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Sample records for a356 aluminum alloys

  1. Effect of Holding Pressure on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huarui; Ma, Zhen; Jia, Lina; Zhang, Hu

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of holding pressure on microstructure and mechanical properties of low-pressure die cast A356 aluminum alloy was investigated. The results showed that the application of high holding pressure (300 kPa) generated castings with denser structure and superior mechanical properties. By increasing the holding pressure up to 300 kPa, the size of secondary dendrite arm spacing greatly reduced by 22.7% at the cooling rate of 1°C/s and decreased by 12.8% at 10°C/s. The Feret's diameter and aspect ratio of eutectic silicon particles decreased by 8.4 and 5.1% at the cooling rate of 1°C/s and decreased by 9.3 and 6.4% at 10°C/s, respectively. Meanwhile, the density of A356 aluminum alloy increased to 2.678 g/cm3 and the area fraction of porosity decreased to 0.035%. Thus, tensile properties of A356 aluminum alloy obtained at high holding pressure were enhanced, especially the ductility. All these could be associated with the better filling capability and faster cooling rate caused by high holding pressure. In the analytical range of experimental conditions, the correlation of mechanical properties with process parameters was established by statistical models to predict the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of low-pressure die cast A356 aluminum alloy.

  2. Influence of friction stir processing on the room temperature fatigue cracking mechanisms of A356 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelaturu, Phalgun; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.

    Here, failure by fatigue is a common problem associated with cast aluminum alloys due to defects like shrinkage porosities, non-metallic inclusions, etc. Friction stir processing (FSP) has recently emerged as an effective technique for local modification of microstructure. This study investigates the fatigue crack initiation and growth mechanisms in cast and FSPed A356 aluminum alloy. Two sets of parameters were used to friction stir the cast alloy resulting in the complete modification the cast microstructure to a wrought microstructure. Both the FSPed microstructures exhibited severe abnormal grain growth (AGG) after heat treatment leading to a multimodal grain size distribution –more » the grain sizes ranging from a few microns to a few millimeters. One of the FSP conditions displayed an excellent improvement in fatigue life by an order of magnitude, while the other condition displayed an unexpectedly large scatter in fatigue lives. Detailed study of the fractured fatigue specimens by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed that both, fatigue crack initiation and propagation, were intimately tied to the grain size as well as the grain misorientations in the microstructure.« less

  3. Influence of friction stir processing on the room temperature fatigue cracking mechanisms of A356 aluminum alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Nelaturu, Phalgun; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.; ...

    2018-01-11

    Here, failure by fatigue is a common problem associated with cast aluminum alloys due to defects like shrinkage porosities, non-metallic inclusions, etc. Friction stir processing (FSP) has recently emerged as an effective technique for local modification of microstructure. This study investigates the fatigue crack initiation and growth mechanisms in cast and FSPed A356 aluminum alloy. Two sets of parameters were used to friction stir the cast alloy resulting in the complete modification the cast microstructure to a wrought microstructure. Both the FSPed microstructures exhibited severe abnormal grain growth (AGG) after heat treatment leading to a multimodal grain size distribution –more » the grain sizes ranging from a few microns to a few millimeters. One of the FSP conditions displayed an excellent improvement in fatigue life by an order of magnitude, while the other condition displayed an unexpectedly large scatter in fatigue lives. Detailed study of the fractured fatigue specimens by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed that both, fatigue crack initiation and propagation, were intimately tied to the grain size as well as the grain misorientations in the microstructure.« less

  4. Wear mechanisms in hybrid composites of Graphite-20 Pct SiC in A356 Aluminum Alloy (Al-7 Pct Si-0.3 Pct Mg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, W.; Alpas, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    The wear behavior of A356 aluminum alloy (Al-7 Pct Si-0.3 Pct Mg) matrix composites reinforced with 20 vol Pct SiC particles and 3 or 10 vol Pct graphite was investigated. These hybrid composites represent the merging of two philosophies in tribological material design: soft-particle lubrication by graphite and hard-particle reinforcement by carbide particles. The wear tests were performed using a block-on-ring (SAE 52100 steel) wear machine under dry sliding conditions within a load range of 1 to 441 N. The microstructural and compositional changes that took place during wear were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXA), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The wear resistance of 3 Pct graphite-20 Pct SiC-A356 hybrid composite was comparable to 20 Pct SiC-A356 without graphite at low and medium loads. At loads below 20 N, both hybrid and 20 Pct SiC-A356 composites without graphite demonstrated wear rates up to 10 times lower than the unreinforced A356 alloy due to the load-carrying capacity of SiC particles. The wear resistance of 3 Pct graphite 20 Pct SiC-A356 was 1 to 2 times higher than 10 Pct graphite-containing hybrid composites at high loads. However, graphite addition reduced the counterface wear. The unreinforced A356 and 20 Pct SiC-A356 showed a transition from mild to severe wear at 95 N and 225 N, respectively. Hybrid composites with 3 Pct and 10 Pct graphite did not show such a transition over the entire load range, indicating that graphite improved the seizure resistance of the composites. Tribolayers, mainly consisting of a compacted mixture of graphite, iron oxides, and aluminum, were generated on the surfaces of the hybrid composites. In the hybrid composites, the elimination of the severe wear (and hence the improvement in seizure resistance) was attributed to the reduction in friction-induced surface heating due to the presence of graphite- and iron

  5. Stress-strain time-dependent behavior of A356.0 aluminum alloy subjected to cyclic thermal and mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrahi, G. H.; Ghodrati, M.; Azadi, M.; Rezvani Rad, M.

    2014-08-01

    This article presents the cyclic behavior of the A356.0 aluminum alloy under low-cycle fatigue (or isothermal) and thermo-mechanical fatigue loadings. Since the thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) test is time consuming and has high costs in comparison to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests, the purpose of this research is to use LCF test results to predict the TMF behavior of the material. A time-independent model, considering the combined nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law, was used to predict the TMF behavior of the material. Material constants of this model were calibrated based on room-temperature and high-temperature low-cycle fatigue tests. The nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law could accurately estimate the stress-strain hysteresis loop for the LCF condition; however, for the out-of-phase TMF, the condition could not predict properly the stress value due to the strain rate effect. Therefore, a two-layer visco-plastic model and also the Johnson-Cook law were applied to improve the estimation of the stress-strain hysteresis loop. Related finite element results based on the two-layer visco-plastic model demonstrated a good agreement with experimental TMF data of the A356.0 alloy.

  6. Preparation of A356 Foam Aluminum by Means of Titanium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajan, Zohair

    2017-09-01

    The effect of heating temperature and stirring time during preparation of foam aluminum alloy A356 on its relative porosity is studied. The optimum amount of the foam-forming agent, i.e., titanium hydride TiH2, facilitating uniform distribution of pores throughout the whole cross section of a hardened casting is determined. Optimum conditions are established for foam formation in a melt during stirring using a mixer are described.

  7. Effect of holding pressure on microstructure and fracture behavior of low-pressure die cast A356-T6 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Yun, Ying; Zhang, Huarui; Ma, Zhen; Jia, Lina; Tao, Tongxiang; Zhang, Hu

    2017-12-01

    The effect of different holding pressures on microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of A356-T6 aluminum alloy was investigated. It was observed that the ultimate strength, yield strength and elongation of A356-T6 aluminum alloy increased with the increasing of holding pressure from 85 kPa to 300 kPa. This was attributed to the finer microstructure and the elimination of porosity defects caused by high holding pressure. The fractographs of specimens obtained under lower holding pressure displayed mixed quasi-cleavage and dimple type morphology with flat dimples and large amount of porosities. However, the fractographs of specimens obtained under high holding pressure of 300 kPa clearly exhibited a dimple morphology with small and deep dimples. The differences in the tensile fracture were attributed to the different shape of eutectic Si particle and different amount of porosity defects.

  8. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) Coatings on an A356 Alloy for Improved Corrosion and Wear Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhijing

    Plasma electrolytic oxidizing (PEO) is an advanced technique that has been used to deposit thick and hard ceramic coatings on aluminium (Al) alloys. This work was however to use the PEO process to produce thin ceramic oxide coatings on an A356 Al alloy for improving corrosion and wear resistance of the alloy. Effects of current density and treatment time on surface morphologies and thickness of the PEO coatings were investigated. The improvement of galvanic corrosion properties of the coated A356 alloy vs. steel and carbon fibre were evaluated in E85 fuel or NaCl environments. Tribological properties of the coatings were studied with comparison to the uncoated A356 substrate and other commercially-used engine bore materials. The research results indicated that the PEO coatings could have excellent tribological and corrosion properties for aluminium engine applications.

  9. Advanced Cast Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    This production route has demonstrated that aluminum alloys with yield strengths in excess of 690 MPa with good elongation (reportedly 8%) are...series of aluminum alloys have poor-to-fair general corrosion resistance and poor-to-good stress corrosion cracking resistance. Wrought 2519...aluminum alloy has good strength, good ballistic performance, good stress corrosion cracking resistance but only fair general corrosion resistance

  10. Hot Extrusion of A356 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Carbon Nanotube/Al2O3 Hybrid Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Babu, J. S. S.; Kang, C. G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, the attention of material scientists and engineers has shifted from conventional composite materials to nanocomposite materials for the development of light weight and high-performance devices. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), many researchers have tried to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) with CNT reinforcements. However, CNTs exhibit low dispersibility in metal melts owing to their poor wettability and large surface-to-volume ratio. The use of an array of short fibers or hybrid reinforcements in a preform could overcome this problem and enhance the dispersion of CNTs in the matrix. In this study, multi-walled CNT/Al2O3 preform-based aluminum hybrid composites were fabricated using the infiltration method. Then, the composites were extruded to evaluate changes in its mechanical properties. In addition, the dispersion of reinforcements was investigated using a hardness test. The required extrusion pressure of hybrid MMCs increased as the Al2O3/CNT fraction increased. The deformation resistance of hybrid material was over two times that of the original A356 aluminum alloy material due to strengthening by the Al2O3/CNTs reinforcements. In addition, an unusual trend was detected; primary transition was induced by the hybrid reinforcements, as can be observed in the pressure-displacement curve. Increasing temperature of the material can help increase formability. In particular, temperatures under 623 K (350 °C) and over-incorporating reinforcements (Al2O3 20 pct, CNTs 3 pct) are not recommended owing to a significant increase in the brittleness of the hybrid material.

  11. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  12. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  13. Effect of foaming temperature on the mechanical properties of produced closed-cell A356Aluminum foams with melting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, N.; Mirbagheri, S. M. H.; Hoseini, S. R.

    2014-07-01

    In this study an attempt was carried out to determine the effect of production temperature on the mechanical properties and energy absorption behavior of closed-cell A356 alloy foams under uniaxial compression test. For this purpose, three different A356 alloy closed-cell foams were synthesized at three different casting temperatures, 650 °C, 675 °C and 700 °C by adding the same amounts of granulated calcium as thickening and TiH2 as blowing agent. The samples were characterized by SEM to study the pore morphology at different foaming temperatures. Compression tests of the A356 foams were carried out to assess their mechanical properties and energy absorption behavior. The results indicated that increasing the foaming temperature from 650 °C to 675 °C and 700 °C reduces the relative density of closed cell A356 alloys by 18.3% and 38% respectively and consequently affects the compressive strength and energy absorption of cellular structures by changing them from equiaxed polyhedral closed cells to distorted cells. Also at 700 °C foaming temperature, growth of micro-pores and coalescence with other surrounding pores leads to several big voids.

  14. Lattice mismatch modeling of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwon; Roy, Shibayan; Watkins, Thomas R.

    We present a theoretical framework to accurately predict the lattice mismatch between the fcc matrix and precipitates in the multi-component aluminum alloys as a function of temperature and composition. We use a computational thermodynamic approach to model the lattice parameters of the multi-component fcc solid solution and θ'-Al2Cu precipitate phase. Better agreement between the predicted lattice parameters of fcc aluminum in five commercial alloys (206, 319, 356, A356, and A356 + 0.5Cu) and experimental data from the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXD) has been obtained when simulating supersaturated rather than equilibrium solid solutions. We use the thermal expansion coefficient of thermodynamicallymore » stable θ-Al2Cu to describe temperature-dependent lattice parameters of meta-stable θ' and to show good agreement with the SXD data. Both coherent and semi-coherent interface mismatches between the fcc aluminum matrix and θ' in Al-Cu alloys are presented as a function of temperature. Our calculation results show that the concentration of solute atoms, particularly Cu, in the matrix greatly affects the lattice mismatch« less

  15. Deformation behaviour of Rheocast A356 Al alloy at microlevel considering approximated RVEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sk. Tanbir; Das, Prosenjit; Das, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    A micromechanical approach is considered here to predict the deformation behaviour of Rheocast A356 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy. Two representative volume elements (RVEs) are modelled in the finite element (FE) framework. Two dimensional approximated microstructures are generated assuming elliptic grains, based on the grain size, shape factor and area fraction of the primary Al phase of the said alloy at different processing condition. Plastic instability is shown using stress and strain distribution between the Al rich primary and Si rich eutectic phases under different boundary conditions. Boundary conditions are applied on the approximated RVEs in such a manner, so that they represent the real life situation depending on their position on a cylindrical tensile test sample. FE analysis is carried out using commercial finite element code ABAQUS without specifying any damage or failure criteria. Micro-level in-homogeneity leads to incompatible deformation between the constituent phases of the rheocast alloy and steers plastic strain localisation. Plastic stain localised regions within the RVEs are predicted as the favourable sites for void nucleation. Subsequent growth of nucleated voids leads to final failure of the materials under investigation.

  16. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  17. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  18. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  19. Synthesizing Aluminum alloys by double mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyen, L.; Delaey, L.; Niu, X. P.; Le Brun, P.; Peytour, C.

    1995-03-01

    A new synthesis technique, namely double mechanical alloying (dMA), has been developed to fabricate aluminum alloys containing the finely distributed intermetallic compounds and inert dispersoids Al4C3 and Al2O3 The technique consists mainly of three steps: a primary milling stage of elemental powders (MAI) followed by a heat treatment to promote the formation of intermetallic phases, a secondary milling stage (MA2) to refine the microstructure, and consolidation of the produced powders. The results of mechanical and tribological properties of the resulting materials indicate that the dMA is a promising technique for the fabrication of aluminum alloys for applications requiring wear resistance and high-temperature performance.

  20. Investigation on the modification behavior of A356.2 alloy with Yb-La composite modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaochen; Leng, Jinfeng; Wang, Zhibin; Wang, Qi; Shao, Yuewen; Teng, Xinying

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an investigation was conducted to evaluate the influence of the Yb + La addition on the microstructures and mechanical properties of A356.2 alloy. The results show that the the grain size was refined and morphological structure of Si changed from needle-like to fine spheroidal particle by adding Yb + La. The eutectic temperature decreased from 589 °C to 581 °C and the freezing range of primary α-Al become wider after adding Yb + La. The mechanical properties showed great improvement after T6 heat treatment. The ultimate tensile strength and microhardness of the composites were increased to 279.0 MPa and 99.2 HB after T6 heat treatment which increased by 28.2% and 47.3%, respectively. The fracture mechanism was analyzed using the scanning electron microscopy and proved to be a transgranular/intergranular fracture modes.

  1. Interplay among Coating Thickness, Strip Size, and Thermal and Solidification Characteristics in A356 Lost Foam Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, S. G.; Divandari, M.; Ghoncheh, M. H.; Jamali, V.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research was evaluation of the solidification parameters of A356 alloy, e.g., dendrite arm spacing (DAS), correlation between cooling rate (CR) and DAS, hot tearing, and microstructural analysis at different coating thicknesses and strip sizes during the lost foam casting process (LFC). To achieve this goal, the DAS was measured at six coating thicknesses and six different strip sizes. In addition, thermal characteristics, such as the CR, temperatures of start and finish points of solidification, recalescence undercooling, and hot tearing susceptibility (HCSC), at five coating thicknesses were recognized from the cooling curves and their first derivative and the solid fraction curves, which have been plotted through the thermal analysis technique. The pouring temperature and strip size were fixed at 1063 K (790 °C) and 12 mm, respectively. Besides, to derive a numerical equation to predict the CR by measuring the DAS in this alloy, a microstructural evaluation was carried out on samples cast through 12-mm strip size. The results showed that both coating thickness and strip size had similar influences on the DAS, in which, by retaining one parameter at a constant value and simultaneous enhancement in the other parameter, the DAS increased significantly. Furthermore, at thinner coating layer, the higher amount of the CR was observed, which caused reduction in the temperatures of both the start and finish points of solidification. Also, increasing the CR caused a nonlinear increase in both the recalescence undercooling and the HCSC.

  2. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  3. Process capability improvement through DMAIC for aluminum alloy wheel machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Babu, B. Surendra

    2017-07-01

    This paper first enlists the generic problems of alloy wheel machining and subsequently details on the process improvement of the identified critical-to-quality machining characteristic of A356 aluminum alloy wheel machining process. The causal factors are traced using the Ishikawa diagram and prioritization of corrective actions is done through process failure modes and effects analysis. Process monitoring charts are employed for improving the process capability index of the process, at the industrial benchmark of four sigma level, which is equal to the value of 1.33. The procedure adopted for improving the process capability levels is the define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) approach. By following the DMAIC approach, the C p, C pk and C pm showed signs of improvement from an initial value of 0.66, -0.24 and 0.27, to a final value of 4.19, 3.24 and 1.41, respectively.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  5. Centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc alloy and composite A356/silicon carbide: Study and modeling of phases' and particles' segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, Bahaa

    Centrifugation is a casting technology that allows the production of cylindrical and graduated parts with different mechanical properties through the section. The need for materials with good quality and specific mechanical properties has been driven this technology in order to produce different types of materials such as zinc alloys and graduated metal matrix composites reinforced by hard and wear resistant particles. The goal of this research project is to study and model the eutectic macrosegregation, the solidification speed, and the speeds of solidification fronts during centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc-aluminum alloy in order to improve the part quality and increase its strength and field reliability. Moreover, the segregation of the particles during centrifugal casting of an aluminum matrix composite reinforced by silicon carbide particles (A356/SiC) is also studied to improve and control the graduation of the parts. The cooling rate, the speed, acceleration/deceleration, displacement, and segregation of the particles across the section will be modeled by discretization of Stokes' law in time in order to take into consideration the change in the centrifugal radius and melt viscosity during cooling process. This study will allow the control of the graduation degree of particles across the section in order to improve the properties and wear resistance of the composite. This composite can be used in systems where friction is critical and load is high (reinforcements of parts for the cylinders of pneumatic systems). The results show that the maximum macrosegregation zone of the eutectic across the casting section corresponds to the last point of solidification. The eutectic macrosegregation produced during centrifugal casting of thin walled part is a normal segregation which varies depending on the solidification speed and the ratio between the speeds of solidification fronts. On the other hand, it was found that the position and volume fraction of the particles

  6. Reinforcing aluminum alloys with high strength fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolpashnikov, A. I.; Manuylov, V. F.; Chukhin, B. D.; Shiryayev, Y. V.; Shurygin, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    A study is made of the possibility of reinforcing aluminum and aluminum based alloys with fibers made of high strength steel wire. The method of introducing the fibers is described in detail. Additional strengthening by reinforcement of the high alloy system Al - An - Mg was investigated.

  7. Reduced-Pressure Foaming of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod Kumar, G. S.; Mukherjee, M.; Garcia-Moreno, F.; Banhart, J.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a novel process for foaming aluminum and its alloys without using a blowing agent. The process involves a designated apparatus in which molten aluminum and its alloys are first foamed under reduced pressure and then solidified quickly. Foaming was done for pure aluminum (99.99 pct) and AlMg5 alloy not containing stabilizing particles and AlMg5 and AlSi9Mg5 alloys containing 5 vol pct SiO2 particles. We discuss the foaming mechanism and develop a model for estimating the porosity that can be achieved in this process. The nucleation of pores in foams is also discussed.

  8. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  9. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-05-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investmentmore » casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength.« less

  10. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part I Microstructure evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres; ...

    2017-03-06

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to themore » dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ''θ'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ'θ' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β'β' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.« less

  11. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part I Microstructure evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to themore » dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ''θ'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ'θ' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β'β' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.« less

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part I—Microstructure Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-05-01

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to the dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ^'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ^' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β^' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.

  13. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 5456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for aluminum alloy 5456 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical property data at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  14. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for aluminum alloy 6061 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  15. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for aluminum 2219 alloy is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  16. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information on aluminum alloy 7075 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  17. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  18. NASA-427: A New Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center researchers have developed a new, stronger aluminum alloy, ideal for cast aluminum products that have powder or paint-baked thermal coatings. With advanced mechanical properties, the NASA-427 alloy shows greater tensile strength and increased ductility, providing substantial improvement in impact toughness. In addition, this alloy improves the thermal coating process by decreasing the time required for heat treatment. With improvements in both strength and processing time, use of the alloy provides reduced materials and production costs, lower product weight, and better product performance. The superior properties of NASA-427 can benefit many industries, including automotive, where it is particularly well-suited for use in aluminum wheels.

  19. Precision forging technology for aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lei; Wang, Xinyun; Jin, Junsong; Xia, Juchen

    2018-03-01

    Aluminum alloy is a preferred metal material for lightweight part manufacturing in aerospace, automobile, and weapon industries due to its good physical properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good corrosion resistance. However, during forging processes, underfilling, folding, broken streamline, crack, coarse grain, and other macro- or microdefects are easily generated because of the deformation characteristics of aluminum alloys, including narrow forgeable temperature region, fast heat dissipation to dies, strong adhesion, high strain rate sensitivity, and large flow resistance. Thus, it is seriously restricted for the forged part to obtain precision shape and enhanced property. In this paper, progresses in precision forging technologies of aluminum alloy parts were reviewed. Several advanced precision forging technologies have been developed, including closed die forging, isothermal die forging, local loading forging, metal flow forging with relief cavity, auxiliary force or vibration loading, casting-forging hybrid forming, and stamping-forging hybrid forming. High-precision aluminum alloy parts can be realized by controlling the forging processes and parameters or combining precision forging technologies with other forming technologies. The development of these technologies is beneficial to promote the application of aluminum alloys in manufacturing of lightweight parts.

  20. Casting Characteristics of High Cerium Content Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D; Rios, O R; Sims, Z C

    This paper compares the castability of the near eutectic aluminum-cerium alloy system to the aluminum-silicon and aluminum-copper systems. The alloys are compared based on die filling capability, feeding characteristics and tendency to hot tear in both sand cast and permanent mold applications. The castability ranking of the binary Al–Ce systems is as good as the aluminum-silicon system with some deterioration as additional alloying elements are added. In alloy systems that use cerium in combination with common aluminum alloying elements such as silicon, magnesium and/or copper, the casting characteristics are generally better than the aluminum-copper system. In general, production systems formore » melting, de-gassing and other processing of aluminum-silicon or aluminum-copper alloys can be used without modification for conventional casting of aluminum-cerium alloys.« less

  1. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  2. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H.; Haga, T.

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connectedmore » when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.« less

  3. FABRICATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.

    1959-12-15

    A process is presented for producing a workable article of a uranium- aluminum alloy in which the uranium content is between 14 and 70% by weight; aluminum powder and powdered UAl/sub 2/, UAl/sub 3/, UAl/sub 5/, or UBe/sub 9/ are mixed, and the mixture is compressed into the shape desired and sintered at between 450 and 600 deg C.

  4. Fatigue Crack-Growth Resistance of Aluminum Alloys Under Spectrum Loading. Volume 2. Aluminum Lithium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Effects on Fatigue Crack Propagation in 2024 -T3 Aluminum Alloy ," Eng. Frac. Mech, * Vol. 8, 1976, p. 657...Retardation Behavior of 7075 * and 2024 Aluminum Alloys ," ASTNI STP 631, 1977. 89 hill". .A•, - . 34. Chanani, G.R., "Investigation of Effects of Saltwater...1.0 9,අ &M Ma ki-L6 &Ŗ &- La 06 lin "Ll Ull 1.25 "A Lm Wit Rtlc()FIV WtklLl’-"- ll*A FATIGUE CRACK-GROWTH RESISTANCE OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS

  5. Aluminum-lithium alloys in helicopters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.F.

    1997-10-01

    Aluminium-lithium alloys are widely applied on the EH101 helicopter, designed and built jointly by GKN Westland Helicopters of England and Agusta S.p.A. of Italy. With the exception of the powder metallurgy alloy AA 5091, all the current commercially available aluminum-lithium alloys are produced by direct-chill casting, and require a precipitation-aging heat treatment to achieve the required properties. In aluminum-lithium alloys containing greater than 1.3% (by weight) of lithium, the intermetallic phase {delta}{prime}-Al{sub 3}Li precipitates upon natural or artificial aging, but the associated strengthening effect is insufficient to meet the medium or high strength levels usually required (the damage tolerant tempermore » in AA 8090 is an exception).« less

  6. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part II: Mechanical and thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systemsmore » (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.« less

  7. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part II: Mechanical and thermal properties

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres; ...

    2017-03-08

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systemsmore » (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.« less

  8. The Delayed Fracture of Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Cracking of a Maraging Steel ," Corrosion NACE, 1971, vol. 27, no. 10, pp. 429-433. 42. H.R. Smith and D.E. Piper: "Stress- Corrosion Testing with Pre...Sivaramakrishman, and R. Kumar: "Influence of Processing Variables on the Stress Corrosion Characteristics of Weldable Al-Zn-Mg Alloys," Light Met. Age , 1979...if necessary and Identify by block number) aluminum alloys, stress- corrosion cracking, oxide film, Auger electron spectroscopy, Auger depth profiling

  9. Use of B4C powder for preparing in situ Al-Ti-B-C inoculant in Al-Ti melt and its refining effect on A356 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuiqing; Cui, Chunxiang; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Lichen; Sun, Yijiao; Shi, Jiejie; Cui, Sen; Ding, Jinhua

    2018-01-01

    A novel preparation technology of Al-Ti-B-C inoculant with uniform microstructure is prepared using B4C powder instead of graphite in Al-Ti melt reaction method in this study. It is found that the addition of B4C powder improves the wettability between carbon element and liquid aluminum and reduce the tendency to the gravity segregation simultaneously. The result shows that Al-Ti-B-C inoculant using B4C powder presents excellent grain refinement performance than the conventional approach. After T6 heat treatment, the ultimate tensile strength, the yield strength and elongation of A356 alloy are increased to 292 ± 6 MPa, 238 ± 7 MPa and 8.2% ± 0.5% from 260 ± 7 MPa, 218 ± 5 MPa and 4.9% ± 0.6% by addition of Al-Ti-B-C inoculant with a very small ratio of 0.3% in weight. The increase of strength in Al-Ti-B-C refined alloy is attributed to the grain refinement of primary α-Al, while the increase of ductility results from the submicron particles in Al-Ti-B-C inoculant adsorb impurity atoms as well as decreased grain size.

  10. Machinability of hypereutectic silicon-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Akasawa, T.

    1999-08-01

    The machinability of high-silicon aluminum alloys made by a P/M process and by casting was compared. The cutting test was conducted by turning on lathes with the use of cemented carbide tools. The tool wear by machining the P/M alloy was far smaller than the tool wear by machining the cast alloy. The roughness of the machined surface of the P/M alloy is far better than that of the cast alloy, and the turning speed did not affect it greatly at higher speeds. The P/M alloy produced long chips, so the disposal can cause trouble. The size effect of silicon grains on the machinability is discussed.

  11. Modification of Sr on 4004 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Erjun; Cao, Guojian; Feng, Yicheng; Wang, Liping; Wang, Guojun; Lv, Xinyu

    2013-05-01

    As a brazing foil, 4004 Al alloy has good welding performance. However, the high Si content decreases the plasticity of the alloy. To improve the plasticity of 4004 Al alloy and subsequently improve the productivity of 4004 Al foil or 434 composite foil, 4004 Al alloy was modified by Al-10%Sr master alloy. Modification effects of an additional amount of Sr, modification temperature, and holding time on 4004 aluminum alloy were studied by orthogonal design. The results showed that the greatest impact parameter of 4004 aluminum alloy modification was the additional amount of Sr, followed by holding time and modification temperature. The optimum modification parameters obtained by orthogonal design were as follows: Sr addition of 0.04%, holding time of 60 min, and modification temperature of 760°C. The effect of Sr addition on modification was analyzed in detail based on orthogonal results. With increasing of Sr addition, elongation of 4004 alloy increased at first, and decreased after reaching the maximum value.

  12. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  13. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Step-by-step procedures were developed for high integrity manual and machine welding of aluminum alloys. Detailed instructions are given for each step with tables and graphs to specify materials and dimensions. Throughout work sequence, processing procedure designates manufacturing verification points and inspection points.

  14. Laser surface alloying on aluminum and its alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yiming; Gu, Guochao; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys have been widely used in aerospace, automotive and transportation industries owing to their excellent properties such as high specific strength, good ductility and light weight. Surface modification is of crucial importance to the surface properties of aluminum and its alloys since high coefficient of friction, wear characteristics and low hardness have limited their long term performance. Laser surface alloying is one of the most effective methods of producing proper microstructure by means of non-equilibrium solidification which results from rapid heating and cooling. In this paper, the influence of different processing parameters, such as laser power and scanning velocity is discussed. The developments of various material systems including ceramics, metals or alloys, and metal matrix composites (MMCs) are reviewed. The microstructure, hardness, wear properties and other behaviors of laser treated layer are analyzed. Besides, the existing problems during laser surface treatment and the corresponding solutions are elucidated and the future developments are predicted.

  15. Oxidation of nickel-aluminum and iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cathcart, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behavior of several ordered alloys in the Ni-Al and Fe-Al systems is reviewed with special emphasis on Ni/sub 3/Al and NiAl. Ordering influences oxidation through its effect on the activities of the alloy components and by changing the point defect concentration in an alloy. Three categories of Ni-Al alloys are distinguished based on Al content and oxidation behavior. A characteristic feature of the oxidation of high-aluminum Ni-Al and Fe-Al alloys is the formation of voids in the substrate at the oxidate-metal interface. The mechanism of void formation and its suppression by minor additions of oxygen-active elements ismore » discussed. A brief description of the effect of preoxidation on the reactions of Ni/sub 3/Al-base alloys in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ environments is also included. 51 references, 14 figures, 1 table.« less

  16. Oxidation of nickel-aluminum and iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cathcart, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behavior of several ordered alloys in the Ni-Al and Fe-Al systems is reviewed with special emphasis on Ni/sub 3/Al and NiAl. Ordering influences oxidation through its effect on the activities of the alloy components and by changing the point defect concentration in an alloy. Three categories of Ni-Al alloys are distinguished based on Al content and oxidation behavior. A characteristic feature of the oxidation of high-aluminum Ni-Al and Fe-Al alloys is the formation of voids in the substrate at the oxide-metal interface. The mechanism of void formation and its suppression by minor additions of oxygen-active elements aremore » discussed. A brief description of the effect of pre-oxidation on the reactions of Ni/sub 3/Al-base alloys in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ environments is also included.« less

  17. Metallography of Aluminum and Its Alloys : Use of Electrolytic Polishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquet, Pierre A

    1955-01-01

    Recent methods are described for electropolishing aluminum and aluminum alloys. Numerous references are included of electrolytic micrographic investigations carried out during the period 1948 to 1952. A detailed description of a commercial electrolytic polishing unit, suitable for micrographic examination of aluminum and its alloys, is included.

  18. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  19. Corrosion of aluminum alloys by chlorinated hydrocarbon/methanol mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Forest, W. S.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory investigations show that water-free mixtures of Freon MF /trichlorofluoromethane/ and methanol vigorously attack aluminum alloys which contain significant amounts of copper. Freon MF alone did not attack the aluminum alloys at room temperature. Pure methanol had only a slight corrosive effect on the alloy.

  20. Torsional Stability of Aluminum Alloy Seamless Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Paul, D A

    1939-01-01

    Torsion tests were made on 51ST aluminum-alloy seamless tubes having diameter-to-thickness ratios of from 77 to 139 and length-to-diameter ratios of from 1 to 60. The torsional strengths developed in the tubes which failed elastically (all tubes having lengths greater than 2 to 6 times the diameter) were in most cases within 10 percent of the value indicated by the theories of Donnel, Timoshenko, and Sturm, assuming a condition of simply supported ends.

  1. Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, George R.; Clark, Ronald K.; Robinson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

  2. Fundamental Investigation of Fatigue Crack Growth Retardation in Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    Fatigue Crack Propagation in 2024 -T3 Aluminum Alloy , " ASTM STP 536, p. 115, 1973. 9. J. Schijve, " Effect of Load Sequences...Hertzberg, " Effect of Multiple Over- loads on Fatigue Crack Propagation in 2024 -T3 Aluminum Alloy , " ASTM STP-536, p. 115, 1973. 9. J. Schijve... Effect of Thickness on Retardation Behavior of 7075 and 2024 Aluminum Alloys .......... 185 vi LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS FIGURE PAGE 1 SEN

  3. Antimicrobial properties of ternary eutectic aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Claudia; Hans, Michael; Hein, Christina; Dennstedt, Anne; Mücklich, Frank; Rettberg, Petra; Hellweg, Christine Elisabeth; Leichert, Lars Ingo; Rensing, Christopher; Moeller, Ralf

    2018-06-27

    Several Escherichia coli deletion mutants of the Keio collection were selected for analysis to better understand which genes may play a key role in copper or silver homeostasis. Each of the selected E. coli mutants had a deletion of a single gene predicted to encode proteins for homologous recombination or contained functions directly linked to copper or silver transport or transformation. The survival of these strains on pure copper surfaces, stainless steel, and alloys of aluminum, copper and/or silver was investigated. When exposed to pure copper surfaces, E. coli ΔcueO was the most sensitive, whereas E. coli ΔcopA was the most resistant amongst the different strains tested. However, we observed a different trend in sensitivities in E. coli strains upon exposure to alloys of the system Al-Ag-Cu. While minor antimicrobial effects were detected after exposure of E. coli ΔcopA and E. coli ΔrecA to Al-Ag alloys, no effect was detected after exposure to Al-Cu alloys. The release of copper ions and cell-associated copper ion concentrations were determined for E. coli ΔcopA and the wild-type E. coli after exposure to pure copper surfaces. Altogether, compared to binary alloys, ternary eutectic alloys (Al-Ag-Cu) had the highest antimicrobial effect and thus, warrant further investigation.

  4. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  5. Multiphase Model of Semisolid Slurry Generation and Isothermal Holding During Cooling Slope Rheoprocessing of A356 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prosenjit; Samanta, Sudip K.; Mondal, Biswanath; Dutta, Pradip

    2018-04-01

    In the present paper, we present an experimentally validated 3D multiphase and multiscale solidification model to understand the transport processes involved during slurry generation with a cooling slope. In this process, superheated liquid alloy is poured at the top of the cooling slope and allowed to flow along the slope under the influence of gravity. As the melt flows down the slope, it progressively loses its superheat, starts solidifying at the melt/slope interface with formation of solid crystals, and eventually exits the slope as semisolid slurry. In the present simulation, the three phases considered are the parent melt as the primary phase, and the solid grains and air as secondary phases. The air phase forms a definable air/liquid melt interface as the free surface. After exiting the slope, the slurry fills an isothermal holding bath maintained at the slope exit temperature, which promotes further globularization of microstructure. The outcomes of the present model include prediction of volume fractions of the three different phases considered, grain evolution, grain growth, size, sphericity and distribution of solid grains, temperature field, velocity field, macrosegregation and microsegregation. In addition, the model is found to be capable of making predictions of morphological evolution of primary grains at the onset of isothermal coarsening. The results obtained from the present simulations are validated by performing quantitative image analysis of micrographs of the rapidly oil-quenched semisolid slurry samples, collected from strategic locations along the slope and from the isothermal slurry holding bath.

  6. Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

    1998-10-01

    This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

  7. Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

  8. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  9. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  10. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  11. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part II—Mechanical and Thermal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Porter, Wallace D.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-05-01

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systems (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.

