purified serospecific agglutinogens from Bordetella pertussis to protect mice against intranasal infection has been examined. Immunization with agglutinogen 2 protected mice against infection with 1.2.0 or 1.2.3 serotypes of B. pertussis, whereas immunization with agglutinogen 3 protected mice against infection with all serotypes. More importantly immunization with serospecific agglutinogen resulted in immune selection so that organisms recovered following infection did not express the immunizing antigen. The results are consistent with the suggestions that protection of children with whole cell pertussis vaccine is to some extent serospecific and that agglutinogens should be considered as constituents of acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:2573215

  17. [Xenograft of human nasopharyngeal mucosa in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Huang, P

    1989-01-01

    Human nasopharyngeal mucosa from 22-cases of chronic nasopharyngitis was transplanted into 26 nude mice. The xenografts were examined on 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after transplantation, and found to have survived in 19 mice. The survival rate was 73.1 per cent. The developed epithelia took the shape of cystic cavities, which gradually enlarged and the thickly laminated columnar epithelia with cells in mitoses or squamous metaplasia changed into thin and flat ones. The epithelium proliferated actively after 15 to 30 days of transplantation. The results afford useful reference to the study of induction of cancer in human nasopharyngeal mucosa transplanted into nude mice.

  18. Induction of cachexia in mice by systemically administered myostatin.

    PubMed

    Zimmers, Teresa A; Davies, Monique V; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Haynes, Paul; Esquela, Aurora F; Tomkinson, Kathy N; McPherron, Alexandra C; Wolfman, Neil M; Lee, Se-Jin

    2002-05-24

    Mice and cattle with genetic deficiencies in myostatin exhibit dramatic increases in skeletal muscle mass, suggesting that myostatin normally suppresses muscle growth. Whether this increased muscling results from prenatal or postnatal lack of myostatin activity is unknown. Here we show that myostatin circulates in the blood of adult mice in a latent form that can be activated by acid treatment. Systemic overexpression of myostatin in adult mice was found to induce profound muscle and fat loss analogous to that seen in human cachexia syndromes. These data indicate that myostatin acts systemically in adult animals and may be a useful pharmacologic target in clinical settings such as cachexia, where muscle growth is desired.

  19. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  20. Purification and Characterization of Epizootic Diarrhea of Infant Mice Virus

    PubMed Central

    Much, David H.; Zajac, Ihor

    1972-01-01

    Epizootic diarrhea of infant mice virus has been purified from the intestines of infected mice using enzymatic digestion, precipitation with polyethylene glycol, extraction with Genesolv-D, and sucrose step-gradient centrifugation. The purified virus was found to be stable at −70 C or when treated with ether, chloroform, or sodium deoxycholate. Biochemical analysis of purified virions has suggested that the nucleic acid type of epizootic diarrhea of infant mice virus was of the ribonucleic acid type. Preparations of purified virions stained with phosphotungstic acid showed a particle with icosahedral symmetry, 54 ± 2 nm in diameter and probably composed of 32 hollow capsomeres. Images PMID:4629391

  1. Method for accelerated identification of arboviruses after inoculation of mice.

    PubMed

    David-West, T S

    1972-03-01

    Sequential titration of infective virus and complement-fixing antigen in brain and liver of suckling mice infected with the following virus strains-Dugbe (a new arbovirus), Congo (related to Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus), yellow fever, dengue 1 and dengue 2-showed a progressive increase in titer after infection. High titers of both infective virus and complement-fixing antigen were demonstrated long before the mice showed clinical signs of infection. It is suggested that earlier isolation and identification of arboviruses from clinical and field specimens can be made if serological tests are done before mice are moribund.

  2. Cerium-144-induced lung gumors in two strains of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    A major problem in the extrapolation of radiation cancer risk factors from one species or population to another is the choice of the risk model to use, either absolute or relative. The purpose of this study was to compare absolute and relative risk models in predicting the lung-tumor risks between a low lung-tumor incidence strain of mice and a high-incidence strain of mice. The conclusion from this study is that absolute risk is more accurate than relative risk for predicting lung tumor risk from high to low lung-tumor incidence strains of mice.

  3. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  4. N-glycans and metastasis in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    More, Shyam K; Srinivasan, Nithya; Budnar, Srikanth; Bane, Sanjay M; Upadhya, Archana; Thorat, Rahul A; Ingle, Arvind D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2015-05-01

    Poly-N-acetyl-lactosamine (polyLacNAc) on N-glycans facilitate lung specific metastasis of melanoma cells by serving as high affinity ligands for galectin-3, expressed in highest amounts in the lungs, on almost all its tissue compartments including on the surface of vascular endothelium. PolyLacNAc not only aids in initial arrest on the organ endothelium but in all the events of extravasation. Inhibition of polyLacNAc synthesis, or competitive inhibition of its interaction with galectin-3 all inhibited these processes and experimental metastasis. Transgenic galectin-3 mice, viz., gal-3(+/+) (wild type), gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and gal-3(-/-) (null) have been used to prove that galectin-3/polyLacNAc interactions are indeed critical for lung specific metastasis. Gal-3(+/-) mice which showed <50% expression of galectin-3 on the lungs also showed proportionate decrease in the number of B16F10 melanoma metastatic colonies affirming that galectin-3 and polyLacNAc interactions are indeed key determinants of lung metastasis. However, surprisingly, the number and size of metastatic colonies in gal-3(-/-) mice was very similar as that seen in gal-3(+/+) mice. The levels of lactose binding lectins on the lungs and the transcripts of other galectins (galectin-1, -8 and -9) which are expressed on lungs and have similar sugar binding specificities as galectins-3, remain unchanged in gal-3(+/+) and gal-3(-/-) mice. Further, inhibition of N-glycosylation with Swainsonine (SW) which drastically reduces metastasis of B16F10 cells in gal-3(+/+) mice, did not affect lung metastasis when assessed in gal-3(-/-) mice. Together, these results rule out the possibility of some other galectin taking over the function of galectin-3 in gal-3(-/-) mice. Chimeric mice generated to assess if absence of any effect on metastasis is due to compromised tumor immunity by replacing bone marrow of gal-3(-/-) mice with that from gal-3(+/+) mice, also failed to impact melanoma metastasis. As galectin-3

  5. Age dependent course of EAE in Aire-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Rina; Aricha, Revital; Eilam, Raya; From, Ido; Mizrahi, Keren; Arnon, Ruth; Souroujon, Miriam C; Fuchs, Sara

    2013-09-15

    This study explores the consequences of deficiency in the autoimmune regulator (Aire) on the susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Increased susceptibility to EAE was found in Aire knockout (KO) compared to wild type (WT) in 6month old mice. In contrast, 2month old Aire KO mice were less susceptible to EAE than WT mice, and this age-related resistance correlated with elevated proportions of T regulatory (Treg) cells in their spleen and brain. Combined with our previous findings in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, we suggest an age-related association between Aire and Treg cells in the susceptibility to autoimmunity.

  6. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice after total lymphoid irradiation: influence of breeding conditions and strain of recipient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-02-01

    Different groups of C57BL/ka or BALB/c mice received a dose of 34 Gy or 42 Gy of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) before bone marrow transplantation with 30 x 10/sup 6/ BALB/c or C57BL nucleated bone marrow cells, respectively. BALB/c mice that were not bred in specific pathogen-free conditions before TLI showed a high morbidity and mortality rate after 34 Gy of TLI and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as compared with BALB/c or C57BL that were bred in pathogen-free conditions before irradiation. Many of the conventionally bred BALB/c mice had clinical and histologic signs of graft-vs-host disease after TLI and allogeneic bone marrow infusion. Although leucocytosis and lymphocytosis and the immunologic competence as measured with in vitro tests were equally depressed after 34 Gy TLI in BALB/c and C57BL mice, chimerism was nevertheless significantly easier to obtain in BALB/c mice. The incidence of chimerism after TLI could be enhanced in C57BL mice by increasing the total radiation dose from 34 to 42 Gy. This augmentation of chimerism was paralleled by the induction of more suppressor cells after 42 Gy of TLI in C57BL mice.

  7. Liposome-entrapped T-cell peptide provides help for a co-entrapped B-cell peptide to overcome genetic restriction in mice and induce immunological memory.

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriadis, G; Wang, Z; Barenholz, Y; Francis, M J

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of a T-cell epitope peptide providing help for a B-cell epitope peptide when both peptides are co-entrapped in the same liposomes. Epitope models used were a 28 amino acid peptide from the S region of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (subtype adw) containing an H-2s Th-cell epitope, and a 33 amino acid peptide from the pre-S1 region of the HBsAg (subtype adw) designed to exclude an adjacent H-2s T-cell epitope, the latter (pre-S1) peptide being recognized by SJL (H-2s) mice as a B-cell epitope. SJL(H-2s) mice were immunized twice intramuscularly with S or pre-S1 peptide alone, co-entrapped in the same liposomes or entrapped in separate liposomes which were mixed before injection. Analysis of sera for anti-peptide IgG1 antibodies revealed that the Th-cell peptide provided help for the pre-S1 peptide only when the two peptides were co-entrapped in the same vesicles. This helper effect was found to correlate with the ability of S peptide (co-entrapped with the pre-S1) to stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. There was no IgG1 response against pre-S1 peptide in mice immunized with a mixture of the free peptides or a mixture of separately entrapped peptides. A helper effect, albeit much weaker, was also observed in mice immunized with the two peptides emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Antisera from mice immunized with both peptides co-entrapped in liposomes were found to bind to full length (pre-S1 containing) recombinant HBsAg. Moreover, binding values were much higher than those seen with antisera from animals immunized with the liposomal S peptide above, presumably because of full access of anti-pre-S1 antibodies to the pre-S1 region of the rHBsAg. It is concluded that liposomes could serve not only as an immunological adjuvant for peptides but also as a carrier for Th- and B-cell epitopes thus eliminating the need for covalent linkage to a carrier protein. PMID:7508417

  8. Minute virus of mice: antibody response, viral shedding, and persistence of viral DNA in multiple strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Mähler, Michael; Köhl, Wiebke; Smoczek, Anna; Hedrich, Hans J; Bleich, Andre

    2008-08-01

    Minute virus of mice (MVM) is a major concern for laboratory animal facilities because it remains with considerably high prevalence despite strict barrier systems. The aim of this study was to elucidate potential risks associated with MVM infection by investigating the role of the genetic background on antibody production and persistence as well as viral shedding. Mice of various strains and stocks were inoculated oronasally with the immunosuppressive strain MVMi; in addition, natural infection was modeled through contact exposure. As determined by serology, seroconversion and serum levels of IgG differed considerably among strains and stocks, especially in the contact-exposed group. For example, C57BL/6J mice responded well to exposure in contrast to FVB/N, NMRI, ICR, and C3H/HeN mice. Titration studies indicated that the viral dose necessary to induce seroconversion was strain-dependent. Experiments to dissect the role of the major histocompatibility complex haplotype in the response to MVMi gave inconclusive results. To detect viral persistence, spleens and feces were analyzed by PCR at 16 wk after exposure, and the infectivity of PCR-positive spleens was investigated by IP and oronasal inoculation of naive mice. Although DNA was detected in the spleens of some mice, feces remained negative, and naive mice were not infected by inoculation. In addition, viral shedding declined rapidly after day 20 postinoculation. In summary, the data show that seroconversion and antibody response to MVMi infection depend on the genetic background of mice, with the infective dose being a critical factor. The role of viral DNA in chronically infected mice will require further elucidation.

