Science.gov

Sample records for a33 antigen-deficient mice

  1. Active vaccination with vaccinia virus A33 protects mice against lethal vaccinia and ectromelia viruses but not against cowpoxvirus; elucidation of the specific adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Paran, Nir; Lustig, Shlomo; Zvi, Anat; Erez, Noam; Israely, Tomer; Melamed, Sharon; Politi, Boaz; Ben-Nathan, David; Schneider, Paula; Lachmi, Batel; Israeli, Ofir; Stein, Dana; Levin, Reuven; Olshevsky, Udy

    2013-07-10

    Vaccinia virus protein A33 (A33VACV) plays an important role in protection against orthopoxviruses, and hence is included in experimental multi-subunit smallpox vaccines. In this study we show that single-dose vaccination with recombinant Sindbis virus expressing A33VACV, is sufficient to protect mice against lethal challenge with vaccinia virus WR (VACV-WR) and ectromelia virus (ECTV) but not against cowpox virus (CPXV), a closely related orthopoxvirus. Moreover, a subunit vaccine based on the cowpox virus A33 ortholog (A33CPXV) failed to protect against cowpox and only partially protected mice against VACV-WR challenge. We mapped regions of sequence variation between A33VACV and A33CPXVand analyzed the role of such variations in protection. We identified a single protective region located between residues 104-120 that harbors a putative H-2Kd T cell epitope as well as a B cell epitope - a target for the neutralizing antibody MAb-1G10 that blocks spreading of extracellular virions. Both epitopes in A33CPXV are mutated and predicted to be non-functional. Whereas vaccination with A33VACV did not induce in-vivo CTL activity to the predicted epitope, inhibition of virus spread in-vitro, and protection from lethal VACV challenge pointed to the B cell epitope highlighting the critical role of residue L118 and of adjacent compensatory residues in protection. This epitope's critical role in protection, as well as its modifications within the orthopoxvirus genus should be taken in context with the failure of A33 to protect against CPXV as demonstrated here. These findings should be considered when developing new subunit vaccines and monoclonal antibody based therapeutics against orthopoxviruses, especially variola virus, the etiologic agent of smallpox.

  2. A midgut lysate of the Riptortus pedestris has antibacterial activity against LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Am; Seo, Eun Sil; Seong, Min Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2017-02-01

    Riptortus pedestris, a common pest in soybean fields, harbors a symbiont Burkholderia in a specialized posterior midgut region of insects. Every generation of second nymphs acquires new Burkholderia cells from the environment. We compared in vitro cultured Burkholderia with newly in vivo colonized Burkholderia in the host midgut using biochemical approaches. The bacterial cell envelope of in vitro cultured and in vivo Burkholderia differed in structure, as in vivo bacteria lacked lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen. The LPS O-antigen deficient bacteria had a reduced colonization rate in the host midgut compared with that of the wild-type Burkholderia. To determine why LPS O-antigen-deficient bacteria are less able to colonize the host midgut, we examined in vitro survival rates of three LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants and lysates of five different midgut regions. The LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants were highly susceptible when cultured with the lysate of a specific first midgut region (M1), indicating that the M1 lysate contains unidentified substance(s) capable of killing LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants. We identified a 17 kDa protein from the M1 lysate, which was enriched in the active fractions. The N-terminal sequence of the protein was determined to be a soybean Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. These data suggest that the 17 kDa protein, which was originated from a main soybean source of the R. pedestris host, has antibacterial activity against the LPS O-antigen deficient (rough-type) Burkholderia.

  3. Radioimmunotherapy of colorectal carcinoma xenografts in nude mice with yttrium-90 A33 IgG and Tri-Fab (TFM).

    PubMed Central

    Antoniw, P.; Farnsworth, A. P.; Turner, A.; Haines, A. M.; Mountain, A.; Mackintosh, J.; Shochat, D.; Humm, J.; Welt, S.; Old, L. J.; Yarranton, G. T.; King, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody A33 recognises a tumour-associated antigen on human colorectal carcinoma, and has undergone preliminary evaluation in the clinic where selective localisation to hepatic metastases has been demonstrated [Welt et al. (1994) J. Clin. Oncol. 12, 1561-1571]. A33 and an A33 tri-fab fragment (TFM) were labelled with 90Y via a stable macrocyclic ligand for biodistribution and therapy studies in nude mice bearing SW1222 colon carcinoma xenografts. Biodistribution studies demonstrated tumour localisation for both A33 IgG and TFM with low bone, liver and kidney levels. Clearance of TFM from the blood was much faster than IgG and this led to lower tumour accumulation for TFM but superior tumour-blood ratios. The maximum per cent injected dose per g localised to tumour was 35.9% +/- 5.3% for A33 IgG and 12.9% +/- 4.6% for A33 TFM with tumour-blood ratios at 48 h after administration of 5.6 +/- 1.8 and 29.2 +/- 9.8 respectively. Autoradiography studies with 125I-labelled A33 IgG and TFM demonstrated a homogeneous distribution within tumour tissue which was not observed with other anti-colorectal tumour antibodies. TFM penetrated into the tumour tissue more rapidly than IgG. In therapy studies, a single dose of 90Y-A33 IgG (250 microCi per mouse) or 90Y-A33 TFM (300 microCi per mouse) led to complete regression of 2-week-old tumour xenografts with long-term tumour-free survivors. A transient drop in white blood cell count was observed with both IgG and TFM but was significantly more pronounced with IgG. The cell count fell to 8.4% of control for IgG, whereas with TFM cell counts fell to 51% of control before recovery. These results indicate that the more rapid blood clearance of 90Y-TFM confers reduced toxicity compared with 90Y-IgG although similar therapeutic effects are achieved. When the dose of 90Y-IgG was adjusted to give the same dose to tumour achieved with 300 microCi 90Y-TFM, a lesser therapeutic effect was observed. This may be owing to more

  4. Xylobiose, an Alternative Sweetener, Ameliorates Diabetes-Related Metabolic Changes by Regulating Hepatic Lipogenesis and miR-122a/33a in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eunjin; Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Eunju; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Shin, Jae-Ho; Seok, Pu Reum; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major public health concern worldwide. Xylobiose (XB) consists of two molecules of d-xylose and is a major disaccharide in xylooligosaccharides that are used as prebiotics. We hypothesized that XB could regulate diabetes-related metabolic and genetic changes via microRNA expression in db/db mice. For six weeks, C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice received 5% XB as part of the total sucrose content of their diet. XB supplementation improved glucose tolerance with reduced levels of OGTT AUC, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, and HOMA-IR. Furthermore, XB supplementation decreased the levels of total triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-C. The expression levels of miR-122a and miR-33a were higher and lower in the XB group, respectively. In the liver, expressions of the lipogenic genes, including, fatty acid synthase (FAS), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1C (SREBP-1C), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), ATP-binding cassette transporter G5/G8 (ABCG5/8), cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), and sterol 12-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP8B1), as well as oxidative stress markers, including superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase, were also regulated by XB supplementation. XB supplementation inhibited the mRNA expressions levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, interleukin (IL)-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). These data demonstrate that XB exhibits anti-diabetic, hypolipogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects via regulation of the miR-122a/33a axis in db/db mice. PMID:27929393

  5. Xylobiose, an Alternative Sweetener, Ameliorates Diabetes-Related Metabolic Changes by Regulating Hepatic Lipogenesis and miR-122a/33a in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eunjin; Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Eunju; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Shin, Jae-Ho; Seok, Pu Reum; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2016-12-05

    Type 2 diabetes is a major public health concern worldwide. Xylobiose (XB) consists of two molecules of d-xylose and is a major disaccharide in xylooligosaccharides that are used as prebiotics. We hypothesized that XB could regulate diabetes-related metabolic and genetic changes via microRNA expression in db/db mice. For six weeks, C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice received 5% XB as part of the total sucrose content of their diet. XB supplementation improved glucose tolerance with reduced levels of OGTT AUC, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, and HOMA-IR. Furthermore, XB supplementation decreased the levels of total triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-C. The expression levels of miR-122a and miR-33a were higher and lower in the XB group, respectively. In the liver, expressions of the lipogenic genes, including, fatty acid synthase (FAS), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1C (SREBP-1C), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), ATP-binding cassette transporter G5/G8 (ABCG5/8), cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), and sterol 12-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP8B1), as well as oxidative stress markers, including superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase, were also regulated by XB supplementation. XB supplementation inhibited the mRNA expressions levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, interleukin (IL)-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). These data demonstrate that XB exhibits anti-diabetic, hypolipogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects via regulation of the miR-122a/33a axis in db/db mice.

  6. Glucocorticoids facilitate the stable transformation of embryonal rat fibroblasts by a polyomavirus large tumor antigen-deficient mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Martens, I; Nilsson, M; Magnusson, G; Linder, S

    1988-01-01

    The addition of glucocorticoids to the growth medium could substitute for the expression of the polyomavirus large tumor antigen in the transformation of rat fibroblasts in vitro. After transfection with a large tumor antigen-deficient mutant of polyomavirus, pbc1051, high-frequency permanent transformation was observed, if the cells were grown in medium containing dexamethasone. Growth of pbc1051-transfected rat fibroblasts was strictly dependent on the presence of glucocorticoids during the initial phase of transformation. In the second phase, the growth of pbc1051-transfected cells was stimulated by dexamethasone, but the hormone was not essential for growth. After approximately 10 weeks in culture, pbc1051-transfected cells had progressed to hormone independent growth. Rat embryo cells transfected with wild-type polyomavirus DNA had the second phase in which growth was stimulated by glucocorticoid, and after this phase growth was steroid independent. Addition of glucocorticoids to rat fibroblasts transfected with a plasmid encoding only the middle-sized tumor antigen resulted in only a weak stimulation of growth. In contrast, embryo cells transfected with a plasmid containing the human homologue of the cellular T24 Ha-ras gene linked to murine sarcoma virus and simian virus 40 enhancers could be efficiently established as cell lines in medium supplemented with glucocorticoids. The data suggest that, in the transformation of primary rodent cells by polyomavirus, the activity of large tumor antigen can be substituted for by stimulating normal cellular functions with dexamethasone. Images PMID:2840668

  7. O-Antigen-Deficient Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Mutants Are Ingested via an Aberrant Form of Looping Phagocytosis and Show Altered Kinetics of Intracellular Trafficking in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the uptake and intracellular trafficking of F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and LVS with disruptions of wbtDEF and wbtI genes essential for synthesis of the O antigen of lipopolysaccharide. Unlike parental bacteria, O-antigen-deficient LVS is efficiently killed by serum with intact complement but not by serum lacking terminal complement components. Opsonization of O-antigen-deficient LVS in serum lacking terminal complement components allows efficient uptake of these live bacteria by macrophages. In the presence of complement, whereas parental F. tularensis LVS is internalized within spacious pseudopod loops, mutant LVS is internalized within tightly juxtaposed multiple onion-like layers of pseudopodia. Without complement, both parental and mutant LVSs are internalized within spacious pseudopod loops. Thus, molecules other than O antigen are important in triggering dramatic pseudopod extensions and uptake by spacious pseudopod loops. Following uptake, both parental and mutant LVSs enter compartments that show limited staining for the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein CD63 and little fusion with secondary lysosomes. Subsequently, both parental and mutant LVSs lose their CD63 staining. Whereas the majority of parental LVS escapes into the cytosol by 6 h after uptake, mutant LVS shows a marked lag but does escape by 1 day after uptake. Despite the altered kinetics of phagosome escape, both mutant and parental strains grow to high levels within human macrophages. Thus, the O antigen plays a role in the morphology of uptake in the presence of complement and the kinetics of intracellular growth but is not essential for escape, survival, altered membrane trafficking, or intramacrophage growth. PMID:22202123

  8. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  9. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  10. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  11. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filing. 245a.33 Section 245a.33 Aliens and... ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form...

  12. 7 CFR 15a.33 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Comparable facilities. 15a.33 Section 15a.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs...

  13. 7 CFR 15a.33 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Comparable facilities. 15a.33 Section 15a.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs...

  14. 7 CFR 15a.33 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Comparable facilities. 15a.33 Section 15a.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs...

  15. 7 CFR 15a.33 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Comparable facilities. 15a.33 Section 15a.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs...

  16. [CD36 Antigen Deficiency and Platelet Transfusion].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yan; Zhou, Yan; Shen, Wei-Dong

    2016-06-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein, a multi-ligand receptor, possesses various biological functions. CD36 deficiency may stimulate the body to produce anti-CD36 alloimmune antibodies through the several pathways, such as blood transfusion, pregnancy or organ transplantation and so on, leading to the refractoriness of immune platelet transfusion and other diseases. The recent research advances of CD36 deficiency and its molecular biological basis, platelet transfusion and CD36 antibody detection are summarized briefey in this review.

  17. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of humanised A33 immunoconjugates for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    King, D. J.; Antoniw, P.; Owens, R. J.; Adair, J. R.; Haines, A. M.; Farnsworth, A. P.; Finney, H.; Lawson, A. D.; Lyons, A.; Baker, T. S.

    1995-01-01

    A humanised IgG1/k version of A33 (hA33) has been constructed and expressed with yields up to 700 mg l-1 in mouse myeloma NS0 cells in suspension culture. The equilibrium dissociation constant of hA33 (KD = 1.3 nM) was shown to be equivalent to that of the murine antibody in a cell-binding assay. hA33 labelled with yttrium-90 using the macrocyclic chelator 12N4 (DOTA) was shown to localise very effectively to human colon tumour xenografts in nude mice, with tumour levels increasing as blood concentration fell up to 144 h. A Fab' variant of hA33 with a single hinge thiol group to facilitate chemical cross-linking has also been constructed and expressed with yields of 500 mg l-1. Trimaleimide cross-linkers have been used to produce a trivalent Fab fragment (hA33 TFM) that binds antigen on tumour cells with greater avidity than hA33 IgG. Cross-linkers incorporating 12N4 or 9N3 macrocycles have been used to produce hA33 TFM labelled stably and site specifically with yttrium-90 or indium-111 respectively. These molecules have been used to demonstrate that hA33 TFM is cleared more rapidly than hA33 IgG from the circulation of animals but does not lead to accumulation of these metallic radionuclides in the kidney. 90Y-labelled hA33 TFM therefore appears to be the optimal form of the antibody for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal carcinoma. Images Figure 3 PMID:8519646

  18. Structural and Functional Characterization of Anti-A33 Antibodies Reveal a Potent Cross-Species Orthopoxviruses Neutralizer

    PubMed Central

    Matho, Michael H.; Schlossman, Andrew; Meng, Xiangzhi; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Kaever, Thomas; Buller, Mark; Doronin, Konstantin; Parker, Scott; Peters, Bjoern; Crotty, Shane; Xiang, Yan; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus A33 is an extracellular enveloped virus (EEV)-specific type II membrane glycoprotein that is essential for efficient EEV formation and long-range viral spread within the host. A33 is a target for neutralizing antibody responses against EEV. In this study, we produced seven murine anti-A33 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by immunizing mice with live VACV, followed by boosting with the soluble A33 homodimeric ectodomain. Five A33 specific MAbs were capable of neutralizing EEV in the presence of complement. All MAbs bind to conformational epitopes on A33 but not to linear peptides. To identify the epitopes, we have adetermined the crystal structures of three representative neutralizing MAbs in complex with A33. We have further determined the binding kinetics for each of the three antibodies to wild-type A33, as well as to engineered A33 that contained single alanine substitutions within the epitopes of the three crystallized antibodies. While the Fab of both MAbs A2C7 and A20G2 binds to a single A33 subunit, the Fab from MAb A27D7 binds to both A33 subunits simultaneously. A27D7 binding is resistant to single alanine substitutions within the A33 epitope. A27D7 also demonstrated high-affinity binding with recombinant A33 protein that mimics other orthopoxvirus strains in the A27D7 epitope, such as ectromelia, monkeypox, and cowpox virus, suggesting that A27D7 is a potent cross-neutralizer. Finally, we confirmed that A27D7 protects mice against a lethal challenge with ectromelia virus. PMID:26325270

  19. 8 CFR 245a.33 - Filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NATIONALITY ACT LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions § 245a.33 Filing. (a) General. An application for Family Unity benefits under section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments must be filed on a Form I-817, Application for Family Unity Benefits, with the Missouri Service Center. A Form I-817 must be filed with...

  20. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bouchez, Valérie; Hegerle, Nicolas; Strati, Francesco; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Guiso, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN), were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) or pertussis toxin (PT) deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE) cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells. PMID:26389958

  1. Acute suppurative parotitis in a 33-day-old patient.

    PubMed

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Belet, Nursen; Karli, Arzu; Sensoy, Gulnar

    2015-06-01

    Acute suppurative parotitis is a rare disease in childhood. Its incidence is higher in premature newborns. Parotid swelling and pus drainage from Stenson's duct is pathognomonic, and Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent in most cases. Here, a 33-day-old patient with acute suppurative parotitis is presented.

  2. Characterization of chimpanzee/human monoclonal antibodies to vaccinia virus A33 glycoprotein and its variola virus homolog in vitro and in a vaccinia virus mouse protection model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaochun; Earl, Patricia; Americo, Jeffrey; Damon, Inger; Smith, Scott K; Yu, Fujuan; Sebrell, Andrew; Emerson, Suzanne; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Gorshkova, Inna; Schuck, Peter; Satterfield, William; Moss, Bernard; Purcell, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Three distinct chimpanzee Fabs against the A33 envelope glycoprotein of vaccinia virus were isolated and converted into complete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with human gamma 1 heavy-chain constant regions. The three MAbs (6C, 12C, and 12F) displayed high binding affinities to A33 (K(d) of 0.14 nM to 20 nM) and may recognize the same epitope, which was determined to be conformational and located within amino acid residues 99 to 185 at the C terminus of A33. One or more of the MAbs were shown to reduce the spread of vaccinia virus as well as variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox) in vitro and to more effectively protect mice when administered before or 2 days after intranasal challenge with virulent vaccinia virus than a previously isolated mouse anti-A33 MAb (1G10) or vaccinia virus immunoglobulin. The protective efficacy afforded by anti-A33 MAb was comparable to that of a previously isolated chimpanzee/human anti-B5 MAb. The combination of anti-A33 MAb and anti-B5 MAb did not synergize the protective efficacy. These chimpanzee/human anti-A33 MAbs may be useful in the prevention and treatment of vaccinia virus-induced complications of vaccination against smallpox and may also be effective in the immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy of smallpox and other orthopoxvirus diseases.

  3. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L.; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W.; Scott, Andrew M.; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking

  4. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  5. A Case of Premature Ovarian Failure in a 33-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Colao, Emma; Granata, Teresa; Vismara, Marco F. M.; Bombardiere, Francesco; Nocera, Donatella; Luciano, Elisa; Perrotti, Nicola; Malatesta, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess aetiology of a POF in a 33-year-old woman and, if possible, plan a cure. Design. Case report. Setting. medical genetics diagnostic unit in a university hospital. Patient. A 33-year-old woman with premature ovarian failure (POF). Intervention(s). Genetic counseling, karyotyping, FISH study. Result(s). Turner-like diagnosis. Conclusion(s). Most cases of POF remain idiopathic. Turner syndrome can occur in very different phenotypes; cytogenetic and molecular profiling can provide a definitive diagnosis in cases with nonclassical phenotype. PMID:23509644

  6. A case of premature ovarian failure in a 33-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Colao, Emma; Granata, Teresa; Vismara, Marco F M; Bombardiere, Francesco; Nocera, Donatella; Luciano, Elisa; Perrotti, Nicola; Malatesta, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess aetiology of a POF in a 33-year-old woman and, if possible, plan a cure. Design. Case report. Setting. medical genetics diagnostic unit in a university hospital. Patient. A 33-year-old woman with premature ovarian failure (POF). Intervention(s). Genetic counseling, karyotyping, FISH study. Result(s). Turner-like diagnosis. Conclusion(s). Most cases of POF remain idiopathic. Turner syndrome can occur in very different phenotypes; cytogenetic and molecular profiling can provide a definitive diagnosis in cases with nonclassical phenotype.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium elkanii TnphoA 33, a Producer of Polyhydroxyalkanoates

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Erica M.; Kishi, Luciano T.; Fernandes, Camila C.; Paganelli, Fernanda Larozza; Alves, Lucia M. C.; de Souza, Jackson A. Marcondes

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Bradyrhizobium comprises bacteria with the ability to form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with legumes. They are of great interest in agriculture, as well as for the production of biopolymers such as polyhydroxyalkanoates. Here, we report the draft genome assembly of Bradyrhizobium elkanii TnphoA 33 comprising 9 Mb, 1,124 contigs, and 9,418 open reading frames. PMID:28232432

  8. B cell maturation antigen deficiency exacerbates lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M; Greenley, Erin J; Tung, Kenneth S; Erickson, Loren D

    2011-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and its preclinical lupus-prone mouse models are autoimmune disorders involving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus results in B cell hyperactivity, survival of self-reactive B cells, and differentiation to autoantibody-secreting plasma cells (PCs). These corrupt B cell responses are, in part, controlled by excess levels of the cytokine BAFF that normally maintains B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance through limited production. B cell maturation Ag (BCMA) is a receptor for BAFF that, under nonautoimmune conditions, is important for sustaining enduring Ab protection by mediating survival of long-lived PCs but is not required for B cell maturation and homeostasis. Through analysis of two different lupus-prone mouse models deficient in BCMA, we identify BCMA as an important factor in regulating peripheral B cell expansion, differentiation, and survival. We demonstrate that a BCMA deficiency combined with the lpr mutation or the murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 causes dramatic B cell and PC lymphoproliferation, accelerated autoantibody production, and early lethality. This study unexpectedly reveals that BCMA works to control B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance in systemic autoimmunity.

  9. Immunological evaluation of peptide vaccination for cancer patients with the HLA -A11(+) or -A33(+) allele.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shijoro; Matsueda, Satoko; Takamori, Shinzou; Toh, Uhi; Noguchi, Masanori; Yutani, Shigeru; Yamada, Akira; Shichijo, Shigeki; Yamada, Teppei; Suekane, Shigetaka; Kawano, Kouichirou; Naitou, Masayasu; Sasada, Tetsuro; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2017-02-08

    The HLA-A11 or -A33 allele is found in approximately 18% or 10% of the Asian population, respectively, but each of which is a minor allele worldwide, and therefore no clinical trials were previously conducted. To develop a therapeutic peptide vaccine for each of them, we investigated immunological responses of advanced cancer patients with the HLA-A11(+) /A11(+) (n=18) or -A33(+) /A33(+) (n=13) allele to personalized peptide vaccine (PPV) regimens. The primary sites of HLA-A11+/A11+ or -A33+/A33+ patients were the colon (n=4 or 2), stomach (2 or 3), breast (3 or 2), lung and pancreas(2 or 2), and so on. For PPV, a maximum of 4 peptides were selected from 9 different peptides capable of binding to HLA-A11 and -A33 molecules based on the pre-existing peptide-specific IgG responses. There were no severe adverse events related to PPV. At the end of the first cycle, peptide-specific CTL responses were augmented in 4/12 or 2/9 of HLA-A11(+) /A11(+) or -A33(+) /A33(+) patients, while peptide-specific IgG responses were augmented in 6/14 or 4/10 patients, respectively. Clinical responses consisted of 4 stable diseases and 14 progressive diseases in HLA-A11(+) /A11(+) patients, versus 7 and 6 in -A33(+) /A33(+) patients, respectively. Further clinical study of PPV could be recommended because of the safety and positive immunological responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Cocktails of ricin A-chain immunotoxins against different antigens on Hodgkin and Sternberg-Reed cells have superior anti-tumor effects against H-RS cells in vitro and solid Hodgkin tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Gottstein, C; Bohlen, H; Winkler, U; Schön, G; Manske, O; Schnell, R; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1995-10-09

    Three ricin A-chain immunotoxins (ITs) recognizing different antigens on Hodgkin-Reed/Sternberg (H-RS) cells were evaluated for their anti-tumor effects when used in combination as "cocktails". These ITs, BB10.dgA (CD25), HRS3.dgA (CD30), and IRac.dgA (70 kDa), strongly inhibited the growth of L540Cy H-RS cells in vitro. The protein synthesis of this cell line was reduced more efficiently by the combination of 2 of these ITs than by BB10.dgA, HRS3.dgA or IRac.dgA alone. A cocktail of all 3 ITs was most effective in vitro. This was at least in part due to the non-homogeneous distribution of CD25, CD30 or IRac on the L540Cy H-RS target cells and to the fact that subpopulations deficient in one antigen nevertheless expressed appreciable levels of the other target antigens. IT cocktails were also superior as anti-tumor agents in nude mice with solid L540Cy tumors. Ninety percent of mice treated with cocktails containing 2 or 3 ITs had continuous complete remissions (CCR), as compared with only 40% of mice treated with the same dose of a single IT. Analysis of 7 L540Cy sub-lines re-established ex vivo from mice that relapsed after having achieved complete remission (CR) after therapy with a single IT showed that the surviving tumor cells were antigen-deficient variants which were resistant to the original IT, but which could be killed by ITs directed against other target antigens. Thus, IT cocktails give superior results against human H-RS cells, both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Newly Emerging Feeding Difficulties in a 33-Year-Old Adult With CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Alexandra; Blake, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Feeding and swallowing difficulties are common among individuals with CHARGE syndrome. Many children require gastrostomy tube feeding in their early years and often undergo a delay in feeding and oral-motor skill development. There is little information available on adults with CHARGE syndrome, and the feeding difficulties they face. The present case describes newly emerging mouth over-stuffing feeding behaviors and feeding difficulties in a 33-year-old adult with CHARGE syndrome who had not undergone feeding therapy since childhood. PMID:26668685

  12. Characterization of the ars gene cluster from extremely arsenic-resistant Microbacterium sp. strain A33.

    PubMed

    Achour-Rokbani, Asma; Cordi, Audrey; Poupin, Pascal; Bauda, Pascale; Billard, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    The arsenic resistance gene cluster of Microbacterium sp. A33 contains a novel pair of genes (arsTX) encoding a thioredoxin system that are cotranscribed with an unusual arsRC2 fusion gene, ACR3, and arsC1 in an operon divergent from arsC3. The whole ars gene cluster is required to complement an Escherichia coli ars mutant. ArsRC2 negatively regulates the expression of the pentacistronic operon. ArsC1 and ArsC3 are related to thioredoxin-dependent arsenate reductases; however, ArsC3 lacks the two distal catalytic cysteine residues of this class of enzymes.

  13. 851 resected cystic tumors of the pancreas: A 33-year experience at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Valsangkar, Nakul P.; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Thayer, Sarah P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Castillo, Carlos Fernández-del

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to identify trends in the diagnosis and treatment of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas using a retrospective review of patients from a surgical database at an academic referral center during a 33-year period. Methods Patient characteristics, including demographics, pathology, and survival, were analyzed over 5 time periods between 1978 and 2011. Results A total of 851 consecutive patients underwent resection for a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas during a 33-year period. Sixty-five percent of patients were female, and mean age was 60 years. The most common pathologic diagnoses were intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (38%), mucinous cystic neoplasm (23%), serous cystadenoma (16%), and cystic neuroendocrine neoplasm (7%). There was a stepwise increase in the number of resections across time periods (67 between 1978 and 1989; 376 between 2005 and 2011), with a parallel increase in the proportion of incidentally discovered lesions (22% to 50%). Diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was very uncommon in the first 2 time periods (before the first recognition of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm as a distinct entity) but predominated in the last 2 (41% and 49%), and cystic neuroendocrine neoplasms, which constituted 3% of the cystic neoplasms in the first time-period, now comprise more than 8% of pancreatic cystic neoplasms. The proportion of malignant neoplasms decreased over time (41% between 1978 and 1989; 12% between 2005 and 2011), reflecting probably the earlier diagnosis and treatment of premalignant neoplasms. Although operative mortality was minimal (4/849, 0.5%), the postoperative complication rate was 38%. Overall 5-year survival for all mucinous lesions was 87%. Conclusion Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are being diagnosed and treated with increasing frequency. At present, most are incidentally discovered intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. (Surgery 2012;152:S4–12.) PMID:22770958

  14. Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis: a case report of a 33-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Kosmidis, Ilias; Krallis, Panagiotis; Tsiamasfirou, Damiani; Filiopoulos, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis is a type IV hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, presenting early in life. This disorder results from defective neural crest differentiation with loss of the first-order afferent system, which is responsible for sensations of pain and temperature; a neuronal loss in the sympathetic ganglia is also present. A case of a 33-year-old patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis is presented. From the time of birth, he did not sweat and did not respond to painful stimuli, although unexplained bouts of fever were often observed in infancy; an extensive workup during childhood helped establish the diagnosis. Throughout childhood and adulthood, the patient presented multiple infections and fractures in various sites of his body, growth disturbances, and avascular necrosis, and Charcot arthropathies and joint dislocations mainly affected his elbow and hip joint. At the final follow-up, at the age of 33 years, he was found to be obese, with a limited social life. A Charcot elbow restricted the activity of his left upper limb, and the dislocated hips combined with the instability of the ankle joints limited the ambulation distance. A specific treatment protocol has not been established in the literature; the main principles that can be applied in patients with normal intelligence include training programs to prevent self-mutilation and accidental injuries and an early diagnosis and treatment of the infections.

  15. Antitumor effects of ricin A chain immunotoxins prepared from intact antibodies and Fab' fragments on solid human Hodgkin's disease tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Martin, G; Pfreundschuh, M; Amlot, P; Hsu, S M; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1990-05-15

    Three monoclonal antibodies which strongly bind to Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and two corresponding Fab' fragments were linked to deglycosylated ricin A chain (dg A) to evaluate their potential as immunotoxins for the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. Two of the antibodies, Ber-H2 and HRS-3, were shown to bind to the same epitope on the CD30 antigen, whereas the third antibody, IRac, bound to a different antigen. None of the antibodies significantly cross-reacted with normal human tissues as judged by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase analyses on frozen sections from 28 normal tissues. All three antibodies formed potent and specific immunotoxins. They inhibited protein synthesis of the L540 Hodgkin's disease cell line in vitro by 50% at concentrations of 1 x 10(-11) M for IRac.dgA, 9 x 10(-11) M for HRS-3.dgA, and 2 x 10(-10) M for Ber-H2.dgA. HRS-3 Fab' and IRac Fab' immunotoxins were 7.8- and 60-fold less cytotoxic, respectively, than their intact counterparts in vitro. In vivo, a single i.v. injection of a dose of Ber-H2.dgA, HRS-3.dgA, or IRac.dgA corresponding to 40% of the LD50 induced lasting complete remissions in 38, 44, and 50%, respectively, of mice with solid s.c. L540 tumors of 60 to 80 mm3 size (0.5-cm diameter). At equivalent dosage (40% of the LD50), the HRS-3 Fab'.dgA and the IRac Fab'.dgA both induced lasting complete remissions in 25% of the mice, although the HRS-3 Fab'.dgA was significantly superior to IRac Fab'.dgA at retarding tumor growth in the remaining animals. The effectiveness of the immunotoxins depended on the size of the tumor at the time of injection, since IRac.dgA treatment induced complete remissions in 100% of mice with small tumors (10 to 20 mm3, approximately 0.3 cm in diameter) but only 13% of mice with larger tumors of 400 to 600 mm3 (approximately 1 cm in diameter). Tumors which regrew after IRac.dgA treatment mainly consisted of antigen-deficient mutants having reduced sensitivity to IRac.dgA but normal

  16. Bochdalek hernia and repetitive pancreatitis in a 33 year old woman

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Medina Andrade Luis; David, Coot Polanco Reyes; Laura, Medina Andrade; Abraham, Medina Andrade; Stephanie, Serrano Collazos; Grecia, Ortiz Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bochdalek hernia presentation in adulthood is rare. The presentation in newborns is the most common, manifesting with data from respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia, requiring urgent surgical intervention with high morbidity and mortality. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a 33 year old woman admitted in the emergency room with severe abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant and disnea. After physical examination and laboratory test we diagnose mild acute pancreatitis. The patient haven’t colelitiasis by ulstrasound or any risk factor for pancreatitis. Initially she received medical treatment and was discharged after one week. After four weeks she presented the same symptoms in two different occasions, with severe and mild pancreatitis respectively. A computed tomography report a left posterolateral diafragmatic hernia. In spite of the rare association of pancreatitis and Bochdalek hernia, we realized it as the etiology until the second event and planned his surgery. We made a posterolateral torachotomy and diafragmatic plasty with a politetrafluoroetileno mesh and after a 6 months follow up she has coursed asymptomatic. DISCUSSION The high rate of complications in this type of hernia requires us to perform surgical treatment as the hernia is detected. In this case it is prudent medical treatment prior to surgical correction despite this being the origin of the pancreatitis, because the systemic inflammatory response added by the surgical act could result in a higher rate of complications if not performed at the appropriate time. There is no precise rule to determine the type of approach of choice in this type of hernia which thoracotomy or laparotomy may be used. CONCLUSION Bochdalek hernia is a rare find in adults who require treatment immediately after diagnosis because of the high risk of complications. When presented with data from pancreatitis is recommended to complete the medical treatment of pancreatitis before

  17. Macromegakaryocytosis after hydroxyurea. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbe, S.; Phalen, E.

    1982-11-01

    A single injection of hydroxyurea (OHU) produced transient megakaryocytopenia in mice. An increase in the average mean size of mature, stage III megakaryocytes coincided with their depopulation. This was due to a selective reduction in numbers of smaller cells. In contrast, the macromegakaryocytosis of immunothrombocytopenia showed substantial increases in numbers of larger cells and reductions in smaller. Further reduction in numbers of smaller cells occurred when OHU was given to mice with immunothrombocytopenia, and the megakaryocytopenia was somewhat more severe than that produced by OHU in normal mice. OHU produced mild thrombocytopenia in normal mice and compromised recovery of the platelet count from immunothrombocytopenia. The most likely explanation for the increase in mean megakaryocyte size in the hypomegakaryocytic state produced by OHU is that the temporary imbalance between a low rate of influx and a normal rate of maturation produced a shift of the age distribution of the cells due to a deficiency of immature cells.

  18. Characterization of the ars Gene Cluster from Extremely Arsenic-Resistant Microbacterium sp. Strain A33▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Achour-Rokbani, Asma; Cordi, Audrey; Poupin, Pascal; Bauda, Pascale; Billard, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The arsenic resistance gene cluster of Microbacterium sp. A33 contains a novel pair of genes (arsTX) encoding a thioredoxin system that are cotranscribed with an unusual arsRC2 fusion gene, ACR3, and arsC1 in an operon divergent from arsC3. The whole ars gene cluster is required to complement an Escherichia coli ars mutant. ArsRC2 negatively regulates the expression of the pentacistronic operon. ArsC1 and ArsC3 are related to thioredoxin-dependent arsenate reductases; however, ArsC3 lacks the two distal catalytic cysteine residues of this class of enzymes. PMID:19966021

  19. The status of MICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ao; Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well characterised neutrino beams of the Neutrino Factory and for lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam. MICE is being constructed in a series of Steps. The configuration currently in operation at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is optimised for the study the properties of liquid hydrogen and lithium hydride that affect cooling. The results that have recently been submitted for publication will be described along with preliminary results from the MICE study of the effect of liquid hydrogen and lithium hydride on the muon beam. The plans for data taking in the present configuration will be described together with a summary of the status of preparation of the final experimental configuration by which MICE will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling.

  20. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1%(which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  1. Colorful Kindergarten Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobick, Bryna; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Developing kindergarten lessons can be very challenging, especially at the beginning of the school year when many students are just learning to cut paper and hold crayons. The author's favorite beginning unit of the year is "mice paintings," a practical introduction to drawing, color theory, and painting. This unit also incorporates children's…

  2. Status of MICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1% (which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  3. Mice and Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Shively; Thompson, Charles L.

    Observations and experiments with mice, developed and tested at the Pennsylvania Advancement School with underachieving boys in grades seven and eight, are described in this teachers' guide which includes copies of student worksheets for exercises needing them. In addition to lists of materials and procedural suggestions, ideas for guiding…

  4. Formylhydrazine carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Toth, B.

    1978-01-01

    Administration of 0.125% formylhydrazine in drinking water to 6-week-old randomly bred Swiss albino mice for life, induced lung tumours. Compared to untreated controls, the lung-tumour incidence rose from 15 to 94% in the females and from 22 to 100% in the males. The treatment had no detectable tumorigenic effect in other organs. PMID:678435

  5. Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and

  6. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  7. A 33-Year-Old Man with Gynaecomastia and Galactorrhea as the First Symptoms of Graves Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Khoohaphatthanakul, Somdul

    2016-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism has a various number of well-recognized manifestations. Galactorrhea is a rare manifestation in this disease. We describe a 33-year-old man who presented with the symptoms of hyperthyroidism, gynaecomastia, and galactorrhea for 2 months. Physical examination revealed goitre, gynaecomastia, and galactorrhea, bilaterally. Laboratory investigations demonstrated high free thyroxine with suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone level together with elevated anti-TSH receptor; therefore, the diagnosis of Graves' disease was confirmed. Other investigations to elucidate the etiology of galactorrhea were normal, so the galactorrhea was hypothesized to be caused by Graves' disease. The gynaecomastia and galactorrhea resolved with the successful treatment of hyperthyroidism. Although the galactorrhea is extremely rare in thyrotoxicosis male patients, to the best of our knowledge, this is the third case which reported gynaecomastia and galactorrhea in male patient who presented with thyrotoxicosis. PMID:28044109

  8. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  9. Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Leonor I.; Friedman, Lorraine

    1972-01-01

    Virulence and infectivity of nine strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were investigated in groups of mice which were inoculated intranasally or intravenously, and some of each were treated with corticosteroids. Fatal infections were not often seen among untreated mice, but mortality usually occurred when corticosteroids were given, regardless of the route of fungus inoculation. Prior treatment did not uniformly increase the incidence of infection, however; only in the case of intranasally inoculated mice was this effect seen. Most strains appeared to be more virulent when administered intravenously, with the exception of a single strain which, under the influence of corticosteroids, repeatedly displayed greatest virulence when given intranasally. All animals that died early in the course of the disease, irrespective of route of inoculation, always had acute pulmonary lesions and usually no other organ was involved. Animals which died later or were sacrificed always had chronic lung lesions. Whether or not chronically diseased animals had additional organ involvement correlated with how the organisms were administered; intravenously inoculated animals usually had extrapulmonary as well as pulmonary lesions, but lesions of those inoculated intranasally were almost exclusively pulmonary. Corticosteroids did not alter the histologic characteristics of either the acute or the chronic type of lesion, but the lesions of treated animals were usually more extensive. Most of the survivors appeared healthy even when infection was extensive. Images PMID:4637603

  10. Transposon Mutagenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Largaespada, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the functional landscape of the mammalian genome is the next big challenge of biomedical research. The completion of the first phases of the mouse and human genome projects, and expression analyses using microarray hybridization, generate critically important questions about the functional landscape and structure of the mammalian genome: how many genes, and of what type, are there; what kind of functional elements make up a properly functioning gene? One step in this process will be to create mutations in every identifiable mouse gene and analyze the resultant phenotypes. Transposons are being considered as tools to further initiatives to create a comprehensive resource of mutant mouse strains. Also, it may be possible to use transposons in true forward genetic screens in the mouse. The “Sleeping Beauty” (SB) transposon system is one such tool. Moreover, due to its tendency for local hopping, SB has been proposed as a method for regional saturation mutagenesis of the mouse genome. In this chapter, we review the tools and methods currently available to create mutant mice using in vivo, germline transposition in mice. PMID:19266336

  11. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.; Kaplan, D.M.; / /IIT, Chicago

    2008-11-01

    Muon ionization cooling is the only practical method for preparing high-brilliance beams needed for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen with RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a particle identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. Plans for measurements of emittance and cooling are described.

  12. Climate change: consequences on the pollination of grasses in Perugia (Central Italy). A 33-year-long study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Ghitarrini; Emma, Tedeschini; Veronica, Timorato; Giuseppe, Frenguelli

    2017-01-01

    Many works carried out in the last decades have shown that the pollen season for taxa flowering in winter and spring, in temperate regions, has tended to be earlier, probably due to the continuous rise in temperature. The mean annual temperature in Perugia, Central Italy, was about 0.5 °C higher in the last three decades compared with that registered from 1952 to 1981. The increase of temperature took place mainly in winter and spring, while no significant variation was recorded during the summer and autumn. This scenario shows variations in the timing and behavior of flowering of many spontaneous plants such as grasses, whose phenology is strongly influenced by air temperature. This work reports fluctuations in the airborne grass pollen presence in Perugia over a 33-year period (1982-2014), in order to study the influence of the warming registered in recent years on the behavior of pollen release of this taxon. The grass pollen season in Perugia typically lasts from the beginning of May to late July. The start dates showed a marked trend to an earlier beginning of the season (-0.4 day/year), as well as a strong correlation with the average temperatures of March and April. The peak is reached around 30th May, but the annual pollen index (API) is following a decreasing trend. The correlation between starting dates and spring temperatures could be interesting for the constitution of a forecasting model capable of predicting the presence of airborne grass pollen, helping to plan therapies for allergic people.

  13. Climate change: consequences on the pollination of grasses in Perugia (Central Italy). A 33-year-long study.

    PubMed

    Sofia, Ghitarrini; Emma, Tedeschini; Veronica, Timorato; Giuseppe, Frenguelli

    2017-01-01

    Many works carried out in the last decades have shown that the pollen season for taxa flowering in winter and spring, in temperate regions, has tended to be earlier, probably due to the continuous rise in temperature. The mean annual temperature in Perugia, Central Italy, was about 0.5 °C higher in the last three decades compared with that registered from 1952 to 1981. The increase of temperature took place mainly in winter and spring, while no significant variation was recorded during the summer and autumn. This scenario shows variations in the timing and behavior of flowering of many spontaneous plants such as grasses, whose phenology is strongly influenced by air temperature. This work reports fluctuations in the airborne grass pollen presence in Perugia over a 33-year period (1982-2014), in order to study the influence of the warming registered in recent years on the behavior of pollen release of this taxon. The grass pollen season in Perugia typically lasts from the beginning of May to late July. The start dates showed a marked trend to an earlier beginning of the season (-0.4 day/year), as well as a strong correlation with the average temperatures of March and April. The peak is reached around 30th May, but the annual pollen index (API) is following a decreasing trend. The correlation between starting dates and spring temperatures could be interesting for the constitution of a forecasting model capable of predicting the presence of airborne grass pollen, helping to plan therapies for allergic people.

  14. Resilience in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, James L; Stout, Michael B; Sierra, Felipe

    2016-11-01

    Recently discovered interventions that target fundamental aging mechanisms have been shown to increase life span in mice and other species, and in some cases, these same manipulations have been shown to enhance health span and alleviate multiple age-related diseases and conditions. Aging is generally associated with decreases in resilience, the capacity to respond to or recover from clinically relevant stresses such as surgery, infections, or vascular events. We hypothesize that the age-related increase in susceptibility to those diseases and conditions is driven by or associated with the decrease in resilience. Thus, a test for resilience at middle age or even earlier could represent a surrogate approach to test the hypothesis that an intervention delays the process of aging itself. For this, animal models to test resilience accurately and predictably are needed. In addition, interventions that increase resilience might lead to treatments aimed at enhancing recovery following acute illnesses, or preventing poor outcomes from medical interventions in older, prefrail subjects. At a meeting of basic researchers and clinicians engaged in research on mechanisms of aging and care of the elderly, the merits and drawbacks of investigating effects of interventions on resilience in mice were considered. Available and potential stressors for assessing physiological resilience as well as the notion of developing a limited battery of such stressors and how to rank them were discussed. Relevant ranking parameters included value in assessing general health (as opposed to focusing on a single physiological system), ease of use, cost, reproducibility, clinical relevance, and feasibility of being repeated in the same animal longitudinally. During the discussions it became clear that, while this is an important area, very little is known or established. Much more research is needed in the near future to develop appropriate tests of resilience in animal models within an aging context

  15. Leptin pharmacokinetics in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, Robin C; Agnew, Linda L; Smart, Neil A; McFarlane, James R

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of leptin in mammals has not been studied in detail and only one study has examined more than one time point in non-mutant mice and this was in a female mice. This is the first study to describe leptin distribution over a detailed time course in normal male mice. A physiologic dose (12 ng) of radiolabelled leptin was injected into adult male mice via the lateral tail vein and tissues were dissected out and measured for radioactivity over a time course of up to two hours. Major targets were the digestive tract, kidneys, skin and lungs. The brain was not a major target, and 0.15% of the total dose was recovered from the brain 5 min after administration. Major differences appear to exist in the distribution of leptin between the male and female mice, indicating a high degree of sexual dimorphism. Although the half-lives were similar between male and female mice, almost twice the proportion of leptin was recovered from the digestive tract of male mice in comparison to that reported previously for females. This would seem to indicate a major difference in leptin distribution and possibly function between males and females. PMID:27998953

  16. A zinc-binding domain is required for targeting the maternal nuclear protein PwA33 to lampbrush chromosome loops

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In oocytes of the newt Pleurodeles waltl, the maternal nuclear protein PwA33 occurs on the lampbrush chromosomes and in some nucleoplasmic particles of the germinal vesicle. PwA33 is a modular protein and we used site-directed mutagenesis to alter the sequences encoding two metal-binding regions, the C3HC4 (or RING finger) and B-box motifs. Several mutant clones were generated and their synthetic transcripts were injected into Pleurodeles oocytes for in vivo analysis. In the oocyte, all translation products localized in the germinal vesicle. Proteins encoded by RING finger mutant clones were distributed in a pattern identical to that of the wild type protein, but when His266 of the B-box was mutated, PwA33 failed to localize in the lampbrush chromosomes and the nucleoplasmic particles. Using an in vitro colorimetric assay, we demonstrated that PwA33 is a zinc-binding protein and that mutations in the RING finger and B-Box altered its metal-binding properties. The RING finger motif bound two Zn2+ ions and the binding ratios of several mutants were consistent with the tertiary structure recently proposed for this motif. The B-box coordinated one Zn2+ and this binding was inhibited by the His266 mutation. The failure of the His266 mutation to bind zinc and to localize properly within the germinal vesicle suggests that an intact B-box is required for normal functioning of the PwA33 protein in the oocyte. PMID:7593179

  17. The Human SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 Genes of Solute Carrier Family 25 Encode Two Mitochondrial Pyrimidine Nucleotide Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Todisco, Simona; Cirigliano, Angela; Rinaldi, Teresa; Agrimi, Gennaro; Iacobazzi, Vito; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport inorganic anions, amino acids, carboxylates, nucleotides, and coenzymes across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. Here two members of this family, SLC25A33 and SLC25A36, have been thoroughly characterized biochemically. These proteins were overexpressed in bacteria and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Their transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A33 transports uracil, thymine, and cytosine (deoxy)nucleoside di- and triphosphates by an antiport mechanism and SLC25A36 cytosine and uracil (deoxy)nucleoside mono-, di-, and triphosphates by uniport and antiport. Both carriers also transported guanine but not adenine (deoxy)nucleotides. Transport catalyzed by both carriers was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. In confirmation of their identity (i) SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 were found to be targeted to mitochondria and (ii) the phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking RIM2, the gene encoding the well characterized yeast mitochondrial pyrimidine nucleotide carrier, were overcome by expressing SLC25A33 or SLC25A36 in these cells. The main physiological role of SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 is to import/export pyrimidine nucleotides into and from mitochondria, i.e. to accomplish transport steps essential for mitochondrial DNA and RNA synthesis and breakdown. PMID:25320081

  18. Experimental cryptosporidiosis in laboratory mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, D; Angus, K W; Snodgrass, D R; Tzipori, S

    1982-01-01

    Eight strains of laboratory mice were susceptible to subclinical infections with Cryptosporidium sp. at 1 to 4 days of age, but only a transient infection could be established at 21 days of age or older. Immunosuppression of 21-day-old mice failed to render them more susceptible to infection. Laboratory storage conditions for Cryptosporidium sp. were investigated by titration in 1- to 4-day-old mice. Storage by freezing with a variety of cryoprotectants was unsuccessful, but storage at 4 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline or 2.5% potassium dichromate was possible for 4 to 6 months. PMID:7141705

  19. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  20. Assessing hoarding in mice.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J

    2006-01-01

    Hoarding is a species-typical behavior shown by rodents, as well as other animals. By hoarding, the rodent secures a food supply for times of emergency (for example, when threatened by a predator) or for times of seasonal adversity such as winter. Scatter hoarding, as seen typically in squirrels and birds, involves placing small caches of food in hidden places, generally underground. Most rodents, however, hoard a supply of food in or near the home base--for example, in 'larders' near the sleeping quarters in a burrow. In the laboratory, measurement of hoarding involves simply weighing the food transported into the home cage from an external source, but the route to that source must be secure and animal-proof; for example, there should be no holes large enough to permit escape of a mouse, and no weak points that could be enlarged by gnawing. A suitable and easily constructed apparatus is described in the protocol. Hoarding has been shown to be sensitive to brain lesions and pharmacological agents, and is a suitable test for species-typical behavior in genetically modified mice.

  1. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-06

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  2. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  3. Owls and larks in mice.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Martina; Wicht, Helmut; von Gall, Charlotte; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl) has been shown to be associated with several health risks. A number of studies show that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior, which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork, and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration.

  4. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  5. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  6. The MICE Run Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, or a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The new MICE Run Control has been developed to ensure proper sequencing of equipment and use of system resources to protect data quality. A description of this system, its implementation, and performance during recent muon beam data collection will be discussed.

  7. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Tanja X.; McCormick, Sally P.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Bro, Susanne; Nielsen, Lars B.

    2010-01-01

    Uremic patients have increased plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) is a subfraction of LDL, where apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is disulfide bound to apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Lp(a) binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), and uremia increases lipoprotein-associated OxPL. Thus, Lp(a) may be particularly atherogenic in a uremic setting. We therefore investigated whether transgenic (Tg) expression of human Lp(a) increases atherosclerosis in uremic mice. Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in Tg mice with expression of human apo(a) (n = 19), human apoB-100 (n = 20), or human apo(a) + human apoB [Lp(a)] (n = 15), and in wild-type (WT) controls (n = 21). The uremic mice received a high-fat diet, and aortic atherosclerosis was examined 35 weeks later. LDL-cholesterol was increased in apoB-Tg and Lp(a)-Tg mice, but it was normal in apo(a)-Tg and WT mice. Uremia did not result in increased plasma apo(a) or Lp(a). Mean atherosclerotic plaque area in the aortic root was increased 1.8-fold in apo(a)-Tg (P = 0.025) and 3.3-fold (P = 0.0001) in Lp(a)-Tg mice compared with WT mice. Plasma OxPL, as detected with the E06 antibody, was associated with both apo(a) and Lp(a). In conclusion, expression of apo(a) or Lp(a) increased uremia-induced atherosclerosis. Binding of OxPL on apo(a) and Lp(a) may contribute to the atherogenicity of Lp(a) in uremia. PMID:20584868

  8. Practical pathology of aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M.

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  9. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. The basic protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured to a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running. PMID:26629772

  10. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  11. Immature mice are more susceptible than adult mice to acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury. The aim of the present study was to analyze the difference of susceptibility between immature and adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. Weanling immature and adult mice were injected with APAP (300 mg/kg). As expected, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. APAP-evoked hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation was stronger in immature mice than in adult mice. Hepatic receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 was obviously activated at APAP-exposed immature and adult mice. Interestingly, hepatic RIP3 activation was more obvious in APAP-treated immature mice than adult mice. Although there was no difference on hepatic GSH metabolic enzymes between immature and adult mice, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion. Of interest, immature mice expressed a much higher level of hepatic Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a11 mRNAs than adult mice. Correspondingly, immature mice expressed a higher level of hepatic CYP2E1, the key drug metabolic enzyme that metabolized APAP into the reactive metabolite NAPQI. These results suggest that a higher level of hepatic drug metabolic enzymes in immature mice than adult mice might contribute to the difference of susceptibility to APAP-induced acute liver injury. PMID:28205631

  12. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 (historical) Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice Altering a key protein involved in the development ... pigmentation loss associated with the skin disorder in mice, according to recent research funded by the NIH’s ...

  13. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  14. Humanized mice and tissue transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Laurie L; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular pathways that control immune responses, particularly immunomodulatory molecules that control the extent and duration of an immune response, have led to new approaches in the field of transplantation immunology to induce allograft survival. These molecular pathways are being defined precisely in murine models, and are now being translated into clinical practice. However, many of the newly available drugs are human-specific reagents and furthermore, there exist many species-specific differences between mouse and human immune systems. Recent advances in the development of humanized mice, i.e., immunodeficient mice engrafted with functional human immune systems, have led to the availability of a small animal model for the study of human immune responses. Humanized mice represent an important pre-clinical model system for evaluation of new drugs as well as identification of the mechanisms underlying human allograft rejection without putting patients at risk. This review highlights recent advances in the development of humanized mice and their use as pre-clinical models for the study of human allograft responses. PMID:26588186

  15. HZE Radiation Leukemogenesis in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanlin

    Radiation exposure is a risk factor for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The Leukemogenesis NSCOR was developed to compare this risk for low LET vs HZE radiations as a means to better assess the leukemia risk to astronauts posed by space radiation. Individual projects within the NSCOR explore HZE radiation leukemogenesis in murine model systems and extend the findings to AML in humans. AML sensitive CBA/CaJ mice have been irradiated with 1 GeV 56 Fe particles at NSRL and with 137 Cs gamma-rays at Colorado State University and followed to 800 days of age for the development of AML. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses of HZE- and gamma-induced AML, including assays for chromosomal aberrations, PU.1 deletion, gene expression, array CGH and microsatellite instability are ongoing. Preliminary data indicate that 56 Fe particles are no more effective in inducing AML or shortening lifespan than gamma-rays. Studies designed to address the individual molecular steps in leukemogenesis and determine the effects of radiation and genetic background on each step have been initiated using knockout mice. Deletion of the PU.1 gene on mouse chromosome 2 is a critical step in this murine model of radiation leukemogenesis. Two of the three HZE-induced AMLs that could be assayed and thirteen of fourteen γ-induced AMLs had PU.1 loss as determined by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH). We have found that AML sensitive CBA/CaJ mice have a higher incidence of Chr. 2 deletion in bone marrow cells following 56 Fe irradiation than AML resistant C57BL/6 mice. This study is being extended to proton irradiated mice. Our preliminary results indicate that microsatellite instability may be common in HZE irradiated progenitor cells. To determine if these cytogenetic changes can be induced in human myeloid progenitor cells by gamma, proton or HZE irradiation we are generating NOD/SCID mice that have been "humanized" by being transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells. We are currently

  16. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-08-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  17. What Art Three Blind Mice Up To?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace, Suze

    1998-01-01

    Offers an integrated art lesson in which kindergarten students drew a picture in response to the "Three Blind Mice" using geometric shapes for the mice. Summarizes the technique used to create the mice and focuses on mixing colors to introduce tints and shading to the students. (CMK)

  18. [Model of meningococcal sepsis in mice].

    PubMed

    Krasnoproshina, L I; Ermakova, L G; Belova, T N; Filippov, Iu V; Efimov, D D

    1978-11-01

    The authors studied a possibility of obtaining experimental meningococcus sepsis model on mice. The use of cyclophosphane, iron compounds, yolk medium produced no significant organism. When 4--5% mucine was injected intraperitoneally together with meningococcus culture mice died with sepsis phenomena. Differences were revealed in the sensitivity of linear and mongrel mice to meningococcus infection--AKR mice proved to be more sensitive. At the same time it was found that mongrel mice weighing from 10 to 12 g could be used to induce meningococcus sepsis.

  19. Socially induced morphine pseudosensitization in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Stephen R; Hofford, Rebecca S; Roberts, Kris W; Wellman, Paul J; Eitan, Shoshana

    2010-03-01

    Given that social influences are among the strongest predictors of adolescents' drug use, this study examined the effect of social interaction on morphine-induced hyperlocomotion in both adolescent and adult mice. Three experimental groups of adolescent and adult male mice were examined (i) morphine-treated mice (twice daily, 10-40 mg/kg, subcutaneous), (ii) saline-injected mice housed together with the morphine-treated mice ('saline cage-mates'), and (iii) saline-injected mice housed physically and visually separated from the morphine-treated mice ('saline alone'). After the treatment period, mice were tested individually for their locomotor response to 10 mg/kg morphine (subcutaneous). Adolescent saline cage-mates, though administered morphine for the very first time, exhibited an enhanced hyperlocomotion response similar to the locomotor sensitization response exhibited by the morphine-treated mice. This was not observed in adults. In adults, there were no significant differences in morphine-induced hyperlocomotion between saline alone and saline cage-mates. As expected, morphine-treated adults and adolescents both exhibited locomotor sensitization. These results show a vulnerability to social influences in adolescent mice, which does not exist in adult mice.