  13. Mechanical evaluation of aluminum alloy ring fixator.

    PubMed

    Tosborvorn, Somboon; Cheechareon, Sukrom; Ruttanuchun, Kittiput; Sirivedin, Suparerk; Rhienumporn, Chaitawat

    2006-11-01

    To test the homemade ring fixator as a tool for correction of bony deformity. The authors developed an aluminum alloy ring fixator and tested it to find out the accuracy of manufacturing and strength of the ring systems under axial load with the Roundness Testing Machine and Lloyd Universal Testing Machine. The mean diameter of the twenty five-drill holes was 6.5843872 +/- 0.0521594 mm (mean +/- SD). Distance between particular drill holes, which reflected the precision of drilling, had a high accuracy with standard deviation from 0.1138 to 0.1870 mm. The roundness of the rings was 0.2421376 +/- 0.12437977 mm (mean +/- SD). The system structure had minimal permanent deformity at breaking point, mean yield strength of the system was 4786.9 +/- 14.353 N (mean +/- SD). This was caused by the failure of the wire. Mean stiffness of the system was 127 N./mm. The aluminum alloy ring fixator was strong enough and well tolerated for clinical usage

  14. Biaxial Testing of 2195 Aluminum Lithium Alloy Using Cruciform Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. M.; Pollock, W. D.; Dawicke, D. S.; Wagner, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A cruciform biaxial test specimen was used to test the effect of biaxial load on the yield of aluminum-lithium alloy 2195. Fifteen cruciform specimens were tested from 2 thicknesses of 2195-T8 plate, 0.45 in. and 1.75 in. These results were compared to the results from uniaxial tensile tests of the same alloy, and cruciform biaxial tests of aluminum alloy 2219-T87.

  15. Aluminum alloy/alumina-based ceramic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebeau, T.; Strom-Olsen, J.O.; Gruzleski, J.E.

    1995-07-01

    Wetting experiments were performed on eutectic ZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ZA), ZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} (ZAT), and ZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} (ZAS) ceramic substrates with different Al alloys. Four major variables were tested to study the wetting behavior of the different ceramic-metal systems. Variable include holding time, melt temperature, ally, and ceramic compositions. An experimental setup was designed to measure in situ contact angles using the sessile drop method. For any ceramic substrate, a temperature over 950 C was necessary to observe an equilibrium wetting angle of less than 90{degree} with pure Al; by alloying the aluminum, wettingmore » could be observed at lower temperatures ({theta} = 76--86{degree} at 900 C for Al-10 wt. % Si, {theta} {approximately}72{degree} at 850 C for Al-2.4 wt. % Mg) forming clean interfaces. Finally, ZAS specimens reacted with molten Al alloys over 900 C to produce Zr-Al based intermetallics at the metal-ceramic interface.« less

  16. Fume generation rates for stainless steel, nickel and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, H.R.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes a study of the effects of pulsed welding current on fume produced during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of stainless steel, nickel, and aluminum alloys. This is an extension of earlier studies of mild steel electrode wire. Reduction of welding fume is important because steady current GMAW of stainless steels and nickel alloys may produce fume that exceeds recommended worker exposure limits for some of the fume constituents. Fume generation from aluminum alloy ER5356 was studied because steady current welding with this alloy produces much higher fume generation rates than ER4043 alloy electrode wire. This work showsmore » that pulsed current can reduce GMAW fume generation rates for Er308L, ER310, and ER312 stainless steel, ERNiCr-3 nickel alloy, and ER5356 aluminum-magnesium alloy electrode wires.« less

  17. Effect of iron-intermetallics and porosity on tensile and impact properties of aluminum-silicon-copper and aluminum-silicon-magnesium cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheyuan

    Aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are an important class of materials that constitute the majority of aluminum cast parts produced, due to their superior properties and excellent casting characteristics. Within this family of alloys, Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg cast alloys are frequently employed in automotive applications. The commercially popular 319 and 356 alloys, representing these two alloy systems, were selected for study in the present work, with the aim of investigating the effect of iron intermetallics and porosity on the alloy performance. This was carried out through a study of the tensile and impact properties, these being two of the important mechanical properties used in design calculations. Iron, through the precipitation of second phase intermetallic constituents, in particular the platelike beta-Al5FeSi phase, is harmful to the alloy properties. Likewise, gas- or shrinkage porosity in castings is also detrimental to the mechanical properties. By determining the optimum alloying, melt processing and solidification parameters (viz., Fe content, Sr modification and cooling rate) required to minimize the harmful effects of porosity and iron intermetallics, and studying their role on the fracture behavior, the fracture mechanism in the alloys could be determined. Castings were prepared from both industrial and experimental 319.2, B319.2 and A356.2 alloy melts, containing Fe levels of 0.2--1.0 wt%. Sr-modified (˜200 ppm) melts were also prepared for each alloy Fe level. The end-chilled refractory mold used provided directional solidification and a range of cooling rates (or dendrite arm spacings, DAS) within the same casting. Tensile and impact test samples machined from specimen blanks sectioned from the castings at various heights above the chill end provided DASs of 23--85mum. All samples were T6-heat-treated before testing. Tests were carried out employing Instron Universal and Instrumented Charpy testing machines. Optical microscopy, image analysis, SEM

  18. Failure analysis of aluminum alloy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johari, O.; Corvin, I.; Staschke, J.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of six service failures in aluminum alloy components which failed in aerospace applications is reported. Identification of fracture surface features from fatigue and overload modes was straightforward, though the specimens were not always in a clean, smear-free condition most suitable for failure analysis. The presence of corrosion products and of chemically attacked or mechanically rubbed areas here hindered precise determination of the cause of crack initiation, which was then indirectly inferred from the scanning electron fractography results. In five failures the crack propagation was by fatigue, though in each case the fatigue crack initiated from a different cause. Some of these causes could be eliminated in future components by better process control. In one failure, the cause was determined to be impact during a crash; the features of impact fracture were distinguished from overload fractures by direct comparisons of the received specimens with laboratory-generated failures.

  19. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  20. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1988-01-01

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  1. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  2. Fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. T. V.; Ritchie, R. O.; Piascik, R. S.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The principal mechanisms which govern the fatigue crack propagation resistance of aluminum-lithium alloys are investigated, with emphasis on their behavior in controlled gaseous and aqueous environments. Extensive data describe the growth kinetics of fatigue cracks in ingot metallurgy Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 and in powder metallurgy alloys exposed to moist air. Results are compared with data for traditional aluminum alloys 2024, 2124, 2618, 7075, and 7150. Crack growth is found to be dominated by shielding from tortuous crack paths and resultant asperity wedging. Beneficial shielding is minimized for small cracks, for high stress ratios, and for certain loading spectra. While water vapor and aqueous chloride environments enhance crack propagation, Al-Li-Cu alloys behave similarly to 2000-series aluminum alloys. Cracking in water vapor is controlled by hydrogen embrittlement, with surface films having little influence on cyclic plasticity.

  3. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann; Burkholder, Jonathon

    2011-01-01

    NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program fs ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self ] Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR ]FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR ]FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process fs limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  4. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  5. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  6. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  7. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  8. Stress-corrosion characteristics of aluminum casting alloy M-45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of the stress-corrosion characteristics of aluminum alloy M-45 shows that the most favorable artificial aging cycle for this alloy, with regard to optimum strength and stress-corrosion resistance, appears to be 400 degrees F for 12 hours.

  9. New weldable high strength aluminum alloy developed for cryogenic service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Wrought aluminum alloy has improved low temperature notch toughness and weldability. This alloy can be mill-fabricated to plate and sheet without difficulty. Post-weld aging improves weld ductility and strength properties. A typical treatment is 8 hours at 225 deg F plus 16 hours at 300 deg F.

  10. Corrosion protection of aluminum alloys in contact with other metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes the quality of chemical and galvanized protection afforded by anodized and aldozided coatings applied to test panels of various aluminum alloys. The test panels, placed in firm contact with panels of titanium alloys, were subjected to salt spray tests and visually examined for corrosion effect.

  11. Aluminum alloy anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. H.; Chen, Z. F.; Fu, Q. W.; Jiang, X. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Aluminum has larger theoretical capacity of 2235 mAh/g than that of graphite (372 mAh/g), but it has big disadvantages including shorter cycle life and higher irreversible capacity loss. Improving cycle performance can be obtained via alloying of aluminum. In this paper, two ternary aluminum alloy, Al7Cu2Fe and Al73Cu5Fe22 were prepared. The main phase of Al7Cu2Fe alloy was Al7Cu2Fe. The heat treatment increased the proportion of Al7Cu2Fe. The main phase of Al73Cu5Fe22 alloy was Al60Cu30Fe10. The heat treatment reduced the proportion of Al60Cu30Fe10. For two alloys, the heat treatment could increase discharge capacity compared with cast alloy. The discharge capacity was improved by 50%. The content of aluminum in alloys has little effect on improving cycle performance, and it has obvious influence on the phase structure of alloy with heat treatment.

  12. An investigation of plastic fracture in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, J. R., Jr.; Vanstone, R. H.; Merchant, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The brittle fracture of many high strength alloys such as steel, titanium, and aluminum was shown to occur by a process called plastic fracture. According to this process microscopic voids form at impurity particles, then grow and coalesce to cause the final rupture. To further understand the role of impurities, four aluminum alloys were investigated: 2024-T851, 2124-T851, 7075-T7351 and 7079-T651. Fractography, quantitative metallography, and microprobe studies assessed the roles of various impurity particles relative to these alloys.

  13. Acoustic emission from a solidifying aluminum-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henkel, D. P.; Wood, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Physical phenomena associated with the solidification of an AA2090 Al-Li alloy have been characterized by AE methods. Repeatable patterns of AE activity as a function of solidification time are recorded and explained for ultrahigh-purity (UHP) aluminum and an Al-4.7 wt pct Cu binary alloy, in addition to the AA2090 Al-Li alloy, by the complementary utilization of thermal, AE, and metallographic methods. One result shows that the solidification of UHP aluminum produces one discrete period of high AE activity as the last 10 percent of solid forms.

  14. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys.

  15. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 2014, 2nd edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A revised edition of the materials data handbook on the aluminum alloy 2014 is presented. The scope of the information presented includes physical and mechanical property data at cryogenic, ambient and elevated temperatures, supplemented with useful information in such areas as material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication and joining techniques. Design data are presented, as available, and these data are complemented with information on the typical behavior of the alloy.

  16. Benign joining of ultrafine grained aerospace aluminum alloys using nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Longtin, Rémi; Hack, Erwin; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta

    2011-12-22

    Ultrafine grained aluminum alloys have restricted applicability due to their limited thermal stability. Metalized 7475 alloys can be soldered and brazed at room temperature using nanotechnology. Reactive foils are used to release heat for milliseconds directly at the interface between two components leading to a metallurgical joint without significantly heating the bulk alloy, thus preserving its mechanical properties. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. First wall design of aluminum alloy R-tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Kitagawa, S.; Toi, K.; Yamazaki, K.; Abe, Y.; Amano, T.; Fujita, J.; Kaneko, O.; Kawahata, K.; Kuroda, T.; Matsuura, K.; Midzuno, Y.; Naitou, H.; Noda, N.; Ohkubo, K.; Oka, Y.; Sakurai, K.; Tanahashi, S.; Watari, T.

    1984-05-01

    A design study of a low-activation D-T tokamak Reacting Plasma Project In Nagoya has been finished. The study emphasizes the vacuum vessel and the bumper limiter. Our choice of materials (aluminum vacuum vessel, copper conductors, aluminum TF coil case and lead shield) results in a radiation level of about 1 × 10 -3 times that of a TFTR type design, and 1 × 10 -4 times that of JET type design, at 2 weeks after one D-T shot. Thick graphite tiles will be fixed directly on the aluminum vacuum vessel using aluminum spring washers and bolts. With this simplified structure of the bumper limiter, the inner surface temperature of the thick aluminum vacuum vessel will be less than 120°C which is required to reduce the overaging effect of the aluminum alloy.

  18. Synthesis of aluminum-based scandium-yttrium master alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhin, V. Yu.; Kosov, Ya. I.; Lobacheva, O. L.; Dzhevaga, N. V.

    2015-07-01

    The preparation technology for an Al-2% Sc-0.5% Y master alloy using aluminum-manganese alloys has been developed and tested. The microstructure of the prepared master alloy is studied and the compositions of intermetallics is determined. The efficient technological parameters of the synthesis are determined. It is shown that varying the compositions of starting reagents and alloying additions and optimizing the process conditions (temperature, mixing, etc.) allow us to forecast the manufacturing and operating characteristics of aluminum-based master alloys. Joint additions of scandium and yttrium oxides to a charge favor a substantial decrease in the grain size of the formed intermetallics; this effect appears to the utmost in the case of microallying with yttrium up to 0.5 wt %.

  19. Heat Treatment of Closed-Cell A356 + 4 wt.%Cu + 2 wt.%Ca Foam and Its Effect on the Foam Mechanical Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, S. M. H.; Vali, H.; Soltani, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this investigation, aluminum-silicon alloy foam is developed by adding certain amounts of copper and calcium elements in A356 alloy. Addition of 4 wt.%Cu + 2 wt.%Ca to the melt changed bubbles morphology from ellipsoid to spherical by decreasing Reynolds number and increasing Bond number. Compression behavior and energy absorption of the foams are assessed before and after aging. Solid solution treatment and aging lead to the best mechanical properties with 170% enhancement in yield strength and 185% improvement in energy absorption capacity as compared to non-heat-treated foams. The metallographic observations showed that bubbles geometry and structure in the A356 + 4wt.% Cu + 2 wt.%Ca foam are more homogeneous than the A356 foam.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Titanium and Aluminum Alloys at Cryogenic Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-03-01

    aluminum alloys. Table I is a tabulation of the chemical composition of the tita - nium alloys. The bar was 5/8 inch in diameter and the sheet 0.060 inch...Ti-6AI-4V Tensile azid yield strength data for both bar and sheet of this tita - nium alloy are shown in Figure A-3. Bar and sheet data show approxi...not recommended for low temperature applications. The remainder of the tita - nium alloys were tested from room temperature to -452 F. In general, Ti

  1. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  2. METHOD OF ALLOYING REACTIVE METALS WITH ALUMINUM OR BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1957-10-15

    A halide of one or more of the reactive metals, neptunium, cerium and americium, is mixed with aluminum or beryllium. The mass is heated at 700 to 1200 deg C, while maintaining a substantial vacuum of above 10/sup -3/ mm of mercury or better, until the halide of the reactive metal is reduced and the metal itself alloys with the reducing metal. The reaction proceeds efficiently due to the volatilization of the halides of the reducing metal, aluminum or beryllium.

  3. Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powders Produced by Cryogenic Attrition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powders Produced by Cryogenic Attrition by Tiffany Ngo ARL-TN-0643...November 2014 Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powders Produced by Cryogenic Attrition Tiffany Ngo Weapons and...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) August 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powders Produced by

  4. Thermodynamics of Titanium-Aluminum-Oxygen Alloys Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium-aluminum alloys are promising intermediate-temperature alloys for possible compressor applications in gas-turbine engines. These materials are based on the a2-Ti3Al + g-TiAl phases. The major issue with these materials is high oxygen solubility in a2-Ti3Al, and oxidation of unsaturated alloys generally leads to mixed non-protective TiO2+Al2O3 scales. From phase diagram studies, oxygen saturated a2-Ti3Al(O) is in equilibrium with Al2O3; however, oxygen dissolution has a detrimental effect on mechanical properties and cannot be accepted. To better understand the effect of oxygen dissolution, we examined the thermodynamics of titanium-aluminum-oxygen alloys.

  5. Microstructural Characterization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloys 1460 and 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1998-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were employed to characterize the precipitate distributions in lithium-containing aluminum alloys 1460 and 2195 in the T8 condition. TEM examinations revealed delta prime and T1 as the primary strengthening precipitates in alloys 1460 and 2195 respectively. TEM results showed a close similarity of the Russian alloy 1460 to the U.S. alloy 2090, which has a similar composition and heat treatment schedule. DSC analyses also indicate a comparable delta prime volume fraction. TEM study of a fractured tensile sample of alloy 1460 showed that delta prime precipitates are sheared by dislocations during plastic deformation and that intense stress fields arise at grain boundaries due to planar slip. Differences in fracture toughness of alloys 1460 and 2195 are rationalized on the basis of a literature review and observations from the present study.

  6. Electrotransfer in Liquid Binary Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekuchev, V. V.; Kalinkin, D. P.; Ivanova, I. V.

    2018-07-01

    The mobility of ions in a liquid binary metal system based on aluminum is calculated for the first time in a wide range of concentrations, based on studies of its resistivity and self-diffusion coefficient. It is established that in an Al-Cu system, the ions of aluminum move to the anode, while Al-Mg, Al-Sn, and Al-Sb move to the cathode; i.e., there is inversion of the electrotransfer of aluminum ions. When the concentration of a component is reduced, the mobility of its ions is increased by the module.

  7. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Section 1 of this report records the progress achieved on NASA-LaRC Grant NAG-1-745 (Environment Assisted Degradation Mechanisms in Al-Li Alloys), and is based on research conducted during the period April 1 to November 30, 1987. A discussion of work proposed for the project's second year is included. Section 2 provides an overview of the need for research on the mechanisms of environmental-mechanical degradation of advanced aerospace alloys based on aluminum and lithium. This research is to provide NASA with the basis necessary to permit metallurgical optimization of alloy performance and engineering design with respect to damage tolerance, long term durability and reliability. Section 3 reports on damage localization mechanisms in aqueous chloride corrosion fatigue of aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 4 reports on progress made on measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 5 provides a detailed technical proposal for research on environmental degradation of Al-Li alloys, and the effect of hydrogen in this.

  8. Tin soldering of aluminum and its alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Gino

    1921-01-01

    A method is presented for soldering aluminum to other metals. The method adopted consists of a galvanic application to the surface of the light-metal parts to be soldered, of a layer of another metal, which, without reacting electrolytically on the aluminum, adheres strongly to the surface to which it is applied, and is, on the other hand, adapted to receive the soft solder. The metal found to meet the criteria best was iron.

  9. Acceptable aluminum additions for minimal environmental effect in iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.; Vyas, S.

    A systematic study of iron-aluminum alloys has shown that Fe-16 at. % Al alloys are not very sensitive to environmental embrittlement. The Fe-22 and -28 at. % Al alloys are sensitive to environmental embrittlement, and the effect can be reduced by the addition of chromium and through the control of grain size by additions of zirconium and carbon. The Fe-16 at. % Al binary, and alloys based on it, yielded over 20% room-temperature (RT) elongation even after high-temperature annealing treatments at 1100[degree]C. The best values for the Fe-22 and -28 at. % Al-base alloys after similar annealing treatments were 5more » and 10%, respectively. A multicomponent alloy, FAP, based on Fe- 16 at. % Al was designed, which gave an RT ductility of over 25%.« less

  10. Acceptable aluminum additions for minimal environmental effect in iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.; Vyas, S.

    A systematic study of iron-aluminum alloys has shown that Fe-16 at. % Al alloys are not very sensitive to environmental embrittlement. The Fe-22 and -28 at. % Al alloys are sensitive to environmental embrittlement, and the effect can be reduced by the addition of chromium and through the control of grain size by additions of zirconium and carbon. The Fe-16 at. % Al binary, and alloys based on it, yielded over 20% room-temperature (RT) elongation even after high-temperature annealing treatments at 1100{degree}C. The best values for the Fe-22 and -28 at. % Al-base alloys after similar annealing treatments were 5more » and 10%, respectively. A multicomponent alloy, FAP, based on Fe- 16 at. % Al was designed, which gave an RT ductility of over 25%.« less

  11. Secondary Heating Under Quenching Cooling of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukrov, S. L.; Ber, L. B.

    2017-07-01

    Variants of secondary heating of aluminum alloys are considered, i.e., under quenching of plates in a water tank or on a horizontal quenching unit with water jet cooling, under continuous quenching of strips, and under quenching of tubes in vertical furnaces. Recommendation are given for removal or substantial reduction of the intensity of secondary heating under industrial conditions.

  12. Characteristics of aluminum alloy microplastic deformation in different structural states

    SciTech Connect

    Seregin, G.V.; Efimenko, L.L.; Leonov, M.V.

    The solution to the problem of improving the mechanical properties (including cyclic strength) of structural materials is largely dependent on our knowledge of the laws governing the development of microplastic deformations in them. The effect of heat and mechanical treatment on the elastoplastic properties and fatigue resistance of the commercial aluminum alloys AK4-1 and D16 is analyzed.

  13. Oxidation resistant, thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranow, S.; Klingler, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Modified thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium alloy has been developed that exhibits greatly improved resistance to high-temperature oxidation. Additions of aluminum have been made to change nature of protective oxide scale entirely and to essentially inhibit oxidation at temperatures up to 1260 C.

  14. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.

  15. Aluminum alloy material structure impact localization by using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiubin

    2014-12-01

    The aluminum alloy structure impact localization system by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and impact localization algorithm was investigated. A four-FBG sensing network was established. And the power intensity demodulation method was initialized employing the narrow-band tunable laser. The wavelet transform was used to weaken the impact signal noise. And the impact signal time difference was extracted to build the time difference localization algorithm. At last, a fiber Bragg grating impact localization system was established and experimentally verified. The experimental results showed that in the aluminum alloy plate with the 500 mm*500 mm*2 mm test area, the maximum and average impact abscissa localization errors were 11 mm and 6.25 mm, and the maximum and average impact ordinate localization errors were 9 mm and 4.25 mm, respectively. The fiber Bragg grating sensors and demodulation system are feasible to realize the aviation aluminum alloy material structure impact localization. The research results provide a reliable method for the aluminum alloy material structure impact localization.

  16. Quality Management and Control of Low Pressure Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianxi; Zhang, Yanbo; Yang, Xiufan; Chen, Zhaosong; Jiang, Zelan

    2018-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the history of low pressure casting and summarizes the major production processes of low pressure casting. It briefly introduces the quality management and control of low pressure cast aluminum alloy. The main processes include are: preparation of raw materials, Melting, refining, physical and chemical analysis, K-mode inspection, sand core, mold, heat treatment and so on.

  17. On the Formation of Lightweight Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloys by Electrodeposition

    DOE PAGES

    Hilty, Robert D.; Masur, Lawrence J.

    2017-08-08

    New nanocrystalline aluminum alloys have been fabricated by electrodeposition. These are thermodynamically stable alloys of Al-Mn and Al-Zr with grain sizes < 100nm. Al-Mn and Al-Zr alloys are characterized here showing high strength (up to 1350 MPa) and hardness (up to 450 HVN) while maintaining the specific gravity of Al. Smooth and dense deposits plated from ionic liquids, such as EMIM:Cl (1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride), can develop to thicknesses of 1mm or more.

  18. Materials Design for Joinable, High Performance Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamm, Ryan James

    An aluminum alloy compatible with friction stir welding is designed for automotive and aerospace structural applications. Current weldable automotive aluminum alloys do not possess the necessary strength to meet safety standards and therefore are not able to replace steel in the automotive body. Significant weight savings could be achieved if steel components are replaced with aluminum. Current aerospace alloys are not weldable, requiring machining of large pieces that are then riveted together. If an aerospace alloy could be friction stir welded, smaller pieces could be welded, reducing material waste. Using a systems approach for materials design, property goals are set from performance objectives. From previous research and computational predictions, a structure is designed for a prototype alloy containing dynamic precipitates to readily dissolve and re-precipitate and high stability precipitates to resist dissolution and coarsening in the weld region. It is found that a Ag modified Al-3.9Mg-0.04Cu (at. %) alloy enhanced the rate and magnitude of hardening during ageing, both beneficial effects for dynamic precipitation. In the same alloy, ageing at 350°C results in hardening from Al 3(Sc,Zr) precipitates. Efforts to effectively precipitate both populations simultaneously are unsuccessful. The Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitation hardened prototype is friction stir processed and no weak zones are found in the weld hardness profile. An aerospace alloy design is proposed, utilizing the dual precipitate structure shown in the prototype. The automotive alloy is designed using a basic strength model with parameters determined from the initial prototype alloy analysis. After ageing to different conditions, the alloy is put through a simulated heat affected zone thermal cycle with a computer controlled induction heater. The aged samples lose hardness from the weld cycle but recover hardness from a post weld heat treatment. Atom probe tomography and transmission electron

  19. Laser Surface Alloying of Aluminum for Improving Acid Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay Gutu; Sankar, Mamilla Ravi; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, laser surface alloying of aluminum with magnesium, manganese, titanium and zinc, respectively, was carried out to improve acid corrosion resistance. Laser surface alloying was conducted using 1600 and 1800 W power source using CO2 laser. Acid corrosion resistance was tested by dipping the samples in a solution of 2.5% H2SO4 for 200 h. The weight loss due to acid corrosion was reduced by 55% for AlTi, 41% for AlMg alloy, 36% for AlZn and 22% for AlMn alloy. Laser surface alloyed samples offered greater corrosion resistance than the aluminum substrate. It was observed that localized pitting corrosion was the major factor to damage the surface when exposed for a long time. The hardness after laser surface alloying was increased by a factor of 8.7, 3.4, 2.7 and 2 by alloying with Mn, Mg, Ti and Zn, respectively. After corrosion test, hardness was reduced by 51% for AlTi sample, 40% for AlMg sample, 41.4% for AlMn sample and 33% for AlZn sample.

  20. Effects of aluminum-copper alloy filtration on photon spectra, air kerma rate and image contrast.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Andréa; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, without the original aluminum filter, for dental radiography in terms of x-ray energy spectrum, air kerma rate and image quality. Comparisons of various thicknesses of aluminum-copper alloy in three different percentages were made with aluminum filtration. Tests were conducted on an intra-oral dental x-ray machine and were made on mandible phantom and on step-wedge. Depending on the thickness of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, the beam could be hardened and filtrated. The use of the aluminum-copper alloy filter resulted in reductions in air kerma rate from 8.40% to 47.33%, and indicated the same image contrast when compared to aluminum filtration. Aluminum-copper alloy filtration may be considered a good alternative to aluminum filtration.

  1. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum Alloys in Acidic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Rosliza; Seoh, S. Y.; Nik, W. B. Wan; Senin, H. B.

    2007-05-01

    The corrosion inhibition of Al and its alloys are the subject of tremendous technological importance due to the increased industrial applications of these materials. This study will report the results of weight loss, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on the corrosion inhibition of AA6061 and AA6063 aluminum alloys in acidic media using sodium benzoate as an inhibitor. The results showed that addition of sodium benzoate retards the rate of dissolution and hence inhibits the corrosion of the aluminum alloy in acidic media. The inhibition efficiency increases with the increase of immersion time in acetic acid however it displays a different behavior in sulfuric acid. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data. EIS studies showed that there was a significant increase in overall resistance after addition of sodium benzoate, when compared to the case without inhibitor. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data.

  3. Charge-density-shear-moduli relationships in aluminum-lithium alloys.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, M

    2001-11-12

    Using the first principles full-potential linear-augmented-Slater-type orbital technique, the energies and charge densities of aluminum and aluminum-lithium supercells have been computed. The experimentally observed increase in aluminum's shear moduli upon alloying with lithium is argued to be the result of predictable changes to aluminum's total charge density, suggesting that simple rules may allow the alloy designer to predict the effects of dilute substitutional elements on alloy elastic response.

  4. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. R.; Korb, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Systems approach to high-quality aluminum welding uses square-butt joints, kept away from sharp contour changes. Intersecting welds are configured for T-type intersections rather than crossovers. Differences in panel thickness are accommodated with transition step areas where thickness increases or decreases within weld, but never at intersection.

  5. Nitrate reduction in water by aluminum alloys particles.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zunsheng; Hu, Qing; Qi, Weikang; Tang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Wan, Pingyu; Chao, Jingbo; Yang, Xiao Jin

    2017-07-01

    Nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles have been extensively investigated for nitrate reduction in water. However, the reduction by NZVI requires acidic pH conditions and the final product is exclusively ammonium, leading to secondary contamination. In addition, nanomaterials have potential threats to environment and the transport and storage of nanomaterials are of safety concerns. Aluminum, the most abundant metal element in the earth's crust, is able to reduce nitrate, but the passivation of aluminum limits its application. Here we report Al alloys (85% Al) with Fe, Cu or Si for aqueous nitrate reduction. The Al alloys particles of 0.85-0.08 mm were inactivate under ambient conditions and a simple treatment with warm water (45 °C) quickly activated the alloy particles for rapid reduction of nitrate. The Al-Fe alloy particles at a dosage of 5 g/L rapidly reduced 50 mg-N/L nitrate at a reaction rate constant (k) of 3.2 ± 0.1 (mg-N/L) 1.5 /min between pH 5-6 and at 4.0 ± 0.1 (mg-N/L) 1.5 /min between pH 9-11. Dopping Cu in the Al-Fe alloy enhanced the rates of reduction whereas dopping Si reduced the reactivity of the Al-Fe alloy. The Al alloys converted nitrate to 20% nitrogen and 80% ammonium. Al in the alloy particles provided electrons for the reduction and the intermetallic compounds in the alloys were likely to catalyze nitrate reduction to nitrogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrogen interactions in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. W.; Scully, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A program is described which seeks to develop an understanding of the effects of dissolved and trapped hydrogen on the mechanical properties of selected Al-Li-Cu-X alloys. A proposal is made to distinguish hydrogen (H2) induced EAC from aqueous dissolution controlled EAC, to correlate H2 induced EAC with mobile and trapped concentrations, and to identify significant trap sites and hydride phases (if any) through use of model alloys and phases. A literature review shows three experimental factors which have impeded progress in the area of H2 EAC for this class of alloys. These are as listed: (1) inter-subgranular fracture in Al-Li alloys when tested in the S-T orientation in air or vacuum make it difficult to readily detect H2 induced fracture based on straight forward changes in fractography; (2) the inherently low H2 diffusivity and solubility in Al alloys is further compounded by a native oxide which acts as a H2 permeation barrier; and (3) H2 effects are masked by dissolution assisted processes when mechanical testing is performed in aqueous solutions.

  7. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  8. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  9. The Delayed Fracture of Aluminum Alloys, End of Year Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Corrosion Cracking of Maraging Steel ," Corrosion NACE, 1971, vol. 27, no. 10, pp. 429-433. 17. J.C.M. Li, R.A. Oriani, and L.S. Darken: "The...Park, OH, 1974, p. 274. 32. M.V. Hyatt and M.O. Speidel: Chapter 4 of Stress- Corrosion Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and Aluminum...reverse side it necessary and identify by block number) Aluminum alloys, stress corrosion cracking, oxide film, Auger electron spectroscopy, Mode I

  10. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000 and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni; Ni-50 at.% Cr; and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. Corrosion isopleths were prepared from these equations. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  11. Properties of Shock Hardened 7050 Aluminum Alloy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-12

    AD-ALO 887 NAVAL AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER WARMINSTER PA AIRCRAFT -ETC F/6 11/6 PROPERTIES OF SHOCK HARDENED 7050 ALUMINUM ALLOT. (UI NOV 81 C E NEU...Systems Technology Directorate NAVAL AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER Warminster, Pennsylvania 18974 12 NOV 1981 PHASE REPORT AIRTASK NO. WF54591201 :3l’ Work Unit...No. ZMIOI )** >,,, A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE;DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED Prepared forg NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND Department of the Navy Washington, D.C

  12. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  13. Predicting Microstructure and Microsegregation in Multicomponent Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xinyan; Ding, Ling; Chen, ShuangLin; Xie, Fanyou; Chu, M.; Chang, Y. Austin

    Accurate predictions of microstructure and microsegregation in metallic alloys are highly important for applications such as alloy design and process optimization. Restricted assumptions concerning the phase diagram could easily lead to erroneous predictions. The best approach is to couple microsegregation modeling with phase diagram computations. A newly developed numerical model for the prediction of microstructure and microsegregation in multicomponent alloys during dendritic solidification was introduced. The micromodel is directly coupled with phase diagram calculations using a user-friendly and robust phase diagram calculation engine-PANDAT. Solid state back diffusion, undercooling and coarsening effects are included in this model, and the experimentally measured cooling curves are used as the inputs to carry out the calculations. This model has been used to predict the microstructure and microsegregation in two multicomponent aluminum alloys, 2219 and 7050. The calculated values were confirmed using results obtained from directional solidification.

  14. First-principles surface interaction studies of aluminum-copper and aluminum-copper-magnesium secondary phases in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Thiago H.; Nelson, Eric B.; Williamson, Izaak; Efaw, Corey M.; Sapper, Erik; Hurley, Michael F.; Li, Lan

    2018-05-01

    First-principles density functional theory-based calculations were performed to study θ-phase Al2Cu, S-phase Al2CuMg surface stability, as well as their interactions with water molecules and chloride (Cl-) ions. These secondary phases are commonly found in aluminum-based alloys and are initiation points for localized corrosion. Density functional theory (DFT)-based simulations provide insight into the origins of localized (pitting) corrosion processes of aluminum-based alloys. For both phases studied, Cl- ions cause atomic distortions on the surface layers. The nature of the distortions could be a factor to weaken the interlayer bonds in the Al2Cu and Al2CuMg secondary phases, facilitating the corrosion process. Electronic structure calculations revealed not only electron charge transfer from Cl- ions to alloy surface but also electron sharing, suggesting ionic and covalent bonding features, respectively. The S-phase Al2CuMg structure has a more active surface than the θ-phase Al2Cu. We also found a higher tendency of formation of new species, such as Al3+, Al(OH)2+, HCl, AlCl2+, Al(OH)Cl+, and Cl2 on the S-phase Al2CuMg surface. Surface chemical reactions and resultant species present contribute to establishment of local surface chemistry that influences the corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys.

  15. Warm Temperature Deformation Behavior and Processing Maps of 5182 and 7075 Aluminum Alloy Sheets with Fine Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D. H.; Kim, W. J.

    2018-05-01

    The tensile deformation behavior and processing maps of commercial 5182 and 7075 aluminum alloy sheets with similarly fine grain sizes (about 8 μm) were examined and compared over the temperature range of 423-723 K. The 5182 aluminum alloy with equiaxed grains exhibited larger strain rate sensitivity exponent ( m) values than the 7075 aluminum alloy with elongated grains under most of the testing conditions. The fracture strain behaviors of the two alloys as a function of strain rate and temperature followed the trend in their m values. In the processing maps, the power dissipation parameter values of the 5182 aluminum alloy were larger than those of the 7075 aluminum alloy and the instability domains of the 5182 aluminum alloy were smaller compared to that of the 7075 aluminum alloy, implying that the 5182 aluminum alloy had a better hot workability than the 7075 aluminum alloy.

  16. A Positron Annihilation Study of Corrosion of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloy by NaOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Zhai, T.; Coleman, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion of fully-annealed pure aluminum and a continuous-cast AA2037 aluminum alloy (solutionized and water quenched) in a 1M NaOH solution for various periods of time were analyzed with positron beam-based Doppler broadening spectroscopy. By varying the energy of the incident positron beam, corrosion-induced defects at different depths from the surface were detected. It was found that the Doppler-broadened annihilation line-width parameter was significantly increased near the surface of pure aluminum after corrosion, probably due to the interaction between positrons and nanometer-sized voids formed near the aluminum surface during corrosion. Examination by atomic force microscopy indicated that many pits were formed on the aluminum surface after corrosion. In contrast, a significant decrease in the line-width parameter was observed in AA2037 alloy after corrosion and interpreted as being caused by copper enrichment at the metal-oxide interface during corrosion; such enrichment at large cavity sites was confirmed by energy dispersion spectrometry.

  17. Stuy on Fatigue Life of Aluminum Alloy Considering Fretting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Maosheng; Zhao, Hongqiang; Wang, Yunxiang; Chen, Xiaofei; Fan, Jiali

    2018-01-01

    To study the influence of fretting on Aluminum Alloy, a global finite element model considering fretting was performed using the commercial code ABAQUS. With which a new model for predicting fretting fatigue life has been presented based on friction work. The rationality and effectiveness of the model were validated according to the contrast of experiment life and predicting life. At last influence factor on fretting fatigue life of aerial aluminum alloy was investigated with the model. The results revealed that fretting fatigue life decreased monotonously with the increasing of normal load and then became constant at higher pressures. At low normal load, fretting fatigue life was found to increase with increase in the pad radius. At high normal load, however, the fretting fatigue life remained almost unchanged with changes in the fretting pad radius. The bulk stress amplitude had the dominant effect on fretting fatigue life. The fretting fatigue life diminished as the bulk stress amplitude increased.