  9. Adaptations to chronic rapamycin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Sherry G.; Livi, Carolina B.; Parihar, Manish; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Benavides, Adriana D.; Morris, Jay; Javors, Martin; Strong, Randy; Christy, Barbara; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin inhibits mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) that promotes protein production in cells by facilitating ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) and eIF4E-mediated 5'cap mRNA translation. Chronic treatment with encapsulated rapamycin (eRapa) extended health and life span for wild-type and cancer-prone mice. Yet, the long-term consequences of chronic eRapa treatment are not known at the organ level. Here, we report our observations of chronic eRapa treatment on mTORC1 signaling and RiBi in mouse colon and visceral adipose. As expected, chronic eRapa treatment decreased detection of phosphorylated mTORC1/S6K substrate, ribosomal protein (rpS6) in colon and fat. However, in colon, contrary to expectations, there was an upregulation of 18S rRNA and some ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) suggesting increased RiBi. Among RPGs, eRapa increases rpl22l1 mRNA but not its paralog rpl22. Furthermore, there was an increase in the cap-binding protein, eIF4E relative to its repressor 4E-BP1 suggesting increased translation. By comparison, in fat, there was a decrease in the level of 18S rRNA (opposite to colon), while overall mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein genes appeared to increase, including rpl22, but not rpl22l1 (opposite to colon). In fat, there was a decrease in eIF4E relative to actin (opposite to colon) but also an increase in the eIF4E/4E-BP1 ratio likely due to reductions in 4E-BP1 at our lower eRapa dose (similar to colon). Thus, in contrast to predictions of decreased protein production seen in cell-based studies, we provide evidence that colon from chronically treated mice exhibited an adaptive ‘pseudo-anabolic’ state, which is only partially present in fat, which might relate to differing tissue levels of rapamycin, cell-type-specific responses, and/or strain differences. PMID:27237224

  10. Consequences of paternal cocaine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the potential neuroteratological effects of paternal cocaine (COC) exposure using the novel mouse model of inhalational drug administration. In this model, mice were trained to self-administer COC in multi-hour daily inhalation sessions reminiscent of crack binges. The controls included males pair-fed with COC-inhaling animals as well as ad-lib-fed males. All males were bred with drug-naive females. The newborn pups sired by COC-inhaling males had a reduced biparietal head diameter, suggesting a decreased cerebral volume. When the pups reached adulthood, their sustained visuo-spatial attention and spatial working memory were tested using a 5-arm maze paradigm. During the attention tests, the percentage of correct trials at the shortest stimulus duration employed in the study (0.5 s) was significantly lower for the male offspring of COC-inhaling fathers as compared to the offspring of both pair-fed and ad-lib-fed controls. For the females sired by COC-inhaling fathers, the deficit was observed at light stimulus durations of 0.5 and 0.75 s. Also, during the working memory tests, the male offspring of COC-inhaling fathers required more sessions than the offspring of either pair-fed or ad-lib-fed fathers to reach the selected criterion at retention intervals of 16 min and longer. The impairment of working memory in female offspring of COC-inhaling fathers was even stronger, as the offspring needed more sessions to reach the criterion as compared to their control counterparts, even at retention intervals as short as 4 min. These findings suggest that paternal COC abuse prior to coitus may impact the development of the offspring, particularly if they are females. We further showed that chronic COC exposure in male mice does not result in substantial breakage of spermatozoal DNA, but significantly alters expression of DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3a in the germ cell-rich seminiferous tubules of the testis. Since these enzymes are essential for

  11. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Chise; Kawase, Yosuke; Tobita, Yoshimi; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Harumi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Shiota, Akira; Kojima, Yuha; Ishida, Yuji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoko A; Tateishi, Hiromi; Sudoh, Masayuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-Ichiro; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Kohara, Michinori

    2015-01-01

    We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID) mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps) replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID). We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb) levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and useful hosts for

  12. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Chise; Kawase, Yosuke; Tobita, Yoshimi; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Harumi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Shiota, Akira; Kojima, Yuha; Ishida, Yuji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoko A; Tateishi, Hiromi; Sudoh, Masayuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-Ichiro; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Kohara, Michinori

    2015-01-01

    We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID) mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps) replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID). We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb) levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and useful hosts for

  13. CD8+ T-Cell Epitope Mapping for Pneumonia Virus of Mice in H-2b Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sidney, John; Welch, Megan; Fremgen, Daniel M.; Sette, Alessandro; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2013-01-01

    The paramyxovirus pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is a rodent model of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) pathogenesis. Here we characterized the PVM-specific CD8+ T-cell repertoire in susceptible C57BL/6 mice. In total, 15 PVM-specific CD8+ T-cell epitopes restricted by H-2Db and/or H-2Kb were identified. These data open the door for using widely profiled, genetically manipulated C57BL/6 mice to study the contribution of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells to PVM pathogenesis. PMID:23824814

  14. CD34 EXPRESSION BY HAIR FOLLICLE STEM CELLS IS REQUIRED FOR SKIN TUMOR DEVELOPMENT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used knockout mice to show that a cell surface protein called CD34 is required for skin tumor formation in mice. Wild type mice treated with 7-12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and a tumor promoter developed papillomas. When we treated CD34 knockout (KO) mice the same way, n...

  15. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  16. Enhanced inflammation and immunosuppression by ultraviolet radiation in xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) model mice.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi-Hashimoto, H; Tanaka, K; Horio, T

    1996-09-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) gene-deficient mice were developed by gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells. To examine whether these XPA-model mice display photodermatologic abnormalities similar to those in human xeroderma pigmentosum, we investigated the effects of acute ultraviolet radiation on the homozygous (-/-) mice compared to the wild type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/-) mice. A single irradiation with ultraviolet B or topical psoralen plus ultraviolet A treatment induced stronger and longer lasting ear swelling in the (-/-) mice than in the (+/+) and (+/-) mice. Histologic changes including epidermal necrosis, cell infiltration, and sunburn cell formation after ultraviolet B radiation were more prominent in the (-/-) model mice than in the control mice. The (-/-) model mice showed damage of ADPase(+)Langerhans cells at a lower ultraviolet B dose than did the control mice. Moreover, the reappearance of ADPase(+)Langerhans cells after ultraviolet B radiation was delayed in the (-/-) mice compared to the control mice. Although contact hypersensitivity was induced equally in all mice, ultraviolet B-induced local and systemic immunosuppression were greatly enhanced in the (-/-) model mice. The data suggest that the XPA gene-deficient mice may be a useful model of human XPA, because the responses to UV radiation in the mice were very similar to those in the patients with XPA. Moreover, it is possible that enhanced ultraviolet immunosuppression is involved in the development of skin cancers in xeroderma pigmentosum. PMID:8751968

  17. Citronellal ingestion decreases the appeal of male mouse urinary pheromone for female mice.

    PubMed

    Osada, Kazumi; Hanawa, Masaaki; Tsunoda, Kenji; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether ingestion of citronellal decreases the attractive power of the male mouse urinary odor, female mice were used in preference tests. A series of tests revealed that the female mice preferred voided urine odors from aged mice over those from younger adult mice. However, exogenous citronellal directly inhibited the advantage of the aged males with regard to attraction.

  18. Status of MICE, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, Alan D.; MICE Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate transverse muon ionization cooling and is thus a strategic R&D project for future muon facilities. It is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom.

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOGENOMIC STUDIES OF PFOA AND PFOS IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are developmentally toxic in rodents. To better understand the mechanism(s) associated with this toxicity, we have conducted transcript profiling in mice. In an initial study, pregnant animals were dosed througho...

  20. Operant ethanol self-administration in ethanol dependent mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Becker, Howard C

    2014-05-01

    While rats have been predominantly used to study operant ethanol self-administration behavior in the context of dependence, several studies have employed operant conditioning procedures to examine changes in ethanol self-administration behavior as a function of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal experience in mice. This review highlights some of the advantages of using operant conditioning procedures for examining the motivational effects of ethanol in animals with a history of dependence. As reported in rats, studies using various operant conditioning procedures in mice have demonstrated significant escalation of ethanol self-administration behavior in mice rendered dependent via forced chronic ethanol exposure in comparison to nondependent mice. This paper also presents a summary of these findings, as well as suggestions for future studies.

  1. Social factors modulate restraint stress induced hyperthermia in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-10-22

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) was examined in three different social conditions in mice by thermographic measurement of the body surface temperature. Placing animals in cylindrical holders induced restraint stress. I examined the effect of the social factors in SIH using the thermograph (body surface temperature). Mice restrained in the holders alone showed SIH. Mice restrained in the holders at the same time as other similarly restrained cage mates (social equality condition) showed less hyperthermia. Interestingly, restrained mice with free moving cage mates (social inequality condition) showed the highest hyperthermia. These results are consistent with a previous experiment measuring the memory-enhancing effects of stress and the stress-induced elevation of corticosterone, and suggest that social inequality enhances stress.