  20. Progress of MICE RFCC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Green, M.; Li, N.; Niinikoski, T.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Bross, A.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Sylvester, C.; Chen, A. B.; Guo, Bin; Li, Liyi; Xu, Fengyu; Cao, Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, Li; Yin, Lixin; Luo, Tianhuan; Summers, Don; Smith, B.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-20

    Recent progress on the design and fabrication of the RFCC (RF and superconducting Coupling Coil) module for the international MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) are reported. The MICE ionization cooling channel has two RFCC modules, each having four 201- MHz normal conducting RF cavities surrounded by one superconducting coupling coil (solenoid) magnet. The magnet is designed to be cooled by three cryocoolers. Fabrication of the RF cavities is complete; preparation for the cavity electro-polishing, low power RF measurements, and tuning are in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Fabrication of the cold mass of the first coupling coil magnet has been completed in China and the cold mass arrived at LBNL in late 2011. Preparations for testing the cold mass are currently under way at Fermilab. Plans for the RFCC module assembly and integration are being developed and are described.

  1. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss; Wiese, Maria; Lundsager, Mia; Buschard, Karsten Stig; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice. PMID:26783537

  2. Idiotypic manipulation in mice: BALB/c mice can express the crossreactive idiotype of A/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M; Leo, O; Hiernaux, J; Urbain, J

    1983-01-01

    The response of A/J mice to arsonate-coupled keyhole limpet hemocyanin is characterized by a crossreactive idiotype (CRIA). CRIA+ antibodies are restricted to the Igh-Ic haplotype and are never expressed in BALB/c mice after immunization with antigen. Studies at the DNA level suggest that the gene encoding the CRIA heavy chain in A/J mice is probably absent in the genome of BALB/c mice. Despite this, using the immunization cascade tool, we have been able to induce the expression of CRIA+ antibodies in BALB/c mice. These studies led to an apparent paradox, whose understanding will provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of the immune system. We suggest that clones secreting CRIA-like Igs in BALB/c mice are "somatic variants" that could arise from gene conversion events. PMID:6576348

  3. Adoptive transfer of experimental autoimmune hepatitis in mice: cellular interaction between donor and recipient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, M.; Mori, Y.; Mori, T.; Ueda, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kato, I.; Iesato, K.; Wakashin, Y.; Azemoto, R.; Wakashin, M.; Okuda, K.; Ohto, M.

    1988-01-01

    This report extends our previous study on experimental autoimmune hepatitis in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Cellular immunity involved in the induction of liver injury in this model was studied by transfer of primed spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice to syngeneic normal recipient mice. The most prominent liver damage in recipient B6 mice was induced by transfer of nylon wool adherent spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice, and T cells in this fraction were the essential requirement for the liver damage in the recipient mice. Nylon wool adherent spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice after depletion of the suppressor T-cell function by low-dose (300 rad) irradiation induced more severe liver injury compared to the same cells without irradiation. When the recipient mice were depleted of lymphocytes by low or high dose (700 rad) whole body irradiation, transfer of primed spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice did not induce liver lesion in the lymphocyte-depleted mice. This low susceptibility of lymphocyte-depleted recipient mice to primed spleen cells of hepatitis mice was no longer demonstrated after reconstitution with normal spleen cells. In a cell-migration study using 51Cr-labelled spleen cells, it was shown that a considerable number of infiltrating cells in the liver of recipient mice were derived from recipient mice themselves. These results seem to indicate that cell-to-cell interaction between radiosensitive precursor cells of recipient mice and liver-antigen-primed T cells from hepatitis donor mice play an essential role in the induction of liver injury in the recipient mice. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:3052945

  4. Identificaiton of Novel Immunogenic Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7-Specific Epitopes Restricted to HLA-A*33;03 for Cervical Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunghoon; Chung, Hye Won; Kong, Hoon Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To identify new immunogenic HLA-A*33;03-restricted epitopes from the human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E7 protein for immunotherapy against cervical cancer. Materials and Methods We synthesized fourteen overlapping 15-amino acid peptides and measured intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in PBMC and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) after sensitization with these peptides using flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. The immunogenicity of epitopes was verified using a 51Cr release assay with SNU1299 cells. Results Among the fourteen 15-amino acid peptides, E749-63 (RAHYNIVTFCCKCDS) demonstrated the highest IFN-γ production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and CD8+ CTLs sensitized with E749-63 showed higher cytotoxic effect against SNU1299 cells than did CD8+ CTLs sensitized with other peptides or a negative control group. Thirteen 9- or 10-amino acid overlapping peptides spanning E749-63, E750-59 (AHYNIVTFCC), and E752-61 (YNIVTFCCKC) induced significantly higher IFN-γ production and cytotoxic effects against SNU1299 cells than the other peptides and negative controls, and the cytotoxicity of E750-59- and E752-61-sensitized PBMCs was induced via the cytolytic effect of CD8+ CTLs. Conclusion We identified E750-59 and E752-61 as novel HPV 16 E7 epitopes for HLA-A*33;03. CD8+ CTL sensitized with these peptides result in an antitumor effect against cervical cancer cells. These epitopes could be useful for immune monitoring and immunotherapy for cervical cancer and HPV 16-related diseases including anal cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:27873494

  5. Kanamycin ototoxicity in glutamate transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Hakuba, Nobuhiro; Hyodo, Jun; Taniguchi, Masafumi; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2005-06-03

    Glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST), a powerful glutamate uptake system, removes released glutamate from the synaptic cleft and facilitates the re-use of glutamate as a neurotransmitter recycling system. Aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss is mediated via a glutamate excitotoxic process. We investigated the effect of aminoglycoside ototoxicity in GLAST knockout mice using the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR) and number of hair cells in the cochlea. Kanamycin (100 mg/mL) was injected directly into the posterior semicircular canal of mice. Before the kanamycin treatment, there was no difference in the ABR threshold average between the wild-type and knockout mice. Kanamycin injection aggravated the ABR threshold in the GLAST knockout mice compared with the wild-type mice, and the IHC degeneration was more severe in the GLAST knockout mice. These findings suggest that GLAST plays an important role in preventing the degeneration of inner hair cells in aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

  6. Carcinogenicity of Embedded Tungsten Alloys in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    out a two-year protocol in mice based upon NTP guidelines. The uses the B6C3F1 hybrid mouse , a strain commonly used in carcinogenicity and toxicity...the same percentages present in the alloys). Aim 2: Sacrifice mice at various times after alloy implantation to detect early signs of tumor...Alloys in Mice PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David E. McClain, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the

  7. The Mice in Council: An Acquisition Fable

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    53 Defense AT&L: January–February 2012 The Mice in Council An Acquisition Fable Edward Todd Urbansky, Ph.D. Urbansky is the senior Air Force ...write stories for his three daughters and sometimes for his coworkers. Throughout the day, the field mice went about their lives under constant threat...from the cat who patrolled their grounds and disrupted their ac-tivities. In frustration, the field mice called for a council, to determine the best

  8. Of mice and microflora: considerations for genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Treuting, P M; Clifford, C B; Sellers, R S; Brayton, C F

    2012-01-01

    The phenotype of genetically engineered mice is a combination of both genetic and environmental factors that include the microflora of the mouse. The impact a particular microbe has on a mouse reflects the host-microbe interaction within the context of the mouse genotype and environment. Although often considered a confounding variable, many host-microbe interactions have resulted in the generation of novel model systems and characterization of new microbial agents. Microbes associated with overt disease in mice have been the historical focus of the laboratory animal medical and pathology community and literature. The advent of genetic engineering and the complex of mouse models have revealed previously unknown or disregarded agents that now oblige the attention of the biomedical research community. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate how phenotypes can be affected by microflora by focusing on the infectious diseases present in genetically engineered mouse (GEM) colonies of our collective institutions and by reviewing important agents that are rarely seen in most research facilities today. The goal is to introduce the concept of the role of microflora on phenotypes and in translational research using GEM models.

  9. The Gut Microbiota of Wild Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, Laura; Abolins, Stephen; Lenzi, Luca; Bourne, Christian; Riley, Eleanor M.; Viney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota profoundly affects the biology of its host. The composition of the microbiota is dynamic and is affected by both host genetic and many environmental effects. The gut microbiota of laboratory mice has been studied extensively, which has uncovered many of the effects that the microbiota can have. This work has also shown that the environments of different research institutions can affect the mouse microbiota. There has been relatively limited study of the microbiota of wild mice, but this has shown that it typically differs from that of laboratory mice (and that maintaining wild caught mice in the laboratory can quite quickly alter the microbiota). There is also inter-individual variation in the microbiota of wild mice, with this principally explained by geographical location. In this study we have characterised the gut (both the caecum and rectum) microbiota of wild caught Mus musculus domesticus at three UK sites and have investigated how the microbiota varies depending on host location and host characteristics. We find that the microbiota of these mice are generally consistent with those described from other wild mice. The rectal and caecal microbiotas of individual mice are generally more similar to each other, than they are to the microbiota of other individuals. We found significant differences in the diversity of the microbiotas among mice from different sample sites. There were significant correlations of microbiota diversity and body weight, a measure of age, body-mass index, serum concentration of leptin, and virus, nematode and mite infection. PMID:26258484

  10. Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone Differentially Improve Cognition in Aged Female Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benice, Ted S.; Raber, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Compared with age-matched male mice, female mice experience a more severe age-related cognitive decline (ACD). Since androgens are less abundant in aged female mice compared with aged male mice, androgen supplementation may enhance cognition in aged female mice. To test this, we assessed behavioral performance on a variety of tasks in 22- to…

  11. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  12. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of 24 hr, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the "central pacemaker" of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hr as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark or "free-running" conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free-running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their homecage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are presented here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free-running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (e.g., jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-24-hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of environmental surroundings.

  13. Teratogenicity of asbestos in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Tomoko; Hojo, Motoki; Inomata, Akiko; Ogata, Akio; Hirose, Akihiko; Nishimura, Tetsuji; Nakae, Dai

    2014-04-01

    Possible teratogenicity of 3 different asbestos (crocidolite, chrysotile and amosite) was assessed in CD1(ICR) mice. Dams on day 9 of gestation were given a single intraperitoneal administration at dose of 40 mg/kg body weight of asbestos suspended in 2% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose solution in phosphate buffered saline, while dams in the control group were given vehicle (10 ml/kg body weight). Dams and fetuses were examined on day 18 of gestation. To compare with the control group, the mean percentage of live fetuses in implantations in the group given crocidolite and the incidence of dams with early dead fetuses in the groups given chrysotile or amosite were increased. While no external or skeletal malformation was observed in the control group, the incidence of external malformation (mainly reduction deformity of limb) in the group given amosite, and the incidences of skeletal malformation (mainly fusion of vertebrae) in the all dosed groups were significantly increased. The result indicated that asbestos (crocidolite, chrysotile and amosite) have fetotoxicity and teratogenicity in mice.

  14. A protein-based smallpox vaccine protects mice from vaccinia and ectromelia virus challenges when given as a prime and single boost.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Aldaz-Carroll, Lydia; Ortiz, Alexandra M; Whitbeck, J Charles; Alexander, Edward; Lou, Huan; Davis, Heather L; Braciale, Thomas J; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Isaacs, Stuart N

    2007-01-26

    The heightened concern about the intentional release of variola virus has led to the need to develop safer smallpox vaccines. While subunit vaccine strategies are safer than live virus vaccines, subunit vaccines have been hampered by the need for multiple boosts to confer optimal protection. Here we developed a protein-based subunit vaccine strategy that provides rapid protection in mouse models of orthopoxvirus infections after a prime and single boost. Mice vaccinated with vaccinia virus envelope proteins from the mature virus (MV) and extracellular virus (EV) adjuvanted with CpG ODN and alum were protected from lethal intranasal challenge with vaccinia virus and the mouse-specific ectromelia virus. Organs from mice vaccinated with three proteins (A33, B5 and L1) and then sacrificed after challenge contained significantly lower titers of virus when compared to control groups of mice that were not vaccinated or that received sub-optimal formulations of the vaccine. Sera from groups of mice obtained prior to challenge had neutralizing activity against the MV and also inhibited comet formation indicating anti-EV activity. Long-term partial protection was also seen in mice challenged with vaccinia virus 6 months after initial vaccinations. Thus, this work represents a step toward the development of a practical subunit smallpox vaccine.

  15. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  16. Abnormal osmotic regulation in trpv4-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, Wolfgang; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    Osmotic homeostasis is one of the most aggressively defended physiological parameters in vertebrates. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying osmotic regulation are poorly understood. The transient receptor potential channel, vanilloid subfamily (TRPV4), is an osmotically activated ion channel that is expressed in circumventricular organs in the mammalian CNS, which is an important site of osmotic sensing. We have generated trpv4-null mice and observed abnormalities of their osmotic regulation. trpv4-/- mice drank less water and became more hyperosmolar than did wild-type littermates, a finding that was seen with and without administration of hypertonic saline. In addition, plasma levels of antidiuretic hormone were significantly lower in trpv4-/- mice than in wild-type littermates after a hyperosmotic challenge. Continuous s.c. infusion of the antidiuretic hormone analogue, dDAVP, resulted in systemic hypotonicity in trpv4-/- mice, despite the fact that their renal water reabsorption capacity was normal. Thus, the response to both hyper- and hypoosmolar stimuli is impaired in trpv4-/- mice. After a hyperosmolar challenge, there was markedly reduced expression of c-FOS in the circumventricular organ, the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, of trpv4-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. This finding suggests that there is an impairment of osmotic sensing in the CNS of trpv4-/- mice. These data indicate that TRPV4 is necessary for the normal response to changes in osmotic pressure and functions as an osmotic sensor in the CNS. PMID:14581612

  17. Adult neurogenesis in serotonin transporter deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, A; Benninghoff, J; Moessner, R; Rizzi, M; Paizanis, E; Doenitz, C; Gross, S; Hermann, M; Gritti, A; Lanfumey, L; Fritzen, S; Reif, A; Hamon, M; Murphy, D L; Vescovi, A; Lesch, K-P

    2007-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a regulator of morphogenetic activities during early brain development and neurogenesis, including cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis. The 5-HT transporter (5-HTT, SLC6A4) mediates high-affinity reuptake of 5-HT into presynaptic terminals and thereby fine-tunes serotonergic neurotransmission. Inactivation of the 5-HTT gene in mice reduces 5-HT clearance resulting in persistently increased concentrations of synaptic 5-HT. In the present study, we investigated the effects of elevated 5-HT levels on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus of 5-HTT deficient mice, including stem cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Using an in vivo approach, we showed an increase in proliferative capacity of hippocampal adult neural stem cells in aged 5-HTT knockout mice (approximately 14.5 months) compared to wildtype controls. In contrast, in vivo and additional in vitro analyses of younger adult 5-HTT knockout mice (approximately 7 weeks and approximately 3.0 months) did not reveal significant changes in proliferation of neural stem cells or survival of newborn cells. We showed that the cellular fate of newly generated cells in 5-HTT knockout mice is not different with respect to the total number and percentage of neurons or glial cells from wildtype controls. Our findings indicate that elevated synaptic 5-HT concentration throughout early development and later life of 5-HTT deficient mice does not induce adult neurogenesis in adult mice, but that elevated 5-HT levels in aged mice influence stem cell proliferation.

  18. Video-oculography in mice.

    PubMed

    de Jeu, Marcel; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2012-07-19

    performance as well as plasticity of the oculomotor system can be tested, allowing research on learning and memory processes. Genetically modified mice are nowadays widely available and they form an important source for the exploration of brain functions at various levels. In addition, they can be used as models to mimic human diseases. Applying oculography on normal, pharmacologically-treated or genetically modified mice is a powerful research tool to explore the underlying physiology of motor behaviors under normal and pathological conditions. Here, we describe how to measure video-oculography in mice.

  19. Video-oculography in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Jeu, Marcel; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2012-01-01

    performance as well as plasticity of the oculomotor system can be tested, allowing research on learning and memory processes9. Genetically modified mice are nowadays widely available and they form an important source for the exploration of brain functions at various levels10. In addition, they can be used as models to mimic human diseases. Applying oculography on normal, pharmacologically-treated or genetically modified mice is a powerful research tool to explore the underlying physiology of motor behaviors under normal and pathological conditions. Here, we describe how to measure video-oculography in mice8. PMID:22847328

  20. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J. -B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  1. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  2. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  3. Transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ and mtDNA mutator mice, but not aged mice, share the same spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Hikari; Suzuki, Michiko; Morishima, Hitomi; Ota, Azusa; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Maeno, Akiteru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-24

    The spectra of phenotypes associated with aging and mitochondrial diseases sometimes appear to overlap with each other. We used aged mice and a mouse model of mitochondrial diseases (transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ with deleted mtDNA) to study whether premature aging phenotypes observed in mtDNA mutator mice are associated with aging or mitochondrial diseases. Here, we provide convincing evidence that all the mice examined had musculoskeletal disorders of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy, which correspond to phenotypes prevalently observed in the elderly. However, precise investigation of musculoskeletal disorders revealed that the spectra of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice were very close to those in mito-miceΔ, but different from those of aged mice. Therefore, mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, but not aged mice, share the spectra of musculoskeletal disorders.

  4. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  5. Experimental anisakid infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Vericimo, M A; Figueiredo, I; Teixeira, G A P B; Clemente, S C São

    2015-09-01

    Anisakidosis is a human parasitic disease caused by infections with members of the Anisakidae family. Accidental infection after fish intake affects the gastrointestinal tract as a consequence of mechanical damage caused by migrating larvae. Infections can also trigger allergies, hives, severe asthma or anaphylaxis with angioedema. Although mouse models of intraperitoneal antigenic stimulation exist, enabling immunological studies, few models using gastric introduction of live larvae are available for the study of immunological and gastrointestinal damage in mice. This study was designed to characterize serum reactivity against Anisakis spp. and Contracaecum spp. in Balb/c mice following orogastric inoculation and to assess gastrointestinal damage. These anisakid species were classified at the Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF) School of Veterinary Medicine and materials for live larval inoculation were developed at the UFF Immunobiology laboratory. Live larvae were inoculated following injection with a NaCl solution. Blood samples were collected and sera screened for immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG anti-larva responses to both nematodes, specific for somatic and excretory/secretory antigens, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The means of the optical densities were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's post-hoc test and the general linear model. This analysis identified the presence of anti-IgG seroreactivity to both somatic and excretory/secretory Anisakis antigens in inoculated animals compared with controls (P< 0.001), and no gastric or intestinal damage was observed. These experiments demonstrated that introduction of live Contracaecum spp. into the gastrointestinal tract did not elicit serum sensitization in animals.

  6. Hearing Dysfunction in Xpa-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shinomiya, Hitomi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Fujita, Takeshi; Nakano, Eiji; Inokuchi, Go; Hasegawa, Shingo; Otsuki, Naoki; Nishigori, Chikako; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare recessive heredity disease caused by DNA repair impairment characterized by photosensitivity and neurologic symptoms in half of the cases. There are eight subtypes of XP: XP-A–XP-G and XP variant. Among eight subtypes, XP complementation group A (XP-A) display the lowest DNA repair ability and the severest cutaneous and neurologic symptoms. While its pathogenesis of skin symptoms have been well-studied, that of neurological symptoms, including sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) remains unknown. Basic studies have suggested that SNHL may be caused by inner ear damage, including damage to the spiral ganglion neurons and organ of Corti, and that the XP-A is associated with most severe form of SNHL in humans. Here, we report the occurrence of SNHL in Xpa-deficient mice. Xpa-deficient mice and wild-type mice underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response, and the results revealed that Xpa-deficient mice exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.01) ABR thresholds at 4, 8, and 16 kHz than the wild-type mice. Furthermore, the number of spiral ganglion neurons was reduced in Xpa-deficient mice compared with that in wild-type mice, indicating that hearing loss may be related to spiral ganglion neuron deficiency, consistent with the few reports published in human patients with XP. These results provide important insights into the pathogenesis of SNHL in patients with XP-A. PMID:28239347

  7. Critical periods for behavioral anomalies in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, P M

    1976-01-01

    While mice have been used less frequently than rats in behavioral research, there use has some advantages in teratological studies. The development of the mouse CNS has been investigated more extensively than that of the rat. Since time of insult has been found to be an important factor in effects on both anatomy and behavior, data on the sequence of events in CNS development are valuable in planning and interpreting behavioral assessments of potential teratogens. A comparison of studies in mice and rats suggests that behavioral effects of teratogens are similar in the two species and demonstrates that mice can be used successfully in a variety of behavioral evaluations. PMID:71232

  8. Interactive effects between trichloroethylene and pesticides at metabolic and genetic level in mice.

    PubMed

    Hrelia, P; Maffei, F; Vigagni, F; Fimognari, C; Flori, P; Stanzani, R; Cantelli Forti, G

    1994-11-01

    A combined cytogeneticurine metabolite analysis approach was used to assess potential interactive effects between Fenarimol (FN), a fungicide, and trichloroethylene (TRI), a halogenated solvent. FN was demonstrated to selectively induce P450-2B1 isoforms in different organs of treated mice. Since the rate of metabolism and the stereospecificity of metabolism are dependent on the types and amount of P450s available, FN might drastically alter the metabolic activation of a precarcinogen, such as TRI, and its toxicological consequences. Male CD1 mice were divided into untreated, vehicle control, and experimental groups. Animals of the latter groups were treated ip with 150 mg/kg bw FN in corn oil, 457 mg/kg bw TRI in corn oil, TRI plus FN separated by different time intervals. Bone marrow cells were harvested for determination of micronuclei (MN) frequencies in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE). The presence of the known metabolite of TRI, trichloroethanol (TCE), was quantitated in collected urine by gas chromatography using an electron-capture detector. Linear regression analysis shows that MN frequency by TRI is correlated with TCE concentration in urine. Observed potentiation of genotoxicity of TRI by FN pretreatment (1 hr before TRI treatment) apparently reflects changes in the spectra of enzymes involved in TRI metabolism, and altered toxicokinetic, as witnessed by the 20% difference in TCE excretion from combined treated mice. However, no increased genetic or metabolic effects were observed when FN was administered 3 hr before TRI. No significant interactive effects were observed at a genetic level when FN was administered 1 hr and 3 hr after TRI whereas a 33 to 47% loss in TCE excretion was recorded.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Recovery of immunological responsiveness in thymectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Dukor, P.; Dietrich, F. M.; Rosenthal, M.

    1966-01-01

    After a limited period of immunological unresponsiveness, neonatally thymectomized colony-bred Swiss mice were found to recover their ability to form haemagglutinins and haemolysins as well as their antibody-plaque-forming capacity following injection of sheep erythrocytes. No such spontaneous reconstitution was observed in F1-hybrids of highly inbred CBA and CBA-T6T6 mice. Adult thymectomized and irradiated Swiss mice similarly regained their ability to form haemolysins and haemagglutinins, but no regeneration of antibody-plaque production occurred in these mice during the period of observation. No regular correlation was found between the degree of immunological deficiency on the one hand and the level of circulating lymphocytes or the histological appearance of the spleens on the other, following neonatal thymectomy or adult thymectomy and irradiation. The possible mechanism of recovery from immunological impairment after thymectomy and the apparent discrepancies between overall haemolysin production and haemolytic plaque production in the spleen are discussed. PMID:5969684

  10. Social transfer of pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Monique L.; Hostetler, Caroline M.; Heinricher, Mary M.; Ryabinin, Andrey E.

    2016-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between the psychosocial environment and the perception and experience of pain, and the mechanisms of the social communication of pain have yet to be elucidated. The present study examined the social communication of pain and demonstrates that “bystander” mice housed and tested in the same room as mice subjected to inflammatory pain or withdrawal from morphine or alcohol develop corresponding hyperalgesia. Olfactory cues mediate the transfer of hyperalgesia to the bystander mice, which can be measured using mechanical, thermal, and chemical tests. Hyperalgesia in bystanders does not co-occur with anxiety or changes in corticosterone and cannot be explained by visually dependent emotional contagion or stress-induced hyperalgesia. These experiments reveal the multifaceted relationship between the social environment and pain behavior and support the use of mice as a model system for investigating these factors. In addition, these experiments highlight the need for proper consideration of how experimental animals are housed and tested. PMID:27774512

  11. Intranasal immunization of mice against Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R H; Babiuk, L A; Stockdale, P H

    1981-01-01

    A potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) extract of Pasteurella multocida serotype III:A was shown to protect mice from an intranasal challenge with up to 300 50% lethal doses of P. multocida. In addition to preventing death, bacteria were rapidly cleared from the lungs of immunized mice so that by 72 to 96 h postchallenge no bacteria were present in the lungs of immunized mice, whereas up to 10(9) bacteria were present in lungs of nonimmunized mice. Immunization by the intranasal route was slightly better than that by the intramuscular route. Protection was considered specific, since immunization with P. multocida protected only against P. multocida and not against Salmonella agona. Furthermore, a similar KSCN extract from P. haemolytica did not protect against P. multocida challenge. A comparison of the KSCN extract with a Formalin-killed bacterin suggested that the KSCN extract may be superior to the bacterin. PMID:7216441

  12. Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163733.html Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice Study authors unsure ... 22, 2017 WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus can be sexually transmitted through semen, and ...

  13. Electroencephalographic changes with age in male mice.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, B E; Zolovick, A J; Elias, M F

    1975-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) changes, as measured by the awake state, slow-wave sleep (SWS), rapid-eye movement (REM) patterns and ratio of REM/total sleep, were recorded in aging male mice of DBA/2J and C57BL/6J strains. Results indicate that there is a significant increase in the awake state accompanied by significant decrease in SWS with advancing age for both strains, although these changes appear more pronounced in DBA/2J mice than C57BL/6J mice. Of considerable significance is the finding that REM sleep is absent in mice of DBA/2J strain at 23.5 months of age. Based on these findings, the conclusion was reached that strain DBA/2J ages significantly faster than C57BL/6J. The difference in aging between the two strains emphasizes the need for additional studies dealing with genetic aspects of aging.

  14. Deoxyspergualin is a new radioprotector in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Kyuichi; Horiuchi, Kazuyuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    1995-02-01

    A novel immunosuppressant, deoxyspergualin, given at doses of 2.5 to 20 mg/kg/day on days -3, -2 and -1 before X irradiation protected BALB/c mice from the lethal effects of radiation in a dose-dependent manner. The dose of radiation that killed 50% of the mice within 30 days was 5.63 Gy for mice receiving radiation alone, but was 7.13 Gy in the mice given deoxyspergualin at 20 mg/kg. Prior administration of deoxyspergualin ameliorated leukopenia and thrombocytopenia induced by sublethal irradiation, and significantly increased the number of femoral spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) that survived irradiation. Deoxyspergualin also reduced the proportion of CFU-S in S phase, as determined by in vitro sensitivity to hydroxyurea. These findings suggest that deoxyspergualin may be effective in the prevention of hematopoietic injury caused by radiotherapy. 15 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. MICE: a mouse imaging collaboration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, Jacek; Flask, Chris; Wilson, David; Johnson, David; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2006-03-01

    With the ever-increasing complexity of science and engineering, many important research problems are being addressed by collaborative, multidisciplinary teams. We present a web-based collaborative environment for small animal imaging research, called the Mouse Imaging Collaboration Environment (MICE). MICE provides an effective and user-friendly tool for managing and sharing of the terabytes of high-resolution and high-dimension image data generated at small animal imaging core facilities. We describe the design of MICE and our experience in the implementation and deployment of a beta-version baseline-MICE. The baseline-MICE provides an integrated solution from image data acquisition to end-user access and long-term data storage at our UH/Case Small Animal Imaging Resource Center. As image data is acquired from scanners, it is pushed to the MICE server which automatically stores it in a directory structure according to its DICOM metadata. The directory structure reflects imaging modality, principle investigators, animal models, scanning dates and study details. Registered end-users access this imaging data through an authenticated web-interface. Thumbnail images are created by custom scripts running on the MICE server while data down-loading is achieved through standard web-browser ftp. MICE provides a security infrastructure that manages user roles, their access privileges such as read/write, and the right to modify the access privileges. Additional data security measures include a two server paradigm with the Web access server residing outside a network firewall to provide access through the Internet, and the imaging data server - a large RAID storage system supporting flexible backup policies - residing behind the protected firewall with a dedicated link to the Web access server. Direct network link to the RAID storage system outside the firewall other than this dedicated link is not permitted. Establishing the initial image directory structure and letting the

  16. Responses of Male C57BL/6N Mice to Observing the Euthanasia of Other Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Gregory P; Bottomley, Michael A; Grobe, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    The AVMA Panel on Euthanasia recommends that sensitive animals should not be present during the euthanasia of others, especially of their own species, but does not provide guidelines on how to identify a sensitive species. To determine if mice are a sensitive species we reviewed literature on empathy in mice, and measured the cardiovascular and activity response of mice observing euthanasia of conspecifics. We studied male 16-wk-old C57BL/6N mice and found no increase in cardiovascular parameters or activity in the response of the mice to observing CO2 euthanasia. Mice observing decapitation had an increase in all values, but this was paralleled by a similar increase during mock decapitations in which no animals were handled or euthanized. We conclude that CO2 euthanasia of mice does not have an impact on other mice in the room, and that euthanasia by decapitation likely only has an effect due to the noise of the guillotine. We support the conceptual idea that mice are both a sensitive species and display empathy, but under the controlled circumstances of the euthanasia procedures used in this study there was no signaling of stress to witnessing inhabitants in the room. PMID:27423146

  17. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  18. Aerosol infection of mice with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y; Izumiya, K; Sato, H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1980-01-01

    Aerosol inhalation of Bordetella pertussis Tohama phase I resulted in a reproducible and uniform infection of mice (strain DDY or ICR). Mice in groups of 10 exposed for 30 min to aerosols generated from bacterial suspensions of 10(9) and 10(10) organisms per ml resulted in mean bacterial counts of 2.3 (+/- 0.3) X 10(4) and 1.0 (+/- 0.3) X 10(5) colony-forming units, respectively, in the lung of each animal. Subsequent studies using a 30-min aerosol inoculation of ICR mice with 2 X 10(9) bacterial cells per ml showed: (i) B. pertussis cells reached a maximum of about 10(7) colony-forming units per lung 14 days after inhalation. (ii) Deaths (10 to 100%, depending on mouse age) occurred 10 to 14 days after exposure. (iii) The lung weight and the leukocyte count increased from basal values of 100 mg and 10(4) leukocytes per mm3 to a plateau of 950 mg and 1.95 X 10(5) leukocytes per mm3, respectively, 14 days after challenge. (iv) There was a significantly reduced rate of body weight gain by infected mice compared to noninfected mice. (v) With mortality as the criterion for disease, susceptibility varied with the age of mice as follows: 10 days old greater than 18 greater than 28 greater than 49. (vi) Bacteria were associated with ciliated respiratory epithelial cells by scanning electron microscopy. Images Fig. 4 PMID:6249758

  19. A Study of Statistical Errors in MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, D.; Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will measure ionization cooling from a beam of muons at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The aim of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, due to ionization cooling, of order 10% for a range of emittances and momenta, to an accuracy of 1%. A greater understanding of the statistical (as well as systematic) errors on emittance measurement in MICE is paramount to meeting this goal.This paper describes a study aimed at exploiting the computing power of the Grid to determine the number of muons necessary to meet the scientific goals of MICE. In this study, tens of thousands of G4MICE Monte Carlo simulations were run to determine the scaling laws that govern the fractional change in emittance as a function of the number of muons (N) in the simulation. By varying random conditions, the standard deviation of these distributions was studied as a function of N. The results of the study indicate that, due to the effect of correlations, of order 10{sup 5} muons are required to meet the goal of MICE for large emittance beams, without which 10{sup 6} would be required.

  20. Hypothyroidism compromises hypothalamic leptin signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Groba, Claudia; Mayerl, Steffen; van Mullem, Alies A; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Habenicht, Andreas J; Heuer, Heike

    2013-04-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production as well as leptin sensing in congenital hypothyroid TRH receptor 1 knockout (Trhr1 ko) mice and euthyroid control animals. Hypothyroid mice exhibited decreased circulating leptin levels due to a decrease in fat mass and reduced leptin expression in white adipose tissue. In neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, hypothyroid mice showed increased leptin receptor Ob-R expression and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 transcript levels. In order to monitor putative changes in central leptin sensing, we generated hypothyroid and leptin-deficient animals by crossing hypothyroid Trhr1 ko mice with the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Hypothyroid Trhr1/ob double knockout mice showed a blunted response to leptin treatment with respect to body weight and food intake and exhibited a decreased activation of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as well as a up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 upon leptin treatment, particularly in the arcuate nucleus. These data indicate alterations in the intracellular processing of the leptin signal under hypothyroid conditions and thereby unravel a novel mode of action by which TH affects energy metabolism.

  1. Palmoplantar Keratoderma in Slurp2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Christopher M; Procaccia, Shiri; Tran, Deanna; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H; Larsson, Mikael; Allan, Bernard B; Young, Lorraine C; Hong, Cynthia; Tontonoz, Peter; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G; Beigneux, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    SLURP1, a member of the lymphocyte antigen 6 protein family, is secreted by suprabasal keratinocytes. Mutations in SLURP1 cause a palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) known as mal de Meleda. SLURP2, another secreted lymphocyte antigen 6 protein, is encoded by a gene located ?20 kb downstream from SLURP1. SLURP2 is produced by suprabasal keratinocytes. To investigate the importance of SLURP2, we first examined Slurp2 knockout mice in which exon 2-3 sequences had been replaced with lacZ and neo cassettes. Slurp2(-/-) mice exhibited hyperkeratosis on the volar surface of the paws (i.e., palmoplantar keratoderma), increased keratinocyte proliferation, and an accumulation of lipid droplets in the stratum corneum. They also exhibited reduced body weight and hind limb clasping. These phenotypes are similar to those of Slurp1(-/-) mice. To solidify a link between Slurp2 deficiency and palmoplantar keratoderma and to be confident that the disease phenotypes in Slurp2(-/-) mice were not secondary to the effects of the lacZ and neo cassettes on Slurp1 expression, we created a new line of Slurp2 knockout mice (Slurp2X(-/-)) in which Slurp2 was inactivated with a simple nonsense mutation. Slurp2X(-/-) mice exhibited the same disease phenotypes. Thus, Slurp2 deficiency and Slurp1 deficiencies cause the same disease phenotypes.

  2. Plasminogen promotes macrophage phagocytosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Riku; Ganapathy, Swetha; Settle, Megan; Plow, Edward F

    2014-07-31

    The phagocytic function of macrophages plays a pivotal role in eliminating apoptotic cells and invading pathogens. Evidence implicating plasminogen (Plg), the zymogen of plasmin, in phagocytosis is extremely limited with the most recent in vitro study showing that plasmin acts on prey cells rather than on macrophages. Here, we use apoptotic thymocytes and immunoglobulin opsonized bodies to show that Plg exerts a profound effect on macrophage-mediated phagocytosis in vitro and in vivo. Plg enhanced the uptake of these prey by J774A.1 macrophage-like cells by 3.5- to fivefold Plg receptors and plasmin proteolytic activity were required for phagocytosis of both preys. Compared with Plg(+/+) mice, Plg(-/-) mice exhibited a 60% delay in clearance of apoptotic thymocytes by spleen and an 85% reduction in uptake by peritoneal macrophages. Phagocytosis of antibody-mediated erythrocyte clearance by liver Kupffer cells was reduced by 90% in Plg(-/-) mice compared with Plg(+/+) mice. A gene array of splenic and hepatic tissues from Plg(-/-) and Plg(+/+) mice showed downregulation of numerous genes in Plg(-/-) mice involved in phagocytosis and regulation of phagocytic gene expression was confirmed in macrophage-like cells. Thus, Plg may play an important role in innate immunity by changing expression of genes that contribute to phagocytosis.

  3. Quantification of alcohol drinking patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, Manuela; Leixner, Sarah; Spanagel, Rainer; Bilbao, Ainhoa

    2015-11-01

    The use of mice in alcohol research provides an excellent model system for a better understanding of the genetics and neurobiology of alcohol addiction. Almost 60 years ago, alcohol researchers began to test strains of mice for alcohol preference and intake. In particular, various voluntary alcohol drinking paradigms in the home cage were developed. In mouse models of voluntary oral alcohol consumption, animals have concurrent access to water and either one or several concentrated alcohol solutions in their home cages. Although these models have high face validity, many experimental conditions require a more precise monitoring of alcohol consumption in mice in order to capture the role of specific strains or genes, or any other manipulation on alcohol drinking behavior. Therefore, we have developed a fully automated, highly precise monitoring system for alcohol drinking in mice in the home cage. This system is now commercially available. We show that this drinkometer system allows for detecting differences in drinking behavior (i) in transgenic mice, (ii) following alcohol deprivation, and (iii) following stress applications that are usually not detected by classical home-cage drinking paradigms. In conclusion, our drinkometer system allows disturbance-free and high resolution monitoring of alcohol drinking behavior. In particular, micro-drinking and circadian drinking patterns can be monitored in genetically modified and inbred strains of mice after environmental and pharmacological manipulation, and therefore this system represents an improvement in measuring behavioral features that are of relevance for the development of alcohol use disorders.

  4. Protection of mice against the highly pathogenic VVIHD-J by DNA and fowlpox recombinant vaccines, administered by electroporation and intranasal routes, correlates with serum neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Bissa, Massimiliano; Quaglino, Elena; Zanotto, Carlo; Illiano, Elena; Rolih, Valeria; Pacchioni, Sole; Cavallo, Federica; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Radaelli, Antonia

    2016-10-01

    The control of smallpox was achieved using live vaccinia virus (VV) vaccine, which successfully eradicated the disease worldwide. As the variola virus no longer exists as a natural infection agent, mass vaccination was discontinued after 1980. However, emergence of smallpox outbreaks caused by accidental or deliberate release of variola virus has stimulated new research for second-generation vaccine development based on attenuated VV strains. Considering the closely related animal poxviruses that also arise as zoonoses, and the increasing number of unvaccinated or immunocompromised people, a safer and more effective vaccine is still required. With this aim, new vectors based on avian poxviruses that cannot replicate in mammals should improve the safety of conventional vaccines, and protect from zoonotic orthopoxvirus diseases, such as cowpox and monkeypox. In this study, DNA and fowlpox (FP) recombinants that expressed the VV L1R, A27L, A33R, and B5R genes were generated (4DNAmix, 4FPmix, respectively) and tested in mice using novel administration routes. Mice were primed with 4DNAmix by electroporation, and boosted with 4FPmix applied intranasally. The lethal VVIHD-J strain was then administered by intranasal challenge. All of the mice receiving 4DNAmix followed by 4FPmix, and 20% of the mice immunized only with 4FPmix, were protected. The induction of specific humoral and cellular immune responses directly correlated with this protection. In particular, higher anti-A27 antibodies and IFNγ-producing T lymphocytes were measured in the blood and spleen of the protected mice, as compared to controls. VVIHD-J neutralizing antibodies in sera from the protected mice suggest that the prime/boost vaccination regimen with 4DNAmix plus 4FPmix may be an effective and safe mode to induce protection against smallpox and poxvirus zoonotic infections. The electroporation/intranasal administration routes contributed to effective immune responses and mouse survival.

  5. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice

    PubMed Central

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations. PMID:25136890

  6. Pleiotropic effects in Eya3 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Söker, Torben; Dalke, Claudia; Puk, Oliver; Floss, Thomas; Becker, Lore; Bolle, Ines; Favor, Jack; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kallnik, Magdalena; Kling, Eva; Moerth, Corinna; Schrewe, Anja; Stigloher, Christian; Topp, Stefanie; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Naton, Beatrix; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Ivandic, Boris; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Bally-Cuif, Laure; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Graw, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Background In Drosophila, mutations in the gene eyes absent (eya) lead to severe defects in eye development. The functions of its mammalian orthologs Eya1-4 are only partially understood and no mouse model exists for Eya3. Therefore, we characterized the phenotype of a new Eya3 knockout mouse mutant. Results Expression analysis of Eya3 by in-situ hybridizations and β-Gal-staining of Eya3 mutant mice revealed abundant expression of the gene throughout development, e.g. in brain, eyes, heart, somites and limbs suggesting pleiotropic effects of the mutated gene. A similar complex expression pattern was observed also in zebrafish embryos. The phenotype of young adult Eya3 mouse mutants was systematically analyzed within the German Mouse Clinic. There was no obvious defect in the eyes, ears and kidneys of Eya3 mutant mice. Homozygous mutants displayed decreased bone mineral content and shorter body length. In the lung, the tidal volume at rest was decreased, and electrocardiography showed increased JT- and PQ intervals as well as decreased QRS amplitude. Behavioral analysis of the mutants demonstrated a mild increase in exploratory behavior, but decreased locomotor activity and reduced muscle strength. Analysis of differential gene expression revealed 110 regulated genes in heart and brain. Using real-time PCR, we confirmed Nup155 being down regulated in both organs. Conclusion The loss of Eya3 in the mouse has no apparent effect on eye development. The wide-spread expression of Eya3 in mouse and zebrafish embryos is in contrast to the restricted expression pattern in Xenopus embryos. The loss of Eya3 in mice leads to a broad spectrum of minor physiological changes. Among them, the mutant mice move less than the wild-type mice and, together with the effects on respiratory, muscle and heart function, the mutation might lead to more severe effects when the mice become older. Therefore, future investigations of Eya3 function should focus on aging mice. PMID:19102749

  7. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice.

    PubMed

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-08-19

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations.

  8. Chronic Co-species Housing Mice and Rats Increased the Competitiveness of Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Juan; Li, Lai-Fu; Zhang, Yao-Hua; Guo, Hui-Fen; Xia, Min; Zhang, Meng-Wei; Jing, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Xu

    2017-01-10

    Rats are predators of mice in nature. Nevertheless, it is a common practice to house mice and rats in a same room in some laboratories. In this study, we investigated the behavioral and physiological responsively of mice in long-term co-species housing conditions. Twenty-four male mice were randomly assigned to their original raising room (control) or a rat room (co-species-housed) for more than 6 weeks. In the open-field and light-dark box tests, the behaviors of the co-species-housed mice and controls were not different. In a 2-choice test of paired urine odors [rabbit urine (as a novel odor) vs. rat urine, cat urine (as a natural predator-scent) vs. rabbit urine, and cat urine vs. rat urine], the co-species-housed mice were more ready to investigate the rat urine odor compared with the controls and may have adapted to it. In an encounter test, the rat-room-exposed mice exhibited increased aggression levels, and their urines were more attractive to females. Correspondingly, the levels of major urinary proteins were increased in the co-species-housed mouse urine, along with some volatile pheromones. The serum testosterone levels were also enhanced in the co-species-housed mice, whereas the corticosterone levels were not different. The norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-HT levels in the right hippocampus and striatum were not different between the 2. Our findings indicate that chronic co-species housing results in adaptation in male mice; furthermore, it appears that long-term rat-odor stimuli enhance the competitiveness of mice, which suggests that appropriate predator-odor stimuli may be important to the fitness of prey animals.

  9. Demodex musculi Infestation in Genetically Immunomodulated Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter C; Zeiss, Caroline J; Beck, Amanda P; Scholz, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Demodex musculi, a prostigmatid mite that has been reported infrequently in laboratory mice, has been identified with increasing frequency in contemporary colonies of immunodeficient mice. Here we describe 2 episodes of D. musculi infestation with associated clinical signs in various genetically engineered mouse strains, as well as treatment strategies and an investigation into transmissibility and host susceptibility. The first case involved D. musculi associated with clinical signs and pathologic lesions in BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) mice, which have a defect in type 2 helper T cell (Th2) immunity. Subsequent investigation revealed mite transmission to both parental strains (BALB/c-Tg[DO11.10] and BALB/c-Il13(tm)), BALB/c-Il13/Il4(tm), and wild-type BALB/c. All Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) mice remained infested throughout the investigation, and D. musculi were recovered from all strains when they were cohoused with BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) index mice. However, only Il13(tm) and Il13/Il4(tm) mice demonstrated persistent infestation after index mice were removed. Only BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13(tm) showed clinical signs, suggesting that the phenotypic dysfunction of Th2 immunity is sufficient for persistent infestation, whereas clinical disease associated with D. musculi appears to be genotype-specific. This pattern was further exemplified in the second case, which involved NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2r(tm1Wjl)/SzJ (NSG) and C;129S4 Rag2(tm1.1Flv) Il2rg(tm1.1Flv)/J mice with varying degrees of blepharitis, conjunctivitis, and facial pruritis. Topical amitraz decreased mite burden but did not eliminate infestation or markedly ameliorate clinical signs. Furthermore, mite burden began to increase by 1 mo posttreatment, suggesting that topical amitraz is an ineffective treatment for D. musculi. These experiences illustrate the need for vigilance regarding opportunistic and uncommon pathogens in rodent colonies, especially among mice with immunologic deficits.

  10. Demodex musculi Infestation in Genetically Immunomodulated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter C; Zeiss, Caroline J; Beck, Amanda P; Scholz, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Demodex musculi, a prostigmatid mite that has been reported infrequently in laboratory mice, has been identified with increasing frequency in contemporary colonies of immunodeficient mice. Here we describe 2 episodes of D. musculi infestation with associated clinical signs in various genetically engineered mouse strains, as well as treatment strategies and an investigation into transmissibility and host susceptibility. The first case involved D. musculi associated with clinical signs and pathologic lesions in BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13tm mice, which have a defect in type 2 helper T cell (Th2) immunity. Subsequent investigation revealed mite transmission to both parental strains (BALB/c-Tg[DO11.10] and BALB/c-Il13tm), BALB/c-Il13/Il4tm, and wild-type BALB/c. All Tg(DO11.10)Il13tm mice remained infested throughout the investigation, and D. musculi were recovered from all strains when they were cohoused with BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13tm index mice. However, only Il13tm and Il13/Il4tm mice demonstrated persistent infestation after index mice were removed. Only BALB/c-Tg(DO11.10)Il13tm showed clinical signs, suggesting that the phenotypic dysfunction of Th2 immunity is sufficient for persistent infestation, whereas clinical disease associated with D. musculi appears to be genotype-specific. This pattern was further exemplified in the second case, which involved NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIl2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) and C;129S4 Rag2tm1.1Flv Il2rgtm1.1Flv/J mice with varying degrees of blepharitis, conjunctivitis, and facial pruritis. Topical amitraz decreased mite burden but did not eliminate infestation or markedly ameliorate clinical signs. Furthermore, mite burden began to increase by 1 mo posttreatment, suggesting that topical amitraz is an ineffective treatment for D. musculi. These experiences illustrate the need for vigilance regarding opportunistic and uncommon pathogens in rodent colonies, especially among mice with immunologic deficits. PMID:27538858

  11. Trace metals and otolith defects in mocha mice.

    PubMed

    Rolfsen, R M; Erway, L C

    1984-01-01

    Mocha mice with pigment anomalies of the coat, eyes, and inner ears also have congenital otolith defects, and they exhibit progressive cochlear degeneration. Mocha mice were first reported to exhibit otolith defects comparable to those of pallid mice. Since manganese supplementation is effective in preventing the otolith defects in pallid mice and in pastel mink, we sought to establish whether or not manganese also might be effective in mocha mice. The otolith defects of mocha mice were prevented or reduced by supplementing the pregnant dams with manganese and/or zinc. The mocha mice also exhibited high perinatal mortality that was not reduced by the supplementary metals. Surviving mocha mice have behavioral anomalies associated with their inner ear defects. Preliminary observations of auditory-evoked brainstem responses and of cochlear degeneration in the mocha mice are discussed.

  12. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; ...

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less thanmore » $$\\sim$$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $$f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.« less

  13. Seasonal acclimation of prairie deer mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R. V.; Belknap, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Prairie deer mice responded to long nights by reducing their metabolic rates, core temperatures, thermal conductances and incremental metabolic responses to cold stimulus, while increasing their capacities for nonshivering thermogenesis. Some winter animals spontaneously entered daily torpor in the mornings and thereby further reduced their metabolic rates and core temperatures. Provision of exogenous melatonin (by subdermal implants) mimiced short photoperiod effects on metabolic rates and core temperatures of wild-caught, laboratory maintained animals. Provision of supplemental dietary tryptophan to laboratory animals conditioned to natural light cycles mimiced metabolic effects of long nights in summer animals, and further reduced metabolic rates of winter mice, but did not affect their core temperature levels. Newly caught, laboratory maintained deer mice responded to natural seasonal clues of shortphotoperiod and increased dietary tryptophan by reducing their resting energy requirements through both lower metabolic and lower core temperature levels. Short photoperiod and seasonal change also promoted gonadal involution, and resulted in more socially tolerant huddling by mice with reduced core temperature. Reduced 24-hour LH excretion rates were also observed in winter animals which were exposed to seasonal light cycles at warm (25°C) room temperatures. We propose that seasonal acclimatization involves pineal effects on sex hormone-influenced social behaviors and on resting metabolism. These effects serve to conserve resting energy expenditure and promote hypothermic insulation by wild prairie deer mice.

  14. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress.

  15. Dietary composition programmes placental phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Coan, P M; Vaughan, O R; McCarthy, J; Mactier, C; Burton, G J; Constância, M; Fowden, A L

    2011-07-15

    Dietary composition during pregnancy influences fetal and adult phenotype but its effects on placental phenotype remain largely unknown. Using molecular, morphological and functional analyses, placental nutrient transfer capacity was examined in mice fed isocaloric diets containing 23%, 18% or 9% casein (C) during pregnancy. At day 16, placental transfer of glucose, but not methyl-aminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), was greater in C18 and C9 than C23 mice, in association with increased placental expression of the glucose transporter Slc2a1/GLUT1, and the growth factor Igf2. At day 19, placental glucose transport remained high in C9 mice while MeAIB transfer was less in C18 than C23 mice, despite greater placental weights in C18 and C9 than C23 mice. Placental System A amino acid transporter expression correlated with protein intake at day 19. Relative growth of transport verses endocrine zones of the placenta was influenced by diet at both ages without changing the absolute volume of the transport surface. Fetal weight was unaffected by diet at day 16 but was reduced in C9 animals by day 19. Morphological and functional adaptations in placental phenotype, therefore, occur to optimise nutrient transfer when dietary composition is varied, even subtly. This has important implications for the intrauterine programming of life expectancy.

  16. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Thomas, David K; Ong, Luvena L; Schwartz, Robert E; Golub, Todd R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2011-07-19

    "Humanized" mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug-drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of "major" human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications.

  17. Lipid transport in cholecystokinin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    King, Alexandra; Yang, Qing; Huesman, Sarah; Rider, Therese; Lo, Chunmin C

    2015-11-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is released in response to lipid feeding and regulates pancreatic digestive enzymes vital to the absorption of nutrients. Our previous reports demonstrated that cholecystokinin knockout (CCK-KO) mice fed for 10 weeks of HFD had reduced body fat mass, but comparable glucose uptake by white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that CCK is involved in energy homeostasis and lipid transport from the small intestine to tissues in response to acute treatment with dietary lipids. CCK-KO mice with comparable fat absorption had increased energy expenditure and were resistant to HFD-induced obesity. Using intraduodenal infusion of butter fat and intravenous infusion using Liposyn III, we determined the mechanism of lipid transport from the small intestine to deposition in lymph and adipocytes in CCK-KO mice. CCK-KO mice had delayed secretion of Apo B48-chylomicrons, lipid transport to the lymphatic system, and triglyceride (TG)-derived fatty acid uptake by epididymal fat in response to acute treatment of intraduodenal lipids. In contrast, CCK-KO mice had comparable TG clearance and lipid uptake by white adipocytes in response to TGs in chylomicron-like emulsion. Thus, we concluded that CCK is important for lipid transport and energy expenditure to control body weight in response to dietary lipid feeding.

  18. Connexin mediated cataract prevention in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Cheng, Catherine; Xia, Chun-hong; White, Thomas W; Fletcher, Daniel A; Gong, Xiaohua

    2010-09-09

    Cataracts, named for any opacity in the ocular lens, remain the leading cause of vision loss in the world. Non-surgical methods for cataract prevention are still elusive. We have genetically tested whether enhanced lens gap junction communication, provided by increased α3 connexin (Cx46) proteins expressed from α8(Kiα3) knock-in alleles in Gja8tm1(Gja3)Tww mice, could prevent nuclear cataracts caused by the γB-crystallin S11R mutation in CrygbS11R/S11R mice. Remarkably, homozygous knock-in α8(Kiα3/Kiα3) mice fully prevented nuclear cataracts, while single knock-in α8(Kiα3/-) allele mice showed variable suppression of nuclear opacities in CrygbS11R/S11R mutant mice. Cataract prevention was correlated with the suppression of many pathological processes, including crystallin degradation and fiber cell degeneration, as well as preservation of normal calcium levels and stable actin filaments in the lens. This work demonstrates that enhanced intercellular gap junction communication can effectively prevent or delay nuclear cataract formation and suggests that small metabolites transported through gap junction channels protect the stability of crystallin proteins and the cytoskeletal structures in the lens core. Thus, the use of an array of small molecules to promote lens homeostasis may become a feasible non-surgical approach for nuclear cataract prevention in the future.

  19. Isolation, cDNA cloning, and overexpression of a 33-kD cell surface glycoprotein that binds to the globular "heads" of C1q

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    antibodies to cC1q-R. Anti-gC1q-R immunoblotted a 33-kD Raji cell membrane protein, whereas anti cC1q-R recognized a molecule of approximately 60 kD. The NH2-terminal sequence of gC1g-R appears to be displayed extracellularly since anti-gC1g-R peptide reacted with surface molecules on lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and platelets, as assessed by flow cytometric and confocal laser scanning microscopic analyses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8195709

  20. Phenylthiocarbamide produces conditioned taste aversions in mice.

    PubMed

    St John, Steven J; Pour, Lindsay; Boughter, John D

    2005-06-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that SWR/J (SW) mice avoid phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) to a greater degree than C3HeB/FeJ mice in 48 h, two-bottle preference tests given in ascending series. The authors hypothesized, based also on previous work, that SW mice might form a conditioned taste aversion over time due to the toxic properties of PTC. We directly tested this hypothesis by attempting to condition a taste aversion to sucrose by injections of PTC. In experiment 1, PTC was nearly as effective as a strong dose of LiCl in reducing sucrose drinking. In experiment 2, the sucrose aversions were parametrically modified by both sucrose concentration and PTC dose, a hallmark of conditioned taste aversion. We conclude that PTC can cause a conditioned taste aversion and discuss the importance of considering toxic effects of aversive tastants when analyzing behavioral strain differences.

  1. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  2. Brain toxicokinetics of prometryne in mice.

    PubMed

    Dikić, Domagoj; Sajli, Lana; Benković, Vesna; Knezević, Anica Horvat; Brozović, Gordana; Lisicić, Duje; Mojsović, Ana; Orsolić, Nada

    2010-03-01

    Prometryne is a methylthio-s-triazine herbicide. Significant trace amounts are found in the environment, mainly in water, soil, and food plants. The aim of this study was to establish brain and blood prometryne levels after single oral dose (1 g kg-1) in adult male and female mice. Prometryne was measured using the GC/MS assay at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h after prometryne administration. Peak brain and blood prometryne values were observed 1 h after administration and they decreased in a time-dependent manner. Male mice had consistently higher brain and blood prometryne levels than female mice. The observed prometryne kinetics was similar to that reported for the structurally related herbicide atrazine.

  3. Payload Processing for Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Experimental payloads flown to the International Space Station provide us with valuable research conducted in a microgravity environment not attainable on earth. The Mice Drawer System is an experiment designed by Thales Alenia Space Italia to study the effects of microgravity on mice. It is designed to fly to orbit on the Space Shuttle Utilization Logistics Flight 2 in October 2008, remain onboard the International Space Station for approximately 100 days and then return to earth on a following Shuttle flight. The experiment apparatus will be housed inside a Double Payload Carrier. An engineering model of the Double Payload Carrier was sent to Kennedy Space Center for a fit check inside both Shuttles, and the rack that it will be installed in aboard the International Space Station. The Double Payload Carrier showed a good fit quality inside each vehicle, and Thales Alenia Space Italia will now construct the actual flight model and continue to prepare the Mice Drawer System experiment for launch.