  18. Grain-scale investigations of deformation heterogeneities in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Baran; Şimşek, Ülke; Yalçınkaya, Tuncay; Efe, Mert

    2018-05-01

    The anisotropic deformation of Aluminum alloys at micron scale exhibits localized deformation, which has negative implications on the macroscale mechanical and forming behavior. The scope of this work is twofold. Firstly, micro-scale deformation heterogeneities affecting forming behavior of aluminum alloys is investigated through experimental microstructure analysis at large strains and various strain paths. The effects of initial texture, local grain misorientation, and strain paths on the strain localizations are established. In addition to uniaxial tension condition, deformation heterogeneities are also investigated under equibiaxial tension condition to determine the strain path effects on the localization behavior. Secondly, the morphology and the crystallographic data obtained from the experiments is transferred to Abaqus software, in order to predict both macroscopic response and the microstructure evolution though crystal plasticity finite element simulations. The model parameters are identified through the comparison with experiments and the capability of the model to capture real material response is discussed as well.

  19. Solid-state Bonding of Superplastic Aluminum Alloy 7475 Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, T. D. S.; Vastava, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental works were carried out to study the feasibility of solid state bonding of superplastic aluminum 7475 sheet. Amount of deformation, bonding time, surface cleaning method and intermediate layer were the process parameters investigated. Other parameters, held constant by the superplastic forming condition which is required to obtain a concurrent solid state bonding, are bonding temperature, bonding pressure and atmosphere. Bond integrity was evaluated through metallographic examination, X-ray line scan analysis, SEM fractographic analysis and lap shear tests. The early results of the development program indicated that sound solid state bonding was accomplished for this high strength 7475 alloy with significant amounts of deformation. A thin intermediate layer of the soft 5052 aluminum alloy aided in achieving a solid state bonding by reducing the required amount of plastic deformation at the interface. Bond strength was substantially increased by a post bond heat treatment.

  20. Modeling aluminum-lithium alloy welding characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a finite element model of the heat-affected zone in the vicinity of a weld line on a plate in order to determine an accurate plastic strain history. The resulting plastic strain increments calculated by the finite element program were then to be used to calculate the measure of damage D. It was hoped to determine the effects of varying welding parameters, such as beam power, efficiency, and weld speed, and the effect of different material properties on the occurrence of microfissuring. The results were to be compared first to the previous analysis of Inconel 718, and then extended to aluminum 2195.

  1. Evaluation and control of environmental corrosion for aluminum and steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion protection systems for aerospace application and the effects of surface treatments and methods of controlling stress corrosion are evaluated. Chromate pigmented systems were found to be most effective for aluminum alloys; zinc-rich coatings gave the greatest protection to steel alloys. Various steel and aluminum alloys are rated for stress corrosion resistance.

  2. Investigation of strength characteristics of aluminum alloy under dynamic tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstifeev, A. D.

    2018-04-01

    The study presents the results of experimental-theoretical analysis for aluminum alloy subjected to static and dynamic tension on samples of different types. The material was tested under initial coarse-grained (CG) and in ultrafine-grained (UFG) condition. The time dependence of the tensile strength is calculated using an incubation time fracture criterion based on a set of fixed constants of the material.

  3. Alloying effect of copper concentration on the localized corrosion of aluminum alloy for heat exchanger tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Min-Sung; Park, In-Jun; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the alloying effect of Cu content on the localized corrosion properties of Al alloy in synthetic acid rain containing 200 ppm of Cl- ion. In aluminum alloy tubes, a small amount of Cu is contained as the additive to improve the mechanical strength or as the impurity. The Cu-containing intermetallic compound, Al2Cu can cause galvanic corrosion because it has more noble potential than Al matrix. Therefore aluminum tube could be penetrated by localized corrosion attack. The results were obtained from electrochemical test, scanning electron microscopy, and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) mapping. Severe localized corrosion was occurred on the Al-0.03 wt% Cu alloy. The negative effect of Cu on the pitting corrosion was attributed to the presence of the Al2Cu precipitates.

  4. Review and Study of Physics Driven Pitting Corrosion Modeling in 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0218 REVIEW AND STUDY OF PHYSICS DRIVEN PITTING CORROSION MODELING IN 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) Lingyu...2014 – 1 April 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE REVIEW AND STUDY OF PHYSICS DRIVEN PITTING CORROSION MODELING IN 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) 5a...18 Review and Study of Physics Driven Pitting Corrosion Modeling in 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys Lingyu Yu 1*, Kumar V. Jata2 1Mechanical Engineering

  5. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    EFFECTS 01: STRESS) 155 Table 2. Mechanical, Fracture, and Stress Corrosion Properties for Plates of Several Aluminum Alloys --Continued 4f’l14...One of the most effective SCC preventives for high strength aluminum alloys is surface working by shot peening, particularl) when used in combination...Aluminaut uses aluminum alloy anodes to supplement the protection of the pressure hull offered by several layers of polyurethane coating 175). 100 A

  6. Development of Weldable Superplastic Forming Aluminum Alloy Sheet Final Report CRADA No. TC-1086-95

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Sun, T. C.

    Numerous applications could exist for superplastic formable, weldable aluminum alloys in the automotive, aerospace, architectural, and construction industries. In this project, LLNL and Kaiser worked with the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems to develop and evaluate weldable superplastic alloys.

  7. Crack Repair in Aerospace Aluminum Alloy Panels by Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Silvello, A.

    2017-04-01

    The cold-spray process has recently been recognized as a very useful tool for repairing metallic sheets, achieving desired adhesion strengths when employing optimal combinations of material process parameters. We present herein the possibility of repairing cracks in aluminum sheets by cold spray. A 2099 aluminum alloy panel with a surface 30° V notch was repaired by cold spraying of 2198 and 7075 aluminum alloy powders. The crack behavior of V-notched sheets subjected to bending loading was studied by finite-element modeling (FEM) and mechanical experiments. The simulations and mechanical results showed good agreement, revealing a remarkable K factor reduction, and a consequent reduction in crack nucleation and growth velocity. The results enable prediction of the failure initiation locus in the case of repaired panels subjected to bending loading and deformation. The stress concentration was quantified to show how the residual stress field and failure are affected by the mechanical properties of the sprayed materials and by the geometrical and mechanical properties of the interface. It was demonstrated that the crack resistance increases more than sevenfold in the case of repair using AA2198 and that cold-spray repair can contribute to increased global fatigue life of cracked structures.

  8. Mechanical properties of anodized coatings over molten aluminum alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Grillet, Anne M.; Gorby, Allen D.; Trujillo, Steven M.; ...

    2007-10-22

    A method to measure interfacial mechanical properties at high temperatures and in a controlled atmosphere has been developed to study anodized aluminum surface coatings at temperatures where the interior aluminum alloy is molten. This is the first time that the coating strength has been studied under these conditions. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ambient atmosphere, temperature, and surface finish on coating strength for samples of aluminum alloy 7075. Surprisingly, the effective Young's modulus or strength of the coating when tested in air was twice as high as when samples were tested in an inert nitrogen ormore » argon atmosphere. Additionally, the effective Young's modulus of the anodized coating increased with temperature in an air atmosphere but was independent of temperature in an inert atmosphere. The effect of surface finish was also examined. Sandblasting the surface prior to anodization was found to increase the strength of the anodized coating with the greatest enhancement noted for a nitrogen atmosphere. Lastly, machining marks were not found to significantly affect the strength.« less

  9. The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han

    2007-04-23

    For this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project, the effect of impurities on the processing of aluminum alloys was systematically investigated. The work was carried out as a collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Industrial support was provided by ALCOA and ThermoCalc, Inc. The achievements described below were made. A method that combines first-principles calculation and calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) was used to develop the multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na. This method was extensively used in this project for the development of a thermodynamic database. The first-principles approach provided some thermodynamic property data thatmore » are not available in the open literature. These calculated results were used in the thermodynamic modeling as experimental data. Some of the thermodynamic property data are difficult, if not impossible, to measure. The method developed and used in this project allows the estimation of these data for thermodynamic database development. The multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na was developed. Elements such as Ca, Li, Na, and K are impurities that strongly affect the formability and corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys. However, these impurity elements are not included in the commercial aluminum alloy database. The process of thermodynamic modeling began from Al-Na, Ca-Li, Li-Na, K-Na, and Li-K sub-binary systems. Then ternary and higher systems were extrapolated because of the lack of experimental information. Databases for five binary alloy systems and two ternary systems were developed. Along with other existing binary and ternary databases, the full database of the multicomponent Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system was completed in this project. The methodology in integrating with commercial or other aluminum alloy databases can be developed. The mechanism of sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement (HTE) of Al-Mg is now understood. Using the

  10. Bearing Strengths of Some Wrought-aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Wescoat, C

    1943-01-01

    Although a number of investigations of the bearing strength of aluminum alloys have been made, the problem remains one of considerable interest to the aircraft industry. For this reason it has seemed advisable to make additional tests of the commonly used aircraft alloys in an effort to establish a better basis for the selection of allowable bearing values. Current design practice does not recognize the effect of edge distance upon bearing strengths, and for this reason edge distance was one of the principal variables considered in this investigation. The increasing emphasis being placed upon permanent set limitations makes it essential that more information on bearing yield phenomena be obtained. The object of this investigation was to determine bearing yield and ultimate strengths of the following aluminum alloy products: 17S-T, 24S-T, Alclad 24S-T, 24S-RT, 52S-0, 52S-1/2H, 52S-H, 53S-T, and 61S-T extrusions. Ratios of these bearing properties to tensile properties were also determined.

  11. Characterization of acoustic cavitation in water and molten aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Komarov, Sergey; Oda, Kazuhiro; Ishiwata, Yasuo; Dezhkunov, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    High-intensive ultrasonic vibrations have been recognized as an attractive tool for refining the grain structure of metals in casting technology. However, the practical application of ultrasonics in this area remains rather limited. One of the reasons is a lack of data needed to optimize the ultrasonic treatment conditions, particularly those concerning characteristics of cavitation zone in molten aluminum. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the intensity and spectral characteristics of cavitation noise generated during radiation of ultrasonic waves into water and molten aluminum alloys, and to establish a measure for evaluating the cavitation intensity. The measurements were performed by using a high temperature cavitometer capable of measuring the level of cavitation noise within five frequency bands from 0.01 to 10MHz. The effect of cavitation treatment was verified by applying high-intense ultrasonic vibrations to a DC caster to refine the primary silicon grains of a model Al-17Si alloy. It was found that the level of high frequency noise components is the most adequate parameter for evaluating the cavitation intensity. Based on this finding, it was concluded that implosions of cavitation bubbles play a decisive role in refinement of the alloy structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct-soldering 6061 aluminum alloys with ultrasonic coating.

    PubMed

    Ding, Min; Zhang, Pei-lei; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Yao, Shun

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the authors applied furnace soldering with ultrasonic coating method to solder 6061 aluminum alloy and investigated the effects of both coating time and soldering temperature on its properties. The following results were obtained: firstly, the solder region mainly composed of four kinds of microstructure zones: rich Sn zone, rich-Pb zone, Sn-Pb eutectic phase and rich Al zone. Meanwhile, the microanalysis identified a continuous reaction product at the alumina-solder interface as a rich-Pb zone. Therefore, the joint strength changed with soldering time and soldering temperature. Secondly, the tensile data had significantly greater variability, with values ranging from 13.99MPa to 24.74MPa. The highest value was obtained for the samples coated with Sn-Pb-Zn alloy for 45s. Fractures occurred along the solder-alumina interface for the 6061 aluminum alloy with its surface including hybrid tough fracture of dimple and tear ridge. The interface could initially strip at the rich Bi zone with the effect of shear stress.

  13. Corrosion fatigue of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue studies were conducted on bare, chemical conversion coated, and anodized 2219-T87 aluminum alloy. These tests were performed using a rotating beam machine running at a velocity of 2500 rpm. The corrosive environments tested were distilled water, 100 ppm NaCl, and 3.5 percent NaCl. Results were compared to the endurance limit in air. An evaluation of the effect of protective coatings on corrosion fatigue was made by comparing the fatigue properties of specimens with coatings to those without.

  14. LDHs/graphene film on aluminum alloys for active protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, You; Yu, Peihang; Wang, Juping; Li, Yingdong; Chen, Fei; Wei, Kai; Zuo, You

    2018-03-01

    A layered double hydroxides (LDHs) nanocontainer film modified with graphene was fabricated on aluminum alloy via a facile two-step process. The structure, morphology and composition of LDHs/graphene film were investigated. Graphene layers were able to seal the pores of nest-like LDHs film. After the modification of graphene, the LDHs film presented hydrophobic (CA 127.8°) and enhanced anticorrosion properties. The active anticorrosion property of the composite film was attributed to the double functions of the impermeable and inert graphene layer and the active inhibitor-loaded LDHs underling film.

  15. Ion implantation and diamond-like coatings of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaczynski, G. W.; Hamdi, A. H.; Elmoursi, A. A.; Qiu, X.

    1997-04-01

    In an attempt to increase the wear resistance of some key automotive components, General Motors Research and Development Center initiated a study to determine the potential of surface modification as a means of improving the tribological properties of automotive parts, and to investigate the feasibility of mass producing such parts. This paper describes the plasma immersion ion implantation system that was designed for the study of various options for surface treatment, and it discusses bench testing procedures used for evaluating the surface-treated samples. In particular, both tribological and microstructural analyses are discussed for nitrogen implants and diamond-like hydrocarbon coatings of some aluminum alloys.

  16. Thermodynamics of iron-aluminum alloys at 1573 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Mehrotra, Gopal M.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of iron and aluminum were measured in Fe-Al alloys at 1573 K, using the ion-current-ratio technique in a high-temperature Knudsen cell mass spectrometer. The Fe-Al solutions exhibited negative deviations from ideality over the entire composition range. The activity coefficients gamma(Fe), and gamma(Al) are given by six following equations as a function of mole fraction, X(Fe), X(Al). The results show good agreement with those obtained from previous investigations at other temperatures by extrapolation of the activity data to 1573 K.

  17. Outgassing measurement of the aluminum alloy UHV chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Itoh, T.; Komaki, S.; Narushima, K.; Ishimaru, H.

    1986-01-01

    A large vacuum chamber (580 mm diameter) was fabricated from an aluminum alloy surface treated by a special process normally used on small chambers. The chamber was tested unbaked and baked at various temperatures, pressures, and holding periods. The chamber was filled with N2 gas, and the outgassing rate was measured after one hour. Then the ultimate pressure was measured. Outgassing rates for baked and unbaked groups were compared. It is concluded that the same surface treatment technique can be used on both large and small chambers produced by the same special extrusion process.

  18. The Weathering of Aluminum Alloy Sheet Materials Used in Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutchler, Willard

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the corrosion of aluminum alloy sheet materials used in aircraft. It has for its purpose to study the causes of corrosion embrittlement in duralumin-type alloys and the development of methods for its elimination. The report contains results, obtained in an extensive series of weather-exposure tests, which reveal the extent to which the resistance of the materials to corrosion was affected by variable factors in their heat treatment and by the application of various surface protective coatings. The results indicate that the sheet materials are to be regarded as thoroughly reliable, from the standpoint of their permanence in service, provided proper precautions are taken to render them corrosion-resistant.

  19. Damage percolation during stretch flange forming of aluminum alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zengtao; Worswick, Michael J.; Keith Pilkey, A.; Lloyd, David J.

    2005-12-01

    A multi-scale finite element (FE)-damage percolation model was employed to simulate stretch flange forming of aluminum alloys AA5182 and AA5754. Material softening and strain gradients were captured using a Gurson-based FE model. FE results were then fed into the so-called damage percolation code, from which the damage development was modelled within measured microstructures. The formability of the stretch flange samples was predicted based upon the onset of catastrophic failure triggered by profuse void coalescence within the measured second-phase particle field. Damage development is quantified in terms of crack and void areal fractions, and compared to metallographic results obtained from interrupted stretch flange specimens. Parametric study is conducted on the effect of void nucleation strain in the prediction of formability of stretch flanges to "calibrate" proper nucleation strains for both alloys.

  20. The Cryogenic Tensile Properties of an Extruded Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    Basic mechanical properties; i.e., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus, were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMet162, at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F)) temperatures. The material evaluated was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions."

  1. Laser Surface Treatment and Modification of Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbass, Muna Khethier

    2018-02-01

    The present work aimed to study the laser surface treatment and modification of Al-4.0%Cu-1.0%Mg alloy matrix composite reinforced with 10%SiC particles produced by stir casting. The specimens of the base alloy and composite were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser of 1000 mJ, 1064 nm and 3 Hz . Dry wear test using the pin-on -disc technique at different sliding times (5-30 min) at a constant applied load and sliding speed were performed before and after laser treatment. Micro hardness and wear resistance were increased for all samples after laser hardening treatment. The improvement of these properties is explained by microstructural homogenization and grain refinement of the laser treated surface. Modification and refinement of SiC particles and grain refinement in the microstructure of the aluminum alloy matrix (α-Al) were observed by optical and SEM micrographs. The highest increase in hardness was 21.4% and 26.2% for the base alloy and composite sample respectively.

  2. Applications of high-temperature powder metal aluminum alloys to small gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millan, P. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A program aimed at the development of advanced powder-metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys for high-temperature applications up to 650 F using the concepts of rapid solidification and mechanical alloying is discussed. In particular, application of rapidly solidified PM aluminum alloys to centrifugal compressor impellers, currently used in auxiliary power units for both military and commercial aircraft and potentially for advanced automotive gas turbine engines, is examined. It is shown that substitution of high-temperature aluminum for titanium alloy impellers operating in the 360-650 F range provides significant savings in material and machining costs and results in reduced component weight, and consequently, reduced rotating group inertia requirements.

  3. Study of Plastic Deformation in Binary Aluminum Alloys by Internal-Friction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, E. C.; Maringer, R. E.; Marsh, L. L.; Manning, G. K.

    1959-01-01

    The damping capacity of several aluminum-copper alloys has been investigated during tensile elongation. This damping is shown to depend on strain rate, strain, temperature, alloy content, and heat treatment. A tentative hypothesis, based on the acceleration of solute atom diffusion by deformation-produced vacancies, is proposed to account for the observed behavior. Internal-friction maxima are observed in deformed aluminum and aluminum-copper alloys at -70 deg and -50 deg C. The peaks appear to be relatively insensitive to frequency and alloy content, but they disappear after annealing at temperatures nearing the recrystallization temperature.

  4. Laser shocking of 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.; Slater, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of laser generated stress waves on the microstructure, hardness, strength and stress corrosion resistance of 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys was investigated. Pulsed CO2 and neodymium-glass lasers were used to determine the effect of wavelength and pulse duration on pressure generation and material property changes. No changes in material properties were observed with CO2 laser. The strength and hardness of 2024-T351 and the strength of 7075-T73 aluminum alloys were substantially improved by the stress wave environments generated with the neodymium-glass laser. The mechanical properties of 2024-T851 and 7075-T651 were unchanged by the laser treatment. The correlation of the laser shock data with published results of flyer plate experiments demonstrated that a threshold pressure needed to be exceeded before strengthening and hardening could occur. Peak pressures generated by the pulsed laser source were less than 7.0 GPa which was below the threshold pressure required to change the mechanical properties of 2024-T851 and 7075-T651. Corrosion studies indicated that laser shocking increased the resistance to local attack in 2024-T351 and 7075-T651.

  5. Fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy-fractographic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, I.; Muhammad, W.; Ejaz, N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-fold approach was adopted to understand the fatigue crack growth process in an Aluminum alloy; fatigue crack growth test of samples and analysis of fractured surfaces. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared from an Aluminum alloy cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The stress applied was from 20,30 and 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material. The fatigue crack growth data was recorded. After fatigue testing, the samples were subjected to detailed scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. The resulting fracture surfaces were subjected to qualitative and quantitative fractographic examinations. Quantitative fracture analysis included an estimation of crack growth rate (CGR) in different regions. The effect of the microstructural features on fatigue crack growth was examined. It was observed that in stage II (crack growth region), the failure mode changes from intergranular to transgranular as the stress level increases. In the region of intergranular failure the localized brittle failure was observed and fatigue striations are difficult to reveal. However, in the region of transgranular failure the crack path is independent of the microstructural features. In this region, localized ductile failure mode was observed and well defined fatigue striations were present in the wake of fatigue crack. The effect of interaction of growing fatigue crack with microstructural features was not substantial. The final fracture (stage III) was ductile in all the cases.

  6. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  7. Thermal Decoating of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys for Aircraft Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñiz Lerma, Jose Alberto; Jung, In-Ho; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of aircraft aluminum alloys can be complex due to the presence of their corrosion protection coating that includes inorganic compounds containing Cr(VI). In this study, the characterization and thermal degradation behavior of the coating on aluminum substrates coming from an aircraft destined for recycling are presented. Elements such as Sr, Cr, Si, Ba, Ti, S, C, and O were found in three different layers by EDS elemental mapping corresponding to SrCrO4, Rutile-TiO2, SiO2, and BaSO4 with an overall particle size D 50 = 1.96 µm. The thermal degradation profile analyzed by TGA showed four different stages. The temperature of complete degradation at the fourth stage occurred at 753.15 K (480 °C) at lower heating rates. At higher heating rates and holding an isotherm at the same temperature, the residence time to fully decompose the aircraft coating has been estimated as 4.0 ± 0.2 minutes. The activation energy calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and the modified Coats-Redfern methods for multiple fraction of decomposition showed a non-constant behavior indicating the complexity of the reaction. Finally, the concentration of Cr(VI) released to the environment during thermal decoating was obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that 2.6 ± 0.1 µg of Cr(VI)/mm2 of aluminum substrate could be released unless adequate particle controls are used.

  8. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  9. Fatigue Resistance of Liquid-assisted Self-repairing Aluminum Alloys Reinforced with Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. Clara; Manuel, Michele; Wallace, Terryl

    2013-01-01

    A self-repairing aluminum-based composite system has been developed using a liquid-assisted healing theory in conjunction with the shape memory effect of wire reinforcements. The metal-metal composite was thermodynamically designed to have a matrix with a relatively even dispersion of a low-melting eutectic phase, allowing for repair of cracks at a predetermined temperature. Additionally, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire reinforcements were used within the composite to provide crack closure. Investigators focused the research on fatigue cracks propagating through the matrix in order to show a proof-of-concept Shape Memory Alloy Self-Healing (SMASH) technology for aeronautical applications.

  10. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys-Development of AL-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloy (2139)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Alex; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report supplement in presentation format describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to continue the development of the silver bearing alloy now registered as aluminum alloy 2139 by the Aluminum Association. Two commercial scale ingots were processed into nominal plate gauges of two, four and six inches, and were extensively characterized in terms of metallurgical and crystallographic structure, and resulting mechanical properties. This report includes comparisons of the property combinations for this alloy and 2XXX and 7XXX alloys more widely used in high performance applications. Alloy 2139 shows dramatic improvement in all combinations of properties, moreover, the properties of this alloy are retained in all gauge thicknesses, contrary to typical reductions observed in thicker gauges of the other alloys in the comparison. The advancements achieved in this study are expected to result in rapid, widespread use of this alloy in a broad range of ground based, aircraft, and spacecraft applications.

  11. Ultrasonic semi-solid coating soldering 6061 aluminum alloys with Sn-Pb-Zn alloys.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin-ye; Xing, Wen-qing; Ding, Min

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, 6061 aluminum alloys were soldered without a flux by the ultrasonic semi-solid coating soldering at a low temperature. According to the analyses, it could be obtained that the following results. The effect of ultrasound on the coating which promoted processes of metallurgical reaction between the components of the solder and 6061 aluminum alloys due to the thermal effect. Al2Zn3 was obtained near the interface. When the solder was in semi-solid state, the connection was completed. Ultimately, the interlayer mainly composed of three kinds of microstructure zones: α-Pb solid solution phases, β-Sn phases and Sn-Pb eutectic phases. The strength of the joints was improved significantly with the minimum shear strength approaching 101MPa. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Relationships Between Solidification Parameters in A319 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersluis, E.; Ravindran, C.

    2018-03-01

    The design of high-performance materials depends on a comprehensive understanding of the alloy-specific relationships between solidification and properties. However, the inconsistent use of a particular solidification parameter for presenting materials characterization in the literature impedes inter-study comparability and the interpretation of findings. Therefore, there is a need for accurate expressions relating the solidification parameters for each alloy. In this study, A319 aluminum alloy castings were produced in a permanent mold with various preheating temperatures in order to control metal cooling. Analysis of the cooling curve for each casting enabled the identification of its liquidus, Al-Si eutectic, and solidus temperatures and times. These values led to the calculation of the primary solidification rate, total solidification rate, primary solidification time, and local solidification time for each casting, which were related to each other as well as to the average casting SDAS and material hardness. Expressions for each of their correlations have been presented with high coefficients of determination, which will aid in microstructural prediction and casting design.

  13. Modeling the Controlled Recrystallization of Particle-Containing Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Khaled; Root, Jameson M.; Long, Zhengdong; Field, David P.

    2017-01-01

    The recrystallized fraction for AA7050 during the solution heat treatment is highly dependent upon the history of deformation during thermomechanical processing. In this work, a state variable model was developed to predict the recrystallization volume fraction as a function of processing parameters. Particle stimulated nucleation (PSN) was observed as a dominant mechanism of recrystallization in AA7050. The mesoscale Monte Carlo Potts model was used to simulate the evolved microstructure during static recrystallization with the given recrystallization fraction determined already by the state variable model for AA7050 alloy. The spatial inhomogeneity of nucleation is obtained from the measurement of the actual second-phase particle distribution in the matrix identified using backscattered electron (BSE) imaging. The state variable model showed good fit with the experimental results, and the simulated microstructures were quantitatively comparable to the experimental results for the PSN recrystallized microstructure of 7050 aluminum alloy. It was also found that the volume fraction of recrystallization did not proceed as dictated by the Avrami equation in this alloy because of the presence of the growth inhibitors.

  14. Anisotropic Effects on Constitutive Model Parameters of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter; Joshi, Vasant

    2011-06-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. The model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloys. Johnson-Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulations go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results are drastically different it is important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy we performed quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal, transverse, and thickness directions of 1' thick Al7075-T651 plate. Flow stresses at a strain rate of ~1100/s in the longitudinal and transverse direction are similar around 670MPa and decreases to 620 MPa in the thickness direction. These data are lower than the flow stress of 760 MPa measured in Al7075-T651 bar stock.

  15. Anisotropic effects on constitutive model parameters of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter S.; Joshi, Vasant S.

    2012-03-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. Model constants are determined from tension, compression or torsion stress-strain at low and high strain rates at different temperatures. These model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloy. Johnson- Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulation go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results show drastically different behavior it becomes important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests were performed on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal "L", transverse "T", and thickness "TH" directions of 1' thick Al7075 Plate. While flow stress at a strain rate of ~1/s as well as ~1100/s in the thickness and transverse directions are lower than the longitudinal direction. The flow stress in the bar was comparable to flow stress in the longitudinal direction of the plate. Fracture strain data from notched tensile specimens fabricated in the L, T, and Thickness directions of 1' thick plate are used to derive fracture constants.

  16. Method to increase the toughness of aluminum-lithium alloys at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Krishnan K. (Inventor); Sova, Brian J. (Inventor); Babel, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method to increase the toughness of the aluminum-lithium alloy C458 and similar alloys at cryogenic temperatures above their room temperature toughness is provided. Increasing the cryogenic toughness of the aluminum-lithium alloy C458 allows the use of alloy C458 for cryogenic tanks, for example for launch vehicles in the aerospace industry. A two-step aging treatment for alloy C458 is provided. A specific set of times and temperatures to age the aluminum-lithium alloy C458 to T8 temper is disclosed that results in a higher toughness at cryogenic temperatures compared to room temperature. The disclosed two-step aging treatment for alloy 458 can be easily practiced in the manufacturing process, does not involve impractical heating rates or durations, and does not degrade other material properties.

  17. Micromechanical models of delamination in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark Christian

    Aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys are lighter, stiffer, and tougher than conventional aerospace aluminum alloys. Replacing conventional aluminums with Al-Li could substantially decrease the weight and cost of aerospace structures. However, Al-Li alloys often fracture intergranularly via a mechanism called delamination cracking. While secondary delamination cracks can improve the effective toughness of a component, no current model accurately predicts the initiation and growth of intergranular cracks. Since simulations cannot incorporate delamination into a structural model, designers cannot quantify the effect of delamination cracking on a particular component. This uncertainty limits the application of Al-Li alloys. Previous experiments identify microstructural features linked to delamination. Fractography of failed surfaces indicates plastic void growth triggers intergranular failure. Furthermore, certain types of soft/stiff grain boundaries tend to localize void growth and nucleate delamination cracks. This dissertation develops a mechanism for the initiation of delamination on the microscale that accounts for these experimental observations. Microscale simulations of grain boundaries near a long primary crack explore the delamination mechanism on the mesoscale. In these simulations, a physically-based crystal plasticity (CP) model represents the constitutive response of individual grains. This CP model incorporates plastic voriticity correction terms into a standard objective stress rate integration, to accurately account for the kinematics of lattice deformation. The CP model implements slip system hardening with a modular approach to facilitate quick testing and calibration of different theories of hardening. The microscale models reveal soft/stiff grain boundaries develop elevated mean stress and plastic strain as a consequence of the mechanics of the interface. These elevated stresses and strain drive plastic void growth. The results indicate plastic void

  18. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new high strength and wear resistant aluminum cast alloy invented by NASA-MSFC for high temperature applications will be presented. Developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low-exhaust emission, the novel NASA 398 aluminum-silicon alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (500 F-800 F), enabling new pistons to utilize less material, which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance. NASA 398 alloy also offers greater wear resistance, surface hardness, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys for several commercial and automotive applications. The new alloy can be produced economically using permanent steel molds from conventional gravity casting or sand casting. The technology was developed to stimulate the development of commercial aluminum casting products from NASA-developed technology by offering companies the opportunity to license this technology.

  19. High-strength laser welding of aluminum-lithium scandium-doped alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of laser welding of an aluminum alloy (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by cold plastic deformation on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys. The strength of the plastically deformed welded joint, aluminum alloys of the Al-Mg-Li and Al-Cu-Li systems reached 0.95 and 0.6 of the base alloy strength, respectively.

  20. Forming an age hardenable aluminum alloy with intermediate annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaifeng; Carsley, John E.; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Lianhong; He, Baiyan

    2013-12-01

    A method to improve formability of aluminum sheet alloys by a two-stage stamping process with intermediate annealing was developed for a non-age hardenable Al-Mg alloy where the annealing heat treatment provided recovery of cold work from the initial stamping and recrystallization of the microstructure to enhance the forming limits of the material. This method was extended to an age hardenable, Al-Mg-Si alloy, which is complicated by the competing metallurgical effects during heat treatment including recovery (softening effect) vs. precipitation (hardening effect). An annealing heat treatment process condition was discovered wherein the stored strain energy from an initial plastic deformation can be sufficiently recovered to enhance formability in a second deformation; however, there is a deleterious effect on subsequent precipitation hardening. The improvement in formability was quantified with uniaxial tensile tests as well as with the forming limit diagram. Since strain-based forming limit curves (FLC) are sensitive to pre-strain history, both stress-based FLCs and polar-effective-plastic-strain (PEPS) FLCs, which are path-independent, were used to evaluate the forming limits after preform annealing. A technique was developed to calculate the stress-based FLC in which a residual-effective-plastic-strain (REPS) was determined by overlapping the hardening curve of the pre-strained and annealed material with that of the simply-annealed- material. After converting the strain-based FLCs using the constant REPS method, it was found that the stress-based FLCs and the PEPS FLCs of the post-annealed materials were quite similar and both tools are applicable for evaluating the forming limits of Al-Mg-Si alloys for a two-step stamping process with intermediate annealing.

  1. Fracture characteristics of structural aerospace alloys containing deep surface flaws. [aluminum-titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Bixler, W. D.; Finger, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Conditions controlling the growth and fracture of deep surface flaws in aerospace alloys were investigated. Static fracture tests were performed on 7075-T651 and 2219-T87 aluminum, and 6Ai-4V STA titanium . Cyclic flaw growth tests were performed on the two latter alloys, and sustain load tests were performed on the titanium alloy. Both the cyclic and the sustain load tests were performed with and without a prior proof overload cycle to investigate possible growth retardation effects. Variables included in all test series were thickness, flaw depth-to-thickness ratio, and flaw shape. Results were analyzed and compared with previously developed data to determine the limits of applicability of available modified linear elastic fracture solutions.

  2. Shot Peening Numerical Simulation of Aircraft Aluminum Alloy Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Lv, Sheng-Li; Zhang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    After shot peening, the 7050 aluminum alloy has good anti-fatigue and anti-stress corrosion properties. In the shot peening process, the pellet collides with target material randomly, and generated residual stress distribution on the target material surface, which has great significance to improve material property. In this paper, a simplified numerical simulation model of shot peening was established. The influence of pellet collision velocity, pellet collision position and pellet collision time interval on the residual stress of shot peening was studied, which is simulated by the ANSYS/LS-DYNA software. The analysis results show that different velocity, different positions and different time intervals have great influence on the residual stress after shot peening. Comparing with the numerical simulation results based on Kriging model, the accuracy of the simulation results in this paper was verified. This study provides a reference for the optimization of the shot peening process, and makes an effective exploration for the precise shot peening numerical simulation.

  3. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  4. Constant amplitude and post-overload fatigue crack growth behavior in PM aluminum alloy AA 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed, rapidly solidified, powder metallurgy, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloy, AA 8009, was fatigue tested at room temperature in lab air. Constant amplitude/constant delta kappa and single spike overload conditions were examined. High fatigue crack growth rates and low crack closure levels compared to typical ingot metallurgy aluminum alloys were observed. It was proposed that minimal crack roughness, crack path deflection, and limited slip reversibility, resulting from ultra-fine microstructure, were responsible for the relatively poor da/dN-delta kappa performance of AA 8009 as compared to that of typical IM aluminum alloys.

  5. Constant amplitude and post-overload fatigue crack growth behavior in PM aluminum alloy AA 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed, rapidly solidified, powder metallurgy, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloy, AA 8009, was fatigue tested at room temperature in lab air. Constant amplitude/constant delta kappa and single spike overload conditions were examined. High fatigue crack growth rates and low crack closure levels compared to typical ingot metallurgy aluminum alloys were observed. It was proposed that minimal crack roughness, crack path delection, and limited slip reversibility, resulting from ultra-fine microstructure, were responsible for the relatively poor da/dN-delta kappa performance of AA 8009 as compared to that of typical IM aluminum alloys.

  6. The hydrogen diffusion in liquid aluminum alloys from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2014-09-01

    We study the hydrogen diffusion in liquid aluminum alloys through extensive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. At the microscopic scale, we show that the hydrogen motion is characterized by a broad distribution of spatial jumps that does not correspond to a Brownian motion. To determine the self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in liquid aluminum alloys, we use a generalized continuous time random walk model recently developed to describe the hydrogen diffusion in pure aluminum. In particular, we show that the model successfully accounts the effects of alloying elements on the hydrogen diffusion in agreement with experimental features.

  7. Properties of welded joints in laser welding of aeronautic aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of the laser welding of the aluminum-lithium alloys (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of the nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by the cold plastic deformation method on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys.

  8. Formability analysis of aluminum alloys through deep drawing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranavi, U.; Janaki Ramulu, Perumalla; Chandramouli, Ch; Govardhan, Dasari; Prasad, PVS. Ram

    2016-09-01

    Deep drawing process is a significant metal forming process used in the sheet metal forming operations. From this process complex shapes can be manufactured with fewer defects. Deep drawing process has different effectible process parameters from which an optimum level of parameters should be identified so that an efficient final product with required mechanical properties will be obtained. The present work is to evaluate the formability of Aluminum alloy sheets using deep drawing process. In which effects of punch radius, lubricating conditions, die radius, and blank holding forces on deep drawing process observed for AA 6061 aluminum alloy sheet of 2 mm thickness. The numerical simulations are performed for deep drawing of square cups using three levels of aforesaid parameters like lubricating conditions and blank holding forces and two levels of punch radii and die radii. For numerical simulation a commercial FEM code is used in which Hollomon's power law and Hill's 1948 yield criterions are implemented. The deep drawing setup used in the FEM code is modeled using a CAD tool by considering the modeling requirements from the literature. Two different strain paths (150x150mm and 200x200mm) are simulated. Punch forces, thickness distributions and dome heights are evaluated for all the conditions. In addition failure initiation and propagation is also observed. From the results, by increasing the coefficient of friction and blank holding force, punch force, thickness distribution and dome height variations are observed. The comparison has done and the optimistic parameters were suggested from the results. From this work one can predict the formability for different strain paths without experimentation.