  2. A complex dietary supplement extends longevity of mice.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Jennifer A; Boreham, Douglas R; Rollo, C David

    2005-03-01

    Key factors implicated in aging include reactive oxygen species, inflammatory processes, insulin resistance, and mitochondrial dysfunction. All are exaggerated in transgenic growth hormone mice (TGM), which display a syndrome resembling accelerated aging. We formulated a complex dietary supplement containing 31 ingredients known to ameliorate all of the above features. We previously showed that this supplement completely abolished the severe age-related cognitive decline expressed by untreated TGM. Here we report that longevity of both TGM and normal mice is extended by this supplement. Treated TGM showed a 28% increase (p < .00008) in mean longevity. An 11% increase in mean longevity was also significant (p < .002093) for treated normal mice, compared to untreated normal mice. These data support the hypothesis that TGM are a model of accelerated aging, and demonstrate that complex dietary supplements may be effective in ameliorating aging or age-related pathologies where simpler formulations have generally failed.

  3. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, J.; Temp, F.R.; Marafiga, J.R.; Jesse, A.C.; Milanesi, L.H.; Rambo, L.M.; Mello, C.F.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Montelukast (10 mg/kg, sc) and phenobarbital (20 mg/kg, sc) increased the latency to generalized seizures in kindled mice. Montelukast increased CysLT1 immunoreactivity only in non-kindled, PTZ-challenged mice. Interestingly, PTZ challenge decreased CysLT2 immunoreactivity only in kindled mice. CysLT1 antagonists appear to emerge as a promising adjunctive treatment for refractory seizures. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical implications of this research. PMID:26909785

  4. Broad protection against influenza infection by vectored immunoprophylaxis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, Alejandro B.; Bloom, Jesse D.; Hong, Christin M.; Rao, Dinesh S.; Baltimore, David

    2014-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies that target epitopes conserved among many strains of influenza virus have been recently isolated from humans. Here we demonstrate that adeno-associated viruses (AAV) encoding two such broadly neutralizing antibodies are protective against diverse influenza strains. Serum from mice that received a single intramuscular AAV injection efficiently neutralized all H1, H2 and H5 influenza strains tested. After infection with diverse strains of H1N1 influenza, treated mice showed minimal weight loss and lung inflammation. Protection lasted for at least 11 months after AAV injection. Notably, even immunodeficient and older mice were protected by this method, suggesting that expression of a monoclonal antibody alone is sufficient to protect mice from illness. If translated to humans, this prophylactic approach may be uniquely capable of protecting immunocompromised or elderly patient populations not reliably protected by existing vaccines. PMID:23728362

  5. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice.

    PubMed

    Fleck, J; Temp, F R; Marafiga, J R; Jesse, A C; Milanesi, L H; Rambo, L M; Mello, C F

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Montelukast (10 mg/kg, sc) and phenobarbital (20 mg/kg, sc) increased the latency to generalized seizures in kindled mice. Montelukast increased CysLT1 immunoreactivity only in non-kindled, PTZ-challenged mice. Interestingly, PTZ challenge decreased CysLT2 immunoreactivity only in kindled mice. CysLT1 antagonists appear to emerge as a promising adjunctive treatment for refractory seizures. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical implications of this research. PMID:26909785

  6. Social factors modulate restraint stress induced hyperthermia in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-10-22

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) was examined in three different social conditions in mice by thermographic measurement of the body surface temperature. Placing animals in cylindrical holders induced restraint stress. I examined the effect of the social factors in SIH using the thermograph (body surface temperature). Mice restrained in the holders alone showed SIH. Mice restrained in the holders at the same time as other similarly restrained cage mates (social equality condition) showed less hyperthermia. Interestingly, restrained mice with free moving cage mates (social inequality condition) showed the highest hyperthermia. These results are consistent with a previous experiment measuring the memory-enhancing effects of stress and the stress-induced elevation of corticosterone, and suggest that social inequality enhances stress. PMID:26232073

  7. Impaired clot lysis in copper-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, S.M.; Klevay, L.M. )

    1991-03-15

    Cu-deficient mice exhibit atrial thrombosis but have significantly lowered plasma coagulation factor V and VIII activities. To investigate the effects of a dietary Cu deficiency on clot lysis, groups of adult male and female Swiss-Webster mice were fed Cu-supplemented or -deficient diets with deionized water for 49 days. Animals were exsanguinated under pentobarbital anesthesia; platelet-poor plasma prepared and assayed for euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) and antithrombin III activity. A protamine sulfate test was also performed. The highly significant ECLT prolongation in Cu-deficient mice clearly demonstrates that critical components of the physiological clot-lysing mechanism must be severely impaired in these animals. These results may help to explain the thrombotic sequelae of a dietary Cu deficiency in mice.

  8. Somatostatin Receptor 1 and 5 Double Knockout Mice Mimic Neurochemical Changes of Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kharmate, Geetanjali; Norman, Michael; Liu, Shi-He; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.; Brunicardi, Charles F.; Kumar, Ujendra

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD). However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST) positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5). Methods and Findings To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2). Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5−/− and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the pathophysiology of

  9. Sirtuin-2 Regulates Sepsis Inflammation in ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianfeng; Buechler, Nancy L.; Martin, Ayana; Wells, Jonathan; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles E.; Vachharajani, Vidula

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity increases morbidity and resource utilization in sepsis patients. Sepsis transitions from early/hyper-inflammatory to late/hypo-inflammatory phase. Majority of sepsis-mortality occurs during the late sepsis; no therapies exist to treat late sepsis. In lean mice, we have shown that sirtuins (SIRTs) modulate this transition. Here, we investigated the role of sirtuins, especially the adipose-tissue abundant SIRT-2 on transition from early to late sepsis in obese with sepsis. Methods Sepsis was induced using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in ob/ob mice. We measured microvascular inflammation in response to lipopolysaccharide/normal saline re-stimulation as a “second-hit” (marker of immune function) at different time points to track phases of sepsis in ob/ob mice. We determined SIRT-2 expression during different phases of sepsis. We studied the effect of SIRT-2 inhibition during the hypo-inflammatory phase on immune function and 7-day survival. We used a RAW264.7 (RAW) cell model of sepsis for mechanistic studies. We confirmed key findings in diet induced obese (DIO) mice with sepsis. Results We observed that the ob/ob-septic mice showed an enhanced early inflammation and a persistent and prolonged hypo-inflammatory phase when compared to WT mice. Unlike WT mice that showed increased SIRT1 expression, we found that SIRT2 levels were increased in ob/ob mice during hypo-inflammation. SIRT-2 inhibition in ob/ob mice during the hypo-inflammatory phase of sepsis reversed the repressed microvascular inflammation in vivo via activation of endothelial cells and circulating leukocytes and significantly improved survival. We confirmed the key finding of the role of SIRT2 during hypo-inflammatory phase of sepsis in this project in DIO-sepsis mice. Mechanistically, in the sepsis cell model, SIRT-2 expression modulated inflammatory response by deacetylation of NFκBp65. Conclusion SIRT-2 regulates microvascular inflammation in obese mice with sepsis and may

  10. Photic Resetting and Entrainment in CLOCK-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dallmann, Robert; DeBruyne, Jason P.; Weaver, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Mice lacking CLOCK protein have a relatively subtle circadian phenotype, including a slightly shorter period in constant darkness, differences in phase resetting after 4-hr light pulses in the early and late night, and a variably advanced phase angle of entrainment in a light-dark (LD) cycle (DeBruyne et al., Neuron 50:465–477, 2006). The present series of experiments was conducted to more fully characterize the circadian phenotype of Clock−/− mice under various lighting conditions. A phase-response curve (PRC) to 4-hour light pulses in free-running mice was conducted; the results confirm that Clock−/− mice exhibit very large phase advances after 4 hrs light pulses in the late subjective night, but have relatively normal responses to light at other phases. The abnormal shape of the PRC to light may explain the tendency of CLOCK-deficient mice to begin activity before lights-out when housed in a 12 hrs light: 12 hrs dark lighting schedule. To assess this relationship further, Clock−/− and wild-type control mice were entrained to skeleton lighting cycles (1L:23D, and 1L:10D:1L:12D). Comparing entrainment under the two types of skeleton photoperiods revealed that exposure to 1 hr light in the morning leads to a phase advance of activity onset (expressed the following afternoon) in Clock−/− mice, but not in the controls. Constant light typically causes an intensity-dependent increase in circadian period in mice, but this did not occur in CLOCK-deficient mice. The failure of Clock−/− mice to respond to the period-lengthening effect of constant light likely results from the increased functional impact of light falling in the phase advance zone of the PRC. Collectively, these experiments reveal that alterations in the response of CLOCK-deficient mice to light in several paradigms are likely due to an imbalance in the shape of the PRC to light. PMID:21921293

  11. Antioxidants can increase melanoma metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Kristell; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Wiel, Clotilde; Sayin, Volkan I; Akula, Murali K; Karlsson, Christin; Dalin, Martin G; Akyürek, Levent M; Lindahl, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Bergo, Martin O

    2015-10-01

    Antioxidants in the diet and supplements are widely used to protect against cancer, but clinical trials with antioxidants do not support this concept. Some trials show that antioxidants actually increase cancer risk and a study in mice showed that antioxidants accelerate the progression of primary lung tumors. However, little is known about the impact of antioxidant supplementation on the progression of other types of cancer, including malignant melanoma. We show that administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) increases lymph node metastases in an endogenous mouse model of malignant melanoma but has no impact on the number and size of primary tumors. Similarly, NAC and the soluble vitamin E analog Trolox markedly increased the migration and invasive properties of human malignant melanoma cells but did not affect their proliferation. Both antioxidants increased the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione in melanoma cells and in lymph node metastases, and the increased migration depended on new glutathione synthesis. Furthermore, both NAC and Trolox increased the activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RHOA, and blocking downstream RHOA signaling abolished antioxidant-induced migration. These results demonstrate that antioxidants and the glutathione system play a previously unappreciated role in malignant melanoma progression.