  4. The somatotropic axis and longevity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The somatotropic signaling pathway has been implicated in aging and longevity studies in mice and other species. The physiology and lifespans of a variety of mutant mice, both spontaneous and genetically engineered, have contributed to our current understanding of the role of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I on aging-related processes. Several other mice discovered to live longer than their wild-type control counterparts also exhibit differences in growth factor levels; however, the complex nature of the phenotypic changes in these animals may also impact lifespan. The somatotropic axis impacts several pathways that dictate insulin sensitivity, nutrient sensing, mitochondrial function, and stress resistance as well as others that are thought to be involved in lifespan regulation. PMID:26219867

  5. Chronic fatal pneumocystosis in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Goto, Y; Yamazaki, S; Fujiwara, K

    1977-12-01

    A chronic pulmonary disease was encountered in nude mice of a barrier sustained colony, and Pneumocystis carinii was identified as the causative agent histopathologically as well as on impression smear preparations in the affected lungs. Fatal infection was seen only in old nude mice aged more than 6 months, while focal pulmonary lesions were developed without clinical signs in young adult nudes 2 to 3 months of age. The lesions produced in aged nude mice were characterized by propagation of mononuclear cells with the presence of foamy masses of P. carinii. Heterozygous littermates were much less susceptible to the infection but pneumocystic lesions could be produced readily by multiple treatment with immunosuppressants. The infection could be transmitted without immunosuppressant to non-infected nudes but not to heterozygous littermates after intranasal inoculation of affected tissue emulsion or by cage mating with severely affected nudes.

  6. Magnetic biomineralisation in Huntington's disease transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyhum, W.; Hautot, D.; Dobson, J.; Pankhurst, Q. A.

    2005-01-01

    The concentration levels of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles in transgenic R6/2 Huntington's disease (HD) mice have been investigated, using seven control and seven HD mice each from an 8 week-old litter and from a 12 week-old litter. Hysteresis and isothermal remnant magnetisation data were collected on a SQUID magnetometer, and analysed using a model comprising dia/paramagnetic, ferrimagnetic and superparamagnetic contributions, to extract the magnetite and ferritin concentrations present. It was found that magnetite was present in both superparamagnetic and blocked states. A larger spread and higher concentration of magnetite levels was found in the diseased mice for both the 8 week-old and 12 week-old batches, compared to the controls.

  7. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  8. Ocular Phenotype of Fbn2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Tu, Yidong; Mecham, Robert P.; Bassnett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Fibrillin-2 (Fbn2) is the dominant fibrillin isoform expressed during development of the mouse eye. To test its role in morphogenesis, we examined the ocular phenotype of Fbn2−/− mice. Methods. Ocular morphology was assessed by confocal microscopy using antibodies against microfibril components. Results. Fbn2−/− mice had a high incidence of anterior segment dysgenesis. The iris was the most commonly affected tissue. Complete iridal coloboma was present in 37% of eyes. Dyscoria, corectopia and pseudopolycoria were also common (43% combined incidence). In wild-type (WT) mice, fibrillin-2-rich microfibrils are prominent in the pupillary membrane (PM) during development. In Fbn2-null mice, the absence of Fbn2 was partially compensated for by increased expression of fibrillin-1, although the resulting PM microfibrils were disorganized, compared with WTs. In colobomatous adult Fbn2−/− eyes, the PM failed to regress normally, especially beneath the notched region of the iris. Segments of the ciliary body were hypoplastic, and zonular fibers, although relatively plentiful, were unevenly distributed around the lens equator. In regions where the zonular fibers were particularly disturbed, the synchronous differentiation of the underlying lens fiber cells was affected. Conclusions. Fbn2 has an indispensable role in ocular morphogenesis in mice. The high incidence of iris coloboma in Fbn2-null animals implies a previously unsuspected role in optic fissure closure. The observation that fiber cell differentiation was disturbed in Fbn2−/− mice raises the possibility that the attachment of zonular fibers to the lens surface may help specify the equatorial margin of the lens epithelium. PMID:24130178

  9. Xanthohumol improved cognitive flexibility in young mice.

    PubMed

    Zamzow, Daniel R; Elias, Valerie; Legette, LeeCole L; Choi, Jaewoo; Stevens, J Fred; Magnusson, Kathy R

    2014-12-15

    The protein palmitoylation cycle has been shown to be important for protein signaling and synaptic plasticity. Data from our lab showed a change in the palmitoylation status of certain proteins with age. A greater percentage of the NMDA receptor subunits GluN2A and GluN2B, along with Fyn and PSD95 proteins, were palmitoylated in the old mice. The higher level of protein palmitoylation was also associated with poorer learning scores. Xanthohumol is a prenylated flavonoid that has been shown to increase beta-oxidation in the livers of rodents, decreasing circulating free fatty acids in the serum. What is not known is whether the application of xanthohumol could influence the palmitoylation status of proteins. In this study, young and old mice were fed a diet supplemented with xanthohumol for 8 weeks. Spatial memory was assessed with the Morris water maze and protein palmitoylation quantified. The young xanthohumol-treated mice showed a significant improvement in cognitive flexibility. However, this appeared to be associated with the young control mice, on a defined, phytoestrogen-deficient diet, performing as poorly as the old mice and xanthohumol reversing this effect. The old mice receiving xanthohumol did not significantly improve their learning scores. Xanthohumol treatment was unable to affect the palmitoylation of NMDA receptor subunits and associated proteins assessed in this study. This evidence suggests that xanthohumol may play a role in improving cognitive flexability in young animals, but it appears to be ineffective in adjusting the palmitoylation status of neuronal proteins in aged individuals.

  10. Xanthohumol improved cognitive flexibility in young mice

    PubMed Central

    Zamzow, Daniel R; Elias, Valerie; Legette, LeeCole L; Choi, Jaewoo; Stevens, J. Fred; Magnusson, Kathy R

    2014-01-01

    The protein palmitoylation cycle has been shown to be important for protein signaling and synaptic plasticity. Data from our lab showed a change in the palmitoylation status of certain proteins with age. A greater percentage of the NMDA receptor subunits GluN2A and GluN2B, along with Fyn and PSD95 proteins, were palmitoylated in the old mice. The higher level of protein palmitoylation was also associated with poorer learning scores. Xanthohumol is a prenylated flavonoid that has been shown to increase beta-oxidation in the livers of rodents, decreasing circulating free fatty acids in the serum. What is not known is whether the application of xanthohumol could influence the palmitoylation status of proteins. In this study, young and old mice were fed a diet supplemented with xanthohumol for 8 weeks. Spatial memory was assessed with the Morris water maze and protein palmitoylation quantified. The young xanthohumol-treated mice showed a significant improvement in cognitive flexibility. However, this appeared to be associated with the young control mice, on a defined, phytoestrogen-deficient diet, performing as poorly as the old mice and xanthohumol reversing this effect. The old mice receiving xanthohumol did not significantly improve their learning scores. Xanthohumol treatment was unable to affect the palmitoylation of NMDA receptor subunits and associated proteins assessed in this study. This evidence suggests that xanthohumol may play a role in improving cognitive flexability in young animals, but it appears to be ineffective in adjusting the palmitoylation status of neuronal proteins in aged individuals. PMID:25192637

  11. Aorta Atherosclerosis Lesion Analysis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Sarajo; Yin, Changjun; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Habenicht, Andreas JR

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium-sized arteries. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice are used as experimental models to study human atherosclerosis. ApoE-/- mice are constitutively hyperlipidemic and develop intima plaques that resemble human plaques. Various issues including experimental design for lesion analysis, dietary conditions, isolation of the aorta, staining methods, morphometry, group size, age, the location within the arterial tree, and statistical analyses are important parameters that need to be addressed to obtain robust data. Here, we provide detailed methods to quantify aorta atherosclerosis. PMID:27366759

  12. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  13. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  14. Social and Sexual Behaivours of Mice in Partial Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aou, Shuji; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Kumei, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Katarzyna; Zeredo, Jorge; Narikiyo, Kimiya; Watanabe, Yuuki

    2012-07-01

    We examined social and sexual behaviours in normal ICR mice, C57BL mice and obese db/db mice lacking leptin receptors in low gravity conditions using parabolic-flight to generate graded levels of partial gravity. Although both normal and obese mice floated with vigorous limb and tail movements when a floor is smooth in microgravity but they were rather stable if a floor is cover by carpet. Obese mice were more stable and socially contacted longer with a partner in low-gravity conditions. When they returned to the home cage after parabolic flights, obese mice started to eat sooner without restless behaviour, while control mice showed restless behaviour without eating. Face grooming, an indicator of stress response, was found more often in the control mice than the obese mice. Obese mice returned to resting condition faster than the control. We also analysed sexual behaviour of ICR mice and C57BL mice but not db/db mice since they are sexually inactive. Social and sexual behaviour could be evaluated in partial gravity conditions to get basic data concerning whether rodents can communicate and reproduce in Moon, Mars and space or not. Supported by Grant-in-Aid for Exploratory Research (JSPS) to S Aou and FY2010 grants from JAXA and Japan Society for Promotion of Science to Y. Kumei.

  15. Biochemical and microscopic analysis of sperm in copper deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.; Jackson, P.; Allison, S.

    1986-03-01

    The Mottle Brindle Mouse Syndrome is a disease in mice which mimics Menkes Syndrome in humans. Treatment of affected male mice has led to varying survival rates in mice and few attempts have led to the development of virile male offsprings in mice and none in humans. In this study the authors examined sperm produced by Brindle mice in an attempt to ascertain reasons for the observed failure of the Brindle mice to reproduce. Microscopic analysis revealed that sperm counts in these mice are higher than sperm counts of the C57/BL or the C57/6J (normal) mice. Microscopically, sperm from Brindle mice showed changes in the acrosomal and flagellum regions. Motility of these sperm were 10% to 50% that of sperm from normal mice. Biochemically, cytochrome oxidase activity was 10% to 50% of the activity seen in normal mice. Hexokinase activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was equal to that observed in normal mice. These observations suggest that infertility in Brindle male mice is due to an impairment of testicular copper transport which leads to a decline in copper dependent processes.

  16. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogeneis imperfecta mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J. Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J.; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (Po, Po/mg and Po/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased Po and an inability to sustain Po for the 300 ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. PMID:20619344

  17. Unexpected regeneration in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Reines, Brandon; Cheng, Lily I; Matzinger, Polly

    2009-02-01

    Complete regeneration of damaged extremities, including both the epithelium and the underlying tissues, is thought to occur mainly in embryos, fetuses, and juvenile mammals, but only very rarely in adult mammals. Surprisingly, we found that common strains of mice are able to regenerate all of the tissues necessary to completely fill experimentally punched ear holes, but only if punched at middle age. Although young postweaning mice regrew the epithelium without typical pre-scar granulation tissue, they showed only minimal regeneration of connective tissues. In contrast, mice punched at 5-11 months of age showed true amphibian-like blastema formation and regrowth of cartilage, fat, and dermis, with blood vessels, sebaceous glands, hair follicles, and, in black mice, melanocytes. These data suggest that at least partial appendage regeneration may be more common in adult mammals than previously thought and call into question the common view that regenerative ability is lost with age. The data suggest that the age at which various inbred mouse strains become capable of epimorphic regeneration may be correlated with adult body weight.

  18. Genomic imprinting: an obsession with depilatory mice.

    PubMed

    Haig, David; Úbeda, Francisco

    2011-04-12

    Excessive grooming in mice has been promoted as a model of human obsessive-compulsive disorders. A recent paper adds Grb10 to the list of genes with effects on behavioral hair loss, with the added twist that this time the gene is imprinted.

  19. Hyperalgesic activity of kisspeptin in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kisspeptin is a neuropeptide known for its role in the hypothalamic regulation of the reproductive axis. Following the recent description of kisspeptin and its 7-TM receptor, GPR54, in the dorsal root ganglia and dorsal horns of the spinal cord, we examined the role of kisspeptin in the regulation of pain sensitivity in mice. Results Immunofluorescent staining in the mouse skin showed the presence of GPR54 receptors in PGP9.5-positive sensory fibers. Intraplantar injection of kisspeptin (1 or 3 nmol/5 μl) induced a small nocifensive response in naive mice, and lowered thermal pain threshold in the hot plate test. Both intraplantar and intrathecal (0.5 or 1 nmol/3 μl) injection of kisspeptin caused hyperalgesia in the first and second phases of the formalin test, whereas the GPR54 antagonist, p234 (0.1 or 1 nmol), caused a robust analgesia. Intraplantar injection of kisspeptin combined with formalin enhanced TRPV1 phosphorylation at Ser800 at the injection site, and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the ipsilateral dorsal horn as compared to naive mice and mice treated with formalin alone. Conclusion These data demonstrate for the first time that kisspeptin regulates pain sensitivity in rodents and suggest that peripheral GPR54 receptors could be targeted by novel drugs in the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:22112588

  20. Induction of experimental allergic sialadenitis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Hirokawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    This article reports that sialadenitis developed in female CRJ:CD-1 mice thymectomized 3 days after birth and later immunized with a homogenate of the submandibular salivary gland emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant. Significant inflammatory changes did not develop in various control groups, including animals thymectomized at Day 3 but not immunized and animals not thymectomized on the day of birth but immunized. Because a more marked decrease of Lyt 2+ cells was found in mice thymectomized on Day 3 after birth than in neonatally thymectomized mice, thymectomy at 3 days of age is more effective for the induction of sialadenitis, presumably by markedly decreasing a population of suppressor T cells. The lesions observed in mice with sialadenitis were mostly composed of small and medium-sized lymphocytes stained by anti-Thy 1.2 and Lyt 2 antibodies and in later stages by immunoglobulin-containing cells in the periphery of inflammatory lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3156505

  1. Progress of the MICE experiment at RAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.

    2013-04-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration comprises one cell of the US Neutrino Factory Study II cooling channel. Results obtained on the construction of the beamline and its instrumentation (STEP I) will be reviewed, together with progress towards final measurements of ionization cooling (STEP IV and VI).

  2. Unexpected Regeneration in Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lily I.; Matzinger, Polly

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Complete regeneration of damaged extremities, including both the epithelium and the underlying tissues, is thought to occur mainly in embryos, fetuses, and juvenile mammals, but only very rarely in adult mammals. Surprisingly, we found that common strains of mice are able to regenerate all of the tissues necessary to completely fill experimentally punched ear holes, but only if punched at middle age. Although young postweaning mice regrew the epithelium without typical pre-scar granulation tissue, they showed only minimal regeneration of connective tissues. In contrast, mice punched at 5–11 months of age showed true amphibian-like blastema formation and regrowth of cartilage, fat, and dermis, with blood vessels, sebaceous glands, hair follicles, and, in black mice, melanocytes. These data suggest that at least partial appendage regeneration may be more common in adult mammals than previously thought and call into question the common view that regenerative ability is lost with age. The data suggest that the age at which various inbred mouse strains become capable of epimorphic regeneration may be correlated with adult body weight. PMID:19226206

  3. Focusing solenoids for the MICE cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Rochford, J.H.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    This report describes a design for focusing solenoids for the low beta sections for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). There are three focusing solenoid pairs that will be around the muon absorbers for MICE. The two solenoid coils have an inside diameter of 510 mm, a length of 180 mm, and a thickness of 100 mm. A distance of 260 mm separates the two coils in the pair. The coils are designed to operate at opposite polarity, in order to create a gradient field in the low beta sections of the MICE cooling channel. As result, the force pushing the coil pair apart approaches 270 metric tons when the coils operate close to the short sample current for the superconductor. The forces between the coils will be carried by a support structure that is both on the inside and the outside the coils. During some modes of operation for MICE, the coils may operate at the same polarity, which means that the force between the coils pushes them together. The focusing magnet must be designed for both modes of operation. This support structure for the coils will be part of the focusing magnet quench protection system.

  4. Of Mice and Men: Interdisciplinary Unit. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck Middle School, Cherry Hill, NJ.

    "Of Mice and Men" is developed as an interdisciplinary unit to be team taught by math, science, language arts, and social studies teachers and team guidance counselors. Developed as an individualized program for middle school students, a variety of supplementary materials is provided to exemplify the types of activities suggested for students.…

  5. Gene therapy for trigeminal pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzabazis, Alexander Z.; Klukinov, Michael; Feliciano, David P.; Wilson, Steven P.; Yeomans, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a single direct injection of viral vector encoding for encephalin to induce a widespread expression of the transgene and potential analgesic effect in trigeminal behavioral pain models in mice. After direct injection of HSV-1 based vectors encoding for human preproenkephalin (SHPE) or the lacZ reporter gene (SHZ.1, control virus) into the trigeminal ganglia in mice, we performed an orofacial formalin test and assessed the cumulative nociceptive behavior at different time points after injection of the viral vectors. We observed an analgesic effect on nociceptive behavior that lasted up to 8 weeks after a single injection of SHPE into the trigeminal ganglia. Control virus injected animals showed nociceptive behavior similar to naïve mice. The analgesic effect of SHPE injection was reversed/attenuated by subcutaneous naloxone injections, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. SHPE injected mice also showed normalization in withdrawal latencies upon thermal noxious stimulation of inflamed ears after subdermal complete Freund’s adjuvans injection indicating widespread expression of the transgene. Quantitative immunohistochemistry of trigeminal ganglia showed expression of human preproenkephalin after SHPE injection. Direct injection of viral vectors proved to be useful for exploring the distinct pathophysiology of the trigeminal system and could also be an interesting addition to the pain therapists’ armamentarium. PMID:24572785

  6. Pathogenicity of Allescheria boydii for Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lupan, David M.; Cazin, John

    1973-01-01

    Allescheria boydii and its imperfect state, Monosporium apiospermum, were studied to determine whether asexual or sexual strains might exhibit different pathogenic potentials for mice. Six different strains of the fungus were inoculated into mice by the intravenous, intracerebral, intraperitoneal, and intranasal routes. Cortisone-treated mice regularly developed infections after inoculation by any of the routes tested. Mice that had not been treated with cortisone were most susceptible to infection by the intravenous route and least susceptible to infection by the intranasal or intraperitoneal route; nevertheless, all animals that did not receive cortisone were considerably more resistant to infection by the fungus than were comparable groups of cortisone-treated animals. Pathogenicity of the fungus appears to be strain dependent and entirely unrelated to its sexual or asexual form. Studies made to determine accurate viable spore counts of the fungus revealed that the highest viable spore count was generally observed using Sabouraud dextrose agar or potato dextrose agar at an incubation temperature of 37 C for a period of 5 days. Images PMID:4795949

  7. Altered schistosome granuloma formation in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Byram, J E; von Lichtenberg, F

    1977-09-01

    Schistosome egg-induced lesions in congenitally athymic mice differed from those found in normal heterozygous controls. Heterozygote liver granulomas were chareacterized by poorly phagocytic epithelioid macrophages, and were rich in eosinophils and fibroblasts, with peripheral lymphocytes and plasma cells. Hepatic lesions in nude mice were much smaller and lacked epithelioid macrophages, with lesions about mature eggs, typically consisting of monocytes and macrophages filled with pigment, occasional neutrophils, and rarely one or more eosinophils or giant cells. While heterozygote granulomas damaged liver cells mainly by encroachment or by their vascular effects, in the nudes hepatocytes bordering the lesions showed microvesicular cytoplasmic damage and either hydropic degeneration or focal acidophilic necrosis of individual liver cells. In heterozygotes, immunofluorescent-stainable schistosome egg antigen (SEA) was concentrated in the granuloma center. In nude mice, SEA, was distributed throughout the infiltrates and in and around hepatocytes adjacent to egg lesions corresponding to the observed pattern of hepatocyte necrosis. We conclude that, in contrast to heterozygotes, nude mice lack hypersensitivity granulomas and fail to sequester toxic egg products, this resulting in zonal hepatocellular damage. Alternative explanations include the possibility of a latent hepatitis virus being activated by the schistosome infection; however, several cogent arguments are presented against that alternative.

  8. Endogenous opiates mediate radiogenic behavioral change. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1983-06-10

    Exposure of C57BL/6J mice to ionizing radiation caused stereotypical locomotor hyperactivity similar to that produced by morphine. Naloxone administration prevented this radiation-induced behavioral activation. These results support the hypothesis that endorphins are involved in some aspects of radiogenic behavioral change.

  9. Hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression in mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kumar, Nikit; Olivas, Victor R; Eberlé, Delphine; Stephens, Kyle; Raffai, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic patients are known to be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and its associated cardiovascular complications. However, the effects of hyperglycemia on atherosclerosis regression remain unclear. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression by modulating the biological function of lesional macrophages. HypoE (Apoe(h/h)Mx1-Cre) mice express low levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) and develop atherosclerosis when fed a high-fat diet. Atherosclerosis regression occurs in these mice upon plasma lipid lowering induced by a change in diet and the restoration of apoE expression. We examined the morphological characteristics of regressed lesions and assessed the biological function of lesional macrophages isolated with laser-capture microdissection in euglycemic and hyperglycemic HypoE mice. Hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin treatment impaired lesion size reduction (36% versus 14%) and lipid loss (38% versus 26%) after the reversal of hyperlipidemia. However, decreases in lesional macrophage content and remodeling in both groups of mice were similar. Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperglycemia impaired cholesterol transport by modulating ATP-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, scavenger receptor class B family member (CD36), scavenger receptor class B1, and wound healing pathways in lesional macrophages during atherosclerosis regression. Hyperglycemia impairs both reduction in size and loss of lipids from atherosclerotic lesions upon plasma lipid lowering without significantly affecting the remodeling of the vascular wall.

  10. Effect of ammonia on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Casey, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC /50/ values were determined for Swiss albino male mice exposed to different concentrations of ammonia in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC/50/ for a 30 minute exposure was 21,430 ppm.

  11. Non-invasive physiology in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Kale, Ajit; Amende, Ivo; Piskorski, Katrina; Chu, Victor; Otero, Jose M; Mueller, Peter; Hampton, Thomas G

    2004-06-01

    Linking gene defect to disease phenotypes in mice has become an essential step in the development of new drugs. Yet, many in vitro and in vivo assays require anaesthetic and surgery or do not reflect physiologically relevant phenomena. The effects of genes or diseases may only become apparent with stressors. Here, we apply non-invasive ECG monitoring and gait imaging systems to describe changes in the electrocardiogram and in gait dynamics resulting from a doubling of the ambulatory speed of mice. We found that B6C3H mice (n = 5) take 3.6 +/- 0.1 strides/second to walk 18cm/second and have a heart rate of 750 +/- 2bpm after 1 minute of walking at this speed. These mice significantly increase stride frequency to 5.2 +/- 0.1 strides/second in order to increase their speed to 36cm/second. The heart rate increased significantly (814 +/- 9bpm, p < 0.05) after trotting at the higher speed for 90 seconds, and the QRS interval duration significantly decreased (9.4 +/- 0.3ms vs. 10.4 +/- 0.3ms, p < 0.05). We discuss the application of the ECG screening and gait imaging systems to mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Down syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, diseases in humans that are known to affect the heart and neuromuscular systems.

  12. Generation of Gene Knockout Mice by ES Cell Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Glenn; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    This unit lists and describes protocols used in the production of chimeric mice leading to the generation of gene knockout mice. These protocols include the collection of blastocyst embryos, ES cell injection, and uterine transfer of injected blastocysts. Support protocols in the superovulation of blastocyst donor mice, generation of pseudopregnant recipients, fabrication of glass pipettes, and generation of germline mice are also included. Practical tips and solutions are mentioned to help troubleshoot problems that may occur. PMID:19731226

  13. [Mice are not Men and yet… how humanized mice inform us about human infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Cachat, Anne; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2012-01-01

    The study of human pathologies is often limited by the absence of animal models which are robust, cost-effective and reproduce the hallmarks of human infections. While mice have been frequently employed to study human diseases, many of important pathogens display unique human tropism. These last two decades the graft of human progenitor cells or tissues into -immunodeficient mice has allowed the elaboration of so called humanized mice. Humanized mouse technology has made rapid progress, and it is now possible to achieve high levels of human chimerism in various organs and tissues, particularly the immune system and the liver. The review briefly summarizes the different models of humanized mice available for in vivo experiments. With a focus on lymphotropic, monocytotropic and hepatotropic viruses, we here discuss the current status and future prospects of these models for studying the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Furthermore, they provide a powerful tool for the development of innovative therapies.

  14. Neural Tube Defects In Mice Exposed To Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Murali K; Werre, Stephen R; Hrubec, Terry C

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2006 we suddenly began to observe neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice. We hypothesized the mice were being exposed unknowingly to a teratogenic agent and investigated the cause. Our results suggested that NTDs were not resulting from bedding material, feed, strain or source of the mice. Additionally, mice were negative for routine and comprehensive screens of pathogens. To further test whether the NTDs resulted from infectious or genetic cause localized to our facility, we obtained three strains of timed pregnant mice from commercial suppliers located in 4 different states. All strains and sources of mice arrived in our laboratory with NTDs, implying that commercially available mice were possibly exposed to a teratogen prior to purchase. Our investigation eventually concluded that exposure to tap water was causing the NTDs. The incidence of NTDs was greatest in purchased mice provided tap water and lowest in purchased mice provided distilled deionized water (DDI). Providing mice DDI water for two generations (F2-DDI) eliminated the NTDs. When F2-DDI mice were provided tap water from three different urban areas prior to breeding, their offspring again developed NTDs. Increased length of exposure to tap water significantly increased the incidence of NTDs. These results indicate that a contaminant in municipal tap water is likely causing NTDs in mice. The unknown teratogen appears to have a wide geographic distribution but has not yet been identified. Water analysis is currently underway to identify candidate contaminants that might be responsible for the malformations. PMID:20549630

  15. Caloric Restriction Chronically Impairs Metabolic Programming in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Henriette; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Fischer-Rosinský, Antje; Hembree, Jazzminn; Abplanalp, William; Ottaway, Nickki; Donelan, Elizabeth; Krishna, Radha; Woods, Stephen C.; Müller, Timo D.; Spranger, Joachim; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul T.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Habegger, Kirk M.

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity rates are rapidly rising, caloric restriction remains one of the few safe therapies. Here we tested the hypothesis that obesity-associated disorders are caused by increased adipose tissue as opposed to excess dietary lipids. Fat mass (FM) of lean C57B6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD; FMC mice) was “clamped” to match the FM of mice maintained on a low-fat diet (standard diet [SD] mice). FMC mice displayed improved glucose and insulin tolerance as compared with ad libitum HFD mice (P < 0.001) or SD mice (P < 0.05). These improvements were associated with fewer signs of inflammation, consistent with the less-impaired metabolism. In follow-up studies, diet-induced obese mice were food restricted for 5 weeks to achieve FM levels identical with those of age-matched SD mice. Previously, obese mice exhibited improved glucose and insulin tolerance but showed markedly increased fasting-induced hyperphagia (P < 0.001). When mice were given ad libitum access to the HFD, the hyperphagia of these mice led to accelerated body weight gain as compared with otherwise matched controls without a history of obesity. These results suggest that although caloric restriction on a HFD provides metabolic benefits, maintaining those benefits may require lifelong continuation, at least in individuals with a history of obesity. PMID:22787140

  16. Effect of chrysotile asbestos fibers on germ cells of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, P.; Reddy, P.P.

    1986-10-01

    An Indian form of chrysotile asbestos procured from a local asbestos factory (Hyderabad) was tested for its toxic effects on spermatocytes and sperm of mice. Swiss albino male mice were fed orally with chrysotile asbestos suspended in water. The concentration tested was 20 mg/kg/day. Chronic oral administration of chrysotile failed to induce chromosomal aberrations and abnormal sperms in mice.

  17. The Mice Drawer System (MDS) experiment and the space endurance record-breaking mice.

    PubMed

    Cancedda, Ranieri; Liu, Yi; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Tavella, Sara; Biticchi, Roberta; Santucci, Daniela; Schwartz, Silvia; Ciparelli, Paolo; Falcetti, Giancarlo; Tenconi, Chiara; Cotronei, Vittorio; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The Italian Space Agency, in line with its scientific strategies and the National Utilization Plan for the International Space Station (ISS), contracted Thales Alenia Space Italia to design and build a spaceflight payload for rodent research on ISS: the Mice Drawer System (MDS). The payload, to be integrated inside the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation and inside the Express Rack in the ISS during experiment execution, was designed to function autonomously for more than 3 months and to involve crew only for maintenance activities. In its first mission, three wild type (Wt) and three transgenic male mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the control of a bone-specific promoter (PTN-Tg) were housed in the MDS. At the time of launch, animals were 2-months old. MDS reached the ISS on board of Shuttle Discovery Flight 17A/STS-128 on August 28(th), 2009. MDS returned to Earth on November 27(th), 2009 with Shuttle Atlantis Flight ULF3/STS-129 after 91 days, performing the longest permanence of mice in space. Unfortunately, during the MDS mission, one PTN-Tg and two Wt mice died due to health status or payload-related reasons. The remaining mice showed a normal behavior throughout the experiment and appeared in excellent health conditions at landing. During the experiment, the mice health conditions and their water and food consumption were daily checked. Upon landing mice were sacrificed, blood parameters measured and tissues dissected for subsequent analysis. To obtain as much information as possible on microgravity-induced tissue modifications, we organized a Tissue Sharing Program: 20 research groups from 6 countries participated. In order to distinguish between possible effects of the MDS housing conditions and effects due to the near-zero gravity environment, a ground replica of the flight experiment was performed at the University of Genova. Control tissues were collected also from mice maintained on Earth in standard vivarium cages.

  18. The Mice Drawer System (MDS) Experiment and the Space Endurance Record-Breaking Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cancedda, Ranieri; Liu, Yi; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Tavella, Sara; Biticchi, Roberta; Santucci, Daniela; Schwartz, Silvia; Ciparelli, Paolo; Falcetti, Giancarlo; Tenconi, Chiara; Cotronei, Vittorio; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The Italian Space Agency, in line with its scientific strategies and the National Utilization Plan for the International Space Station (ISS), contracted Thales Alenia Space Italia to design and build a spaceflight payload for rodent research on ISS: the Mice Drawer System (MDS). The payload, to be integrated inside the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation and inside the Express Rack in the ISS during experiment execution, was designed to function autonomously for more than 3 months and to involve crew only for maintenance activities. In its first mission, three wild type (Wt) and three transgenic male mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the control of a bone-specific promoter (PTN-Tg) were housed in the MDS. At the time of launch, animals were 2-months old. MDS reached the ISS on board of Shuttle Discovery Flight 17A/STS-128 on August 28th, 2009. MDS returned to Earth on November 27th, 2009 with Shuttle Atlantis Flight ULF3/STS-129 after 91 days, performing the longest permanence of mice in space. Unfortunately, during the MDS mission, one PTN-Tg and two Wt mice died due to health status or payload-related reasons. The remaining mice showed a normal behavior throughout the experiment and appeared in excellent health conditions at landing. During the experiment, the mice health conditions and their water and food consumption were daily checked. Upon landing mice were sacrificed, blood parameters measured and tissues dissected for subsequent analysis. To obtain as much information as possible on microgravity-induced tissue modifications, we organized a Tissue Sharing Program: 20 research groups from 6 countries participated. In order to distinguish between possible effects of the MDS housing conditions and effects due to the near-zero gravity environment, a ground replica of the flight experiment was performed at the University of Genova. Control tissues were collected also from mice maintained on Earth in standard vivarium cages. PMID:22666312

  19. The Skeletal Phenotype of Chondroadherin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wenglén, Christina; Petzold, Christiane; Tanner, Elizabeth K.; Brorson, Sverre-Henning; Baekkevold, Espen S.; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Reinholt, Finn P.; Heinegård, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Chondroadherin, a leucine rich repeat extracellular matrix protein with functions in cell to matrix interactions, binds cells via their α2β1 integrin as well as via cell surface proteoglycans, providing for different sets of signals to the cell. Additionally, the protein acts as an anchor to the matrix by binding tightly to collagens type I and II as well as type VI. We generated mice with inactivated chondroadherin gene to provide integrated studies of the role of the protein. The null mice presented distinct phenotypes with affected cartilage as well as bone. At 3–6 weeks of age the epiphyseal growth plate was widened most pronounced in the proliferative zone. The proteome of the femoral head articular cartilage at 4 months of age showed some distinct differences, with increased deposition of cartilage intermediate layer protein 1 and fibronectin in the chondroadherin deficient mice, more pronounced in the female. Other proteins show decreased levels in the deficient mice, particularly pronounced for matrilin-1, thrombospondin-1 and notably the members of the α1-antitrypsin family of proteinase inhibitors as well as for a member of the bone morphogenetic protein growth factor family. Thus, cartilage homeostasis is distinctly altered. The bone phenotype was expressed in several ways. The number of bone sialoprotein mRNA expressing cells in the proximal tibial metaphysic was decreased and the osteoid surface was increased possibly indicating a change in mineral metabolism. Micro-CT revealed lower cortical thickness and increased structure model index, i.e. the amount of plates and rods composing the bone trabeculas. The structural changes were paralleled by loss of function, where the null mice showed lower femoral neck failure load and tibial strength during mechanical testing at 4 months of age. The skeletal phenotype points at a role for chondroadherin in both bone and cartilage homeostasis, however, without leading to altered longitudinal growth. PMID

  20. Ascaris: development of selected genotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weidong; Yuan, Keng; Peng, Guohua; Qiu, Lin; Dai, Zhifang; Yuan, Fang; Hu, Yinying; Hu, Ningyan

    2012-05-01

    Using nucleotide variation in the first internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA, five different genotypes (designated G1-G5) have been identified and the preponderance of genotype G1 in humans and of genotype G3 in pigs led to the proposal that parasites bearing the two genotypes have an affinity for a particular host species. A subsequent study using eggs of genotype G1 from humans and G3 from pigs to infect pigs and mice indicated that there is a significant difference in the ability to infect and establish as larvae in mice and as adults in pigs between the two genotypes. Extending previous investigations, the present study investigated whether there are differences in development as designated by egg hatching, larvae migration and distribution in the mice between the Ascaris strains with known genotypes. Ascaris eggs of genotypes G1 (predominating in human-derived worms) and G3 (predominating in pig-derived worms) were used to infect C57BL/6 mice orally. Eggs/larvae were examined from the small and large intestines, thoracic and abdominal cavities, peripheral blood, livers and lungs at intervals of 2h until 12h post-infection, then periodically until 34 days of infection. Results showed distinct differences in egg hatching (the timing and location of hatching, and the numbers hatched), and in larvae migration and distribution (the means and constituent ratios, the time of peak recovery, and larvae reappearing in intestines) between the two strains. The results can explain the findings of significantly higher larval recovery of genotype G1 than G3 in the mice, and may shed some enlightenment to understand the difference in host affiliation of Ascaris of different genotypes.

  1. NSG Mice Provide a Better Spontaneous Model of Breast Cancer Metastasis than Athymic (Nude) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puchalapalli, Madhavi; Zeng, Xianke; Mu, Liang; Anderson, Aubree; Hix Glickman, Laura; Zhang, Ming; Sayyad, Megan R.; Mosticone Wangensteen, Sierra; Clevenger, Charles V.; Koblinski, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most common cause of mortality in breast cancer patients worldwide. To identify improved mouse models for breast cancer growth and spontaneous metastasis, we examined growth and metastasis of both estrogen receptor positive (T47D) and negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM1315, and CN34BrM) human breast cancer cells in nude and NSG mice. Both primary tumor growth and spontaneous metastases were increased in NSG mice compared to nude mice. In addition, a pattern of metastasis similar to that observed in human breast cancer patients (metastases to the lungs, liver, bones, brain, and lymph nodes) was found in NSG mice. Furthermore, there was an increase in the metastatic burden in NSG compared to nude mice that were injected with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in an intracardiac experimental metastasis model. This data demonstrates that NSG mice provide a better model for studying human breast cancer metastasis compared to the current nude mouse model. PMID:27662655

  2. Wound healing in hemophilia B mice and low tissue factor mice.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Dougald M; Mackman, Nigel; Hoffman, Maureane

    2010-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of physiologic mechanisms including coagulation, inflammation, formation of granulation tissue, and tissue remodeling. Coagulation with robust thrombin generation leading to fibrin formation is necessary for wound healing. It is less clear if there is a requirement for ongoing coagulation to support tissue remodeling. We have studied wound healing in mice with defects in both the initiation (low tissue factor) and propagation (hemophilia B) phases. In hemophilia B mice, dermal wound healing is delayed; this delay is associated with bleeding into the granulation tissue. Mice can be treated with replacement therapy (factor IX) or bypassing agents (factor VIIa) to restore thrombin generation. If treated just prior to wound placement, mice will have normal hemostasis in the first day of wound healing. As the therapeutic agents clear, the mice will revert to hemophilic state. If the primary role of coagulation in wound healing is to provide a stable platelet/fibrin plug that is loaded with thrombin, then treating hemophilic animals just prior to wound placement should restore normal wound healing. The results from this study did not support that hypothesis. Instead the results show that restoring thrombin generation only at the time of wound placement did not improve the delayed wound healing. In preliminary studies on low tissue factor mice, there also appears to be a delay in wound healing with evidence of bleeding into the granulation tissue. The current data suggests that ongoing coagulation function needs to be maintained to support a normal wound healing process.

  3. Defective bone microstructure in hydronephrotic mice: a histomorphometric study in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice.

    PubMed

    Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Wongdee, Kannikar; Tiyasatkulkovit, Wacharaporn; Ampawong, Sumate; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Kengkoom, Kanchana; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2014-02-01

    Chronic renal impairment can lead to bone deterioration and abnormal bone morphology, but whether hydronephrosis is associated with bone loss remains unclear. Herein, we aimed to use computer-assisted bone histomorphometric technique to investigate microstructural bone changes in Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice with a spontaneous mutation that was associated with bilateral nonobstructive hydronephrosis (ICR/Mlac-hydro). The results showed that 8-week-old ICR/Mlac-hydro mice manifested decreases in trabecular bone number and thickness, and an increased trabecular separation, thereby leading to a reduction in trabecular bone volume compared with the wild-type mice. Furthermore, histomorphometric parameters related to both bone resorption and formation, that is, eroded surface, osteoclast surface, and osteoblast surface, were much lower in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice than in the wild type. A decrease in moment of inertia was found in ICR/Mlac-hydro mice, indicating a decrease in bone strength. In conclusion, ICR/Mlac-hydro mice exhibited trabecular bone loss, presumably caused by marked decreases in both osteoblast and osteoclast activities, which together reflected abnormally low bone turnover. Thus, this mouse strain appeared to be a valuable model for studying the hydronephrosis-associated bone disease.

  4. Oral lactoferrin protects against experimental candidiasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Alsaedi, Wijdan; Alabdulmohsen, Waad; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fine, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To determine the role of lactoferrin in protecting the oral cavities of mice against Candida albicans infection in lactoferrin knockout (LFKO−/−) mice were compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We also determine the protective role of human lactoferrin in the LFKO−/− mice. Methods and Results Antibiotic treated immunosuppressed mice were inoculated with C. albicans (or sham infection) by oral swab and evaluated for the severity of infection after 7 days of infection. To determine the protective role of hLF, we added 0.3% solution of hLF to the drinking water given to some of the mice. CFU count, scoring of lesions and microscopic observations were carried out to determine the severity of infection. LFKO−/−I mice showed a 2 log (P=0.001) higher CFUs of C. albicans in the oral cavity compared to the WTI mice. LFKO−/−I mice given hLF had a 3 log (P=0.001) reduction in CFUs in the oral cavity compared to untreated LFKO−/−I mice. The severity of infection, observed by light microscopy revealed that the tongue of the LFKO−/−I mice showed more white patches compared to WTI and LFKO−/−I+hLF mice. Scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that more filiform papillae were destroyed in LFKO−/−I mice when compared to WTI or LFKO−/−I +hLF mice. Conclusions Human lactoferrin is important in protecting mice from oral C. albicans infection. Administered hLF may be used to prevent C. albicans infection. Significance and Impact of the Study Human lactoferrin, a multifunctional iron-binding glycoprotein can be used as a therapeutic active ingredient in oral health care products against C. albicans. PMID:25319508

  5. Cardiomyocyte ultrastructural damage in β-thalassaemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanyear, Chanita; Butthep, Punnee; Nithipongvanich, Ramaneeya; Sirankapracha, Pornpan; Winichagoon, Pranee; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros

    2013-01-01

    β-thalassaemia is a hereditary anaemia resulting from the absence or reduction in β-globin chain production. Heart complications related to iron overload are the most serious cause of death in these patients. In this report cardiac pathology of β-thalassaemic mice was evaluated by light and electron microscopy. The study was carried out in thalassaemic mice carrying human β-thalassaemia mutation, IVSII-654 (654), transgenic mice carrying human βE-globin transgene insertion (E4), thalassaemic mice with human βE-globin transgene insertion (654/E4) and homozygous thalassaemic mice rescued by the human βE-globin transgene (R), which is generated by cross-breeding between the 654 and E4 mice. Histology showed iron deposition in cardiac myocytes of 654 and R mice, but the ultrastructural damage was observed only in the R mice when compared with the wild type, 654, E4 and 654/E4 mice. Histopathological changes in the cardiomyocytes of the R mice included mitochondrial swelling, loss of myofilaments and the presence of lipofuscin, related to the increased level of tissue iron content. The progressive ultrastructural pathology in R mice cardiomyocytes is consistent with the ultrastructural pathology previously studied in patients with thalassaemia. Thus, this R thalassaemic mouse model is suitable for in vivo pathophysiological study of thalassaemic heart. PMID:24020406

  6. Chronic stress impairs collateral blood flow recovery in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Sood, Subeena; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Jhamnani, Sunny; Aghili, Nima; Nashin, Hajra; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti; Epstein, Stephen E; Burnett, Mary Susan

    2014-11-01

    Chronic stress is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Aging is also associated with vascular dysfunction. We hypothesize that chronic stress accelerates collateral dysfunction in old mice. Mice were subjected to either chronic social defeat (CSD) or chronic cold stress (CCS). The CSD mice were housed in a box inside an aggressor's cage and exposed to the aggressor. The CCS group was placed in iced water. After chronic stress, mice underwent femoral artery ligation (FAL) and flow recovery was measured. For the CSD group, appearance and use scores of the foot and a behavioral test were performed. CSD impaired collateral flow recovery after FAL. Further, stressed mice had greater ischemic damage, impaired foot function, and altered behavior. The CCS mice also showed impaired collateral flow recovery. Chronic stress causes hind limb collateral dysfunction in old mice, a conclusion reinforced by the fact that two types of stress produced similar changes.

  7. Effect of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on ICR mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC(50) values were determined for male ICR mice exposed to different concentration of carbon monoxide for 30 min and of nitrogen dioxide for 10 min in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The data indicate that ICR mice are more resistant to these two toxicants than Swiss albino mice. The carbon monoxide LC(50) for a 30-min exposure was about 8,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to 3,570 ppm for Swiss albino mice. The nitrogen dioxide LC(50) for a 10-min exposure was above 2,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to about 1,000 ppm for Swiss albino mice.

  8. Microglial cells from psychologically stressed mice as an accelerator of cerebral cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masae; Jones, Vickie C; Kobayashi, Makiko; Suzuki, Fujio

    2006-12-01

    Severe stress decreases the resistance of hosts exposed to microbial infections. As compared with two groups of control mice (normal mice, food-and-water-deprived mice [FWD mice]), restraint-stressed mice (RST mice) were shown to be greatly susceptible to intracerebral growth of Cryptococcus neoformans. The susceptibility of FWD mice to cerebral cryptococcosis increased to the level shown in RST mice, when these groups of mice were inoculated with microglial cells from the brains of RST mice. However, the susceptibility of FWD mice to cerebral cryptococcosis was not influenced by the adoptive transfer of microglial cells from normal mice or FWD mice. Microglial cells from RST mice produced CC-chemokine ligand-2 (CCL-2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), but not microglial cells from FWD mice. The resistance of RST mice to cerebral cryptococcosis was improved to the extent shown in FWD mice, when they were treated with anti-CCL-2 antibody. However, the susceptibility of normal mice and FWD mice to cerebral cryptococcosis increased to that shown in RST mice, when they were treated with rCCL-2. Microglial cells from RST mice were discriminated from the same cell preparations derived from FWD mice by their abilities to produce CCL-2, to phagocytize C. neoformans cells and to express Toll-like receptor 2. These results indicate that the resistance of RST mice to cerebral cryptococcosis is diminished by CCL-2 produced by microglial cells that are influenced by restraint stress.

  9. Acute acetaminophen toxicity in transgenic mice with elevated hepatic glutathione.

    PubMed

    Rzucidlo, S J; Bounous, D I; Jones, D P; Brackett, B G

    2000-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that elevation of hepatic glutathione (GSH) concentrations protect against acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity in mice. Employing transgenic mice overexpressing glutathione synthetase, this study was conducted to determine if sustained elevation of hepatic GSH concentrations could ameliorate or prevent APAP toxicity. International Cancer Research transgenic mouse males and matched (ie same strain, sex, and age) control nontransgenic mice were pretreated ip with GSH synthetase substrate gamma-glutamylcysteinyl ethyl ester (gamma-GCE) or with saline. After a 16-h fast, mice received a single dose of 500 mg APAP/kg bw in saline ip and were sacrificed 4 h later. Other mice similarly pretreated were killed without APAP challenge. The elevated GSH concentrations in transgenic mice livers did not lessen APAP hepatotoxicity. Instead higher degrees of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were observed in transgenic mice than in controls as indicated by higher serum alanine aminotransferase activity and more severe histopathological lesions in transgenic mice livers and kidneys. Pretreatment with gamma-GCE did not affect either initial or post-APAP treatment tissue GSH concentrations or observed degrees of toxicity. Detection of a higher level of serum APAP in transgenic mice and the histopathological lesions found in transgenic mice kidneys together with no observable nephrotoxicity in control mice indicated early kidney damage in transgenic mice. Our findings suggest that high levels of GSH-APAP conjugates resulting from increased GSH concentrations in the livers of transgenic mice caused rapid kidney damage. Compromised excretory ability may have caused retention of APAP, which, in effect, elicited higher hepatotoxicity than that observed in nontransgenic mice.

  10. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    Background: The immune response is blunted in mice and humans in spaceflight. The effects of hyperoxia in mice alter expression of some of the same immune response genes. If these two conditions are additive, there could be an increased risk of infection in long duration missions. Immunosuppression is seen in healthy astronauts who have flown in space; however little is known about the mechanisms that cause the reduced immunity in spaceflight. Here we examine the role of oxidative stress on mice exposed to periods of high O2 levels mimicking pre-breathing protocols and extravehicular activity (EVA). To prevent decompression sickness, astronauts are exposed to elevated oxygen (hyperoxia) before and during EVA activities. Spaceflight missions may entail up to 24 hours of EVA per crewmember per week to perform construction and maintenance tasks. The effectiveness and success of these missions depends on designing EVA systems and protocols that maximize human performance and efficiency while minimizing health and safety risks for crewmembers. To our knowledge, no studies have been conducted on the immune system under 100% oxygen exposures to determine the potential for immune compromise due to prolonged and repeated EVAs. Methods: Animals were exposed to hyperoxic or control conditions for 8 hours per day over a period of 3 days, initiated 4 hours into the dark cycle (12h dark/12h light), using animal environmental control cabinets and oxygen controller (Biospherix, Lacona, NY). Experimental mice were exposed to 98-100% oxygen as a model for pre-breathing and EVA conditions, while control mice were maintained in chambers supplied with compressed air. These are ground control studies where we use real-time RTPCR (qRTPCR) to measure gene expression of the early immune gene expression during bead activation of splenocytes of normoxic and hyperoxic mice. All procedures were reviewed and approved by the IACUC at Ames Research Center. After the last 8h of hyperoxic exposure

  11. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  12. Running enhances spatial pattern separation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Creer, David J.; Romberg, Carola; Saksida, Lisa M.; van Praag, Henriette; Bussey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that regular exercise improves brain health and promotes synaptic plasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise improves learning, but specific mechanisms of information processing influenced by physical activity are unknown. Here, we report that voluntary running enhanced the ability of adult (3 months old) male C57BL/6 mice to discriminate between the locations of two adjacent identical stimuli. Improved spatial pattern separation in adult runners was tightly correlated with increased neurogenesis. In contrast, very aged (22 months old) mice had impaired spatial discrimination and low basal cell genesis that was refractory to running. These findings suggest that the addition of newly born neurons may bolster dentate gyrus-mediated encoding of fine spatial distinctions. PMID:20133882

  13. Progress on the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.; Lau, W.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-06-10

    This report describes the 400 mm warm bore tracker solenoid for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The 2.923 m long tracker solenoid module includes the radiation shutter between the end absorber focus coil modules and the tracker as well as the 2.735 m long magnet cryostat vacuum vessel. The 2.554 m long tracker solenoid cold mass consists of two sections, a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil matching section that matches the uniform field 4 T spectrometer solenoid into the MICE cooling channel. The two tracker magnets are used to provide a uniform magnetic field for the fiber detectors that are used to measure the muon beam emittance at the two ends of the cooling channel. This paper describes the design for the tracker magnet coils and the 4.2 K cryogenic coolers that are used to cool the superconducting magnet. Interfaces between the magnet and the detectors are discussed.

  14. MISS- Mice on International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcetti, G. C.; Schiller, P.

    2005-08-01

    The use of rodents for scientific research to bridge the gap between cellular biology and human physiology is a new challenge within the history of successful developments of biological facilities. The ESA funded MISS Phase A/B study is aimed at developing a design concept for an animal holding facility able to support experimentation with mice on board the International Space Station (ISS).The MISS facility is composed of two main parts:1. The MISS Rack to perform scientific experiments onboard the ISS.2. The MISS Animals Transport Container (ATC) totransport animals from ground to orbit and vice- versa.The MISS facility design takes into account guidelines and recommendations used for mice well-being in ground laboratories. A summary of the MISS Rack and MISS ATC design concept is hereafter provided.

  15. Circadian Dysfunction Induces Leptin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Mayo, Sara A; Hua, Jack; Lee, Choogon; Moore, David D; Fu, Loning

    2015-09-01

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt overall energy homeostasis and Leptin signaling. We found that BMAL1/CLOCK generates circadian rhythm of C/EBPα-mediated leptin transcription in adipose. Per and Cry mutant mice show similar disruption of peripheral clock and deregulation of leptin in fat, but opposite body weight and composition phenotypes that correlate with their distinct patterns of POMC neuron deregulation in the arcuate nucleus. Chronic jet lag is sufficient to disrupt the endogenous adipose clock and also induce central Leptin resistance in wild-type mice. Thus, coupling of the central and peripheral clocks controls Leptin endocrine feedback homeostasis. We propose that Leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity in humans, plays a key role in circadian dysfunction-induced obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  16. STUDIES ON TRANSMISSIBLE LYMPHOID LEUCEMIA OF MICE.

    PubMed

    Furth, J; Strumia, M

    1931-04-30

    Lymphoid leucemia of the mouse is readily transmitted by intravenous inoculations. The majority of the mice inoculated successfully develop leucemic, a smaller number of them, aleucemic lymphadenosis. The data presented favor the view that leucemic and aleucemic lymphadenosis are essentially the same condition. Leucemia produced by transmission is preceded by an aleucemic stage, in which the lymph nodes and the spleen are uniformly enlarged, and the white blood count and the percentage of lymphocytes are within the normal range but immature lymphocytes are numerous in the circulating blood. Young as well as old mice may develop leucemia if leucotic material enters their circulation. Studies of transmissible leucemia favor the view that leucemia of mammals is a neoplastic disease. The basic problem of leucemia would seem to be determination of the factors that bring about a malignant transformation of lymphoid cells.

  17. Human malignant melanoma heterotransplanted to nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tropé, C; Johnsson, J E; Alm, P; Landberg, T; Olsson, H; Wennerberg, J

    1981-01-01

    Five different human malignant melanoma were heterotransplanted subcutaneously to nude mice. When small tissue pieces were used 3 out of 5 tumors grew. Subcutaneous injections of suspended tumor cells were also made, but all failed to take. Metastatic or infiltrative growth was never seen in the mice observed for up to 2.5 months. The successful grafts largely retained the original morphologicaL features. The three successfully transplanted tumors could all be serially transferred with 100% tumor take. In one case passage time was reduced from 40 days to 15 days. As measured with 3H-thymidine incorporation the proliferation rate increased during the passages. These changes might be due to a selection of more rapidly growing tumor cells in the nudes.

  18. Antidepressant Activity of Brahmi in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kadali, SLDV Ramana Murty; M.C., Das; Rao A.S.R., Srinivasa; Sri G, Karuna

    2014-01-01

    Context: In traditional system of medicine brahmi has been used to enhance memory. Recently it has been reported to have action in psychiatric disorders. With these backgrounds the work has been undertaken to study antidepressant activity of brahmi in albino mice. Aim: To evaluate antidepressant activity of brahmi in experimental models. Materials and Methods: The antidepressant activity was studied in albino mice using forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and shock induced depression (SID). Imipramine (10mg/kg), fluoxetine (30mg/kg) were used as standard drugs and brahmi (10, 20, 30mg/kg) was used as test drug. Results: Brahmi exhibited significant decrease in duration of immobility in FST and reduced the shock induced decrease in activity in SID models. It didn’t show any activity in the TST model. Conclusion: Brahmi has shown antidepressant activity in FST and SID. PMID:24783074

  19. Construction noise decreases reproductive efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Skye; Glickman, Gary; Norinsky, Rada; Quimby, Fred W; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2009-07-01

    Excessive noise is well known to impair rodent health. To better understand the effect of construction noise and to establish effective noise limits during a planned expansion of our vivarium, we analyzed the effects of construction noise on mouse gestation and neonatal growth. Our hypothesis was that high levels of construction noise would reduce the number of live births and retard neonatal growth. Female Swiss Webster mice were individually implanted with 15 B6CBAF1/J embryos and then exposed to 70- and 90-dBA concrete saw cutting noise samples at defined time points during gestation. In addition, groups of mice with litters were exposed to noise at 70, 80, or 90 dBA for 1 h daily during the first week after parturition. Litter size, birth weight, incidence of stillborn pups, and rate of neonatal weight gain were analyzed. Noise decreased reproductive efficiency by decreasing live birth rates and increasing the number of stillborn pups.

  20. The origin of common laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Y

    1995-02-01

    The house mouse is one of the model organisms in genetics and more than 400 inbred strains have been established. However, many of the strains are related and their ancestry can be traced back to European fancy mice inbred in the 1920s. Recent molecular studies corroborate the early historical records that assert that Japanese fancy mice were introduced into European stocks and thus contributed to the development of "old" inbred strains. Consequently, many inbred strains have genomic DNA derived from more than one subspecies of Mus musculus. The subspecific hybrid origin of common inbred strains has important bearings on the interpretation of genetic data, and the limitations that history imposes upon the currently available strains make it necessary to establish new inbred strains representing specific wild populations.

  1. Oxytocin and behavior: Lessons from knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Heather K; Aulino, Elizabeth A; Freeman, Angela R; Miller, Travis V; Witchey, Shannah K

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that the nonapeptide oxytocin (Oxt) is important for the neural modulation of behaviors in many mammalian species. Since its discovery in 1906 and synthesis in the early 1950s, elegant pharmacological work has helped identify specific neural substrates on which Oxt exerts its effects. More recently, mice with targeted genetic disruptions of the Oxt system-i.e., both the peptide and its receptor (the Oxtr)-have further defined Oxt's actions and laid some important scientific groundwork for studies in other species. In this article, we highlight the scientific contributions that various mouse knockouts of the Oxt system have made to our understanding of Oxt's modulation of behavior. We specifically focus on how the use of these mice has shed light on our understanding of social recognition memory, maternal behavior, aggression, and several nonsocial behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 190-201, 2017.

  2. Natural effector T lymphocytes in normal mice.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, P; Larsson, E L; Forni, L; Bandeira, A; Coutinho, A

    1985-01-01

    The "natural" T-cell activity in normal unimmunized mice was studied. By double-parameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, it was found that 5-10% of all splenic Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ lymphocytes are large, of which more than half are in mitotic cycle. In contrast with small resting cells of the same phenotype, activated (large) T cells isolated from normal mice are functional effector cells: L3T4+ large cells induce normal B lymphocytes into proliferation and antibody secretion, while large Lyt-2+ cells efficiently suppress B-lymphocyte responses. No effector cell cytolytic activity could be detected among naturally activated T cells. The significance of these findings for the internal activity in the normal immune system is discussed. PMID:2933744

  3. Hoxc13 mutant mice lack external hair.

    PubMed

    Godwin, A R; Capecchi, M R

    1998-01-01

    Hox genes are usually expressed temporally and spatially in a colinear manner with respect to their positions in the Hox complex. Consistent with the expected pattern for a paralogous group 13 member, early embryonic Hoxc13 expression is found in the nails and tail. Hoxc13 is also expressed in vibrissae, in the filiform papillae of the tongue, and in hair follicles throughout the body; a pattern that apparently violates spatial colinearity. Mice carrying mutant alleles of Hoxc13 have been generated by gene targeting. Homozygotes have defects in every region in which gene expression is seen. The most striking defect is brittle hair resulting in alopecia (hairless mice). One explanation for this novel role is that Hoxc13 has been recruited for a function common to hair, nail, and filiform papilla development.