  9. Recent Developments in the Formability of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banabic, Dorel; Cazacu, Oana; Paraianu, Liana; Jurco, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The paper presents a few recent contributions brought by the authors in the field of the formability of aluminum alloys. A new concept for calculating Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) using the finite element method is presented. The article presents a new strategy for calculating both branches of an FLD, using a Hutchinson - Neale model implemented in a finite element code. The simulations have been performed with Abaqus/Standard. The constitutive model has been implemented using a UMAT subroutine. The plastic anisotropy of the sheet metal is described by the Cazacu-Barlat and the BBC2003 yield criteria. The theoretical predictions have been compared with the results given by the classical Hutchinson - Neale method and also with experimental data for different aluminum alloys. The comparison proves the capability of the finite element method to predict the strain localization. A computer program used for interactive calculation and graphical representation of different Yield Loci and Forming Limit Diagrams has also been developed. The program is based on a Hutchinson-Neale model. Different yield criteria (Hill 1948, Barlat-Lian and BBC 2003) are implemented in this model. The program consists in three modules: a graphical interface for input, a module for the identification and visualization of the yield surfaces, and a module for calculating and visualizing the forming limit curves. A useful facility offered by the program is the possibility to perform the sensitivity analysis both for the yield surface and the forming limit curves. The numerical results can be compared with experimental data, using the import/export facilities included in the program.

  10. Recent Developments in the Formability of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Banabic, Dorel; Paraianu, Liana; Jurco, Paul

    The paper presents a few recent contributions brought by the authors in the field of the formability of aluminum alloys. A new concept for calculating Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) using the finite element method is presented. The article presents a new strategy for calculating both branches of an FLD, using a Hutchinson - Neale model implemented in a finite element code. The simulations have been performed with Abaqus/Standard. The constitutive model has been implemented using a UMAT subroutine. The plastic anisotropy of the sheet metal is described by the Cazacu-Barlat and the BBC2003 yield criteria. The theoretical predictions have beenmore » compared with the results given by the classical Hutchinson - Neale method and also with experimental data for different aluminum alloys. The comparison proves the capability of the finite element method to predict the strain localization. A computer program used for interactive calculation and graphical representation of different Yield Loci and Forming Limit Diagrams has also been developed. The program is based on a Hutchinson-Neale model. Different yield criteria (Hill 1948, Barlat-Lian and BBC 2003) are implemented in this model. The program consists in three modules: a graphical interface for input, a module for the identification and visualization of the yield surfaces, and a module for calculating and visualizing the forming limit curves. A useful facility offered by the program is the possibility to perform the sensitivity analysis both for the yield surface and the forming limit curves. The numerical results can be compared with experimental data, using the import/export facilities included in the program.« less

  11. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  12. High-temperature corrosion of iron-aluminum and iron-aluminum-yttrium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insoo, Kim

    The high-temperature corrosion behavior of Fe3Al alloy has been investigated by conducting two studies: (1) corrosion of Fe 3Al and Fe3Al-Y alloys in oxidizing atmosphere and (2) corrosion of Fe3Al in mixed chlorine/oxygen environments. In the first study, oxidation of the two alloys, Fe-14.3 wt% Al and Fe-14.1 wt% Al-0.3 wt% Y, was carried out in the temperature range of 800 to 1100°C to investigate the general oxidation behavior of Fe3Al and the effect of yttrium on the oxidation of Fe3Al in terms of oxidation kinetics, oxide scale adhesion and microstructure. At lower temperatures (<1000°C), the oxidation rate of the two alloys was nearly identical, and the parabolic rate constant obtained as a function of temperature was Kp = 5128 exp[--39500 (cal/mol)/RT] mg2/cm4 h. At higher temperatures, however, yttrium-added Fe3Al alloy exhibited lower oxidation rate and much more improved oxide adhesion. The lower oxidation rate observed in Fe3Al-Y alloy seems to be due to the followings: (1) a decrease in aluminum diffusion through alumina scale and (2) modification of the scale growth mechanism from simultaneous countercurrent diffusion of aluminum and oxygen to predominant inward diffusion of oxygen, which generates less growth stress and thus prevents the formation of fast diffusion paths such as microcracks. The adhesion improvement of alumina scale formed on the Fe3Al-Y was attributed to the modification of alumina growth mechanism by the addition of Y to the Fe3Al alloy. The change of growth mechanism leads to the formation of pegs, decrease of the oxide growth stress, and decrease of voids formation, which enhances the adhesion of alumina scale to the Fe3Al alloy. The second study has focused on the corrosion of Fe3Al in the temperature range of 600--800°C in Cl2-Ar gas mixtures containing traces of oxygen as an impurity. Weight gain was observed during the corrosion of Fe3Al at 600°C in 0.25% Cl2-Ar, which is due to the formation of Fe2O3, while continuous

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy/Stainless Steel Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Tomo; Nishida, Taichi; Nishida, Hidehito; Yoshikawa, Syuhei; Yoshida, Takumi; Omichi, Noriko; Fujimoto, Mitsuo; Hirose, Akio

    The mechanical properties and interfacial microstructure of an aluminum alloy/stainless steel dissimilar lap joint using friction stir welding (FSW) were characterized. In an FSWed A3003 aluminum alloy-SUS304 steel lap joint, the strength on the advancing side was larger than that at the retreating side. TEM observation indicated that a sound joint can be obtained from the stage of the formation of the amorphous layer owing to the mechanical alloying effects before the formation of intermetallic compounds. This lap joining technique was also successfully applied to A6061-T6 aluminum alloy-grooved SUS304 plates. The maximum tensile strength of the lap joint was approximately the same as that of the base alloy, however, the proof stress of the joint decreased with the dissolution of the β″ phase in the A6061 aluminium alloy, which is caused by the generation of heat during friction stir welding.

  14. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  15. Effect of Preexisting Corrosion on Fatigue Cracking of Aluminum Alloys 2024-T3 and 7075-T6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-01

    alloys 2024 -T3 and 7075-T6. It was determined that preexisting corrosion has a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of aluminum alloys 2024 -T3 and...following conclusions were drawn: 1. Preexisting corrosion has a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of aluminum alloys 2024 -T3 and 7075-T6. The...corrosion has a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of aluminum alloys

  16. Microstructural studies of wear mechanisms in cast aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmadagli, Mustafa

    2005-07-01

    The microstructural basis of wear and surface degradation mechanisms in Al-Si alloys has been investigated in order to improve the current understanding of the requirements for wear resistant aluminum alloy design. The wear behaviour of three commercial alloys namely: a sand cast A390 (Al-18.4%Si), a spray formed Al-25%Si, and a die cast 383 (Al-9.5%Si) have been investigated. Dry sliding wear tests were performed using a block on ring type tribometer under controlled environments. The experiments were performed in a load range between 0.2 N and 300 N at a constant speed of 1 m/s. The testing environments were a dry air (5% RH), a humid air (95% RH), and an argon atmosphere. In dry air (5% RH), two main wear regimes namely, mild wear (MW), and severe wear (SW) were identified. The (MW) regime consisted of two sub-regimes: first and second regimes of mild wear, (MW-1) and (MW-2). The mild wear was controlled by the formation and destruction (spallation) of hardened tribolayers composed of Fe, Al, Si, and O which gave rise to steady state wear rates in both sub-regimes. The transition to second sub-regime was attributed to the destabilization and partial removal of the tribolayers on the contact surfaces. Severe wear occurred at loads exceeding 150 N irrespective of the alloy when the contact surface temperature reached a critical value (210-240°C). The wear rates (W) in each sub-regime of the MW obeyed the relation, W=CLn, where C and n were the wear coefficient and the wear exponent, respectively. The wear exponents, n, were similar in each of the sub-regimes for all three alloys, indicating that the same mechanisms controlled the wear rates. However, the wear coefficients, C, and the transition loads to the second sub-regime were considerably different for each alloy. A method of analyzing the wear coefficients and the transition loads of the alloys, based on pair-wise comparison between them, was developed. This method demonstrated that small equiaxed silicon

  17. Chemically activated nanodiamonds for aluminum alloy corrosion protection and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannstein, Inga; Adler, Anne-Katrin; Lapina, Victoria; Osipov, Vladimir; Opitz, Jörg; Schreiber, Jürgen; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, a smart coating for light metal alloys was developed and investigated. Chemically activated nanodiamonds (CANDiT) were electrophoretically deposited onto anodized aluminum alloy AA2024 substrates in order to increase corrosion resistance, enhance bonding properties and establish a means of corrosion monitoring based on the fluorescence behavior of the particles. In order to create stable aqueous CANDiT dispersions suitable for electrophoretic deposition, mechanical milling had to be implemented under specific chemical conditions. The influence of the CANDiT volume fraction and pH of the dispersion on the electrochemical properties of the coated samples was investigated. Linear voltammetry measurements reveal that the chemical characteristics of the CANDiT dispersion have a distinct influence on the quality of the coating. The fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence excitation spectra of the samples show that corrosion can be easily detected by optical means. Furthermore, an optimization on the basis of "smart" - algorithms for the data processing of a surface analysis by the laser-speckle-method is presented.

  18. A calorimetric study of precipitation in aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazian, John M.

    1981-02-01

    Precipitate microstructures in aluminum alloy 2219 were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC signatures of individual precipitate phases were established by comparing the DSC and TEM results from samples that had been aged such that only one precipitate phase was present. These signatures were then used to analyze the commercial tempers. It was found that DSC could readily distinguish between the T3, T4, T6, T8 and O tempers but could not distinguish amongst T81, T851 and T87. Small amounts of plastic deformation between solution treatment and aging had a significant effect on the thermograms. Aging experiments at 130 and 190 °C showed that the aging sequence and DSC response of this alloy were similar to those of pure Al-Cu when the increased copper content is taken into account. Further aging experiments at temperatures between room temperature and 130 °C showed pronounced changes of the GP zone dissolution peak as a function of aging conditions. These changes were found to be related to the effect of GP zone size on the metastable phase boundary and on the GP zone dissolution kinetics.

  19. Laser-initiated combustion studies of selected aluminum, copper, iron, and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Clark, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    The results of combustion studies at atmospheric pressure on ten metal alloys are presented. The alloys studied were aluminum alloys 1100, 2219, 6061, and tensile-50; 304, 347 and 21-6-9 stainless steel; inconel 600; beryllium copper and a bronze. It was found that once ignition was achieved all alloys would generally burn to completion. The overall combustion process appears to obey a first order rate process. Preliminary conclusions are presented along with recommendations for future work.

  20. Methodology for Evaluation of Fatigue Crack-Growth Resistance of Aluminum Alloys under Spectrum Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    fatigue life , except for the 2024 - T351 alloy which had a significantly longer spectrum fatigue life than the other alloys and 2) for...OF FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS UNDER SPECTRUM LOADING MATERIALS PRESENT EFFORT FUTURE EFFORT 2024 - T351 2020-T651 2024 -T851 TMT2020-T6X51...the same spectrum fatigue life . The 2024 - T351 alloy had a significantly longer spectrum

  1. Long-term strategies for increased recycling of automotive aluminum and its alloying elements.

    PubMed

    Løvik, Amund N; Modaresi, Roja; Müller, Daniel B

    2014-04-15

    Aluminum recycling currently occurs in a cascading fashion, where some alloys, used in a limited number of applications, absorb most of the end-of-life scrap. An expected increase in scrap supply in coming decades necessitates restructuring of the aluminum cycle to open up new recycling paths for alloys and avoid a potential scrap surplus. This paper explores various interventions in end-of-life management and recycling of automotive aluminum, using a dynamic substance flow analysis model of aluminum and its alloying elements with resolution on component and alloy level (vehicle-component-alloy-element model). It was found that increased component dismantling before vehicle shredding can be an effective, so far underestimated, intervention in the medium term, especially if combined with development of safety-relevant components such as wheels from secondary material. In the long term, automatic alloy sorting technologies are most likely required, but could at the same time reduce the need for magnesium removal in refining. Cooperation between the primary and secondary aluminum industries, the automotive industry, and end-of-life vehicle dismantlers is therefore essential to ensure continued recycling of automotive aluminum and its alloying elements.

  2. Evaluation of Sc-Bearing Aluminum Alloy C557 for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Dicus, Dennis L.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of the Al-Mg-Sc alloy C557 was evaluated to assess its potential for a broad range of aerospace applications, including airframe and launch vehicle structures. Of specific interest were mechanical properties at anticipated service temperatures and thermal stability of the alloy. Performance was compared with conventional airframe aluminum alloys and with other emerging aluminum alloys developed for specific service environments. Mechanical properties and metallurgical structure were evaluated for commercially rolled sheet in the as-received H116 condition and after thermal exposures at 107 C. Metallurgical analyses were performed to de.ne grain morphology and texture, strengthening precipitates, and to assess the effect of thermal exposure.

  3. Fretting of Nickel-Chromium-Aluminum Alloys at Temperatures to 816 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of four nickel-based alloys containing 10 percent and 20 percent chromium in combination with 2 percent and 5 percent aluminum were fretted in dry air at temperatures to 816 C. At all temperatures, the alloys showed far less fretting wear than did high-purity nickel. This was attributed to the formation of protective oxide films on the alloys, the result of the selective oxidation of the alloy constituents. Increasing the aluminum concentration reduced fretting wear at all temperatures. Increasing the chromium concentration from 10 percent to 20 percent resulted in decreased fretting wear at 23 and 540 C, but increased fretting wear at 650 and 816 C.

  4. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding.

    PubMed

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-23

    Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately t H = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  5. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding

    PubMed Central

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately tH = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation and minimum reduction in the thickness of the tube. PMID:28793629

  6. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Evaluation of an Investment Cast Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, Wayne; McGill, Preston

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation that details the fracture toughness of Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy for use in structures at cryogenic temperatures. Graphs and charts are presented in the presentation

  8. Corrosion of Aluminum Alloys in the Presence of Fire-Retardant Aircraft Interior Materials

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-10-01

    This research project was to evaluate the potential for fire-retardant materials used in aircraft interiors to cause corrosion of aluminum structural alloys. Service Difficulty Reports (SDR's) were reviewed for several aircraft types, and the most fr...

  9. Study to determine peening stress profile of rod peened aluminum structural alloys versus shot peened material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosas, R. E.; Calfin, B. G.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the peening stress profiles of rod peened aluminum structural alloys versus shot peened material to define the effective depth of the compressed surface layer.

  10. New water-soluble metal working fluids additives from phosphonic acid derivatives for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Ichitaro; Tomoda, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shoji

    2007-01-01

    Water-soluble metal working fluids are used for processing of aluminum alloy materials. This short paper describes properties of new additives for water-soluble cutting fluids for aluminum alloy materials. Some alkyldiphosphonic acids were prepared with known method. Amine salts of these phosphonic acids showed anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials. However, they have no hard water tolerance. Monoesters of octylphosphonic acid were prepared by the reaction of octylphosphonic acid dichloride with various alcohols in the presence of triethylamine. Amine salts of monoester of octylphosphonic acid with diethyleneglycol monomethyl ether, ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether and triethyleneglycol monomethyl ether showed both of a good anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials and hard water tolerance.

  11. Demonstration of the Impact of Thermomagnetic Processing on Cast Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Murphy, Bart L.; Rios, Orlando

    2017-10-01

    This project builds on an earlier Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technical Collaboration phase 1 project to investigate application of high magnetic fields during solution heat treating and aging of three different cast aluminum alloys.

  12. Corrosion Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Aluminum Alloys in Tropical Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosliza, R.; Senin, H. B.

    2008-05-01

    The corrosion inhibition of aluminum and its alloys is the subject of remarkable technological importance due to their increased industrial applications. This paper reports the results of the corrosion inhibition properties of AA6061 and AA6063 aluminum alloys in tropical seawater using sodium benzoate as an inhibitor. It was found that the corrosion inhibition occurred through the adsorption on the surfactant on the metal surface without modifying the mechanism of corrosion processes.

  13. Biaxial Testing of 2219-T87 Aluminum Alloy Using Cruciform Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Pollock, W. D.

    1997-01-01

    A cruciform biaxial test specimen was designed and seven biaxial tensile tests were conducted on 2219-T87 aluminum alloy. An elastic-plastic finite element analysis was used to simulate each tests and predict the yield stresses. The elastic-plastic finite analysis accurately simulated the measured load-strain behavior for each test. The yield stresses predicted by the finite element analyses indicated that the yield behavior of the 2219-T87 aluminum alloy agrees with the von Mises yield criterion.

  14. Study of localized corrosion in aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in 2219-T87 aluminum (Al) alloy, 2195 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy, and welded 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 filler) have been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique (SRET). Anodic sites are more frequent and of greater strength in the 2195 Al-Li alloy than in the 2219-T87 Al alloy, indicating a greater tendency toward pitting for the latter. However, the overall corrosion rates are about the same for these two alloys, as determined using the polarization resistance technique. In the welded 2195 Al-Li alloy, the weld bean is entirely cathodic, with rather strongly anodic heat affected zones (HAZ) bordering both sides, indicating a high probability of corrosion in the HAZ parallel to the weld bead.

  15. Development of a 3D Filling Model of Low-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloy Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianglan; Maijer, Daan; Cockcroft, Steve; Reilly, Carl

    2013-12-01

    A two-phase computational fluid dynamics model of the low-pressure die-cast process for the production of A356 aluminum alloy wheels has been developed to predict the flow conditions during die filling. The filling model represents a 36-deg section of a production wheel, and was developed within the commercial finite-volume package, ANSYS CFX, assuming isothermal conditions. To fully understand the behavior of the free surface, a novel technique was developed to approximate the vent resistances as they impact on the development of a backpressure within the die cavity. The filling model was first validated against experimental data, and then was used to investigate the effects of venting conditions and pressure curves during die filling. It was found that vent resistance and vent location strongly affected die filling time, free surface topography, and air entrainment for a given pressure fill-curve. With regard to the pressure curve, the model revealed a strong relation between the pressure curve and the flow behavior in the hub, which is an area prone to defect formation.

  16. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  17. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  18. Water and oil wettability of anodized 6016 aluminum alloy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. P.; Alves, C. F. Almeida; Cavaleiro, A.; Carvalho, S.

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on the control of wettability behaviour of a 6000 series aluminum (Al) alloy surface (Al6016-T4), which is widely used in the automotive and aerospace industries. In order to induce the surface micro-nanostructuring of the surface, a combination of prior mechanical polishing steps followed by anodization process with different conditions was used. The surface polishing with sandpaper grit size 1000 promoted aligned grooves on the surface leading to static water contact angle (WCA) of 91° and oil (α-bromonaphthalene) contact angle (OCA) of 32°, indicating a slightly hydrophobic and oleophilic character. H2SO4 and H3PO4 acid electrolytes were used to grow aluminum oxide layers (Al2O3) by anodization, working at 15 V/18° C and 100 V/0 °C, respectively, in one or two-steps configuration. Overall, the anodization results showed that the structured Al surfaces were hydrophilic and oleophilic-like with both WCA and OCA below 90°. The one-step configuration led to a dimple-shaped Al alloy surface with small diameter of around 31 nm, in case of H2SO4, and with larger diameters of around 223 nm in case of H3PO4. The larger dimples achieved with H3PO4 electrolyte allowed to reach a slight hydrophobic surface. The thicker porous Al oxide layers, produced by anodization in two-step configuration, revealed that the liquids can penetrate easily inside the non-ordered porous structures and, thus, the surface wettability tended to superhydrophilic and superoleophilic character (CA < 10°). These results indicate that the capillary-pressure balance model, described for wettability mechanisms of porous structures, was broken. Moreover, thicker oxide layers with narrow pores of about 29 nm diameter allowed to achieve WCA < OCA. This inversion in favour of the hydrophilic-oleophobic surface behaviour is of great interest either for lubrication of mechanical components or in water-oil separation process.

  19. Interfacial Reaction During Dissimilar Joining of Aluminum Alloy to Magnesium and Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, J. D.; Panteli, A.; Zhang, C. Q.; Baptiste, D.; Cai, E.; Prangnell, P. B.

    Ultrasonic welding (USW), a solid state joining process, has been used to produce welds between AA6111 aluminum alloy and AZ31 magnesium alloys or titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The mechanical properties of the welds have been assessed and it has been shown that it is the nature and thickness of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at the joint line that are critical in determining joint strength and particularly fracture energy. Al-Mg welds suffer from a very low fracture energy, even when strength is comparable with that of similar metal Mg-Mg welds, due to a thick IMC layer always being formed. It is demonstrated that in USW of Al-Ti alloy the slow interdiffusion kinetics means that an IMC layer does not form during welding, and fracture energy is greater. A model has been developed to predict IMC formation during welding and provide an understanding of the critical factors that determine the IMC thickness. It is predicted that in Al-Mg welds, most of the lMC thickening occurs whilst the IMC regions grow as separate islands, prior to the formation of a continuous layer.

  20. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-05-08

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg 17 Al 12 and Mg₂Al₃. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  1. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research. PMID:28788646

  2. Ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film fabricated by citric acid-assisted hot-water-treatment of aluminum-palladium alloy film

    SciTech Connect

    Harumoto, Takashi; Tamura, Yohei; Ishiguro, Takashi, E-mail: ishiguro@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp

    Hot-water-treatment has been adapted to fabricate ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film from aluminum-palladium alloy film. Using citric acid as a chelating agent, a precipitation of boehmite (aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlOOH) on the nanoporous palladium-aluminum film was suppressed. According to cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy observations, the ligament/pore sizes of the prepared nanoporous film were considerably small (on the order of 10 nm). Since this fabrication method only requires aluminum alloy film and hot-water with chelating agent, the ultrafine nanoporous film can be prepared simply and environmentally friendly.

  3. Superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surfaces by a novel one-step process.

    PubMed

    Saleema, N; Sarkar, D K; Paynter, R W; Chen, X-G

    2010-09-01

    A simple one-step process has been developed to render aluminum alloy surfaces superhydrophobic by immersing the aluminum alloy substrates in a solution containing NaOH and fluoroalkyl-silane (FAS-17) molecules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurements have been performed to characterize the morphological features, chemical composition and superhydrophobicity of the surfaces. The resulting surfaces provided a water contact angle as high as ∼162° and a contact angle hysteresis as low as ∼4°. The study indicates that it is possible to fabricate superhydrophobic aluminum surfaces easily and effectively without involving the traditional two-step processes.

  4. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H. W.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an examination of the fracture toughness of aluminum-lithium alloy C458 for use in cryotank structures. Topics cover include: cryogenics, alloy composition, strengthing precipitates in C458, cryogenic fracture toughness improvements, design of experiments for measuring aging optimization of C458 plate and effects of aging of properties of C458 plate.

  5. Analysis of rolling fracture of the conticasted and tandem rolled blanks of low alloyed aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zeng, Lingping; Jiao Xie, Xian

    2018-01-01

    Optical microscopy, electron microscopy and energy spectrum were used to test the morphology of grains, as-cast microstructure and secondary phases in confiscated and tandem rolled planks of 8011 low alloying aluminum alloy. It can be concluded that the existence of inhomogeneous secondary FeSiAl phases lead to the fracture of planks during rolling.

  6. Gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 3004, 5052, and 5X54. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1002 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 3004, 5052, 5154, and 5454 (P-22), in thickness range 0.062 to 0.5 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23) for 3004, and ER5356 (F-22) for other alloys; shielding gas is argon.

  7. Numerical simulation of high speed incremental forming of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppina, Ambrogio; Teresa, Citrea; Luigino, Filice; Francesco, Gagliardi

    2013-12-01

    In this study, an innovative process is analyzed with the aim to satisfy the industrial requirements, such as process flexibility, differentiation and customizing of products, cost reduction, minimization of execution time, sustainable production, etc. The attention is focused on incremental forming process, nowadays used in different fields such as: rapid prototyping, medical sector, architectural industry, aerospace and marine, in the production of molds and dies. Incremental forming consists in deforming only a small region of the workspace through a punch driven by a NC machine. SPIF is the considered variant of the process, in which the punch gives local deformation without dies and molds; consequently, the final product geometry can be changed by the control of an actuator without requiring a set of different tools. The drawback of this process is its slowness. The aim of this study is to assess the IF feasibility at high speeds. An experimental campaign will be performed by a CNC lathe with high speed to test process feasibility and the influence on materials formability mainly on aluminum alloys. The first results show how the material presents the same performance than in conventional speed IF and, in some cases, better material behavior due to the temperature field. An accurate numerical simulation has been performed to investigate the material behavior during the high speed process substantially confirming experimental evidence.

  8. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  9. Chemical conditions inside occluded regions on corroding aircraft aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K S; Yuan, J; Kelly, R G

    1999-07-30

    Corrosion of aluminum alloy structures costs the US Air Force in the order of US$1 x 10(9) annually. Corrosion develops in areas of overlap such as aircraft lap-splice joints and under protective organic coatings. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been used to determine the local chemistries at these corrosion sites of solutions that were extracted using a microsampling system. Analysis of the local solution within lap-splice joints from aircraft has been performed in two ways: rehydration of corrosion products and direct microsampling. The solutions collected were analyzed with CE to quantitatively determine the species present during corrosion. The most common ions detected were Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, HCO3-, K+, Al3+, Ca2+, Na+ and Mg2+. Studies of the solution chemistry under local coating defects are required to understand coating failure and develop more durable coatings. A microsampling system and micro pH sensor were developed to extract solution from and measure pH in defects with diameters as small as 170 microns. Actively corroding defects contained high concentrations of Cl-, Al3+, Mg2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ whereas only trace levels of Mg2+ were found in repassivated defects. The effects of these species on initiation and propagation of corrosion are discussed.

  10. Strengthening of Aluminum Alloy 2219 by Thermo-mechanical Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Lei, Kun; Song, Peng; Liu, Xinqin; Zhang, Fei; Li, Jianfei; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Strengthening of aluminum alloy 2219 by thermo-mechanical treatment has been compared with artificial aging. Three simple deformation modes including pre-stretching, compression, and rolling have been used in thermo-mechanical treatment. The tensile strength, elongation, fracture feature, and precipitated phase have been investigated. The results show that the strengthening effect of thermo-mechanical treatment is better than the one of artificial aging. Especially, the yield strength significantly increases with a small decrease of elongation. When the specimen is pre-stretched to 8.0%, the yield strength reaches 385.0 MPa and increases by 22.2% in comparison to the one obtained in aging condition. The maximum tensile strength of 472.4 MPa is achieved with 4.0% thickness reduction by compression. The fracture morphology reveals locally ductile and brittle failure mechanism, while the coarse second-phase particles distribute on the fracture surface. The intermediate phases θ″ or θ' orthogonally precipitate in the matrix after thermo-mechanical treatment. As compared to artificial aging, the cold plastic deformation increases distribution homogeneity and the volume fraction of θ'' or θ' precipitates. These result in a better strengthening effect.

  11. Cooling Rate Determination in Additively Manufactured Aluminum Alloy 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brice, Craig A.; Dennis, Noah

    2015-05-01

    Metallic additive manufacturing processes generally utilize a conduction mode, welding-type approach to create beads of deposited material that can be arranged into a three-dimensional structure. As with welding, the cooling rates in the molten pool are relatively rapid compared to traditional casting techniques. Determination of the cooling rate in the molten pool is critical for predicting the solidified microstructure and resultant properties. In this experiment, wire-fed electron beam additive manufacturing was used to melt aluminum alloy 2219 under different thermal boundary conditions. The dendrite arm spacing was measured in the remelted material, and this information was used to estimate cooling rates in the molten pool based on established empirical relationships. The results showed that the thermal boundary conditions have a significant effect on the resulting cooling rate in the molten pool. When thermal conduction is limited due to a small thermal sink, the dendrite arm spacing varies between 15 and 35 µm. When thermal conduction is active, the dendrite arm spacing varies between 6 and 12 µm. This range of dendrite arm spacing implies cooling rates ranging from 5 to 350 K/s. Cooling rates can vary greatly as thermal conditions change during deposition. A cooling rate at the higher end of the range could lead to significant deviation from microstructural equilibrium during solidification.

  12. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, V.K.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-08-24

    A wrought and annealed iron-aluminum alloy is described consisting essentially of 8 to 9.5% aluminum, an effective amount of chromium sufficient to promote resistance to aqueous corrosion of the alloy, and an alloying constituent selected from the group of elements consisting of an effective amount of molybdenum sufficient to promote solution hardening of the alloy and resistance of the alloy to pitting when exposed to solutions containing chloride, up to about 0.05% carbon with up to about 0.5% of a carbide former which combines with the carbon to form carbides for controlling grain growth at elevated temperatures, and mixtures thereof, and the balance iron, wherein said alloy has a single disordered [alpha] phase crystal structure, is substantially non-susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and has a room-temperature ductility of greater than 20%.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of LD10 Aluminum Alloy in UDMH and N2O4 propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youhong; Chang, Xinlong; Liu, Wanlei

    2018-03-01

    The LD10 aluminum alloy double cantilever beam specimens were corroded under the conditions of Unsymmetric Uimethyl Hydrazine (UDMH), Dinitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4), and 3.5% NaCl environment. The crack propagation behavior of the aluminum alloy in different corrosion environment was analyzed. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of aluminum alloy in N2O4 is relatively slight and there are not evident stress corrosion phenomenons founded in UDMH.

  14. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  15. Macrosegregation in aluminum alloy ingot cast by the semicontinuous direct chill method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, H.; Granger, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of the semicontinuous DC casting method is developed to predict the positive segregation observed at the subsurface and the negative segregation commonly found at the center of large commercial-size aluminum alloy ingot. Qualitative analysis of commercial-size aluminum alloy semicontinuous cast direct chill (DC) ingot is carried out. In the analysis, both positive segregation in the ingot subsurface and negative segregation at the center of the ingot are examined. Ingot subsurface macrosegregation is investigated by considering steady state casting of a circular cross-section binary alloy ingot. Nonequilibrium solidification is assumed with no solid diffusion, constant equilibrium partition ratio, and constant solid density.

  16. Adhesion enhancement of titanium nitride coating on aluminum casting alloy by intrinsic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong L.; Preston, Andrew; Tran, Anh T. T.; Dickinson, Michelle; Metson, James B.

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum casting alloys have excellent castability, high strength and good corrosion resistance. However, the presence of silicon in these alloys prevents surface finishing with conventional methods such as anodizing. Hard coating with titanium nitride can provide wear and corrosion resistances, as well as the aesthetic finish. A critical factor for a durable hard coating is its bonding with the underlying substrate. In this study, a titanium nitride layer was coated on LM25 casting alloy and a reference high purity aluminum substrate using Ion Assisted Deposition. Characterization of the coating and the critical interface was carried out by a range of complementing techniques, including SIMS, XPS, TEM, SEM/EDS and nano-indentation. It was observed that the coating on the aluminum alloy is stronger compared to that on the pure aluminum counterpart. Silicon particles in the alloy offers the reinforcement though mechanical interlocking at microscopic level, even with nano-scale height difference. This reinforcement overcomes the adverse effect caused by surface segregation of magnesium in aluminum casting alloys.

  17. Investigation of Fatigue Crack-Growth Resistance of Aluminum Alloys under Spectrum Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    Effects on Fatigue Crack Progation in 2024 -T3 Aluminum Alloy ," Eng. Frac. Mech, Vol...results ("a" from 6 to 13 mm) can be made (Figure 20a): 1. The 2XXX alloys 2020-T651, 2324-T39, and 2024 - T351 had longer spectrum fatigue lives than the...strength and spectrum life exists at all three maximum peak stress levels for the 2024 alloy , with the lower yield strength T351 condition having

  18. Carbothermic reduction and prereduced charge for producing aluminum-silicon alloys

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, David T.; Troup, Robert L.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for the carbothermic reduction of aluminum oxide to form an aluminum alloy including producing silicon carbide by heating a first mix of carbon and silicon oxide in a combustion reactor to an elevated temperature sufficient to produce silicon carbide at an accelerated rate, the heating being provided by an in situ combustion with oxygen gas, and then admixing the silicon carbide with carbon and aluminum oxide to form a second mix and heating the second mix in a second reactor to an elevated metal-forming temperature sufficient to produce aluminum-silicon alloy. The prereduction step includes holding aluminum oxide substantially absent from the combustion reactor. The metal-forming step includes feeding silicon oxide in a preferred ratio with silicon carbide.

  19. Carbothermic reduction and prereduced charge for producing aluminum-silicon alloys

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, D.T.; Troup, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for the carbothermic reduction of aluminum oxide to form an aluminum alloy including producing silicon carbide by heating a first mix of carbon and silicon oxide in a combustion reactor to an elevated temperature sufficient to produce silicon carbide at an accelerated rate, the heating being provided by an in situ combustion with oxygen gas, and then admixing the silicon carbide with carbon and aluminum oxide to form a second mix and heating the second mix in a second reactor to an elevated metal-forming temperature sufficient to produce aluminum-silicon alloy. The prereduction step includes holding aluminum oxide substantially absent from the combustion reactor. The metal-forming step includes feeding silicon oxide in a preferred ratio with silicon carbide. 1 fig.

  20. Aluminum base alloy powder metallurgy process and product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical method including cooling molten aluminum particles and consolidating resulting solidified particles into a multiparticle body, wherein the improvement comprises the provision of greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn. Aluminum containing greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn.

  1. The effect of hydrogen embrittlement on the localized plastic deformation of aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkareva, Anna, E-mail: avb@ispms.tsc.ru; Lunev, Aleksey, E-mail: agl@ispms.tsc.ru; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050

    2015-10-27

    The effect of hydrogen embrittlement on the localized plastic deformation of aluminum alloy D1 was investigated. The studies were performed for the test samples of aluminum alloy subjected to electrolytic hydrogenation. It is found that the mechanical properties and localized plastic deformation parameters of aluminum alloy are affected adversely by hydrogen embrittlement. The hydrogenated counterpart of alloy has a lower degree of ductility relative to the original alloy; however, the plastic flow behavior of material remains virtually unaffected. Using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy methods, the changes in the fracture surface were investigated. The deformation diagrams were examined formore » the deformed samples of aluminum alloy. These are found to show all the plastic flow stages: the linear, parabolic and pre-failure stages would occur for the respective values of the exponent n from the Ludwik-Holomon equation. Using digital speckle image technique, the local strain patterns were being registered for the original alloy D1 and the counterpart subjected to electrolytic hydrogenation for 100 h.« less

  2. M551 metals melting experiment. [space manufacturing of aluminum alloys, tantalum alloys, stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.; Busch, G.; Creter, C.

    1976-01-01

    The Metals Melting Skylab Experiment consisted of selectively melting, in sequence, three rotating discs made of aluminum alloy, stainless steel, and tantalum alloy. For comparison, three other discs of the same three materials were similarly melted or welded on the ground. The power source of the melting was an electron beam unit. Results are presented which support the concept that the major difference between ground base and Skylab samples (i.e., large elongated grains in ground base samples versus nearly equiaxed and equal sized grains in Skylab samples) can be explained on the basis of constitutional supercooling, and not on the basis of surface phenomena. Microstructural observations on the weld samples and present explanations for some of these observations are examined. In particular, ripples and their implications to weld solidification were studied. Evidence of pronounced copper segregation in the Skylab A1 weld samples, and the tantalum samples studied, indicates a weld microhardness (and hence strength) that is uniformly higher than the ground base results, which is in agreement with previous predictions. Photographs are shown of the microstructure of the various alloys.

  3. The stress-corrosion cracking behavior of high-strength aluminum powder metallurgy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickens, J. R.; Christodoulou, L.