  12. Nitroglycerin Tolerance in Caveolin-1 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Fukai, Tohru; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Chernaya, Olga; Dudley, Samuel C.; Minshall, Richard D.; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN) exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae) and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48–72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50%) of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%), and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations). In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation. PMID:25158065

  13. Of mice and men, metals and mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Danks, D M

    1986-01-01

    Several mutations affecting the transport of copper and zinc in humans and in mice have been discovered over the last 15 years, joining the long known disturbance of copper transport in Wilson's disease. Menkes' disease (classical and mild variant forms) and X linked Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (type IX, X linked cutis laxa) have features in common with one another and with the brindled (Mobr) and blotchy (Moblo) mouse mutants, respectively. There may be one allelic series of mutants in each species or two loci may be involved in each. The toxic milk mutant (tx) in the mouse may be homologous to Wilson's disease in man. The defect of intestinal absorption of zinc in acrodermatitis enteropathica has no homologue yet in the mouse. However, the lethal milk (lm) mutant in the mouse may be homologous to a condition of zinc deficiency described in a few breastfed, low birth weight infants. Many more genetic defects of transport of copper and of zinc may await discovery. Conversely, these mutants are valuable in elucidating the normal processes of copper and zinc transport. PMID:3519972

  14. Biodistribution of Different Sized Nanodiamonds in Mice.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Konstantin; Petunin, Alexey; Inzhevatkin, Evgeny; Burov, Andrey; Ronzhin, Nikita; Puzyr, Alexey; Bondar, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    The particle size is one of critical parameters influencing the biodistribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) after their administration into the body. As DNDs are prone to aggregation, the difference between their sizes in aqueous and physiological solutions has to be taken into account. Radioactive I125-BSA molecules were covalently immobilized on DNDs divided in three fractions of different average size. The DND-BSAI125 conjugates were intravenously administrated into adult mice and the particle allocation in the animal's organs and blood was evaluated based on the radioactivity distribution. We conclude that most of the conjugates were taken from the bloodstream and trapped in the liver and spleen. The short-term distribution pattern for all DNDs was similar regardless of size and practically unchanged with time. No significant clearance of the particles was observed for 4 h, but the presence of DNDs was detected in the blood. It was found that the largest particles tend to accumulate more into the liver as compared to the smaller ones. However, the size effect was not well pronounced for the studied size range. PMID:26353614

  15. Narcosis studies and oxygen poisoning of mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research for a mechanism by which narcotic gases alter metabolism is reported. Possible sites of action by narcotic and anesthetic gases in isolated electron transport particles were explored. Using the relative activities of the NADH-oxygen, NADH-ferricyanide, succinate-cytochrome C and succinate-NAD oxidoreductase systems as parameters, the relative potency of volatile anesthetics were tested. Testing the relative ability of human subjects to contract and repay an oxygen debt while in the narcotic versus alert state, it was found that narcosis induced by 33% nitrous oxide increased the size of the oxygen debt contracted and the amount of oxygen required to repay it during recovery. Mice acclimatized to sea level (760 mm Hg), 5000 feet (632 mm Hg) or 15,000 feet 437 mm Hg) for from one to eight weeks were found to be more susceptible to convulsion and death as a function of altitude acclimatization when tested in hyperoxic environments. There were no reasonable explanations for the connection between hypoxia and oxygen poisoning but several practical implications for persons living at altitude are discussed.

  16. Multiphysics Integrated Coupling Environment (MICE) User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01

    The complex, multi-part nature of waste glass melters used in nuclear waste vitrification poses significant modeling challenges. The focus of this project has been to couple a 1D MATLAB model of the cold cap region within a melter with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of the melter itself. The Multiphysics Integrated Coupling Environment (MICE) has been developed to create a cohesive simulation of a waste glass melter that accurately represents the cold cap. The one-dimensional mathematical model of the cold cap uses material properties, axial heat, and mass fluxes to obtain a temperature profile for the cold cap, the region where feed-to-glass conversion occurs. The results from Matlab are used to update simulation data in the three-dimensional STAR-CCM+ model so that the cold cap is appropriately incorporated into the 3D simulation. The two processes are linked through ModelCenter integration software using time steps that are specified for each process. Data is to be exchanged circularly between the two models, as the inputs and outputs of each model depend on the other.

  17. Enhancement of lung tumor formation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.

    1984-01-01

    There is now a great deal of data available to show that butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) enhances the development of lung tumors in mice. In many ways BHT functions like a promoting agent. Interestingly, it also has tumor enhancing or promoting properties in organs other than mouse lung such as rat liver, rat bladder, possibly rat GI tract and in in vitro systems. The development of lung tumors by BHT may be influenced by comparatively low exposure regimens; the minimum dose found so far to be effective are 6 intraperitoneal injections of 50 mg/kg or a diet containing 500 ppM of BHT for 2 weeks. While these findings seem to require that the continued use of BHT as a food additive needs to be reevaluated it should be mentioned that other considerations have lead to the conclusion that BHT probably has a large margin of safety. This makes it important to establish the mechanism of action of BHT which remains unknown. 41 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  18. Promotion of lung tumors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.

    1981-01-01

    Several elements of two-stage carcinogenesis apply to the development of lung tumors in mice. At least three agents, identified as promoters, will also enhance tumor formation in lung: phorbol, saccharin, and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The antioxidant BHT is effective only if animals are treated after exposure to an initiating agent. Administration can be delayed up to 5 months after urethan treatment and still enhance tumor formation. BHT enhances lung tumor formation regardless of its route of administration. The lowest dose required to produce an effect has not yet been determined. In at least one mouse strain, BHT also enhances tumor formation in animals initiated with 3-methylcholanthren or diethylnitrosaine. No evidence is available yet to show that BHT would enhance tumor development in animals treated with subcarcinogenic doses of an initiating compound. Nor has it been possible to produce more tumors with BHT in mouse strains which have a low spontaneous tumor incidence and respond poorly to urethan. Neveretheless, the data collected on the effects of BHT on mouse lung tumor development have broadened the concept of two-stage carcinogenesis and complement the evidence for initiation-promotion available for other epithelial tissues. (ERB)

  19. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Fukai, Tohru; Bakhshi, Farnaz R; Chernaya, Olga; Dudley, Samuel C; Minshall, Richard D; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN) exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae) and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50%) of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%), and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations). In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  20. Human brain disease recreated in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.

    1990-12-14

    In the early 1980s, neurologist Stanley Prusiner suggested that scrapie, an apparently infectious degenerative brain disease of sheep, could be transmitted by prions, infectious particles made just of protein - and containing no nucleic acids. But prion research has come a long way since then. In 1985, the cloning of the gene encoding the prion protein proved that it does in fact exist. And the gene turned out to be widely expressed in the brains of higher organisms, a result suggesting that the prion protein has a normal brain function that can somehow be subverted, leading to brain degeneration. Then studies done during the past 2 years suggested that specific mutations in the prion gene might cause two similar human brain diseases, Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Creutzfelt-Jakob disease. Now, Prusiner's group at the University of California, San Francisco, has used genetic engineering techniques to recreate GSS by transplanting the mutated prion gene into mice. Not only will the animal model help neurobiologists answer the many remaining questions about prions and how they work, but it may also shed some light on other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

  1. Manufacture of diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T Y; Markert, C L

    1980-01-01

    Tetraploid mouse embryos were produced by cytochalasin B treatment. These embryos usually die before completion of embryonic development and are abnormal morphologically and physiologically. The tetraploid embryos can be rescued to develop to maturity by aggregating them with normal diploid embryos to produce diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice. The diploid/tetraploid chimeric embryos are frequently abnormal: the larger the proportion of tetraploid cells, the greater the abnormality. By karyotype analysis and by the use of appropriate pigment cell markers, we have demonstrated that two of our surviving chimeras are in fact diploid/tetraploid chimeras. One surviving chimera is retarded in growth and displays neurological abnormalities. The coat color chimerism suggests that this chimera is about 50% tetraploid. Another chimera with about 10% tetraploid pigment cells in the coat is only slightly retarded in growth and is a fertile male. Tetraploid cells are distributed in many, if not all, tissues of embryos but evidently are physiologically inadequate to support completely normal development and function in the absence of substantial numbers of normal diploid cells. Images PMID:6934528

  2. Chemical induction of sperm abnormalities in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wyrobek, A J; Bruce, W R

    1975-01-01

    The sperm of (C57BL X C3H)F1 mice were examined 1, 4, and 10 weeks after a subacute treatment with one of 25 chemicals at two or more dose levels. The fraction of sperm that were abnormal in shape was elevated above control values of 1.2-3.4% for methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, griseofulvin, benzo[a]pyrene, METEPA [tris(2-methyl-l-aziridinyl)phosphine oxide], THIO-TEPA [tris(l-aziridinyl)phosphine sulfide], mitomycin C, myleran, vinblastine sulphate, hydroxyurea, 3-methylcholanthrene, colchicine, actinomycin D, imuran, cyclophosphamide, 5-iododeoxyuridine, dichlorvos, aminopterin, and trimethylphosphate. Dimethylnitrosamine, urethane, DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane], 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, caffeine, and calcium cyclamate did not induce elevated levels of sperm abnormalities. The results suggest that sperm abnormalities might provide a rapid inexpensive mammalian screen for agents that lead to errors in the differentiation of spermatogenic stem cells in vivo and thus indicate agents which might prove to be mutagenic, teratogenic, or carcinogenic. Images PMID:1060122

  3. Parabiosis in Mice: A Detailed Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Paniz; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Zhao, Peng; Ali, Shah R.; Weissman, Irving L.; Ardehali, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Parabiosis is a surgical union of two organisms allowing sharing of the blood circulation. Attaching the skin of two animals promotes formation of microvasculature at the site of inflammation. Parabiotic partners share their circulating antigens and thus are free of adverse immune reaction. First described by Paul Bert in 18641, the parabiosis surgery was refined by Bunster and Meyer in 1933 to improve animal survival2. In the current protocol, two mice are surgically joined following a modification of the Bunster and Meyer technique. Animals are connected through the elbow and knee joints followed by attachment of the skin allowing firm support that prevents strain on the sutured skin. Herein, we describe in detail the parabiotic joining of a ubiquitous GFP expressing mouse to a wild type (WT) mouse. Two weeks after the procedure, the pair is separated and GFP positive cells can be detected by flow cytometric analysis in the blood circulation of the WT mouse. The blood chimerism allows one to examine the contribution of the circulating cells from one animal in the other. PMID:24145664

  4. INTERSTITIAL IMMUNE COMPLEX THYROIDITIS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Clagett, James A.; Wilson, Curtis B.; Weigle, William O.