  4. PUMA Suppresses Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Carson-Walter, Eleanor B.; Kuan, Shih Fan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Defective apoptosis contributes to tumorigenesis, although the critical molecular targets remain to be fully characterized. PUMA, a BH3-only protein essential for p53-dependent apoptosis, has been shown to suppress lymphomagenesis. In this study, we investigated the role of PUMA in intestinal tumorigenesis using two animal models. In the azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium salt model, PUMA deficiency increased the multiplicity and size of colon tumors but reduced the frequency of β-catenin hotspot mutations. The absence of PUMA led to a significantly elevated incidence of precursor lesions induced by AOM. AOM was found to induce p53-dependent PUMA expression and PUMA-dependent apoptosis in the colonic crypts and stem cell compartment. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency significantly enhanced the formation of spontaneous macroadenomas and microadenomas in the distal small intestine and colon of APCMin/+ mice. These results show an essential role of PUMA-mediated apoptosis in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis in mice. PMID:19491259

  5. Localization of antigens PwA33 and La on lampbrush chromosomes and on nucleoplasmic structures in the oocyte of the urodele Pleurodeles waltl: light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Pyne, C K; Simon, F; Loones, M T; Géraud, G; Bachmann, M; Lacroix, J C

    1994-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies A33/22 and La11G7 have been used to study the distribution of the corresponding antigens, PwA33 and La, on the lampbrush chromosome loops and nucleoplasmic structures of P. waltl oocytes, using immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunogold labeling. The results obtained with these antibodies have been compared with those obtained with the Sm-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody Y12. All these monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) labeled the matrices of the majority of normal loops along their whole length. Nucleoplasmic RNP granules showed a strong staining with the mAbs La11G7 and Y12 throughout their mass, but with the mAb A33/22, they showed only a weak peripheral labeling in the form of patches on their surface. This patchy labeling was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Electron microscopy revealed that this patchy labeling might be due to a hitherto undescribed type of submicroscopic granular structure, around 100 nm in either dimension, formed by 10-nm particles. Such granules were observed either attached to the RNP granules or free in the nucleoplasm, but rarely in relation with the normal loop matrices. These 100-nm granules may have a role in the movement of proteins and snRNPs inside the oocyte nuclei for storage, recycling, and/or degradation. Our results also suggest that all the microscopically visible free RNP granules of the nucleoplasm of P. waltl oocytes correspond to B snurposomes. The granules forming the B (globular) loops showed a labeling pattern similar to that of B snurposomes; their possible relationship is discussed.

  6. MICE data handling on the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyniak, J.; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The international Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate the principle of muon ionisation cooling for the first time, for application to a future Neutrino factory or Muon Collider. The experiment is currently under construction at the ISIS synchrotron at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), UK. In this paper we present a system - the Raw Data Mover, which allows us to store and distribute MICE raw data - and a framework for offline reconstruction and data management. The aim of the Raw Data Mover is to upload raw data files onto a safe tape storage as soon as the data have been written out by the DAQ system and marked as ready to be uploaded. Internal integrity of the files is verified and they are uploaded to the RAL Tier-1 Castor Storage Element (SE) and placed on two tapes for redundancy. We also make another copy at a separate disk-based SE at this stage to make it easier for users to access data quickly. Both copies are check-summed and the replicas are registered with an instance of the LCG File Catalog (LFC). On success a record with basic file properties is added to the MICE Metadata DB. The reconstruction process is triggered by new raw data records filled in by the mover system described above. Off-line reconstruction jobs for new raw files are submitted to RAL Tier-1 and the output is stored on tape. Batch reprocessing is done at multiple MICE enabled Grid sites and output files are shipped to central tape or disk storage at RAL using a custom File Transfer Controller.

  7. Immunomodulatory activities of gemifloxacin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Umair, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Ghafoor, Aamir; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Gemifloxacin is a broad spectrum antibiotic and has shown excellent coverage against a wide variety of microorganisms. In this study, an attempt was made to evaluate the immunomodulatory potential of gemifloxacin in male swiss albino mice in vivo. Materials and Methods: Three doses of gemifloxacin 25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg and 75 mg/kg were used intraperitoneally (IP) for the evaluation of immune responses in mice. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), heamagglutination assay, jerne hemolytic plaque formation assay and cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia assay were performed to evaluate the effect of gemifloxacin on immune responses. Results: DTH assay has shown the significant immune suppressant potential of gemifloxacin at 25 mg/kg dose and 75mg/kg dose. Total leukocyte count (TLC) has shown decrease in leukocyte count (P<0.05) in drug treatment groups before cyclophosphamide administration and significant decrease (P<0.001) in leukocyte count after cyclophosphamide administration as compared to negative control group. Differential leukocyte count (DLC) has shown significant decrease (P<0.001) in percentage count of lymphocytes in 75 mg/kg treatment group in leukopenic mice while increase (P<0.01) in monocytes percentage in 50 mg/kg treatment group in leukopenic mice and increase in neutrophil percentage count (P<0.05) in all treatment groups was observed after cyclophosphamide administration. Humoral immune response is shown to be suppressed in dose dependent manner by both heamagglutination titre values (P<0.001) and jerne hemolytic plaque formation assay (P<0.001). Conclusion: The results of this work clearly demonstrate that gemifloxacin has significant immunomodulatory potential. PMID:27803786

  8. Health Evaluation of Experimental Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Tanya; Foltz, Charmaine; Karlsson, Eleanor; Linton, C Garry; Smith, Joanne M

    2012-01-01

    Good science and good animal care go hand in hand. A sick or distressed animal does not produce the reliable results that a healthy and unstressed animal produces. This unit describes the essentials of assessing mouse health, colony health surveillance, common conditions, and determination of appropriate endpoints. Understanding the health and well-being of the mice used in research enables the investigator to optimize research results and animal care. PMID:22822473

  9. Development of Social Vocalizations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley, Jasmine M. S.; Monaghan, Jessica J. M.; Wenstrup, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Adult mice are highly vocal animals, with both males and females vocalizing in same sex and cross sex social encounters. Mouse pups are also highly vocal, producing isolation vocalizations when they are cold or removed from the nest. This study examined patterns in the development of pup isolation vocalizations, and compared these to adult vocalizations. In three litters of CBA/CaJ mice, we recorded isolation vocalizations at ages postnatal day 5 (p5), p7, p9, p11, and p13. Adult vocalizations were obtained in a variety of social situations. Altogether, 28,384 discrete vocal signals were recorded using high-frequency-sensitive equipment and analyzed for syllable type, spectral and temporal features, and the temporal sequencing within bouts. We found that pups produced all but one of the 11 syllable types recorded from adults. The proportions of syllable types changed developmentally, but even the youngest pups produced complex syllables with frequency-time variations. When all syllable types were pooled together for analysis, changes in the peak frequency or the duration of syllables were small, although significant, from p5 through p13. However, individual syllable types showed different, large patterns of change over development, requiring analysis of each syllable type separately. Most adult syllables were substantially lower in frequency and shorter in duration. As pups aged, the complexity of vocal bouts increased, with a greater tendency to switch between syllable types. Vocal bouts from older animals, p13 and adult, had significantly more sequential structure than those from younger mice. Overall, these results demonstrate substantial changes in social vocalizations with age. Future studies are required to identify whether these changes result from developmental processes affecting the vocal tract or control of vocalization, or from vocal learning. To provide a tool for further research, we developed a MATLAB program that generates bouts of vocalizations

  10. A prototype molecular interactive collaborative environment (MICE).

    PubMed

    Bourne, P; Gribskov, M; Johnson, G; Moreland, J; Wavra, S; Weissig, H

    1998-01-01

    Illustrations of macromolecular structure in the scientific literature contain a high level of semantic content through which the authors convey, among other features, the biological function of that macromolecule. We refer to these illustrations as molecular scenes. Such scenes, if available electronically, are not readily accessible for further interactive interrogation. The basic PDB format does not retain features of the scene; formats like PostScript retain the scene but are not interactive; and the many formats used by individual graphics programs, while capable of reproducing the scene, are neither interchangeable nor can they be stored in a database and queried for features of the scene. MICE defines a Molecular Scene Description Language (MSDL) which allows scenes to be stored in a relational database (a molecular scene gallery) and queried. Scenes retrieved from the gallery are rendered in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and currently displayed in WebView, a VRML browser modified to support the Virtual Reality Behavior System (VRBS) protocol. VRBS provides communication between multiple client browsers, each capable of manipulating the scene. This level of collaboration works well over standard Internet connections and holds promise for collaborative research at a distance and distance learning. Further, via VRBS, the VRML world can be used as a visual cue to trigger an application such as a remote MEME search. MICE is very much work in progress. Current work seeks to replace WebView with Netscape, Cosmoplayer, a standard VRML plug-in, and a Java-based console. The console consists of a generic kernel suitable for multiple collaborative applications and additional application-specific controls. Further details of the MICE project are available at http:/(/)mice.sdsc.edu.

  11. Radioprotectors and Tumors: Molecular Studies in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle Woloschak, David Grdina

    2010-03-10

    This proposal investigated effects of radiation using a set of archival tissues. Main interests of this proposal were to investigate effects of irradiation alone or in the presence or radioprotectors; to investigate these effects on different tissues; and to use/develop molecular biology techniques that would be suitable for work with archived tissues. This work resulted in several manuscripts published or in preparation. Approach for evaluation of gene copy numbers by quantitative real time PCR has been developed and we are striving to establish methods to utilize Q-RT-PCR data to evaluate genomic instability caused by irradiation(s) and accompanying treatments. References: 1. Paunesku D, Paunesku T, Wahl A, Kataoka Y, Murley J, Grdina DJ, Woloschak GE. Incidence of tissue toxicities in gamma ray and fission neutron-exposed mice treated with Amifostine. Int J Radiat Biol. 2008, 84(8):623-34. PMID: 18661379, http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.1080/09553000802241762?cookieSet=1 2. Wang Q, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Tissue and data archives from irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory over a period of four decades, in press in Radiation and Environmental Biophysics. 3. Alcantara M, Paunesku D, Rademaker A, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF TISSUE TOXICITIES IN B6CF1 MICE IRRADIATED WITH FISSION NEUTRONS OR COBALT 60 GAMMA RAYS: Gender modulates accumulation of tissue toxicities caused by low dose rate fractionated irradiation; in preparation; this document has been uploaded as STI product 4. Wang Q, Paunesku T Wanzer B and Woloschak GE. Mitochondrial gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice with lymphoid cancers; in preparation 5. Wang Q, Raha, S, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Evaluation of gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice; in preparation

  12. Microangiography in Living Mice Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Falei; Wang Yongting; Xie Bohua; Tang Yaohui; Guan Yongjing; Lu Haiyan; Yang Guoyuan; Xie Honglan; Du Guohao; Xiao Tiqiao

    2010-07-23

    Traditionally, there are no methods available to detect the fine morphologic changes of cerebrovasculature in small living animals such as rats and mice. Newly developed synchrotron radiation microangiography can achieve a fine resolution of several micrometers and had provided us with a powerful tool to study the cerebral vasculature in small animals. The purpose of this study is to identify the morphology of cerebrovasculature especially the structure of Lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) in living mice using the synchrotron radiation source at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in Shanghai, China. Adult CD-1 mice weighing 35-40 grams were anesthetized. Nonionic iodine (Omnipaque, 350 mg I /mL) was used as a contrast agent. The study was performed at the BL13W1 beam line at SSRF. The beam line was derived from a storage ring of electrons with an accelerated energy of 3.5 GeV and an average beam current of 200 mA. X-ray energy of 33.3 keV was used to produce the highest contrast image. Images were acquired every 172 ms by a x-ray camera (Photonic-Science VHR 1.38) with a resolution of 13 {mu}m/pixel. The optimal dose of contrast agent is 100 {mu}l per injection and the injecting rate is 33 {mu}l/sec. The best position for imaging is to have the mouse lay on its right or left side, with ventral side facing the X-ray source. We observed the lenticulostriate artery for the first time in living mice. Our result show that there are 4 to 5 lenticulostriate branches originating from the root of middle cerebral artery in each hemisphere. LSAs have an average diameter of 43{+-}6.8 {mu}m. There were no differences between LSAs from the left and right hemisphere (p<0.05). These results suggest that synchrotron radiation may provide a unique tool for experimental stroke research.

  13. The mesenchymal stem cells derived from transgenic mice carrying human coagulation factor VIII can correct phenotype in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Gong, Xiuli; Gong, Zhijuan; Ren, Xiaoyie; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-12-20

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. Previous studies showed that introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified by FVIII-expressing retrovirus may result in phenotypic correction of HA animals. This study aimed at the investigation of an alternative gene therapy strategy that may lead to sustained FVIII transgene expression in HA mice. B-domain-deleted human FVIII (hFVIIIBD) vector was microinjected into single-cell embryos of wild-type mice to generate a transgenic mouse line, from which hFVIIIBD-MSCs were isolated, followed by transplantation into HA mice. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of hFVIIIBD in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of hFVIIIBD positive staining in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. ELISA indicated that plasma hFVIIIBD level in recipient mice reached its peak (77 ng/mL) at the 3rd week after implantation, and achieved sustained expression during the 5-week observation period. Plasma FVIII activities of recipient HA mice increased from 0% to 32% after hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplantation. APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) value decreased in hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplanted HA mice compared with untreated HA mice (45.5 s vs. 91.3 s). Our study demonstrated an effective phenotypic correction in HA mice using genetically modified MSCs from hFVIIIBD transgenic mice.

  14. Drug-induced regeneration in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Strehin, Iossif; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise; Leferovich, John; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Whereas amphibians regenerate lost appendages spontaneously, mammals generally form scars over the injury site through the process of wound repair. The MRL mouse strain is an exception among mammals because it shows a spontaneous regenerative healing trait and so can be used to investigate proregenerative interventions in mammals. We report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a central molecule in the process of regeneration in adult MRL mice. The degradation of HIF-1α protein, which occurs under normoxic conditions, is mediated by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). We used the drug 1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3-carboxylic acid (1,4-DPCA), a PHD inhibitor, to stabilize constitutive expression of HIF-1α protein. A locally injectable hydrogel containing 1,4-DPCA was designed to achieve controlled delivery of the drug over 4 to 10 days. Subcutaneous injection of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel into Swiss Webster mice that do not show a regenerative phenotype increased stable expression of HIF-1α protein over 5 days, providing a functional measure of drug release in vivo. Multiple peripheral subcutaneous injections of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel over a 10-day period led to regenerative wound healing in Swiss Webster mice after ear hole punch injury. Increased expression of the HIF-1α protein may provide a starting point for future studies on regeneration in mammals. PMID:26041709

  15. Impairment of mice spermatogenesis by sodium arsenite.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mónica; Matos, Rita Cerejeira; Oliveira, Helena; Nunes, Bruno; Pereira, Maria de Lourdes

    2012-03-01

    In order to assess the effect of arsenic on the male reproductive impairment in mice, 7-week-old animals were exposed to 7.5 mg sodium arsenite (NaAsO(2))/kg body weight, during 35 days (one spermatogenic cycle). One group of animals was sacrificed after exposure, while another group received distilled water for an additional period of 35 days, in order to study the spermatoxic effect and the recovery of spermatogenesis. In mice sacrificed after NaAsO(2) exposure, a decrease in testis/body weight ratio and reduction of tubular diameter were observed. Both groups of NaAsO(2)-exposed animals showed remarkable histopathological changes, such as sloughing of immature germ cells. Animals sacrificed after NaAsO(2) exposure showed decreased sperm motility, increased abnormal sperm morphology and decreased sperm viability. The effects of NaAsO(2) on sperm motility recovered to normal values after one spermatogenic cycle, while increased sperm abnormality was maintained. However, at this period, a decrease in acrosome integrity was detected. Concerning oxidative stress parameters, animals sacrificed after NaAsO(2) exposure showed a decreased selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity, which was not detected after the recovery. Conversely, at this period, total glutathione peroxidase activity increased in exposed animals. These results demonstrate the toxic effects of NaAsO(2) on mice spermatogenesis and show the lack of recovery after one spermatogenic cycle.

  16. Wallerian degeneration in ICAM-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vougioukas, V. I.; Roeske, S.; Michel, U.; Brück, W.

    1998-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration of the peripheral nervous system was studied in ICAM-1-deficient mice and compared with the phenomena observed in C57BL wild-type animals. There was a decrease in myelin density in both mice strains 4 and 6 days after transection of the sciatic nerve. The degenerating nerves were invaded by Mac-1-, LFA-1-, and F4/80-positive macrophages; significantly lower numbers of macrophages were present in ICAM-1-deficient nerves. Myelin loss decreased after nerve transection with a more prominent loss in ICAM-1-deficient animals. Schwann cells revealed a much higher myelin load in these animals when compared with wild-type nerves, and there was an increased proliferation of endoneurial cells in ICAM-1-deficient mice. These data indicate that ICAM-1 is involved in macrophage recruitment to injured peripheral nerves as well as in the proliferative and phagocytic response of Schwann cells after peripheral nerve transection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9422541

  17. Superconducting solenoids for the MICE channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Baynham, D.E.; Rockford, J.H.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinin, S.; Palmer, R.B.; Rey, J.M.

    2003-05-01

    This report describes the channel of superconductingsolenoids for the proposed international Muon Ionization CoolingExperiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channelthat is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrinofactory[1]. MICE also consists of two detector solenoids at either end ofthe cooling channel section. The superconducting solenoids for MICEperform three functions. The coupling solenoids, which are largesolenoids around 201.25 MHz RF cavities, couple the muon beam between thefocusing sections as it passes along the cooling channel. The focusingsolenoids are around the liquid hydrogen absorber that reduces themomentum of the muons in all directions. These solenoids generate agradient field along the axis as they reduce the beta of the muon beambefore it enters the absorber. Each detector solenoid system consists offive coils that match the muon beam coming to or from an absorber to a4.0 T uniform solenoidal field section that that contains the particledetectors at the ends of the experiment. There are detector solenoids atthe beginning and at the end of the experiment. This report describes theparameters of the eighteen superconducting coils that make up the MICEmagnetic channel.

  18. Zoopharmacognosy in Diseased Laboratory Mice: Conflicting Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Minesh; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Donglai; Hatkar, Rupal; Marchese, Monica; Sakic, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Zoopharmacognosy denotes a constellation of learned ingestive responses that promote healing and survival of infected or poisoned animals. A similar self-medication phenomenon was reported in diseased laboratory rodents. In particular, a series of studies revealed that autoimmune MRL/lpr mice readily consume solutions paired or laced with cyclophosphamide (CY), an immunosuppressive drug that prevents inflammatory damage to internal organs. However, due to design limitations, it could not be elucidated whether such a response reflects the learned therapeutic effect of CY, or a deficit in sensory input. We presently assess the behavioural effects of prolonged consumption of CY-laced, 16% sucrose solution in a continuous choice paradigm, with tap water available ad lib. Contrary to overall expectation, MRL/lpr mice did not increase their intake of CY with disease progression. Moreover, they ingested lower doses of CY and preferred less CY-laced sucrose solution than age-matched controls. The results obtained could not confirm zoopharmacognosy in diseased MRL/lpr mice, likely due to impaired responsiveness to palatable stimulation, or attenuated survival mechanisms after prolonged inbreeding in captivity. However, by revealing the effectiveness of unrestricted drinking of drug-laced sucrose solution on behavior and immunity, the current study supports broader use of such an administration route in behavioural studies sensitive to external stressors. PMID:24956477

  19. Critical period for acoustic preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eun-Jin; Lin, Eric W.; Hensch, Takao K.

    2012-01-01

    Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a “critical period” for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR−/−) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical period as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was observed in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, suggesting a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular “brakes” on critical period plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas. PMID:23045690

  20. Antiamnesic effects of Desmodium gangeticum in mice.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hanumanthachar; Parle, Milind

    2006-09-01

    Dementia is a mental disorder characterized by loss of intellectual ability sufficiently severe enough to interfere with one's occupational or social activities. Desmodium gangeticum commonly known as Salparni, is widely used in ayurveda for the treatment of neurological disorders. The present work was designed to assess the potential of aqueous extract of D. gangeticum (DG) as a nootropic agent in mice. DG (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 7 successive days to both young and older mice. Exteroceptive behavioral models such as elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigm were employed to evaluate learning and memory. Scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia and ageing induced amnesia were the interoceptive behavioral models. To delineate the mechanism by which DG exerts nootropic activity, the effect of DG on whole brain AChE activity was also assessed. Piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard nootropic agent. Pretreatment with DG (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for seven successive days significantly improved learning and memory in mice and reversed the amnesia induced by both, scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) and natural ageing. DG also decreased whole brain acetyl cholinesterase activity. Hence, D. gangeticum appears to be a promising candidate for improving memory and it would be worthwhile to explore the potential of this plant in the management of dementia and Alzheimer disease.

  1. Heart regeneration in adult MRL mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leferovich, John M.; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Samulewicz, Stefan; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Zwas, Donna; Lankford, Edward B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2001-08-01

    The reaction of cardiac tissue to acute injury involves interacting cascades of cellular and molecular responses that encompass inflammation, hormonal signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and compensatory adaptation of myocytes. Myocardial regeneration is observed in amphibians, whereas scar formation characterizes cardiac ventricular wound healing in a variety of mammalian injury models. We have previously shown that the MRL mouse strain has an extraordinary capacity to heal surgical wounds, a complex trait that maps to at least seven genetic loci. Here, we extend these studies to cardiac wounds and demonstrate that a severe transmural, cryogenically induced infarction of the right ventricle heals extensively within 60 days, with the restoration of normal myocardium and function. Scarring is markedly reduced in MRL mice compared with C57BL/6 mice, consistent with both the reduced hydroxyproline levels seen after injury and an elevated cardiomyocyte mitotic index of 10-20% for the MRL compared with 1-3% for the C57BL/6. The myocardial response to injury observed in these mice resembles the regenerative process seen in amphibians.

  2. Zoopharmacognosy in diseased laboratory mice: conflicting evidence.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Minesh; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Donglai; Hatkar, Rupal; Marchese, Monica; Sakic, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Zoopharmacognosy denotes a constellation of learned ingestive responses that promote healing and survival of infected or poisoned animals. A similar self-medication phenomenon was reported in diseased laboratory rodents. In particular, a series of studies revealed that autoimmune MRL/lpr mice readily consume solutions paired or laced with cyclophosphamide (CY), an immunosuppressive drug that prevents inflammatory damage to internal organs. However, due to design limitations, it could not be elucidated whether such a response reflects the learned therapeutic effect of CY, or a deficit in sensory input. We presently assess the behavioural effects of prolonged consumption of CY-laced, 16% sucrose solution in a continuous choice paradigm, with tap water available ad lib. Contrary to overall expectation, MRL/lpr mice did not increase their intake of CY with disease progression. Moreover, they ingested lower doses of CY and preferred less CY-laced sucrose solution than age-matched controls. The results obtained could not confirm zoopharmacognosy in diseased MRL/lpr mice, likely due to impaired responsiveness to palatable stimulation, or attenuated survival mechanisms after prolonged inbreeding in captivity. However, by revealing the effectiveness of unrestricted drinking of drug-laced sucrose solution on behavior and immunity, the current study supports broader use of such an administration route in behavioural studies sensitive to external stressors.

  3. APP Causes Hyperexcitability in Fragile X Mice.

    PubMed

    Westmark, Cara J; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Hays, Seth A; Filon, Mikolaj J; Ray, Brian C; Westmark, Pamela R; Gibson, Jay R; Huber, Kimberly M; Wong, Robert K S

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-beta protein precursor (APP) and metabolite levels are altered in fragile X syndrome (FXS) patients and in the mouse model of the disorder, Fmr1(KO) mice. Normalization of APP levels in Fmr1(KO) mice (Fmr1(KO) /APP(HET) mice) rescues many disease phenotypes. Thus, APP is a potential biomarker as well as therapeutic target for FXS. Hyperexcitability is a key phenotype of FXS. Herein, we determine the effects of APP levels on hyperexcitability in Fmr1(KO) brain slices. Fmr1(KO) /APP(HET) slices exhibit complete rescue of UP states in a neocortical hyperexcitability model and reduced duration of ictal discharges in a CA3 hippocampal model. These data demonstrate that APP plays a pivotal role in maintaining an appropriate balance of excitation and inhibition (E/I) in neural circuits. A model is proposed whereby APP acts as a rheostat in a molecular circuit that modulates hyperexcitability through mGluR5 and FMRP. Both over- and under-expression of APP in the context of the Fmr1(KO) increases seizure propensity suggesting that an APP rheostat maintains appropriate E/I levels but is overloaded by mGluR5-mediated excitation in the absence of FMRP. These findings are discussed in relation to novel treatment approaches to restore APP homeostasis in FXS.

  4. APP Causes Hyperexcitability in Fragile X Mice

    PubMed Central

    Westmark, Cara J.; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Hays, Seth A.; Filon, Mikolaj J.; Ray, Brian C.; Westmark, Pamela R.; Gibson, Jay R.; Huber, Kimberly M.; Wong, Robert K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-beta protein precursor (APP) and metabolite levels are altered in fragile X syndrome (FXS) patients and in the mouse model of the disorder, Fmr1KO mice. Normalization of APP levels in Fmr1KO mice (Fmr1KO/APPHET mice) rescues many disease phenotypes. Thus, APP is a potential biomarker as well as therapeutic target for FXS. Hyperexcitability is a key phenotype of FXS. Herein, we determine the effects of APP levels on hyperexcitability in Fmr1KO brain slices. Fmr1KO/APPHET slices exhibit complete rescue of UP states in a neocortical hyperexcitability model and reduced duration of ictal discharges in a CA3 hippocampal model. These data demonstrate that APP plays a pivotal role in maintaining an appropriate balance of excitation and inhibition (E/I) in neural circuits. A model is proposed whereby APP acts as a rheostat in a molecular circuit that modulates hyperexcitability through mGluR5 and FMRP. Both over- and under-expression of APP in the context of the Fmr1KO increases seizure propensity suggesting that an APP rheostat maintains appropriate E/I levels but is overloaded by mGluR5-mediated excitation in the absence of FMRP. These findings are discussed in relation to novel treatment approaches to restore APP homeostasis in FXS. PMID:28018172

  5. Acute toxicity of karlotoxins to mice

    PubMed Central

    Place, Allen R.; Munday, R.; Munday, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Karlotoxins, polyketide derivatives produced by the dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum, are associated with fish kills in temperate estuaries world wide. In this study, the acute effects of 3 pure karlotoxin analogs (KmTx 1, KmTx 3 and KmTx 2) have been examined in mice. Transient lethargy and increased respiratory rates were observed soon after dosing with the karlotoxins by intraperitoneal injection, but no deaths were recorded in animals dosed with KmTx 2 at up to 500 μg/kg or with KmTx 1 or KmTx 3 at up to 4000 μg/kg. Animals dosed intraperitoneally with KmTx 1 and KmTx 3 at 4000 μg/kg showed a pronounced decrease in food and water intake, lasting 3–4 days after dosing, accompanied by a significant decrease in body weight. After this time, the lost body weight was regained and the behavior and appearance of the mice remained normal throughout the following 10 day observation period. No effects were seen in mice dosed orally with KmTx 1 or KmTx 3 at a dose of 4000 μg/kg. It is concluded that contamination of seafood if it were to occur with these karlotoxins is unlikely to pose a major risk of acute intoxication in consumers. PMID:25150200

  6. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  7. Circadian Behaviour in Neuroglobin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hundahl, Christian A.; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night. PMID:22496809

  8. [Effect of scopolamine on depression in mice].

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng-xue; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2011-04-01

    Based on the report of previous clinical study which showed cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine had antidepressant activity, this study was to investigate the antidepressant activity of scopolamine and explore its effective dose in mice, and to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on the central nervous system and learning/memory ability at its antidepressant effective dose. Tail suspension test, forced swimming test, step-down passive avoidance test and open field test were used to evaluate its effects on mice. Compared with the vehicle control group, single-dose administration of scopolamine (0.1-0.4 mg x kg(-1), ip) significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001) in tail suspension test, and significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.001) in forced swimming test, but had no effect on the step-down latency and errors in step-down passive avoidance test. Scopolamine (0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), ip) had no influence on the locomotor activity in open field test, while at dose of 0.4 mg x kg(-1) significantly increase the locomotor activity. These results showed that scopolamine produced reliable antidepressant effect at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), without impairment on learning and memory, as well as excitory or inhibitory effect on central nervous system in mice.

  9. Antifatigue effect of Gracilaria eucheumoides in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jin-Ting; Wang, Mei-Yan; Zheng, Lu-Bin

    2013-12-01

    Gracilaria eucheumoides Linn (Gracilariaceae; G. eucheumoides) is abundant in dietary fiber, which aids the clearance of excess cholesterol from the blood and maintains stable blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antifatigue effect of G. eucheumoides in mice and the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. Mice were randomly divided into four groups and three of the groups were administered different doses of G. eucheumoides extract. A loaded swimming test demonstrated that the swimming times of the low-, medium- and high-dose groups were longer than those of the control group. Examinations revealed that the liver and muscle glycogen, lactate dehydrogenase and blood glucose concentration levels of the treatment groups were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). However, this was not the case for lactic acid concentration (P>0.05). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the gene expression levels of glucose transport protein 4 and AMP-activated protein kinase in the medium-dose group exhibited the largest increases, compared with the other treatment groups, and were 3.0- and 1.8-fold higher than those in the control group, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that G. eucheumoides exerts an antifatigue effect on mice.

  10. Antifatigue effect of Gracilaria eucheumoides in mice

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, JIN-TING; WANG, MEI-YAN; ZHENG, LU-BIN

    2013-01-01

    Gracilaria eucheumoides Linn (Gracilariaceae; G. eucheumoides) is abundant in dietary fiber, which aids the clearance of excess cholesterol from the blood and maintains stable blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antifatigue effect of G. eucheumoides in mice and the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. Mice were randomly divided into four groups and three of the groups were administered different doses of G. eucheumoides extract. A loaded swimming test demonstrated that the swimming times of the low-, medium- and high-dose groups were longer than those of the control group. Examinations revealed that the liver and muscle glycogen, lactate dehydrogenase and blood glucose concentration levels of the treatment groups were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). However, this was not the case for lactic acid concentration (P>0.05). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the gene expression levels of glucose transport protein 4 and AMP-activated protein kinase in the medium-dose group exhibited the largest increases, compared with the other treatment groups, and were 3.0- and 1.8-fold higher than those in the control group, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that G. eucheumoides exerts an antifatigue effect on mice. PMID:24255683

  11. Parturition failure in mice lacking Mamld1.

    PubMed

    Miyado, Mami; Miyado, Kenji; Katsumi, Momori; Saito, Kazuki; Nakamura, Akihiro; Shihara, Daizou; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki

    2015-10-05

    In mice, the onset of parturition is triggered by a rapid decline in circulating progesterone. Progesterone withdrawal occurs as a result of functional luteolysis, which is characterized by an increase in the enzymatic activity of 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20α-HSD) in the corpus luteum and is mediated by the prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) signaling. Here, we report that the genetic knockout (KO) of Mamld1, which encodes a putative non-DNA-binding regulator of testicular steroidogenesis, caused defective functional luteolysis and subsequent parturition failure and neonatal deaths. Progesterone receptor inhibition induced the onset of parturition in pregnant KO mice, and MAMLD1 regulated the expression of Akr1c18, the gene encoding 20α-HSD, in cultured cells. Ovaries of KO mice at late gestation were morphologically unremarkable; however, Akr1c18 expression was reduced and expression of its suppressor Stat5b was markedly increased. Several other genes including Prlr, Cyp19a1, Oxtr, and Lgals3 were also dysregulated in the KO ovaries, whereas PGF2α signaling genes remained unaffected. These results highlight the role of MAMLD1 in labour initiation. MAMLD1 likely participates in functional luteolysis by regulating Stat5b and other genes, independent of the PGF2α signaling pathway.

  12. Dehydration anorexia is attenuated in oxytocin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rinaman, Linda; Vollmer, Regis R; Karam, Joseph; Phillips, Donnesha; Li, Xia; Amico, Janet A

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in rats suggests that central oxytocin (OT) signaling pathways contribute to suppression of food intake during dehydration (i.e., dehydration anorexia). The present study examined water deprivation-induced dehydration anorexia in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Mice were deprived of food alone (fasted, euhydrated) or were deprived of both food and water (fasted, dehydrated) for 18 h overnight. Fasted wild-type mice consumed significantly less chow during a 60-min refeeding period when dehydrated compared with their intake when euhydrated. Conversely, fasting-induced food intake was slightly but not significantly suppressed by dehydration in OT -/- mice, evidence for attenuated dehydration anorexia. In a separate experiment, mice were deprived of water (but not food) overnight for 18 h; then they were anesthetized and perfused with fixative for immunocytochemical analysis of central Fos expression. Fos was elevated similarly in osmo- and volume-sensitive regions of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in wild-type and OT -/- mice after water deprivation. OT-positive neurons expressed Fos in dehydrated wild-type mice, and vasopressin-positive neurons were activated to a similar extent in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Conversely, significantly fewer neurons within the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex were activated in OT -/- mice after water deprivation compared with activation in wild-type mice. These findings support the view that OT-containing projections from the hypothalamus to the hindbrain are necessary for the full expression of compensatory behavioral and physiological responses to dehydration.

  13. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  14. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  15. Kidney histologic alterations in α-Galactosidase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Carmen; Oliveira, João Paulo; Carneiro, Fátima; Relvas, Sandra; Ganhão, Mariana; Sá-Miranda, M Clara; Rodrigues, Lorena G

    2011-04-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the α-galactosidase gene (GLA), the resultant deficiency of lysosomal α-galactosidase enzyme activity leading to systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and other glycosphingolipids. GLA knockout mice ("Fabry mice") were generated as an animal model for Fabry disease but, as they do not manifest progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD), their relevance as a model for human Fabry nephropathy is uncertain. We evaluated the histological alterations in the kidneys of Fabry mice at different ages, as contrasted to those observed in wild-type mice. Furthermore, we compared the renal histological alterations of Fabry mice to the kidney pathology reported in patients with Fabry disease at comparable age ranges and across different CKD stages, using a scoring system that has been developed for Fabry nephropathy. Fabry mice are phenotypically different from wild-type mice, displaying progressive age-related accumulation of glycosphingolipids in all types of renal cells. There were no statistically significant differences between Fabry mice and Fabry patients in the prevalence of glycosphingolipid storage per renal cell type with the exceptions of mesangial (higher in humans) and proximal tubular cells (higher in mice). However, Fabry mice lack the nonspecific histological glomerulosclerotic and interstitial fibrotic renal lesions that best correlate with progressive CKD in Fabry patients, and do not develop large podocyte inclusions. We postulate that the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these species differences, may contribute important clues to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of Fabry nephropathy.

  16. IL-4 Knock Out Mice Display Anxiety-Like Behavior.

    PubMed

    Moon, Morgan L; Joesting, Jennifer J; Blevins, Neil A; Lawson, Marcus A; Gainey, Stephen J; Towers, Albert E; McNeil, Leslie K; Freund, Gregory G

    2015-07-01

    Inflammation is a recognized antecedent and coincident factor when examining the biology of anxiety. Little is known, however, about how reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators impact anxiety. Therefore, mood- cognition- and anxiety-associated/like behaviors were examined in IL-4 knock out (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. In comparison to WT mice, IL-4 KO mice demonstrated decreased burrowing and increased social exploration. No differences were seen in forced swim or saccharine preference testing. IL-4 KO mice had similar performance to WT mice in the Morris water maze and during object location and novel object recognition. In the elevated zero-maze, IL-4 KO mice, in comparison to WT mice, demonstrated anxiety-like behavior. Anxiety-like behavior in IL-4 KO mice was not observed, however, during open-field testing. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-4 KO mice display state, but not trait, anxiety suggesting that reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory bioactives can engender subtypes of anxiety.

  17. IL-4 Knock out Mice Display Anxiety-like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Morgan L.; Joesting, Jennifer J.; Blevins, Neil A.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Gainey, Stephen J.; Towers, Albert E.; McNeil, Leslie K.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a recognized antecedent and coincident factor when examining the biology of anxiety. Little is known, however, about how reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators impact anxiety. Therefore, mood- cognition- and anxiety-associated/like behaviors were examined in IL-4 knock out (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. In comparison to WT mice, IL-4 KO mice demonstrated decreased burrowing and increased social exploration. No differences were seen in forced swim or saccharine preference testing. IL-4 KO mice had similar performance to WT mice in the Morris water maze and during object location and novel object recognition. In the elevated zero-maze, IL-4 KO mice, in comparison to WT mice, demonstrated anxiety-like behavior. Anxiety-like behavior in IL-4 KO mice was not observed, however, during open-field testing. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-4 KO mice display state, but not trait, anxiety suggesting that reductions in endogenous anti-inflammatory bioactives can engender subtypes of anxiety. PMID:25772794

  18. Intestinal Microbiota Modulates Gluten-Induced Immunopathology in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Heather J.; McCarville, Justin L.; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A.; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G.; Verdu, Elena F.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk. PMID:26456581

  19. Lipid metabolism and body composition in Gclm(-/-) mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kendig, Eric L.; Chen, Ying; Krishan, Mansi; Johansson, Elisabet; Schneider, Scott N.; Genter, Mary Beth; Nebert, Daniel W.; Shertzer, Howard G.

    2011-12-15

    In humans and experimental animals, high fat diets (HFD) are associated with risk factors for metabolic diseases, such as excessive weight gain and adiposity, insulin resistance and fatty liver. Mice lacking the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene (Gclm(-/-)) and deficient in glutathione (GSH), are resistant to HFD-mediated weight gain. Herein, we evaluated Gclm-associated regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and glucose and lipid homeostasis. C57BL/6J Gclm(-/-) mice and littermate wild-type (WT) controls received a normal diet or an HFD for 11 weeks. HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not display a decreased respiratory quotient, suggesting that they are unable to process lipid for metabolism. Although dietary energy consumption and intestinal lipid absorption were unchanged in Gclm(-/-) mice, feeding these mice an HFD did not produce excess body weight nor fat storage. Gclm(-/-) mice displayed higher basal metabolic rates resulting from higher activities of liver mitochondrial NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, thus elevating respiration. Although Gclm(-/-) mice exhibited strong systemic and hepatic oxidative stress responses, HFD did not promote glucose intolerance or insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not develop fatty liver, likely resulting from very low expression levels of genes encoding lipid metabolizing enzymes. We conclude that Gclm is involved in the regulation of basal metabolic rate and the metabolism of dietary lipid. Although Gclm(-/-) mice display a strong oxidative stress response, they are protected from HFD-induced excessive weight gain and adipose deposition, insulin resistance and steatosis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not produce body weight and fat gain in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not induce steatosis or insulin resistance in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gclm(-/-) mice have high basal metabolism and mitochondrial

  20. Adaptation and immunogenicity of Cryptosporidium parvum to immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohide; Tsuge, Yasuko; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Fujino, Takashi; Matsui, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    The adaptation and immunogenisity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Siberian chipmunks (SC1 strain) in immunocompetent (ICR) mice were examined. The oocysts were received to the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice by repeated passage. The oocysts collected from the 18th SCID mice were inoculated to 5 ICR mice. The mice began to shed oocysts from 6 days after inoculation, the patency was 5 days, and the maximum oocysts per gram of feces (OPG) value was 10(4). The maximum of OPG value was gradually increased by successive passage, and finally that in the 22nd mice reached 10(6) (patency: 11 days). It is considered that these results indicate completion of their adaptation to ICR mice. To examine the immunogenicity of C. parvum to ICR mice, 8 groups of 5 mice each were inoculated with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts of SC1 strain, which were collected after adaptation to SCID mice. All groups shed oocysts from 6th day, and their patency was from 8 to 12 days. On the 21st day after the primary infection, these mice were challenged with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts. No oocysts shed from any groups, although 2 control groups shed oocysts from the 6th day, and their OPG values were more than 10(6). These results suggest that this strain has strong immunogenicity against ICR mice. Therefore, the immunological healthy mice were considered a useful experimental model to investigate immunological and drug treatments in the strain of C. parvum.

  1. Capability of SART3(109-118) peptide to induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes from prostate cancer patients with HLA class I-A11, -A31 and -A33 alleles.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Elnisr Rashed; Naito, Masayasu; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Niu, Yamei; Gohara, Shojiro; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Itoh, Kyogo; Noguchi, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    We previously reported the SART3 gene to be a tumor-rejection antigen gene encoding a peptide at positions 109-118 (SART3(109-118)) with the ability to induce HLA-A24-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated both humoral and cellular responses to this peptide in cancer patients with alleles other than HLA-A24 to explore the possibility of using this peptide as a cancer vaccine for these patients. IgG reactive to SART3(109-118) peptide was identified in sera of the vast majority of non-cancer subjects (n=50) and all cancer patients (n=50) tested without apparent HLA-A association. Levels of anti-SART3(109-118) peptide antibody in cancer patients were significantly higher than those of non-cancer subjects, but no difference was found between HLA-A24+A2- and HLA-A24-A2+ cancer patients. This peptide induced cancer cell-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of both healthy donors and prostate cancer patients with HLA-A11, HLA-A31 and HLA-A33 alleles, but not with HLA-A2. These results suggest that this peptide can be applicable as a cancer vaccine not only for HLA-A24+, but also for HLA-A11+, HLA-A31+ and HLA-A33+ prostate cancer patients.

  2. Changes in the pharmacokinetics of digoxin in polyuria in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and lithium carbonate-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Kagami, Mai; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Ishii, Makoto; Toda, Takahiro; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    In humans, digoxin is mainly eliminated through the kidneys unchanged, and renal clearance represents approximately 70% of the total clearance. In this study, we used the mouse models to examine digoxin pharmacokinetics in polyuria induced by diabetes mellitus and lithium carbonate (Li(2)CO(3)) administration, including mechanistic evaluation of the contribution of glomerular filtration, tubular secretion, and tubular reabsorption. After digoxin administration to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, digoxin CL/F increased to approximately 2.2 times that in normal mice. After treatment with Li(2)CO(3) (0.2%) for 10 days, the CL/F increased approximately 1.1 times for normal mice and 1.6 times for STZ mice. Creatinine clearance (CLcr) and the renal mRNA expression levels of mdr1a did not differ significantly between the normal, STZ, and Li(2)CO(3)-treated mice. The urine volume of STZ mice was approximately 26 mL/day, 22 times that of normal mice. The urine volume of Li(2)CO(3)-treated mice increased approximately 7.3 times for normal mice and 2.3 times for STZ mice. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of digoxin may be significantly reduced in the presence of polyuria either induced by diabetes mellitus or manifested as an adverse effect of Li(2)CO(3) in diabetic patients, along with increased urine volume.

  3. BALB/c Mice Can Learn Touchscreen Visual Discrimination and Reversal Tasks Faster than C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Turner, Karly M; Simpson, Christopher G; Burne, Thomas H J

    2017-01-01

    Touchscreen technology is increasingly being used to characterize cognitive performance in rodent models of neuropsychiatric disorders. Researchers are attracted to the automated system and translational potential for touchscreen-based tasks. However, training time is extensive and some mouse strains have struggled to learn touchscreen tasks. Here we compared the performance of commonly used C57BL/6 mice against the BALB/c mice, which are considered a poor performing strain, using a touchscreen task. BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were trained to operate the touchscreens before learning a visual discrimination (VD) and reversal task. Following touchscreen testing, these strains were assessed for differences in locomotion and learned helplessness. BALB/c mice finished training in nearly half the number of sessions taken by C57BL/6 mice. Following training, mice learned a VD task where BALB/c mice again reached criteria in fewer than half the sessions required for C57BL/6 mice. Once acquired, there were no strain differences in % correct responses, correction trials or response latency. BALB/c mice also learnt the reversal task in significantly fewer sessions than C57BL/6 mice. On the open field test C57BL/6 mice traveled further and spent more time in the center, and spent less time immobile than BALB/c mice on the forced swim test (FST). After touchscreen testing, strains exhibited well-established behavioral traits demonstrating the extensive training and handling from touchscreen testing did not alter their behavioral phenotype. These results suggest that BALB/c mice can be examined using touchscreen tasks and that task adaptations may improve feasibility for researchers using different strains.

  4. BALB/c Mice Can Learn Touchscreen Visual Discrimination and Reversal Tasks Faster than C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Karly M.; Simpson, Christopher G.; Burne, Thomas H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Touchscreen technology is increasingly being used to characterize cognitive performance in rodent models of neuropsychiatric disorders. Researchers are attracted to the automated system and translational potential for touchscreen-based tasks. However, training time is extensive and some mouse strains have struggled to learn touchscreen tasks. Here we compared the performance of commonly used C57BL/6 mice against the BALB/c mice, which are considered a poor performing strain, using a touchscreen task. BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were trained to operate the touchscreens before learning a visual discrimination (VD) and reversal task. Following touchscreen testing, these strains were assessed for differences in locomotion and learned helplessness. BALB/c mice finished training in nearly half the number of sessions taken by C57BL/6 mice. Following training, mice learned a VD task where BALB/c mice again reached criteria in fewer than half the sessions required for C57BL/6 mice. Once acquired, there were no strain differences in % correct responses, correction trials or response latency. BALB/c mice also learnt the reversal task in significantly fewer sessions than C57BL/6 mice. On the open field test C57BL/6 mice traveled further and spent more time in the center, and spent less time immobile than BALB/c mice on the forced swim test (FST). After touchscreen testing, strains exhibited well-established behavioral traits demonstrating the extensive training and handling from touchscreen testing did not alter their behavioral phenotype. These results suggest that BALB/c mice can be examined using touchscreen tasks and that task adaptations may improve feasibility for researchers using different strains. PMID:28197083

  5. Neutrophil depletion delays wound repair in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Okawa, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important clinical problems in caring for elderly patients is treatment of pressure ulcers. One component of normal wound healing is the generation of an inflammatory reaction, which is characterized by the sequential infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Neutrophils migrate early in the wound healing process. In aged C57BL/6 mice, wound healing is relatively inefficient. We examined the effects of neutrophil numbers on wound healing in both young and aged mice. We found that the depletion of neutrophils by anti-Gr-1 antibody dramatically delayed wound healing in aged mice. The depletion of neutrophils in young mice had less effect on the kinetics of wound healing. Intravenous G-CSF injection increased the migration of neutrophils to the wound site. While the rate of wound repair did not change significantly in young mice following G-CSF injection, it increased significantly in old mice. PMID:19424869

  6. Spontaneous development of autoimmune sialadenitis in aging BDF1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y.; Kurashima, C.; Utsuyama, M.; Hirokawa, K.

    1988-01-01

    This study reports that spontaneous autoimmune sialadenitis developed in aging female, rather than male, BDF1 mice. The lesions first appeared in 6-month-old female BDF1 mice and were aggravated with advancing age, especially in 24-month-old and 30-month-old senescent mice. In contrast, significant inflammatory changes did not develop in aging male BDF1 mice. The presence of antisalivary duct antibody was found in sera from mice with sialadenitis. The infiltrating cells in the lesions of submandibular salivary glands were mainly composed of T cells, especially Lyt 1+ and L3T4+ cells. Moreover, mild inflammatory lesions were observed in parotid, sublingual salivary glands, pancreas, or kidneys in some mice that developed spontaneously occurring sialadenitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3260751

  7. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  8. Contact hypersensitivity response to isophorone diisocyanate in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.L.; Brown, T.A.; Brown, R.D.; Munson, A.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Isophorone diisocyanate was evaluated for its potential as a sensitizing agent for allergic contact hypersensitivity in mice. Female B6C3F1 mice were sensitized with 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0% isophorone diisocyanate and challenged with 3.0% isophorone diisocyanate. Doses of isophorone diisocyanate were selected from assays for primary irritancy. Mice received 20 microliters by direct dermal application, for 5 days, to sites prepared by shaving, dermabrading and, in some mice, with intra dermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The rest period was 7 days. Measurement of the contact hypersensitivity response in mice was by radioisotopic assay two days after challenge and mouse ear swelling one and two days after challenge. Mice demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent contact hypersensitivity responses to isophorone diisocyanate with or without adjuvant pretreatment.

  9. Methylphenidate restores novel object recognition in DARPP-32 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Heyser, Charles J; McNaughton, Caitlyn H; Vishnevetsky, Donna; Fienberg, Allen A

    2013-09-15

    Previously, we have shown that Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) knockout mice required significantly more trials to reach criterion than wild-type mice in an operant reversal-learning task. The present study was conducted to examine adult male and female DARPP-32 knockout mice and wild-type controls in a novel object recognition test. Wild-type and knockout mice exhibited comparable behavior during the initial exploration trials. As expected, wild-type mice exhibited preferential exploration of the novel object during the substitution test, demonstrating recognition memory. In contrast, knockout mice did not show preferential exploration of the novel object, instead exhibiting an increase in exploration of all objects during the test trial. Given that the removal of DARPP-32 is an intracellular manipulation, it seemed possible to pharmacologically restore some cellular activity and behavior by stimulating dopamine receptors. Therefore, a second experiment was conducted examining the effect of methylphenidate. The results show that methylphenidate increased horizontal activity in both wild-type and knockout mice, though this increase was blunted in knockout mice. Pretreatment with methylphenidate significantly impaired novel object recognition in wild-type mice. In contrast, pretreatment with methylphenidate restored the behavior of DARPP-32 knockout mice to that observed in wild-type mice given saline. These results provide additional evidence for a functional role of DARPP-32 in the mediation of processes underlying learning and memory. These results also indicate that the behavioral deficits in DARPP-32 knockout mice may be restored by the administration of methylphenidate.

  10. Pentylenetetrazol-kindling in mice overexpressing heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Ammon-Treiber, Susanne; Grecksch, Gisela; Angelidis, Charalampos; Vezyraki, Patra; Höllt, Volker; Becker, Axel

    2007-04-01

    Kindling induced by the convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is an accepted model of primary generalized epilepsy. Because seizures represent a strong distressing stimulus, stress-induced proteins such as heat shock proteins might counteract the pathology of increased neuronal excitation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether PTZ kindling outcome parameters are influenced by heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) overexpression in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to the respective wild-type mice. Kindling was performed by nine intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (ED(16) for induction of clonic-tonic seizures, every 48 h); control animals received saline instead of PTZ. Seven days after the final injection, all mice received a PTZ challenge dose. Outcome parameters included evaluation of seizure stages and overall survival rates. In addition, histopathological findings such as cell number in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3 were determined. The onset of the highest convulsion stage was delayed in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice, and overall survival during kindling was improved in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice. In addition, a challenge dose after termination of kindling produced less severe seizures in Hsp70 transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. PTZ kindling did not result in significant subsequent neuronal cell loss in CA1 or CA3 neither in wild-type mice nor in the Hsp70 transgenic mice. The results of the present experiments clearly demonstrate that overexpression of Hsp70 exerts protective effects regarding seizure severity and overall survival during PTZ kindling. In addition, the decreased seizure severity in Hsp70 transgenic mice after a challenge dose suggests an interference of Hsp70 with the developmental component of kindling.

  11. Prolonged administration of antithymocyte serum in mice. II. Histopathological investigation

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Elizabeth; Nehlsen, Sandra L.

    1971-01-01

    Prolonged administration of ATS to mice resulted in depletion of small lymphocytes in the thymus-dependent (paracortical) areas of lymph nodes in all mice. Small lymphocyte depletion of the thymus-dependent periarteriolar region of the spleen was present in most mice, although this feature was masked by plasmacytosis in this region in some. Depletion of small lymphocytes in the thymus-dependent areas of Peyer's patches was evident in some of the younger mice. None of these changes in lymphoid organs were seen in control mice, untreated or given NRS. The thymus was unaffected except in some ATS- or NRS-treated mice which were sick and/or old, in which the narrowing of the thymic cortex was attributed to non-specific stress. Plasmacytosis was seen in the medullae of lymph nodes of both ATS- and NRS-treated mice, although it was more intense in the latter. In non-lymphoid organs the most striking changes were seen in the kidneys of mice treated both with ATS and NRS. Complex-type nephritis followed by amyloidosis was seen in a large proportion of mice over 6 months old in both these groups and in these mice amyloid was seen frequently in other organs, including spleen and liver. Tumours occurred in fifty-four ATS-treated mice, but in no other group. Fifty-two of these tumours were attributable to polyoma virus; two other were lymphoblastomas. Reticulum cell hyperplasia was seen in two further mice. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18 PMID:4326920

  12. SUPPRESSION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN CLASS SYNTHESIS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Alexander R.; Asofsky, Richard; Hylton, Martha B.; Cooper, Max D.

    1972-01-01

    Germfree BALB/c mice have been treated from birth with intraperitoneal injections of purified goat antibodies to mouse IgM. The treated mice, and controls which had received an equivalent amount of goat γ-globulin, were sacrificed at 8 or 13 wk of age. Compared to controls, mice given anti-µ (a) had very few germinal centers in spleen and lymph node, (b) had decreased numbers of mature plasma cells synthesizing IgM and IgG1 in spleen, and virtual absence of IgA-synthesizing plasma cells in the gut, (c) had greatly diminished numbers of B lymphocytes bearing membrane-bound immunoglobulins of the IgM, IgG1, IgG2, and IgA classes in spleen, (d) had reduced synthesis of IgM, IgG2, and IgA by in vitro spleen cultures, and (e) had significant decreases in serum levels of IgM, IgG1, IgG2, and IgA. The treated animals failed to make antibodies to ferritin after hyperimmunization, and lacked natural antibodies to sheep erythrocytes. These results indicate that cells ultimately committed to synthesis of IgG1, IgG2, and IgA immunoglobulins are derived from cells which have expressed IgM determinants at an earlier stage of differentiation. They are consistent with a proposed two-stage model for plasma cell differentiation. The first stage is antigen independent, involves sequential activation of Cµ, Cγ, and Cα genes by progeny of a single stem cell, and results in the formation of B lymphocytes bearing membrane-bound recognition antibodies of each class. The second, antigen-dependent, stage results in formation of mature plasmacytes and memory cells. PMID:4551216

  13. JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ossato, A; Vigolo, A; Trapella, C; Seri, C; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Marti, M

    2015-08-06

    Naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist illegally marketed in "Spice" and "herbal blend" for its psychoactive effect greater than those produced by cannabis. In rodents JWH-018 reproduces typical effects of (-)-Δ(9)-THC or Dronabinol® (Δ(9)-THC) such as hypothermia, analgesia, hypolocomotion and akinesia, while its effects on sensorimotor functions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of acute administration of JWH-018 (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.) on sensorimotor functions in male CD-1 mice and to compare its effects with those caused by the administration of Δ(9)-THC (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.). A specific battery of behavioral tests were adopted to investigate effects of cannabinoid agonists on sensorimotor functions (visual, auditory, tactile) and neurological changes (convulsion, myoclonia, hyperreflexia) while video-tracking analysis was used to study spontaneous locomotion. JWH-018 administration inhibited sensorimotor responses at lower doses (0.01-0.1mg/kg), reduced spontaneous locomotion at intermediate/high doses (1-6mg/kg) and induced convulsions, myoclonia and hyperreflexia at high doses (6mg/kg). Similarly, administration of Δ(9)-THC reduced sensorimotor responses in mice but it did not inhibit spontaneous locomotion and it did not induce neurological alterations. All behavioral effects and neurological alterations were prevented by the administration of the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251). For the first time these data demonstrate that JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor responses in mice. This aspect should be carefully evaluated to better understand the potential danger that JWH-018 may pose to public health, with particular reference to decreased performance in driving and hazardous works.