    1987-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of rapidly solidified (RS) aluminum powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys 7090 and 7091, mechanically alloyed aluminum P/M alloy IN* 9052, and ingot metallurgy (I/M) alloys of similar compositions was compared using bolt-loaded double cantilever beam specimens. In addition, the effects of aging, grain size, grain boundary segregation, pre-exposure embrittlement, and loading mode on the SCC of 7091 were independently assessed. Finally, the data generated were used to elucidate the mechanisms of SCC in the three P/M alloys. The IN 9052 had the lowest SCC susceptibility of all alloys tested in the peak-strength condition, although no SCC was observed in the two RS alloys in the overaged condition. The susceptibility of the RS alloys was greater in the underaged than the peak-aged temper. We detected no significant differences in susceptibility of 7091 with grain sizes varying from 2 to 300 μm. Most of the crack advance during SCC of 7091 was by hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Furthermore, both RS alloys were found to be susceptible to preexposure embrittlement—also indicative of HE. The P/M alloys were less susceptible to SCC than the I/M alloys in all but one test.

  4. Behavior and Microstructure in Cryomilled Aluminum alloy Containing Diamondoids Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Walid Magdy

    Aluminum (Al) alloys have been the materials of choice for both civil and military aircraft structure. Primary among these alloys are 6061 Al and 5083 Al, which have used for several structural applications including those in aerospace and automobile industry. It is desirable to enhance strength in Al alloys beyond that achieved via traditional techniques such as precipitation hardening. Recent developments have indicated strengthening via grain refinement is an effective approach since, according the Hall-Petch relation, as grain size decreases strength significantly increases. The innovate techniques of severe plastic deformation, cryomilling, are successful in reefing grain size. These techniques lead to a minimum grain size that is the result of a dynamic balance between the formation of dislocation structure and its recovery by thermal processes. According to Mohamed's model, each metal is characterized by a minimum grain size that is determined by materials parameters such as the stacking faulty energy and the activation energy for diffusion. In the present dissertation, 6061 Al and 5083 Al were synthesized using cryomilling. Microstructural characterization was extensively carried out to monitor grain size changes. A close examination of the morphology of the 6061 Al powder particles revealed that in the early milling stages, the majority of the particles changed from spheres to thin disk-shaped particles. This change was attributed to the high degree of plastic deformation generated by the impact energy during ball-powder-ball collisions. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to monitor the change in grain size as a function of milling time. The results of both techniques demonstrated a close agreement with respect to two observations: (a) during cryomilling, the grain size of 6061 Al decreased with milling time, and (b) after 15 h of milling, the grain size approached a minimum value of about 22 nm, which is in

  5. Copper, Aluminum and Nickel: A New Monocrystalline Orthodontic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierenga, Mark

    Introduction: This study was designed to evaluate, via tensile and bend testing, the mechanical properties of a newly-developed monocrystalline orthodontic archwire comprised of a blend of copper, aluminum, and nickel (CuAlNi). Methods: The sample was comprised of three shape memory alloys; CuAlNi, copper nickel titanium (CuNiTi), and nickel titanium (NiTi); from various orthodontic manufacturers in both 0.018" round and 0.019" x 0.025" rectangular dimensions. Additional data was gathered for similarly sized stainless steel and beta-titanium archwires as a point of reference for drawing conclusions about the relative properties of the archwires. Measurements of loading and unloading forces were recorded in both tension and deflection testing. Repeated-measure ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare loading and unloading forces across wires and one-way ANOVA (alpha= 0.05) was used to compare elastic moduli and hysteresis. To identify significant differences, Tukey post-hoc comparisons were performed. Results: The modulus of elasticity, deflection forces, and hysteresis profiles of CuAlNi were significantly different than the other superelastic wires tested. In all tests, CuAlNi had a statistically significant lower modulus of elasticity compared to the CuNiTi and NiTi wires (P <0.0001). The CuAlNi wire exhibited significantly lower loading and unloading forces than any other wire tested. In round wire tensile tests, loading force at all deflections was significantly lower for CuAlNi than CuNiTi or NiTi (P <0.0001). In tensile testing, the CuAlNi alloy was able to recover from a 7 mm extension (10% elongation) without permanent deformation and with little to no loss in force output. In large-deflection bend tests at 4, 5, and 6 mm deflection, CuAlNi showed the significantly lowest loading forces across the three wire materials (P <0.0001). The NiTi wires showed up to 12 times the amount of energy loss due to hysteresis compared to CuAlNi. CuAlNi showed a hysteresis

  6. Effect of oxide layer formation on deformation of aluminum alloys under fire conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Vigil, Francisco M.; Tolendino, Greg; ...

    2015-05-14

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural behavior of aluminum alloys used in the aerospace industry when exposed to conditions similar to those of an accident scenario, such as a fuel fire. This study focuses on the role that the aluminum oxide layer plays in the deformation and the strength of the alloy above melting temperature. To replicate some of the thermal and atmospheric conditions that the alloys might experience in an accident scenario, aluminum rod specimens were subjected to temperatures near to or above their melting temperature in air, nitrogen, and vacuum environments. The characteristics ofmore » their deformation, such as geometry and rate of deformation, were observed. Tests were conducted by suspending aluminum rods vertically from an enclosure. This type of experiment was performed in two different environments: air and nitrogen. The change in environments allowed the effects of the oxide layer on the material strength to be analyzed by inhibiting the growth of the oxide layer. Observations were reported from imaging taken during the experiment showing creep behavior of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures and time to failure. In addition, an example of tensile load–displacement data obtained in air and vacuum was reported to understand the effect of oxide layer on aluminum deformation and strength.« less

  7. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' formore » evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important since it

  8. Microstructural characterization of ultrasonic impact treated aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim Ngoc Thi

    Aluminum 5456-H116 has high as-welded strength, is formable, and highly corrosion resistant, however, it can become sensitized when exposed to elevated temperatures for a prolonged time. Sensitization results in the formation of a continuous β phase at the grain boundaries that is anodic to the matrix. Thus the grain boundaries become susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular corrosion cracking (IGC). Cracking issues on aluminum superstructures have prompted the use of a severe plastic deformation processes, such as ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT), to improve SCC resistance. This study correlated the effects of UIT on the properties of 5456-H116 alloy to the microstructural evolution of the alloy and helped develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that cause the microstructural evolution. Ultrasonic impact treatment produces a deformed layer at the surface ˜ 10 to 18 µm thick that is characterized by micro-cracks, tears, and voids. Ultrasonic impact treatment results in grain refinement within the deformation layer and extending below the deformed layer. The microstructure exhibits weak crystallographic texture with larger fraction of high angle grain boundaries. Nanocrystalline grains within the deformation layer vary in size from 2 to 200 nm in diameter and exhibit curved or wavy grain boundaries. The nanocrystalline grains are thermally stable up to 300°C. Above 300°C, grain growth occurs with an activation energy of ˜ 32 kJ/mol. Below the deformation layer, the microstructure is characterized by submicron grains, complex structure of dislocations, sub-boundaries, and Moiré fringes depicting overlapping grains. The deformation layer does not exhibit the presence of a continuous β phase, however below the deformation layer; a continuous β phase along the grain boundaries is present. In general the highest hardness and yield strength is at the UIT surface which is attributed to the formation of nanocrystalline grains

  9. A Fatigue Model for Discontinuous Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Composite: Influence of Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, R. R.; Jordon, J. B.; Brammer, A. T.; Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Allison, P. G.; Rushing, T. W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the use of a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model is put forth for the analysis of discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy metal matrix composite. The fatigue model was used for a ceramic particle-reinforced aluminum alloy deformed under conditions of fully reversed strain control. Experimental results revealed the aluminum alloy to be strongly influenced by volume fraction of the particulate reinforcement phase under conditions of strain-controlled fatigue. The model safely characterizes the evolution of fatigue damage in this aluminum alloy composite into the distinct stages of crack initiation and crack growth culminating in failure. The model is able to capture the specific influence of particle volume fraction, particle size, and nearest neighbor distance in quantifying fatigue life. The model yields good results for correlation of the predicted results with the experimental test results on the fatigue behavior of the chosen aluminum alloy for two different percentages of the ceramic particle reinforcement. Further, the model illustrates that both particle size and volume fraction are key factors that govern fatigue lifetime. This conclusion is well supported by fractographic observations of the cyclically deformed and failed specimens.

  10. Friction stir welding of T joints of dissimilar aluminum alloy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakare, Shrikant B.; Kalyankar, Vivek D.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloys are preferred in the mechanical design due to their advantages like high strength, good corrosion resistance, low density and good weldability. In various industrial applications T joints configuration of aluminum alloys are used. In different fields, T joints having skin (horizontal sheet) strengthen by stringers (vertical sheets) were used to increase the strength of structure without increasing the weight. T joints are usually carried out by fusion welding which has limitations in joining of aluminum alloy due to significant distortion and metallurgical defects. Some aluminum alloys are even non weldable by fusion welding. The friction stir welding (FSW) has an excellent replacement of conventional fusion welding for T joints. In this article, FSW of T joints is reviewed by considering aluminum alloy and various joint geometries for defect analysis. The previous experiments carried out on T joints shows the factors such as tool geometry, fixturing device and joint configurations plays significant role in defect free joints. It is essential to investigate the material flow during FSW to know joining mechanism and the formation of joint. In this study the defect occurred in the FSW are studied for various joint configurations and parameters. Also the effect of the parameters and defects occurs on the tensile strength are studied. It is concluded that the T-joints of different joint configurations can be pretended successfully. Comparing to base metal some loss in tensile strength was observed in the weldments as well as overall reduction of the hardness in the thermos mechanically affected zone also observed.

  11. The role of hydrogen in hot-salt stress corrosion cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrejcin, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    Additional support is presented for the previously proposed role of hydrogen as an embrittling agent in hot-salt stress corrosion cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys. The main source of hydrogen formed during the reactions of titanium alloys with hot salt was identified as water associated with the salt. Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of an intermediate (hydrogen halide) with the alloy rather than from metal-water reactions. The fracture mode of precracked tensile specimens was ductile when the specimens were tested in air, and brittle when tests were made in high-pressure hydrogen. Stressed titanium-aluminum alloys also were cracked by bombardment with hydrogen ions produced in a proton accelerator. The approximate concentrations of the hydrogen ions in the alloys were calculated.

  12. Influence of Composition on the Environmental Impact of a Cast Aluminum Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Patricia; Elduque, Daniel; Sarasa, Judith; Pina, Carmelo; Javierre, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The influence of alloy composition on the environmental impact of the production of six aluminum casting alloys (Al Si12Cu1(Fe), Al Si5Mg, Al Si9Cu3Zn3Fe, Al Si10Mg(Fe), Al Si9Cu3(Fe)(Zn) and Al Si9) has been analyzed. In order to perform a more precise environmental impact calculation, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) with ReCiPe Endpoint methodology has been used, with the EcoInvent v3 AlMg3 aluminum alloy dataset as a reference. This dataset has been updated with the material composition ranges of the mentioned alloys. The balanced, maximum and minimum environmental impact values have been obtained. In general, the overall impact of the studied aluminum alloys varies from 5.98 × 10−1 pts to 1.09 pts per kg, depending on the alloy composition. In the analysis of maximum and minimum environmental impact, the alloy that has the highest uncertainty is AlSi9Cu3(Fe)(Zn), with a range of ±9%. The elements that contribute the most to increase its impact are Copper and Tin. The environmental impact of a specific case, an LED luminaire housing made out of an Al Si12Cu1(Fe) cast alloy, has been studied, showing the importance of considering the composition. Significant differences with the standard datasets that are currently available in EcoInvent v3 have been found. PMID:28773536

  13. Influence of Composition on the Environmental Impact of a Cast Aluminum Alloy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Patricia; Elduque, Daniel; Sarasa, Judith; Pina, Carmelo; Javierre, Carlos

    2016-05-25

    The influence of alloy composition on the environmental impact of the production of six aluminum casting alloys (Al Si12Cu1(Fe), Al Si5Mg, Al Si9Cu3Zn3Fe, Al Si10Mg(Fe), Al Si9Cu3(Fe)(Zn) and Al Si9) has been analyzed. In order to perform a more precise environmental impact calculation, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) with ReCiPe Endpoint methodology has been used, with the EcoInvent v3 AlMg3 aluminum alloy dataset as a reference. This dataset has been updated with the material composition ranges of the mentioned alloys. The balanced, maximum and minimum environmental impact values have been obtained. In general, the overall impact of the studied aluminum alloys varies from 5.98 × 10 -1 pts to 1.09 pts per kg, depending on the alloy composition. In the analysis of maximum and minimum environmental impact, the alloy that has the highest uncertainty is AlSi9Cu3(Fe)(Zn), with a range of ±9%. The elements that contribute the most to increase its impact are Copper and Tin. The environmental impact of a specific case, an LED luminaire housing made out of an Al Si12Cu1(Fe) cast alloy, has been studied, showing the importance of considering the composition. Significant differences with the standard datasets that are currently available in EcoInvent v3 have been found.

  14. The Effect of Alloying Elements on Thermal Conductivity and Casting Characteristic in High Pressure Die Casting of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Ik; Choi, Se-Weon; Kim, Young-Chan; Kang, Chang-Seog

    Recently, demand of aluminum alloys for use in high thermal conductivity application is increases but the most aluminum die casting alloys exhibit very lower thermal properties because of their high concentrations of alloying elements. However, those alloying elements are essential to obtain sufficient fluidity and mechanical strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of alloying elements in die casting alloys, Si, Cu, Mg, Fe and Mn, in thermal conductivity, die casting characteristics and mechanical properties and find out the appropriate amount of each alloying element for development of heat sink component. The results showed that Mn had the most deleterious effect in thermal conductivity and Si and Fe contents were important to improve strength and limit casting defects, such as hot tearing and die soldering. The alloy with 0.2 1.0wt%Cu, 0.3 0.6wt%Fe and 1.0 2.0wt%Si showed very good combination of high thermal conductivity and good casting characteristics.

  15. Thermomechanical processing of aluminum micro-alloyed with Sc, Zr, Ti, B, and C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Cameron T.

    Critical exploration of the minimalistic high strength low alloy aluminum (HSLA-Al) paradigm is necessary for the continued development of advanced aluminum alloys. In this study, scandium (Sc) and zirconium (Zr) are examined as the main precipitation strengthening additions, while magnesium (Mg) is added to probe the synergistic effects of solution and precipitation hardening, as well as the grain refinement during solidification afforded by a moderate growth restriction factor. Further, pathways of recrystallization are explored in several potential HSLA-Al syste =ms sans Sc. Aluminum-titanium-boron (Al-Ti-B) and aluminum-titanium-carbon (Al-Ti-C) grain refining master alloys are added to a series of Al-Zr alloys to examine both the reported Zr poisoning effect on grain size reduction and the impact on recrystallization resistance through the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) imaging. Results include an analysis of active strengthening mechanisms and advisement for both constitution and thermomechanical processing of HSLA-Al alloys for wrought or near-net shape cast components. The mechanisms of recrystallization are discussed for alloys which contain a bimodal distribution of particles, some of which act as nucleation sites for grain formation during annealing and others which restrict the growth of the newly formed grains.

  16. Effect of Intensive Plastic Deformation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhadilov, Bauyrzhan; Uazyrkhanova, Gulzhaz; Myakinin, Alexandr; Uazyrkhanova, Zhuldyz

    2016-08-01

    In work it was studied the influence of intensive plastic deformation on structure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Intensive plastic deformation was carried out by using equal-channel angular extrusion. It is shown that the most efficient angle of intersection of the channels is the angle of Φ=120°, which ensures defect-free parts at the highest possible level of accumulated strain (e=8). It is established that the intensive milling grain structures in aluminum alloys AMG6 and AMC occurs at ECAE-12 passes, while the intersection angle of the channels of 120°. After ECAE-12 in aluminum alloys the grain refinement reaches to the size of ∼⃒1.0-1.5 gm. It is determined that as a result of equal channel angular pressing, the microhardness of alloy AMG6 increases almost 4 times in comparison with the initial state, the microhardness of alloy AMC increases by almost 4.5 times in comparison with the initial state. It is shown that ECAE-12 mass loss is reduced to 5.4 and 5.6 mg, which shows an increase in wear-resistance of aluminum alloys AMG6 and AMC 13-14 %.

  17. A comparison of corrosion inhibition of magnesium aluminum and zinc aluminum vanadate intercalated layered double hydroxides on magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lian; Zhang, Fen; Lu, Jun-Cai; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Shuo-Qi; Song, Liang; Zeng, Jian-Min

    2018-04-01

    The magnesium aluminum and zinc aluminum layered double hydroxides intercalated with NO3 -(MgAl-NO3-LDH and ZnAl-NO3-LDH) were prepared by the coprecipitation method, and the magnesium aluminum and the zinc aluminum layered double hydroxides intercalated with VO x -(MgAl-VO x -LDH and ZnAl-VO x -LDH) were prepared by the anion-exchange method. Morphologies, microstructures and chemical compositions of LDHs were investigated by SEM, EDS, XRD, FTIR, Raman and TG analyses. The immersion tests were carried to determine the corrosion inhibition properties of MgAl-VO x -LDH and ZnAl-VO x -LDH on AZ31 Mg alloys. The results showed that ZnAl-VO x -LDH possesses the best anion-exchange and inhibition abilities. The influence of treatment parameters on microstructures of LDHs were discussed. Additionally, an inhibition mechanism for ZnAl-VO x -LDH on the AZ31 magnesium alloy was proposed and discussed.

  18. Simulation of 7050 Wrought Aluminum Alloy Wheel Die Forging and its Defects Analysis based on DEFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shiquan; Yi Youping; Zhang Yuxun

    2010-06-15

    Defects such as folding, intercrystalline cracking and flow lines outcrop are very likely to occur in the forging of aluminum alloy. Moreover, it is difficult to achieve the optimal set of process parameters just by trial and error within an industrial environment. In producing 7050 wrought aluminum alloy wheel, a rigid-plastic finite element method (FEM) analysis has been performed to optimize die forging process. Processing parameters were analyzed, focusing on the effects of punch speed, friction factor and temperature. Meanwhile, mechanism as well as the evolution with respect to the defects of the wrought wheel was studied in details. Frommore » an analysis of the results, isothermal die forging was proposed for producing 7050 aluminum alloy wheel with good mechanical properties. Finally, verification experiment was carried out on hydropress.« less

  19. Research on the Treatment of Aluminum Alloy Chemical Milling Wastewater with Fenton Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong-liang, Huang; Ru, Li; Peng, Luo; Jun-li, Gu

    2018-03-01

    The aluminum alloy chemical milling wastewater was treated by Fenton method. The effect of pH value, reaction time, rotational speed, H2O2 dosage, Fe2+ dosage and the molar ratio between H2O2 and Fe2+ on the COD removal rate of aluminum alloy chemical milling wastewater were investigated by single factor experiment and orthogonal experiment. The results showed that the optimum operating conditions for Fenton oxidation were as follows: the initial pH value was 3, the rotational speed was 250r/min, the molar ratio of H2O2 and Fe2+ was 8, the reaction time was 90 min. Under the optimum conditions, the removal rate of the wastewater’s COD is about 72.36%. In the reaction kinetics that aluminum alloy chemical milling wastewater was oxidized and degraded by Fenton method under the optimum conditions, the reaction sequence of the initial COD was 0.8204.

  20. Effect of Aluminum Coating on the Surface Properties of Ti-(~49 at. pct) Ni Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Arijit; Khan, Gobinda Gopal; Mondal, Bholanath; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta; Chattopadhyay, Partha Protim

    2015-08-01

    Stable porous layer of mixed Al2O3 and TiO2 has been formed on the Ti-(~49 at. pct) Ni alloy surface with an aim to suppress leaching of Ni from the alloy surface in contact with bio-fluid and to enhance the process of osseointegration. Aluminum coating on the Ni-Ti alloy surface prior to the anodization treatment has resulted in enhancement of depth and uniformity of pores. Thermal oxidation of the anodized aluminum-coated Ni-Ti samples has exhibited the formation of Al2O3 and TiO2 phases with dense porous structure. The nanoindentation and nanoscratch measurements have indicated a remarkable improvement in the hardness, wear resistance, and adhesiveness of the porous aluminum-coated Ni-Ti sample after thermal oxidation.

  1. A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfrich, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

  2. The effect of aluminum alloying on strength properties and deformation mechanisms of the <123> Hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Tukeev, M. S.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.

    2007-10-01

    The role of aluminum alloying on strength properties and deformation mechanisms (slip, twinning) of <123> single crystals of Hadfield steel under tensile loading at T = 300 K is demonstrated. It is found out that aluminum alloying suppresses twinning deformation in the <123> single crystals and, during slip, results in a dislocation structure change from a uniform dislocation distribution to a planar dislocation structure.

  3. Fretting Wear-Resistant, Micro-Arc Oxidation Coatings for Aluminum and Titanium Alloy Bearings (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Cushman, Infoscitex Corporation, 303 Bear Hill Road, Waltham, MA 02451 Aluminum and titanium alloys are used as replacements for steel in gear...assess the susceptibility of selected substrates to wear. Initial testing utilized M50 steel rings as the counter surface to uncoated aluminum and...were recorded and plotted over the 4500 cycles, as shown in the right of Figure 3, depicting results of the best performing test substrate, M50 Steel

  4. The Effect of Surface Coatings on the Fatigue Strength of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Satec Models SF-2U-144 and -145 fatigue testing machines. The abrasion (wear) resistance, the thickness, and the corrosion resistance of the specimens...former coupons; therefore, sharp ed-, es should be finished or rounded by shot peening or sandblasting in order to diminish the possibility of crack...propagation. "Anodic Coatings for Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys%" Military Specification MIL-A-8625C. 6 Satec Systems, Inc.;Grove City, PA 16127. 3 41: I! ,I

  5. Violent oxidation of lithium-containing aluminum alloys in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalins, Ilmars; Karimi, Majid; Ila, Daryush

    1991-06-01

    A strong exothermic and quite well known thermite reaction involving aluminum, oxygen and transition metals (Fe, Cr, Ni, etc.) has apparently been initiated during impact testing of Alcoa aluminum alloy #2090 in liquid oxygen at NASA-MSFC. In some instances, this reaction, essentially an oxidation process, has been so intense that the Inconel 718 cup containing the aluminum alloy disk and associated impacter has melted raising certain safety concerns in the use of this alloy. Reaction products as well as the test specimen surfaces have been studied with surface science techniques like XPS/ESCA, SIMS and AES. Typically, in order to initiate the thermite reaction a temperature of approximately 1000°C is necessary. The mechanism responsible for this oxidation is of great interest. The analysis of the reaction products together with a theoretical analysis, including digital modeling has been pursued. There is strong evidence that the large relaxation energy of the aluminum oxide coating, formed during the aluminum alloy cleaning process, is causing a highly localized energy release during fracture or lattice deformation which is enhancing the oxidation process to a runaway condition. The presence of alkali atoms (Li) enhances the likelihood and intensity of the oxidation reaction. The details of the surface studies will be discussed.

  6. Numerical investigation for formability of aluminum 6016 alloy under non-isothermal warm forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P.; Dai, M. H.; Ying, L.; Shi, D. Y.; Zhao, K. M.; Lu, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The warm forming technology of aluminum alloy has attracted attention from worldwide automotive engineering sector in recent years, with which the complex geometry parts can be realized at elevated temperature. A non-isothermal warm forming process for the heat treatable aluminum can quickly carry out its application on traditional production line by adding a furnace to heat up the aluminum alloy sheet. The 6000 aluminum alloy was investigated by numerical simulation and experiment using the Nakajima test model in this paper. A modified Fields-Backofen model was introduced into numerical simulation process to describe the thermo-mechanical flow behavior of a 6000 series aluminum alloy. The experimental data was obtained by conducting thermal-mechanical uniaxial tensile experiment in temperatures range of 25˜400°C to guarantee the numerical simulation more accurate. The numerical simulation was implemented with LS_DYNA software in terms of coupled dynamic explicit method for investigating the effect of initial forming temperature and the Binder Holder Force (BHF), which are critical process parameters in non-isothermal warm forming. The results showed that the optimal initial forming temperature range was 300°C˜350°C. By means of conducting numerical simulation in deep drawing box model, the forming window of BHF and temperature around the optimal initial forming temperature (275°, 300° and 325°) are investigated, which can provide guidance to actual experiment.

  7. Power ultrasound irradiation during the alkaline etching process of the 2024 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutarlier, V.; Viennet, R.; Rolet, J.; Gigandet, M. P.; Hihn, J. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Prior to any surface treatment on an aluminum alloy, a surface preparation is necessary. This commonly consists in performing an alkaline etching followed by acid deoxidizing. In this work, the use of power ultrasound irradiation during the etching step on the 2024 aluminum alloy was studied. The etching rate was estimated by weight loss, and the alkaline film formed during the etching step was characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The benefit of power ultrasound during the etching step was confirmed by pitting potential measurement in NaCl solution after a post-treatment (anodizing).

  8. An Economic Model and Experiments to Understand Aluminum-Cerium Alloy Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ananth V.; Lim, Heejong; Rios, Orlando; Sims, Zachary; Weiss, David

    2018-04-01

    We provide an economic model to understand the impact of adoption, sorting and pricing of scrap on the recycling of a new aluminum-cerium (AlCe) alloy for use in engine blocks in the automobile industry. The goal of the laboratory portion of this study is to investigate possible effects of cerium contamination on well-established aluminum recycling streams. Our methodology includes three components: (1) focused data gathering from industry supply chain participants, (2) experimental data through laboratory experiments to understand the impact of cerium on existing alloys and (3) an economic model to understand pricing incentives on a recycler's separation of AlCe engine blocks.

  9. The Column Strength of Two Extruded Aluminum-Alloy H-Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgood, William R; Holt, Marshall

    1939-01-01

    Extruded aluminum-alloy members of various cross sections are used in aircraft as compression members either singly or as stiffeners for aluminum-alloy sheet. In order to design such members, it is necessary to know their column strength or, in the case of stiffeners, the value of the double modulus, which is best obtained for practical purposes from column tests. Column tests made on two extruded h-sections are described, and column formulas and formulas for the ratio of the double modulus to Young's modulus, based on the tests, are given.

  10. Niobium-aluminum base alloys having improved, high temperature oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor); Stephens, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A niobium-aluminum base alloy having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 48%-52% niobium, 36%-42% aluminum, 4%-10% chromium, 0%-2%, more preferably 1%-2%, silicon and/or tungsten with tungsten being preferred, and 0.1%-2.0% of a rare earth selected from the group consisting of yttrium, ytterbium and erbium. Parabolic oxidation rates, k.sub.p, at 1200.degree. C. range from about 0.006 to 0.032 (mg/cm.sup.2).sup.2 /hr. The new alloys also exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance.

  11. Maco/Micro Studies of Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms in Titanium and Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (.frhe .,bstf-f: - te-.J ’ h/’ 4 J .0 d lfr n, /5,po IS. SUPPLEMENTARY N3TES a Hydrogen Embrittlement, Titanium Alloys, Aluminum...AD-A116 025 MINNESOTA U4IV MINNEAPOLIS F/ 6 11/ 6 NACO/MICRO STUD~IES OF HYDRO6EN ENORITTLEMENT MECHANISMS IN TITA--CYCCUD APR 81 W W GERBERICH AFOSR77...HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT MECHANSIMS IN TITANIUM AND ALUMINUM ALLOYS FINAL REPORT for Period October 1975 to October 1981 4M University of Minnesota Minneapolis

  12. All-aluminum-alloy UHV chamber for molecular beam epitaxy, 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemitsu, M.; Miyamoto, N.

    1984-03-01

    The first all aluminum alloy (ex. JIS.6263-t6,2219-t87 etc) MBE chamber is constructed and described. After exposure to atmosphere, the chamber is drown to 10(-9) torr in 24 hours, and reaches an ultrahigh vacuum of 1.6x10(-10) torr by a 115 C, 24 bakeout process. The light weight and low cost as well as the short pump-down time and the law outgassing rate of the all aluminum alloy vacuum system seems to have a considerable applicative potentiality for equipment used in semiconductor ultrahigh vacuum processes.

  13. Analysis and Thermodynamic Prediction of Hydrogen Solution in Solid and Liquid Multicomponent Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyalebechi, P. N.

    Reported experimentally determined values of hydrogen solubility in liquid and solid Al-H and Al-H-X (where X = Cu, Si, Zn, Mg, Li, Fe or Ti) systems have been critically reviewed and analyzed in terms of Wagner's interaction parameter. An attempt has been made to use Wagner's interaction parameter and statistic linear regression models derived from reported hydrogen solubility limits for binary aluminum alloys to predict the hydrogen solubility limits in liquid and solid (commercial) multicomponent aluminum alloys. Reasons for the observed poor agreement between the predicted and experimentally determined hydrogen solubility limits are discussed.

  14. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy L277 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Cho, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties and improved damage tolerance. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate and a limited study on extrusions. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy L277 is typically aged at 290 F for 40 hours. In the study for plate, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a design of experiments study and the one step aging used as a control. Based on the earlier NASA studies on 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 220 F and 260 F. The second step aging temperatures was varied between 290 F and 310 F, which is in the range of the single-step aging temperature. For extrusions, two, single-step, and one two-step aging condition were evaluated. The results of the design of experiments used for the T8 temper as well as a smaller set of experiments for the T6 temper for plate and the results for extrusions will be presented.

  15. Effects of Stress Relaxation Aging with Electrical Pulses on Microstructures and Properties of 2219 Aluminum Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jingsheng; Zhan, Lihua; Zhang, Jiao; Yang, Zhan; Ma, Ziyao

    2016-01-01

    To realize the high-efficiency and high-performance manufacture of complex high-web panels, this paper introduced electric pulse current (EPC) into the stress relaxation aging forming process of 2219 aluminum alloy and systematically studied the effects of EPC, stress, and aging time upon the microstructure and properties of 2219 aluminum alloy. It is discovered that: (a) EPC greatly enhanced the mechanical properties after stress relaxation aging and reduced the sensitivity of the yield strength for the initial stress under the aging system of 165 °C/11 h; (b) compared with general aging, stress relaxation aging instead delayed the aging process of 2219 aluminum alloy and greatly increased the peak strength value; (c) EPC accelerated the aging precipitation behavior of 2219 aluminum alloy and reduced transgranular and grain-boundary energy difference, thus leading to a more diffused distribution of the transgranular precipitated phase and the absence of a significant precipitation-free zone (PFZ) and grain-boundary stable phase in the grain boundary, further improving the mechanical properties of the alloy. PMID:28773660

  16. Processing, microstructure evolution and properties of nanoscale aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jixiong

    In this project, phase transformations and precipitation behavior in age-hardenable nanoscale materials systems, using Al-Cu alloys as model materials, were first studied. The Al-Cu nanoparticles were synthesized by a Plasma Ablation process and found to contain a 2˜5 nm thick adherent aluminum oxide scale, which prevented further oxidation. On aging of the particles, a precipitation sequence consisting of, nearly pure Cu precipitates to the metastable theta' to equilibrium theta was observed, with all three forming along the oxide-particle interface. The structure of theta' and its interface with the Al matrix has been characterized in detail. Ultrafine Al-Cu nanoparticles (5˜25 nm) were also synthesized by inert gas condensation (IGC) and their aging behavior was studied. These particles were found to be quite stable against precipitation. Secondly, pure Al nanoparticles were prepared by the Exploding Wire process and their sintering and consolidation behavior were studied. It was found that nanopowders of Al could be processed to bulk structures with high hardness and density. Sintering temperature was found to have a dominant effect on density, hardness and microstructure. Sintering at temperatures >600°C led to breakup of the oxide scale, leading to an interesting nanocomposite composed of 100˜200 nm Al oxide dispersed in a bimodal nanometer-micrometer size Al matrix grains. Although there was some grain growth, the randomly dispersed oxide fragments were quite effective in pinning the Al grain boundaries, preventing excessive grain growth and retaining high hardness. Cold rolling and hot rolling were effective methods for attaining full densification and high hardness. Thirdly, the microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of Al-Al 2O3 nanocomposites were studied. The composites can retain high strength at elevated temperature and thermal soaking has practically no detrimental effect on strength. Although the ductility of the composite remains

  17. Evaluation of Aluminum Alloy 2050-T84 Microstructure and Mechanical Properties at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hales, Stephen J.; Shenoy, Ravi N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2050 is being considered for the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks to reduce the mass of future heavy-lift launch vehicles. The alloy is available in section thicknesses greater than that of the incumbent aluminum alloy, 2195, which will enable designs with greater structural efficiency. While ambient temperature design allowable properties are available for alloy 2050, cryogenic properties are not available. To determine its suitability for use in cryogenic propellant tanks, tensile, compression and fracture tests were conducted on 4 inch thick 2050-T84 plate at ambient temperature and at -320degF. Various metallurgical analyses were also performed in order to provide an understanding of the compositional homogeneity and microstructure of 2050.

  18. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; McKamey, Claudette G.

    1993-01-01

    Iron-aluminum alloys having selectable room-temperature ductilities of greater than 20%, high resistance to oxidation and sulfidation, resistant pitting and corrosion in aqueous solutions, and possessing relatively high yield and ultimate tensile strengths are described. These alloys comprise 8 to 9.5% aluminum, up to 7% chromium, up to 4% molybdenum, up to 0.05% carbon, up to 0.5% of a carbide former such as zirconium, up to 0.1 yttrium, and the balance iron. These alloys in wrought form are annealed at a selected temperature in the range of 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. for providing the alloys with selected room-temperature ductilities in the range of 20 to about 29%.

  19. Thermomechanical treatment of welded joints of aluminum-lithium alloys modified by scandium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    At present, the aeronautical equipment manufacture involves up-to-date high-strength aluminum alloys of decreased density resulting from the lithium admixture. Various technologies of fusible welding of these alloys are being developed. The paper presents experimental investigations of the optimization of the laser welding of aluminum alloys with the scandium-modified welded joint after thermomechanical treatment. The effect of scandium on the micro- and macrostructure is studied along with strength characteristics of the welded joint. It is found that thermomechanical treatment allows us to obtain the strength of the welded joint 0.89 for the Al-Mg-Li system and 0.99 for the Al-Cu-Li system with the welded joint modified by scandium in comparison with the base alloy after treatment.

  20. Electrochemical Behavior and Surface Chemistry of Aluminum Alloys: Solute-Rich Interphase Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-31

    physical vapor deposition ( PVD ). Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the passivity of stainless aluminum alloys, including...flat-cell model K0235), which simplified the mounting of the specimens since no lead wire attachment or coating of the specimens were required. The...reasons. First, depending on when the particles were ejected and whether they were subsequently coated with the alloy, their presence could establish

  1. A Review of Texture Evolution Mechanisms During Deformation by Rolling in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shasha; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Zhiyi; Li, Fudong

    2018-06-01

    The current understanding of texture evolution during deformation by rolling in aluminum alloys was summarized. This included understanding the evolution mechanisms and several key factors of initial texture, microstructure, alloy composition, deformation temperature, stress-strain condition, and rolling geometry. Related models on predicting texture evolution during rolling were also discussed. Finally, for this research field, the recommendations for controlling the formation of rolling textures were proposed.

  2. Hot hardness of nickel-rich nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    Rockwell A hardness of cast nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys was examined from ambient to 1150 K and compared to cast NiAl and IN-100. Alloy constitution was either gamma, gamma prime + gamma or gamma + beta + alpha + gamma prime. Below 1000 K beta containing NiCrAl alloys have hardnesses comparable to IN-100; above 1000 K they soften faster than IN-100. At 1150 K the hardness of beta-containing NiCrAl alloys decreases with increasing beta-content. The beta-containing NiCrAl alloys were harder than beta-NiAl. The ultimate tensile strengths of the NiCrAl alloys were estimated. The effects of NiCrAl coatings on strength and fatigue life of cooled turbine components were deduced.

  3. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  4. Advantages of Oxide Films as Bases for Aluminum Pigmented Surface Coatings for Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R W; Mutchler, W H

    1931-01-01

    Both laboratory and weather-exposure corrosion tests showed conclusively that the protection afforded by aluminum pigmented spar varnish coatings applied to previously anodized aluminum surfaces was greatly superior to that afforded by the same coatings applied to surfaces which had simply been cleaned free from grease and not anodized.