    1974-01-01

    Mice immunized with soluble heterologous thyroglobulins developed autoantibody that cross-reacted with autologous thyroglobulin. There was a direct correlation between the temporal appearance and quantity of serum autoantibody and the presumed in situ formation of immune complexes in the interstitium of the thyroid glands. Immediately after the formation of interstitial immune complexes containing antibody of the IgG complement-fixing type, the thyroids were invaded by a transient but intense neutrophil infiltrate which within 1 wk was replaced by chronic mononuclear elements. By the combination of fluorescence microscopy and autoradiography, thyroglobulin was demonstrated to be one, if not the sole, antigen in the interstitial immune complexes. The interstitial immune complexes were granular to lumpy in appearance and formed at the basal area of the follicular cells in intimate association with the follicular basement membrane. Electron microscopy revealed electron dense deposits, presumably immune complexes, between the follicular basement membrane and the plasma membrane. The presumed in situ formation of immune complexes in this model is similar to that which occurs in the Arthus reaction and is a different mechanism of immune complex injury than that caused by tissue deposition of circulating immune complexes as occurs in serum sickness. PMID:4279269

  5. Cloned mice derived from somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, K; Ohi, S; Ando, A; Kobayashi, M; Sato, K

    2000-12-01

    In 1997, a cloned sheep "Dolly" was produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell. The first birth of cloned mice derived from some somatic cells were succeeded in 1998. At present, it is shown that somatic cells, cumulus cells, fibroblasts and Sertoli cells can be used to the study of cloned animal as nuclear donor. In this study investigation was designed to compare with efficiency on the production of cloned embryos by using the microinjection and the electrofusion methods for nuclear transfer. Oocyte enucleation was performed with a micromanipulator. The oocyte was held by holding pipette, and was enucleated using a beveled pipette. Microinjection method: Cell's nucleus injection was carried out by piezo-micromanipulator. Cytochalasin B treated cumulus cell was aspirated into a injection pipette, and was broken its plasma membrane using the injection pipette. Then, the cumulus cell was injected into the enucleated ooplasm directly. Electrofusion method: The cell was aspirated into a beveled pipette, and then an aspirated cell was inserted into perivitelline space. Then, the pair of enucleated oocyte and cell was fused using electrical cell fusion apparatus. The reconstituted embryos were activated after nuclear transfer using St2+. Reconstituted embryos had been produced by the microinjection showed the embryonic development to over 8-cell stages. But, the rate of fragmentation of reconstituted embryos by the microinjection showed a little high rate in comparison with the electrofusion. When some reconstituted embryos by the microinjection were transplanted to pseudopregnant females' oviduct, 9 fetuses were observed at 14 days post coitum. PMID:11329940

  6. ROCK insufficiency attenuates ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, David I; Mathews, Joel A; Park, Chan Y; Cho, Youngji; Hunt, Gabrielle; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Liao, James K; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Ozone causes airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and pulmonary inflammation. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell contraction and inflammatory cell migration. To determine the contribution of the two ROCK isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 to ozone-induced AHR, we exposed wild-type, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice to air or ozone (2 ppm for 3 h) and evaluated mice 24 h later. ROCK1 or ROCK2 haploinsufficiency did not affect airway responsiveness in air-exposed mice but significantly reduced ozone-induced AHR, with a greater reduction in ROCK2(+/-) mice despite increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cells in ROCK2(+/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, ozone-induced increases in BAL hyaluronan, a matrix protein implicated in ozone-induced AHR, were lower in ROCK1(+/-) but not ROCK2(+/-) mice. Ozone-induced increases in other inflammatory moieties reported to contribute to ozone-induced AHR (IL-17A, osteopontin, TNFα) were not different in wild-type vs. ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. We also observed a dose-dependent reduction in ozone-induced AHR after treatment with the ROCK1/ROCK2 inhibitor fasudil, even though fasudil was administered after induction of inflammation. Ozone increased pulmonary expression of ROCK2 but not ROCK1 or RhoA. A ROCK2 inhibitor, SR3677, reduced contractile forces in primary human airway smooth muscle cells, confirming a role for ROCK2 in airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results demonstrate that ozone-induced AHR requires ROCK. Whereas ROCK1-dependent changes in hyaluronan may contribute to ROCK1's role in O3-induced AHR, the role of ROCK2 is downstream of inflammation, likely at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction.

  7. Ped gene deletion polymorphism frequency in wild mice.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Judith A; Sacher, Frank; Jones, Gwilym S; Warner, Carol M

    2002-07-01

    The Ped gene influences the rate of cleavage of preimplantation embryos and their subsequent survival. Embryos that express the product of the Ped gene, Qa-2 protein, cleave at a faster rate than embryos with an absence of Qa-2 protein. In addition, the Ped gene has pleiotropic effects on reproduction. Thus, there is a reproductive advantage to those mouse strains that are Qa-2 positive. The presence or absence of Qa-2 is reflected at the DNA level by the presence or absence (deletion polymorphism) of the gene(s) encoding Qa-2 protein. Many inbred and wild-derived mouse strains have been characterized as Qa-2 positive or negative, but no previous studies have looked at the distribution of the Ped gene in a population of free-living wild mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the Ped gene deletion polymorphism frequency in a sample of free-living wild mice. Twenty-nine mice were collected and identified as Mus musculus. Genomic DNA extraction was performed on tail tips, and PCR was used to amplify a region from the Ped gene. Known Qa-2 positive and negative mice were used as controls. Results showed that all 29 wild mice were positive for the Ped gene. Since the Ped gene is dominant and provides a reproductive advantage, it is not surprising that all of the wild mice were Qa-2 positive. However, our assay could not distinguish homozygous from heterozygous mice. It is possible that the Qa-2 deletion polymorphism is segregating in the population, and a larger sample size would identify some Qa-2 negative mice. PMID:12115912

  8. Crybb2 deficiency impairs fertility in female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Qian; Sun, Li-Li; Xiang, Fen-Fen; Gao, Li; Jia, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Tao, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jie

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Crybb2 deletion impaired female fertility. • Crybb2 deletion dramatically affected the production of reproduction-related hormones and hormone response. • Crybb2 deletion impaired follicular development and inhibited the proliferation of granulosa cells. • Crybb2 deletion promoted follicular atresia and apoptosis in granulosa cells. - Abstract: Beta-B2-crystallin (CRYBB2), encoded by Crybb2 gene, is a major protein in the mammalian eye lens that plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the ocular lens. However, CRYBB2 also plays important roles in many extra-lenticular tissues and organs such as the retina, brain and testis. Our previous studies demonstrated that male Crybb2 deficient (Crybb2{sup −/−}) mice have reduced fertility compared with wild-type (WT) mice, while female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited reduced ovary weights and shorter estrous cycle percentages. Here we specifically investigated the role of CRYBB2 in the female reproductive system. Our studies revealed that ovaries from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited significantly reduced numbers of primordial, secondary and pre-ovulatory follicles when compared with WT mice, while the rate of atretic follicles was also increased. Additionally, fewer eggs were collected from the oviduct of Crybb2{sup −/−} female mice after superovulation. Estrogen levels were higher in the metestrus and diestrus cycles of female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, while progesterone levels were lower in diestrus cycles. Furthermore, the expression of survival and cell cycle genes, Bcl-2, Cdk4 and Ccnd2, were significantly decreased in granulosa cells isolated from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, consistent with the predominant expression of CRYBB2 in ovarian granulosa cells. Our results reveal a critical role for CRYBB2 in female fertility and specific effects on the proliferation and survival status of ovarian granulosa cells.

  9. Chimeric Plantibody Passively Protects Mice against Aerosolized Ricin Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Whaley, Kevin J.; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do H.; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Hiatt, Ernie; Morton, Josh; Swope, Kelsi; Roy, Chad J.; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Recent incidents in the United States and abroad have heightened concerns about the use of ricin toxin as a bioterrorism agent. In this study, we produced, using a robust plant-based platform, four chimeric toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that were then evaluated for the ability to passively protect mice from a lethal-dose ricin challenge. The most effective antibody, c-PB10, was further evaluated in mice as a therapeutic following ricin exposure by injection and inhalation. PMID:24574537

  10. Chimeric plantibody passively protects mice against aerosolized ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Whaley, Kevin J; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do H; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Hiatt, Ernie; Morton, Josh; Swope, Kelsi; Roy, Chad J; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-05-01

    Recent incidents in the United States and abroad have heightened concerns about the use of ricin toxin as a bioterrorism agent. In this study, we produced, using a robust plant-based platform, four chimeric toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that were then evaluated for the ability to passively protect mice from a lethal-dose ricin challenge. The most effective antibody, c-PB10, was further evaluated in mice as a therapeutic following ricin exposure by injection and inhalation. PMID:24574537

  11. Transfer of human nasal papilloma into nude mice.

    PubMed

    Riglar, C; Mackay, I R; Burns, G F; Dowling, J P; Millar, H S

    1984-08-01

    We transferred tumor tissue from two inverted schneiderian nasal papillomas to hypothymic nude mice. Tissue from one tumor, which later underwent malignant change, was transferred three times. Forty days lapsed before growth was evident, with a subsequent period of rapid growth. Histologic appearances of the primary tumor and xenografts were similar. Although the data are derived from only two cases, our findings suggest that the capacity of these tumors to grow in nude mice may be an index of their malignant potential.