  14. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  15. Sleep in Kcna2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Christopher L; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav; Southard, Teresa; Chiu, Shing-Yan; Messing, Albee; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2007-01-01

    Background Shaker codes for a Drosophila voltage-dependent potassium channel. Flies carrying Shaker null or hypomorphic mutations sleep 3–4 h/day instead of 8–14 h/day as their wild-type siblings do. Shaker-like channels are conserved across species but it is unknown whether they affect sleep in mammals. To address this issue, we studied sleep in Kcna2 knockout (KO) mice. Kcna2 codes for Kv1.2, the alpha subunit of a Shaker-like voltage-dependent potassium channel with high expression in the mammalian thalamocortical system. Results Continuous (24 h) electroencephalograph (EEG), electromyogram (EMG), and video recordings were used to measure sleep and waking in Kcna2 KO, heterozygous (HZ) and wild-type (WT) pups (P17) and HZ and WT adult mice (P67). Sleep stages were scored visually based on 4-s epochs. EEG power spectra (0–20 Hz) were calculated on consecutive 4-s epochs. KO pups die by P28 due to generalized seizures. At P17 seizures are either absent or very rare in KO pups (< 1% of the 24-h recording time), and abnormal EEG activity is only present during the seizure. KO pups have significantly less non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep (-23%) and significantly more waking (+21%) than HZ and WT siblings with no change in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep time. The decrease in NREM sleep is due to an increase in the number of waking episodes, with no change in number or duration of sleep episodes. Sleep patterns, daily amounts of sleep and waking, and the response to 6 h sleep deprivation are similar in HZ and WT adult mice. Conclusion Kv1.2, a mammalian homologue of Shaker, regulates neuronal excitability and affects NREM sleep. PMID:17925011

  16. Vocal Ontogeny in Neotropical Singing Mice (Scotinomys)

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Polly; Pasch, Bret; Warren, Ashley L.; Phelps, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Isolation calls produced by dependent young are a fundamental form of communication. For species in which vocal signals remain important to adult communication, the function and social context of vocal behavior changes dramatically with the onset of sexual maturity. The ontogenetic relationship between these distinct forms of acoustic communication is surprisingly under-studied. We conducted a detailed analysis of vocal development in sister species of Neotropical singing mice, Scotinomys teguina and S. xerampelinus. Adult singing mice are remarkable for their advertisement songs, rapidly articulated trills used in long-distance communication; the vocal behavior of pups was previously undescribed. We recorded 30 S. teguina and 15 S. xerampelinus pups daily, from birth to weaning; 23 S. teguina and 11 S. xerampelinus were recorded until sexual maturity. Like other rodent species with poikilothermic young, singing mice were highly vocal during the first weeks of life and stopped vocalizing before weaning. Production of first advertisement songs coincided with the onset of sexual maturity after a silent period of ≧2 weeks. Species differences in vocal behavior emerged early in ontogeny and notes that comprise adult song were produced from birth. However, the organization and relative abundance of distinct note types was very different between pups and adults. Notably, the structure, note repetition rate, and intra-individual repeatability of pup vocalizations did not become more adult-like with age; the highly stereotyped structure of adult song appeared de novo in the first songs of young adults. We conclude that, while the basic elements of adult song are available from birth, distinct selection pressures during maternal dependency, dispersal, and territorial establishment favor major shifts in the structure and prevalence of acoustic signals. This study provides insight into how an evolutionarily conserved form of acoustic signaling provides the raw material for

  17. Imaging hallmarks of cancer in living mice.

    PubMed

    Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-06-01

    To comprehend the complexity of cancer, the biological characteristics acquired during the initiation and progression of tumours were classified as the 'hallmarks of cancer'. Intravital microscopy techniques have been developed to study individual cells that acquire these crucial traits, by visualizing tissues with cellular or subcellular resolution in living animals. In this Review, we highlight the latest intravital microscopy techniques that have been used in living animals (predominantly mice) to unravel fundamental and dynamic aspects of various hallmarks of cancer. In addition, we discuss the application of intravital microscopy techniques to cancer therapy, as well as limitations and future perspectives for these techniques.

  18. Humanized Mice as Preclinical Models in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Safinia, N; Becker, P D; Vaikunthanathan, T; Xiao, F; Lechler, R; Lombardi, G

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have been instrumental in our understanding of the mechanisms of rejection and the testing of novel treatment options in the context of transplantation. We have now entered an exciting era with research on humanized mice driving advances in translational studies and in our understanding of the function of human cells in response to pathogens and cancer as well as the recognition of human allogeneic tissues in vivo. In this chapter we provide a historical overview of humanized mouse models of transplantation to date, outlining the distinct strains and share our experiences in the study of human transplantation immunology.

  19. Restraint stress augments antibody production in cyclophosphamide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Karp, J D; Smith, J; Hawk, K

    2000-01-01

    These studies evaluated the effects of a psychological stressor (restraint, RST) on antibody production in male BALB/cByJ mice. In Experiment 1, mice were immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH, 100 microg i.p.) 8 h prior to 15 h of RST or food and water deprivation (FWD). RST mice exhibited higher serum anti-KLH IgM and IgG antibodies than FWD mice. In Experiment 2, mice were given either cyclophosphamide (CY, 15 mg/kg) or saline (SAL) prior to immunization with KLH and RST or FWD. ANOVA revealed serum anti-KLH IgG antibody titers in CY+RST animals to be significantly higher than in CY+FWD, SAL+FWD, and SAL+RST mice. Anti-KLH IgM titers of CY+RST mice were higher than those of other groups before and after a second immunization with KLH. In Experiment 3, we show that these changes in antibody production are not likely to be mediated via CY-induced alterations in the reactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis to RST. Together, these results indicate two potentially immunomodulatory parameters (RST and CY) can interact to alter a humoral immune response. In addition, these data support the hypothesis that humoral immune response of mice can be more reactive to stress when the mice are given a low dose of an immunomodulatory drug prior to stressor exposure.

  20. Hepatitis E virus DNA vaccine elicits immunologic memory in mice.

    PubMed

    He, J; Hayes, C G; Binn, L N; Seriwatana, J; Vaughn, D W; Kuschner, R A; Innis, B L

    2001-01-01

    Injection of an expression vector pJHEV containing hepatitis E virus (HEV) structural protein open reading frame 2 gene generates a strong antibody response in BALB/c mice that can bind to and agglutinate HEV. In this study, we tested for immunologic memory in immunized mice whose current levels of IgG to HEV were low or undetectable despite 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine 18 months earlier. Mice previously vaccinated with vector alone were controls. All mice were administered a dose of HEV DNA vaccine to simulate an infectious challenge with HEV. The endpoint was IgG to HEV determined by ELISA. Ten days after the vaccine dose, 5 of 9 mice previously immunized with HEV DNA vaccine had a slight increase in IgG to HEV. By 40 days after the vaccine dose, the level of IgG to HEV had increased dramatically in all 9 mice (108-fold increase in geometric mean titer). In contrast, no control mice became seropositive. These results indicate that mice vaccinated with 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine retain immunologic memory. In response to a small antigenic challenge delivered as DNA, possibly less than delivered by a human infective dose of virus, mice with memory were able to generate high levels of antibody in less time than the usual incubation period of hepatitis E. We speculate that this type of response could protect a human from overt disease.

  1. Experimental Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in different strains of cortisonized mice.

    PubMed Central

    Walzer, P D; Powell, R D; Yoneda, K

    1979-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was produced in eight different strains of mice by the administration of corticosteroids, low (8%)-protein diet, and tetracycline in the drinking water. Heavier degrees of P. carinii infection were most consistently found in C3H/HeN mice; intermediate levels occurred in BALB/c AnN, C57BL/6N, B10.A(2R), AKR/J, and Swiss Webster mice; lighter degrees were found in DBA/2N and DBA/IJ mice. Histopathologically, P. carinii organisms were morphologically indistinguishable from human and rat P. carinii, and elicited a predominantly mononuclear response that was similar among the various mouse strains. The optimal cortisone acetate regimen was 1 mg injected subcutaneously twice weekly. Higher doses shortened the life span of the mice, presumably by inducing overwhelming bacterial infection. This problem occurred not only in different strains of mice, but also in the same strain of mice obtained from different breeders. Thus, cortisonized mice should be useful in the study of experimental P. carinii infection. Success of this model depends on the corticosteroid dose, as well as the strain, source, general health, and preexisting microbial flora of the mice chosen for study. Images PMID:313907

  2. Partial Return Yoke for MICE Step IV and Final Step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, Holger; Plate, Stephen; Berg, J.Scott; Tarrant, Jason; Bross, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  3. Humanization of excretory pathway in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hirotoshi; Katoh, Miki; Sawada, Toshiro; Nakajima, Miki; Soeno, Yoshinori; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-06-01

    The liver of a chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)(+/+)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse line recently established in Japan could be replaced by more than 80% with human hepatocytes. We previously reported that the chimeric mice with humanized liver could be useful as a human model in studies on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the humanization of an excretory pathway was investigated in the chimeric mice. Cefmetazole (CMZ) was used as a probe drug. The CMZ excretions in urine and feces were 81.0 and 5.9% of the dose, respectively, in chimeric mice and were 23.7 and 59.4% of the dose, respectively, in control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. Because CMZ is mainly excreted in urine in humans, the excretory profile of chimeric mice was demonstrated to be similar to that of humans. In the chimeric mice, the hepatic mRNA expression of human drug transporters could be quantified. On the other hand, the hepatic mRNA expression of mouse drug transporters in the chimeric mice was significantly lower than in the control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. In conclusion, chimeric mice exhibited a humanized profile of drug excretion, suggesting that this chimeric mouse line would be a useful animal model in excretory studies.

  4. Chronic rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Christine E; Partap, Uttara; Patchen, Bonnie K; Swoap, Steven J

    2014-08-15

    Current evidence indicates that the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin both increases longevity and, seemingly contradictorily, impairs glucose homeostasis. Most studies exploring the dimensions of this paradox have been based on rapamycin treatment in mice for up to 20 wk. We sought to better understand the metabolic effects of oral rapamycin over a substantially longer period of time in HET3 mice. We observed that treatment with rapamycin for 52 wk induced diabetes in male mice, characterized by hyperglycemia, significant urine glucose levels, and severe glucose and pyruvate intolerance. Glucose intolerance occurred in male mice by 4 wk on rapamycin and could be only partially reversed with cessation of rapamycin treatment. Female mice developed moderate glucose intolerance over 1 yr of rapamycin treatment, but not diabetes. The role of sex hormones in the differential development of diabetic symptoms in male and female mice was further explored. HET3 mice treated with rapamycin for 52 wk were gonadectomized and monitored over 10 wk. Castrated male mice remained glucose intolerant, while ovariectomized females developed significant glucose intolerance over the same time period. Subsequent replacement of 17β-estradiol (E2) in ovariectomized females promoted a recovery of glucose tolerance over a 4-wk period, suggesting the protective role of E2 against rapamycin-induced diabetes. These results indicate that 1) oral rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice, 2) the diabetes is partially reversible with cessation of treatment, and 3) E2 plays a protective role against the development of rapamycin-induced diabetes.

  5. Experimental oral and nasal transmission of rabies virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Charlton, K M; Casey, G A

    1979-01-01

    Weanling female white Swiss mice were exposed to challenge virus standard rabies virus and street virus isolates from various domestic and wild animals. Virus was given free choice as suspension or as infected mouse brain by stomach tube, by single injection of suspension into the oral cavity of unanesthetized mice, by repeated injection into the oral cavity of anesthetized mice and by single application to the external nares of anesthetized mice. Challenge virus standard virus in mouse brain suspension and a suspension of skunk salivary glands infected with street virus (titers greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) consistently produced high rates of infection in mice exposed intranasally, low to high rates of infection in mice exposed by forced feeding and other artificial methods of oral exposure and very low rates of infection when given free choice. Street virus isolates passaged intracerebrally in mice had titers less than or equal to 10(4.5) MICLD50/0.03 ml and rarely caused rabies in mice exposed orally or nasally by any method. The results indicate that with the isolates used, virus of high titer (greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) is required to consistently produce infection in mice by the nasal route and that the mucosa of the nasal cavity probably is the chief route of infection even after oral administration.

  6. Experimental oral and nasal transmission of rabies virus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, K M; Casey, G A

    1979-01-01

    Weanling female white Swiss mice were exposed to challenge virus standard rabies virus and street virus isolates from various domestic and wild animals. Virus was given free choice as suspension or as infected mouse brain by stomach tube, by single injection of suspension into the oral cavity of unanesthetized mice, by repeated injection into the oral cavity of anesthetized mice and by single application to the external nares of anesthetized mice. Challenge virus standard virus in mouse brain suspension and a suspension of skunk salivary glands infected with street virus (titers greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) consistently produced high rates of infection in mice exposed intranasally, low to high rates of infection in mice exposed by forced feeding and other artificial methods of oral exposure and very low rates of infection when given free choice. Street virus isolates passaged intracerebrally in mice had titers less than or equal to 10(4.5) MICLD50/0.03 ml and rarely caused rabies in mice exposed orally or nasally by any method. The results indicate that with the isolates used, virus of high titer (greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) is required to consistently produce infection in mice by the nasal route and that the mucosa of the nasal cavity probably is the chief route of infection even after oral administration. PMID:427634

  7. Intrastrain variations in anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam in mice.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Venugopal; Devi, Kshama

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the individual differences in the baseline anxiety and anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam in Balb/c mice. Initially mice were sorted according into low, intermediate and high anxiety groups (LA, IA and HA) based on the number of entries to and time spent in open arms in elevated plus maze. Later, anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam (2 mg/kg, p.o) in LA, IA and HA mice was evaluated using hole board and light/dark tests. In Hole board test, LA mice made more number of head dippings and spent more time during head dippings, while HA mice made less number of head dippings and spent less time during head dipping when compared to that of IA mice. In light/dark test LA mice made more reentries to and spent more time in bright compartment, while HA mice made few reentries to and spent less time in bright compartment. Results suggest that mice of a single strain differ in their baseline anxiety and anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced lethality and cytokine production in aged mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, K; Matsumoto, T; Miyazaki, S; Yamaguchi, K

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to define the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitivity of aged mice in terms of lethality and cytokine production and to determine down-regulating responses of corticosterone and interleukin 10 (IL-10). The 50% lethal doses of LPS in young (6- to 7-week-old) and aged (98- to 102-week-old) mice were 601 and 93 microg per mouse (25.6 and 1.6 mg per kg of body weight), respectively. Aged mice were approximately 6.5-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of LPS in micrograms per mouse (16-fold more sensitive in milligrams per kilogram) than young mice. Levels in sera of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) IL-1alpha, and IL-6 after intraperitoneal injection of 100 microg of LPS peaked at 1.5, 3, and 3 h, respectively, and declined thereafter in both groups of mice. However, the peak values of these cytokines were significantly higher in aged than in young mice (P < 0.05). Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detectable at 3 h, and sustained high levels were still detected after 12 h in both age groups. Although there were no significant differences in levels of IFN-gamma in sera from both groups, aged mice showed higher IFN-gamma levels throughout the 3- to 12-h study period. Administration of increasing doses of LPS revealed that aged mice had a lower threshold to IL-1alpha production than young mice. In addition, aged mice were approximately 4-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of exogenous TNF in units per mouse (10-fold more sensitive in units per kilogram) than young mice. With regard to down-regulating factors, corticosterone amounts were similar at basal levels and no differences in kinetics after the LPS challenge were observed, whereas IL-10 levels in sera were significantly higher in aged mice at 1.5 and 3 h than in young mice (P < 0.01). These results indicate that aged mice are more sensitive to the lethal toxicities of LPS and TNF than young mice. We conclude that a relatively activated, or primed, state for LPS

  9. Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics, Quinolones, and General Gnotobiological Isolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Armed Forces Ra ioloy Research Institute Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones, and General...Gnotobiological Isolation Russia State Medical University 19990119 114 Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones...effects of antibiotics and probiotics (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) in mice irradiated with 7 Gy. The effects were studied in normal mice and mice

  10. Dietary CLA-induced lipolysis is delayed in soy oil-fed mice compared to coconut oil-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ippagunta, S; Angius, Z; Sanda, M; Barnes, K M

    2013-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to cause a reduction in obesity in several species. CLA-induced body fat loss is enhanced when mice are fed coconut oil (CO) and involves increased lipolysis. The objective of this paper was to determine if the CLA-induced lipolysis in mice fed with different oil sources was time-dependent. Mice were fed 7 % soybean oil (SO) or CO diets for 6 week and then supplemented with 0 or 0.5 % CLA for 3, 7, 10 or 14 days. Body fat and ex-vivo lipolysis was determined. Body fat was reduced by CO on day 7 (P < 0.01) and in both CO and SO-fed mice (P < 0.05) in response to CLA on d14. Lipolysis was increased by CLA in CO-fed mice (P < 0.01) but not in SO-fed mice on day 7 and 10, but on day 14 CLA increased lipolysis in both CO- and SO-fed mice (P < 0.001). Expression and activation level of proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis was determined by western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. No significant differences were detected in protein expression. CO-fed mice had greater fatty acid synthase and stearyl CoA desaturase 1 mRNA expression and less acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA expression (P < 0.01). Sterol regulatory binding protein 1c was decreased by CLA in CO-fed mice and increased in SO-fed mice (P < 0.05). Malic enzyme expression was increased by CLA (P < 0.001) and CO (P < 0.01). Therefore, CLA-induced lipolysis occurs more rapidly in CO vs SO-fed mice and lipogenesis is decreased in CO-fed mice with CLA supplementation.

  11. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Hoynowski, S. M.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines.

  12. Comparative toxicity of acephate in laboratory mice, white-footed mice and meadow voles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The LD50 (95% confidence limits) of the organophosphorus insecticide acephate was estimated to be 351, 380, and 321 mg/kg (295?416, 280?516, and 266?388 mg/kg) for CD-1 laboratory mice (Mus musculus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), respectively. In a second study, these species were provided mash containing 0, 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for five days. Brain and plasma cholinesterase activities were reduced in a dose-dependent manner to a similar extent in the three species (inhibition of brain acetyl-cholinesterase averaged for each species ranged from 13 to 22% at 25 ppm, 33 to 42% at 100 ppm, and 56 to 57% at 400 ppm). Mash intake, body or liver weight, plasma enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferase), hepatic enzyme activities (aniline hydroxylase, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, and glutathione S-transferase), and cytochrome content (P-450 and b5) were not affected by acephate ingestion, although values differed among species. In a third experiment, mice and voles received 400 ppm acephate for 5 days followed by untreated food for up to 2 weeks. Mean inhibition of brain acetylcholin-esterase for the three species ranged from 47 to 58% on day 5, but by days 12 and 19, activity had recovered to 66 to 76% and 81 to 88% of concurrent control values. These findings indicate that CD-1 laboratory mice, white-footed mice, and meadow voles are equally sensitive to acephate when maintained under uniform laboratory conditions. Several factors (e.g., behavior, food preference, habitat) could affect routes and degree of exposure in the field, thereby rendering some species of wild rodents ecologically more vulnerable to organophosphorus insecticides.

  13. Comparative toxicity of acephate in laboratory mice, white-footed mice, and meadow voles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The LD50 (95% confidence limits) of the organophosphorus insecticide acephate was estimated to be 351, 380, and 321 mg/kg (295?416, 280?516, and 266?388 mg/kg) for CD-1 laboratory mice (Mus musculus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis), and meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), respectively. In a second study, these species were provided mash containing 0, 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for five days. Brain and plasma cholinesterase activities were reduced in a dose-dependent manner to a similar extent in the three species (inhibition of brain acetyl-cholinesterase averaged for each species ranged from 13 to 22% at 25 ppm, 33 to 42% at 100 ppm, and 56 to 57% at 400 ppm). Mash intake, body or liver weight, plasma enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferase), hepatic enzyme activities (aniline hydroxylase, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, and glutathione S-transferase), and cytochrome content (P-450 and b5) were not affected by acephate ingestion, although values differed among species. In a third experiment, mice and voles received 400 ppm acephate for 5 days followed by untreated food for up to 2 weeks. Mean inhibition of brain acetylcholin-esterase for the three species ranged from 47 to 58% on day 5, but by days 12 and 19, activity had recovered to 66 to 76% and 81 to 88% of concurrent control values. These findings indicate that CD-1 laboratory mice, white-footed mice, and meadow voles are equally sensitive to acephate when maintained under uniform laboratory conditions. Several factors (e.g., behavior, food preference, habitat) could affect routes and degree of exposure in the field, thereby rendering some species of wild rodents ecologically more vulnerable to organophosphorus insecticides.

  14. Origin and course of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in iv/iv mice

    PubMed Central

    ICARDO, JOSÉ M.; COLVEE, ELVIRA

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the origin and distribution of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in mice of the iv/iv strain, which show situs inversus and heterotaxia. The coronary arteries were studied by direct observation of the aortic sinuses with the scanning electron microscope, and by examination of vascular corrosion casts. In the normal mouse, the left and right coronaries (LC, RC) arise from the respective Valsalva sinus and course along the ventricular borders to reach the heart apex. Along this course the coronary arteries give off small branches at perpendicular or acute angles to supply the ventricles. The ventricular septum is supplied by the septal artery, which arises as a main branch from the right coronary. Conus arteries arise from the main coronary trunks, from the septal artery and/or directly from the Valsalva sinus. The vascular casts demonstrate the presence of intercoronary anastomoses. The origin of the coronary arteries was found to be abnormal in 84% of the iv/iv mice. These anomalies included double origin, high take-off, slit-like openings and the presence of a single coronary orifice. These anomalies occurred singly or in any combination, and were independent of heart situs. The septal artery originated from RC in most cases of situs solitus but originated predominantly from LC in situs inversus hearts. Except for this anomalous origin no statistical correlation was found between the coronary anomalies and heart situs or a particular mode of heterotaxia. The coronary anomalies observed in the iv/iv mice are similar to those found in human hearts. Most coronary anomalies appear to be due to defective connections between the aortic root and the developing coronaries. iv/iv mice may therefore constitute a good model to study the development of similar anomalies in the human heart. PMID:11693308

  15. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  16. Characterization of natural fluorescence in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeziri, Salim; Ma, Guobin; Mincu, Niculae; Benyamin Seeyar, Anader; Khayat, Mario

    2008-02-01

    One important challenge for in-vivo imaging fluorescence in cancer research and related pharmaceutical studies is to discriminate the exogenous fluorescence signal of the specific tagged agents from the natural fluorescence. For mice, natural fluorescence is composed of endogenous fluorescence from organs like the skin, the bladder, etc. and from ingested food. The discrimination between the two kinds of fluorescence makes easy monitoring the targeted tissues. Generally, the amplitude of the fluorescence signal depends on the location and on the amount of injected fluorophore, which is limited in in-vivo experiments. This paper exposes some results of natural fluorescence analysis from in-vivo mice experiments using a time domain small animal fluorescence imaging system: eXplore Optix TM. Fluorescence signals are expressed by a Time Point Spread Function (TPSF) at each scan point. The study uses measures of similarity applied purposely to the TPSF to evaluate the discrepancy and/or the homogeneity of scanned regions of a mouse. These measures allow a classification scheme to be performed on the TPSF's based on their temporal shapes. The work ends by showing how the exogenous fluorescence can be distinguished from natural fluorescence by using the TPSF temporal shape.

  17. Arctigenin efficiently enhanced sedentary mice treadmill endurance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuan; Zhuang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Yu, Liang; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Physical inactivity is considered as one of the potential risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases, while endurance exercise training could enhance fat oxidation that is associated with insulin sensitivity improvement in obesity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an energy sensor plays pivotal roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis, and its activation could improve glucose uptake, promote mitochondrial biogenesis and increase glycolysis. Recent research has even suggested that AMPK activation contributed to endurance enhancement without exercise. Here we report that the natural product arctigenin from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) strongly increased AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently up-regulated its downstream pathway in both H9C2 and C2C12 cells. It was discovered that arctigenin phosphorylated AMPK via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) and serine/threonine kinase 11(LKB1)-dependent pathways. Mice treadmill based in vivo assay further indicated that administration of arctigenin improved efficiently mice endurance as reflected by the increased fatigue time and distance, and potently enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) related genes expression in muscle tissues. Our results thus suggested that arctigenin might be used as a potential lead compound for the discovery of the agents with mimic exercise training effects to treat metabolic diseases.

  18. Teratogenic effects of noise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, M.; Takigawa, H.

    1989-07-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the hazardous effects of noise on embryonic development. The experiment was composed of two parts; one was the observation of the effect due to noise alone, and the other was the observation of the combined effect of noise and known teratogens. ICR mice were exposed to a wide octave-band noise at 100 dB(C) for 6 hours a day in three ways: the first group was exposed to a continuous noise only on day 7 of pregnancy (group "N"), the second was exposed to an intermittent noise (15 min ON/15 min OFF) only on day 7 of pregnancy (group "IN"), and the third was exposed daily to a continuous noise during days 7-12 of pregnancy (group "RN"). Cadmium sulfate or trypan blue was applied as a teratogen, and was administered intraperitoneously on day 7 of pregnancy. On day 18 of pregnancy, mice were sacrificed and the developmental status and external malformations of their fetuses were examined. Each type of noise exposure did not significantly induce embryolethality and fetal growth retardation. However, teratogenicity was observed in groups "N" and "IN". Combined effects of teratogen and noise did not show clear-cut interactions.

  19. Inhaled linalool-induced sedation in mice.

    PubMed

    Linck, Viviane Moura; da Silva, Adriana Lourenço; Figueiró, Micheli; Piato, Angelo Luis; Herrmann, Ana Paula; Dupont Birck, Franciele; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Nunes, Domingos Sávio; Moreno, Paulo Roberto H; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Linalool is a monoterpene often found as a major component of essential oils obtained from aromatic plant species, many of which are used in traditional medical systems as hypno-sedatives. Psychopharmacological evaluations of linalool (i.p. and i.c.v.) revealed marked sedative and anticonvulsant central effects in various mouse models. Considering this profile and alleged effects of inhaled lavender essential oil, the purpose of this study was to examine the sedative effects of inhaled linalool in mice. Mice were placed in an inhalation chamber during 60 min, in an atmosphere saturated with 1% or 3% linalool. Immediately after inhalation, animals were evaluated regarding locomotion, barbiturate-induced sleeping time, body temperature and motor coordination (rota-rod test). The 1% and 3% linalool increased (p<0.01) pentobarbital sleeping time and reduced (p<0.01) body temperature. The 3% linalool decreased (p<0.01) locomotion. Motor coordination was not affected. Hence, linalool inhaled for 1h seems to induce sedation without significant impairment in motor abilities, a side effect shared by most psycholeptic drugs.

  20. The MICE Demonstration of Muon Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste; Hunt, Christopher; Palladino, Vittorio; Pasternak, Jaroslaw

    2016-06-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate muon ionization cooling, the technique proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam traverses a material (the absorber) loosing energy, which is replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). The configuration of MICE required to deliver the demonstration of ionization cooling is being prepared in parallel to the execution of a programme designed to measure the cooling properties of liquid-hydrogen and lithium hydride. The design of the cooling-demonstration experiment will be presented together with a summary of the performance of each of its components and the cooling performance of the experiment.

  1. Heart rate reduction and longevity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gent, Sabine; Kleinbongard, Petra; Dammann, Philip; Neuhäuser, Markus; Heusch, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Heart rate correlates inversely with life span across all species, including humans. In patients with cardiovascular disease, higher heart rate is associated with increased mortality, and such patients benefit from pharmacological heart rate reduction. However, cause-and-effect relationships between heart rate and longevity, notably in healthy individuals, are not established. We therefore prospectively studied the effects of a life-long pharmacological heart rate reduction on longevity in mice. We hypothesized, that the total number of cardiac cycles is constant, and that a 15% heart rate reduction might translate into a 15% increase in life span. C57BL6/J mice received either placebo or ivabradine at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day in drinking water from 12 weeks to death. Heart rate and body weight were monitored. Autopsy was performed on all non-autolytic cadavers, and parenchymal organs were evaluated macroscopically. Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 14% (median, interquartile range 12-15%) throughout life, and median life span was increased by 6.2% (p = 0.01). Body weight and macroscopic findings were not different between placebo and ivabradine. Life span was not increased to the same extent as heart rate was reduced, but nevertheless significantly prolonged by 6.2%.

  2. Xenobiotic receptor humanized mice and their utility.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Nico; Roland Wolf, C

    2013-02-01

    The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha have important endogenous functions and are also involved in the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in response to exogenous xenobiotics. Though not belonging to the same protein family, the Per-Sim-ARNT domain receptor aryl hydrocarbon receptor functionally overlaps with the three nuclear receptors in many aspects and is therefore included in this review. Significant species differences in ligand affinity and biological responses as a result of activation of these receptors have been described. Several xenobiotic receptor humanized mice have been created to overcome these species differences and to provide in vivo models that are more predictive for human responses. This review provides an overview of the different xenobiotic receptor humanized mouse models described to date and will summarize how these models can be applied in basic research and improve drug discovery and development. Some of the key applications in the evaluation of drug induction, drug-drug interactions, nongenotoxic carcinogenicity, other toxicity, or efficacy studies are described. We also discuss relevant considerations in the interpretation of such data and potential future directions for the use of xenobiotic receptor humanized mice.

  3. Safety study of Ciprofloxacin in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Thomas; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Zhao, Wei; Guimiot, Fabien; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Durand, Estelle; Ringot, Maud; Gallego, Jorge; Storme, Thomas; Le Guellec, Chantal; Kassaï, Behrouz; Turner, Mark A; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Matrot, Boris

    2016-02-01

    Ciprofloxacin, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent belonging to the fluoroquinolone family, is prescribed off-label in infants less than one year of age. Ciprofloxacin is included in the European Medicines Agency priority list of off-patent medicinal products requiring evaluation in neonates. This evaluation is undergoing within the TINN (Treat Infections in Neonates) FP7 EU project. As part of the TINN project, the present preclinical study was designed to assess the potential adverse effects of Ciprofloxacin on neurodevelopment, liver and joints in mice. Newborn mice received subcutaneous Ciprofloxacin at 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg/day from 2 to 12 postnatal days. Peak plasma levels of Ciprofloxacin were in the range of levels measured in human neonates. We examined vital functions in vivo, including cardiorespiratory parameters and temperature, psychomotor development, exploratory behavior, arthro-, nephro- and hepato-toxic effects. We found no effect of Ciprofloxacin at 10 and 30 mg/kg/day. In contrast, administration at 100 mg/kg/day delayed weight gain, impaired cardiorespiratory and psychomotor development, caused inflammatory infiltrates in the connective tissues surrounding the knee joint, and moderately increased extramedullary hematopoiesis. The present study pleads for careful watching of cardiorespiratory and motor development in neonates treated with Ciprofloxacin, in addition to the standard surveillance of arthrotoxicity.

  4. Lung disease in mice with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, G; Iles, R; Bear, C E; Huan, L J; Griesenbach, U; McKerlie, C; Frndova, H; Ackerley, C; Gosselin, D; Radzioch, D; O'Brodovich, H; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Tanswell, A K

    1997-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality and morbidity in humans with cystic fibrosis is lung disease. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the lung disease of cystic fibrosis, as well as development of innovative therapeutic interventions, have been compromised by the lack of a natural animal model. The utility of the CFTR-knockout mouse in studying the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis has been limited because of their failure, despite the presence of severe intestinal disease, to develop lung disease. Herein, we describe the phenotype of an inbred congenic strain of CFTR-knockout mouse that develops spontaneous and progressive lung disease of early onset. The major features of the lung disease include failure of effective mucociliary transport, postbronchiolar over inflation of alveoli and parenchymal interstitial thickening, with evidence of fibrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment. We speculate that the basis for development of lung disease in the congenic CFTR-knockout mice is their observed lack of a non-CFTR chloride channel normally found in CFTR-knockout mice of mixed genetic background. PMID:9399953

  5. Acute toxicity of gymnodimine to mice.

    PubMed

    Munday, Rex; Towers, Neale R; Mackenzie, Lincoln; Beuzenberg, Veronica; Holland, Patrick T; Miles, Christopher O

    2004-08-01

    The acute toxicity of the phycotoxin gymnodimine to female Swiss mice by intraperitoneal injection and by oral administration has been determined. Gymnodimine was highly toxic by injection, the LD50 being only 96 microg/kg. Animals either died within 10 min of injection or made a full recovery with no perceptible long-term effects. Gymnodimine was also toxic after oral administration by gavage (LD50 755 microg/kg), but was much less toxic when administered with food. No signs of toxicity were seen in mice voluntarily ingesting food containing gymnodimine at a level sufficient to give a dose of approximately 7500 microg/kg. Pre-treatment with physostigmine or neostigmine protected against injected gymnodimine, suggesting that the latter exerts its toxic effects via blockade of nicotinic receptors at the neuromuscular junction. The low toxicity of gymnodimine when ingested with food suggests that this compound is of low risk to humans, a conclusion that is consonant with anecdotal evidence for the absence of harmful effects in individuals consuming shellfish contaminated with gymnodimine.

  6. Behavioral characterization of P311 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gregory A.; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Greene, Robert I.; Daniell, Xiaoju; Henry, Stanley C.; Crooks, Kristy R.; Kotloski, Robert; Tessarollo, Lino; Phillips, Lindsey E.; Wetsel, William C.

    2013-01-01

    P311 is an 8-kDa protein that is expressed in many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, cerebellum and olfactory lobes, and is under stringent regulation by developmental, mitogenic and other physiological stimuli. P311 is thought to be involved in the transformation and motility of neural cells; however, its role in normal brain physiology is undefined. To address this point, P311-deficient mice were developed through gene targeting and their behaviors were characterized. Mutants displayed no overt abnormalities, bred normally and had normal survival rates. Additionally, no deficiencies were noted in motor co-ordination, balance, hearing or olfactory discrimination. Nevertheless, P311-deficient mice showed altered behavioral responses in learning and memory. These included impaired responses in social transmission of food preference, Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning. Additionally, mutants displayed altered emotional responses as indicated by decreased freezing in contextual and cued fear conditioning and reduced fear-potentiated startle. Together, these data establish P311 as playing an important role in learning and memory processes and emotional responses. PMID:18616608

  7. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  8. Inherited resistance to Corynebacterium kutscheri in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, R G; Wallace, M E

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the factors responsible for inherited resistance to Corynebacterium kutscheri was undertaken. Various inbred mouse strains were examined; these included the Swiss Lynch and C57Bl/l mice, their F1 and F2 progeny, and the progeny of the F1 backcrossed to each parent strain. Two modes of inherited resistance are described. An examination suggested that resistance as measured by the mean lethal dose of C. kutscheri was under polygenic control and was inherited continuously. However, the efficiency with which C. kutscheri was eliminated by the mononuclear phagocyte cells of the liver over 3 days differed markedly among strains. A genetic analysis of this mononuclear phagocyte microbicidal efficiency (MPME) in Swiss Lynch and C57Bl/6 mice was undertaken. The trait, MPME, was present, but did not segregate, in the F1 progeny or in the progeny of the backcross to the resistant C57Bl/6 parent; this was clear evidence of dominance. Moreover, MPME segregated in a ratio of 1:1 in the progeny of the backcross to the sensitive Swiss Lynch parent and in a ratio of 3:1 in the F2 progeny. It was concluded that MPME was inherited discontinuously and was controlled by a single dominant autosomal gene (or closely linked group); the recessive allele was assigned the gene symbol ack. Linkage experiments showed there to be no association between the ack locus and any of the immune-response genes. PMID:971958

  9. Photoperiod and reproduction in female deer mice

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.M.; Miller, L.L.

    1982-03-01

    Female deer mice were exposed to a short day photoperiod beginning during 1 of 3 stages of life. In the first experiment, exposure to SD during adulthood resulted in a minimal disruption of reproductive condition; many females bore 2 litters after the onset of this treatment. In the second experiment, females reared on SD from weaning matured normally, as measured by vaginal introitus; however, vaginal closure occurred in approximately one-half of these females by 9 weeks of age. In the third experiment, females were born of mothers housed on either an SD or a long day photoperiod, and were continued on the maternal photoperiod until 6 weeks of postnatal age. The SD photoperiod markedly inhibited reproductive maturation as measured by vaginal patency, ovarian weight, and uterine weight. A comparison of reproductive organ weights and vaginal condition provided evidence for the validity of the latter measure as an index of reproductive state. As assayed by the present testing procedure, the sensitivity of the reproductive system to photoperiod decreases as a function of age in female deer mice.

  10. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  11. Piperine prevents cholesterol gallstones formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiu-Yun; Xu, Shuang; Hu, Jin-Feng; Tang, Jia; Chu, Shi-Feng; Liu, Hang; Han, Ning; Li, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Dong-Ming; Li, Yue-Ting; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2015-03-15

    Biliary cholesterol may contribute to the formation of cholesterol gallstones, and regulation of these levels could be a useful therapeutic strategy for gallstones disease. Piperine (PA) is a potential cholesterol lowering agent. In this study, we assessed the effect and mechanism of PA in preventing cholesterol gallstones formation induced by feeding lithogenic diet containing high cholesterol levels to mice. C57BL/6 inbred mice were fed lithogenic or chow diets for 10 weeks, with or without PA (15, 30 and 60 mg/kg) or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, 60 mg/kg) administration. Cholesterol, phospholipids and crystals in bile, the lipid in serum, pathological changes and proteins expression in liver were analyzed. The results showed that PA could decrease the cholesterol potency and crystals in bile, reduce total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and increase high-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein (HDL/LDL) levels in serum. Furthermore, PA treatment reduced liver lipid peroxidation and protected hepatobiliary cells from liver injury by decreasing malondialdehyde (MDA) and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, PA inhibited the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/8 (ABCG5/8) and liver X receptor (LXR) in liver, and reduced cholesterol transport from the hepatocytes to the gallbladder. It may be the mechanism of PA in preventing cholesterol gallstones formation. PA as a potential drug for prevention cholesterol gallstones merits further investigation.

  12. Early Neurobehavioral Development of Mice Lacking Endogenous PACAP.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Jozsef; Sandor, Balazs; Tamas, Andrea; Kiss, Peter; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Nagy, Andras D; Fulop, Balazs D; Juhasz, Tamas; Manavalan, Sridharan; Reglodi, Dora

    2017-04-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide. In addition to its diverse physiological roles, PACAP has important functions in the embryonic development of various tissues, and it is also considered as a trophic factor during development and in the case of neuronal injuries. Data suggest that the development of the nervous system is severely affected by the lack of endogenous PACAP. Short-term neurofunctional outcome correlates with long-term functional deficits; however, the early neurobehavioral development of PACAP-deficient mice has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe the postnatal development of physical signs and neurological reflexes in mice partially or completely lacking PACAP. We examined developmental hallmarks during the first 3 weeks of the postnatal period, during which period most neurological reflexes and motor coordination show most intensive development, and we describe the neurobehavioral development using a complex battery of tests. In the present study, we found that PACAP-deficient mice had slower weight gain throughout the observation period. Interestingly, mice partially lacking PACAP weighed significantly less than homozygous mice. There was no difference between male and female mice during the first 3 weeks. Some other signs were also more severely affected in the heterozygous mice than in the homozygous mice, such as air righting, grasp, and gait initiation reflexes. Interestingly, incisor teeth erupted earlier in mice lacking PACAP. Motor coordination, shown by the number of foot-faults on an elevated grid, was also less developed in PACAP-deficient mice. In summary, our results show that mice lacking endogenous PACAP have slower weight gain during the first weeks of development and slower neurobehavioral development regarding a few developmental hallmarks.

  13. Dysfunctional Muscle and Liver Glycogen Metabolism in mdx Dystrophic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, David I.; Lau, Xianzhong; Flores, Marcelo; Trieu, Jennifer; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Lynch, Gordon S.; Koopman, René

    2014-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd) gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD) exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice. Results Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (P<0.01)). Skeletal muscle glycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (P<0.0001). Glycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (P<0.05) but glycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (P<0.01) in mdx compared with wild-type mice. The rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (P<0.01) in mdx mice resulting from a 24% reduction in PKA activity (P<0.01). In mdx mice glycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (P<0.001) together with starch-binding domain protein 1 (219% higher; P<0.01). In addition, mdx mice were glucose intolerant (P<0.01) and had 30% less liver glycogen (P<0.05) compared with control mice. Subsequent analysis of the enzymes dysregulated in skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; P<0.05) as a possible cause of this phenotype. Conclusion We identified that mdx mice were glucose intolerant, and had increased skeletal muscle glycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen. PMID:24626262

  14. Experimental infection of mice with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to infect mice. Two mice each were either mock infected or inoculated with one of three BVDV strains by the intraperitoneal (IP) (n = 8) or intranasal (IN) (n = 8) route. All mice were euthanized at day 7 postinfection (p.i.). None of the infected mice exhibited any clinical signs of illness; however, the tissues harvested after BVDV challenge showed significant histopathological changes. Blood samples from five mice that were injected IP and one mouse that was inoculated IN were positive for BVDV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the presence of viral antigen in the organs of mice infected with three BVDV strains. In IP-injected mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the spleen (5/6), mesenteric lymph nodes (4/6), lymphatic tissue of the lung (3/6), lung (1/6), and stomach (1/6) of the infected mice; however, it was not detected in the liver (0/6) or kidney (0/6). In IN-inoculated mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the lung and mesenteric lymph nodes of one BVDV-infected mouse but was not detected in other tissues. The results of this study suggest that the spleen is the most reliable tissue for BVDV antigen detection using IHC in the IP-injected group. Our study demonstrates that mice can be infected by BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV infection in mice.

  15. Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia causes hyperopic refractive shift in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tkatchenko, Tatiana V.; Tkatchenko, Andrei V.

    2010-01-01

    Mice have increasingly been used as a model for studies of myopia. The key to successful use of mice for myopia research is the ability to obtain accurate measurements of refractive status of their eyes. In order to obtain accurate measurements of refractive errors in mice, the refraction needs to be performed along the optical axis of the eye. This represents a particular challenge, because mice are very difficult to immobilize. Recently, ketamine-xylazine anesthesia has been used to immobilize mice before measuring refractive errors, in combination with tropicamide ophthalmic solution to induce mydriasis. Although these drugs have increasingly been used while refracting mice, their effects on the refractive state of the mouse eye have not yet been investigated. Therefore, we have analyzed the effects of tropicamide eye drops and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on refraction in P40 C57BL/6J mice. We have also explored two alternative methods to immobilize mice, i.e. the use of a restraining platform and pentobarbital anesthesia. We found that tropicamide caused a very small, but statistically significant, hyperopic shift in refraction. Pentobarbital did not have any substantial effect on refractive status, whereas ketamine-xylazine caused a large and highly significant hyperopic shift in refraction. We also found that the use of a restraining platform represents good alternative for immobilization of mice prior to refraction. Thus, our data suggest that ketamine-xylazine anesthesia should be avoided in studies of refractive development in mice and underscore the importance of providing appropriate experimental conditions when measuring refractive errors in mice. PMID:20813132

  16. Vitamin D receptor signaling enhances locomotive ability in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Sadaoki; Suzuki, Miho; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Keisuke; Takeda, Satoshi; Aizawa, Ken; Hirata, Michinori; Yogo, Kenji; Endo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Bone fractures markedly reduce quality of life and life expectancy in elderly people. Although osteoporosis increases bone fragility, fractures frequently occur in patients with normal bone mineral density. Because most fractures occur on falling, preventing falls is another focus for reducing bone fractures. In this study, we investigated the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling in locomotive ability. In the rotarod test, physical exercise enhanced locomotive ability of wild-type (WT) mice by 1.6-fold, whereas exercise did not enhance locomotive ability of VDR knockout (KO) mice. Compared with WT mice, VDR KO mice had smaller peripheral nerve axonal diameter and disordered AChR morphology on the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Eldecalcitol (ED-71, ELD), an analog of 1,25(OH)2 D3 , administered to rotarod-trained C57BL/6 mice enhanced locomotor performance compared with vehicle-treated nontrained mice. The area of AChR cluster on the extensor digitorum longus was greater in ELD-treated mice than in vehicle-treated mice. ELD and 1,25(OH)2 D3 enhanced expression of IGF-1, myelin basic protein, and VDR in rat primary Schwann cells. VDR signaling regulates neuromuscular maintenance and enhances locomotive ability after physical exercise. Further investigation is required, but Schwann cells and the neuromuscular junction are targets of vitamin D3 signaling in locomotive ability.

  17. Moxidectin toxicity in senescence-accelerated prone and resistant mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vanessa K; Tiwary, Asheesh K; Sharma-Reddy, Prachi; Lieber, Karen A; Taylor, Douglas K; Mook, Deborah M

    2009-06-01

    Moxidectin has been used safely as an antiparasitic in many animal species, including for the eradication of the mouse fur mite, Mycoptes musculinus. Although no side effects of moxidectin have previously been reported to occur in mice, 2 strains of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8 and SAMR1) sustained considerable mortality after routine prophylactic treatment. To investigate the mechanism underlying this effect, moxidectin toxicosis in these mice was evaluated in a controlled study. Moxidectin was applied topically (0.015 mg), and drug concentrations in both brain and serum were analyzed by using HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry. The moxidectin concentration in brain of SAMP8 mice was 18 times that in controls, and that in brain of SAMR1 mice was 14 times higher than in controls, whereas serum moxidectin concentrations did not differ significantly among the 3 strains. Because deficiency of the blood-brain barrier protein P-glycoprotein leads to sensitivity to this class of drugs in other SAM mice, Pgp immunohistochemistry of brain sections from a subset of mice was performed to determine whether this commercially available analysis could predict sensitivity to this class of drug. The staining analysis showed no difference among the strains of mice, indicating that this test does not correlate with sensitivity. In addition, no gross or histologic evidence of organ toxicity was found in brain, liver, lung, or kidney. This report shows that topically applied moxidectin at a standard dose accumulates in the CNS causing toxicosis in both SAMP8 and SAMR1 mice.

  18. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-01-28

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans.

  19. Major contribution of tubular secretion to creatinine clearance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Christoph; Faulhaber-Walter, Robert; Wang, Yaohui; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Mizel, Diane; Star, Robert A.; Briggs, Josephine P.; Levine, Mark; Schnermann, Jurgen

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to quantify the fraction of excreted creatinine not attributable to creatinine filtration for accurately determining the glomerular filtration rate in mice. To measure this we compared creatinine filtration with the simultaneous measurement of inulin clearance using both single-bolus fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin elimination kinetics and standard FITC-inulin infusion. During anesthesia, creatinine filtration was found to be systematically higher than inulin clearance in both male and female C57BL/6J mice. The secretion fraction was significantly less in female mice. Administration of either cimetidine or para-aminohippuric acid, competitors of organic cation and anion transport respectively, significantly reduced the secretion fraction in male and female mice and both significantly increased the plasma creatinine level. Creatinine secretion in both genders was not mediated by the organic cation transporters OCT1 or OCT 2 since secretion fraction levels were identical in FVB wild-type and OCT1/2 knockout mice. Thus, secretion accounts for about 50 and 35% of excreted creatinine in male and female mice, respectively. Increasing plasma creatinine threefold by infusion further increased the secretion fraction. Renal organic anion transporter 1 mRNA expression was higher in male than in female mice, reflecting the gender difference in creatinine secretion. Hence we show that there is a major secretory contribution to creatinine excretion mediated through the organic anion transport system. This feature adds to problems associated with measuring endogenous creatinine filtration in mice. PMID:20032962

  20. Abetalipoproteinemia induced by overexpression of ORP150 in mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Iguchi, Taisen; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    2007-06-01

    ORP150 is an endoplasmic-resident, hypoxic stress-induced protein, but little is known about the effects of its systemic overexpression. We have produced a transgenic strain of mice that overexpress ORP150 (ORP-Tg mice). These mice exhibit severe growth retardation concomitant with vacuolar degeneration in the heart. To investigate the cause of the observed growth retardation in response to ORP150 overexpression, we conducted a clinical evaluation of the ORP-Tg mice. Blood analysis showed significantly lower concentrations of serum triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose and insulin. The triglyceride components that were reduced in ORP-Tg mice were localized mainly at the origin and in the pre-beta fraction on agarose gel electrophoresis, corresponding to chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins. A lipid-loading test of ORP-Tg mice revealed reduced triglyceride uptake, which mainly was due to suppressed uptake of very low-density lipoproteins. An intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test indicated that the ORP-Tg mice have a significantly higher rate of glucose degradation. These findings suggest that overexpression of ORP150 in mice leads to abetalipoproteinemia with alteration of glucose and lipid metabolism. These data could provide clues for a therapeutic target of dyslipidemia or diabetes.

  1. REVIEW - Thermal Physiology of Laboratory Mice: Defining Thermoneutrality

    EPA Science Inventory

    In terms of total number of publications, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has emerged as the most popular test subject in biomedical research. Mice are used as models to study obesity, diabetes, eNS diseases and variety of other pathologies. Mice are classified as homeotherms...

  2. `Mice In Space': evaluation of a new housing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Mitchell; Liu, Yi; Serradj, Nadjet; Salanova, Michele; Touma, Chadi; Poursaberi, Ahmad; Jamon, Marc; Blottner, Dieter; Cancedda, Ranieri; Giuliani, Alessandra; Rustichelli, Franco; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Vico, Lawrence; D'Hooge, Rudi; Falcetti, Giancarlo; Berckmans, Daniel

    In this project a cage design is being proposed in which mice can be housed in a microgravity environment. The objective of this paper is to describe and evaluate the proposed cage design, by investigating the micro-environment within such a MIS cage, and to quantify the difference in activity between single and double housed mice by using integrated cameras in the top covers of the cages and quantifying the differences in stress levels by fecal hormone extraction. By assessing the gradients in air circulation in the cage, it can be visualized that high air flow gradients exist within the MIS cage. Measuring the 3D temperature distribution showed small temperature gradients, being maximum 0.1 C. Single housed MIS mice showed significant different body weight compared to double housed MIS mice and controls (p¡0.05). The effect of individual or double housing on activity was quantified with images recorded during 25 day trials. There was a significantly difference observed as single housed show significant more activity compared to double housed mice (p¡0.05). No significant difference was found in stress levels between MIS housed mice and control mice. The technical description in this paper should allow researchers to be informed about the possibilities that will come available to do mice experimentations in space. Keywords: mouse, spaceflight, animal housing, cage design, micro environment

  3. Myocarditis induced by coxsackie B3 virus in mature mice.

    PubMed

    Jaśkiewicz, K; Mrozińska, B

    1975-01-01

    Forty female mice during breast-feeding were infected intraperitoneally with coxackie B3 virus. Gross and microscopic examination of the hearts of the mice 7, 20, 44 and 120 days after infection revealed myocarditis typical of the acute stage of the disease, not reported previously, and gradually increasing intensity of immunologic changes in the chronic stage.

  4. Preference for and Discrimination of Paintings by Mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    I measured preference for paintings (Renoir vs. Picasso or Kandinsky vs. Mondrian) in mice. In general mice did not display a painting preference except for two mice: one preferred Renoir to Picasso, and the other preferred Kandinsky to Mondrian. Thereafter, I examined discrimination of paintings with new mice. When exposure to paintings of one artist was associated with an injection of morphine (3.0 mg/kg), mice displayed conditioned preference for those paintings, showing discrimination of paintings by Renoir from those by Picasso, and paintings by Kandinsky from those by Mondrian after the conditioning. They also exhibited generalization of the preference to novel paintings of the artists. After conditioning with morphine for a set of paintings consisting of two artists, mice showed discrimination between two sets of paintings also from the two artists but not in association with morphine. These results suggest that mice can discriminate not only between an artist’s style but also among paintings of the same artist. When mice were trained to discriminate a pair of paintings by Kandinsky and Renoir in an operant chamber equipped with a touch screen, they showed transfer of the discrimination to new pairs of the artists, but did not show transfer of discrimination of paintings by other artists, suggesting generalization. PMID:23762346

  5. Preference for and discrimination of paintings by mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    I measured preference for paintings (Renoir vs. Picasso or Kandinsky vs. Mondrian) in mice. In general mice did not display a painting preference except for two mice: one preferred Renoir to Picasso, and the other preferred Kandinsky to Mondrian. Thereafter, I examined discrimination of paintings with new mice. When exposure to paintings of one artist was associated with an injection of morphine (3.0 mg/kg), mice displayed conditioned preference for those paintings, showing discrimination of paintings by Renoir from those by Picasso, and paintings by Kandinsky from those by Mondrian after the conditioning. They also exhibited generalization of the preference to novel paintings of the artists. After conditioning with morphine for a set of paintings consisting of two artists, mice showed discrimination between two sets of paintings also from the two artists but not in association with morphine. These results suggest that mice can discriminate not only between an artist's style but also among paintings of the same artist. When mice were trained to discriminate a pair of paintings by Kandinsky and Renoir in an operant chamber equipped with a touch screen, they showed transfer of the discrimination to new pairs of the artists, but did not show transfer of discrimination of paintings by other artists, suggesting generalization.

  6. Transmission of multiple system atrophy prions to transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Joel C.; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Middleton, Lefkos; Dexter, David T.; Gentleman, Steve M.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2013-01-01

    Prions are proteins that adopt alternative conformations, which become self-propagating. Increasing evidence argues that prions feature in the synucleinopathies that include Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia, and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Although TgM83+/+ mice homozygous for a mutant A53T α-synuclein transgene begin developing CNS dysfunction spontaneously at ∼10 mo of age, uninoculated TgM83+/− mice (hemizygous for the transgene) remain healthy. To determine whether MSA brains contain α-synuclein prions, we inoculated the TgM83+/− mice with brain homogenates from two pathologically confirmed MSA cases. Inoculated TgM83+/− mice developed progressive signs of neurologic disease with an incubation period of ∼100 d, whereas the same mice inoculated with brain homogenates from spontaneously ill TgM83+/+ mice developed neurologic dysfunction in ∼210 d. Brains of MSA-inoculated mice exhibited prominent astrocytic gliosis and microglial activation as well as widespread deposits of phosphorylated α-synuclein that were proteinase K sensitive, detergent insoluble, and formic acid extractable. Our results provide compelling evidence that α-synuclein aggregates formed in the brains of MSA patients are transmissible and, as such, are prions. The MSA prion represents a unique human pathogen that is lethal upon transmission to Tg mice and as such, is reminiscent of the prion causing kuru, which was transmitted to chimpanzees nearly 5 decades ago. PMID:24218576

  7. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  8. A touchscreen based global motion perception task for mice.

    PubMed

    Stirman, Jeffrey N; Townsend, Leah B; Smith, Spencer L

    2016-10-01

    Global motion perception is a function of higher, or extrastriate, visual system circuitry. These circuits can be engaged in visually driven navigation, a behavior at which mice are adept. However, the properties of global motion perception in mice are unclear. Therefore, we developed a touchscreen-based, two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) task to explore global motion detection in mice using random dot kinematograms (RDK). Performance data was used to compute coherence thresholds for global motion perception. The touchscreen-based task allowed for parallel training and testing with multiple chambers and minimal experimenter intervention with mice performing hundreds of trials per session. Parameters of the random dot kinematograms, including dot size, lifetime, and speed, were tested. Mice learned to discriminate kinematograms whose median motion direction differed by 90 degrees in 7-24days after a 10-14day pre-training period. The average coherence threshold (measured at 70% correct) in mice for this task was 22±5%, with a dot diameter of 3.88mm and speed of 58.2mm/s. Our results confirm the ability of mice to perform global motion discriminations, and the touchscreen assay provides a flexible, automated, and relatively high throughput method with which to probe complex visual function in mice.

  9. Leptin responsiveness in mice that ectopically express agouti protein.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ruth B S; Mitchell, Tiffany D; Mynatt, Randall L

    Agouti protein is an endogenous antagonist of melanocortin receptors (MCR), including MCR3 and MCR4, which have been implicated as part of the hypothalamic mechanism that mediates leptin-induced hypophagia. In this experiment we examined the effects of peripheral and central leptin administration in male and female beta-actin promoter (BAPa) mice that express agouti protein ectopically and have a phenotype that includes obesity and diabetes which is exaggerated in males compared with females. Intraperitoneal infusion of 10 microg leptin/day for 13 days caused weight loss and a transient inhibition of food intake in wild-type mice, with a greater effect in males than females. Male BAPa mice were resistant to leptin infusion whereas female mice lost weight. All of the mice lost body weight following a single intracerebroventricular injection of leptin but the effect was greater in female BAPa mice than any other group. There also was a delayed suppression of food intake that was the same for wild-type and BAPa female mice, whereas food intake recovered faster in BAPa than wild-type males. The dissociation between food intake and body weight loss implies a significant effect of leptin on energy expenditure in BAPa mice. These results demonstrate that the effect of leptin on energy balance is not entirely dependent upon the melanocortin system.

  10. Altered food consumption in mice lacking lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Dusaulcy, R; Daviaud, D; Pradère, J P; Grès, S; Valet, Ph; Saulnier-Blache, J S

    2009-12-01

    The release of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) by adipocytes has previously been proposed to play a role in obesity and associated pathologies such as insulin resistance and diabetes. In the present work, the sensitivity to diet-induced obesity was studied in mice lacking one of the LPA receptor subtype (LPA1R). Conversely to what was observed in wild type (WT) mice, LPA1R-KO-mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) showed no significant increase in body weight or fat mass when compared to low fat diet (LFD). In addition, in contrast to what was observed in WT mice, LPA1R-KO mice did not exhibit over-consumption of food associated with HFD. Surprisingly, when fed a LFD, LPA1R-KO mice exhibited significant higher plasma leptin concentration and higher level of adipocyte leptin mRNA than WT mice. In conclusion, LPA1R-KO mice were found to be resistant to diet-induced obesity consecutive to a resistance to fat-induced over-consumption of food that may result at least in part from alterations in leptin expression and production.