  5. Characteristics of the aluminum alloy sheets for forming and application examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uema, Naoyuki; Asano, Mineo

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the characteristics and application examples of aluminum alloy sheets developed for automotive parts by Sumitomo Light Metal are described. For the automotive closure panels (ex., hood, back-door), an Al-Mg-Si alloy sheet having an excellent hemming performance was developed. The cause of the occurrence and the propagation of cracks by bending were considered to be the combined effect of the shear bands formed across several crystal grains and the micro-voids formed around the second phase particles. By reducing the shear band formation during bending by controlling the crystallographic texture, the Al-Mg-Si alloy sheets showed an excellent hemming performance. For the automotive outer panels (ex., roof, fender, trunk-lid), an Al-Mg alloy sheet, which has both a good hot blow formability and excellent surface appearance after hot blow forming was developed, and hot blow forming technology was put to practical use using this developed Al-Mg alloy sheet. For automotive heat insulators, a high ductile Al-Fe alloy sheet was developed. The heat insulator, which integrated several panels, was put into practical use using this developed Al-Fe alloy sheet. The textured sheet was often used as a heat insulator in order to reduce the thickness of the aluminum alloy sheet and obtain good press formability. The new textured sheet, which has both high rigidity and good press formability for heat insulators, was developed by FE analysis.

  6. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report, in multiple presentation format, describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to improve the overall property response of selected aerospace alloys, explore further a newly-developed and registered alloy, and correlate the processing, metallurgical structure, and subsequent properties achieved with particular emphasis on the crystallographic orientation texture developed. Modifications to plate processing, specifically hot rolling practices, were evaluated for Al-Li alloys 2195 and 2297, for the recently registered Al-Cu-Ag alloy, 2139, and for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050. For all of the alloys evaluated, the processing modifications resulted in significant improvements in mechanical properties. Analyses also resulted in an enhanced understanding of the correlation of processing, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties.

  7. Finite element analysis of the upsetting of a 5056 aluminum alloy sample with consideration of its microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, S. V.; Chaplygin, K. K.

    2017-12-01

    Computer simulation of upsetting the finite element models (FEMs) of an isotropic 5056 aluminum alloy sample and a 5056 aluminum alloy sample with consideration of microstructure is carried out. The stress and strain distribution patterns at different process stages are obtained. The strain required for the deformation of the FEMs of 5056 alloy samples is determined. The influence of the material microstructure on the stress-strain behavior and technological parameters are demonstrated.

  8. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 (Al-1.0 Li-4.0 Cu-0.4 Mg-0.4 Ag-0.12 Zr) for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. These newer alloys generally have lithium content less than 2 wt. % and their composition and processing have been carefully tailored to increase the toughness and reduce the mechanical property anisotropy of the earlier generation alloys such 2090 and 8090. Alloy processing, particularly the aging treatment, has a significant influence on the strength-toughness combinations and their dependence on service environments for aluminum-lithium alloys. Work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on alloy 2195 has shown that the cryogenic toughness can be improved by employing a two-step aging process. This is accomplished by aging at a lower temperature in the first step to suppress nucleation of the strengthening precipitate at sub-grain boundaries while promoting nucleation in the interior of the grains. Second step aging at the normal aging temperature results in precipitate growth to the optimum size. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy C458 (Al-1.8 Li-2.7 Cu-0.3 Mg- 0.08 Zr-0.3 Mn-0.6 Zn) is typically aged at 300 F for 24 hours. In this study, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a comprehensive 24 full factorial design of experiments study and the typical one-step aging used as a reference. Based on the higher lithium content of C458 compared with 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 175 F and 250 F. The second step aging temperatures was

  9. A detailed investigation of the strain hardening response of aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canadinc, Demircan

    The unusual strain hardening response exhibited by Hadfield steel single and polycrystals under tensile loading was investigated. Hadfield steel, which deforms plastically through the competing mechanisms slip and twinning, was alloyed with aluminum in order to suppress twinning and study the role of slip only. To avoid complications due to a grained structure, only single crystals of the aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel were considered at the initial stage of the current study. As a result of alloying with aluminum, twinning was suppressed; however a significant increase in the strain hardening response was also present. A detailed microstructural analysis showed the presence of high-density dislocation walls that evolve in volume fraction due to plastic deformation and interaction with slip systems. The very high strain hardening rates exhibited by the aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel single crystals was attributed to the blockage of glide dislocations by the high-density dislocation walls. A crystal plasticity model was proposed, that accounts for the volume fraction evolution and rotation of the dense dislocation walls, as well as their interaction with the active slip systems. The novelty of the model lies in the simplicity of the constitutive equations that define the strain hardening, and the fact that it is based on experimental data regarding the microstructure. The success of the model was tested by its application to different crystallographic orientations, and finally the polycrystals of the aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel. Meanwhile, the capability of the model to predict texture was also observed through the rotation of the loading axis in single crystals. The ability of the model to capture the polycrystalline deformation response provides a venue for its utilization in other alloys that exhibit dislocation sheet structures.

  10. Measurements of degree of sensitization (DoS) in aluminum alloys using EMAT ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Xiang, Dan; Qin, Yexian; Pond, Robert B; Slusarski, Kyle

    2011-07-01

    Sensitization in 5XXX aluminum alloys is an insidious problem characterized by the gradual formation and growth of beta phase (Mg(2)Al(3)) at grain boundaries, which increases the susceptibility of alloys to intergranular corrosion (IGC) and intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The degree of sensitization (DoS) is currently quantified by the ASTM G67 Nitric Acid Mass Loss Test, which is destructive and time consuming. A fast, reliable, and non-destructive method for rapid detection and the assessment of the condition of DoS in AA5XXX aluminum alloys in the field is highly desirable. In this paper, we describe a non-destructive method for measurements of DoS in aluminum alloys with an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). AA5083 aluminum alloy samples were sensitized at 100°C with processing times varying from 7days to 30days. The DoS of sensitized samples was first quantified with the ASTM 67 test in the laboratory. Both ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in sensitized specimens were then measured using EMAT and the results were correlated with the DoS data. We found that the longitudinal wave velocity was almost a constant, independent of the sensitization, which suggests that the longitudinal wave can be used to determine the sample thickness. The shear wave velocity and especially the shear wave attenuation are sensitive to DoS. Relationships between DoS and the shear velocity, as well as the shear attenuation have been established. Finally, we performed the data mining to evaluate and improve the accuracy in the measurements of DoS in aluminum alloys with EMAT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aluminum for bonding Si-Ge alloys to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Eggemann, Robert V.

    1976-01-13

    Improved thermoelectric device and process, comprising the high-temperature, vacuum bonding of a graphite contact and silicon-germanium thermoelectric element by the use of a low void, aluminum, metallurgical shim with low electrical resistance sandwiched therebetween.

  12. Effect of Iron Impurity on the Phase Composition, Structure and Properties of Magnesium Alloys Containing Manganese and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E. F.

    2017-07-01

    Results of a study of the interaction between iron impurity and manganese and aluminum alloying elements during formation of phase composition in alloys of the Mg - Mn, Mg - Al, Mg - Al - Mn, and Mg - Al - Zn - Mn systems are presented. It is proved that this interaction results in introduction of Fe into the intermetallic phase. The phase compositions of model magnesium alloys and commercial alloys MA2-1 and MA5 are studied. It is shown that both manganese and aluminum may bind the iron impurity into phases. Composite Fe-containing intermetallic phases of different compositions influence differently the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys.

  13. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  14. Fatigue Strength Estimation Based on Local Mechanical Properties for Aluminum Alloy FSW Joints

    PubMed Central

    Sillapasa, Kittima; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Miyashita, Yukio; Seo, Nobushiro

    2017-01-01

    Overall fatigue strengths and hardness distributions of the aluminum alloy similar and dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) joints were determined. The local fatigue strengths as well as local tensile strengths were also obtained by using small round bar specimens extracted from specific locations, such as the stir zone, heat affected zone, and base metal. It was found from the results that fatigue fracture of the FSW joint plate specimen occurred at the location of the lowest local fatigue strength as well as the lowest hardness, regardless of microstructural evolution. To estimate the fatigue strengths of aluminum alloy FSW joints from the hardness measurements, the relationship between fatigue strength and hardness for aluminum alloys was investigated based on the present experimental results and the available wide range of data from the references. It was found as: σa (R = −1) = 1.68 HV (σa is in MPa and HV has no unit). It was also confirmed that the estimated fatigue strengths were in good agreement with the experimental results for aluminum alloy FSW joints. PMID:28772543

  15. Perforation of Thin Aluminum Alloy Plates by Blunt Projectiles - Experimental and Numerical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xinke; Guo, Zitao

    2011-06-01

    Reducing the armor weight has become a research focus in terms of armored material with the increasing requirement of the mobility and flexibility of tanks and armored vehicles in modern local wars. Due to high strength-to-density ratio, aluminum alloy has become a potential light armored material. In this study, both lab-scale ballistic test and finite element simulation were adopted to examine the ballistic resistance of aluminum alloy targets. Blunt high strength steel projectiles with 12.7 mm diameter were launched by light gas gun against 3.3 mm thick aluminum alloy plates at velocity of 90 ~170 m/s. The ballistic limit velocity was obtained. Plugging failure and obvious structure deformation of targets were observed, and with the impact velocity increasing, the target structure deformation decrease gradually. Corresponding 2D finite element simulations were conducted by ABAQUS/EXPLICIT combined with material performance testing. Good agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental results was found. Detailed computational results were provided to understand the deformation and failure mechanisms of the aluminum alloy plates.

  16. Anti-icing/frosting and self-cleaning performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Libang; Yan, Zhongna; Shi, Xueting; Sultonzoda, Firdavs

    2018-02-01

    Ice formation and frost deposition on cryogenic equipment and systems can result in serious problems and huge economic loss. Hence, it is quite necessary to develop new materials to prevent icing and frosting on cold surfaces in engineering fields. Here, a superhydrophobic aluminum alloy with enhanced anti-frosting, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance has been developed by a facile one-step method. The anti-frosting/icing performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys is confirmed by frosting/icing time delay, consolidating and freezing temperature reduction, and lower amount of frost/ice adhesion. Meanwhile, the excellent self-cleaning performance is authenticated by the fact that simulated pollution particles can be cleaned out by rolling water droplets completely. Finally, based on the classical nucleation theory, anti-icing and anti-frosting mechanisms of the superhydrophobic aluminum alloys are deduced. Results show that grounded on "air cushion" and "heat insulation" effect, a larger nucleation barrier and a lower crystal growth rate can be observed, which, hence, inhibit ice formation and frost deposition. It can be concluded that preparing superhydrophobic surfaces would be an effective strategy for improving anti-icing, anti-frosting, and self-cleaning performance of aluminum alloys.

  17. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P.; Malone, T.; Bond, R.; Torres, P.

    2001-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  18. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po; Malone, Tina; Bod, Robert; Torres, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  19. ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPLIANT CORROSION-ACTIVATED INHIBITOR SYSTEM FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The federal government is estimated to spend $1 billion on painting/repainting aircraft annually. Aircraft have surfaces composed of aluminum alloys that are highly susceptible to corrosion and must be protected with corrosion-preventative treatments that typically conta...

  20. Effect of aging on mechanical properties of aluminum-alloy rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roop, Frederick C

    1941-01-01

    Curves and tabular data present the results of strength tests made during and after 2 1/2 years of aging on rivets and rivet wire of 3/16-inch nominal diameter. The specimens were of aluminum alloy: 24S, 17S, and A17S of the duralumin type and 53S of the magnesium-silicide type.

  1. Effect of aging on mechanical properties of aluminum-alloy rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roop, Frederick C

    1941-01-01

    Curves and tabular data present the results of strength tests made during and after 2 1/2 years of aging on rivets and rivet wire of 3/16-inch nominal diameter. The specimens were of aluminum alloy: 24s, 17s, and a17s of the duralumin type and 53s of the magnesium-silicide type.

  2. Method of thermally processing superplastically formed aluminum-lithium alloys to obtain optimum strengthening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Claire E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Optimum strengthening of a superplastically formed aluminum-lithium alloy structure is achieved via a thermal processing technique which eliminates the conventional step of solution heat-treating immediately following the step of superplastic forming of the structure. The thermal processing technique involves quenching of the superplastically formed structure using static air, forced air or water quenching.

  3. Gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 6XXX. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1003 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.516 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23) or ER5356 (F-22); shielding gas is argon.

  4. Experimental Investigation on the Joining of Aluminum Alloy Sheets Using Improved Clinching Process

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Shengdun; Han, Xiaolan; Zhao, Xuzhe; Ishida, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheets have been widely used to build the thin-walled structures by mechanical clinching technology in recent years. However, there is an exterior protrusion located on the lower sheet and a pit on the upper sheet, which may restrict the application of the clinching technology in visible areas. In the present study, an improved clinched joint used to join aluminum alloy sheets was investigated by experimental method. The improved clinching process used for joining aluminum alloy evolves through four phases: (a) localized deformation; (b) drawing; (c) backward extrusion; and (d) mechanical interlock forming. A flat surface can be produced using the improved clinching process. Shearing strength, tensile strength, material flow, main geometrical parameters, and failure mode of the improved clinched joint were investigated. The sheet material was compressed to flow radially and upward using a punch, which generated a mechanical interlock by producing severe localized plastic deformation. The neck thickness and interlock of the improved clinched joint were increased by increasing the forming force, which also contributed to increase the strength of the clinched joint. The improved clinched joint can get high shearing strength and tensile strength. Three main failure modes were observed in the failure process, which were neck fracture mode, button separation mode, and mixed failure mode. The improved clinched joint has better joining quality to join aluminum alloy sheets on the thin-walled structures. PMID:28763027

  5. Fracture Testing of Large-Scale Thin-Sheet Aluminum Alloy (MS Word file)

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-02-01

    Word Document; A series of fracture tests on large-scale, precracked, aluminum alloy panels were carried out to examine and characterize the process by which cracks propagate and link up in this material. Extended grips and test fixtures were special...

  6. Experimental Investigation on the Joining of Aluminum Alloy Sheets Using Improved Clinching Process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Shengdun; Han, Xiaolan; Zhao, Xuzhe; Ishida, Tohru

    2017-08-01

    Aluminum alloy sheets have been widely used to build the thin-walled structures by mechanical clinching technology in recent years. However, there is an exterior protrusion located on the lower sheet and a pit on the upper sheet, which may restrict the application of the clinching technology in visible areas. In the present study, an improved clinched joint used to join aluminum alloy sheets was investigated by experimental method. The improved clinching process used for joining aluminum alloy evolves through four phases: (a) localized deformation; (b) drawing; (c) backward extrusion; and (d) mechanical interlock forming. A flat surface can be produced using the improved clinching process. Shearing strength, tensile strength, material flow, main geometrical parameters, and failure mode of the improved clinched joint were investigated. The sheet material was compressed to flow radially and upward using a punch, which generated a mechanical interlock by producing severe localized plastic deformation. The neck thickness and interlock of the improved clinched joint were increased by increasing the forming force, which also contributed to increase the strength of the clinched joint. The improved clinched joint can get high shearing strength and tensile strength. Three main failure modes were observed in the failure process, which were neck fracture mode, button separation mode, and mixed failure mode. The improved clinched joint has better joining quality to join aluminum alloy sheets on the thin-walled structures.

  7. Fatigue Strength Estimation Based on Local Mechanical Properties for Aluminum Alloy FSW Joints.

    PubMed

    Sillapasa, Kittima; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Miyashita, Yukio; Seo, Nobushiro

    2017-02-15

    Overall fatigue strengths and hardness distributions of the aluminum alloy similar and dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) joints were determined. The local fatigue strengths as well as local tensile strengths were also obtained by using small round bar specimens extracted from specific locations, such as the stir zone, heat affected zone, and base metal. It was found from the results that fatigue fracture of the FSW joint plate specimen occurred at the location of the lowest local fatigue strength as well as the lowest hardness, regardless of microstructural evolution. To estimate the fatigue strengths of aluminum alloy FSW joints from the hardness measurements, the relationship between fatigue strength and hardness for aluminum alloys was investigated based on the present experimental results and the available wide range of data from the references. It was found as: σ a ( R = -1) = 1.68 HV ( σ a is in MPa and HV has no unit). It was also confirmed that the estimated fatigue strengths were in good agreement with the experimental results for aluminum alloy FSW joints.

  8. Fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with improved corrosion inhibition on 6061 aluminum alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Guo, Zheng; Shi, Tian; Yu, Jingui; Tang, Mingkai; Huang, Xingjiu

    2015-07-01

    This work has developed a simple and low-cost method to render 6061 aluminum alloy surface superhydrophobicity and excellent corrosion inhibition. The superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface has been fabricated by hydrochloric acid etching, potassium permanganate passivation and fluoroalkyl-silane modification. Meanwhile, the effect of the etching and passivation time on the wettability and corrosion inhibition of the fabricated surface has also been investigated. Results show that with the etching time of 6 min and passivation time of 180 min the fabricated micro/nano-scale terrace-like hierarchical structures accompanying with the nanoscale coral-like network bulge structures after being modified can result in superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (CA) of 155.7°. Moreover, an extremely weak adhesive force to droplets as well as an outstanding self-cleaning behavior of the superhydrophobic surface has also been proved. Finally, corrosion inhibition in seawater of the as-prepared aluminum alloy surface is characterized by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Evidently, the fabricated superhydrophobic surface attained an improved corrosion inhibition efficiency of 83.37% compared with the traditional two-step processing consisting of etching and modification, which will extend the further applications of aluminum alloy especially in marine engineering fields.

  9. Wear behaviors of pure aluminum and extruded aluminum alloy (AA2024-T4) under variable vertical loads and linear speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jeki; Oak, Jeong-Jung; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Cho, Yi Je; Park, Yong Ho

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transition of wear behavior for pure aluminum and extruded aluminum alloy 2024-T4 (AA2024-T4). The wear test was carried using a ball-on-disc wear testing machine at various vertical loads and linear speeds. The transition of wear behaviors was analyzed based on the microstructure, wear tracks, wear cross-section, and wear debris. The critical wear rates for each material are occurred at lower linear speed for each vertical load. The transition of wear behavior was observed in which abrasion wears with the generation of an oxide layer, fracture of oxide layer, adhesion wear, severe adhesion wear, and the generation of seizure occurred in sequence. In case of the pure aluminum, the change of wear debris occurred in the order of blocky, flake, and needle-like debris. Cutting chip, flake-like, and coarse flake-like debris was occurred in sequence for the extruded AA2024-T4. The transition in the wear behavior of extruded AA2024-T4 occurred slower than in pure aluminum.

  10. Study of Shell Zone Formation in Lithographic and Anodizing Quality Aluminum Alloys: Experimental and Numerical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Christine; Larouche, André; Hark, Robert

    Shell thickness is an important quality factor for lithographic and anodizing quality aluminum alloys. Increasing pressure is placed on casting plants to produce a thinner shell zone for these alloys. This study, based on plant trials and mathematical modelling highlights the most significant parameters influencing shell zone formation. Results obtained show the importance of metal temperature and distribution and mould metal level on shell zone formation. As an answer to specific plant problems, this study led to the development of improved metal distribution systems for DC casting of litho and anodizing quality alloys.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Larson, L. A.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitaton events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significantly alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  12. Warm Forming of Aluminum Alloys using a Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Anisotropic Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abedrabbo, Nader; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Carsley, John E.

    Temperature-dependant anisotropic material models for two types of automotive aluminum alloys (5754-O and 5182-O) were developed and implemented in LS-Dyna as a user material subroutine (UMAT) for coupled thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) of warm forming of aluminum alloys. The anisotropy coefficients of the Barlat YLD2000 plane stress yield function for both materials were calculated for the range of temperatures 25 deg. C-260 deg. C. Curve fitting was used to calculate the anisotropy coefficients of YLD2000 and the flow stress as a function of temperature. This temperature-dependent material model was successfully applied to the coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of stretching ofmore » aluminum sheets and results were compared with experiments.« less

  13. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  14. Influences on the formability and mechanical properties of 7000-aluminum alloys in hot and warm forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Nürnberger, F.; Bonk, C.; Hübner, S.; Behrens, S.; Vogt, H.

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum alloys of the 7000 series possess high lightweight potential due to their high specific tensile strength combined with a good ultimate elongation. For this reason, hot-formed boron-manganese-steel parts can be substituted by these alloys. Therefore, the application of these aluminum alloys for structural car body components is desired to decrease the weight of the body in white and consequently CO2 emissions during vehicle operation. These days, the limited formability at room temperature limits an application in the automobile industry. By increasing the deformation temperature, formability can be improved. In this study, two different approaches to increase the formability of these alloys by means of higher temperatures were investigated. The first approach is a warm forming route to form sheets in T6 temper state with high tensile strength at temperatures between 150 °C and 300 °C. The second approach is a hot forming route. Here, the material is annealed at solution heat treatment temperature and formed directly after the annealing step. Additionally, a quench step is included in the forming stage. After the forming and quenching step, the sheets have to be artificially aged to achieve the high specific tensile strength. In this study, several parameters in the presented process routes, which influence the formability and the mechanical properties, have been investigated for the aluminum alloys EN AW7022 and EN AW7075.

  15. Fabrication of the superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy by anodizing and polymeric coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenyong; Luo, Yuting; Sun, Linyu; Wu, Ruomei; Jiang, Haiyun; Liu, Yuejun

    2013-01-01

    We reported the preparation of the superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy via anodizing and polymeric coating. Both the different anodizing processes and different polymeric coatings of aluminum alloy were investigated. The effects of different anodizing conditions, such as electrolyte concentration, anodization time and current on the superhydrophobic surface were discussed. The results showed that a good superhydrophobic surface was facilely fabricated by polypropylene (PP) coating after anodizing. The optimum conditions for anodizing were determined by orthogonal experiments. When the concentration of oxalic acid was 10 g/L, the concentration of NaCl was 1.25 g/L, anodization time was 40 min, and anodization current was 0.4 A, the best superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy with the contact angle (CA) of 162° and the sliding angle of 2° was obtained. On the other hand, the different polymeric coatings, such as polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP) and polypropylene grafting maleic anhydride (PP-g-MAH) were used to coat the aluminum alloy surface after anodizing. The results showed that the superhydrophobicity was most excellent by coating PP, while the duration of the hydrophobic surface was poor. By modifying the surface with the silane coupling agent before PP coating, the duration of the superhydrophobic surface was improved. The morphologies of the superhydrophobic surface were further confirmed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Combined with the material of PP with the low surface free energy, the micro/nano-structures of the surface resulted in the superhydrophobicity of the aluminum alloy surface.

  16. Replacement of steel parts with extruded aluminum alloys in an automobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daggula, Manikantha Reddy

    Over the past years, vehicle emissions have shown a negative impact on environment and human health. A new strategy has been used by automakers to reduce a vehicle's weight which significantly reduce fuel consumption and C02 emissions. A very light car consumes very less fuel as it needs to overcome less inertia, decreasing the required power to movie the vehicle. Reducing weight is the easiest way to increase fuel economy and making it by just 10% can increase its efficiency 6 to 8 percent. For a normal scale 80% of vehicles weight is shared among chassis, power train and other exterior components. Almost 60% of the vehicles weight is comprised of steel and the remaining is with cast and extruded aluminum and magnesium alloys. Our main aim is to look for the parts like Fuel tank holder, Fuel filler neck, Turbo inlet assembly, and Brake lines, Dash board frame which are made from steel and replace them with extruded aluminum alloys, to analyze a conventional rear wheel aluminum drive shaft and replace it with a new design and with a new aluminum alloy. The current project involves dismantling an automobile and looking for feasible steel parts and making samples, analyzing the hardness of the samples. These parts are optimally analyzed using Ansys Finite element analysis tool, these parts are subjected to the constraints such as three-point bending, tensile testing, hydrostatic pressure and also torsional stress action on the drive shaft, the deformation and stress are observed in these parts. The results show the current steel parts can be replaced with 3000 series aluminum alloy and the drive shaft can be replaced with new design with 6061-T6 Al-alloy which decreases 25% of the shaft weight.

  17. Four-point-bend fatigue of AA 2026 aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. X.; Zhai, T.; Garratt, M. D.; Bray, G. H.

    2005-09-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests were carried out on a newly developed high-strength AA 2026 Al alloy, which was in the form of extrusion bars with square and rectangular cross sections, using a self-aligning four-point-bend rig at room temperature, 15 Hz, and R = 0.1, in lab air. The fatigue strength of the square and rectangular bars was measured to be 85 and 90 pct of their yield strength, respectively, more than twice that of the predecessor to the 2026 alloy (the AA 2024 Al alloy). Fatigue cracks were found to be always initiated at large Θ' (Al7Cu2(Fe,Mn)) particles and to propagate predominantly in a crystallographic mode in the AA 2026 alloy. The fatigue fractographies of the square and rectangular extrusion bars were found to be markedly different, due to their different grain structures (fibril and layered, respectively). Fracture steps on the crack face were found in both of these extrusion bars. Since the 2026 alloy was purer in terms of Fe and Si content, it contained much less coarse particles than in a 2024 alloy. This partially accounted for the superior fatigue strength of the 2026 alloy.

  18. A study of spectrum fatigue crack propagation in two aluminum alloys. 2: Influence of microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    The important metallurgical factors that influence both constant amplitude and spectrum crack growth behavior in aluminum alloys were investigated. The effect of microstructural features such as grain size, inclusions, and dispersoids was evaluated. It was shown that a lower stress intensities, the I/M 7050 alloy showed better fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance than P/M 7091 alloy for both constant amplitude and spectrum testing. It was suggested that the most important microstructural variable accounting for superior FCP resistance of 7050 alloy is its large grain size. It was further postulated that the inhomogenous planar slip and large grain size of 7050 limit dislocation interactions and thus increase slip reversibility which improves FCP performance. The hypothesis was supported by establishing that the cyclic strain hardening exponent for the 7091 alloy is higher than that of 7050.

  19. Mechanisms of grain refinement in aluminum alloys in the process of severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaibyshev, R. O.; Mazurina, I. A.; Gromov, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the mechanisms of grain refinement in the process of severe plastic deformation of two aluminum alloys, i.e., 2219 bearing nanometric particles of Al3Zr and low-alloy Al-3% Cu, is described. The alloys are deformed by the method of equal channel angular pressing at 250°C to a maximum strain degree of about 12. The angles of (sub)grain boundaries in alloy 2219 are determined with the help of transmission electron microscopy by the method of Kikuchi lines. The evolution of the microstructure in alloy Al-3% Cu is studied with the help of grain-boundary maps obtained by the method of electron back-scattered diffraction.

  20. Corrosion Performance of New Generation Aluminum-Lithium Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, James P.; Bovard, Francine S.; Chrzan, James D.; Vandenburgh, Peter

    Over the past several years, a new generation of aluminum-lithium alloys has been developed. These alloys are characterized by excellent strength, low density, and high modulus of elasticity and are therefore of interest for lightweight structural materials applications particularly for construction of current and future aircraft. These new alloys have also demonstrated significant improvements in corrosion resistance when compared with the legacy and incumbent alloys. This paper documents the superior corrosion resistance of the current commercial tempers of these materials and also discusses the corrosion performance as a function of the degree of artificial aging. Results from laboratory corrosion tests are compared with results from exposures in a seacoast atmosphere to assess the predictive capability of the laboratory tests. The correlations that have been developed between the laboratory tests and the seacoast exposures provide confidence that a set of available methods can provide an accurate assessment of the corrosion performance of this new generation of alloys.

  1. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  2. The Cryogenic Properties of Several Aluminum-Beryllium Alloys and a Beryllium Oxide Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Performance related mechanical properties for two aluminum-beryllium (Al-Be) alloys and one beryllium-oxide (BeO) material were developed at cryogenic temperatures. Basic mechanical properties (Le., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 at cryogenic [-195.5"C (-320 F) and -252.8"C (-423"F)I temperatures. Basic mechanical properties for the Be0 material were obtained at cyrogenic [- 252.8"C (-423"F)] temperatures. Fracture properties were obtained for the investment cast alloy Beralcast 363 at cryogenic [-252.8"C (-423"F)] temperatures. The AlBeMetl62 material was extruded, the Be0 material was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) consolidated, and the Beralcast 363 material was investment cast.

  3. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defectmore » interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.« less

  4. Method of preparing an electrode material of lithium-aluminum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Settle, Jack L.; Myles, Kevin M.; Battles, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A solid compact having a uniform alloy composition of lithium and aluminum is prepared as a negative electrode for an electrochemical cell. Lithium losses during preparation are minimized by dissolving aluminum within a lithium-rich melt at temperatures near the liquidus temperatures. The desired alloy composition is then solidified and fragmented. The fragments are homogenized to a uniform composition by annealing at a temperature near the solidus temperature. After comminuting to fine particles, the alloy material can be blended with powdered electrolyte and pressed into a solid compact having the desired electrode shape. In the preparation of some electrodes, an electrically conductive metal mesh is embedded into the compact as a current collector.

  5. Laser Overlap Welding of Zinc-coated Steel on Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, Hamed Tasalloti; Kah, Paul; Martikainen, Jukka

    Local reinforcement of aluminum with laser welded patches of zinc-coated steel can effectively contribute to crashworthiness, durability and weight reduction of car body. However, the weld between Zn-coated steel and aluminum is commonly susceptible to defects such as spatter, cavity and crack. The vaporization of Zn is commonly known as the main source of instability in the weld pool and cavity formation, especially in a lap joint configuration. Cracks are mainly due to the brittle intermetallic compounds growing at the weld interface of aluminum and steel. This study provides a review on the main metallurgical and mechanical concerns regarding laser overlap welding of Zn-coated steel on Al-alloy and the methods used by researchers to avoid the weld defects related to the vaporization of Zn and the poor metallurgical compatibility between steel and aluminum.

  6. The Special Features of the Deformation Behavior of an Ultrafine-Grained Aluminum Alloy of the Al-Mg-Li System at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenkin, E. V.; Mishin, I. P.; Ivanov, K. V.

    2015-04-01

    The special features of the deformation behavior of an ultrafine-grained aluminum alloy produced by severe plastic deformation are investigated. Unlike ultrafine-grained pure aluminum, the second-phase particles precipitated in the bulk and at the grain boundaries of the alloy are shown to hinder the development of grain boundary sliding and plastic strain localization. This increases the length of the strain hardening stage and uniformity of elongation of a heterogeneous aluminum alloy specimen as compared to pure aluminum.

  7. Properties of splat-quenched 7075 aluminum type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, J. P. H. A.; Pelloux, R. M.; Grant, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The 7075 alloy belonging to the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system, prepared by powder metallurgy techniques, was used in a study of alloys prepared from splat-quenched foils consolidated into bar material by hot extrusion. Ni and Fe were included in one alloy specimen, producing a fine dispersion of FeAl3 type particles which added to the strength of the aged alloy but did not coarsen upon heat treatment. Fine oxide films showing up on air-splatted foils induce finely dispersed oxide stringers (if the foils are not hot-worked subsequently) which in turn promote axial cracking (but longitudinal tensile strength is not seriously impaired). Splatting in a protective atmosphere, or thermomechanical processing, is recommended to compensate for this.

  8. Recrystallization and Grain Growth Kinetics in Binary Alpha Titanium-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Anna Marie

    Titanium alloys are used in a variety of important naval and aerospace applications and often undergo thermomechanical processing which leads to recrystallization and grain growth. Both of these processes have a significant impact on the mechanical properties of the material. Therefore, understanding the kinetics of these processes is crucial to being able to predict the final properties. Three alloys are studied with varying concentrations of aluminum which allows for the direct quantification of the effect of aluminum content on the kinetics of recrystallization and grain growth. Aluminum is the most common alpha stabilizing alloying element used in titanium alloys, however the effect of aluminum on these processes has not been previously studied. This work is also part of a larger Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) effort whose goal is to combine both computational and experimental efforts to develop computationally efficient models that predict materials microstructure and properties based on processing history. The static recrystallization kinetics are measured using an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and a significant retardation in the kinetics is observed with increasing aluminum concentration. An analytical model is then used to capture these results and is able to successfully predict the effect of solute concentration on the time to 50% recrystallization. The model reveals that this solute effect is due to a combination of a decrease in grain boundary mobility and a decrease in driving force with increasing aluminum concentration. The effect of microstructural inhomogeneities is also experimentally quantified and the results are validated with a phase field model for recrystallization. These microstructural inhomogeneities explain the experimentally measured Avrami exponent, which is lower than the theoretical value calculated by the JMAK model. Similar to the effect seen in recrystallization, the addition of aluminum

  9. Structure-Property Relations in Aluminum-Lithium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    adsorbed ( Mughrabi et al , 1983). Such dislocations could not re-enter the grain during the reverse cycle of stress and the associated slip would be...ASTM STP 601, ASTM, 33 Mughrabi , H., Wang, R., Differt, D., Essmann, U. (1983) ASTM STP 811, ASTM, 5 Muller, W. et al (1986) Aluminium-Lithium Alloys...behaviour of Al -Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloys ...... 34 2.4 Mechanical behaviour ......................................... 35 2.4.1 Elastic modulus

  10. Effects of surface preparation on quality of aluminum alloy weldments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizer, D.; Saperstein, Z.

    1968-01-01

    Study of surface preparations and surface contamination effects on the welding of 2014 aluminum involves several methods of surface analysis to identify surface properties conducive to weld defects. These methods are radioactive evaporation, spectral reflectance mass spectroscopy, gas chromatography and spark emission spectroscopy.

  11. Comments on the origin of acoustic emission in fatigue testing of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiple, C. R.; Carpenter, S. H.; Armentrout, D. L.

    The size of acoustic emission (AE) signals expected from inclusion fracture during fatigue testing of 7075 aluminum has been estimated on the basis of previous measurements of AE produced by the fracture of boron particles incorporated into 2219 aluminum. The AF signal size expected from deformation in the plastic zone ahead of the fatigue crack was estimated from the results of tensile tests on 7075 aluminum. The signals predicted from both processes are near or below the noise level in the fatigue experiments and are therefore far too small to account for the signals actually observed. Nearly simultaneous fracture of multiple inclusions could produce signals as large as those observed in fatigue tests of 7075 aluminum, however, fatigue tests of 7050 aluminum produced signals as large or larger than in 7075. Since 7050 has substantially fewer inclusions than 7075, the simultaneous failure of multiple inclusions is unlikely to be a major AE source in fatigue testing of either aluminum alloy. Thus, the most probable source of acoustic emission during fatigue testing of 7075 and 7050 aluminum is the crack advance itself. The measured crack advance per cycle is large enough to release sufficient elastic energy to account for the AE signals observed.

  12. Long-term thermal degradation and alloying constituent effects on five boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal exposure effects on the properties of five boron/aluminum composite systems were experimentally investigated. The composite systems were 49 volume percent boron fibers (203 micron diameter) in aluminum-alloy matrices 1100 Al, 2024 Al, 3003 Al, 5052 Al, and 6061 Al. Specimens were thermally exposed up to 10,000 hours at 500 K and 590 K, up to 500 hours at 730 K, and up to 10,000 hours at 500 K and 590 K, up to 500 hours at 730 K, and up to 2000 thermal cycles between 200 K and 590 K. Composite longitudinal and transverse tensile strengths, longitudinal compression strength, and in-plane shear strength were determined. None of the systems was severely degraded by exposure at 590 K. The best performing system was B-2024 Al. Effects of matrix alloys on degradation mechanisms were experimentally investigated. Composite specimens and individual fibers were metallurgically analyzed with a scanning electron microscope and an electron microprobe to determine failure characteristics, chemical element distribution, and reaction layer morphology. Alloying constituents were found to be affect the composite degradation mechanisms as follows: alloys containing iron, but without manganese as a stabilizer, caused increased low-temperature degradation; alloys containing magnesium, iron, or manganese caused increased degradation; and alloys containing copper caused increased fiber strength.

  13. Characterization of B4C-composite-reinforced aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram; Rai, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    Dry sliding wear tests conducted on Pin-on-disk wear test machine. The rotational speed of disc is ranging from (400-600rpm) and under loads ranging from (30-70 N) the contact time between the disc and pin is constant for each pin specimen of composites is 15 minute. In all manufacturing industries the uses of composite materials has been increasing globally, In the present study, an aluminum 5083 alloy is used as the matrix and 5% of weight percentage of Boron Carbide (B4C) as the reinforcing material. The composite is produced using stir casting technique. This is cost effective method. The aluminum 5083 matrix can be strengthened by reinforcing with hard ceramic particles like silicon carbide and boron carbide. In this experiment, aluminum 5083 alloy is selected as one of main material for making parts of the ship it has good mechanical properties, good corrosion resistance and it is can welded very easily and does have good strength. The samples are tested for hardness and tensile strength. The mechanical properties like Hardness can be increased by reinforcing aluminum 5083alloy 5% boron carbide (B4C) particles and tensile strength. Finally the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis and EDS is done, which helps to study topography of composites and it produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons and the presence of composition found in the matrix.