  12. Endocranial and masticatory muscle volumes in myostatin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Nathan; Mendias, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Structural and functional trade-offs are integral to the evolution of the mammalian skull and its development. This paper examines the potential for enlargement of the masticatory musculature to limit the size of the endocranial cavity by studying a myostatin-deficient mouse model of hypermuscularity (MSTN−/−). The study tests the null prediction that the larger MSTN−/− mice have larger brains compared with wild-type (WT) mice in order to service the larger muscles. Eleven post-mortem MSTN−/− mice and 12 WT mice were imaged at high resolution using contrast enhanced micro-CT. Masticatory muscle volumes (temporalis, masseter, internal and external pterygoids) and endocranial volumes were measured on the basis of two-dimensional manual tracings and the Cavalieri principle. Volumes were compared using Kruskal–Wallis and Student's t-tests. Results showed that the masticatory muscles of the MSTN−/− mice were significantly larger than in the WT mice. Increases were in the region of 17–36% depending on the muscle. Muscles increased in proportion to each other, maintaining percentages in the region of 5, 10, 21 and 62% of total muscle volume for the external ptyergoid, internal pterygoid, temporalis and masseter, respectively. Kruskal–Wallis and t-tests demonstrated that the endocranial volume was significantly larger in the WT mice, approximately 16% larger on average than that seen in the MSTN−/− mice. This comparative reduction of MSTN−/− endocranial size could not be explained in terms of observer bias, ageing, sexual dimorphism or body size scaling. That the results showed a reduction of brain size associated with an increase of muscle size falsifies the null prediction and lends tentative support to the view that the musculature influences brain growth. It remains to be determined whether the observed effect is primarily physical, nutritional, metabolic or molecular in nature. PMID:26064569

  13. Adrenal Homografts in Mice, with special reference to `Immunological Adrenalectomy'

    PubMed Central

    Medawar, P. B.; Russell, P. S.

    1958-01-01

    Adrenal cortical grafts transplanted between members of an inbred strain of mice (`isografts') are held to be successful when they empower adrenalectomized mice to subsist upon a diet low in NaCl. By this criterion, in which due allowance must be made for the hypertrophy of accessory adrenal tissue, the intramuscular implantation of adrenal cortical shavings, free from medullary tissue, is a reliable method of grafting. The intravascular injection of dissociated cortical cells, though sometimes successful, is not reliable. The testis, the anterior chamber of the eye, and the brain will also serve as sites of transplantation, though less efficiently than muscle. Adrenal cortical grafts transplanted by the intramuscular method between members of different inbred strains of mice (`homografts') are unsuccessful. Homografts may, however, survive in the anterior chamber of the eye. Immunological tolerance may be procured in respect of adrenal cortical tissue: adult A-line mice into which CBA splenic cells have been injected shortly after birth will accept CBA adrenal homografts as readily as they accept isografts. It is accordingly argued that all the `transplantation antigens' possessed by a mouse's adrenal cortical tissue are also possessed by its spleen. Tolerant A-line mice subsisting upon homografts of CBA adrenal cortical tissue will die after adoptive immunization, i.e. after the injection of lymphoid cells taken from normal A-line mice which have been actively immunized against CBA tissues. It is shown that this procedure causes CBA tissue in the tolerant host to be destroyed; death is therefore attributed to an immunological `adrenalectomy'. Adrenal homografts transplanted between mice of unrelated strains behave essentially like skin homografts. No opinion is expressed upon whether or not adrenal homografts might survive their transplantation between mice belonging to strains which, though closely related, stand far enough apart for skin homografts to fail

  14. Antibiotic administration in the drinking water of mice.

    PubMed

    Marx, James O; Vudathala, Daljit; Murphy, Lisa; Rankin, Shelley; Hankenson, F Claire

    2014-05-01

    Although antibiotics frequently are added to the drinking water of mice, this practice has not been tested to confirm that antibiotics reach therapeutic concentrations in the plasma of treated mice. In the current investigation, we 1) tested the stability of enrofloxacin and doxycycline in the drinking water of adult, female C57BL/6 mice; 2) measured the mice's consumption of water treated with enrofloxacin, doxycycline, amoxicillin, or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; and 3) used HPLC to measure plasma antibiotic concentrations in mice that had ingested treated water for 1 wk. Plasma concentrations of antibiotic were measured 1 h after the start of both the light and dark cycle. The main findings of the study were that both enrofloxacin and nonpharmaceutical, chemical-grade doxycycline remained relatively stable in water for 1 wk. In addition, mice consumed similar volumes of antibiotic-treated and untreated water. The highest plasma antibiotic concentrations measured were: enrofloxacin, 140.1 ± 10.4 ng/mL; doxycycline, 56.6 ± 12.5 ng/mL; amoxicillin, 299.2 ± 64.1 ng/mL; and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 5.9 ± 1.2 ng/mL. Despite the stability of the antibiotics in the water and predictable water consumption by mice, the plasma antibiotic concentrations were well below the concentrations required for efficacy against bacterial pathogens, except for those pathogens that are exquisitely sensitive to the antibiotic. The findings of this investigation prompt questions regarding the rationale of the contemporary practice of adding antibiotics to the drinking water of mice for systemic antibacterial treatments.

  15. Pair housing reverses post-stroke depressive behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajkumar; Friedler, Brett D; Harris, Nia M; McCullough, Louise D

    2014-08-01

    Social isolation (SI) has been linked epidemiologically to high rates of morbidity and mortality following stroke. In contrast, strong social support enhances recovery and lowers stroke recurrence. However, the mechanism by which social support influences stroke recovery has not been adequately explored. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of post-stroke pair housing and SI on behavioral phenotypes and chronic functional recovery in mice. Young male mice were paired for 14 days before a 60 min transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or sham surgery and assigned to various housing environments immediately after stroke. Post-stroke mice paired with either a sham or stroke partner showed significantly higher (P<0.05) sociability after MCAO than isolated littermates. Sociability deficits worsened over time in isolated animals. Pair-housed mice showed restored sucrose consumption (P<0.05) and reduced immobility in the tail suspension test compared to isolated cohorts. Pair-housed stroked mice demonstrated significantly reduced cerebral atrophy after 6 weeks (17.5 ± 1.5% in PH versus 40.8 ± 1.3% in SI; P<0.001). Surprisingly, total brain arginase-1, a marker of a M2 "alternatively activated" myeloid cells was higher in isolated mice. However, a more detailed assessment of cellular expression showed a significant increase in the number of microglia that co-labeled with arginase-1 in the peri-infarct region in PH stroke mice compared to SI mice. Pair housing enhances sociability and reduces avolitional and anhedonic behavior. Pair housing reduced serum IL-6 and enhanced peri-infarct microglia arginase-1 expression. Social interaction reduces post-stroke depression and improves functional recovery.

  16. In vivo multiphoton imaging of obstructive cholestasis in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Chieh; Lee, Yu Yang; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    Combining multiphoton microscopy with a newly designed hepatic imaging window, we acquired in vivo images of mice obstructive cholestasis. We observed that in mice with bile duct ligation, bile canaliculi failed to appear during the whole observation period over 100 minutes following carboxyfluorescein diacetate injection, whereas the fluorescence was retained much longer within sinusoids. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensities in sinusoids were persistently higher than in hepatocytes during the course.

  17. Immune response to intrapharyngeal LPS in neonatal and juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A; Lee, Seakwoo; Gibbs, Kevin; Lopez, Armando; Collaco, Joseph M; Neptune, Enid; Soloski, Mark J; Scott, Alan; D'Alessio, Franco

    2015-03-01

    Neonates and infants have a higher morbidity and mortality associated with lower respiratory tract illnesses compared with older children. To identify age-related and longitudinal differences in the cellular immune response to acute lung injury (ALI), neonatal and juvenile mice were given Escherichia coli LPS using a novel, minimally invasive aspiration technique. Neonatal and juvenile mice received between 3.75 and 7.5 mg/kg LPS by intrapharyngeal aspiration. Airway and lung cells were isolated and characterized by flow cytometry, cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression from lung homogenates was quantified, and lung morphometry and injury scores were performed. LPS-treated neonatal mice underwent adoptive transfer with adult T regulatory cells (Tregs). After LPS aspiration, lung monocytes isolated from neonatal mice had a predominant M2 phenotype, whereas lung monocytes from juvenile mice displayed a mixed M1/M2 phenotype. At 72 hours after LPS exposure, neonatal lungs were slower to resolve inflammation and expressed lower mRNA levels of CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, and IL-10. Juvenile, but not neonatal, mice demonstrated a significant increase in airway Tregs after LPS exposure. Adoptive transfer of adult Tregs into LPS-challenged neonatal mice resulted in reduced lung inflammation and improved weight gain. These findings underscore several vulnerabilities in the neonatal immune response to LPS-induced ALI. Most striking was the deficiency in airway Tregs after LPS aspiration. Adoptive transfer of adult Tregs mitigated LPS-induced ALI in neonatal mice, highlighting the importance of age-related differences in Tregs and their response to ALI during early postnatal development.

  18. Effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on social development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Zeeba D.; Kennedy, Bruce; Katzman, Aaron; Lahvis, Garet; Kosofsky, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) in humans and animals has been shown to impair social development. Molecules that mediate synaptic plasticity and learning in the medial PFC (mPFC), specifically BDNF and its downstream signaling molecule, egr1 have been shown to affect the regulation of social interactions (SI). In this study we determined the effects of PCE on SI and the corresponding ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in developing mice. Furthermore, we studied the PCE-induced changes in constitutive expression of BDNF, egr1 and their transcriptional regulators in the mPFC as a possible molecular mechanism mediating the altered SI. In prenatal cocaine exposed (PCOC) mice we identified increased SI and USV production at P25, and increased SI but not USVs, at P35. By P45 the expression of both social behaviors normalized in PCOC mice. At the molecular level, we found increased BDNF exon IV and egr1 mRNA in the mPFC of PCOC mice at P30 that normalized by P45. This was concurrent with increased egr1 protein in the mPFC of PCOC mice at P30 suggesting a role of egr1 in the enhanced SI observed in juvenile PCOC mice. Additionally, by measuring the association of acH3K9,14, and MeCP2 at the promoters of BDNF exons I and IV, and egr1, our results provide evidence of promoter specific alterations in the mPFC of PCOC juvenile mice with increased association of acH3K9,14 only at the BDNF exon IV promoter. These results identify a potential PCE-induced molecular alteration as the underlying neurobiologic mechanism mediating the altered social development in juvenile mice. PMID:24852757

  19. Ghrelin treatment prevents development of activity based anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Romain; Lucas, Nicolas; Breton, Jonathan; Azhar, Saïda; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-06-01

    Stimulation of feeding is necessary for treatment of pathological conditions of chronic malnutrition due to anorexia. Ghrelin, a hunger hormone, is one of the candidate for pharmacological treatments of anorexia, but because of its instability in plasma has limited efficacy. We previously showed that plasmatic IgG protect ghrelin from degradation and that IgG from obese subjects and mice may increase ghrelin׳s orexigenic effect. In this study we tested if ghrelin alone or combined with IgG may improve feeding in chronically food-restricted mice with or without physical activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by free access to a running wheel. Mice received a single daily intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin (1nM) together or not with total IgG (1nM) from obese ob/ob or lean mice before access to food during 8 days of 3h/day feeding time. We found that both ghrelin and ghrelin combined with IgG from obese, but not lean mice, prevented ABA, however, they were not able to diminish body weight loss. Physical activity was lower during the feeding period and was increased shortly after feeding in mice receiving ghrelin together with IgG from obese mice. In food-restricted mice without ABA, ghrelin treatments did not have significant effects on food intake. Thus, this study supports pharmacological use of ghrelin or ghrelin combined with IgG from obese animals for treatment of anorexia accompanied by elevated physical activity. The utility of combining ghrelin with protective IgG should be further determined in animal models of anorexia with unrestricted access to food.