  11. Peromyscus leucopus mice: a potential animal model for haematological studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2014-10-01

    Peromyscus leucopus mice share physical similarities with laboratory mice Mus musculus (MM) but have higher agility and longer lifespan. We compared domesticated P. leucopus linville (PLL) and M. musculus C57BL/6 (MMB6) mice for cellular composition of peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM) and spleen. PLL mice had significantly fewer platelets and significantly more monocytes in the blood, and notably fewer megakaryocytes in the BM. Spleens of PLL mice were significantly smaller, with 50% fewer cells and reduced 'red pulp'. There was no obvious haematological change in PLL mice between 2-8 and 16-26 months of age, except for a significant increase in blood monocytes. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content showed no change with age but differed significantly between different cell types. Treating two to eight month-old PLL mice with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine in drinking water for three months did not affect cellular ROS content, but increased blood leucocytes especially the concentration of monocytes. The low platelets, low megakaryocytes, high monocytes and low splenic erythropoiesis in PLL mice resemble human measurements better than the values seen in MMB6.

  12. Peromyscus leucopus mice: a potential animal model for haematological studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2014-01-01

    Peromyscus leucopus mice share physical similarities with laboratory mice Mus musculus (MM) but have higher agility and longer lifespan. We compared domesticated P. leucopus linville (PLL) and M. musculus C57BL/6 (MMB6) mice for cellular composition of peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM) and spleen. PLL mice had significantly fewer platelets and significantly more monocytes in the blood, and notably fewer megakaryocytes in the BM. Spleens of PLL mice were significantly smaller, with 50% fewer cells and reduced ‘red pulp’. There was no obvious haematological change in PLL mice between 2–8 and 16–26 months of age, except for a significant increase in blood monocytes. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content showed no change with age but differed significantly between different cell types. Treating two to eight month-old PLL mice with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine in drinking water for three months did not affect cellular ROS content, but increased blood leucocytes especially the concentration of monocytes. The low platelets, low megakaryocytes, high monocytes and low splenic erythropoiesis in PLL mice resemble human measurements better than the values seen in MMB6. PMID:25116892

  13. Artificially reared mice exhibit anxiety-like behavior in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hidemi; Harauma, Akiko; Kato, Maki; Ootomo, Yuki; Hatanaka, Erisa; Moriguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    It is important to establish experimental animal techniques that are applicable to the newborn and infant phases for nutrition and pharmacological studies. Breeding technology using the artificial suckling method without breast milk is very effective for the study of newborn nutrition. Using this method, we separated newborn mice from dams within 48 h of birth and provided them with artificial milk. We evaluated mouse anxiety levels after early postnatal maternal separation. Artificially reared mice were subjected to elevated plus-maze tests to assess emotional behavior at 9 weeks of age. Artificially reared mice showed a significantly lower frequency of entries and dipping into the open arms of the maze compared with dam-reared mice. This result indicates that the anxiety level of artificially reared mice was higher than that of dam-reared mice. Moreover, the concentration of monoamines in the brain was determined after the behavioral experiment. The hippocampal norepinephrine, serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the artificially reared mice were significantly higher than those of the dam-reared mice. These results suggest that maternal-offspring interactions are extremely important for the emotional development of newborn infants during the lactation period. In future studies, it is necessary to consider the environmental factors and conditions that minimize the influence of artificial rearing on emotional behavior. PMID:26948536

  14. Social dominance rank influences wheel running behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Pérez, Héctor; Sellings, Laurie; Grieder, Taryn; Díaz, José-Luis

    2009-07-03

    Dominance hierarchies within social groups determine resource distribution. Resources, such as food and access to mating partners, can act as reinforcers. The present study examined the effect of social rank on access to wheel running-a reinforcing behavior performed by laboratory animals. Mice were identified as dominant or subordinate and given access to a running wheel access under solitary or social conditions. In the solitary condition, subordinate and dominant mice spent equal amounts of time on the running wheel. In the social condition, when one wheel was present, subordinate mice spent less time on the wheel than did dominant mice. Conversely, when two wheels were present, subordinates spent more time on the wheel than did dominant mice. When mice were given 24h access to one running wheel in the social condition, dominant mice ran more than subordinates during the dark cycle. Subordinate mice did not compensate for the lack of running wheel access by schedule shifting. These results suggest that social rank influences access to reinforcers by behavioral interference rather than by social inhibition.

  15. Oxygen effects on mortality of mice infected with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrick, E. J.; Somerson, N. L.; Weiss, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Diplococcus pneumoniae were held at 1 atm in either hypoxic (12%), hyperoxic (75%), or a normal (21%) oxygen environment. Mortality rates indicated prolongation of survival in hypoxia and shortened survival in hyperoxia. Exposure of mice to the experimental gas mixtures prior to inoculation did not alter the results.

  16. Antistress, Adoptogenic Activity of Sida cordifolia Roots in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sumanth, Meera; Mustafa, S S

    2009-05-01

    Ethanol extract of roots of Sida cordifolia was evaluated for antistress, adaptogenic activity using cold restraint stress and swim endurance in mice. Mice pretreated with extract of Sida cordifolia showed significant improvement in the swim duration and reduced the elevated WBC, blood glucose and plasma cortisone.

  17. Inhalation of two putative Gulf War toxins by mice.

    PubMed

    Repine, John E; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Klawitter, Jelena; Christians, Uwe; Peters, Ben; Smith, Dwight M

    2016-01-01

    We employed our inhalation methodology to examine whether biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress would be produced in mice following inhalation of aerosols containing carbonaceous particles or the vapor of pesticides prevalent during the first Gulf War. Exposure to two putative Gulf War Illness toxins, fine airborne particles and the pesticide malathion, increased biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in Friend virus B (FVB) female mice. Mice inhaling particles 24 h before had increased lung lavage and plasma Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) (a biomarker of inflammation) and PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) levels, lung lavage protein and lung lavage lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. These changes were a function of particle density and exposure time. Compared to particle inhalation, mice inhaling malathion 24 h before had small increase in plasma LTB4 and PGF2α levels but no increase in lung lavage LTB4, lung lavage protein, lung lavage LDH, and lung lavage alveolar macrophage (AM) levels compared to unexposed control mice. AM from particle-exposed mice contained phagocytosed particles, while AM from malathion-exposed mice showed no abnormalities. Our results indicate that inhaling particles or malathion can alter inflammatory and oxidative biomarkers in mice and raise the possibility that these toxins may have altered inflammation and oxidative stress biomarkers in Gulf War-exposed individuals.

  18. Neutrino Factory Targets and the MICE Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Walaron, Kenneth Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The future of particle physics in the next 30 years must include detailed study of neutrinos. The first proof of physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics is evident in results from recent neutrino experiments which imply that neutrinos have mass and flavour mixing. The Neutrino Factory is the leading contender to measure precisely the neutrino mixing parameters to probe beyond the Standard Model physics. Significantly, one must look to measure the mixing angle θ13 and investigate the possibility of leptonic CP violation. If found this may provide a key insight into the origins of the matter/anti- matter asymmetry seen in the universe, through the mechanism of leptogenesis. The Neutrino Factory will be a large international multi-billion dollar experiment combining novel new accelerator and long-baseline detector technology. Arguably the most important and costly features of this facility are the proton driver and cooling channel. This thesis will present simulation work focused on determining the optimal proton driver energy to maximise pion production and also simulation of the transport of this pion °ux through some candidate transport lattices. Bench-marking of pion cross- sections calculated by MARS and GEANT4 codes to measured data from the HARP experiment is also presented. The cooling channel aims to reduce the phase-space volume of the decayed muon beam to a level that can be e±ciently injected into the accelerator system. The Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) hosted by the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK is a proof-of-principle experiment aimed at measuring ionisation cooling. The experiment will run parasitically to the ISIS accelerator and will produce muons from pion decay. The MICE beamline provides muon beams of variable emittance and momentum to the MICE experiment to enable measurement of cooling over a wide range of beam conditions. Simulation work in the design of this beamline is presented in this thesis as

  19. Silver nanoparticles cause complications in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Park, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kang, Min-Hee; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much interest and have been used for antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, and antiangiogenic applications because of their unique properties. The increased usage of AgNPs leads to a potential hazard to human health. However, the potential effects of AgNPs on animal models are not clear. This study was designed to investigate the potential impact of AgNPs on pregnant mice. Methods The synthesis of AgNPs was performed using culture extracts of Bacillus cereus. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. AgNPs were administrated into pregnant mice via intravenous infusion at 1.0 mg/kg doses at 6.5 days postcoitum (dpc). At 13.5, 15.5, and 17.5 dpc, the pregnant mice were euthanized, and the embryo and placenta were isolated. The meiotic status of oocytes was evaluated. DNA methylation studies were performed, and aberrant imprinting disrupted fetal, placental, and postnatal development. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and Western blot were used to analyze various gene expressions. Results The synthesized AgNPs were uniformly distributed and were spherical in shape with an average size of 8 nm. AgNPs exposure increased the meiotic progression of female germ cells in the fetal mouse ovaries, and maternal AgNP exposure significantly disrupted imprinted gene expression in 15.5 dpc embryos and placentas, such as Ascl2, Snrpn, Kcnq1ot1, Peg3, Zac1, H19, Igf2r, and Igf2; DNA methylation studies revealed that AgNPs exposure significantly altered the methylation levels of differentially methylated regions of Zac1. Conclusion The results from this study indicated that early exposure to AgNPs has the potential to disrupt fetal and postnatal health through epigenetic changes in the embryo and abnormal development of the placenta. These results can contribute to research involved in the safe use of

  20. The genetic basis of adaptive melanism in pocket mice.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Michael W; Hoekstra, Hopi E; D'Agostino, Susan L

    2003-04-29

    Identifying the genes underlying adaptation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Here, we describe the molecular changes underlying adaptive coat color variation in a natural population of rock pocket mice, Chaetodipus intermedius. Rock pocket mice are generally light-colored and live on light-colored rocks. However, populations of dark (melanic) mice are found on dark lava, and this concealing coloration provides protection from avian and mammalian predators. We conducted association studies by using markers in candidate pigmentation genes and discovered four mutations in the melanocortin-1-receptor gene, Mc1r, that seem to be responsible for adaptive melanism in one population of lava-dwelling pocket mice. Interestingly, another melanic population of these mice on a different lava flow shows no association with Mc1r mutations, indicating that adaptive dark color has evolved independently in this species through changes at different genes.

  1. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Naoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Furushima, Kenryo; Takamune, Kazufumi; Li, Zhenghua; Abe, Shin-ichi; Aizawa, Shin-ichi; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1+/− male mice. Healthy Prm1+/− offspring were then produced by transferring blastocysts obtained via in vitro fertilization using zona-free oocytes and sperm from Prm1+/− mice. This result suggests that sperm lacking Prm1 can generate offspring despite being abnormally shaped and having destabilised DNA, decondensed chromatin and a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. Nevertheless, these mice showed little derangement of expression profiles. PMID:27250771

  2. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Naoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Furushima, Kenryo; Takamune, Kazufumi; Li, Zhenghua; Abe, Shin-Ichi; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi

    2016-06-02

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1(+/-) male mice. Healthy Prm1(+/-) offspring were then produced by transferring blastocysts obtained via in vitro fertilization using zona-free oocytes and sperm from Prm1(+/-) mice. This result suggests that sperm lacking Prm1 can generate offspring despite being abnormally shaped and having destabilised DNA, decondensed chromatin and a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. Nevertheless, these mice showed little derangement of expression profiles.

  3. Induction of follistatin precedes gastric transformation in gastrin deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Weiqun; Saqui-Salces, Milena; Zavros, Yana; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2008-11-21

    We previously showed that antral gastric tumors develop in gastrin-deficient (Gas{sup -/-}) mice. Therefore Gas{sup -/-}mice were studied sequentially over 12 months to identify molecular mechanisms underlying gastric transformation. Fundic atrophy developed by 9 months in Gas{sup -/-} mice. Antral mucosal hyperplasia developed coincident with the focal loss of TFF1 and Muc5AC. Microarray analysis of 12 month Gas{sup -/-} tumors revealed an increase in follistatin, an activin/BMP antagonist. We found that elevated follistatin expression occurred in the proliferative neck zone of hyperplastic antrums, in antral tumors of Gas{sup -/-} mice, and also in human gastric cancers. Follistatin induced cyclin D1 and the trefoil factors TFF1 and TFF2 in a gastric cancer cell line. We concluded that antral hyperplasia in Gas{sup -/-} mice involves amplification of mucous cell lineages due to follistatin, suggesting its role in the development of antral gastric tumors.

  4. Quinolones potentiate cefazolin-induced seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed Central

    De Sarro, A; Zappalá, M; Chimirri, A; Grasso, S; De Sarro, G B

    1993-01-01

    The behavioral and convulsant effects of cefazolin, a beta-lactam derivative, were studied after intraperitoneal administration to DBA/2 mice, a strain genetically susceptible to sound-induced seizures, and Swiss mice. DBA/2 mice were more susceptible to seizures induced by cefazolin than were Swiss mice. The proconvulsant effects of some quinolones on seizures evoked by intraperitoneal administration of cefazolin were also evaluated in DBA/2 mice. Our study also demonstrated that the order of proconvulsant activity in our epileptic model was pefloxacin > enoxacin > ofloxacin > rufloxacin > norfloxacin > cinoxacin > ciprofloxacin > nalidixic acid. The relationships between the chemical structures and proconvulsant activities of quinolone derivatives were studied. The relationship between lipophilicity and proconvulsant activity was also investigated. PMID:8395790

  5. Accelerated fracture healing in mice lacking the 5-lipoxygenase gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promotes inflammation by synthesizing pro-inflammatory prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Inflammation is an early response to bone fracture, and ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing. Arachidonic acid is also converted into leukotrienes by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). We hypothesized that 5-LO is a negative regulator of fracture healing and that in the absence of COX-2, excess leukotrienes synthesized by 5-LO will impair fracture healing. Methods Fracture healing was assessed in mice with a targeted 5-LO mutation (5-LOKO mice) and control mice by radiographic and histological observations, and measured by histomorphometry and torsional mechanical testing. To assess effects on arachidonic acid metabolism, prostaglandin E2, F2α, and leukotriene B4 levels were measured in the fracture calluses of control, 5-LOKO COX-1KO, and COX-2KO mice by enzyme linked immunoassays. Results Femur fractures in 5-LOKO mice rapidly developed a cartilaginous callus that was replaced with bone to heal fractures faster than in control mice. Femurs from 5-LOKO mice had substantially better mechanical properties after 1 month of healing than did control mice. Callus leukotriene levels were 4-fold higher in mice homozygous for a targeted mutation in the COX-2 gene (COX-2KO), which indicated that arachidonic acid was shunted into the 5-LO pathway in the absence of COX-2. Interpretation These experiments show that 5-LO negatively regulates fracture healing and that shunting of arachidonic acid into the 5-LO pathway may account, at least in part, for the impaired fracture healing response observed in COX-2KO mice. PMID:21067431

  6. Systemic Coccidioides immitis infection in nude and beige mice.

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, K V; Leathers, C R; Lee, K W

    1985-01-01

    The course of experimental systemic Coccidioides immitis infection was assessed quantitatively and histologically in beige mice, congenitally athymic nude mice, and their respective normal counterparts. After intravenous inoculation with 50 arthroconidia, the number of viable C. immitis cultured from the spleens, livers, and lungs progressively increased throughout the assay in the organs of all mice. During the first 2 weeks of infection, significantly greater numbers of CFU were recovered from the spleens and livers, but not the lungs, of nude mice than from the respective organs of their phenotypically normal littermates. Significantly greater numbers of CFU were cultured from the lungs and spleens of beige mice compared with the number recovered from their functionally normal littermates. After intranasal inoculation, extrapulmonary dissemination of C. immitis occurred at an equal rate and resulted in similar organ burdens in nude mice and their normal littermates. Histological examination of infected tissues revealed a characteristic mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate in euthymic mice; the response in nude mice was less severe, consisting predominantly, if not solely, of granulocytes. In addition, in tissue sections from nude mice, but not in those from their euthymic counterparts, mature spherules were frequently observed to be devoid of an associated inflammatory response. The inflammatory lesion in beige mice contained a predominance of mononuclear cells, whereas their littermates responded with a typical mixed granulomatous infiltrate. Collectively, these results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that resistance to C. immitis infection involves two primary cell populations, one under the direct influence of T-cells and the other independent of T-lymphocytes. Images PMID:3972455

  7. [Development of a hepatitis B virus carrier transgenic mice model].

    PubMed

    Caner, Müge; Arat, Sezen; Bircan, Rifat

    2008-01-01

    The studies for the development of transgenic mice models which provide important profits for the studies concerning immunopathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are in progress since 20 years. For this purpose different lineages bearing whole HBV genome or selected viral genes have been developed and their usage in clarifying the HBV replication and pathogenesis mechanisms have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to develop and breed a HBV carrier mice model. In the study the full HBV genome has been transferred to mouse embryos by microinjection procedure. Following transgenic manipulation, the HBV carriers among the daughter mice have been detected by molecular methods in which HBV-DNA replication and expression have been shown. The manipulations for transgene transfers have been performed in TUBITAK Marmara Research Center Transgene Laboratory, Gebze, Istanbul. The HBV-DNA carrier mice have been demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the DNA samples obtained from tail tissues and also by dot-blot hybridization of the mice sera. Integrated HBV-DNA has been detected by applying in-situ hybridization to the liver tissue sections. HBV-DNA expression has been shown by reverse transcriptase PCR method with total RNA molecules that have been isolated from the liver tissues of the HBV-DNA carrier mice. HBsAg has been detected in the liver by immunohistochemical method, and HBsAg and HBeAg have additionally been demonstrated by ELISA. HBV genome, expression of the genome and the expression products have been determined in approximately 10% of the mice of which HBV-DNA have been transferred. By inbreeding heterozygote carrier mice, homozygote HBV transgenic mice line have been obtained. These HBV transgenic mice are the first lineages developed in our country. It is hopefully thought that this HBV carrier transgenic mouse model may contribute to the studies on the pathogenesis of HBV infections which are important health problems in the

  8. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  9. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Soenjaya, Y; Foster, B L; Nociti, F H; Ao, M; Holdsworth, D W; Hunter, G K; Somerman, M J; Goldberg, H A

    2015-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp(-/-)) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp(-/-) mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp(-/-) and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro-computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp(-/-) mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp(-/-) mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp(-/-) mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp(-/-) mice. Bsp(-/-) incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the

  10. Food intake reduction and immunologic alterations in mice fed dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Weindruch, R; McFeeters, G; Walford, R L

    1984-01-01

    A diet containing 0.4% DHEA was fed to male mice of a long-lived strain from 3 weeks until 18 weeks of age. These mice were compared with others fed a control diet ad libitum and with mice pair-fed the control diet in amounts approximating the intake of the DHEA-fed group. Mice fed the DHEA diet failed to eat all of the food presented to them whereas the pair-fed mice ate all of their food. All mice were studied at 18 weeks of age for two age-sensitive immune parameters (spleen lymphocyte proliferation induced by T-cell mitogens [PHA or ConA] and natural killer cell lysis of an allogeneic tumor). DHEA feeding led to: 1) a decrease in food intake (approximately 30% less than for mice fed the control diet ad libitum), 2) a lower body weight at 18 weeks of age (approximately 40% lower than for ad libitum controls) due to a decrease in the body weight gained from 3 weeks through 18 weeks of age (approximately 55% lower than controls), 3) a lower spleen weight (approximately 30% lower than controls) but without lower numbers of nucleated cells per spleen, 4) an increase in PHA-induced proliferation by spleen lymphocytes (approximately 100% higher than for controls) and, 5) no influence on splenic natural killer cell activity. The inhibition of body weight gain for mice fed DHEA appeared due to both a reduction in food intake and a metabolic effect since mice eating DHEA gained less body weight per gram of food eaten than did mice in either group eating the control diet.

  11. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  12. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Andersson, Annica; Windahl, Sara H; Farman, Helen H; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Islander, Ulrika; Sjögren, Klara

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx) results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L) strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para) or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix) given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh) treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  13. Longitudinal Frequencies of Blood Leukocyte Subpopulations Differ between NOD and NOR Mice but Do Not Predict Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Telieps, Tanja; Köhler, Meike; Treise, Irina; Foertsch, Katharina; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Verschoor, Admar; Adler, Kerstin; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Immune phenotyping provides insight into disease pathogenesis and prognostic markers. Trajectories from age of 4 to 36 weeks were modeled for insulin autoantibodies and for leukocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood from female NOD (n = 58) and NOR (n = 22) mice. NOD mice had higher trajectories of insulin autoantibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, IgD+IgM− B lymphocytes, and NK cells and lower trajectories of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes, IgM+ B lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes than NOR mice (all p < 0.001). Of these, only the increased IAA trajectory was observed in NOD mice that developed diabetes as compared to NOD mice that remained diabetes-free. Therefore, the profound differences in peripheral blood leukocyte proportions observed between the diabetes-prone NOD mice and the diabetes-resistant mice do not explain the variation in diabetes development within NOD mice and do not provide markers for diabetes prediction in this model. PMID:26966692

  14. A 33-GVA Interrupter Test Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    commercial ac circuit breakers for de switching operations requires that they be evaluated to determine their de limitations. TWo 2.4-GVA...has been conducting experiments with commerical ac circuit breakers to determine their direct-current ratings application in various fusion for...ABSTRACT The use of commercial ac circuit breakers for de switching operations requires that they be evaluated to determine their de limitations

  15. Hospital malnutrition: a 33-hospital screening study.

    PubMed

    Kamath, S K; Lawler, M; Smith, A E; Kalat, T; Olson, R

    1986-02-01

    A collaborative study involving nutrition screening of 3,047 patients (excluding 125 pregnant women) at admission to 33 hospitals in and around the greater Chicago area was carried out to identify patients at nutritional risk. Information on sex, age, admitting diagnosis, serum albumin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, and height and weight was collected from the medical chart within 48 hours of admission. Nutrition screening could not be completed for a larger number of patients (60%) because data at admission were not available. Of the remaining 40% of patients, more than 50% had below normal values for one or more of the variables studied: serum albumin, hemoglobin, and total lymphocyte count. A large number of the patients (40%) also were considered at nutritional risk as judged by the criteria of weight/height (measured only). Early nutrition intervention for high-risk patients cannot be implemented, nor can the efficacy of nutrition services be evaluated, unless nutrition screening is carried out on patients at admission.

  16. Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

  17. p53 Suppresses Tetraploid Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Takuro; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian tetraploid embryos die in early development because of defects in the epiblast. Experiments with diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice, obtained via the aggregation of embryonic stem cells, clarified that while tetraploid cells are excluded from epiblast derivatives, diploid embryos with tetraploid extraembryonic tissues can develop to term. Today, this method, known as tetraploid complementation, is usually used for rescuing extraembryonic defects or for obtaining completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived pups. However, it is still unknown why defects occur in the epiblast during mammalian development. Here, we demonstrated that downregulation of p53, a tumour suppressor protein, rescued tetraploid development in the mammalian epiblast. Tetraploidy in differentiating epiblast cells triggered p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting the activation of a tetraploidy checkpoint during early development. Finally, we found that p53 downregulation rescued tetraploid embryos later in gestation. PMID:25752699

  18. Genetic reassortment of mammalian reoviruses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wenske, E A; Chanock, S J; Krata, L; Fields, B N

    1985-01-01

    Reassortments between type 1 (Lang) and type 3 (Dearing) reoviruses were isolated from suckling mice infected perorally with an inoculum containing both type 1 and type 3 viruses. A total of five distinct reassortants (designated as E1 through E5) were isolated from animals during the course of the experiment. Two reassortants (E1 and E2) represented the majority of the reassortants isolated. The majority of genes of types E1 and E2 were derived from type 1 (Lang). However, E1 had an M2 gene and an S1 gene derived from type 3 (Dearing), while E2 had M2 and S2 genes derived from type 3 (Dearing). Thus, nonrandom reassortment between mammalian reoviruses can be demonstrated in vivo. PMID:4057359

  19. Heart Rate and Electrocardiography Monitoring in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, David; Zhao, Xin; Gao, Shumin; Hong, Chull; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of current cardiovascular research involves studies in genetically engineered mouse models. The measurement of heart rate is central to understanding cardiovascular control under normal conditions, with altered autonomic tone, superimposed stress or disease states, both in wild type mice as well as those with altered genes. Electrocardiography (ECG) is the “gold standard” using either hard wire or telemetry transmission. In addition, heart rate is measured or monitored from the frequency of the arterial pressure pulse or cardiac contraction, or by pulse oximetry. For each of these techniques, discussions of materials and methods, as well as advantages and limitations are covered. However, only the direct ECG monitoring will determine not only the precise heart rates but also whether the cardiac rhythm is normal or not. PMID:21743842

  20. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi . E-mail: tkhoda.epgn@tmd.ac.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-10-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones.

  1. p53 suppresses tetraploid development in mice.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuro; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-03-10

    Mammalian tetraploid embryos die in early development because of defects in the epiblast. Experiments with diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice, obtained via the aggregation of embryonic stem cells, clarified that while tetraploid cells are excluded from epiblast derivatives, diploid embryos with tetraploid extraembryonic tissues can develop to term. Today, this method, known as tetraploid complementation, is usually used for rescuing extraembryonic defects or for obtaining completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived pups. However, it is still unknown why defects occur in the epiblast during mammalian development. Here, we demonstrated that downregulation of p53, a tumour suppressor protein, rescued tetraploid development in the mammalian epiblast. Tetraploidy in differentiating epiblast cells triggered p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting the activation of a tetraploidy checkpoint during early development. Finally, we found that p53 downregulation rescued tetraploid embryos later in gestation.

  2. Severe hearing loss in Dlxl mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Polley, Daniel B; Cobos, Inma; Merzenich, Michael M; Rubenstein, John L R

    2006-04-01

    The Dlx homeobox gene family participates in regulating middle and inner ear development. A significant role for Dlxl, in particular,has been demonstrated in the development of the middle ear ossicles, but the functional consequences of Dlx.l gene mutation on hearing thresholds has not been assessed. The present study characterizes auditory brainstem responses to click and tonal stimuli in a non-lethal variant of a Dlxl gene knockout. We found that peripheral hearing thresholds for click and tonal stimuli were significantly elevated in homozygous Dlxl knockout (Dlxl-/ ) compared to both heterozygous (Dlxl+/ ) and wild type (Dlxl+/+) mice. Thus, abnormal mor-phogenesis of the incus and stapes that has been documented previously with histological measures is now known to result in a severe peripheral hearing deficit.

  3. Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home

    PubMed Central

    Mabry, Karen E; Stamps, Judy A

    2007-01-01

    During natal dispersal, young animals leave their natal area and search for a new area to live. In species in which individuals inhabit different types of habitat, experience with a natal habitat may increase the probability that a disperser will select the same type of habitat post-dispersal (natal habitat preference induction or NHPI). Despite considerable interest in the ecological and the evolutionary implications of NHPI, we lack empirical evidence that it occurs in nature. Here we show that dispersing brush mice (Peromyscus boylii) are more likely to search and settle within their natal habitat type than expected based on habitat availability. These results document the occurrence of NHPI in nature and highlight the relevance of experience-generated habitat preferences for ecological and evolutionary processes. PMID:18077253

  4. Application of Humanized Mice in Immunological Research.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenwei; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the development of humanized mouse models and their general applications in biomedical research greatly accelerated the translation of outcomes obtained from basic research into potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in clinic. In this chapter, we firstly present an overview on the history and current progress of diverse humanized mouse models and then focus on those equipped with reconstituted human immune system. The update advancement in the establishment of humanized immune system mice and their applications in the studies of the development of human immune system and the pathogenesis of multiple human immune-related diseases are intensively reviewed here, while the shortcoming and perspective of these potent tools are discussed as well. As a valuable bridge across the gap between bench work and clinical trial, progressive humanized mouse models will undoubtedly continue to play an indispensable role in the wide area of biomedical research.

  5. Genetics of meiosis and recombination in mice.

    PubMed

    Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Schimenti, John C

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is one of the most critical developmental processes in sexually reproducing organisms. One round of DNA replication followed by two rounds of cell divisions results in generation of haploid gametes (sperm and eggs in mammals). Meiotic failure typically leads to infertility in mammals. In the process of meiotic recombination, maternal and paternal genomes are shuffled, creating new allelic combinations and thus genetic variety. However, in order to achieve this, meiotic cells must self-inflict DNA damage in the form of programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). Complex processes evolved to ensure proper DSB repair, and to do so in a way that favors interhomolog reciprocal recombination and crossovers. The hallmark of meiosis, a structurally conserved proteinaceous structure called the synaptonemal complex, is found only in meiotic cells. Conversely, meiotic homologous recombination is an adaptation of the mitotic DNA repair process but involving specialized proteins. In this chapter, we summarize current developments in mammalian meiosis enabled by genetically modified mice.

  6. Coffee improves auditory neuropathy in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bin Na; Yi, Tae Hoo; Park, Raekil; Kim, Sun Yeou; Kang, Tong Ho

    2008-08-29

    Coffee is a widely consumed beverage and has recently received considerable attention for its possible beneficial effects. Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder characterized by an abnormal auditory brainstem response. This study examined the auditory neuropathy induced by diabetes and investigated the action of coffee, trigonelline, and caffeine to determine whether they improved diabetic auditory neuropathy in mice. Auditory brainstem responses, auditory middle latency responses, and otoacoustic emissions were evaluated to assess auditory neuropathy. Coffee or trigonelline ameliorated the hearing threshold shift and delayed latency of the auditory evoked potential in diabetic neuropathy. These findings demonstrate that diabetes can produce a mouse model of auditory neuropathy and that coffee consumption potentially facilitates recovery from diabetes-induced auditory neuropathy. Furthermore, the active constituent in coffee may be trigonelline.

  7. Controlled Cervical Laceration Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi Ping; Walker, Melissa J.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Wang, Xiaofei; Walker, Chandler L.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Shields, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Use of genetically modified mice enhances our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying several neurological disorders such as a spinal cord injury (SCI). Freehand manual control used to produce a laceration model of SCI creates inconsistent injuries often associated with a crush or contusion component and, therefore, a novel technique was developed. Our model of cervical laceration SCI has resolved inherent difficulties with the freehand method by incorporating 1) cervical vertebral stabilization by vertebral facet fixation, 2) enhanced spinal cord exposure, and 3) creation of a reproducible laceration of the spinal cord using an oscillating blade with an accuracy of ±0.01 mm in depth without associated contusion. Compared to the standard methods of creating a SCI laceration such as freehand use of a scalpel or scissors, our method has produced a consistent lesion. This method is useful for studies on axonal regeneration of corticospinal, rubrospinal, and dorsal ascending tracts. PMID:23685551

  8. Anxiolytic effect of noscapine in mice.

    PubMed

    Khodarahmi, Parvin; Rostami, Parvin; Rashidi, Armin; Khodarahmi, Iman

    2006-01-01

    The anxiety-related effects of noscapine were investigated using male Balb-c mice. Since noscapine-induced locomotion may alter the animals' activity level in the dark-light model, the anxiety-related effects of noscapine were studied at doses with no effect on locomotion (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.8, 1, 1.5 and 2 mg/kg). The parameter measured in dark-light model was the time spent in lit compartment. Intraperitoneal administration of noscapine (0.1-0.5 mg/kg) did not produce a significant effect on the time spent in the light, whereas higher doses (0.8, 1, 1.5 and 2 mg/kg) increased it significantly, implying an anxiolytic effect.

  9. Tumor angiogenesis in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Alani, Rhoda M; Silverthorn, Courtney F; Orosz, Kate

    2004-06-01

    Over the past decade much research has focused on understanding the molecular pathways that regulate the development of a tumor-associated vasculature. In 1999, Lyden and colleagues showed that mice deficient in one to three Id1 or Id3 alleles could not support the growth of tumor xenografts due to defects in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Three recently published manuscripts have now re-examined the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature using more clinically relevant tumor model systems. Remarkably, all three studies have found strikingly different results compared to the original xenograft data published in 1999. Below we review the current understanding of the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature given the most recent data and suggest ways in which animal tumor model systems might be put to better use to provide more clinically relevant information.

  10. Reproductive toxicity of brazilein in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lei, Fan; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Shuang; Wang, Yu-Gang; Feng, Tian-Shi; Li, Hui-Ying; Li, Hui-Yu; Zhan, Hong-Lei; Xing, Dong-Ming; DU, Li-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Brazilein is an active small molecular compound extracted from Caesalpinia sappan L. with favorable pharmacological properties on immune system, cardiovascular system, and nervous system. C. sappan has been used as a traditional medicine in China for hundreds of years for various diseases. However, the general reproductive toxicity of brazilein is still unknown. The purpose of the present study was to thoroughly evaluate the general reproductive toxicity of brazilein in ICR mice to support the future drug development and modernization of this potent traditional Chinese medicine. The results showed that, although no apparent toxicity on the reproducibility of the male was observed, brazilein might cause considerable risks to the fetuses and females as indicated by the ratios of dead fetuses and reabsorptions. In conclusion, our results from the present study provided some useful insights about the safety profile of brazilein, suggesting that brazilein should be used with caution in pregnant women.

  11. Quantitative cumulative biodistribution of antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Victor; Palma, Enzo; Tesar, Devin B; Mundo, Eduardo E; Bumbaca, Daniela; Torres, Elizabeth K; Reyes, Noe A; Shen, Ben Q; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta; Khawli, Leslie A; Boswell, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in antibody recycling in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and thus it influences the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, considerably less is known about FcRn’s role in the metabolism of IgG within individual tissues after intravenous administration. To elucidate the organ distribution and gain insight into the metabolism of humanized IgG1 antibodies with different binding affinities FcRn, comparative biodistribution studies in normal CD-1 mice were conducted. Here, we generated variants of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D-specific antibody (humanized anti-gD) with increased and decreased FcRn binding affinity by genetic engineering without affecting antigen specificity. These antibodies were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, purified and paired radiolabeled with iodine-125 and indium-111. Equal amounts of I-125-labeled and In-111-labeled antibodies were mixed and intravenously administered into mice at 5 mg/kg. This approach allowed us to measure both the real-time IgG uptake (I-125) and cumulative uptake of IgG and catabolites (In-111) in individual tissues up to 1 week post-injection. The PK and distribution of the wild-type IgG and the variant with enhanced binding for FcRn were largely similar to each other, but vastly different for the rapidly cleared low-FcRn-binding variant. Uptake in individual tissues varied across time, FcRn binding affinity, and radiolabeling method. The liver and spleen emerged as the most concentrated sites of IgG catabolism in the absence of FcRn protection. These data provide an increased understanding of FcRn’s role in antibody PK and catabolism at the tissue level. PMID:24572100

  12. Wound Healing Activity of Silibinin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Rojalini; Pattnaik, Ashok K.; Pradhan, Kishanta K.; Mehta, Beena K.; Pattanayak, Shakti P.; Banerjee, Sugato

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silibinin is a semi-purified fraction of silymarin contained in milk thistle (Silybum marianum Asteraceae). Primarily known for its hepatoprotective actions, silymarin may also stimulate epithelialization and reduce inflammation in excision wound. Previous studies show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial actions of silibinin. However, wound healing property of silibinin is not well studied. Objective: This study investigates wound healing activity of silibinin topical formulation. Materials and Methods: Wound healing activity of 0.2% silibinin gel was assessed by incision and excision wound models in mice. Animals were divided into gel base, silibinin gel, and Mega Heal gel® treated groups with six animals in each group. Wound contraction, wound tissue tensile strength, and hydroxyproline content were measured, and histopathological evaluation of wound tissue of all the above treatment groups was carried out. Results: Application of 0.2% silibinin hydrogel for 8 days led to 56.3% wound contraction compared to 64.6% using standard Mega Heal gel with a subsequent increase in hydroxyproline content, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) over control animals showing 33.2% contraction. After 14 days, percentage of contraction reached 96.1%, 97.6%, and 86.7%, respectively. Wound tissue tensile strength with silibinin (223.55 ± 3.82 g) and standard (241.38 ± 2.49 g) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than control (174.06 ± 5.75 g). Histopathology of silibinin and standard gel treated wound tissue showed more fibroblasts, fewer macrophage infiltration, and well-formed collagen fibers. Conclusion: Here, we show potent wound healing activity of silibinin hydrogel formulation. SUMMARY 0.2% silibinin hydrogel showed potent wound healing activity in incision and excision wound models in mice. Abbreviations Used: ROS: Reactive oxygen species PMID:27695272

  13. Arthritis of mice induced by Mycoplasma arthritidis. Humoral antibody and lymphocyte responses of CBA mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Golightly-Rowland, L; Ward, J R

    1976-01-01

    Peak arthritis occurred 7 days after intravenous injection of CBA mice with Mycoplasma arthritidis and persisted in some animals for 84 days. A marked leucocytosis was apparent for the first 21 days. Complement-fixing antibodies reached a peak 14 days after injection of the organisms and persisted at high levels for 84 days. Metabolic-inhibiting and mycoplasmacidal antibodies were present but at much lower titres. PMID:1275576

  14. Arthritis of mice induced by Mycoplasma pulmonis: humoral antibody and lymphocyte responses of CBA mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Golightly-Rowland, L; Ward, J R

    1975-01-01

    Peak arthritis occurred 14 days after intravenous injection of Mycoplasma pulmonis and persisted in some mice at low levels for 84 days. A marked lymphocytosis occurred during the first week of infection with only a slight increase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Complement-fixing antibodies appeared in low titer 3 days after infection and moderate levels persisted for 84 days. The metabolic-inhibiting and mycoplasmacidal antibody responses were absent or minimal. M. pulmonis appeared to be mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes as evidenced by (i) increased uptake of [3H]thymidine for normal lymphocytes exposed to various concentrations of nonviable M. pulmonis antigen, and (ii) a 13-fold increase in [3H]thymidine uptake in lymphocytes taken from mice 3 days after infection with M. pulmonis in the absence of added antigen. Lymphocytes taken from infected mice transformed significantly more at all time periods than control lymphocytes when exposed to M. pulmonis antigen. This response was maximal at 3 days and minimal at 21 to 35 days after infection. Lymphocytes sensitized to M. pulmonis did not transform when exposed to M. arthritidis antigen or vice versa. M. pulmonis infection had no effect upon the mitogenic responses of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin or lipopolysaccharide. There was no statistically significant correlation between persistence of arthritis and degree of humor antibody or lymphocyte responses. However, persisting arthritis was associated with a higher incidence of mycoplasma isolations. PMID:1193724

  15. The gut microbiota modulates host energy and lipid metabolism in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Hezaveh, Rahil; Reigstad, Christopher S.; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Yetukuri, Laxman; Islam, Sama; Felin, Jenny; Perkins, Rosie; Borén, Jan; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    The gut microbiota has recently been identified as an environmental factor that may promote metabolic diseases. To investigate the effect of gut microbiota on host energy and lipid metabolism, we compared the serum metabolome and the lipidomes of serum, adipose tissue, and liver of conventionally raised (CONV-R) and germ-free mice. The serum metabolome of CONV-R mice was characterized by increased levels of energy metabolites, e.g., pyruvic acid, citric acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid, while levels of cholesterol and fatty acids were reduced. We also showed that the microbiota modified a number of lipid species in the serum, adipose tissue, and liver, with its greatest effect on triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine species. Triglyceride levels were lower in serum but higher in adipose tissue and liver of CONV-R mice, consistent with increased lipid clearance. Our findings show that the gut microbiota affects both host energy and lipid metabolism and highlights its role in the development of metabolic diseases. PMID:20040631

  16. Different regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in Western house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Fabienne; Hauser, Thomas; Lindholm, Anna K; Cameron, Heather A; Slomianka, Lutz; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Amrein, Irmgard

    2012-02-14

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) of laboratory rodents is enhanced by physical exercise in a running wheel. However, little is known about modulation of AHN in wild-living rodent species. The finding that AHN cannot be modulated by voluntary exercise in wild wood mice suggests that AHN may be regulated differently under natural conditions than in laboratory adapted animals. In order to minimize genetic influences, we aimed to investigate the genetically closest wild-living relatives of laboratory mice. Here, C57BL/6 mice and F1 offspring of wild house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) were tested in two different running paradigms: voluntary running and running-for-food--a condition in which mice had to run for their daily allowance of food. In house mice, we found a non-significant trend towards increased numbers of proliferating cells and doublecortin-positive immature neurons in both voluntary runners and runners-for-food. Voluntary running in C57BL/6 mice resulted in a 30% increase in cell proliferation and a pronounced 70% increase in doublecortin-positive cells. C57BL/6 runners-for-food ran as much as voluntary runners, but they showed no enhancement of cell proliferation, a small increase in the number of doublecortin-positive cells and more pyknotic cells compared to controls. Taken together, these findings suggest that motivational aspects of running are critical determinants of the increased cell proliferation in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, running has smaller and context-independent effects in house mice. The findings imply a difference in the regulation of AHN in C57BL/6 mice and their wild-derived conspecifics.

  17. Mice do not habituate to metabolism cage housing--a three week study of male BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Darusman, Huda S; Henriksen, Trine; Weimann, Allan; Poulsen, Henrik E; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism cage is a barren, non-enriched, environment, combining a number of recognized environmental stressors. We investigated the ability of male BALB/c mice to acclimatize to this form of housing. For three weeks markers of acute and oxidative stress, as well as clinical signs of abnormality were monitored. Forced swim tests were conducted to determine whether the animals experienced behavioral despair and the serotonergic integrity was tested using an 8-OH-DPAT challenge. The metabolism cage housed mice excreted approximately tenfold higher amounts of corticosterone metabolites in feces throughout the study when compared to controls. Urinary biomarkers confirmed that these mice suffered from elevated levels of oxidative stress, and increased creatinine excretions indicated increased muscle catabolism. Changes in the core body temperature (stress-induced hyperthermia) and the fur state of the mice also indicated impaired well-being in the metabolism cage housed mice. However, monitoring body weight and feed intake was found misleading in assessing the wellbeing of mice over a longer time course, and the forced swim test was found poorly suited for studying chronic stress in mice in the present setup. In conclusion, the mice were found not to acclimatize to the metabolism cages whereby concern for animal welfare would dictate that mice should be housed in this way for as short periods as possible. The elevated degree of HPA axis activity, oxidative stress, and increased overall metabolism warrant caution when interpreting data obtained from metabolism cage housed mice, as their condition cannot be considered representative of a normal physiology.

  18. Assessment of dental fluorosis in Mmp20 +/- mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Tye, C E; Arun, A; MacDonald, D; Chatterjee, A; Abrazinski, T; Everett, E T; Whitford, G M; Bartlett, J D

    2011-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20 (+/-) mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F(-)) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20 (+/-) mice had F(-) tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20 (+/+) mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F(-)-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20 (+/-) mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis.

  19. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  20. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  1. Hhip haploinsufficiency sensitizes mice to age-related emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Yun, Jeong; Qiu, Weiliang; Guo, Feng; Huang, Chunfang; Mancini, John Dominic; Gupta, Kushagra; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Naing, Zun Zar Chi; Zhang, Li; Perrella, Mark A; Owen, Caroline A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-08-09

    Genetic variants in Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) have consistently been associated with the susceptibility to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary function levels, including the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), in general population samples by genome-wide association studies. However, in vivo evidence connecting Hhip to age-related FEV1 decline and emphysema development is lacking. Herein, using Hhip heterozygous mice (Hhip(+/-)), we observed increased lung compliance and spontaneous emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice starting at 10 mo of age. This increase was preceded by increases in oxidative stress levels in the lungs of Hhip(+/-) vs. Hhip(+/+) mice. To our knowledge, these results provide the first line of evidence that HHIP is involved in maintaining normal lung function and alveolar structures. Interestingly, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine treatment in mice starting at age of 5 mo improved lung function and prevented emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice, suggesting that N-acetyl cysteine treatment limits the progression of age-related emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice. Therefore, reduced lung function and age-related spontaneous emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice may be caused by increased oxidative stress levels in murine lungs as a result of haploinsufficiency of Hhip.

  2. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-05-27

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies.

  3. Impaired Vibration of Auditory Ossicles in Osteopetrotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Sho; Takada, Yasunari; Niida, Shumpei; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru; Nango, Nobuhito; Momose, Atsushi; Matsuo, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    In the middle ear, a chain of three tiny bones (ie, malleus, incus, and stapes) vibrates to transmit sound from the tympanic membrane to the inner ear. Little is known about whether and how bone-resorbing osteoclasts play a role in the vibration of auditory ossicles. We analyzed hearing function and morphological features of auditory ossicles in osteopetrotic mice, which lack osteoclasts because of the deficiency of either cytokine RANKL or transcription factor c-Fos. The auditory brainstem response showed that mice of both genotypes experienced hearing loss, and laser Doppler vibrometry revealed that the malleus behind the tympanic membrane failed to vibrate. Histological analysis and X-ray tomographic microscopy using synchrotron radiation showed that auditory ossicles in osteopetrotic mice were thicker and more cartilaginous than those in control mice. Most interestingly, the malleal processus brevis touched the medial wall of the tympanic cavity in osteopetrotic mice, which was also the case for c-Src kinase–deficient mice (with normal numbers of nonresorbing osteoclasts). Osteopetrotic mice showed a smaller volume of the tympanic cavity but had larger auditory ossicles compared with controls. These data suggest that osteoclastic bone resorption is required for thinning of auditory ossicles and enlargement of the tympanic cavity so that auditory ossicles vibrate freely. PMID:21356377

  4. Lung Function Changes in Mice Sensitized to Ammonium ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Occupational exposure to halogenated platinum salts can trigger the development of asthma. The risk to the general population that may result from the use of platinum in catalytic converters and its emerging use as a diesel fuel additive is unclear. To investigate pulmonary responses to platinum, we developed a mouse model of platinum hypersensitivity. Mice were sensitized through application of ammonium hexachloroplatinate (AHCP) to the shaved back on days 0, 5 and 19, and to each ear on days 10, 11 and 12. On days 24 and 29, mice were challenged by oropharyngeal aspiration with AHCP in saline. Before and immediately after challenge, pulmonary responses were assessed using whole body plethysmography (WBP). A dose-dependentincrease in immediate responses was observed in AHCP-sensitized and challenged mice. On days 26 and 31, changes in ventilatory responses to methacholine (Mch) aerosol were assessed by WBP; dose-dependent increases in Mch responsiveness occurred in sensitized mice. Lymph node cell counts indicate a proliferative response in lymph nodes drainng the sites of application. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid harvested from sensitized mice contained an average of 5% eosinophils compared to less than 0.5% in non-sensitized mice (p < 0.05); significant increases in total serum immunoglobulin E were observed for all sensitized mice. Although a second airway challenge on day 29 affected some results, only one airway challenge was needed to observe changes in l

  5. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shirine E.; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A.; Hill, Tracy L.; Welch, Ian D.; Beier, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα’s potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear. PMID:27457421

  6. Assessment of Dental Fluorosis in Mmp20+/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, R.; Tye, C.E.; Arun, A.; MacDonald, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Abrazinski, T.; Everett, E.T.; Whitford, G.M.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20+/− mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F−) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20+/− mice had F− tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20+/+ mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F−-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20+/− mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis. PMID:21386097

  7. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on Arterial Contractile Responses in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jia; Ren, Xin-Ling; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine if hindlimb unweighting in mice alters arterial contractile responses. Sixteen male C57B/6 mice and 16 male Chinese Kunming mice were divided into control and 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting groups, respectively. Using isolated arterial rings from different arteries of mouse, effects of 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting on arterial contractile responsiveness were examined in vitro. The results showed that, in arterial rings from both C57B/6 and Chinese Kunming mice, maximum isometric contractile tensions evoked by either KCl or phenylephrine were significantly lower in abdominal aortic, mesenteric arterial and femoral arterial rings from hindlimb unweighting, compared to control mice. However, the maximal contractile responses of common carotid rings to KCl and PE were not significantly different between control and hindlimb unweighting groups. The sensitivity (EC(sub 50)) of all arteries to KCl or PE showed no significant differences between control and hindlimb unweighting mice. These data indicated that 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting results in a reduced capacity of the arterial smooth muscle of the hindquarter to develop tension. In addition, the alterations in arterial contractile responses caused by hindlimb unweighting in mice are similar as those in rats. Our work suggested that hindlimb unweighting mouse model may be used as a model for the study of postflight cardiovascular deconditioning.

  8. Studies of macrophage function during Trichinella spiralis infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, E J; Krahenbuhl, J L; Remington, J S

    1979-01-01

    Studies were made to investigate the quantitative and functional changes which occur in peritoneal macrophage populations obtained from mice infected orally with Trichinella spiralis larvae. C57BL/6 mice infected with T. spiralis larvae became parasitized with adult worms which were rejected from the intestine from 14 to 20 days after infection. Infected mice developed a striking increase in peritoneal exudate cells, composed largely of macrophages, which was maximal at from 16 to 18 days after infection. T. spiralis larvae and eosinophils were not seen in the peritoneal exudates. Macrophages from mice infected more than 11 days earlier inhibited DNA synthesis of syngeneic and allogeneic tumour cells, a property atributed to activated macrophages. In addition, macrophages from T. spiralis-infected mice had the functional ability to kill EL-4 tumour cells as measured by 51Cr release. Unlike activated macrophages, however, macrophages from infected mice did not develop the ability to inhibit multiplication of the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. These studies demonstrate that T. spiralis infection in mice induces changes in macrophage function that differ from changes associated with infections by intracellular pathogens. PMID:437839

  9. Dermal mast cell responses in Paragonimus westermani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, M H

    1997-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether dermal mast cell responses to Paragonimus westermani in an abnormal host, the mouse, were dependent on the site of metacercarial inoculation. In mice during subcutaneous infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at the first week (38.3/mm2) and then persisted at a high level until the sixth week (45.2/mm2) of infection compared with PBS-injected (control) mice (range: 19.4-25.1/mm2). In mice during oral infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at two weeks (33.5/mm2) after infection and remained at these levels thereafter compared with non-infected (control) mice (range: 17.4-22.3/mm2). In mice both during subcutaneous and oral infection, the recruited dermal mast cells showed extensive degranulation at the second week (68.4% and 60.7%, respectively), reached a peak at the third week (81.4%, and 92.1%, respectively) and then declined slightly thereafter. By contrast, in both control mice, about 10% of dermal mast cells were degranulated. In conclusion, this study suggests that dermal mast cell responses to P. westermani in mice are dependent on cutaneous sensitization by larval excretory-secretory antigens, irrespective of infection route.

  10. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A; Hill, Tracy L; Welch, Ian D; Beier, Frank

    2016-07-26

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα's potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear.

  11. Subchronic exposure of mice to Love Canal soil contaminants.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; McMartin, D N; Rej, R; Narang, R S; Stein, V B; Briggs, R G; Kaminsky, L S

    1984-04-01

    The health hazard potential of soil collected from the surface of the Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, New York, was assessed in 90-day exposure studies. Female CD-1 mice were exposed to two concentrations of the volatile components of 1 kg of soil with and without direct soil contact. Control mice were identically housed but without soil. The soil was replaced weekly and 87 compounds were detected in the air in the cages above fresh and 7-day-old soil as analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The concentration of many of these compounds decreased during the 7-day exposure cycle. Histopathologic, hematologic, and serum enzyme studies followed necropsy of all mice. There was no mortality of mice exposed for up to 90 days under any condition. Thymus and spleen weights relative to body weight were increased after 4 weeks of exposure by inhalation but not after 8 or 12 weeks of exposure. alpha-, beta-, and delta- Benzenehexachlorides , pentachlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene were detected in liver tissue from these animals. Mice exposed to 5- to 10-fold elevated concentration of volatiles had increased body and relative kidney weights. There was no chemically induced lesion in any animal exposed only to the volatile soil contaminants. Mice exposed by direct contact with the soil without elevated volatile exposure had increased body (10%) and relative liver weights (169%). Centrolobular hepatocyte hypertrophy, which involved 40 to 70% of the lobules, was observed in all mice in this group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Subchronic exposure of mice to Love Canal soil contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Silkworth, J.B.; McMartin, D.N.; Rej, R.; Narang, R.S.; Stein, V.B.; Briggs, R.G.; Kaminsky, L.S.

    1984-04-01

    The health hazard potential of soil collected from the surface of the Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, New York, was assessed in 90-day exposure studies. Female CD-1 mice were exposed to two concentrations of the volatile components of 1 kg of soil with and without direct soil contact. Control mice were identically housed but without soil. The soil was replaced weekly and 87 compounds were detected in the air in the cages above fresh and 7-day-old soil as analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The concentration of many of these compounds decreased during the 7-day exposure cycle. Histopathologic, hematologic, and serum enzyme studies followed necropsy of all mice. There was no mortality of mice exposed for up to 90 days under any condition. Thymus and spleen weights relative to body weight were increased after 4 weeks of exposure by inhalation but not after 8 or 12 weeks of exposure. alpha-, beta-, and delta- Benzenehexachlorides , pentachlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene were detected in liver tissue from these animals. Mice exposed to 5- to 10-fold elevated concentration of volatiles had increased body and relative kidney weights. There was no chemically induced lesion in any animal exposed only to the volatile soil contaminants. Mice exposed by direct contact with the soil without elevated volatile exposure had increased body (10%) and relative liver weights (169%). Centrolobular hepatocyte hypertrophy, which involved 40 to 70% of the lobules, was observed in all mice in this group.

  13. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wanli W; Smith, Megan; Yang, Dejun; Choi, Pique P; Moghadam, Alexander; Li, Tianxia; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1), in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK), amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT) mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in parkin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Palacino, James J; Sagi, Dijana; Goldberg, Matthew S; Krauss, Stefan; Motz, Claudia; Wacker, Maik; Klose, Joachim; Shen, Jie

    2004-04-30

    Loss-of-function mutations in parkin are the predominant cause of familial Parkinson's disease. We previously reported that parkin-/- mice exhibit nigrostriatal deficits in the absence of nigral degeneration. Parkin has been shown to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Loss of parkin function, therefore, has been hypothesized to cause nigral degeneration via an aberrant accumulation of its substrates. Here we employed a proteomic approach to determine whether loss of parkin function results in alterations in abundance and/or modification of proteins in the ventral midbrain of parkin-/- mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry revealed decreased abundance of a number of proteins involved in mitochondrial function or oxidative stress. Consistent with reductions in several subunits of complexes I and IV, functional assays showed reductions in respiratory capacity of striatal mitochondria isolated from parkin-/- mice. Electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross morphological abnormalities in striatal mitochondria of parkin-/- mice. In addition, parkin-/- mice showed a delayed rate of weight gain, suggesting broader metabolic abnormalities. Accompanying these deficits in mitochondrial function, parkin-/- mice also exhibited decreased levels of proteins involved in protection from oxidative stress. Consistent with these findings, parkin-/- mice showed decreased serum antioxidant capacity and increased protein and lipid peroxidation. The combination of proteomic, genetic, and physiological analyses reveal an essential role for parkin in the regulation of mitochondrial function and provide the first direct evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in the absence of nigral degeneration in a genetic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

  15. Commensal microbiota is hepatoprotective and prevents liver fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mazagova, Magdalena; Wang, Lirui; Anfora, Andrew T.; Wissmueller, Max; Lesley, Scott A.; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars; Dhungana, Suraj; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Sumner, Susan; Westwater, Caroline; Brenner, David A.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of bacteria and their products across the intestinal barrier is common in patients with liver disease, and there is evidence that experimental liver fibrosis depends on bacterial translocation. The purpose of our study was to investigate liver fibrosis in conventional and germ-free (GF) C57BL/6 mice. Chronic liver injury was induced by administration of thioacetamide (TAA) in the drinking water for 21 wk or by repeated intraperitoneal injections of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Increased liver fibrosis was observed in GF mice compared with conventional mice. Hepatocytes showed more toxin-induced oxidative stress and cell death. This was accompanied by increased activation of hepatic stellate cells, but hepatic mediators of inflammation were not significantly different. Similarly, a genetic model using Myd88/Trif-deficient mice, which lack downstream innate immunity signaling, had more severe fibrosis than wild-type mice. Isolated Myd88/Trif-deficient hepatocytes were more susceptible to toxin-induced cell death in culture. In conclusion, the commensal microbiota prevents fibrosis upon chronic liver injury in mice. This is the first study describing a beneficial role of the commensal microbiota in maintaining liver homeostasis and preventing liver fibrosis.—Mazagova, M., Wang, L., Anfora, A. T., Wissmueller, M., Lesley, S. A., Miyamoto, Y., Eckmann, L., Dhungana, S., Pathmasiri, W., Sumner, S., Westwater, C., Brenner, D. A., Schnabl, B. Commensal microbiota is hepatoprotective and prevents liver fibrosis in mice. PMID:25466902

  16. Left-Sided Cardiac Valvulitis in Tristetraprolin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sanjukta; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Clayton, Natasha; Myers, Page; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Maronpot, Robert R.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation may play a role in the etiology of both degenerative and rheumatic cardiac valve diseases. We report here that mice deficient in tristetraprolin (TTP), a protein with known anti-inflammatory functions, develop severe left-sided cardiac valvulitis. TTP is an mRNA binding protein that inhibits inflammation by destabilizing the mRNA encoding tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). This leads in turn to a TNF-excess syndrome characterized by systemic inflammation. Evaluation of hearts from TTP−/− mice demonstrated gross thickening of the mitral and aortic but not the tricuspid or pulmonary valves, accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltrates. To determine whether TNF played a role in the development of this valvulitis, we examined mice deficient in both TNF receptors and in TTP; four of five of these mice exhibited no histological evidence of valvulitis, but one mouse had aortic valve leaflet thickening with a cellular infiltrate. Four additional mice had no external evidence of valvular thickening. Cardiac valves of transgenic mice expressing human TNF developed mild aortic valve leaflet edema without evidence of hypercellularity. Thus, TTP deficiency in mice leads to left-sided cardiac valvulitis with prominent inflammatory cell involvement, due, at least in part, to excess TNF. These findings support the potential involvement of TNF and inflammation in the development of cardiac valve disease in man. PMID:20093488

  17. Acceleration of palatal wound healing in Smad3-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Takahashi, T; Tsuchida, K; Tanaka, E; Moriyama, K

    2009-08-01

    Wound healing is a well-orchestrated complex process leading to the repair of injured tissues. It is suggested that transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta/Smad3 signaling is involved in wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling in palatal wound healing in Smad3-deficient (Smad3(-/-)) mice. Histological examination showed that wound closure was accelerated by the proliferation of epithelium and dermal cells in Smad3(-/-) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Macrophage/monocyte infiltration at wounded regions in Smad3(-/-) mice was decreased in parallel with the diminished production of TGF-beta1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha compared with WT mice. Fibrocytes, expressing hematopoietic surface marker and fibroblast products, were recruited and produced alpha-smooth-muscle actin in WT mice, but were not observed in Smad3(-/-) mice. These results suggest that TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling may play an important role in the regulation of palatal wound healing.