  14. Influence of surface pretreatments on the quality of trivalent chromium process coatings on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viroulaud, Rémi; Światowska, Jolanta; Seyeux, Antoine; Zanna, Sandrine; Tardelli, Joffrey; Marcus, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The effects of surface pretreatments (degreasing and pickling) on the characteristics of the Trivalent Chromium Process (TCP) coating on pure aluminum and on AA2024-T351 aluminum alloy were investigated here by means of surface sensitive techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The XPS and ToF-SIMS results evidence that the TCP coating homogeneity is strongly dependent on the pretreatment process used. The TCP coverage factor, calculated from XPS results, is significantly lower, on both pure aluminum and AA2024-T351 alloy surface, when a pickling step is applied. One of the main effects of pickling pretreatment is strong metallic copper enrichment at the surface of the 2024 alloy, associated with chemical dissolution of Al-Cu intermetallic particles. However, it is evidenced here, that the copper enrichment is not detrimental for the quality of the TCP coating. The coating failure, observed when the pickling step is applied, can be assigned to a faster kinetics of the coating growth leading to formation of thicker conversion coating more susceptible to cracking or to the localized presence of aluminum fluoride species leading to the appearance of coating defects or detachment.

  15. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-05

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical effects in the Corrosion of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys. A Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    tances.II. Effect Of Pomegranate Juice And The Aqueous Extract Of Pomegranate Fruits And Tea leaves On The Corrosion Of Aluminum" The effect of the juices...T7651 tempers to exfoliation and stress- corrosion cracking . 1968-8 D.P. Doyle and H.P. Godard ,a) Tr. Mezhdunar. Kongr. Korroz. Metal, 4, 439-48, (1968...Tapper Brit. Corros. J., 3, 285-87, (1968) "Corrosion Of Aluminum" Summary of the literature of Al corrosion which includes stress- corrosion cracking

  17. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin II Accelerated Corrosion Tests and the Behavior of High-Strength Aluminum Alloys of Different Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    The permanence, with respect to corrosion, of light aluminum alloy sheets of the duralumin type, that is, heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si is discussed. Alloys of this type are subject to surface corrosion and corrosion of the interior by intercrystalline paths. Results are given of accelerated corrosion tests, tensile tests, the effect on corrosion of various alloying elements and heat treatments, electrical resistance measurements, and X-ray examinations.

  18. Continuous Severe Plastic Deformation Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Srinivasan; Prabir K. Chaudhury; Balakrishna Cherukuri

    2006-06-30

    produced by SPD techniques. This combination of properties makes UFG metals produced by SPD very attractive as machining, forging or extrusion stock, both from the point of view of formability as well as energy and cost saving. However, prior to this work there had been no attempt to transfer these potential benefits observed in the laboratory scale to industrial shop floor. The primary reason for this was that the laboratory scale studies had been conducted to develop a scientific understanding of the processes that result in grain refinement during SPD. Samples that had been prepared in the laboratory scale were typically only about 10-mm diameter and 50-mm long (about 0.5-inch diameter and 2-inches long). The thrust of this project was three-fold: (i) to show that the ECAE/P process can be scaled up to produce long samples, i.e., a continuous severe plastic deformation (CSPD) process, (ii) show the process can be scaled up to produce large cross section samples that could be used as forging stock, and (iii) use the large cross-section samples to produce industrial size forgings and demonstrate the potential energy and cost savings that can be realized if SPD processed stock is adopted by the forging industry. Aluminum alloy AA-6061 was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach used. The CSPD process developed using the principles of chamber-less extrusion and drawing, and was demonstrated using rolling and wire drawing equipment that was available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a parallel effort, ECAE/P dies were developed for producing 100-mm square cross section SPD billets for subsequent forging. This work was carried out at Intercontinental Manufacturing Co. (IMCO), Garland TX. Forging studies conducted with the ECAE/P billets showed that many of the potential benefits of using UFG material can be realized. In particular, the material yield can be increased, and the amount of material that is lost as scrap can be reduced by as much as 50%. Forging

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Finite element modelling of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 under transverse impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Ahmad Sufian; Kuntjoro, Wahyu; Yamin, A. F. M.

    2017-12-01

    Fiber metal laminate named GLARE is a new aerospace material which has great potential to be widely used in future lightweight aircraft. It consists of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and glass-fiber reinforced laminate. In order to produce reliable finite element model of impact response or crashworthiness of structure made of GLARE, one can initially model and validate the finite element model of the impact response of its constituents separately. The objective of this study was to develop a reliable finite element model of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 under low velocity transverse impact loading using commercial software ABAQUS. Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage models were used to predict the alloy's material properties and impact behavior. The results of the finite element analysis were compared to the experiment that has similar material and impact conditions. Results showed good correlations in terms of impact forces, deformation and failure progressions which concluded that the finite element model of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under low velocity transverse impact condition using Johnson-Cook plastic and damage models was reliable.

  1. Calibration curves for commercial copper and aluminum alloys using handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, B. N.; Martin, M. Z.; Leonard, D. N.

    Handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (HH LIBS) was used to study the elemental composition of four copper alloys and four aluminum alloys to produce calibration curves. The HH LIBS instrument used is a SciAps Z-500, commercially available, that contains a class-1 solid-state laser with an output wavelength of 1532 nm, a laser energy of 5 mJ/pulse, and a pulse duration of 5 ns. Test samples were solid specimens comprising of copper and aluminum alloys and data were collected from the samples’ surface at three different locations, employing a 12-point-grid pattern for each data set. All three data sets of the spectramore » were averaged, and the intensity, corrected by subtraction of background, was used to produce the elemental calibration curves. Calibration curves are presented for the matrix elements, copper and aluminum, as well as several minor elements. The surface damage produced by the laser was examined by microscopy. The alloys were tested in air and in a glovebox to evaluate the instrument’s ability to identify the constituents within materials under different environmental conditions. The main objective of using this HH LIBS technology is to determine its capability to fingerprint the presence of certain elements related to subpercent level within materials in real time and in-situ, as a starting point for undertaking future complex material characterization work.« less

  2. Calibration curves for commercial copper and aluminum alloys using handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Bennett, B. N.; Martin, M. Z.; Leonard, D. N.; ...

    2018-02-13

    Handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (HH LIBS) was used to study the elemental composition of four copper alloys and four aluminum alloys to produce calibration curves. The HH LIBS instrument used is a SciAps Z-500, commercially available, that contains a class-1 solid-state laser with an output wavelength of 1532 nm, a laser energy of 5 mJ/pulse, and a pulse duration of 5 ns. Test samples were solid specimens comprising of copper and aluminum alloys and data were collected from the samples’ surface at three different locations, employing a 12-point-grid pattern for each data set. All three data sets of the spectramore » were averaged, and the intensity, corrected by subtraction of background, was used to produce the elemental calibration curves. Calibration curves are presented for the matrix elements, copper and aluminum, as well as several minor elements. The surface damage produced by the laser was examined by microscopy. The alloys were tested in air and in a glovebox to evaluate the instrument’s ability to identify the constituents within materials under different environmental conditions. The main objective of using this HH LIBS technology is to determine its capability to fingerprint the presence of certain elements related to subpercent level within materials in real time and in-situ, as a starting point for undertaking future complex material characterization work.« less

  3. Expanding the Availability of Lightweight Aluminum Alloy Armor Plate Procured from Detailed Military Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Kevin; Squillacioti, Richard; Cheeseman, Bryan; Placzankis, Brian; Gallardy, Denver

    For many years, the range of aluminum alloys for armor plate applications obtainable in accordance with detailed military specifications was very limited. However, the development of improved aluminum alloys for aerospace and other applications has provided an opportunity to modernize the Army portfolio for ground vehicle armor applications. While the benefits of offering additional alloy choices to vehicle designers is obvious, the process of creating detailed military specifications for armor plate applications is not trivial. A significant amount of material and testing is required to develop the details required by an armor plate specification. Due to the vast number of material programs that require standardization and with a limited amount of manpower and funds as a result of Standardization Reform in 1995, one typically requires a need statement from a vehicle program office to justify and sponsor the work. This presentation will focus on recent aluminum alloy armor plate specifications that have added capability to vehicle designers' selection of armor materials that offer possible benefits such as lower cost, higher strength, better ballistic and corrosion resistance, improved weldability, etc.

  4. Calibration curves for commercial copper and aluminum alloys using handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, B. N.; Martin, M. Z.; Leonard, D. N.; Garlea, E.

    2018-03-01

    Handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (HH LIBS) was used to study the elemental composition of four copper alloys and four aluminum alloys to produce calibration curves. The HH LIBS instrument used is a SciAps Z-500, commercially available, that contains a class-1 solid-state laser with an output wavelength of 1532 nm, laser energy of 5 mJ/pulse, and a pulse duration of 5 ns. Test samples were solid specimens comprising copper and aluminum alloys and data were collected from the samples' surface at three different locations, employing a 12-point-grid pattern for each data set. All three data sets of the spectra were averaged, and the intensity, corrected by subtraction of background, was used to produce the elemental calibration curves. Calibration curves are presented for the matrix elements, copper and aluminum, as well as several minor elements. The surface damage produced by the laser was examined by microscopy. The alloys were tested in air and in a glovebox to evaluate the instrument's ability to identify the constituents within materials under different environmental conditions. The main objective of using this HH LIBS technology is to determine its capability to fingerprint the presence of certain elements related to subpercent level within materials in real time and in situ, as a starting point for undertaking future complex material characterization work.

  5. Mechanical Performance of Cold-Sprayed A357 Aluminum Alloy Coatings for Repair and Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petráčková, K.; Kondás, J.; Guagliano, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cold-sprayed coatings made of A357 aluminum alloy, a casting alloy widely used in aerospace, underwent set of standard tests as well as newly developed fatigue test to gain an information about potential of cold spray for repair and additive manufacturing of loaded parts. With optimal spray parameters, coating deposition on substrate with smooth surface resulted in relatively good bonding, which can be further improved by application of grit blasting on substrate's surface. However, no enhancement of adhesion was obtained for shot-peened surface. Process temperature, which was set either to 450 or 550 °C, was shown to have an effect on adhesion and cohesion strength, but it does not influence residual stress in the coating. To assess cold spray perspectives for additive manufacturing, flat tensile specimens were machined from coating and tested in as-sprayed and heat-treated (solution treatment and aging) condition. Tensile properties of the coating after the treatment correspond to properties of the cast A357-T61 aluminum alloy. Finally, fatigue specimen was proposed to test overall performance of the coating and coating's fatigue limit is compared to the results obtained on cast A357-T61 aluminum alloy.

  6. Effect of Thermal Exposure on the Tensile Properties of Aluminum Alloys for Elevated Temperature Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edahl, Robert A., Jr.; Domack, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Tensile properties were evaluated for four aluminum alloys that are candidates for airframe applications on high speed transport aircraft. These alloys included the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys C415 and C416 and the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloys RX818 and ML377. The Al-Cu-Mg alloys CM001, which was used on the Concorde SST, and 1143, which was modified from the alloy used on the TU144 Russian supersonic aircraft, were tested for comparison. The alloys were subjected to thermal exposure at 200 F, 225 F and 275 F for times up to 30,000 hours. Tensile tests were performed on thermally-exposed and as-received material at -65 F, room temperature, 200 F, 225 F and 275 F. All four candidate alloys showed significant tensile property improvements over CM001 and 1143. Room temperature yield strengths of the candidate alloys were at least 20% greater than for CM001 and 1143, for both the as-received and thermally-exposed conditions. The strength levels of alloy RX818 were the highest of all materials investigated, and were 5-10% higher than for ML377, C415 and C416 for the as-received condition and after 5,000 hours thermal exposure. RX818 was removed from this study after 5,000 hours exposure due to poor fracture toughness performance observed in a parallel study. After 30,000 hours exposure at 200 F and 225 F, the alloys C415, C416 and ML377 showed minor decreases in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation when compared to the as-received properties. Reductions in tensile strength from the as-received values were up to 25% for alloys C415, C416 and ML377 after 15,000 hours exposure at 275 F.

  7. Microstructure-sensitive plasticity and fatigue modeling of extruded 6061 aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Robert Ross

    In this study, the development of fatigue failure and stress anisotropy in light weight ductile metal alloys, specifically Al-Mg-Si aluminum alloys, was investigated. The experiments were carried out on an extruded 6061 aluminum alloy. Reverse loading experiments were performed up to a prestrain of 5% in both tension-followed-by-compression and compression-followed-by-tension. The development of isotropic and kinematic hardening and subsequent anisotropy was indicated by the observation of the Bauschinger effect phenomenon. Experimental results show that 6061 aluminum alloy exhibited a slight increase in the kinematic hardening versus applied prestrain. However, the ratio of kinematic-to-isotropic hardening remained near unity. An internal state variable (ISV) plasticity and damage model was used to capture the evolution of the anisotropy for the as-received T6 and partially annealed conditions. Following the stress anisotropy experiments, the same extruded 6061 aluminum alloy was tested under fully reversing, strain-controlled low cycle fatigue at up to 2.5% strain amplitudes and two heat treatment conditions. Observations were made of the development of striation fields up to the point of nucleation at cracked and clustered precipitants and free surfaces through localized precipitant slip band development. A finite element enabled micro-mechanics study of fatigue damage development of local strain field in the presence of hard phases was conducted. Both the FEA and experimental data sets were utilized in the implementation of a multi-stage fatigue model in order to predict the microstructure response, including fatigue nucleation and propagation contributions on the total fatigue life in AA6061. Good correlation between experimental and predicted results in the number of cycles to final failure was observed. The AA6061 material maintained relatively consistent low cycle fatigue performance despite two different heat treatments.

  8. Formation of the structure of thin-sheet rolled product from a high-strength sparingly alloyed aluminum alloy ``nikalin''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurkin, P. K.; Belov, N. A.; Akopyan, T. K.; Alabin, A. N.; Aleshchenko, A. S.; Avxentieva, N. N.

    2017-09-01

    The regime of thermomechanical treatment of flat ingots of a high-strength sparingly alloyed alloy based on the Al-Zn-Mg-Ni-Fe system upon the production of thin-sheet rolled products with a reduction of more than 97% has been substantiated. Using experimental and calculated methods, the structure and phase composition of the experimental alloy in the as cast and deformed state and after heat treatment including quenching with subsequent aging have been studied. It has been found that the structure of the wrought semi-finished products after aging according to T and T1 regimes consists of the precipitation-hardened aluminum matrix and uniformly distributed isolated particles of Al9FeNi with a size of 1-2 μm, which provides a combination of high strength and satisfactory plasticity at the level of standard high-strength aluminum alloys of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system. The fractographic analysis confirmed that the tested samples underwent a ductile fracture.

  9. Secondary aluminum industry final emissions test report: Culp Aluminum Alloys, Steele, Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    The purpose of this testing program was to obtain emissions data for uncontrolled and controlled hydrochloric acid (HCl), particulate matter (PM) and speciated hydrocarbon Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) from a secondary aluminum processing plant to support a national emission standard for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP).

  10. Damping Associated with Incipient Melting in Aluminum-Indium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    aluminum. It was expected that the composite microstructure would demonstrate strain dependent damping as a result of microplasticity (dislocation...NAVSEA SEA 05M SEA 05MB SEA 05M2 SEA 05M3 SEA 05R25 SEA 08 SEA 55Y SEA 55Y1 SEA 55Y12 SEA 55Y2 SEA 55Y21 SEA 55Y22 SEA 55Y3 SEA55Y31 SEA

  11. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  12. An Analysis of Strengthening Mechanisms and Rate-Dependence in a High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, B.; Shaeffer, M.; Cadel, D.; Ramesh, K. T.; Prasad, S.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the strengthening mechanisms within a high-strength aluminum alloy with the objective of providing guidelines for increased strength. First, we measure the mechanical behavior of the age-hardenable Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy known as Al 2139 in the T8 condition, and observe strengths of 500 MPa at quasistatic strain rates and average strengths of up to 600 MPa at high strain rates. Next, we explore the reasons for the high strength of this alloy by considering the contributions of various strengthening mechanisms to the total strength of the material. Finally, we develop an analytical approach to estimating the strengthening developed through the mechanism of dislocation cutting of closely spaced plate-like semi-coherent precipitates. Our results suggest that dislocation cutting of the Ω phase is the primary strengthening mechanism in this alloy.

  13. Dissolution Kinetics of Spheroidal-Shaped Precipitates in Age-Hardenable Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjabin, Nozar; Salehi, Majid Seyed

    2018-05-01

    As a first attempt, a mathematical model is proposed to predict the dissolution kinetics of non-spherical secondary phase precipitates during solution heat treatment of age-hardenable aluminum alloys. The model uses general spheroidal geometry to describe the dissolution process of the alloys containing needle/disc-shaped particles with different size distributions in a finite matrix. It is found that as the aspect ratio deviates from unity, the dissolution rate is accelerated. Also, the dissolution rate of the particles in the alloy containing the particle size distribution is lower than that of mono-sized particles system. The modeling results for dissolution of θ' precipitates in an Al-Cu alloy are compared with experiments, and a good agreement was found between the modeling and the experimental results. The proposed model can be applied to different isothermal and non-isothermal annealing conditions.

  14. Influence of deformation ageing treatment on microstructure and properties of aluminum alloy 2618

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianhua; Yi Danqing; Su Xuping

    2008-07-15

    The effects of deformation ageing treatment (DAT) on the microstructure and properties of aluminum alloy 2618 were investigated. The alloy was subjected to deformation ageing treatment which included solution treating at 535 deg. C quenching into water at room-temperature, cold rolling (10%) and further ageing to peak hardness level at 200 deg. C. The electron microscopic studies revealed that the treatment affects the ageing characteristics and the coarsening of ageing phase (S') at elevated-temperature. The dislocation-precipitate tangles substructure couldn't be found in alloy 2618. The tensile and hardness tests showed that deformation-ageing treatment causes a significant improvement in tensile strengthmore » and hardness to alloy 2618 at room- and elevated-temperature.« less

  15. Microstructural analysis of the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this research was to explain a tendency of 2195 Al-Li alloy to crack at elevated temperature during welding. Therefore, a study was made on the effect of welding and thermal treatment on the microstructure of Al-Li Alloy 2195. The critical roles of precipitates, boundaries, phases, and other features of the microstructure were inferred from the crack propagation paths and the morphology of fracture surface of the alloy with different microstructures. Particular emphasis was placed on the microstructures generated by the welding process and the mechanisms of crack propagation in such structures. Variation of the welding parameters and thermal treatments were used to alter the micro/macro structures, and they were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. A theoretical model is proposed to explain changes in the microstructure of welded material. This model proposes a chemical reaction in which gases from the air (i.e., nitrogen) release hydrogen inside the alloy. Such a reaction could generate large internal stresses capable to induce porosity and crack-like delamination in the material.

  16. [Comparison of texture distribution of cold rolled DC and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy at different positions through thickness direction by XRD].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-biao; Ma, Min; Yang, Qing-xiang; Wang, Shan; Liu, Wen-chang; Zhao, Ying-mei

    2013-09-01

    To provide gist of DC AA 5052 and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy to industry production and application, the texture variation of cold rolled sheets through thickness direction was studied by X-ray diffraction method, and the difference in texture at surface, quarter and center layer was analyzed. The hot plates of direct chill cast (DC) AA 5052 and continuous cast (CC) AA 5052 aluminum alloy were annealed at 454 degrees C for 4 hours and then cold rolled to different reductions. The strength and volume fraction of the fiber in CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is larger than in DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy after same rolling reduction The volume fraction of the recrystallization texture cube in the CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is less than in the DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy, which result in that CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy needs less cold rolling reduction than DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for generating the texture with same intensity and volume fraction at surface layer, quarter layer and center layer. The manufacturability and performance of CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is superior to DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for use in stamping.

  17. Analysis of the flow property of aluminum alloy AA6016 based on the fracture morphology using the hydroforming technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Lihui; Zhang, Quanda; Sun, Zhiying; Wang, Yao

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic bulging experiments were respectively carried out using AA6016-T4 aluminum alloy and AA6016-O aluminum alloy, and the deformation properties and fracture mechanism of aluminum alloy under the conditions of thermal and hydraulic were analyzed. Firstly, the aluminum alloy AA6016 was dealt with two kinds of heat treatment systems such as solid solution heat treatment adding natural ageing and full annealing, then the aluminum alloy such as AA6016-T4 and AA6016-O were obtained. In the same working environment, the two kinds of materials were used in the process of hydraulic bulging experiments, according to the observation and measurement of the deformation sizes of grid circles and material thicknesses near the fracture region, the flow properties and development trend of fracture defect of the materials were analyzed comprehensively from the perspective of qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis; Secondly, the two kinds of materials were sampled in different regions of the fracture area and the microstructure morphology of the fracture was observed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The influence laws of the heat treatment systems on the fracture defect of the aluminum alloy under the condition of the liquid pressure were studied preliminarily by observing the distribution characteristics of the fracture microstructure morphology of dimple. At the same time, the experimental research on the ordinary stamping forming process of AA6016-O was carried out and the influence law of different forming process on the fracture defect of the aluminum alloy material was studied by observing the distribution of the fracture microstructure morphology; Finally, the development process of the fracture defect of aluminum alloy sheet was described theoretically from the view of the stress state.

  18. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory.

  19. Cerium-based, intermetallic-strengthened aluminum casting alloy: High-volume co-product development

    DOE PAGES

    Sims, Zachary C.; Weiss, David; McCall, S. K.; ...

    2016-05-23

    Here, several rare earth elements are considered by-products to rare earth mining efforts. By using one of these by-product elements in a high-volume application such as aluminum casting alloys, the supply of more valuable rare earths can be globally stabilized. Stabilizing the global rare earth market will decrease the long-term criticality of other rare earth elements. The low demand for Ce, the most abundant rare earth, contributes to the instability of rare earth extraction. In this article, we discuss a series of intermetallic-strengthened Al alloys that exhibit the potential for new high-volume use of Ce. The castability, structure, and mechanicalmore » properties of binary, ternary, and quaternary Al-Ce based alloys are discussed. We have determined Al-Ce based alloys to be highly castable across a broad range of compositions. Nanoscale intermetallics dominate the microstructure and are the theorized source of the high ductility. In addition, room-temperature physical properties appear to be competitive with existing aluminum alloys with extended high-temperature stability of the nanostructured intermetallic.« less

  20. Spectro-photometric determinations of Mn, Fe and Cu in aluminum master alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan; Naveed, A.; Shan, A.; Afzal, M.; Saleem, J.; Noshad, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Highly reliable, fast and cost effective Spectro-photometric methods have been developed for the determination of Mn, Fe & Cu in aluminum master alloys, based on the development of calibration curves being prepared via laboratory standards. The calibration curves are designed so as to induce maximum sensitivity and minimum instrumental error (Mn 1mg/100ml-2mg/100ml, Fe 0.01mg/100ml-0.2mg/100ml and Cu 2mg/100ml-10mg/ 100ml). The developed Spectro-photometric methods produce accurate results while analyzing Mn, Fe and Cu in certified reference materials. Particularly, these methods are suitable for all types of Al-Mn, Al-Fe and Al-Cu master alloys (5%, 10%, 50% etc. master alloys).Moreover, the sampling practices suggested herein include a reasonable amount of analytical sample, which truly represent the whole lot of a particular master alloy. Successive dilution technique was utilized to meet the calibration curve range. Furthermore, the workout methods were also found suitable for the analysis of said elements in ordinary aluminum alloys. However, it was observed that Cush owed a considerable interference with Fe, the later one may not be accurately measured in the presence of Cu greater than 0.01 %.

  1. Micro and Nano Laser Pulses for Melting and Surface Alloying of Aluminum with Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamoudi, Walid K.; Ismail, Raid A.; Sultan, Fatima I.; Jaleel, Summayah

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, the use of microsecond and nanosecond laser pulses to alloy copper in aluminum is presented. In the first run, high purity (99.999%) copper thin film was thermally evaporated over (99.9%) purity, 300 μm aluminum sheet. Thereafter, surface alloying was performed using (1-3) 500 μs, (0.1-1.5) Joule Nd: YAG laser pulses; operating at 1060 nm wavelength. Hard homogeneous alloyed zone was obtained at depths between 60 and 110 μm below the surface. In the second run, 9 ns laser pulses from Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1060 nm was employed to melt/alloy Al-Cu sheets. The resulted alloyed depth, after using 20 laser pulses, was 199.22 μm for Al over Cu samples and 419.61 μm for Cu over Al samples. X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis revealed the formation of Cu2Al2, CuAl2 and δ- Al4Cu9 phases with percentage depended on laser energy and copper layer thicknesses.

  2. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  3. Method of Heat Treating Aluminum-Lithium Alloy to Improve Formability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn Kurgan (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method is provided for heat treating aluminum-lithium alloys to improve their formability. The alloy is heated to a first temperature, maintained at the first temperature for a first time period, heated at the conclusion of the first time period to a second temperature, maintained at the second temperature for a second time period, actively cooled at the conclusion of the second time period to a third temperature, maintained at the third temperature for a third time period, and then passively cooled at the conclusion of the third time period to room temperature.

  4. Structural efficiencies of various aluminum, titanium, and steel alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Hughes, Philip J

    1953-01-01

    Efficient temperature ranges are indicated for two high-strength aluminum alloys, two titanium alloys, and three steels for some short-time compression-loading applications at elevated temperatures. Only the effects of constant temperatures and short exposure to temperature are considered, and creep is assumed not to be a factor. The structural efficiency analysis is based upon preliminary results of short-time elevated-temperature compressive stress-strain tests of the materials. The analysis covers strength under uniaxial compression, elastic stiffness, column buckling, and the buckling of long plates in compression or in shear.

  5. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  6. Effect of Service Stress on Impact Resistance, X-ray Diffraction Patterns, and Microstructure of 25s Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kies, J A; Quick, G W

    1939-01-01

    Report presents the results of a great number of tests made to determine the effect of service stresses on the impact resistance, the x-ray diffraction patterns, and the microstructure of 25s aluminum alloy. Many of the specimens were taken from actual propeller blades and others were cut from 13/16-inch rod furnished by the Aluminum Company of America.

  7. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    PubMed

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  8. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  9. Effects of Laser Energies on Wear and Tensile Properties of Biomimetic 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuhuan; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guoping; Gao, Yang; Tao, Lixi; Chen, Heng; Zhang, Jianlong; Zhou, Hong

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by the non-smooth surface of certain animals, a biomimetic coupling unit with various sizes, microstructure, and hardness was prepared on the surface of 7075 aluminum alloy. Following experimental studies were conducted to investigate the wear and tensile properties with various laser energy inputs. The results demonstrated that the non-smooth surface with biomimetic coupling units had a positive effect on both the wear resistance and tensile property of 7075 aluminum alloy. In addition, the sample with the unit fabricated by the laser energy of 420.1 J/cm2 exhibited the most significant improvement on the wear and tensile properties owing to the minimum grain size and the highest microhardness. Also, the weight loss of the sample was one-third of the untreated one's, and the yield strength, the ultimate tensile strength, and the elongation improved by 20, 20, and 34% respectively. Moreover, the mechanisms of wear and tensile properties improvement were also analyzed.

  10. Recycling of Aluminum Alloy with Dimox and Rheocasting Functionalize High Performance Structural Foam Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabeeh, Bakr Mohamed

    Great efforts aiming towards the synthesis and the development of structural composite materials. Direct metal oxidation, DIMOX introduced for hybrid composite processing. However, oxidation temperatures around 1100°C lead to the formation of porous ceramic materials. To utilize this porosity intentionally for foam production, a new approach based on synergetic effect of alloying elements, DIMOX and semisolid (rheocsting) processing is developed. A semisolid reaction, rheocasting is introduced to control porosity shape and size. Aluminum alloy 6xxx (automobile scrap pistons) is recycled for this objective and DIMOX at 1100°C for 30 min, then rheocasting, at 750°C for 30 minutes. The effect of α-Fe powder, Mg powder, and Boric acid powder established for the objective of a hybrid structural metal matrix composite in bulk foam matrix. The kinetic of formation of hybrid metal matrix foam composite is introduced. Microstructural and mechanical characterization established for high performance Aluminum foam hybrid composite materials.

  11. Experimental Study of Laser - enhanced 5A03 Aluminum Alloy and Its Stress Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guicheng; Chen, Jing; Pang, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Based on the study of improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy for ship, this paper mainly studied the tensile test, surface morphology and residual stress under laser shock, high temperature and stress corrosion. It is found that the residual compressive stress and the grain refinement on the surface of the material during the heat strengthening process increase the breaking strength of the sample in the stress corrosion environment. Appropriate high temperature maintenance helps to enhance the effect of deformation strengthening. In the 300°C environment insulation, due to recrystallization of the material, the performance decreased significantly. This study provides an experimental basis for effectively improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy.

  12. Reaction rates and prediction of thermal instability during aluminum alloy 6061 dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, J.; DePaoli, D. W.; Mattus, C. H.

    Here, chemical kinetics of dissolution of aluminum alloy 6061 was investigated for the processing of Pu-238 for deep space missions. The rate of dissolution was measured by the heat release and appeared to be controlled by the rate of release of Al(OH) 4 – from the metal surface. Rates of reaction were measured from 273 to 365 K, giving an activation energy of 72 ± 13 kJ•(mol Al) –1 and a pre-exponential factor of 5 ± 3 × 10 9 dm 3mol –1min –1. Minor alloying elements did not appear to affect the reaction kinetics. The average heat of dissolutionmore » was –360 ± 70 kJ•(mol NaAlO 2) –1. When extrapolated to an infinitely dilute solution of aluminum, kJ•(mol NaAlO 2) –1.« less

  13. Reaction rates and prediction of thermal instability during aluminum alloy 6061 dissolution

    DOE PAGES

    McFarlane, J.; DePaoli, D. W.; Mattus, C. H.

    2017-11-10

    Here, chemical kinetics of dissolution of aluminum alloy 6061 was investigated for the processing of Pu-238 for deep space missions. The rate of dissolution was measured by the heat release and appeared to be controlled by the rate of release of Al(OH) 4 – from the metal surface. Rates of reaction were measured from 273 to 365 K, giving an activation energy of 72 ± 13 kJ•(mol Al) –1 and a pre-exponential factor of 5 ± 3 × 10 9 dm 3mol –1min –1. Minor alloying elements did not appear to affect the reaction kinetics. The average heat of dissolutionmore » was –360 ± 70 kJ•(mol NaAlO 2) –1. When extrapolated to an infinitely dilute solution of aluminum, kJ•(mol NaAlO 2) –1.« less

  14. Optimization of the Mechanical Properties and Residual Stresses in 2024 Aluminum Alloy Through Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araghchi, M.; Mansouri, H.; Vafaei, R.; Guo, Y.

    2018-05-01

    Residual stresses induced during quenching of aluminum alloys cause dimensional instability and distortion. In this study, the effects of different concentrations of polyalkylene glycol (PAG) quenchants on residual stresses and mechanical properties of 2024 aluminum alloy were investigated. Surface residual stresses were measured by using hole-drilling strain-gauge method. Also, mechanical properties and microstructure of the heat-treated samples were analyzed using hardness measurements, tensile tests, and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that quenching into a 15% polymeric solution and aging at 190 °C for 12 h cause 50% reduction in residual stress as compared with quenching in water at 20 °C and naturally aging. Moreover, tensile strength decreased by 104 MPa ( 20%) in compared with the T6 sample.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum-Based Dissimilar Alloy Joints by Power Beams, Arc and FSW Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Michinori; Kon, Tomokuni; Abe, Nobuyuki

    Dissimilar smart joints are useful. In this research, welded quality of dissimilar aluminum alloys of 3 mm thickness by various welding processes and process parameters have been investigated by hardness and tensile tests, and observation of imperfection and microstructure. Base metals used in this study are A1050-H24, A2017-T3, A5083-O, A6061-T6 and A7075-T651. Welding processes used are YAG laser beam, electron beam, metal inert gas arc, tungsten inert gas arc and friction stir welding. The properties of weld zones are affected by welding processes, welding parameters and combination of base metals. Properties of high strength aluminum alloy joints are improved by friction stir welding.

  16. Protection of Tempered Aluminum Alloy in Contact with the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araoyinbo, A. O.; Salleh, M. A. A. Mohd; Rahmat, A.; Azmi, A. I.; Rahim, W. M. F. Wan Abd; Perju, M. C.; Jin, T. S.

    2018-06-01

    In many service applications an increasing temperature or inadequate protections often give rise to localized forms of corrosion in an initially free and unprotected system. This research understudy the corrosion chemistry, the effect of chromium as the inhibitor, Vickers hardness test, and weight loss on tempered aluminium alloy 7075 in corrosive mediums. The tempers of the aluminium alloy used are T6 and T73 where obtained by solution heat treatment at 470°C and quenched before immersion test in acidic (pH3), and slightly alkaline (pH7.5) solutions. The results obtained were characterized by conventional weight loss process and morphology observation with a microscope. The surface morphology shows exfoliation form of corrosion and the weight loss analysis shows the as received sample experience more weight loss when compared with the other heat treated samples.

  17. Characterization of Aluminum Magnesium Alloy Reverse Sensitized via Heat Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    been on ships that had seen an unknown cycle of painting - stripping -repainting, so some variation was expected. 16 The exact age and range of...Figure 44. Effect of Temperature on Al-Mg Alloys. Adapted from [9]. d. Other heat treatment techniques – high power diode laser (HPDL) arrays Because...25] B. Baker et. al, "Use of High-Power diode Laser Arrays for Pre- and Post- Weld Heating During Friction Stir Welding of Steels," in Friction

  18. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy AA2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S.; Sankar, V. S.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a relatively recent development, which can provide a superior alternative to resistance spot welding and riveting for fabrication of aluminum sheet metal structures. In the current work, FSSW experiments were conducted in 3-mm thick sheets of aluminum alloy 2014 in T4 and T6 conditions, with and without Alclad layers. The effects of tool geometry and welding process parameters on joint formation were investigated. A good correlation between process parameters, bond width, hook height, joint strength, and fracture mode was observed. The presence of Alclad layers and the base metal temper condition were found to have no major effect on joint formation and joint strength. Friction stir spot welds produced under optimum conditions were found to be superior to riveted joints in lap-shear and cross-tension tests. The prospects of FSSW in aluminum sheet metal fabrication are discussed.

  19. Studies on separation and purification of fission (99)Mo from neutron activated uranium aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ankita; Kumar Sharma, Abhishek; Kumar, Pradeep; Charyulu, M M; Tomar, B S; Ramakumar, K L

    2014-07-01

    A new method has been developed for separation and purification of fission (99)Mo from neutron activated uranium-aluminum alloy. Alkali dissolution of the irradiated target (100mg) results in aluminum along with (99)Mo and a few fission products passing into solution, while most of the fission products, activation products and uranium remain undissolved. Subsequent purification steps involve precipitation of aluminum as Al(OH)3, iodine as AgI/AgIO3 and molybdenum as Mo-α-benzoin oxime. Ruthenium is separated by volatilization as RuO4 and final purification of (99)Mo was carried out using anion exchange method. The radiochemical yield of fission (99)Mo was found to be >80% and the purity of the product was in conformity with the international pharmacopoeia standards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Torsion Tests of 24S-T Aluminum-alloy Noncircular Bar and Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Paul, D A

    1943-01-01

    Tests of 24S-T aluminum alloy have been made to determine the yield and ultimate strengths in torsion of noncircular bar and tubing. An approximate basis for predicting these torsional strength characteristics has been indicated. The results show that the torsional stiffness and maximum shearing stresses within the elastic range may be computed quite closely by means of existing formulas based on mathematical analysis and the membrane analogy.