  20. An analysis of licking microstructure in three strains of mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A.W.; Sherwood, A.; Smith, D.R.; Wosiski-Kuhn, M.; Gallagher, M.; Holland, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of feeding provide a useful tool for elucidating the molecular pathways of energy regulation. The majority of studies in mice have been limited to intake analyses conducted over extended periods of time, which fail to distinguish between a variety of factors that influence nutrient intake. Using licking microstructure analyses we examined both the size and number of licking bursts for water, polycose, sucrose and lecithin in three strains of mice (C57BL/6J, 129Sv/ImJ and C57129F1 hybrids), using pause criteria (250–500, >500 and >1000 ms) that have previously been described in the rat. Burst size and number varied both as a function of tastant concentration and mouse strain; however, these differences were most evident with the >1000 ms pause criterion. Consistent with previous reports, during water consumption C57 mice showed longer mean interlick intervals, a larger number of bursts but reduced burst size relative to the two other strains. F1 mice showed larger burst sizes for polycose, while C57 mice displayed a greater number of bursts for both polycose and sucrose. Both 129 and F1 mice were insensitive to sucrose concentration, whereas C57 mice showed attenuated lecithin intake influenced by a reduction in the size of bursts for this tastant. These results suggest that these strains of mice display differences in the pattern of licking that are most evident with the use of larger pause criteria. These differences in licking behavior might reflect influences of genetic background on pre- and post-ingestive factors controlling intake, the reinforcing properties of each tastant, or native differences in licking style. PMID:20006663

  1. A test to identify judgement bias in mice.

    PubMed

    Boleij, Hetty; van't Klooster, José; Lavrijsen, Marla; Kirchhoff, Susanne; Arndt, Saskia S; Ohl, Frauke

    2012-07-15

    Emotional states are known to affect cognitive processes. For example highly anxious individuals interpret ambiguous stimuli more negatively than low anxious people, an effect called negative judgement bias. Recently, the measurement of judgement bias has been used to try and indicate emotional states in animals. In the present experiment a potential test for judgement bias in mice was examined. Mice were trained with two distinct odour cues (vanilla or apple) predicting either a palatable or an unpalatable almond piece. Subsequently their reaction to mixtures of both odours, the ambiguous stimuli, was investigated. Mice of the BALB/cJ and 129P3/J inbred mouse strains (high initial anxiety and low initial anxiety phenotypes respectively) were tested. While BALB/cJ mice showed odour association learning and showed intermediate reactions to the ambiguous cues, 129P3/J mice did not discriminate between the cues. Additionally BALB/cJ mice that were tested under more aversive white light conditions revealed a higher latency to approach the almond piece than mice tested under less aversive red light conditions. The ambiguous stimulus however was interpreted as negative under both test conditions. Brain c-Fos expression levels (a marker for neuronal activity) differed between the BALB/c/J and 129P3/J in the lateral amygdala and the prelimbic cortex, indicating differences in ambiguous information processing between the strains. The behavioural results suggest that the present judgement bias test might be used to assess emotional states in at least BALB/c mice, however further research on both behaviour and on the involved brain mechanisms is necessary to confirm this idea.

  2. Inhalation pharmacokinetics of isoprene in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, H; Wiegand, H J; Filser, J G; Bolt, H M; Laib, R J

    1990-01-01

    Studies on inhalation pharmacokinetics of isoprene were conducted in rats (Wistar) and mice (B6C3F1) to investigate possible species differences in metabolism of this compound. Pharmacokinetic analysis of isoprene inhaled by rats and mice revealed saturation kinetics of isoprene metabolism in both species. For rats and mice, linear pharmacokinetics apply at exposure concentrations below 300 ppm isoprene. Saturation of isoprene metabolism is practically complete at atmospheric concentrations of about 1000 ppm in rats and about 2000 ppm in mice. In the lower concentration range where first-order metabolism applies, metabolic clearance (related to the concentration in the atmosphere) of inhaled isoprene per kilogram body weight was 6200 mL/hr for rats and 12,000 mL/hr for mice. The estimated maximal metabolic elimination rates were 130 mumole/hr/kg for rats and 400 mumole/hr/kg for mice. This shows that the rate of isoprene metabolism in mice is about two or three times that in rats. When the untreated animals are kept in a closed all-glass exposure system, the exhalation of isoprene into the system can be measured. This shows that the isoprene endogenously produced by the animals is systemically available within the animal organism. From such experiments the endogenous production rate of isoprene was calculated to be 1.9 mumole/hr/kg for rats and 0.4 mumole/hr/kg for mice. Our data indicate that the endogenous production of isoprene should be accounted for when discussing a possible carcinogenic or mutagenic risk of this compound. PMID:2401276

  3. [Effect of eel oil capsule on mice memory].

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Xu, D; Xu, S; Huang, X

    1998-06-01

    Step-down test, step-through test and water maze in mice were used to observe the effect of eel oil capsule on mice memory. The results indicated that during the administration period (30 days), the eel oil capsule treating groups with dosages of 0.129, 0.387, and 1.161 g/kg obviously improved the learning and memory abilities. Compared with the control test, the eel oil capsule promoted the memory and smart.

  4. Experimental Granulomatous Pulmonary Nocardiosis in BALB/C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mifuji Lira, Roque M.; Limón Flores, Alberto Yairh; Salinas Carmona, Mario César

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a granulomatous disease with high mortality that affects both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients. The mechanisms leading to the establishment and progression of the infection are currently unknown. An animal model to study these mechanisms is sorely needed. We report the first in vivo model of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis that closely resembles human pathology. BALB/c mice infected intranasally with two different doses of GFP-expressing Nocardia brasiliensis ATCC700358 (NbGFP), develop weight loss and pulmonary granulomas. Mice infected with 109 CFUs progressed towards death within a week while mice infected with 108 CFUs died after five to six months. Histological examination of the lungs revealed that both the higher and lower doses of NbGFP induced granulomas with NbGFP clearly identifiable at the center of the lesions. Mice exposed to 108 CFUs and subsequently to 109 CFUs were not protected against disease severity but had less granulomas suggesting some degree of protection. Attempts to identify a cellular target for the infection were unsuccessful but we found that bacterial microcolonies in the suspension used to infect mice were responsible for the establishment of the disease. Small microcolonies of NbGFP, incompatible with nocardial doubling times starting from unicellular organisms, were identified in the lung as early as six hours after infection. Mice infected with highly purified unicellular preparations of NbGFP did not develop granulomas despite showing weight loss. Finally, intranasal delivery of nocardial microcolonies was enough for mice to develop granulomas with minimal weight loss. Taken together these results show that Nocardia brasiliensis microcolonies are both necessary and sufficient for the development of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis in mice. PMID:27303806

  5. Maotai Ameliorates Diethylnitrosamine-Initiated Hepatocellular Carcinoma Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xu; Long, Li; Yang, Chunzhang; Lu, Yingying; Cheng, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol is closely related to liver disease, such as hepatic fibrosis or even hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, epidemiological and experimental studies indicated that consumption of Maotai, one of the famous liquors in China, exhibits no significant correlation with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis as other beverage sources do. This study detected the relationship of Maotai consumption and HCC development in a diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-initiated HCC animal model. DEN was given to mice at a dose of 100 mg/kg, ip, and 50 mg/kg, ip in the following week. Mice were simultaneously given Maotai or an equal amount of ethanol (53%, 5 ml/kg/day, 5days/week for up to 35weeks). At 3-week and 35- week of the experiment, serum and livers were collected for biochemical and histopathological examination of liver injury and incidence of HCC. Real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of metallothionein-1/2 (MT-1/2), NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modified subunit (GCLM). We identified tissue damage and dysfunction of liver in ethanol + DEN-treated mice, whereas the extent of injury was reduced in Maotai+ DEN –treated mice. Significant Glypican-3(GPC3) expression and precancerous injury or HCC were seen in approximately 50% of mice with ethanol+ DEN, but barely be seen in Maotai + DEN-treated mice. A higher expression of MT-1/2, Nrf2 and GCLC could be seen in Maotai + DEN-treated mice. Thus, Maotai liquor ameliorates the formation of DEN-induced HCC in mice, and the protection mechanism is possibly related with the activation of anti-oxidation factors, such as MTs, Nrf2 and GCLC. PMID:24690765

  6. PIR-B-deficient mice are susceptible to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Torii, Ikuko; Oka, Satoshi; Hotomi, Muneki; Benjamin, William H; Takai, Toshiyuki; Kearney, John F; Briles, David E; Kubagawa, Hiromi

    2008-09-15

    Paired Ig-like receptors of activating (PIR-A) and inhibitory (PIR-B) isoforms are expressed by many hematopoietic cells, including B lymphocytes and myeloid cells. To determine the functional roles of PIR-A and PIR-B in primary bacterial infection, PIR-B-deficient (PIR-B(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were injected i.v. with an attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (WB335). PIR-B(-/-) mice were found to be more susceptible to Salmonella infection than WT mice, as evidenced by high mortality rate, high bacterial loads in the liver and spleen, and a failure to clear bacteria from the circulation. Although blood levels of major cytokines and Salmonella-specific Abs were mostly comparable in the two groups of mice, distinct patterns of inflammatory lesions were found in their livers at 7-14 days postinfection: diffuse spreading along the sinusoids in PIR-B(-/-) mice vs nodular restricted localization in WT mice. PIR-B(-/-) mice have more inflammatory cells in the liver but fewer B cells and CD8(+) T cells in the spleen than WT mice at 14 days postinfection. PIR-B(-/-) bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMphi) failed to control intracellular replication of Salmonella in vitro, in part due to inefficient phagosomal oxidant production, when compared with WT BMMphi. PIR-B(-/-) BMMphi also produced more nitrite and TNF-alpha upon exposure to Salmonella than WT BMMphi did. These findings suggest that the disruption of PIR-A and PIR-B balance affects their regulatory roles in host defense to bacterial infection.