  18. Myeloid heme oxygenase-1 promotes metastatic tumor colonization in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Huei; Chiang, Ming-Tsai; Chang, Po-Chiao; Chau, Lee-Young

    2015-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme degradation enzyme with antioxidant and immune-modulatory functions. HO-1 promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Whether HO-1 has an effect on cancer progression through stromal compartments is less clear. Here we show that the growth of tumor engrafted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice was not affected by host HO-1 expression. However, lung metastasis arisen from subcutaneous tumor or circulating tumor cells was significantly reduced in HO-1(+/-) mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice. The reduced lung metastasis was also observed in B6 mice bearing HO-1(+/-) bone marrow as comparing to WT chimeras, indicating that HO-1 expression in hematopoietic cells impacts tumor colonization at the metastatic site. Further experiments demonstrated that the numbers of myeloid cells recruited to pulmonary premetastatic niches and metastatic loci were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice than in WT mice. Likewise, the extents of tumor cell extravasation and colonization at the metastatic loci in the early phase of metastasis were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that HO-1 impacted chemoattractant-induced myeloid cell migration by modulating p38 kinase signaling. Moreover, myeloid HO-1-induced expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-10 promoted tumor cell transendothelial migration and STAT3 activation in vitro. These data support a pathological role of myeloid HO-1 in metastasis and suggest a possibility of targeting myeloid HO-1 for cancer treatment.

  19. Chronic social stress leads to altered sleep homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Olini, Nadja; Rothfuchs, Iru; Azzinnari, Damiano; Pryce, Christopher R; Kurth, Salome; Huber, Reto

    2017-03-15

    Disturbed sleep and altered sleep homeostasis are core features of many psychiatric disorders such as depression. Chronic uncontrollable stress is considered an important factor in the development of depression, but little is known on how chronic stress affects sleep regulation and sleep homeostasis. We therefore examined the effects of chronic social stress (CSS) on sleep regulation in mice. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were implanted for electrocortical recordings (ECoG) and underwent either a 10-day CSS protocol or control handling (CON). Subsequently, ECoG was assessed across a 24-h post-stress baseline, followed by a 4-h sleep deprivation, and then a 20-h recovery period. After sleep deprivation, CSS mice showed a blunted increase in sleep pressure compared to CON mice, as measured using slow wave activity (SWA, electroencephalographic power between 1 - 4Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Vigilance states did not differ between CSS and CON mice during post-stress baseline, sleep deprivation or recovery, with the exception of CSS mice exhibiting increased REM sleep during recovery sleep. Behavior during sleep deprivation was not affected by CSS. Our data provide evidence that CSS alters the homeostatic regulation of sleep SWA in mice. In contrast to acute social stress, which results in a faster SWA build-up, CSS decelerates the homeostatic build up. These findings are discussed in relation to the causal contribution of stress-induced sleep disturbance to depression.

  20. Immunomodulatory and antioxidative activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yu; Feng, Cui-ping; Li, Xing; Chang, Ming-chang; Meng, Jun-long; Xu, Li-jing

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the immune activation and reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides (CMP) in vivo, 24 male and 24 female Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. The mice in the four experimental groups were administered 0 (normal control), 50, 100, or 200mg/kg/d body weight CMP via gavage. After 30 days, the viscera index, leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, immunoglobulin (IgG) levels, and biochemical parameters were measured. The effect of CMP on the expression of tumor necrosis (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-1β in the spleens of experimental mice was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the administration of CMP improved the immune function in mice, significantly increased the spleen and thymus indices, the spleen lymphocyte activity, the total quantity of white blood cells, and IgG function in mice serum. CMP exhibited significant antioxidative activity in mice, and decreased malondialdehyde levels in vivo. CMP upregulated the expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β mRNA in high-dose groups compared to that observed for the control mice. We can thus conclude that CMP effectively improved the immune function through protection against oxidative stress. CMP thus shows potential for development as drugs and health supplements.

  1. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-01-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens. PMID:7642292

  2. Reduced Uterine Perfusion Pressure (RUPP) Model of Preeclampsia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fushima, Tomofumi; Sekimoto, Akiyo; Minato, Takahiro; Ito, Takuya; Oe, Yuji; Kisu, Kiyomi; Sato, Emiko; Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Ito, Sadayoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced hypertension with proteinuria that typically develops after 20 weeks of gestation. A reduction in uterine blood flow causes placental ischemia and placental release of anti-angiogenic factors such as sFlt-1 followed by PE. Although the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model is widely used in rats, investigating the role of genes on PE using genetically engineered animals has been problematic because it has been difficult to make a useful RUPP model in mice. To establish a RUPP model of PE in mice, we bilaterally ligated ovarian vessels distal to ovarian branches, uterine vessels, or both in ICR-strain mice at 14.5 days post coitum (dpc). Consequently, these mice had elevated BP, increased urinary albumin excretion, severe endotheliosis, and mesangial expansion. They also had an increased incidence of miscarriage and premature delivery. Embryonic weight at 18.5 dpc was significantly lower than that in sham mice. The closer to the ligation site the embryos were, the higher the resorption rate and the lower the embryonic weight. The phenotype was more severe in the order of ligation at the ovarian vessels < uterine vessels < both. Unlike the RUPP models described in the literature, this model did not constrict the abdominal aorta, which allowed BP to be measured with a tail cuff. This novel RUPP model in mice should be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of PE in genetically engineered mice and for evaluating new therapies for PE. PMID:27187738

  3. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  4. Delayed olfactory nerve regeneration in ApoE-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Britto P; Nisar, Rafia; Short, Jody; Randall, Shari; Grissom, Elin; Griffin, Gwen; Switzer, Paul V; Struble, Robert G

    2005-04-11

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a lipid transporting protein, is extensively expressed in the primary olfactory pathway, but its function is unknown. We previously reported increased apoE levels in the olfactory bulb (OB) following olfactory epithelium (OE) lesion in mice, and hypothesized that apoE may play a vital role in olfactory nerve (ON) regeneration. To directly test this hypothesis, we examined the rate of ON regeneration following OE lesion in apoE deficient/knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. OE was lesioned in 2- to 3-month-old mice by intranasal irrigation with Triton X-100 (TX). OB were collected at 0, 3, 7, 21, 42, and 56 days post-lesion. OB recovery was measured by both immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analysis of growth cone associated protein (GAP) 43 and olfactory marker protein (OMP). The results revealed that (1) OMP recovery in the OB was significantly slower in apoE KO compared to WT mice; (2) recovery of glomerular area was similarly slower; and (3) GAP43 increases and return to prelesion levels in the OB were slower in KO mice. Together, these results show that olfactory nerve regeneration is significantly slower in KO mice as compared to WT mice, suggesting apoE facilitates olfactory nerve regeneration.

  5. The treatment of mice with Lactobacillus casei induces protection against Babesia microti infection.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Garfias, C R; Gómez, M B; Aguilar, B R; Ixta, O; Martínez, F; Mosqueda, J

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we report that administration of Lactobacillus casei confers protection to mice against the intracellular protozoan Babesia microti. Mice treated with L. casei orally or intraperitoneally were inoculated 7 days later with an infectious dose of B. microti. Mice treated with lactobacilli showed significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes (PPE) compared to untreated mice. When mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with L. casei 3 or 0 days before challenge with B. microti, the PPE was significantly lower compared to untreated mice and there were no differences between treated mice and mice immune to B. microti infection. When mice treated with live or dead L. casei were compared to mice inoculated with Freund Complete Adjuvant before a B. microti infection, a significant reduction of PPE was observed. These results show the protective effect of L. casei administered to mice against a B. microti infection and suggest that it might act by stimulating the innate immune system.

  6. Low-dose ethanol aggravates allergic dermatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakazaki, Fumitoshi; Ogino, Hirofumi; Arakawa, Tomohiro; Okuno, Tomofumi; Ueno, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol injures dendritic cells and suppresses cellular immunity, while some evidence indicates that drinking alcohol aggravates allergic asthma. This study investigated the effect of low doses of ethanol in enhancing allergic reactions in the skin of mice. Liquid food containing alcohol was administered to conventional NC/Nga mice to induce alcoholic hepatic steatosis, and spontaneous dermatitis was evaluated. BALB/c mice were administered approximately 1 g/kg body weight of ethanol by gavage, and contact hypersensitivity (CHS) or active cutaneous anaphylaxis (ACA) was induced. Spleens were collected 24 h after the elicitation of CHS and mRNA expressions of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18 were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Alcohol-containing diet exaggerated spontaneous dermatitis in conventional NC/Nga mice and contact hypersensitivity in BALB/c mice. Ethanol administered by gavage for 5 days enhanced contact hypersensitivity in BALB/c mice. Ethanol administration with gavage also enhanced ACA of BALB/c mice. Ethanol did not affect mRNA expression of IFN-γ and IL-4, but did enhance IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18 mRNA expression. Histological evaluation revealed an absence of hepatic steatosis in mice administered ethanol by gavage for 5 days. In ethanol-administered mice, inflamed areas presented as lesions or a local extreme accumulation of mononuclear cells in the epidermis. These findings suggest that ethanol enhances the expression of inflammatory cytokines independently from T helper (Th)1/Th2 cytokine phenotypes, causing abnormalities in the epidermis resulting in exacerbated allergic reactivity.

  7. State Machine Operation of the MICE Cooling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  8. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked fasting hyperinsulinemia was seen for p55(-)/-p75(-)/- males between 12 and 16 wk of feeding the high-fat diet. Insulin levels were four times greater than wild-type mice. In contrast, p55(-)/- and p75(-)/- mice exhibited insulin levels that were similar or reduced, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, high-fat diet-fed p75(-)/- mice had the lowest body weights and leptin levels, and improved insulin sensitivity. Obese (db/db) mice, which are not responsive to leptin, were used to study the role of p55 in severe obesity. Male p55(-)/-db/db mice exhibited threefold higher insulin levels and twofold lower glucose levels at 20 wk of age than control db/db expressing p55. All db/db mice remained severely insulin resistant based on fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Our data do not support the concept that TNF, acting via its receptors, is a major contributor to obesity-associated insulin resistance. In fact, data suggest that the two TNF receptors work in concert to protect against diabetes. PMID:9664082

  9. Cryptorchidism rescues spermatogonial differentiation in juvenile spermatogonial depletion (jsd) mice.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Gunapala; Weng, Connie C Y

    2004-01-01

    Male mice homozygous for jsd mutation undergo an initial wave of spermatogenesis, but spermatogonial differentiation ceases a few weeks after birth; at that point the tubules show only type A spermatogonia and Sertoli cells. To test whether testicular descent into the scrotum contributes to the block in spermatogonial differentiation, jsd mutant (jsd/jsd) mice were bilaterally cryptorchidized at the age of 4 wk. Surprisingly, 8 wk later, germ cell differentiation was maintained in 98% of the tubules, a rate that fell to 13.5% in mice without surgery. The testis weight and the degree of spermatogenesis in cryptorchidized normal (jsd/+) and jsd mutant mice were almost identical. Furthermore, germ cell differentiation was also restored in almost all the tubules in 20-wk- and 70-wk-old jsd mutant testis unilaterally cryptorchidized 8 wk earlier, whereas the contralateral scrotal testis in these mice showed differentiation in only 6% of tubules. In irradiated LBNF1 rats, which have a block in spermatogonial differentiation similar to that in jsd mutant mice, unilateral cryptorchidism produced a small but significant increase in the percentage of differentiated tubules. In both of these models, the intratesticular levels of testosterone in the cryptorchidized testes were still above the physiological range, and the serum testosterone and LH levels were unchanged after bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidization. Cryptorchidism also did not alter serum FSH levels after bilateral and unilateral cryptorchidism in jsd mutant mice and irradiated rats, respectively. We conclude that cryptorchidism reverses the phenotype in jsd mutant mice. The findings show for the first time that spermatogenesis in rodents, and spermatogonial differentiation in particular, is sensitive to reduced scrotal temperature. Furthermore, we conclude that in jsd mutant mice spermatogonial differentiation is inhibited by testosterone only at the normal scrotal temperature.

  10. Saw palmetto extract induces nuclear heterogeneity in mice.

    PubMed

    Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Francis, Bettina M; Rayburn, A Lane

    2009-01-01

    Saw palmetto (SW), a phytotherapeutic compound used in the treatment of prostate disease, was examined for potential nuclear effects. SW extract was incorporated into a complete casein-based semisynthetic rodent chow at 0%, 0.1% and 1% SW. SW was fed to mice for 6 weeks, after which the mice received a single i/p injection of either the known genotoxic agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in saline or just saline. Forty-eight hours after injection, blood and bone marrow were collected for flow cytometric analysis. A significant effect of MMS was observed in both male and female mice with respect to: an increase in nuclear heterogeneity in bone marrow cells as measured by the coefficient of variation of the G1 peak in a flow histogram (6.32 versus 4.8 in male mice, 7.0 versus 4.9 in female mice) and an increase in the number of micronucleated blood cells (3.4% versus 0.56% male mice, 3.1% versus 0.6 in female mice) indicating a positive genotoxic response. SW also appears to increase the heterogeneity of bone marrow nuclei in a dose dependent manner (0-5.1%, 0.1-5.5% and 1-5.7% in male mice, 0-5.7%, 0.1-6.0% and 1-6.2% in female mice) without a concomitant increase in blood cell micronuclei. These results indicate that SW is not genotoxic with respect to physical DNA damage and that the changes observed in the bone marrow are due to chromatin conformation modifications in the nuclei of in vivo treated mouse cells.

  11. Metformin Reduces Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Mi; Jang, An Hee; Kim, Hyojin; Lee, Kyu Hwa; Kim, Young Whan

    2016-09-01

    Metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. We investigated whether metformin has an inhibitory effect on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. A total of 62 mice were divided into 5 groups: control, metformin (100 mg/kg), BLM, and BLM with metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg). Metformin was administered to the mice orally once a day from day 1. We sacrificed half of the mice on day 10 and collected the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from their left lungs. The remaining mice were sacrificed and analyzed on day 21. The right lungs were harvested for histological analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers were determined via analysis of the harvested lungs on day 21. The mice treated with BLM and metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg) showed significantly lower levels of inflammatory cells in the BALF compared with the BLM-only mice on days 10 and 21. The histological examination revealed that the metformin treatment led to a greater reduction in inflammation than the treatment with BLM alone. The mRNA levels of collagen, collagen-1, procollagen, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor-β in the metformin-treated mice were lower than those in the BLM-only mice on day 21, although statistical significance was observed only in the case of procollagen due to the small number of live mice in the BLM-only group. Additionally, treatment with metformin reduced fibrosis to a greater extent than treatment with BLM alone. Metformin suppresses the inflammatory and fibrotic processes of BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model.

  12. Feeding-elicited cataplexy in orexin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, E L; Baumann, C R; Cano, G; Scammell, T E; Mochizuki, T

    2009-07-21

    Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin signaling have sudden episodes of atonia and paralysis during active wakefulness. These events strongly resemble cataplexy, episodes of sudden muscle weakness triggered by strong positive emotions in people with narcolepsy, but it remains unknown whether murine cataplexy is triggered by positive emotions. To determine whether positive emotions elicit murine cataplexy, we placed orexin knockout (KO) mice on a scheduled feeding protocol with regular or highly palatable food. Baseline sleep/wake behavior was recorded with ad libitum regular chow. Mice were then placed on a scheduled feeding protocol in which they received 60% of their normal amount of chow 3 h after dark onset for the next 10 days. Wild-type and KO mice rapidly entrained to scheduled feeding with regular chow, with more wake and locomotor activity prior to the feeding time. On day 10 of scheduled feeding, orexin KO mice had slightly more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and more cataplexy in the second half of the dark period, when they may have been foraging for residual food. To test whether more palatable food increases cataplexy, mice were then switched to scheduled feeding with an isocaloric amount of Froot Loops, a food often used as a reward in behavioral studies. With this highly palatable food, orexin KO mice had much more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and throughout the dark period. The increase in cataplexy with scheduled feeding, especially with highly palatable food, suggests that positive emotions may trigger cataplexy in mice, just as in people with narcolepsy. Establishing this connection helps validate orexin KO mice as an excellent model of human narcolepsy and provides an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms that trigger cataplexy.

  13. Alterations in the baroreceptor-heart rate reflex in conscious inbred polydipsic (STR/N) mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, C P; Cui, B R; Kannan, H; Qiu, D L

    2015-01-01

    STR/N is an inbred strain of mice which is known to exhibit extreme polydipsia and polyuria. We previously found central administration of angiotensin II enhanced cardiovascular responses in STR/N mice than normal mice, suggesting that STR/N mice might exhibit different cardiovascular responses. Therefore, in this study, we investigated daily mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate, and changes in the baroreceptor-heart rate reflex in conscious STR/N mice and control (ICR) mice. We found that variability in daily mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate was significantly larger in STR/N mice than in ICR mice (p<0.05). There was a stronger response to phenylephrine (PE) in STR/N mice than in ICR mice. For baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, in the rapid response period, the slopes of PE and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were more negative in STR/N mice than in ICR mice. In the later period, the slopes of PE and SNP were negatively correlated between heart rate and blood pressure in ICR mice, but their slopes were positively correlated in STR/N mice. These results indicated that STR/N mice exhibited the different cardiovascular responses than ICR mice, suggesting that the dysfunction of baroreceptor reflex happened in conscious STR/N mice.

  14. Postpartum estrogen withdrawal impairs hippocampal neurogenesis and causes depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuan; Hong, Juan; Zhang, Suyun; Zhang, Tingting; Sha, Sha; Yang, Rong; Qian, Yanning; Chen, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Postpartum estrogen withdrawal is known to be a particularly vulnerable time for depressive symptoms. Ovariectomized adult mice (OVX-mice) treated with hormone-simulated pregnancy (HSP mice) followed by a subsequent estradiol benzoate (EB) withdrawal (EW mice) exhibited depression- and anxiety-like behaviors, as assessed by forced swim, tail suspension and elevated plus-maze, while HSP mice, OVX mice or EB-treated OVX mice (OVX/EB mice) did not. The survival and neurite growth of newborn neurons in hippocampal dentate gyrus were examined on day 5 after EW. Compared with controls, the numbers of 28-day-old BrdU(+) and BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells were increased in HSP mice but significantly decreased in EW mice; the numbers of 10-day-old BrdU(+) cells were increased in HSP mice and OVX/EB mice; and the density of DCX(+) fibers was reduced in EW mice and OVX mice. The phosphorylation of hippocampal NMDA receptor (NMDAr) NR2B subunit or Src was increased in HSP mice but decreased in EW mice. NMDAr agonist NMDA prevented the loss of 28-day-old BrdU(+) cells and the depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in EW mice. NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 or Src inhibitor dasatinib caused depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in HSP mice with the reduction of 28-day-old BrdU(+) cells. The hippocampal BDNF levels were reduced in EW mice and OVX mice. TrkB receptor inhibitor K252a reduced the density of DCX(+) fibers in HSP mice without the reduction of 28-day-old BrdU(+) cells, or the production of affective disorder. Collectively, these results indicate that postpartum estrogen withdrawal impairs hippocampal neurogenesis in mice that show depression- and anxiety-like behaviors.

  15. Skeletal defects in Osterix-Cre transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2015-02-01

    Cre/loxP recombination is a powerful strategy widely used for in vivo conditional gene targeting. This technique has made possible many important discoveries of gene function in normal and disease biology. However, due to the transgenic nature of most Cre mouse strains undesired phenotypes occasionally occur in Cre mice. Here we report skeletal defects in Osterix-Cre (Osx-Cre) transgenic mice including delayed calvarial ossification and fracture calluses at multiple skeletal sites. These data suggest that Osx-Cre containing controls should be used for both in vivo and in vitro skeletal analyses of conditional knockout mice generated with this Osx-Cre mouse strain.

  16. Macrophages in protective immunity to Hymenolepis nana in mice.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Ito, A; Okamoto, K

    1992-12-01

    When mice were treated with carrageenan just before infection with eggs of Hymenolepis nana, they failed to exhibit sterile immunity to the egg challenge, with evidence of a decrease in the number of peripheral macrophages (Mø) and the rate of carbon clearance. Although there were high levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) released into the intestinal tracts of the parasitized mice at challenge infection, there was almost no release of IL-1 in those treated with carrageenan just before challenge. These results strongly suggest that Mø have an important role in protective immunity to H. nana in mice.

  17. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  18. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  19. Cerium-144-induced lung gumors in two strains of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    A major problem in the extrapolation of radiation cancer risk factors from one species or population to another is the choice of the risk model to use, either absolute or relative. The purpose of this study was to compare absolute and relative risk models in predicting the lung-tumor risks between a low lung-tumor incidence strain of mice and a high-incidence strain of mice. The conclusion from this study is that absolute risk is more accurate than relative risk for predicting lung tumor risk from high to low lung-tumor incidence strains of mice.

  20. N-glycans and metastasis in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    More, Shyam K; Srinivasan, Nithya; Budnar, Srikanth; Bane, Sanjay M; Upadhya, Archana; Thorat, Rahul A; Ingle, Arvind D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2015-05-01

    Poly-N-acetyl-lactosamine (polyLacNAc) on N-glycans facilitate lung specific metastasis of melanoma cells by serving as high affinity ligands for galectin-3, expressed in highest amounts in the lungs, on almost all its tissue compartments including on the surface of vascular endothelium. PolyLacNAc not only aids in initial arrest on the organ endothelium but in all the events of extravasation. Inhibition of polyLacNAc synthesis, or competitive inhibition of its interaction with galectin-3 all inhibited these processes and experimental metastasis. Transgenic galectin-3 mice, viz., gal-3(+/+) (wild type), gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and gal-3(-/-) (null) have been used to prove that galectin-3/polyLacNAc interactions are indeed critical for lung specific metastasis. Gal-3(+/-) mice which showed <50% expression of galectin-3 on the lungs also showed proportionate decrease in the number of B16F10 melanoma metastatic colonies affirming that galectin-3 and polyLacNAc interactions are indeed key determinants of lung metastasis. However, surprisingly, the number and size of metastatic colonies in gal-3(-/-) mice was very similar as that seen in gal-3(+/+) mice. The levels of lactose binding lectins on the lungs and the transcripts of other galectins (galectin-1, -8 and -9) which are expressed on lungs and have similar sugar binding specificities as galectins-3, remain unchanged in gal-3(+/+) and gal-3(-/-) mice. Further, inhibition of N-glycosylation with Swainsonine (SW) which drastically reduces metastasis of B16F10 cells in gal-3(+/+) mice, did not affect lung metastasis when assessed in gal-3(-/-) mice. Together, these results rule out the possibility of some other galectin taking over the function of galectin-3 in gal-3(-/-) mice. Chimeric mice generated to assess if absence of any effect on metastasis is due to compromised tumor immunity by replacing bone marrow of gal-3(-/-) mice with that from gal-3(+/+) mice, also failed to impact melanoma metastasis. As galectin-3

  1. Bone density, strength, and formation in adult cathepsin K (-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Pennypacker, B; Shea, M; Liu, Q; Masarachia, P; Saftig, P; Rodan, S; Rodan, G; Kimmel, D

    2009-02-01

    Cathepsin K (CatK) is a cysteine protease expressed predominantly in osteoclasts, that plays a prominent role in degrading Type I collagen. Growing CatK null mice have osteopetrosis associated with a reduced ability to degrade bone matrix. Bone strength and histomorphometric endpoints in young adult CatK null mice aged more than 10 weeks have not been studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe bone mass, strength, resorption, and formation in young adult CatK null mice. In male and female wild-type (WT), heterozygous, and homozygous CatK null mice (total N=50) aged 19 weeks, in-life double fluorochrome labeling was performed. Right femurs and lumbar vertebral bodies 1-3 (LV) were evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). The trabecular region of the femur and the cortical region of the tibia were evaluated by histomorphometry. The left femur and sixth lumbar vertebral body were tested biomechanically. CatK (-/-) mice show higher BMD at the central and distal femur. Central femur ultimate load was positively influenced by genotype, and was positively correlated with both cortical area and BMC. Lumbar vertebral body ultimate load was also positively correlated to BMC. Genotype did not influence the relationship of ultimate load to BMC in either the central femur or vertebral body. CatK (-/-) mice had less lamellar cortical bone than WT mice. Higher bone volume, trabecular thickness, and trabecular number were observed at the distal femur in CatK (-/-) mice. Smaller marrow cavities were also present at the central femur of CatK (-/-) mice. CatK (-/-) mice exhibited greater trabecular mineralizing surface, associated with normal volume-based formation of trabecular bone. Adult CatK (-/-) mice have higher bone mass in both cortical and cancellous regions than WT mice. Though no direct measures of bone resorption rate were made, the higher cortical bone quantity is associated with a smaller

  2. State of lymphopoiesis in mice with alloxan diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, Yu.A.; Timofeeva, E.E.; Zinger, M.G.

    1986-09-01

    The state of lymphopoiesis was studied in mice with alloxan diabetes. After blood analysis, all the animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine before being killed. It is concluded that the state of alloxan diabetes is characterized by marked disturbances of lymphopoiesis. The total number of leukocytes and absolute number of lymphocytes in the blood of both healthy and diabetic mice is shown. The cytological parameters characterizing the state of lymphopoiesis in thymus and bone marrow of healthy and diabetic mice are presented.

  3. Adaptations to chronic rapamycin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Sherry G.; Livi, Carolina B.; Parihar, Manish; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Benavides, Adriana D.; Morris, Jay; Javors, Martin; Strong, Randy; Christy, Barbara; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin inhibits mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) that promotes protein production in cells by facilitating ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) and eIF4E-mediated 5'cap mRNA translation. Chronic treatment with encapsulated rapamycin (eRapa) extended health and life span for wild-type and cancer-prone mice. Yet, the long-term consequences of chronic eRapa treatment are not known at the organ level. Here, we report our observations of chronic eRapa treatment on mTORC1 signaling and RiBi in mouse colon and visceral adipose. As expected, chronic eRapa treatment decreased detection of phosphorylated mTORC1/S6K substrate, ribosomal protein (rpS6) in colon and fat. However, in colon, contrary to expectations, there was an upregulation of 18S rRNA and some ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) suggesting increased RiBi. Among RPGs, eRapa increases rpl22l1 mRNA but not its paralog rpl22. Furthermore, there was an increase in the cap-binding protein, eIF4E relative to its repressor 4E-BP1 suggesting increased translation. By comparison, in fat, there was a decrease in the level of 18S rRNA (opposite to colon), while overall mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein genes appeared to increase, including rpl22, but not rpl22l1 (opposite to colon). In fat, there was a decrease in eIF4E relative to actin (opposite to colon) but also an increase in the eIF4E/4E-BP1 ratio likely due to reductions in 4E-BP1 at our lower eRapa dose (similar to colon). Thus, in contrast to predictions of decreased protein production seen in cell-based studies, we provide evidence that colon from chronically treated mice exhibited an adaptive ‘pseudo-anabolic’ state, which is only partially present in fat, which might relate to differing tissue levels of rapamycin, cell-type-specific responses, and/or strain differences. PMID:27237224

  4. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Chise; Kawase, Yosuke; Tobita, Yoshimi; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Harumi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Shiota, Akira; Kojima, Yuha; Ishida, Yuji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoko A; Tateishi, Hiromi; Sudoh, Masayuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-Ichiro; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Kohara, Michinori

    2015-01-01

    We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID) mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps) replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID). We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb) levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and useful hosts for

  5. Genistein alters methylation patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Day, J Kevin; Bauer, Andrew M; DesBordes, Charles; Zhuang, Yi; Kim, Byung-Eun; Newton, Leslie G; Nehra, Vedika; Forsee, Kara M; MacDonald, Ruth S; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Lubahn, Dennis B

    2002-08-01

    In this study we examine the effect of the phytoestrogen genistein on DNA methylation. DNA methylation is thought to inhibit transcription of genes by regulating alterations in chromatin structure. Estrogenic compounds have been reported to regulate DNA methylation in a small number of studies. Additionally, phytoestrogens are believed to affect progression of some human diseases, such as estrogen-dependent cancers, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, our working hypothesis is that certain soy phytoestrogens, such as genistein, may be involved in preventing the development of certain prostate and mammary cancers by maintaining a protective DNA methylation profile. The objective of the present study is to use mouse differential methylation hybridization (DMH) arrays to test for changes in the methylation status of the cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) islands in the mouse genome by examining how these methylation patterns are affected by genistein. Male mice were fed a casein-based diet (control) or the same diet containing 300 mg genistein/kg according to one of four regimens: control diet for 4 wk, genistein diet for 4 wk, control diet for 2 wk followed by genistein diet for 2 wk and genistein diet for 2 wk followed by control diet for 2 wk. DNA from liver, brain and prostate were then screened with DMH arrays. Clones with methylation differences were sequenced and compared with known sequences. In conclusion, consumption of genistein diet was positively correlated with changes in prostate DNA methylation at CpG islands of specific mouse genes.

  6. Melamine negatively affects testosterone synthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiarui; Cao, Yinan; Zhang, Xinchen; Zhao, Qiling; Bao, Endong; Lv, Yingjun

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have found that melamine causes damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. However, few studies have investigated the effect of melamine on the synthesis of testosterone, which plays an import role in testicular development and spermatogenesis. In present study, mice were orally administrated with 2, 10 or 50mg/kg of melamine for 28days. In these groups, various abnormalities were observed including disruption of the seminiferous tubule structure, an increased necrotic germ cells and sperm abnormalities, and a reduced sperm count. Melamine exposure also decreased the level of serum testosterone and levels of testicular StAR, P450scc and 17β-HSD. In addition, melamine exposure reduced the number of Leydig cells. Taken together, these results indicate that melamine exposure reduces the level of testosterone through down-regulation of StAR and testosterone synthetic enzyme expression and also a decreased number of Leydig cells. This may further affect testicular development and lead to sperm damage.

  7. Harvesting sperm and artificial insemination of mice.

    PubMed

    Duselis, Amanda R; Vrana, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    Rodents of the genus Peromyscus (deer mice) are the most prevalent native North American mammals. Peromyscus species are used in a wide range of research including toxicology, epidemiology, ecology, behavioral, and genetic studies. Here they provide a useful model for demonstrations of artificial insemination. Methods similar to those displayed here have previously been used in several deer mouse studies, yet no detailed protocol has been published. Here we demonstrate the basic method of artificial insemination. This method entails extracting the testes from the rodent, then isolating the sperm from the epididymis and vas deferens. The mature sperm, now in a milk mixture, are placed in the female's reproductive tract at the time of ovulation. Fertilization is counted as day 0 for timing of embryo development. Embryos can then be retrieved at the desired time-point and manipulated.Artificial insemination can be used in a variety of rodent species where exact embryo timing is crucial or hard to obtain. This technique is vital for species or strains (including most Peromyscus) which may not mate immediately and/or where mating is hard to assess. In addition, artificial insemination provides exact timing for embryo development either in mapping developmental progress and/or transgenic work. Reduced numbers of animals can be used since fertilization is guaranteed. This method has been vital to furthering the Peromyscus system, and will hopefully benefit others as well.

  8. Nitroglycerin Tolerance in Caveolin-1 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Fukai, Tohru; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Chernaya, Olga; Dudley, Samuel C.; Minshall, Richard D.; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN) exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae) and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48–72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50%) of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%), and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations). In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation. PMID:25158065

  9. Hypoxia induces heart regeneration in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Canseco, Diana C; Thet, SuWannee; Abdisalaam, Salim; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Santos, Celio X; Shah, Ajay M; Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E; Kinter, Michael T; Szweda, Luke I; Xing, Chao; Hu, Zeping; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Schiattarella, Gabriele; Hill, Joseph A; Oz, Orhan; Lu, Zhigang; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kimura, Wataru; Sadek, Hesham A

    2017-01-12

    The adult mammalian heart is incapable of regeneration following cardiomyocyte loss, which underpins the lasting and severe effects of cardiomyopathy. Recently, it has become clear that the mammalian heart is not a post-mitotic organ. For example, the neonatal heart is capable of regenerating lost myocardium, and the adult heart is capable of modest self-renewal. In both of these scenarios, cardiomyocyte renewal occurs via the proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, and is regulated by aerobic-respiration-mediated oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we reasoned that inhibiting aerobic respiration by inducing systemic hypoxaemia would alleviate oxidative DNA damage, thereby inducing cardiomyocyte proliferation in adult mammals. Here we report that, in mice, gradual exposure to severe systemic hypoxaemia, in which inspired oxygen is gradually decreased by 1% and maintained at 7% for 2 weeks, results in inhibition of oxidative metabolism, decreased reactive oxygen species production and oxidative DNA damage, and reactivation of cardiomyocyte mitosis. Notably, we find that exposure to hypoxaemia 1 week after induction of myocardial infarction induces a robust regenerative response with decreased myocardial fibrosis and improvement of left ventricular systolic function. Genetic fate-mapping analysis confirms that the newly formed myocardium is derived from pre-existing cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate that the endogenous regenerative properties of the adult mammalian heart can be reactivated by exposure to gradual systemic hypoxaemia, and highlight the potential therapeutic role of hypoxia in regenerative medicine.

  10. Memory B Cells of Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Florian; Shlomchik, Mark

    2017-01-30

    Wecomprehensively review memory B cells (MBCs), covering the definition of MBC and their identities and subsets, how MBCs are generated, where they are localized, how they are maintained, and how they are reactivated. Whereas naive B cells adopt multiple fates upon stimulation, MBCs are more restricted in their responses. Evolving work reveals that the MBC compartment in mice and humans consists of distinct subpopulations with differing effector functions. We discuss the various approaches to define subsets and subset-specific roles. A major theme is the need to both deliver faster effector function upon reexposure and readapt to antigenically variant pathogens while avoiding burnout, which would be the result if all MBCs generated only terminal effector function. We discuss cell-intrinsic differences in gene expression and signaling that underlie differences in function between MBCs and naive B cells and among MBC subsets and how this leads to memory responses. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Immunology Volume 35 is April 26, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  11. Glibenclamide Prevents Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bou Saab, Joanna; Pontes, Helena; Mathieu, Chantal; Meda, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has revealed that Cx36, the sole connexin expressed in the insulin-producing beta cells, enhances the secretion of insulin, and promotes the resistance of beta cells against pro-inflammatory cytokines. In parallel, the anti-diabetic sulphonylurea glibenclamide was shown to promote the assembly and function of Cx36 channels. Here, we assessed whether glibenclamide could protect the insulin-producing cells against conditions mimicking those expected at the onset of type 1 diabetes. We found that the drug 1) protected in vitro the mouse MIN6 cells from the apoptosis and loss of Cx36, which are induced by Th1 cytokines; 2) prevented the development of hyperglycemia as well as the loss of beta cells and Cx36, which rapidly develop with aging in untreated NOD mice; 3) modified the proportion of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in pancreatic draining lymph nodes. The data imply that an early glibenclamide treatment may help protecting beta cells against the autoimmune attack, which triggers the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:28006000

  12. Human brain disease recreated in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.

    1990-12-14

    In the early 1980s, neurologist Stanley Prusiner suggested that scrapie, an apparently infectious degenerative brain disease of sheep, could be transmitted by prions, infectious particles made just of protein - and containing no nucleic acids. But prion research has come a long way since then. In 1985, the cloning of the gene encoding the prion protein proved that it does in fact exist. And the gene turned out to be widely expressed in the brains of higher organisms, a result suggesting that the prion protein has a normal brain function that can somehow be subverted, leading to brain degeneration. Then studies done during the past 2 years suggested that specific mutations in the prion gene might cause two similar human brain diseases, Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Creutzfelt-Jakob disease. Now, Prusiner's group at the University of California, San Francisco, has used genetic engineering techniques to recreate GSS by transplanting the mutated prion gene into mice. Not only will the animal model help neurobiologists answer the many remaining questions about prions and how they work, but it may also shed some light on other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

  13. Craniosynostosis in transgenic mice overexpressing Nell-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinli; Kuroda, Shun’ichi; Carpenter, Dale; Nishimura, Ichiro; Soo, Chia; Moats, Rex; Iida, Keisuke; Wisner, Eric; Hu, Fei-Ya; Miao, Steve; Beanes, Steve; Dang, Catherine; Vastardis, Heleni; Longaker, Michael; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kanayama, Norihiro; Saito, Naoaki; Ting, Kang

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we reported NELL-1 as a novel molecule overexpressed during premature cranial suture closure in patients with craniosynostosis (CS), one of the most common congenital craniofacial deformities. Here we describe the creation and analysis of transgenic mice overexpressing Nell-1. Nell-1 transgenic animals exhibited CS-like phenotypes that ranged from simple to compound synostoses. Histologically, the osteogenic fronts of abnormally closing/closed sutures in these animals revealed calvarial overgrowth and overlap along with increased osteoblast differentiation and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, anomalies were restricted to calvarial bone, despite generalized, non-tissue-specific overexpression of Nell-1. In vitro, Nell-1 overexpression accelerated calvarial osteoblast differentiation and mineralization under normal culture conditions. Moreover, Nell-1 overexpression in osteoblasts was sufficient to promote alkaline phosphatase expression and micronodule formation. Conversely, downregulation of Nell-1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation in vitro. In summary, Nell-1 overexpression induced calvarial overgrowth resulting in premature suture closure in a rodent model. Nell-1, therefore, has a novel role in CS development, perhaps as part of a complex chain of events resulting in premature suture closure. On a cellular level, Nell-1 expression may modulate and be both sufficient and required for osteoblast differentiation. PMID:12235118

  14. Multiphysics Integrated Coupling Environment (MICE) User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01

    The complex, multi-part nature of waste glass melters used in nuclear waste vitrification poses significant modeling challenges. The focus of this project has been to couple a 1D MATLAB model of the cold cap region within a melter with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of the melter itself. The Multiphysics Integrated Coupling Environment (MICE) has been developed to create a cohesive simulation of a waste glass melter that accurately represents the cold cap. The one-dimensional mathematical model of the cold cap uses material properties, axial heat, and mass fluxes to obtain a temperature profile for the cold cap, the region where feed-to-glass conversion occurs. The results from Matlab are used to update simulation data in the three-dimensional STAR-CCM+ model so that the cold cap is appropriately incorporated into the 3D simulation. The two processes are linked through ModelCenter integration software using time steps that are specified for each process. Data is to be exchanged circularly between the two models, as the inputs and outputs of each model depend on the other.

  15. Antioxidants can increase melanoma metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Kristell; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Wiel, Clotilde; Sayin, Volkan I; Akula, Murali K; Karlsson, Christin; Dalin, Martin G; Akyürek, Levent M; Lindahl, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Bergo, Martin O

    2015-10-07

    Antioxidants in the diet and supplements are widely used to protect against cancer, but clinical trials with antioxidants do not support this concept. Some trials show that antioxidants actually increase cancer risk and a study in mice showed that antioxidants accelerate the progression of primary lung tumors. However, little is known about the impact of antioxidant supplementation on the progression of other types of cancer, including malignant melanoma. We show that administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) increases lymph node metastases in an endogenous mouse model of malignant melanoma but has no impact on the number and size of primary tumors. Similarly, NAC and the soluble vitamin E analog Trolox markedly increased the migration and invasive properties of human malignant melanoma cells but did not affect their proliferation. Both antioxidants increased the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione in melanoma cells and in lymph node metastases, and the increased migration depended on new glutathione synthesis. Furthermore, both NAC and Trolox increased the activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RHOA, and blocking downstream RHOA signaling abolished antioxidant-induced migration. These results demonstrate that antioxidants and the glutathione system play a previously unappreciated role in malignant melanoma progression.

  16. Rhabdomyosarcomas in Aging A/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sher, Roger B.; Cox, Gregory A.; Mills, Kevin D.; Sundberg, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RSCs) are skeletal muscle neoplasms found in humans and domestic mammals. The A/J inbred strain developed a high frequency (between 70–80%) of adult pleomorphic type (APT) RSC at >20 months of age while BALB/cByJ also develop RSC but less frequently. These neoplasms invaded skeletal muscle surrounding either the axial or proximal appendicular skeleton and were characterized by pleomorphic cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, multiple nuclei, and cross striations. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of alpha-sarcomeric actin and myogenin in the neoplastic cells using immunocytochemistry. The A/J strain, but not the related BALB/c substrains, is also characterised by a progressive muscular dystrophy homologous to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. The association between the development of RSC in similar muscle groups to those most severely affected by the progressive muscular dystrophy suggested that these neoplasms developed from abnormal regeneration of the skeletal muscle exacerbated by the dysferlin mutation. Transcriptome analyses of RSCs revealed marked downregulation of genes in muscular development and function signaling networks. Non-synonymous coding SNPs were found in Myl1, Abra, Sgca, Ttn, and Kcnj12 suggesting these may be important in the pathogenesis of RSC. These studies suggest that A strains of mice can be useful models for dissecting the molecular genetic basis for development, progression, and ultimately for testing novel anticancer therapeutic agents dealing with rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:21853140

  17. Narcosis studies and oxygen poisoning of mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research for a mechanism by which narcotic gases alter metabolism is reported. Possible sites of action by narcotic and anesthetic gases in isolated electron transport particles were explored. Using the relative activities of the NADH-oxygen, NADH-ferricyanide, succinate-cytochrome C and succinate-NAD oxidoreductase systems as parameters, the relative potency of volatile anesthetics were tested. Testing the relative ability of human subjects to contract and repay an oxygen debt while in the narcotic versus alert state, it was found that narcosis induced by 33% nitrous oxide increased the size of the oxygen debt contracted and the amount of oxygen required to repay it during recovery. Mice acclimatized to sea level (760 mm Hg), 5000 feet (632 mm Hg) or 15,000 feet 437 mm Hg) for from one to eight weeks were found to be more susceptible to convulsion and death as a function of altitude acclimatization when tested in hyperoxic environments. There were no reasonable explanations for the connection between hypoxia and oxygen poisoning but several practical implications for persons living at altitude are discussed.

  18. Avoidance of hydrolyzed casein by mice

    PubMed Central

    Field, Kristin L.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Mennella, Julie A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    When casein, a milk protein, is hydrolyzed, it renders human foods that contain it (e.g., hypoallergenic infant formula, cheeses) distasteful to many people. This rejection of hydrolyzed casein (HC)-containing foods has recently been found to also occur in a non-human species (deer, Odocoileus spp.). Identifying other animals that avoid HC would facilitate understanding how and why HC-containing food is often rejected. This study determined whether HC-containing food is avoided by Mus musculus and whether consumption patterns were sensitive to testing conditions, specifically food form (powder, pellet or dough) and food access (ad libitum or 1.5 h/day following 6 h of food deprivation). Diets were offered in two-choice tests that paired an HC-containing food with an intact casein-containing alternative at seven protein concentrations (0%–50% w/w). Five experimental groups were tested under different combinations of food form and food access. Three groups (ad lib/powder, ad lib/pellet, and 1.5 h/pellet) avoided the HC diet starting at the 30% protein level. At the 40% and 50% protein levels, all groups showed strong avoidance of HC. Although testing conditions influenced total caloric intake and body weight gain, avoidance of HC at the highest concentrations was robust to the manipulations in experimental conditions. Our study suggests that mice may be a useful model for understanding the mechanisms of HC rejection. PMID:17900635

  19. Chemical induction of sperm abnormalities in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wyrobek, A J; Bruce, W R

    1975-01-01

    The sperm of (C57BL X C3H)F1 mice were examined 1, 4, and 10 weeks after a subacute treatment with one of 25 chemicals at two or more dose levels. The fraction of sperm that were abnormal in shape was elevated above control values of 1.2-3.4% for methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, griseofulvin, benzo[a]pyrene, METEPA [tris(2-methyl-l-aziridinyl)phosphine oxide], THIO-TEPA [tris(l-aziridinyl)phosphine sulfide], mitomycin C, myleran, vinblastine sulphate, hydroxyurea, 3-methylcholanthrene, colchicine, actinomycin D, imuran, cyclophosphamide, 5-iododeoxyuridine, dichlorvos, aminopterin, and trimethylphosphate. Dimethylnitrosamine, urethane, DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane], 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, caffeine, and calcium cyclamate did not induce elevated levels of sperm abnormalities. The results suggest that sperm abnormalities might provide a rapid inexpensive mammalian screen for agents that lead to errors in the differentiation of spermatogenic stem cells in vivo and thus indicate agents which might prove to be mutagenic, teratogenic, or carcinogenic. Images PMID:1060122

  20. Increased Anxiety in Offspring Reared by Circadian Clock Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Hiroko; Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Yuto; Sanada, Kamon

    2013-01-01

    The maternal care that offspring receive from their mothers early in life influences the offspring’s development of emotional behavior in adulthood. Here we found that offspring reared by circadian clock-impaired mice show elevated anxiety-related behavior. Clock mutant mice harboring a mutation in Clock, a key component of the molecular circadian clock, display altered daily patterns of nursing behavior that is fragmented during the light period, instead of long bouts of nursing behavior in wild-type mice. Adult wild-type offspring fostered by Clock mutant mice exhibit increased anxiety-related behavior. This is coupled with reduced levels of brain serotonin at postnatal day 14, whose homeostasis during the early postnatal period is critical for normal emotional behavior in adulthood. Together, disruption of the circadian clock in mothers has an adverse impact on establishing normal anxiety levels in offspring, which may increase their risk of developing anxiety disorders. PMID:23776596

  1. Novel, whisker-dependent texture discrimination task for mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsia-Pai Patrick; Ioffe, Julie C; Iverson, Michaela M; Boon, Jacqueline M; Dyck, Richard H

    2013-01-15

    Many mammals use their mystacial vibrissae to palpate objects in their environment and encode information such as size, shape and texture. We have developed a novel method to assess the sensitivity with which mice can discriminate textures using their mystacial vibrissae. Our texture discrimination task can be performed within 3 days, requiring approximately 1 h of handling time, per subject, over the entire testing period. No appetitive or aversive training is required. We have demonstrated that this novel texture discrimination task is dependent on intact mystacial vibrissae and can be performed by both young (2-month old) and older (6-month old) C57BL/6 mice. The parameters of the task can be adjusted to assess the sensitivity of mice using a gradient of textures with different roughness. We have developed a novel, efficient method to assess whisker-mediated texture discrimination in mice.

  2. Germ cell mutagenicity of phthalic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Jha, A M; Singh, A C; Bharti, M

    1998-12-03

    Mutagenicity of phthalic acid was evaluated by employing dominant lethal mutation and sperm head abnormality assays in male Swiss albino mice. For the dominant lethal mutation assay, adult male mice received a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either 40 mg or 80 mg/kg b.w. of phthalic acid for 5 consecutive days. For the sperm head abnormality assay, the mice were treated with 50, 100, 150, 200 and 300 mg/kg b.w. as a single i.p. injection. Treatment of adult male mice with phthalic acid resulted in induction of dominant lethal mutations and abnormal sperm heads. The results obtained indicate that phthalic acid is a germ cell mutagen.

  3. Cholera toxin-induced tolerance to allografts in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, S; Taniguchi, M; Shinomiya, N; Fujisawa, H; Zinnaka, Y; Nomoto, K

    1987-01-01

    When C3H/HeN (C3H) mice were primed with viable C57BL/6 (B6) spleen cells and treated with cholera toxin (CT) on the same day, a profound tolerance to tumour allografts of B6 origin was induced. The tolerant state was sustained for as long as 6 weeks or more. Skin allografts of B6 were rejected by such tolerant C3H mice, although the survival times were prolonged very slightly. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes was reduced markedly in the tolerant mice, whereas delayed footpad reaction to B6 cells was maintained at the normal immune level or higher. There is a possibility that a T-cell subset responsible for delayed footpad reaction is resistant to CT-induced tolerance and participates in the rejection of skin allografts in tolerant mice. PMID:2438209

  4. Anti-fatigue properties of tartary buckwheat extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Mei; Wei, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Anti-fatigue properties of tartary buckwheat extracts (TBE) was investigated in male Kunming mice. The animals were divided into four groups. The first group, designated as the control group (control), was administered with distilled water by gavage every day for 28 days. The other three groups, designated as TBE treatment groups, were administered with TBE of 60, 120 and 240 mg/kg body weight, respectively, by gavage every day for 28 days. Exhaustive swimming time, blood lactic acid (BLA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), tissue glycogen, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of mice after swimming were determined. The results showed that tartary buckwheat extracts had anti-fatigue properties, which extended the exhaustive swimming time of mice, effectively inhibiting the increase of BLA, decreasing the level of BUN, increasing the tissue glycogen content and the activities of SOD and GPx of mice. However, further study is needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of the effect of TBE on fatigue.

  5. Testosterone modulation of striatal dopamine output in orchidectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Shemisa, Kamal; Kunnathur, Vidhya; Liu, Bin; Salvaterra, Ty J; Dluzen, Dean E

    2006-10-01

    Three experiments are presented in which dopamine (DA) responses from superfused striatal tissue of orchidectomized (ORCH) mice treated or not with testosterone (T) are compared. In experiment 1, potassium-stimulated DA output was significantly greater in ORCH vs. ORCH+T mice. This profile was reversed when reserpine was infused in experiment 2, with DA output being significantly greater in ORCH+T vs. ORCH mice. In experiment 3, the amount of DA recovered following infusion of DA indicated no statistically significant differences in DA recoveries between ORCH and ORCH+T mice as tested in this paradigm. The findings that both potassium- and reserpine-induced DA responses are altered significantly by T suggests that one potential site of T action might involve the storage/uptake of DA within the vesicles of these neurons. Such results have important implications with regard to understanding the sex differences that are present in nigrostriatal dopaminergic function within health and diseased states.

  6. Increased hippocampal DNA oxidation in serotonin transporter deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mössner, R; Dringen, R; Persico, A M; Janetzky, B; Okladnova, O; Albert, D; Götz, M; Benninghoff, J; Schmitt, A; Gerlach, M; Riederer, P; Lesch, K P

    2002-05-01

    The serotonin transporter (5HTT) is the molecule responsible for the high-affinity reuptake of 5HT from the synaptic cleft. Mice lacking the 5HTT exhibit highly elevated extracellular concentrations of 5HT. We assessed whether the glutathione detoxification system is altered in 5HTT-deficient mice. While levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione were unchanged, glutathione metabolising enzymes showed a differential pattern of modulation. Glutathione peroxidase was reduced in frontal cortex, brainstem, and cerebellum of 5HTT-deficient mice, though not to a statistically significant extent, while a putative isoform of the detoxifying enzyme glutathione-S-transferase pi was decreased in a number of brain regions, especially in brainstem. At the level of the DNA, we found an increase of oxidative DNA adducts in the hippocampus of 5HTT-deficient mice. Given the importance of the hippocampus in learning and memory, this may be the most important neurochemical consequence of the absence of the 5HTT.

  7. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOGENOMIC STUDIES OF PFOA AND PFOS IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are developmentally toxic in rodents. To better understand the mechanism(s) associated with this toxicity, we have conducted transcript profiling in mice. In an initial study, pregnant animals were dosed througho...

  8. Banishing Asthma-Inducing Mice Allergens on The Cheap

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163963.html Banishing Asthma-Inducing Mice Allergens on the Cheap Do-it- ... pest management may not be needed to control asthma in kids with a mouse allergy, researchers say. ...

  9. [Abortive infection of mice inoculated intraperitoneally with Chlamydia ovis].

    PubMed

    Rodolakis, A

    1976-01-01

    A mouse adaptated strain of Chlamydia ovis, when inoculated in the peritoneal cavity, caused the death of both pregnant and non pregnant mice. In addition, mice inoculated late in pregnancy (12 to 16 days after breeding) aborted 4 to 6 days after inoculation. Chlamydia was recovered from foetuses and from the organs of the mice (Liver, Spleen, Lungs). The severity of the disease was related to the inoculum concentration, so it was possible to induce late abortions with a rapid recovery of the females, like in the natural infection of the ewes. In the same conditions, the original Chlamydia strain maintained by passage on yolk sac, induced only an inapparent disease transmissible to the young mice.

  10. Microglia mediate postoperative hippocampal inflammation and cognitive decline in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Valdearcos, Martin; Uchida, Yosuke; Lutrin, David; Maze, Mervyn; Koliwad, Suneil K.

    2017-01-01

    Surgery can induce cognitive decline, a risk that increases with advancing age. In rodents, postoperative cognitive decline (POCD) is associated with the inflammatory activation of hippocampal microglia. To examine the role of microglia in POCD, we inhibited the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) in adult mice, effectively depleting CNS microglia. Surgical trauma (tibial fracture) reduced the ability of mice to remember a conditioned response learned preoperatively, a deficit more pronounced and persistent in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Whereas microglial depletion by itself did not affect learning or memory, perioperative microglial depletion remarkably protected mice, including those with DIO, from POCD. This protection was associated with reduced hippocampal levels of inflammatory mediators, abrogation of hippocampal recruitment of CCR2+ leukocytes, and higher levels of circulating inflammation-resolving factors. Targeting microglia may thus be a viable strategy to mitigate the development of POCD, particularly in those with increased vulnerability.

  11. CD34 EXPRESSION BY HAIR FOLLICLE STEM CELLS IS REQUIRED FOR SKIN TUMOR DEVELOPMENT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used knockout mice to show that a cell surface protein called CD34 is required for skin tumor formation in mice. Wild type mice treated with 7-12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and a tumor promoter developed papillomas. When we treated CD34 knockout (KO) mice the same way, n...

  12. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  13. Immunogenicity of a psoralen-inactivated dengue virus type 1 vaccine candidate in mice.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Castillo Oré, Roger M; Porter, Kevin R; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2010-02-01

    We evaluated a novel psoralen-inactivated dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) vaccine candidate in Mus musculus mice. Mice received intradermal alum or 5 to 10 ng of psoralen-inactivated virus. Anti-DENV-1 neutralizing antibody was detectable in 10/11 mice receiving a 10-ng dose at 90 days. Psoralen-inactivated DENV-1 is immunogenic in mice.