  7. New operant model of nicotine-seeking behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Elena; Barbano, Maria Flavia; Galeote, Lola; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-04-01

    Nicotine addiction represents a major health problem in the world with dramatic socio-economic consequences. Recent studies using genetically modified mice have provided a better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine responses. However, the study of nicotine addiction requires sophisticated behavioural models that are still not fully developed in mice. Here, we report the validation of a new reliable operant model of nicotine-seeking behaviour in mice. C57BL/6 mice were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.03 mg/kg per infusion) under a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement for 10 d. A light cue was contingently associated with the nicotine infusion. After reaching the acquisition criteria of nicotine self-administration, mice were exposed to extinction sessions similar to the self-administration training except that nicotine was not available and the associated cues were not presented. Nicotine-seeking behaviour was then reinstated by exposure to nicotine-associated environment cues, a priming injection of nicotine or stress, the three main conditions leading to nicotine relapse in humans. The exposure to the cues associated with nicotine infusion was the most effective stimulus reinstating nicotine-seeking behaviour in 90% of mice. A priming injection of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) produced nicotine reinstatement in 30% of the animals, whereas stress exposure (0.22 mA footshock) reinstated nicotine-seeking behaviour in 50% of mice. The validation of this new model of nicotine-seeking behaviour and reinstatement in mice provides an important tool to help clarify the genetic and neurochemical bases of nicotine addiction.

  8. Induction of hepatic metallothionein I in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kloth, D M; Chin, J L; Cherian, M G

    1995-04-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is an intracellular metal-binding protein which has been implicated in various biological roles, including heavy-metal detoxification and zinc and copper homeostasis, and has putative antioxidant properties. High levels of MT have been detected in certain human tumours, but its functions are unclear. The presence of tumour may cause stress conditions along with alterations in host metabolism, such as the redistribution of metals and, subsequently, in changes in hepatic MT isoforms. The distribution of basal levels of MT-1 and MT-11 isoforms in livers of different strains of mice and their induction in mice inoculated with tumour cells are investigated. While Balb-c, C57/BL and CD1 mice strains had an equal distribution of both hepatic MT isoforms, MT-I and MT-II. In addition, MT-I was the predominant isoform synthesised (> 88%) in the livers of all strains of mice at 24 h after injection with either cadmium or zinc salts. After inoculation with human testicular T7800 or T7799 tumour cells, the major form of MT induced in the livers of nude (nu/nu) mice was Zn-MT-I, and its concentration was positively correlated with the size of the inoculated tumours (r2 = 0.85). A similar positive relation was found in the livers of Balb-c mice inoculated with MM45T mouse bladder tumour cells (r2 = 0.96). Following surgical removal of T7800 tumour, hepatic MT concentrations returned to basal values. There was an increase in plasma MT levels in tumour-bearing mice and it was positively correlated with the increase in hepatic MT levels. These results demonstrate a specific increase in hepatic MT-I isoform in tumour-bearing mice, and this may be due to a generalised stress during tumour growth. PMID:7710933

  9. Effects of the light--dark cycle on a water tank social interaction test in mice.

    PubMed

    Nejdi, A; Guastavino, J M; Lalonde, R

    1996-01-01

    Mice were exposed to a water tank interaction test in which food could be obtained either by wading in the water or by attacking littermates. A tank with progressively rising water levels caused mice in groups of four to differentiate into those willing to wade (carrier mice) from those unwilling to wade (noncarrier mice). Noncarrier mice could only obtain food by stealing it from carrier mice or from other noncarrier mice. It was found that mice during the dark period of the light--dark cycle were more willing to wade in the search for food rather than attempt to steal food from other mice. Because mice are generally more active during the dark period, this result suggests that higher activity levels increase the willingness to share the work load, a form of altruism, rather than promote parasitic behavior and aggression.

  10. Cyclophilin A protects mice against infection by influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Can; Wong, Gary; Dong, Wei; Zheng, Weinan; Li, Yun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Lianfeng; Gao, George F; Bi, Yuhai; Liu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies indicate that Cyclophilin A (CypA) impairs the replication of influenza A virus in vitro. To further evaluate the antiviral functions of CypA and explore its mechanism, transgenic mice with overexpression of CypA by two specific promoters with SPC (CypA-SPC) or CMV (CypA-CMV) were developed. After challenge with the A/WSN/33(H1N1) influenza virus, CypA-SPC and CypA-CMV transgenic mice displayed nearly 2.5- and 3.8-fold stronger disease resistance to virus infection, respectively, compared to wild-type animals. Virus replication, pathological lesions and inflammatory cytokines were substantially reduced in both lines of transgenic mice. In addition, after infection there was an upregulation of genes associated with cell migration, immune function, and organ development; and a downregulation of genes associated with the positive regulation of immune cells and apoptosis in the peritoneal macrophages of CypA-overexpressing transgenic mice (CypA+). These results indicate that CypA is a key modulator of influenza virus resistance in mice, and that CypA+ mice constitutes an important model to study the roles of CypA in the regulation of immune responses and infections. PMID:27354005

  11. Mycophenolate Mofetil Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang Gyun; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Arah; Kim, Dong-Jin; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Kyung Hye; Hwang, Seung Joon; Woo, Jong Shin; Lim, Sung Jig; Kim, Weon; Moon, Ju-Young

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has an anti-inflammatory effect, inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation. Previous studies showed attenuation of diabetic nephropathy with MMF, but the underlying mechanisms were unclear. This study aimed to identify the effect of MMF on diabetic nephropathy and investigate its action mechanisms in type 2 diabetic mice model. Eight-week-old db/db and control mice (db/m mice) received vehicle or MMF at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks. MMF-treated diabetic mice showed decreased albuminuria, attenuated mesangial expansion, and profibrotic mRNA expressions despite the high glucose level. The number of infiltrated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the kidney was significantly decreased in MMF-treated db/db mice and it resulted in attenuating elevated intrarenal TNF-α and IL-17. The renal chemokines expression and macrophages infiltration were also attenuated by MMF treatment. The decreased expression of glomerular nephrin and WT1 was recovered with MMF treatment. MMF prevented the progression of diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice independent of glycemic control. These results suggest that the effects of MMF in diabetic nephropathy are mediated by CD4+ T cell regulation and related cytokines. PMID:26345532

  12. Pathological effects of dichlorvos and fenitrothion in mice.

    PubMed

    Somia, El-Maghraby; Madiha, Farghaly

    2012-05-15

    Seeds of faba and soybeans were treated with dichlorvos (12 mg/kg) and fenitrothion (5 mg/kg) insecticides and stored for 30 weeks. The total internal residues of dichlorvos and fenitrothion amounted to about 69%, 73% and 67%, 74% in the applied doses in faba and soybeans, respectively. The pathological potential of dichlorvos and fenitrothion residues was studied by feeding mice for 90 days with the treated seeds. Parallel studies were conducted in two control groups. Liver and kidney were taken for histological examinations. The results of blood biochemistry are supported by the histopathological changes observed in the liver and kidney of treated mice. Dichlorvos and fenitrothion insecticides caused degenerative changes in the liver and kidney of mice. Changes were more intense in mice which were given beans treated with dichlorvos than in mice fed on beans treated with fenitrothion. The livers of both treated groups showed an abnormal size and shape of hepatic cells. The kidneys of treated mice showed tubular vascular degeneration and lumen dilatation in both groups as compared with the control group.

  13. Impact of Adiponectin Overexpression on Allergic Airways Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Verbout, Norah G.; Williams, Alison S.; Kasahara, David I.; Wurmbrand, Allison P.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Shore, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma. Obese individuals have decreased circulating adiponectin, an adipose-derived hormone with anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that transgenic overexpression of adiponectin would attenuate allergic airways inflammation and mucous hyperplasia in mice. To test this hypothesis, we used mice overexpressing adiponectin (Adipo Tg). Adipo Tg mice had marked increases in both serum adiponectin and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid adiponectin. Both acute and chronic ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge protocols were used. In both protocols, OVA-induced increases in total BAL cells were attenuated in Adipo Tg versus WT mice. In the acute protocol, OVA-induced increases in several IL-13 dependent genes were attenuated in Adipo Tg versus WT mice, even though IL-13 per se was not affected. With chronic exposure, though OVA-induced increases in goblet cells numbers per millimeter of basement membrane were greater in Adipo Tg versus WT mice, mRNA abundance of mucous genes in lungs was not different. Also, adiponectin overexpression did not induce M2 polarization in alveolar macrophages. Our results indicate that adiponectin protects against allergen-induced inflammatory cell recruitment to the airspaces, but not development of goblet cell hyperplasia. PMID:23861690

  14. Suspended animation-like state protects mice from lethal hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Eric; Roth, Mark B

    2007-04-01

    Joseph Priestley observed the high burn rate of candles in pure oxygen and wondered if people would "live out too fast" if we were in the same environment. We hypothesize that sulfide, a natural reducer of oxygen that is made in many cell types, acts as a buffer to prevent unrestricted oxygen consumption. To test this, we administered sulfide in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to mice (Mus musculus). As we have previously shown, H2S decreases the metabolic rate of mice by approximately 90% and induces a suspended animation-like state. Mice cannot survive for longer than 20 min when exposed to 5% oxygen. However, if mice are first put into a suspended animation-like state by a 20-min pretreatment with H2S and then are exposed to low oxygen, they can survive for mor