  14. Photic Resetting and Entrainment in CLOCK-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dallmann, Robert; DeBruyne, Jason P.; Weaver, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Mice lacking CLOCK protein have a relatively subtle circadian phenotype, including a slightly shorter period in constant darkness, differences in phase resetting after 4-hr light pulses in the early and late night, and a variably advanced phase angle of entrainment in a light-dark (LD) cycle (DeBruyne et al., Neuron 50:465–477, 2006). The present series of experiments was conducted to more fully characterize the circadian phenotype of Clock−/− mice under various lighting conditions. A phase-response curve (PRC) to 4-hour light pulses in free-running mice was conducted; the results confirm that Clock−/− mice exhibit very large phase advances after 4 hrs light pulses in the late subjective night, but have relatively normal responses to light at other phases. The abnormal shape of the PRC to light may explain the tendency of CLOCK-deficient mice to begin activity before lights-out when housed in a 12 hrs light: 12 hrs dark lighting schedule. To assess this relationship further, Clock−/− and wild-type control mice were entrained to skeleton lighting cycles (1L:23D, and 1L:10D:1L:12D). Comparing entrainment under the two types of skeleton photoperiods revealed that exposure to 1 hr light in the morning leads to a phase advance of activity onset (expressed the following afternoon) in Clock−/− mice, but not in the controls. Constant light typically causes an intensity-dependent increase in circadian period in mice, but this did not occur in CLOCK-deficient mice. The failure of Clock−/− mice to respond to the period-lengthening effect of constant light likely results from the increased functional impact of light falling in the phase advance zone of the PRC. Collectively, these experiments reveal that alterations in the response of CLOCK-deficient mice to light in several paradigms are likely due to an imbalance in the shape of the PRC to light. PMID:21921293

  15. Sleep and fatigue in mice infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Olivadoti, Melissa D; Weinberg, Jason B; Toth, Linda A; Opp, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue, a common symptom of many acute and chronic medical conditions, reduces both quality of life and workplace productivity and can be disabling. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie fatigue can be difficult to study in human populations due to the patient heterogeneity, the variety of underlying causes and potential triggering events, and an inability to collect samples that may be essential to elucidation of mechanisms (e.g., brain). Although the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains elusive, some studies have implicated viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) is a mouse pathogen that shares many similarities with human γHVs, including EBV. In this study, we use γHV68-infected C57BL/6J mice as a model system for studying the impact of chronic viral infection on sleep-wake behavior, activity patterns, and body temperature profiles. Our data show that γHV68 alters sleep, activity, and temperature in a manner suggestive of fatigue. In mice infected with the highest dose used in this study (40,000plaque forming units), food intake, body weight, wheel running, body temperature, and sleep were normal until approximately 7days after infection. These parameters were significantly altered during days 7 through 11, returned to baseline levels at day 12 after infection, and remained within the normal range for the remainder of the 30-day period after inoculation. At that time, both infected and uninfected mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and their responses monitored. Uninfected mice given LPS developed a modest and transient febrile response during the initial light phase (hours 12 through 24) after injection. In contrast, infected mice developed changes in core body temperatures that persisted for at least 5days. Infected mice showed an initial hypothermia that lasted for approximately 12h

  16. Haploinsufficiency of osterix in chondrocytes impairs skeletal growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaohong; Xing, Weirong; Zhou, Xin; Mohan, Subburaman

    2013-10-01

    Osterix (Osx) is essential for both intramembranous or endochondral bone formation. Osteoblast-specific ablation of Osx using Col1α1-Cre resulted in osteopenia, because of impaired osteoblast differentiation in adult mice. Since Osx is also known to be expressed in chondrocytes, we evaluated the role of Osx expressed in chondrocytes by examining the skeletal phenotype of mice with conditional disruption of Osx in Col2α1-expressing chondrocytes. Surprisingly, Cre-positive mice that were homozygous for Osx floxed alleles died after birth. Alcian blue and alizarin red staining revealed that the lengths of skeleton, femur, and vertebrae were reduced by 21, 26, and 14% (P < 0.01), respectively, in the knockout (KO) compared with wild-type mice. To determine if haploid insufficiency of Osx in chondrocytes influenced postnatal skeletal growth, we compared skeletal phenotype of floxed heterozygous mice that were Cre-positive or Cre-negative. Body length was reduced by 8% (P < 0.001), and areal BMD of total body, femur, and tibia was reduced by 5, 7, and 8% (P < 0.05), respectively, in mice with conditional disruption of one allele of Osx in chondrocytes. Micro-CT showed reduced cortical volumetric bone mineral density and trabecular bone volume to total volume in the femurs of Osx(flox/+);col2α1-Cre mice. Histological analysis revealed that the impairment of longitudinal growth was associated with disrupted growth plates in the Osx(flox/+);col2α1-Cre mice. Primary chondrocytes isolated from KO embryos showed reduced expression of chondral ossification markers but elevated expression of chondrogenesis markers. Our findings indicate that Osx expressed in chondrocytes regulates bone growth in part by regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy.

  17. Experimental Granulomatous Pulmonary Nocardiosis in BALB/C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mifuji Lira, Roque M.; Limón Flores, Alberto Yairh; Salinas Carmona, Mario César

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a granulomatous disease with high mortality that affects both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients. The mechanisms leading to the establishment and progression of the infection are currently unknown. An animal model to study these mechanisms is sorely needed. We report the first in vivo model of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis that closely resembles human pathology. BALB/c mice infected intranasally with two different doses of GFP-expressing Nocardia brasiliensis ATCC700358 (NbGFP), develop weight loss and pulmonary granulomas. Mice infected with 109 CFUs progressed towards death within a week while mice infected with 108 CFUs died after five to six months. Histological examination of the lungs revealed that both the higher and lower doses of NbGFP induced granulomas with NbGFP clearly identifiable at the center of the lesions. Mice exposed to 108 CFUs and subsequently to 109 CFUs were not protected against disease severity but had less granulomas suggesting some degree of protection. Attempts to identify a cellular target for the infection were unsuccessful but we found that bacterial microcolonies in the suspension used to infect mice were responsible for the establishment of the disease. Small microcolonies of NbGFP, incompatible with nocardial doubling times starting from unicellular organisms, were identified in the lung as early as six hours after infection. Mice infected with highly purified unicellular preparations of NbGFP did not develop granulomas despite showing weight loss. Finally, intranasal delivery of nocardial microcolonies was enough for mice to develop granulomas with minimal weight loss. Taken together these results show that Nocardia brasiliensis microcolonies are both necessary and sufficient for the development of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis in mice. PMID:27303806

  18. Alcohol dependence and free-choice drinking in mice.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol dependence continues to be an important health concern and animal models are critical to furthering our understanding of this complex disease. A hallmark feature of alcoholism is a significant increase in alcohol drinking over time. While several different animal models of excessive alcohol (ethanol) drinking exist for mice and rats, a growing number of laboratories are using a model that combines chronic ethanol exposure procedures with voluntary ethanol drinking with mice as experimental subjects. Primarily, these studies use a chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure pattern to render mice dependent and a 2-h limited access procedure to evaluate drinking behavior. Compared to non-dependent mice that also drink ethanol, the ethanol-dependent mice demonstrate significant increases in voluntary ethanol drinking. The increased drinking significantly elevates blood and brain ethanol concentrations compared to the non-dependent control mice. Studies report that the increased drinking by dependent mice is driven by neuroadaptations in glutamatergic and corticotropin-releasing factor signaling in different brain regions known to be involved in alcohol-related behaviors. The dysregulation of these systems parallels findings in human alcoholics and treatments that demonstrate efficacy in alcoholics can also reduce drinking in this model. Moreover, preclinical findings have informed the development of human clinical trials, further highlighting the translational potential of the model. As a result of these features, the CIE exposure and free-choice drinking model is becoming more widely used and promises to provide more insight into mechanisms of excessive drinking that may be important for developing treatments for human alcoholics. The salient features and possible future considerations for CIE exposure and free-choice drinking in mice are discussed.

  19. Surgery plus anesthesia induces loss of attention in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Quan; Peng, Mian; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Chen, Ming; Yin, Ning; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to develop animal models to study postoperative delirium. Inattention is one of the symptoms of delirium. Increases in the levels of α-synuclein and S100β have been reported to be associated with delirium. Therefore, we set out to determine the effects of surgery plus general anesthesia on the behavioral changes (including loss of attention) in mice and on the levels of α-synuclein and S100β in the brain tissues of these mice. C57BL/6J mice (2- to 8-months-old) had a simple laparotomy plus isoflurane anesthesia. The behavioral changes, including attention level and the speed of movements, were determined 12, 24, and 48 h after the surgery plus anesthesia in the mice. The levels of α-synuclein and S100β in the cortex of these mice following the surgery plus anesthesia were determined by Western blot analysis. We found that there was a loss of attention at 24, but not 12 or 48 h following the surgery plus anesthesia (49% ± 5 vs. 33% ± 2.9, P = 0.011, N = 12) in the mice without significantly affecting the speed of their movements. There were increases in the levels of total α-synuclein (139% ± 33.5 vs. 100% ± 13.7, P = 0.037, N = 6) and S100β (142% ± 7.7 vs. 100% ± 6, P = 0.002, N = 6) in the cortex of the mice 12 h following the surgery plus anesthesia. These findings suggested that the surgery plus isoflurane anesthesia might induce behavioral and biochemical/cellular changes associated with delirium. We could use the surgery plus anesthesia in mice to develop an animal model to study postoperative delirium. PMID:26441522

  20. Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    response to endogenous estrogens. These female estrogen non-responsive ERα knock-in (ENERKI) mice had immature and hypoplastic uterine and vaginal ...developing mice as well as in adult animals with genetically induced mammary cancers through PPT administration or withdrawal. 15. SUBJECT TERMS estrogen...is a crucial therapeutic target for hormone dependent breast cancers . More effective treatment and prevention strategies are likely to emerge from

  1. ROCK insufficiency attenuates ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, David I; Mathews, Joel A; Park, Chan Y; Cho, Youngji; Hunt, Gabrielle; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Liao, James K; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Ozone causes airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and pulmonary inflammation. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell contraction and inflammatory cell migration. To determine the contribution of the two ROCK isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 to ozone-induced AHR, we exposed wild-type, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice to air or ozone (2 ppm for 3 h) and evaluated mice 24 h later. ROCK1 or ROCK2 haploinsufficiency did not affect airway responsiveness in air-exposed mice but significantly reduced ozone-induced AHR, with a greater reduction in ROCK2(+/-) mice despite increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cells in ROCK2(+/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, ozone-induced increases in BAL hyaluronan, a matrix protein implicated in ozone-induced AHR, were lower in ROCK1(+/-) but not ROCK2(+/-) mice. Ozone-induced increases in other inflammatory moieties reported to contribute to ozone-induced AHR (IL-17A, osteopontin, TNFα) were not different in wild-type vs. ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. We also observed a dose-dependent reduction in ozone-induced AHR after treatment with the ROCK1/ROCK2 inhibitor fasudil, even though fasudil was administered after induction of inflammation. Ozone increased pulmonary expression of ROCK2 but not ROCK1 or RhoA. A ROCK2 inhibitor, SR3677, reduced contractile forces in primary human airway smooth muscle cells, confirming a role for ROCK2 in airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results demonstrate that ozone-induced AHR requires ROCK. Whereas ROCK1-dependent changes in hyaluronan may contribute to ROCK1's role in O3-induced AHR, the role of ROCK2 is downstream of inflammation, likely at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction.

  2. Novel weight-reducing activity of Galega officinalis in mice.

    PubMed

    Palit, P; Furman, B L; Gray, A I

    1999-11-01

    Galega officinalis (galega, Goat's Rue, French Lilac) is well known for its hypoglycaemic action and has been used as part of a plant mixture in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. During pharmacological investigations of an ethanolic extract of a powdered mixture of equal proportions of G. officinalis, Cressa cretica, Mangifera indica and Syzygium jambolanum, a weight reducing effect of galega was discovered. In this study we have investigated the novel weight reducing effect of galega in mice. Galega herb (10% w/w in the diet) caused a significant reduction in body weight in both normal and genetically obese (ob/ob) animals treated for 28 days when compared with respective controls (P < 0.01). In normal mice, the weight loss was reversible and initially associated with a transient reduction in food intake but was then maintained even in the presence of increased eating above the control level. Pair-fed normal mice receiving galega for seven days also showed significant weight loss (P < 0.01, compared with the control) in the presence of increasing food intake. In sharp contrast, weight loss in galega-treated ob/ob mice was accompanied by a persistent reduction in food intake over the 28-day treatment period. Post-mortem examinations of all galega-treated mice revealed a striking absence of body fat. Serum glucose was significantly reduced in both strains of mice receiving galega for 28 days (P < 0.01), whereas serum insulin was significantly reduced only in obese mice (P < 0.01). In summary, together with its established hypoglycaemic effects, galega has a novel weight reducing action that, in normal mice, is largely independent of a reduction in food intake. The mechanism of the weight reducing action of galega is unclear but involves loss of body fat.

  3. Crybb2 deficiency impairs fertility in female mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Qian; Sun, Li-Li; Xiang, Fen-Fen; Gao, Li; Jia, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Tao, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jie

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Crybb2 deletion impaired female fertility. • Crybb2 deletion dramatically affected the production of reproduction-related hormones and hormone response. • Crybb2 deletion impaired follicular development and inhibited the proliferation of granulosa cells. • Crybb2 deletion promoted follicular atresia and apoptosis in granulosa cells. - Abstract: Beta-B2-crystallin (CRYBB2), encoded by Crybb2 gene, is a major protein in the mammalian eye lens that plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the ocular lens. However, CRYBB2 also plays important roles in many extra-lenticular tissues and organs such as the retina, brain and testis. Our previous studies demonstrated that male Crybb2 deficient (Crybb2{sup −/−}) mice have reduced fertility compared with wild-type (WT) mice, while female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited reduced ovary weights and shorter estrous cycle percentages. Here we specifically investigated the role of CRYBB2 in the female reproductive system. Our studies revealed that ovaries from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice exhibited significantly reduced numbers of primordial, secondary and pre-ovulatory follicles when compared with WT mice, while the rate of atretic follicles was also increased. Additionally, fewer eggs were collected from the oviduct of Crybb2{sup −/−} female mice after superovulation. Estrogen levels were higher in the metestrus and diestrus cycles of female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, while progesterone levels were lower in diestrus cycles. Furthermore, the expression of survival and cell cycle genes, Bcl-2, Cdk4 and Ccnd2, were significantly decreased in granulosa cells isolated from female Crybb2{sup −/−} mice, consistent with the predominant expression of CRYBB2 in ovarian granulosa cells. Our results reveal a critical role for CRYBB2 in female fertility and specific effects on the proliferation and survival status of ovarian granulosa cells.

  4. Phagocytic activity in stressed mice: effects of alprazolam.

    PubMed

    Freire-Garabal, M; Núñez, M J; Fernández-Rial, J C; Couceiro, J; García-Vallejo, L; Rey-Méndez, M

    1993-06-01

    Mice exposed to a chronic auditory stressor and daily injected with alprazolam (1 mg/kg/day, s.c.) showed a reduction in stress-induced suppression of the in vitro and in vivo activity of phagocytosis, measured using the zymosan particle uptake method and the carbon clearance test, respectively. Pretreatment with Ro-15-1788 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a central nervous system benzodiazepine antagonist, resulted in suppression of the effects of alprazolam in stressed mice.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Daily Activity in Humans and Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of the technical developments that have made such genetic dissections a productive force in the mouse , have, when combined with innovations in...and Mice AFOSR grant F49620-97-1-0321 Joseph S. Takahashi Dept. of Neurobiology & Physiology Northwestern University 2153 North Campus Dr. Evanston...Activity in Humans and Mice Unclassified 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Takahashi, Joseph S. ; 5f. WORK

  6. Evaluating fatigue in lupus-prone mice: preliminary assessments.

    PubMed

    Meeks, Allison; Larson, Susan J

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is a debilitating condition suffered by many as the result of chronic disease, yet relatively little is known about its biological basis or how to effectively manage its effects. This study sought to evaluate chronic fatigue by using lupus-prone mice and testing them at three different time periods. Lupus-prone mice were chosen because fatigue affects over half of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Eleven MLR⁺/(+) (genetic controls) and twelve MLR/MpJ-Fas/J (MRL/lpr; lupus-prone) mice were tested three times: once at 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age. All mice were subjected to a variety of behavioral tests including: forced swim, post-swim grooming, running wheel, and sucrose consumption; five of the MLR⁺/(+) and five of the MLR/lpr mice were also tested on a fixed ratio-25 operant conditioning task. MRL/lpr mice showed more peripheral symptoms of lupus than controls, particularly lymphadenopathy and proteinuria. Lupus mice spent more time floating during the forced swim test and traveled less distance in the running wheel at each testing period. There were no differences between groups in post-swim grooming or in number of reinforcers earned in the operant conditioning task indicating the behavioral changes were not likely due simply to muscle weakness or motivation. Correlations between performance in the running wheel, forced swim test and sucrose consumption were conducted and distance traveled in the running wheel was consistently negatively correlated with time spent floating. Based on these data, we conclude that the lupus-prone mice were experiencing chronic fatigue and that running wheel activity and floating during a forced swim test can be used to evaluate fatigue, although these data cannot rule out the possibility that both fatigue and a depressive-like state were mediating these effects.

  7. THE INFECTION OF MICE WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1935-01-01

    The experiments confirm the earlier observation of Andrewes, Laidlaw and Smith that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for white mice when administered intranasally. Two field strains of the swine influenza virus were found to differ in their initial pathogenicity for mice. One strain was apparently fully pathogenic even in its 1st mouse passage while the other required 2 or 3 mouse passages to acquire full virulence for this species. Both strains, however, were initially infectious for mice, without the necessity of intervening ferret passages. There is no evidence that bacteria play any significant rôle in the mouse disease though essential in that of swine, and fatal pneumonias can be produced in mice by pure virus infections. Mice surviving the virus disease are immune to reinfection for at least a month. In mice the disease is not contagious though it is notably so in swine. The virus, while regularly producing fatal pneumonias when administered intranasally to mice, appears to be completely innocuous when given subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. Prolonged serial passage of the virus in mice does not influence its infectivity or virulence for swine or ferrets. It is a stable virus so far as its infectivity is concerned, and can be transferred at will from any one of its three known susceptible hosts to any other. In discussing these facts the stability of the swine influenza virus has been contrasted with the apparent instability of freshly isolated strains of the human influenza virus. Though the mouse is an un-natural host for the virus it is, nevertheless, useful for the study of those aspects of swine influenza which have to do with the virus only. PMID:19870434

  8. Thioredoxin-Related Mechanisms in Hyperoxic Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tipple, Trent E.; Welty, Stephen E.; Rogers, Lynette K.; Hansen, Thomas N.; Choi, Young-Eun; Kehrer, James P.; Smith, Charles V.

    2007-01-01

    Reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to glutathione (GSH) by glutathione reductase (GR) enhances the efficiency of GSH-dependent antioxidant activities. However, GR-deficient (a1Neu) mice are less susceptible to acute lung injury from continuous exposure to > 95% O2 (96 h: 6.9 ± 0.1 g right lung/kg body versus room air 3.6 ± 0.3) than are C3H/HeN control mice (10.6 ± 1.3 versus 4.2 ± 0.3, P < 0.001). a1Neu mice have greater hepatic thioredoxin (Trx)1 and Trx2 levels than do C3H/HeN mice, suggesting compensation for the absence of GR. a1Neu mice exposed to hyperoxia for 96 hours showed lower levels of inflammatory infiltrates in lungs than did similarly exposed C3H/HeN mice. Pretreatment with aurothioglucose (ATG), a thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitor, exacerbated the effects of hyperoxia on lung injury in a1Neu mice (11.6 ± 0.8, P < 0.001), but attenuated hyperoxic lung edema and inflammation in C3H/HeN mice (6.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.001). No consistent alterations were observed in lung GSH contents or liver GSH or GSSG levels after ATG pretreatment. The data suggest that modulation of Trx/TrxR systems might provide therapeutically useful alterations of cellular resistance to oxidant stresses. The protective effects of ATG against hyperoxic lung injury could prove to be particularly useful therapeutically. PMID:17575077

  9. Chimeric plantibody passively protects mice against aerosolized ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Whaley, Kevin J; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do H; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Hiatt, Ernie; Morton, Josh; Swope, Kelsi; Roy, Chad J; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-05-01

    Recent incidents in the United States and abroad have heightened concerns about the use of ricin toxin as a bioterrorism agent. In this study, we produced, using a robust plant-based platform, four chimeric toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that were then evaluated for the ability to passively protect mice from a lethal-dose ricin challenge. The most effective antibody, c-PB10, was further evaluated in mice as a therapeutic following ricin exposure by injection and inhalation.

  10. Antibiotic administration in the drinking water of mice.

    PubMed

    Marx, James O; Vudathala, Daljit; Murphy, Lisa; Rankin, Shelley; Hankenson, F Claire

    2014-05-01

    Although antibiotics frequently are added to the drinking water of mice, this practice has not been tested to confirm that antibiotics reach therapeutic concentrations in the plasma of treated mice. In the current investigation, we 1) tested the stability of enrofloxacin and doxycycline in the drinking water of adult, female C57BL/6 mice; 2) measured the mice's consumption of water treated with enrofloxacin, doxycycline, amoxicillin, or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; and 3) used HPLC to measure plasma antibiotic concentrations in mice that had ingested treated water for 1 wk. Plasma concentrations of antibiotic were measured 1 h after the start of both the light and dark cycle. The main findings of the study were that both enrofloxacin and nonpharmaceutical, chemical-grade doxycycline remained relatively stable in water for 1 wk. In addition, mice consumed similar volumes of antibiotic-treated and untreated water. The highest plasma antibiotic concentrations measured were: enrofloxacin, 140.1 ± 10.4 ng/mL; doxycycline, 56.6 ± 12.5 ng/mL; amoxicillin, 299.2 ± 64.1 ng/mL; and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 5.9 ± 1.2 ng/mL. Despite the stability of the antibiotics in the water and predictable water consumption by mice, the plasma antibiotic concentrations were well below the concentrations required for efficacy against bacterial pathogens, except for those pathogens that are exquisitely sensitive to the antibiotic. The findings of this investigation prompt questions regarding the rationale of the contemporary practice of adding antibiotics to the drinking water of mice for systemic antibacterial treatments.

  11. Maladaptive defensive behaviours in monoamine oxidase A-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Godar, Sean C.; Bortolato, Marco; Frau, Roberto; Dousti, Mona; Chen, Kevin; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Rich evidence indicates that monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, the major enzyme catalysing the degradation of monoamine neurotransmitters, plays a key role in emotional regulation. Although MAOA deficiency is associated with reactive aggression in humans and mice, the involvement of this enzyme in defensive behaviour remains controversial and poorly understood. To address this issue, we tested MAOA knockout (KO) mice in a spectrum of paradigms and settings associated with variable degrees of threat. The presentation of novel inanimate objects induced a significant reduction in exploratory approaches and increase in defensive behaviours, such as tail-rattling, biting and digging. These neophobic responses were context-dependent and particularly marked in the home cage. In the elevated plus- and T-mazes, MAOA KO mice and wild-type (WT) littermates displayed equivalent locomotor activity and time in closed and open arms; however, MAOA KO mice featured significant reductions in risk assessment, as well as unconditioned avoidance and escape. No differences between genotypes were observed in the defensive withdrawal and emergence test. Conversely, MAOA KO mice exhibited a dramatic reduction of defensive and fear-related behaviours in the presence of predator-related cues, such as predator urine or an anaesthetized rat, in comparison with those observed in their WT littermates. The behavioural abnormalities in MAOA KO mice were not paralleled by overt alterations in sensory and microvibrissal functions. Collectively, these results suggest that MAOA deficiency leads to a general inability to appropriately assess contextual risk and attune defensive and emotional responses to environmental cues. PMID:21156093

  12. Effect of Amphotericin B Nanodisks on Leishmania major Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cole, PA; Bishop, JV; Beckstead, JA; Titus, R; Ryan, RO

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of a novel formulation of the polyene antibiotic, amphotericin B (AMB), as therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis in different mouse strains. Methods (AMB), was formulated into water-soluble transport particles, termed nanodisks (ND). Balb/c and CH3 mice infected with Leishmania major on Day 0 were administered vehicle alone, empty ND or AMB-ND on Day 1 and day 7, via the tail vein. Mice were sacrificed 25 or 50 days post inoculation and tissue histology evaluated. Balb/c mice treated with vehicle or empty ND showed signs of severe infection while CH3 mice had less inflammation and fewer parasites. AMB-ND treatment (2 mg/kg) had a marked therapeutic effect on L. major infected Balb/c mice and a discernable therapeutic benefit on CH3 mice. Conclusions AMB-ND is efficacious in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. It may be inferred that AMB-ND may be useful for prophylactic and/or treatment of early stage Leishmania spp. infection. PMID:25584195

  13. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection.

  14. Host microbiota modulates development of social preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arentsen, Tim; Raith, Henrike; Qian, Yu; Forssberg, Hans; Heijtz, Rochellys Diaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence indicates that the indigenous gut microbiota exerts long-lasting programming effects on brain function and behaviour. Objective In this study, we used the germ-free (GF) mouse model, devoid of any microbiota throughout development, to assess the influence of the indigenous microbiota on social preference and repetitive behaviours (e.g. self-grooming). Methods and results Using the three-chambered social approach task, we demonstrate that when adult GF mice were given a choice to spend time with a novel mouse or object, they spent significantly more time sniffing and interacting with the stimulus mouse compared to conventionally raised mice (specific pathogen-free, SPF). Time spent in repetitive self-grooming behaviour, however, did not differ between GF and SPF mice. Real-time PCR–based gene expression analysis of the amygdala, a key region that is part of the social brain network, revealed a significant reduction in the mRNA levels of total brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), BDNF exon I-, IV-, VI-, IX-containing transcripts, and NGFI-A (a signalling molecule downstream of BDNF) in GF mice compared to SPF mice. Conclusion These results suggest that differential regulation of BDNF exon transcripts in the amygdala by the indigenous microbes may contribute to the altered social development of GF mice. PMID:26679775

  15. Therapeutic Effects of Bupleurum Polysaccharides in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Liu, Zhenzhen; Xu, Yanyan; Zhou, Chunjiao; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Su, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yunyi; Chen, Daofeng

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is related to low-grade chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Bupleurum Polysaccharides (BPs), isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. However, little is known about its therapeutic effects on diabetes. In this experiment, the effects of BPs on alleviation of diabetes and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Diabetic mice model was established via successive intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (100 mg/kg body weight) for two days. Mice with blood glucose levels higher than 16.8mmol/L were selected for experiments. The diabetic mice were orally administered with BPs (30 and 60 mg/kg) once a day for 35 days. BPs not only significantly decreased levels of blood glucose, but also increased those of serum insulin and liver glycogen in diabetic mice compared to model mice. Additionally, BPs adminstration improved the insulin expression and suppressed the apoptosis in pancreas of the diabetic mice. Histopathological observations further demonstrated that BPs protected the pancreas and liver from oxidative and inflammatory damages. These results suggest that BPs protect pancreatic β cells and liver hepatocytes and ameliorate diabetes, which is associated with its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26176625

  16. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Castellucci, Gregg A.; McGinley, Matthew J.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/−) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/− mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/− mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/− song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene’s role in general vocal motor control. PMID:26980647

  17. Anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol in old mice liver.

    PubMed

    Tung, Bui Thanh; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabeth; Talero, Elena; Gamero-Estévez, Enrique; Motilva, Virginia; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of aging. Caloric restriction and resveratrol (RSV) have shown important effects on prevention of oxidative stress and inflammation. Here, we investigate the progression of proinflammatory markers in liver during aging and the effect of RSV on inflammation markers in the liver of old male C57BL/6J mice. Young (2 months), mature (12 months) and old (18 months) mice were fed during 6 months with RSV. Levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and TNF-α were evaluated by ELISA in mice liver. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α and also their respective mRNA increased in the liver from old mice. However, RSV decreased these levels in the case of IL-1β and TNF-α but only in old mice showing no effect on young and mature animals. This reduction was also found at the mRNA level. Levels of mRNA of the components of NALP-3 inflammasome, ASC, CASP-1, NALP-1 and NALP-3, also showed an age-dependent increase that was reversed by RSV. Furthermore, cyclooxygenase 2 levels, a marker of proinflammatory innate immune activity, were also upregulated in aged liver and reversed again by RSV. In conclusion, our study confirms that aging is accompanied by an increase in the proinflammatory pattern in the liver and that RSV reduces this pattern in old mice liver.

  18. Hepatocyte tissue factor activates the coagulation cascade in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Bradley P.; Kopec, Anna K.; Joshi, Nikita; Cline, Holly; Brown, Juliette A.; Bishop, Stephanie C.; Kassel, Karen M.; Rockwell, Cheryl; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we characterized tissue factor (TF) expression in mouse hepatocytes (HPCs) and evaluated its role in mouse models of HPC transplantation and acetaminophen (APAP) overdose. TF expression was significantly reduced in isolated HPCs and liver homogenates from TFflox/flox/albumin-Cre mice (HPCΔTF mice) compared with TFflox/flox mice (control mice). Isolated mouse HPCs expressed low levels of TF that clotted factor VII-deficient human plasma. In addition, HPC TF initiated factor Xa generation without exogenous factor VIIa, and TF activity was increased dramatically after cell lysis. Treatment of HPCs with an inhibitory TF antibody or a cell-impermeable lysine-conjugating reagent prior to lysis substantially reduced TF activity, suggesting that TF was mainly present on the cell surface. Thrombin generation was dramatically reduced in APAP-treated HPCΔTF mice compared with APAP-treated control mice. In addition, thrombin generation was dependent on donor HPC TF expression in a model of HPC transplantation. These results suggest that mouse HPCs constitutively express cell surface TF that mediates activation of coagulation during hepatocellular injury. PMID:23305736

  19. Nrf2 deficiency impairs fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lippross, Sebastian; Beckmann, Rainer; Streubesand, Nadine; Ayub, Ferda; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Campbell, Graeme; Kan, Yuet Wai; Horst, Fischer; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Varoga, Deike; Lichte, Philipp; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas; Wruck, Christoph Jan

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in wound healing but data relating oxidative stress to fracture healing are scarce. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is the major transcription factor that controls the cellular defence essential to combat oxidative stress by regulating the expression of antioxidative enzymes. This study examined the impact of Nrf2 on fracture healing using a standard closed femoral shaft fracture model in wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO)-mice. Healing was evaluated by histology, real-time RT-PCR, µCT and biomechanical measurements. We showed that Nrf2 expression is activated during fracture healing. Bone healing and remodelling were retarded in the Nrf2-KO compared to the WT-mice. Nrf2-KO-mice developed significantly less callus tissue compared to WT-mice. In addition, biomechanical testing demonstrated lower strength against shear stress in the Nrf2-KO-group compared to WT. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and osteocalcin is reduced during fracture healing in Nrf2-KO-mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Nrf2 deficiency in mice results in impaired fracture healing suggesting that Nrf2 plays an essential role in bone regeneration. Pharmacological activation of Nrf2 may have therapeutic potential for the enhancement of fracture healing.

  20. Norepinephrine transporter heterozygous knockout mice exhibit altered transport and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fentress, H M; Klar, R; Krueger, J J; Sabb, T; Redmon, S N; Wallace, N M; Shirey-Rice, J K; Hahn, M K

    2013-11-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET(+/-) ), demonstrating that they display an approximately 50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET(+/-) mouse establishes an activated state of existing surface NET proteins. The NET(+/-) mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris water maze. These data suggest that recovery of near basal activity in NET(+/-) mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET(+/-) mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders.

  1. Suspended animation-like state protects mice from lethal hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Eric; Roth, Mark B

    2007-04-01

    Joseph Priestley observed the high burn rate of candles in pure oxygen and wondered if people would "live out too fast" if we were in the same environment. We hypothesize that sulfide, a natural reducer of oxygen that is made in many cell types, acts as a buffer to prevent unrestricted oxygen consumption. To test this, we administered sulfide in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to mice (Mus musculus). As we have previously shown, H2S decreases the metabolic rate of mice by approximately 90% and induces a suspended animation-like state. Mice cannot survive for longer than 20 min when exposed to 5% oxygen. However, if mice are first put into a suspended animation-like state by a 20-min pretreatment with H2S and then are exposed to low oxygen, they can survive for more than 6.5 h in 5% oxygen with no apparent detrimental effects. In addition, if mice are exposed to a 20-min pretreatment with H2S followed by 1 h at 5% oxygen, they can then survive for several hours at oxygen tensions as low as 3%. We hypothesize that prior exposure to H2S reduces oxygen demand, therefore making it possible for the mice to survive with low oxygen supply. These results suggest that H2S may be useful to prevent damage associated with hypoxia.

  2. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P<0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P<0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression.

  3. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P < 0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P < 0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression. PMID:24966923

  4. Astaxanthin affects oxidative stress and hyposalivation in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuraji, Manatsu; Matsuno, Tomonori; Satoh, Tazuko

    2016-01-01

    Oral dryness, a serious problem for the aging Japanese society, is induced by aging-related hyposalivation and causes dysphagia, dysgeusia, inadaptation of dentures, and growth of oral Candida albicans. Oxidative stress clearly plays a role in decreasing saliva secretion and treatment with antioxidants such astaxanthin supplements may be beneficial. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of astaxanthin on the oral saliva secretory function of aging mice. The saliva flow increased in astaxanthin-treated mice 72 weeks after administration while that of the control decreased by half. The plasma d-ROMs values of the control but not astaxanthin-treated group measured before and 72 weeks after treatment increased. The diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) value of astaxanthin-treated mice 72 weeks after treatment was significantly lower than that of the control group was. The plasma biological antioxidative potential (BAP) values of the control but not astaxanthin-treated mice before and 72 weeks after treatment decreased. Moreover, the BAP value of the astaxanthin-treated group 72 weeks after treatment was significantly higher than that of the control was. Furthermore, the submandibular glands of astaxanthin-treated mice had fewer inflammatory cells than the control did. Specifically, immunofluorescence revealed a significantly large aquaporin-5 positive cells in astaxanthin-treated mice. Our results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may prevent age-related decreased saliva secretion. PMID:27698533

  5. Impaired receptivity and decidualization in DHEA-induced PCOS mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Yun; Song, Zhuo; Song, Min-Jie; Qin, Jia-Wen; Zhao, Meng-Long; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2016-12-07

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a complex endocrine disorder, is a leading cause of female infertility. An obvious reason for infertility in PCOS women is anovulation. However, success rate with high quality embryos selected by assisted reproduction techniques in PCOS patients still remain low with a high rate of early clinical pregnancy loss, suggesting a problem in uterine receptivity. Using a dehydroepiandrosterone-induced mouse model of PCOS, some potential causes of decreased fertility in PCOS patients were explored. In our study, ovulation problem also causes sterility in PCOS mice. After blastocysts from normal mice are transferred into uterine lumen of pseudopregnant PCOS mice, the rate of embryo implantation was reduced. In PCOS mouse uteri, the implantation-related genes are also dysregulated. Additionally, artificial decidualization is severely impaired in PCOS mice. The serum estrogen level is significantly higher in PCOS mice than vehicle control. The high level of estrogen and potentially impaired LIF-STAT3 pathway may lead to embryo implantation failure in PCOS mice. Although there are many studies about effects of PCOS on endometrium, both embryo transfer and artificial decidualization are applied to exclude the effects from ovulation and embryos in our study.

  6. Atrial structure, function and arrhythmogenesis in aged and frail mice

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Hailey J.; Moghtadaei, Motahareh; Mackasey, Martin; Rafferty, Sara A.; Bogachev, Oleg; Sapp, John L.; Howlett, Susan E.; Rose, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in aging populations; however not all individuals age at the same rate. Instead, individuals of the same chronological age can vary in health status from fit to frail. Our objective was to determine the impacts of age and frailty on atrial function and arrhythmogenesis in mice using a frailty index (FI). Aged mice were more frail and demonstrated longer lasting AF compared to young mice. Consistent with this, aged mice showed longer P wave duration and PR intervals; however, both parameters showed substantial variability suggesting differences in health status among mice of similar chronological age. In agreement with this, P wave duration and PR interval were highly correlated with FI score. High resolution optical mapping of the atria demonstrated reduced conduction velocity and action potential duration in aged hearts that were also graded by FI score. Furthermore, aged mice had increased interstitial fibrosis along with changes in regulators of extracellular matrix remodelling, which also correlated with frailty. These experiments demonstrate that aging results in changes in atrial structure and function that create a substrate for atrial arrhythmias. Importantly, these changes were heterogeneous due to differences in health status, which could be identified using an FI. PMID:28290548

  7. Electric field exposure and evidence of stress in mice

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, L.; De Jager, L. )

    1994-04-01

    The effect of stress induced by an electric field on the adrenal gland cortex of mice was examined by means of corticosterone serum assay and evaluation of the lipid profile of the different zones of the cortex. Six generations of experimental mice were exposed to a 10 kV/m electric field from conception and corresponding control groups were sham exposed. Mice were sacrificed at 35 days (n = 10), as adults (n = 20) and at 18 months (old mice) (n = 10). Blinded lipid estimates were performed on histological preparations of the adrenals, serum corticosterone levels were determined, and the results were statistically analyzed. The mean lipid volume in the zona glomerulosa of the exposed adult male group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P = 0.004). The median daytime corticosterone level of the exposed male mice was also significantly higher than that in the controls (P = 0.02). The lipid profiles and corticosterone values in the other subgroups did not differ significantly. As chronic stress increases the lipid volume of all the zones of the adrenal cortex and stimulates the zona glomerulosa to corticosterone secretion, the data suggest that the electric field acted as a chronic stressor in the adult male mice. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Temporal requirement for high SMN expression in SMA mice

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thanh T.; McGovern, Vicki L.; Alwine, Isaac E.; Wang, Xueyong; Massoni-Laporte, Aurelie; Rich, Mark M.; Burghes, Arthur H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by loss of the survival motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1) and retention of the SMN2 gene, resulting in reduced SMN. SMA mice can be rescued with high expression of SMN in neurons, but when is this high expression required? We have developed a SMA mouse with inducible expression of SMN to address the temporal requirement for high SMN expression. Both embryonic and early postnatal induction of SMN resulted in a dramatic increase in survival with some mice living greater than 200 days. The mice had no marked motor deficits and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) function was near normal thus it appears that induction of SMN in postnatal SMA mice rescues motor function. Early postnatal SMN induction, followed by a 1-month removal of induction at 28 days of age, resulted in no morphological or electrophysiological abnormalities at the NMJ and no overt motor phenotype. Upon removal of SMN induction, five mice survived for just over 1 month and two female mice have survived past 8 months of age. We suggest that there is a postnatal period of time when high SMN levels are required. Furthermore, two copies of SMN2 provide the minimal amount of SMN necessary to maintain survival during adulthood. Finally, in the course of SMA, early induction of SMN is most efficacious. PMID:21672919

  9. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  10. Exposure of Mice to Topical Bovine Thrombin Induces Systemic Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenecker, Jonathan G.; Johnson, Rachel K.; Lesher, Aaron P.; Day, Jarrod D.; Love, Stephanie D.; Hoffman, Maureane R.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Parker, William; Lawson, Jeffrey H.

    2001-01-01

    Bovine thrombin is used as an aid to hemostasis in medical and surgical procedures. At least 500,000 Americans are exposed to this therapeutic annually and reports suggest that exposure is associated with the development of autoreactive antibodies. To determine whether bovine thrombin can induce pathological autoimmunity we exposed nonautoimmune-prone galactose-α1-3-galactose-deficient mice to the two bovine thrombin preparations currently approved for use in the United States. We found that, like humans exposed to bovine thrombin, mice developed an immune response against the therapeutic and the xenogeneic carbohydrate galactose-α1-3-galactose, and some mice developed autoantibodies against clotting factors. Further, unexpectedly, a single exposure to this therapeutic also induced autoimmunity with features characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus including antibodies against nuclear antigens, native DNA, double-stranded DNA, and cardiolipin. High levels of these autoantibodies correlated with glomerulonephritis in all mice evaluated. This autoimmune syndrome was detected in mice 15 weeks after a secondary exposure to bovine thrombin and female mice were found to develop the syndrome at a significantly greater frequency than males. Thus, these studies indicate that exposure to bovine thrombin preparations can induce a pathological systemic autoimmune syndrome with lupus-like serology. PMID:11696457

  11. Perioperative haemostatic management of haemophilic mice using normal mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, K; Ohashi, K; Kanegae, K; Shim, I K; Okano, T

    2013-11-01

    Intense haemostatic interventions are required to avoid bleeding complications when surgical procedures are performed on haemophilia patients. The objective of this study was to establish an appropriate protocol for perioperative haemostatic management of haemophilic mice. We assessed the prophylactic haemostatic effects of normal mouse plasma (NMP) on haemophilia B (HB) mice for both a skin flap procedure and a laparotomy. When 500 μL of NMP was administered to the mice, plasma factor IX (FIX:C) levels peaked at 15.1% immediately after intravenous (IV) administration, at 6.1% 2 h after intraperitoneal (IP) administration and at 2.7% 6 h after subcutaneous administration. Administering 500 μL of NMP via IP or IV 30 min in advance enabled the skin flap procedure to be performed safely without any complications. After the laparotomy procedure, several mice in the IP administration group exhibited lethal bleeding, but all mice survived in the IV administration group. Anti-mouse FIX inhibitors did not develop, even after repetitive administrations of NMP. However, human FIX concentrates, especially plasma-derived concentrates, elicited the anti-human FIX inhibitors. The results show that administering 500 μL of NMP via IV or IP 30 min in advance enables surgical procedures to be safely performed on HB mice, and that IV administration is more desirable than IP if the procedure requires opening of the abdominal wall.

  12. Caloric restriction enhances fear extinction learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Megan C; McKenna, Morgan C; Yoon, Yone J; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Santos, Patricia Mae G; Casey, B J; Glatt, Charles E

    2013-05-01

    Fear extinction learning, the ability to reassess a learned cue of danger as safe when it no longer predicts aversive events, is often dysregulated in anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's) enhance neural plasticity and their ability to enhance fear extinction learning may explain their anxiolytic properties. Caloric restriction (CR) has SSRI-like effects on neural plasticity and anxiety-related behavior. We implemented CR in mice to determine its effects on conditioned-fear responses. Wild type and serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout mice underwent CR for 7 days leading to significant weight loss. Mice were then tested for cued fear learning and anxiety-related behavior. CR markedly enhanced fear extinction learning and its retention in adolescent female mice, and adults of both sexes. These effects of CR were absent in SERT knockout mice. Moreover, CR phenocopied behavioral and molecular effects of chronic fluoxetine, but there was no additive effect of CR in fluoxetine-treated mice. These results demonstrate that CR enhances fear extinction learning through a SERT-dependent mechanism. These results may have implications for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN), in which there is a high prevalence of anxiety before the onset of dietary restriction and support proposals that in AN, CR is a motivated effort to control dysregulated fear responses and elevated anxiety.

  13. Kanamycin activates caspase-1 in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2011-08-01

    Abuse of antibiotics to treat children has been associated with an increased risk of the development of inflammatory diseases. The underlying mechanism behind this association still remains to be clarified. Here, we examined the mechanisms behind kanamycin-induced skin inflammation in NC/Nga mice. NC/Nga mice were orally administered kanamycin for 7 days consecutively. Blood, spleen and dorsal skin were taken 18 weeks after kanamycin treatment was stopped. Kanamycin significantly increased the allergic reaction. We also observed significant increases in caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression in the dorsal skin of the kanamycin-administered mice compared to the control mice. The increased enzymatic activity of caspase-1 in the dorsal skin of the kanamycin-administered mice increased the mRNA expressions of IL-1β and IL-18. The productions of IL-1β and IL-18 were also increased in the splenocytes obtained from kanamycin-administered mice. Kanamycin upregulated the TNF-α mRNA expression in the dorsal skin and the TNF-α production in stimulated splenocytes. The activation of nuclear factor-κB and degradation of IκBα were increased by kanamycin administration. Our findings suggest that the use of kanamycin during infancy may increase the potential for skin inflammatory reactions through the upregulation of caspase-1.

  14. Enhanced malignant tumorigenesis in Cdk4 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Macias, Everardo; Conti, Claudio J; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2004-03-11

    In a previous study, we reported that overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (CDK4) in mouse epidermis results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy and severe dermal fibrosis. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibility to skin tumor formation by forced expression of CDK4. Skin tumors from transgenic mice showed a dramatic increase in the rate of malignant progression to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in an initiation-promotion protocol. Histopathological analysis of papillomas from transgenic mice showed an elevated number of premalignant lesions characterized by dysplasia and marked atypia. Interestingly, transgenic mice also developed tumors in initiated but not promoted skin, demonstrating that CDK4 replaced the action of tumor promoters. These results suggest that expression of cyclin D1 upon ras activation synergizes with CDK4 overexpression. However, cyclin D1 transgenic mice and double transgenic mice for cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not show increased malignant progression in comparison to CDK4 transgenic mice. Biochemical analysis of tumors showed that CDK4 sequesters the CDK2 inhibitors p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, suggesting that indirect activation of CDK2 plays an important role in tumor development. These results indicate that, contrary to the general assumption, the catalytic subunit, CDK4, has higher oncogenic activity than cyclin D1, revealing a potential use of CDK4 as therapeutic target.

  15. Microbiota protects mice against acute alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Mazagova, Magdalena; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Eckmann, Lars; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol abuse is associated with intestinal bacterial overgrowth, increased intestinal permeability, and translocation of microbial products from the intestine to the portal circulation and liver. Translocated microbial products contribute to experimental alcoholic liver disease. Aim To investigate the physiological relevance of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol-induced liver injury. Methods We subjected germ-free and conventional C57BL/6 mice to a model of acute alcohol exposure that mimics binge drinking. Results Germ-free mice showed significantly greater liver injury and inflammation after oral gavage of ethanol compared with conventional mice. In parallel, germ-free mice exhibited increased hepatic steatosis and upregulated expression of genes involved in fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis compared with conventional mice after acute ethanol administration. The absence of microbiota was also associated with increased hepatic expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes, which led to faster ethanol elimination from the blood and lower plasma ethanol concentrations. Intestinal levels of ethanol metabolizing genes showed regional expression differences, and were overall higher in germ-free relative to conventional mice. Conclusion Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal microbiota increases hepatic ethanol metabolism and the susceptibility to binge-like alcohol drinking. PMID:26556636

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Richt, Jürgen A; Casey, Thomas A; Rasmussen, Mark A; Kehrli, Marcus E; Petrich, Jacob W

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated with the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model system to study age-related accumulation of lipofuscin, which has been investigated by monitoring the increasing fluorescence with age covering its entire life span. The current work aims at developing mice retina as a convenient model system to diagnose scrapie and other fatal TSE diseases in animals such as sheep and cows. The objective of the research reported here was to determine whether the spectral features are conserved between two different species namely mice and sheep, and whether an appropriate small animal model system could be identified for diagnosis of scrapie based on the fluorescence intensity in retina. The results were consistent with the previous reports on fluorescence studies of healthy and scrapie-infected retina of sheep. The fluorescence from the retinas of scrapie-infected sheep was significantly more intense and showed more heterogeneity than that from the retinas of uninfected mice. Although the structural characteristics of fluorescence spectra of scrapie-infected sheep and mice eyes are slightly different, more importantly, murine retinas reflect the enhancement of fluorescence intensity upon infecting the mice with scrapie, which is consistent with the observations in sheep eyes.

  17. Differences in Metabolism of Vinylidene Chloride Between Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B. K.; Hathway, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    The present finding that mice metabolize a greater proportion of an oral dose (50 mg/kg) of vinylidence chloride. (1,1 - dichloroethylene, DCE) than rats implies (a) that the efficiency of DCE metabolism follows the known activity of cytochrome P-450 in the organs of these animals, and (b) that, in accordance with the LD50 values, the real exposure (expressed as the amount of DCE metabolized) is relatively higher for orally dosed mice than rats, and (c) that DCE carcinogenicity would appear to be more likely in mice than rats. Mice metabolize DCE simiarly to rats (Jones and Hathway, 1977) but there are some differences. Thus, qualitatively, treated mice (but not rats) excrete a small amount of N-acetyl-S-(2carboxymethyl)cysteine. Quantitatively, (i) the relative proportions of the N-acetyl-S-(2-cysteinyl acetyl derivative that are formed in mice and rats parallel the activity of liver glutathione-S-epoxide transferase in these rodents, and (ii) there are marked differences in the proportions of DCE metabolites belonging to the chloroacetic acid branch of the metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the previously assumed β-thionase hydrolysis of thiodiglycollic acid (Jones and Hathway, 1977) is now established in vivo, and the possible biogenesis of the N-acetyl-S-cysteinyl acetyl derivative is verified by another tracer study. The conclusion is drawn that the DCE metabolites, 1,1-dichloroethylene oxide and chloroacetyl chloride, may be important to murine DCE carcinogenicity. PMID:638019

  18. Differences in metabolism of vinylidene chloride between mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, B K; Hathway, D E

    1978-03-01

    The present finding that mice metabolize a greater proportion of an oral dose (50 mg/kg) of vinylidence chloride. (1,1 - dichloroethylene, DCE) than rats implies (a) that the efficiency of DCE metabolism follows the known activity of cytochrome P-450 in the organs of these animals, and (b) that, in accordance with the LD(50) values, the real exposure (expressed as the amount of DCE metabolized) is relatively higher for orally dosed mice than rats, and (c) that DCE carcinogenicity would appear to be more likely in mice than rats.Mice metabolize DCE simiarly to rats (Jones and Hathway, 1977) but there are some differences. Thus, qualitatively, treated mice (but not rats) excrete a small amount of N-acetyl-S-(2carboxymethyl)cysteine. Quantitatively, (i) the relative proportions of the N-acetyl-S-(2-cysteinyl acetyl derivative that are formed in mice and rats parallel the activity of liver glutathione-S-epoxide transferase in these rodents, and (ii) there are marked differences in the proportions of DCE metabolites belonging to the chloroacetic acid branch of the metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the previously assumed β-thionase hydrolysis of thiodiglycollic acid (Jones and Hathway, 1977) is now established in vivo, and the possible biogenesis of the N-acetyl-S-cysteinyl acetyl derivative is verified by another tracer study. The conclusion is drawn that the DCE metabolites, 1,1-dichloroethylene oxide and chloroacetyl chloride, may be important to murine DCE carcinogenicity.

  19. Respiratory and sniffing behaviors throughout adulthood and aging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wesson, Daniel W.; Varga-Wesson, Adrienn G.; Borkowski, Anne H.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Orienting responses are physiological and active behavioral reactions evoked by novel stimulus perception and are critical for survival. We explored whether odor orienting responses are impacted throughout both adulthood and normal and pathological aging in mice. Novel odor investigation (including duration and bout numbers) and its subsequent habituation as assayed in the odor habituation task were preserved in adult C57BL/6J mice up to 12mo of age with <6% variability between age groups in investigation time. Separately, using whole-body plethysmography we found that both spontaneous respiration and odor-evoked sniffing behaviors were strikingly preserved in wildtype (WT) mice up to 26mo of age. In contrast, mice accumulating amyloid-β protein in the brain by means of overexpressing mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) showed preserved spontaneous respiration up to 12mo, but starting at 14mo showed significant differences from WT. Similar to WTs, odor-evoked sniffing was not impacted in APP mice up to 26mo. These results show that odor-orienting responses are minimally impacted throughout aging in mice, and suggest that the olfactomotor network is mostly spared of insults due to aging. PMID:21524667

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: histopathology of endocrine system in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, K. S.; Lagrange, P. H.; da Costa, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally immunocompromised athymic mice, neonatal mice and adult outbred OFI mice treated with the immunosuppressive agents cyclophosphamide (CY), dexamethasone (DM) and indomethacin (IM) were infected with trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi Y and CL strains. 10(4) parasites were used, except in the case of IM treatment, where mice received 10(3) trypomastigotes in one group and 10(5) in another. The course of parasitaemia, tissue distribution of amastigotes and time of mortality were compared with an infected thymus intact control group. Neonate and indomethacin treated mice presented the same pattern of parasitaemia. Death occurred as early as 9-10 days after infection. A single dose of CY 200 mg/kg given 5 days after infection enhanced the parasitaemia and increased the number of parasites in the tissues. All groups were similar in terms of colonization of the endocrine system by parasites and the adrenals showed the highest density of amastigotes nests. The thyroid gland (analysed only in neonates) showed intense amastigote accumulation. Colonization of the ovary was observed with amastigotes in both the theca interna and in the stroma. The testes (also examined only in the neonate) showed that the interstitial cells, the tunica albuginea of the seminiferous tubules and the loose connective tissue were infected. Athymic nude mice showed the most intense parasite colonization of the islets of Langerhans. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7734334

  1. Stevia and saccharin preferences in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Bahrani, Mahsa; Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2010-06-01

    Use of natural noncaloric sweeteners in commercial foods and beverages has expanded recently to include compounds from the plant Stevia rebaudiana. Little is known about the responses of rodents, the animal models for many studies of taste systems and food intake, to stevia sweeteners. In the present experiments, preferences of female Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6J mice for different stevia products were compared with those for the artificial sweetener saccharin. The stevia component rebaudioside A has the most sweetness and least off-tastes to human raters. In ascending concentration tests (48-h sweetener vs. water), rats and mice preferred a high-rebaudioside, low-stevioside extract as strongly as saccharin, but the extract stimulated less overdrinking and was much less preferred to saccharin in direct choice tests. Relative to the extract, mice drank more pure rebaudioside A and showed stronger preferences but still less than those for saccharin. Mice also preferred a commercial mixture of rebaudioside A and erythritol (Truvia). Similar tests of sweet receptor T1R3 knockout mice and brief-access licking tests with normal mice suggested that the preferences were based on sweet taste rather than post-oral effects. The preference response of rodents to stevia sweeteners is notable in view of their minimal response to some other noncaloric sweeteners (aspartame and cyclamate).

  2. Vitamin D3 analogs stimulate hair growth in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Vegesna, Vijaya; O'Kelly, James; Uskokovic, Milan; Said, Jonathan; Lemp, Nathan; Saitoh, Takayuki; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Binderup, Lise; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2002-11-01

    The active form of vitamin D3 can regulate epidermal keratinization by inducing terminal differentiation; and mice lacking the vitamin D receptor display defects leading to postnatal alopecia. These observations implicate the vitamin D3 pathway in regulation of hair growth. We tested the ability of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its synthetic analogs to stimulate hair growth in biege/nude/xid (BNX) nu/nu (nude) mice exhibiting congenital alopecia. Nude mice were treated with different vitamin D3 analogs at doses that we had previously found to be the highest dose without inducing toxicity (hypercalcemia). The mice were monitored for hair growth and were scored according to a defined scale. Skin samples were taken for histological observation of hair follicles and for extraction of RNA and protein. Vitamin D3 analogs dramatically stimulated the hair growth of nude mice, although parental 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 had no effect. Hair growth occurred in a cyclical pattern, accompanied by formation of normal hair follicles and increased expression of certain keratins (Ha7, Ha8, and Hb3). Vitamin D3 analogs seem to act on keratinocytes to initiate hair follicle cycling and stimulate hair growth in mice that otherwise do not grow hair.

  3. Tumor development after polyoma infection in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Stutman

    1975-04-01

    Nude (nu/nu) mice in a CBA/H background show an age-dependent ssuceptibility to tumor development after polyoma virus infection (strain LID-1) when compared with nu/ + or CBA/H mice, which is apparent when 15- or 30-day-old mice are used: tumor incidence was 83 to 90% in nudes and 0 to 10% in controls. Latent perids for tumor development were also shortened in nudes. However, with increasing age nude mice become partially resistant and only 25% develop tumors when infected at 120 days of age. This partial resistance could be transferred with spleen cells to newborn mice. The cells in spleen responsible for this transfer can be eliminated by lysis with anti-Ig and complement or by pre-treatment of the donor with 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide and were not affected by treatment in vitro with anti-Thy.1.2 or procedures that remove adherent cells and/or macrophages. When the cells in 15-day-old nu/ + spleen were studied, both anti-Ig or anti-Thy.1.2 treatment eliminated tranfer of resistance to newborn. Virus replication in tissues of nude mice was increased 5 days after infection when compared with nu/ + but became comparable by day 15 after infection. Hemagglutination-inhibition antibodies in serum of nude and nu/ + had comparable titers when measured early after infection but higher titers were observed in nu/ + later after infection.

  4. Infections of Brugia pahangi in conventional and nude (athymic) mice.

    PubMed

    Suswillo, R R; Owen, D G; Denham, D A

    1980-12-01

    AKR, BALB/c and CBA/Ca and T.O. mice were completely resistant to infection with third stage infective larvae of Brugia pahangi. Third, fourth and fifth stage worms transplanted from the peritoneal cavity of jirds into the peritoneal c