  1. Analysis of the Noneroding Penetration of Tungsten Alloy Long Rods into Aluminum Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    J D YATTEAU 5941 S MIDDLEFIELD RD SUITE 100 LITTLETON CO 80123 2 APPLIED RESEARCH ASSOC INC D GRADY F MAESTAS SUITE A220 4300...of Tungsten Alloy Long Rods Into Aluminum Targets 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER AH80 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Steven B...Segletes 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Research Laboratory ATTN: AMSRL-WM-TD Aberdeen

  2. Study of Cavitation and Failure Mechanisms of a Superplastic 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Failure Mechanisms of a Superplastic 5083 Aluminum Alloy 6. AUTHOR( S ) Boydon, Juanito F. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) General Motors Corp., Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (Dr. Paul E. Krajewski, Technical Program...of 973931(A3), deformed gauge area 1- region 1. Sample was pulled under uniaxial tension at 450 °C at a strain rate of 3x10-4 s -1 and elongated to

  3. Analysis of the Transition in Deformation Mechanisms in Superplastic 5083 Aluminum Alloys by Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Analysis of the Transition in Deformation Mechanisms in Superplastic 5083 Aluminum Alloys by Orientation Imaging Microscopy 6. AUTHOR( S ) Harrell...James W. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) General Motors Corp., Research and Development Center

  4. Effects of Strain Path on the Microstructure of Aluminum Alloys During Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    processing route at this level. A recent study by Garcia-Infanta, et al., of a hypo- eutectic Al-7%Si alloy with spheroidal primary aluminum grains is a...compared with the model proposed by Garcia-Infanta, et al. [10]. Further, annealing studies will be performed to determine the recrystallization ...study conducted at 450°C as a function of time to assess recrystallization and grain growth. Two data points per sample were taken from different

  5. NBS: Nondestructive evaluation of nonuniformities in 2219 aluminum alloy plate: Relationship to processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartzendruber, L.; Boettinger, W.; Ives, L.; Coriell, S.; Ballard, D.; Laughlin, D.; Clough, R.; Biancanieilo, F.; Blau, P.; Cahn, J.

    1980-01-01

    The compositional homogeneity, microstructure, hardness, electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of 2219 aluminum alloy plates are influenced by the process variables during casting, rolling and thermomechanical treatment. The details of these relationships wre investigated for correctly processed 2219 plate as well as for deviations caused by improper quenching after solution heat treatment. Primary emphasis was been placed on the reliability of eddy current electrical conductivity and hardness as NDE tools to detect variations in mechanical properties.

  6. The Role of Stress in the Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion IGSCC Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking NAMLT Nitric Acid Mass Loss Test SCC Stress Corrosion Cracking TGSCC Transgranular Stress...solution at a nitric acid mass loss test (NAMLT) value of 49 mg/cm 2 with an applied voltage of 0.73 VSCE. They also showed that the amount of corrosion ...for determining the susceptibility to intergranualr corrosion of 5XXX series aluminum alloys by mass loss after exposure to nitric acid ," vol.

  7. Nanostructuring of Aluminum Alloy Powders by Cryogenic Attrition with Hydrogen-Free Process Control Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructuring of Aluminum Alloy Powders by Cryogenic Attrition with Hydrogen-Free Process Control Agent by Frank Kellogg , Clara Hofmeister...Process Control Agent Frank Kellogg Bowhead Science and Technology Clara Hofmeister Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Frank Kellogg , Clara Hofmeister, Anit Giri, and Kyu Cho 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  8. Studies of the Crystallization Process of Aluminum-Silicon Alloys Using a High Temperature Microscope. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justi, S.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that primary silicon crystals grow polyhedral in super-eutectic AlSi melts and that phosphorus additives to the melt confirm the strong seeding capacity. Primary silicon exhibits strong dendritic seeding effects in eutectic silicon phases of various silicon alloys, whereas primary aluminum does not possess this capacity. Sodium addition also produces a dendritic silicon network growth in the interior of the sample that is attributed to the slower silicon diffusion velocity during cooling.

  9. Time-dependent corrosion fatique crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research is to characterize environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth for the susceptible short-longitudinal orientation of aluminum alloy 7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution. This work is necessary in order to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA-FLAGRO (NASGRO). This effort concentrates on determining relevant inputs to a superposition model in order to more accurately model environmental fatigue crack propagation.

  10. Genetically engineered peptides for inorganics: study of an unconstrained bacterial display technology and bulk aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bryn L; Finch, Amethist S; Hurley, Margaret M; Sarkes, Deborah A; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N

    2013-09-06

    The first-ever peptide biomaterial discovery using an unconstrained engineered bacterial display technology is reported. Using this approach, we have developed genetically engineered peptide binders for a bulk aluminum alloy and use molecular dynamics simulation of peptide conformational fluctuations to demonstrate sequence-dependent, structure-function relationships for metal and metal oxide interactions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Determination of design allowable properties. Fracture of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engstrom, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to provide a comprehensive report of available valid data on tensile properties, fracture toughness, fatigue crack propagation, and sustained load behavior of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy base metal and weldments, as applicable to manned spacecraft tankage. Most of the data found were from tests conducted at room temperature, -320 F and -423 F. Data are presented in graphical and tabular form, and areas in which data are lacking are established.

  12. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  13. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  14. Rapid Solidification of a New Generation Aluminum-Lithium Alloy via Electrospark Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, David W.; Boselli, Julien; Gauvin, Raynald; Brochu, Mathieu

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a rapid solidification processing technique capable of depositing a metal onto a conductive substrate. The short pulse duration and high pulse frequency, combined with the small amount of material transferred during each pulse, results in high cooling rates being realized, on the order of 105-106 C/sec. This study investigates the ability to induce solute trapping behavior, for a new generation aluminum-lithium alloy, AA2199, using ESD.

  15. Creep-resistant aluminum alloys for use in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modlinski, R.; Ratchev, P.; Witvrouw, A.; Puers, R.; DeWolf, I.

    2005-07-01

    Creep is expected to be a reliability issue in MEMS where high temperatures and stresses are present in the moving part. In this paper, we describe a method of measuring the creep parameters, ΔF and τ, in metal thin films. Substrate curvature measurements were used to study different Al alloys—Al98.3Cu1.7, Al99.7V0.2Pd0.1, Al93.5Cu4.4Mg1.5Mn0.6 and Al99.6Cu0.4 films—during isothermal tensile stress relaxation. We show that there is a direct relation between the measured creep parameters and the coherency, size and spacing of precipitates observed by TEM and SEM in the alloys. Furthermore, we confirm that the plastic deformation is controlled by the motion of dislocations inside grains in the Al alloy films. A strengthening process called precipitation hardening was used to create stronger precipitates within the grains in Al99.6Cu0.4 to hinder the movement of dislocations more effectively and thus to make the alloy more creep resistant.

  16. Properties of Free-Machining Aluminum Alloys at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltus, Jiří; Karlík, Miroslav; Haušild, Petr

    In areas close to the cutting tool the workpieces being dry machined could be heated up to 350°C and they may be impact loaded. Therefore it is of interest to study mechanical properties of corresponding materials at elevated temperatures. Free-machining alloys of Al-Cu and Al-Mg-Si systems containing Pb, Bi and Sn additions (AA2011, AA2111B, AA6262, and AA6023) were subjected to Charpy U notch impact test at the temperatures ranging from 20 to 350°C. The tested alloys show a sharp drop in notch impact strength KU at different temperatures. This drop of KU is caused by liquid metal embrittlement due to the melting of low-melting point dispersed phases which is documented by differential scanning calorimetry. Fracture surfaces of the specimens were observed using a scanning electron microscope. At room temperature, the fractures of all studied alloys exhibited similar ductile dimple fracture micromorphology, at elevated temperatures, numerous secondary intergranular cracks were observed.

  17. The Solidification Behavior of AA2618 Aluminum Alloy and the Influence of Cooling Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ming; Luo, Lei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2014-01-01

    In AA2618 aluminum alloy, the iron- and nickel-rich intermetallics formed during solidification are of great effect on the mechanical properties of the alloy at both room temperature and elevated temperatures. However, the solidification behavior of the alloy and the formation mechanism of the intermetallics during solidification of the alloy are not clear. This research fills the gap and contributes to understanding the intermetallic of the alloy. The results showed that cooling rate was of great influence on the formation of the intermetallics. Under the condition of slow cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy were complex with many coarse eutectic compounds including Al9FeNi, Al7(CuNi)5, Si, Al2Cu and Al2CuMg. The phase Al9FeNi was the dominant intermetallic compound, which precipitated at the earlier stage of the solidification by eutectic reaction L → α-Al + Al9FeNi. Increasing the cooling rate would suppress the formation of the coarse eutectic intermetallics. Under the condition of near-rapid cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy consisted of metastable intermetallics Al9FeNi and Al2Cu; the equilibrium eutectic compounds were suppressed. This research concluded that intermetallics could be refined to a great extent by near-rapid cooling. PMID:28788281

  18. Production of Magnesium and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys from Recycled Secondary Aluminum Scrap Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesing, Adam J.; Das, Subodh K.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental proof of concept was demonstrated for a patent-pending and trademark-pending RE12™ process for extracting a desired amount of Mg from recycled scrap secondary Al melts. Mg was extracted by electrorefining, producing a Mg product suitable as a Mg alloying hardener additive to primary-grade Al alloys. This efficient electrorefining process operates at high current efficiency, high Mg recovery and low energy consumption. The Mg electrorefining product can meet all the impurity specifications with subsequent melt treatment for removing alkali contaminants. All technical results obtained in the RE12™ project indicate that the electrorefining process for extraction of Mg from Al melt is technically feasible. A techno-economic analysis indicates high potential profitability for applications in Al foundry alloys as well as beverage—can and automotive—sheet alloys. The combination of technical feasibility and potential market profitability completes a successful proof of concept. This economical, environmentally-friendly and chlorine-free RE12™ process could be disruptive and transformational for the Mg production industry by enabling the recycling of 30,000 tonnes of primary-quality Mg annually.

  19. Springback of aluminum alloy brazing sheet in warm forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyu Bin; George, Ryan; Kurukuri, Srihari; Worswick, Michael J.; Winkler, Sooky

    2017-10-01

    The use of aluminum is increasing in the automotive industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, recyclability and corrosion resistance. However, aluminum is prone to significant springback due to its low elastic modulus coupled with its high strength. In this paper, a warm forming process is studied to improve the springback characteristics of 0.2 mm thick brazing sheet with an AA3003 core and AA4045 clad. Warm forming decreases springback by lowering the flow stress. The parts formed have complex features and geometries that are representative of automotive heat exchangers. The key objective is to utilize warm forming to control the springback to improve the part flatness which enables the use of harder temper material with improved strength. The experiments are performed by using heated dies at several different temperatures up to 350 °C and the blanks are pre-heated in the dies. The measured springback showed a reduction in curvature and improved flatness after forming at higher temperatures, particularly for the harder temper material conditions.

  20. Optimizing cutting conditions on sustainable machining of aluminum alloy to minimize power consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, Rusdi; Suyuti, Muhammad Arsyad; Susanto, Tri Agus

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum is widely utilized in the industrial sector. There are several advantages of aluminum, i.e. good flexibility and formability, high corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity, and high heat. Despite of these characteristics, however, pure aluminum is rarely used because of its lacks of strength. Thus, most of the aluminum used in the industrial sectors was in the form of alloy form. Sustainable machining can be considered to link with the transformation of input materials and energy/power demand into finished goods. Machining processes are responsible for environmental effects accepting to their power consumption. The cutting conditions have been optimized to minimize the cutting power, which is the power consumed for cutting. This paper presents an experimental study of sustainable machining of Al-11%Si base alloy that was operated without any cooling system to assess the capacity in reducing power consumption. The cutting force was measured and the cutting power was calculated. Both of cutting force and cutting power were analyzed and modeled by using the central composite design (CCD). The result of this study indicated that the cutting speed has an effect on machining performance and that optimum cutting conditions have to be determined, while sustainable machining can be followed in terms of minimizing power consumption and cutting force. The model developed from this study can be used for evaluation process and optimization to determine optimal cutting conditions for the performance of the whole process.

  1. THE ACCURATE DETERMINATION OF MICROGRAM AMOUNTS OF BORON IN ALUMINUM AND ALUMINUM-URANIUM ALLOYS BY THE METHYL BORATE-CURCUMIN-OXALIC ACID METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, I.H.

    1958-10-01

    A method was developed for the deternninntion of boron in aluminum and aluminum--uranium alloys in which the boron concentration is 30 ppm or more. Boron is separated by distillation as methyl borate from a hydrochloric acid solution of the alloy and is determined spectrophotometrically by the boric acid-- curcumin-oxalic acid color reaction. A precision of plus or minus 2% is attain able when the determination is penformed with the utmost care. The accuracy is such that no bias need be given when a calibration curve is used. (auth)

  2. Perforation of Thin Aluminum Alloy Plates by Blunt Projectiles - Experimental and Numerical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gang; Zhang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Reducing the armor weight has become a research focus in terms of armored material with the increasing requirement of the mobility and flexibility of tanks and armored vehicles in modern local wars. Due to high strength-to-density ratio, aluminum alloy has become a potential light armored material. In this study, both lab-scale ballistic test and finite element simulation were adopted to examine the ballistic resistance of aluminum alloy targets. Blunt high strength steel projectiles with 12.7 mm diameter were launched by light gas gun against 3.3 mm thick aluminum alloy plates at velocity of 90 ~ 170 m/s. The ballistic limit velocity was obtained. Plugging failure and obvious structure deformation of targets were observed, and with the impact velocity increasing, the target structure deformation decrease gradually. Corresponding 2D finite element simulations were conducted by ABAQUS/EXPLICIT combined with material performance testing. Good agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental results was found. National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.: 11072072).

  3. A hot-cracking mitigation technique for welding high-strength aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.P.; Dong, P.; Zhang, J.

    2000-01-01

    A hot-cracking mitigation technique for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of high-strength aluminum alloy 2024 is presented. The proposed welding technique incorporates a trailing heat sink (an intense cooling source) with respect to the welding torch. The development of the mitigation technique was based on both detailed welding process simulation using advanced finite element techniques and systematic laboratory experiments. The finite element methods were used to investigate the detailed thermomechanical behavior of the weld metal that undergoes the brittle temperature range (BTR) during welding. As expected, a tensile deformation zone within the material BTR region was identified behind the weldmore » pool under conventional GTA welding process conventional GTA welding process conditions for the aluminum alloy studied. To mitigate hot cracking, the tensile zone behind the weld pool must be eliminated or reduce to a satisfactory level if the weld metal hot ductility cannot be further improved. With detailed computational modeling, it was found that by the introduction of a trailing heat sink at some distance behind the welding arc, the tensile strain rate with respect to temperature in the zone encompassing the BTR region can be significantly reduced. A series of parametric studies were also conducted to derive optimal process parameters for the trailing heat sink. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the trailing heat sink technique. With a proper implementation of the trailing heat sink method, hot cracking can be completely eliminated in welding aluminum alloy 2024 (AA 2024).« less

  4. Superhydrophobic surface prepared by micro-milling and WEDM on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanling, Wan; Jian, Yang; Huadong, Yu

    2018-06-01

    To simulate the hydrophobic microstructure of rice leaf surface, high-speed precision micro-milling machine was used to fabricate micro groove array structure on the surface of aluminum alloy. The micro-and nanostructure was constructed on the surface of the grooved convex platform by Wire Cut Electrical Discharge Machining (WEDM). The surface morphology and hydrophobic properties of the aluminum alloy microstructures fabricated by two processing methods were observed respectively, and the hydrophobic mechanism was analyzed. The results show that the contact angle was effectively improved from 49° up to 158.4° in the vertical direction, and 146.7° in the parallel direction. The change of surface wettability from hydrophilic to hydrophobic was realized. By comparison, the micro-and nanostructure fabricated by WEDM had improved the hydrophobic stability of the aluminum alloy surface while enlarging the contact Angle, and the micro-milling groove structure further amplified the contact angle and greatly reduced the contact area of the water droplet, it was also observed that the drop took longer to completely spread on the sample after WEDM.

  5. Investigation of Flat Clinching Process Combined with Material Forming Technology for Aluminum Alloy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Shengdun; Han, Xiaolan; Wang, Yongfei; Zhao, Xuzhe

    2017-12-15

    In recent years, the use of aluminum alloy has tended to increase for building lightweight automobiles to reduce their automotive weight, which is helpful to save energy and protect the environment. In order to join aluminum alloy, a flat-clinching process combined with material forming technology was investigated to join aluminum alloy sheets using an experimental and a numerical method. Al1060 was chosen as the material of the sheet, and DEFORM-2D software was used to build the numerical model. After the numerical model was validated by the experimental results, the influences of punch diameter and holder force on the materials deforming behavior of the clinched joint were analyzed using the numerical model. Then, the material flow, joining ability, and joining quality were investigated to assess the clinched joint. The results showed that an increase in punch diameter could give rise to an increase in neck thickness and interlocking length, while an increase in blank holder force induced a decrease in interlocking length and an increase in neck thickness. The joining quality could be increased by increasing the forming force. It can be concluded that a clinched joint has better joining quality for joining light-weight sheets onto automotive structures.

  6. Spray-coating of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys with enhanced mechanical robustness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youfa; Ge, Dengteng; Yang, Shu

    2014-06-01

    A superhydrophobic aluminum alloy was prepared by one-step spray coating of an alcohol solution consisting of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles (15-40 nm) and methyl silicate precursor on etched aluminum alloy with pitted morphology. The as-sprayed metal surface showed a water contact angle of 155° and a roll-off angle of 4°. The coating was subjected to repeated mechanical tests, including high-pressure water jetting, sand particles impacting, and sandpaper shear abrasion. It remained superhydrophobic with a roll-off angle <10° up to three cycles of water jetting (25 kPa for 10 min) and sand particle impinging. After five cycles, the roll-off angle increased, but no more than 19° while the water contact angle remained greater than 150°. The superhydrophobic state was also maintained after three cycles of sandpaper abrasion. It was found that the micro-protrusion structures on the etched aluminum alloy played an important role to enhance the coating mechanical robustness, where the nanoparticles could grab on the rough surface, specifically in the groove structures, in comparison with the smooth glass substrates spray coated with the same materials. Further, we showed that the superhydrophobicity could be restored by spray a new cycle of the nanocomposite solution on the damaged surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perforation of thin aluminum alloy plates by blunt projectiles: An experimental and numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, G.; Zhang, W.

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the armor weight has become a research focus in terms of armored material. Due to high strength-to-density ratio, aluminum alloy has become a potential light armored material. In this study, both lab-scale ballistic test and finite element simulation were adopted to examine the ballistic resistance of aluminum alloy targets. Blunt high strength steel projectiles with 12.7 mm diameter were launched by light gas gun against 3.3 mm thickness 7A04 aluminum alloy plates at a velocity of 90~170 m/s. The ballistic limit velocity was obtained. Plugging failure and obvious structure deformation of targets were observed. Corresponding 2D finite element simulations were conducted by ABAQUS/EXPLICIT combined with material performance testing. The validity of numerical simulations was verified by comparing with the experimental results. Detailed analysis of the failure modes and characters of the targets were carried out to reveal the target damage mechanism combined with the numerical simulation.

  8. Chemical interactions and thermodynamic studies in aluminum alloy/molten salt systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ramesh

    The recycling of aluminum and aluminum alloys such as Used Beverage Container (UBC) is done under a cover of molten salt flux based on (NaCl-KCl+fluorides). The reactions of aluminum alloys with molten salt fluxes have been investigated. Thermodynamic calculations are performed in the alloy/salt flux systems which allow quantitative predictions of the equilibrium compositions. There is preferential reaction of Mg in Al-Mg alloy with molten salt fluxes, especially those containing fluorides like NaF. An exchange reaction between Al-Mg alloy and molten salt flux has been demonstrated. Mg from the Al-Mg alloy transfers into the salt flux while Na from the salt flux transfers into the metal. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that the amount of Na in metal increases as the Mg content in alloy and/or NaF content in the reacting flux increases. This is an important point because small amounts of Na have a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the Al-Mg alloy. The reactions of Al alloys with molten salt fluxes result in the formation of bluish purple colored "streamers". It was established that the streamer is liquid alkali metal (Na and K in the case of NaCl-KCl-NaF systems) dissipating into the melt. The melts in which such streamers were observed are identified. The metal losses occurring due to reactions have been quantified, both by thermodynamic calculations and experimentally. A computer program has been developed to calculate ternary phase diagrams in molten salt systems from the constituting binary phase diagrams, based on a regular solution model. The extent of deviation of the binary systems from regular solution has been quantified. The systems investigated in which good agreement was found between the calculated and experimental phase diagrams included NaF-KF-LiF, NaCl-NaF-NaI and KNOsb3-TINOsb3-LiNOsb3. Furthermore, an insight has been provided on the interrelationship between the regular solution parameters and the topology of the phase

  9. Characterization of disk-laser dissimilar welding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V to aluminum alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Corrado, Gaetano; Sergi, Vincenzo

    2013-02-01

    Both technical and economic reasons suggest to join dissimilar metals, benefiting from the specific properties of each material in order to perform flexible design. Adhesive bonding and mechanical joining have been traditionally used although adhesives fail to be effective in high-temperature environments and mechanical joining are not adequate for leak-tight joints. Friction stir welding is a valid alternative, even being difficult to perform for specific joint geometries and thin plates. The attention has therefore been shifted to laser welding. Interest has been shown in welding titanium to aluminum, especially in the aviation industry, in order to benefit from both corrosive resistance and strength properties of the former, and low weight and cost of the latter. Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V and aluminum alloy 2024 are considered in this work, being them among the most common ones in aerospace and automotive industries. Laser welding is thought to be particularly useful in reducing the heat affected zones and providing deep penetrative beads. Nevertheless, many challenges arise in welding dissimilar metals and the aim is further complicated considering the specific features of the alloys in exam, being them susceptible to oxidation on the upper surface and porosity formation in the fused zone. As many variables are involved, a systematic approach is used to perform the process and to characterize the beads referring to their shape and mechanical features, since a mixture of phases and structures is formed in the fused zone after recrystallization.

  10. Coating of 6028 Aluminum Alloy Using Aluminum Piston Alloy and Al-Si Alloy-Based Nanocomposites Produced by the Addition of Al-Ti5-B1 to the Matrix Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labban, Hashem F.; Abdelaziz, M.; Mahmoud, Essam R. I.

    2014-10-01

    The Al-12 pctSi alloy and aluminum-based composites reinforced with TiB2 and Al3Ti intermetallics exhibit good wear resistance, strength-to-weight ratio, and strength-to-cost ratio when compared to equivalent other commercial Al alloys, which make them good candidates as coating materials. In this study, structural AA 6028 alloy is used as the base material. Four different coating materials were used. The first one is Al-Si alloy that has Si content near eutectic composition. The second, third, and fourth ones are Al-6 pctSi-based reinforced with TiB2 and Al3Ti nano-particles produced by addition of Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy with different weight percentages (1, 2, and 3 pct). The coating treatment was carried out with the aid of GTAW process. The microstructures of the base and coated materials were investigated using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX analyzer. Microhardness of the base material and the coated layer were evaluated using a microhardness tester. GTAW process results in almost sound coated layer on 6028 aluminum alloy with the used four coating materials. The coating materials of Al-12 pct Si alloy resulted in very fine dendritic Al-Si eutectic structure. The interface between the coated layer and the base metal was very clean. The coated layer was almost free from porosities or other defects. The coating materials of Al-6 pct Si-based mixed with Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy with different percentages (1, 2, and 3 pct), results in coated layer consisted of matrix of fine dendrite eutectic morphology structure inside α-Al grains. Many fine in situ TiAl3 and TiB2 intermetallics were precipitated almost at the grain boundary of α-Al grains. The amounts of these precipitates are increased by increasing the addition of Al-Ti5-B1 master alloy. The surface hardness of the 6028 aluminum alloy base metal was improved with the entire four used surface coating materials. The improvement reached to about 85 pct by the first type of

  11. Characterization of Molybdate Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate the corrosion inhibiting properties of newly developed proprietary molybdate conversion coatings on aluminum alloy 2024-T3 under immersion in aerated 5% (w/w) NaCl. Corrosion potential and EIS measurements were gathered for six formulations of the coating at several immersion times for two weeks. Nyquist as well as Bode plots of the data were obtained. The conversion-coated alloy panels showed an increase in the corrosion potential during the first 24 hours of immersion that later subsided and approached a steady value. Corrosion potential measurements indicated that formulations A, D, and F exhibit a protective effect on aluminum 2024-T3. The EIS spectra of the conversion-coated alloy were characterized by an impedance that is higher than the impedance of the bare alloy at all the immersion times. The low frequency impedance, Z(sub lf) (determined from the value at 0.05 Hz) for the conversion-coated alloy was higher at all the immersion times than that of the bare panel. This indicates improvement of corrosion resistance with addition of the molybdate conversion coating. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of cracks in the coating and the presence of cubic crystals believed to be calcium carbonate. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the test panels revealed the presence of high levels of aluminum, oxygen, and calcium but did not detect the presence of molybdenum on the test panels. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated the presence of less than 0.01 atomic percent molybdenum on the surface of the coating.

  12. Determination of Minor and Trace Metals in Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys by ICP-AES; Evaluation of the Uncertainty and Limit of Quantitation from Interlaboratory Testing.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Michihisa; Makino, Masanori; Ota, Yuji; Sakaguchi, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yukari; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Minor and trace metals in aluminum and aluminum alloys have been determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) as an interlaboratory testing toward standardization. The trueness of the measured data was successfully investigated to improve the analytical protocols, using certified reference materials of aluminum. Their precision could also be evaluated, feasible to estimate the uncertainties separately. The accuracy (trueness and precision) of the data were finally in good agreement with the certified values and assigned uncertainties. Repeated measurements of aluminum solutions with different concentrations of the analytes revealed the relative standard deviations of the measurements with concentrations, thus enabling their limits of quantitation. They differed separately and also showed slightly higher values with an aluminum matrix than those without one. In addition, the upper limit of the detectable concentration of silicon with simple acid digestion was estimated to be 0.03 % in the mass fraction.

  13. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 (Al-1.0 Li-4.0 Cu-0.4 Mg-0.4 Ag-0.12 Zr) for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. These newer alloys generally have lithium content less than 2 wt. % and their composition and processing have been carefully tailored to increase the toughness and reduce the mechanical property anisotropy of the earlier generation alloys such 2090 and 8090. Alloy processing, particularly the aging treatment, has a significant influence on the strength-toughness combinations and their dependence on service environments for aluminum-lithium alloys. Work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on alloy 2195 has shown that the cryogenic toughness can be improved by employing a two-step aging process. This is accomplished by aging at a lower temperature in the first step to suppress nucleation of the strengthening precipitate at sub-grain boundaries while promoting nucleation in the interior of the grains. Second step aging at the normal aging temperature results in precipitate growth to the optimum size. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy C458 (Al-1.8 Li-2.7 Cu-0.3 Mg-0.08 Zr-0.3 Mn-0.6 Zn) is typically aged at 300F for 24hours. In this study, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a comprehensive 2(exp 4) full factorial design of experiments study and the typical one-step aging used as a reference. Based on the higher lithium content of C458 compared with 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 175F and 250F. The second step aging temperatures was

  14. Nondestructive detection of an undesirable metallic phase, T.sub.1, during processing of aluminum-lithium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Buck, Otto; Bracci, David J.; Jiles, David C.; Brasche, Lisa J. H.; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Chumbley, Leonard S.

    1990-08-07

    A method is disclosed for detecting the T.sub.1 phase in aluminum-lithium alloys through simultaneous measurement of conductivity and hardness. In employing eddy current to measure conductivity, when the eddy current decreases with aging of the alloy, while the hardness of the material continues to increase, the presence of the T.sub.1 phase may be detected.

  15. Adhesive material transfer in the erosion of an aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Brainard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    In order to study the basic mechanisms of erosion, hardened steel balls were shot into annealed 6061 Al alloy targets at velocity of up to 150 m/sec. The projectiles were collected and examined by a scanning electron microscope combined with energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer and it was found that target material in substantial amounts is adhesively transferred to the projectile. The transferred material forms on the projectile surface a layer the thickness of which increases with increases in impact velocity.

  16. Aluminum-Silicon Alloy Having Improved Properties at Elevated Temperatures and Articles Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An aluminum alloy suitable for high temperature applications, such as heavy duty pistons and other internal combustion applications. having the following composition, by weight percent (wt %): Silicon: 11.0-14.0; Copper: 5.6-8.0; Iron: 0-0.8; Magnesium: 0.5-1.5; Nickel: 0.05-0.9; Manganese: 0.5-1.5; Titanium: 0.05-1.2; Zirconium: 0.12-1.2; Vanadium: 0.05-1.2; Zinc: 0.005-0.9; Strontium: 0.001-0.1; Aluminum: balance. In this alloy the ratio of silicon:magnesium is 10-25, and the ratio of copper:magnesium is 4-15. After an article is cast from this alloy, the article is treated in a solutionizing step which dissolves unwanted precipitates and reduces any segregation present in the original alloy. After this solutionizing step, the article is quenched, and is then aged at an elevated temperature for maximum strength.

  17. Mechanical behavior of monocrystalline aluminum-lithium alloy at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.G.; Liu, W.; Xu, Y.B.

    1994-12-01

    Investigations have indicated that at low temperature aluminum- lithium alloys display improved toughness and an improved strength-toughness relationship. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation and the fracture toughness increase with decreasing temperatures. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this most striking feature. Webster claimed that low melting point impurities, such as sodium and potassium, are responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties in Al-Li alloys at low temperatures. However, Venkateswara Rao et al. indicated that the increased delamination at low temperatures can increase the degree of in-plane crack deflection, resulting in toughening of the alloys. On the basismore » of their own results, Xu and coworker pointed out that the improvement of tensile and fatigue properties at liquid nitrogen temperatures is also presumably attributable to the delamination. Therefore, the mechanisms responsible for the variation in mechanical properties with temperature are not currently well-understood. In order to elucidate the real situation, single crystals of a binary aluminum-lithium alloy were adopted in the present study. This paper is devoted to the description of the behavior of the load-displacement curves and the associated slip traces on the sample surfaces.« less

  18. Mechanical behavior of aluminum-bearing ferritic alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guria, Ankan

    Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of electrical power worldwide. Nuclear reactors generating this power traditionally use Zirconium (Zr) based alloys as the fuel cladding material. Exothermic reaction of Zr with steam under accident conditions may lead to production of hydrogen with the possibility of catastrophic consequences. Following the Fukushima-Daiichi incident, the exploration of accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials accelerated. Aluminum-rich (around 5 wt. %) ferritic steels such as Fecralloy, APMT(TM) and APM(TM) are considered as potential materials for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications. These materials create an aluminum-based oxide scale protecting the alloy at elevated temperatures. Tensile deformation behavior of the above alloys was studied at different temperatures (25-500 °C) at a strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and correlated with microstructural characteristics. Higher strength and decent ductility of APMT(TM) led to further investigation of the alloy at various combination of strain rates and temperatures followed by fractography and detailed microscopic analyses. Serrations appeared in the stress-strain curves of APMT(TM) and Fecralloy steel tested in a limited temperature range (250-400 °C). The appearance of serrations is explained on the basis of dynamic strain aging (DSA) effect due to solute-dislocation interactions. The research in this study is being performed using the funds received from the US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP).

  19. Hot forging of roll-cast high aluminum content magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Tomohiro; Watari, Hisaki; Suzuki, Mayumi; Haga, Toshio

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on hot forging of high aluminum content magnesium alloy sheets manufactured using horizontal twin-roll casting. AZ111 and AZ131 were applied for twin-roll casting, and a hot-forging test was performed to manufacture high-strength magnesium alloy components economically. For twin-roll casting, the casting conditions of a thick sheet for hot forging were investigated. It was found that twin-roll casting of a 10mm-thick magnesium alloy sheet was possible at a roll speed of 2.5m/min. The grain size of the cast strip was 50 to 70µm. In the hot-forging test, blank material was obtained from as-cast strip. A servo press machine with a servo die cushion was used to investigate appropriate forging conditions (e.g., temperature, forging load, and back pressure) for twin-roll casts (TRCs) AZ111 and AZ131. It was determined that high aluminum content magnesium alloy sheets manufactured using twin-roll casting could be forged with a forging load of 150t and a back pressure of 3t at 420 to 430°C. Applying back pressure during hot forging effectively forged a pin-shaped product.

  20. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Bjorkman, Gerry; McCool, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems, and McCook Metals' development an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding 2195 aluminum lithium. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, which is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program consists of 2195 welded with 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire. The B218 filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties. An initial characterization of the B218 weld filler wire was performed consisting of initial weld and repair weld evaluation comparing B218 and 4043. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. B218 weld filler wire proved to produce enhanced initial and repair weld tensile and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding 2195 and other aluminum lithium alloys over 4043.

  1. Microstructure dependence of dynamic fracture and yielding in aluminum and an aluminum alloy at strain rates of 2 × 106 s-1 and faster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, D. A.; Worthington, D. L.; Sherek, P. A.; Pedrazas, N. A.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Rambo, P.; Schwarz, J.; Edens, A.; Geissel, M.; Smith, I. C.; Taleff, E. M.; Ditmire, T.

    2011-11-01

    Experiments investigating fracture and resistance to plastic deformation at fast strain rates (>106 s-1) were performed via laser ablation on thin sheets of aluminum and aluminum alloys. Single crystal high purity aluminum (Al-HP) and a single crystal 1100 series aluminum alloy (AA1100) were prepared to investigate the role of impurity particles. Specimens of aluminum alloy +3 wt. % Mg (Al+3Mg) at three different grain sizes were also studied to determine the effect of grain size. In the present experiments, high purity aluminum (Al-HP) exhibited the highest spall strength over 1100 series aluminum alloy (AA1100) and Al+3Mg. Fracture characterization and particle analysis revealed that fracture was initiated in the presence of particles associated with impurity content in the AA1100 and at both grain boundaries and particles in Al+3Mg. The Al+3Mg specimens exhibited the greatest resistance to plastic deformation likely resulting from the presence of magnesium atoms. The Al-HP and AA1100, both lacking a strengthening element such as Mg, were found to have the same Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) stress. Within the single crystal specimens, orientation effects on spall strength and HEL stress appear to be negligible. Although the fracture character shows a trend with grain size, no clear dependence of spall strength and HEL stress on grain size was measured for the Al+3Mg. Hydrodynamic simulations show how various strength and fracture models are insufficient to predict material behavior at fast strain rates, and a revised set of Tuler-Butcher coefficients for spall are proposed.

  2. FIM/atom probe analysis of a heat treated 7150 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, S. S.; Kowalik, J.; Hua Ming-Jian

    1991-04-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength aluminum alloys can be substantially altered by heat treatment. In addition to microstructural changes, the alloys may also undergo chemical changes as a result of the heat treatment which may affect the stress corrosion properties. The FIM/atom probe has been used to detect such changes. The compositions of the matrix, matrix precipitates, precipitate-free zone (PFZ) and grain boundary precipitates in a heat-treated 7150 Al alloy tempered to peak strength have been quantitatively measured. A substantial increase in the concentrations of Mg, Zn and Cu were found in the PFZ. The average compositions of the precipitates in the matrix and at the sub-boundaries were shown not to differ significantly. The coarser precipitates at high-angle boundaries, which may have a more important effect on stress corrosion, were difficult to analyze because of their low number density and the large grain size of the material.

  3. Metallurgical characterization of the fracture of several high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandarkar, M. D.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The fracture behavior for structural aluminum alloys (2024, 6061, 7075, and 7178) was examined in selected heat treatments. The investigation included tensile, shear, and precracked notch-bend specimens fractured at ambient temperature under monotonic loading. Specimens were obtained from thin sheets and thick plates and were tested in longitudinal and transverse orientations at different strain rates. Microstructures of alloys were examined using the optical microscope and the scanning electron microscope with associated energy dispersive X ray chemical analysis. Several different types of second phase particles, some not reported by other investigators, were identified in the alloys. Fracture morphology was related to microstructural variables, test variables, and type of commercial product. Specimen orientation examined in the present investigation had little effect on fracture morphology. Test strain rate changes resulted in some change in shear fracture morphology, but not in fracture morphology of tensile specimens.

  4. Effect of low-temperature annealing on the creep of 1570 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevezentsev, V. N.; Shcherban', M. Yu.; Gracheva, T. A.; Kuz'micheva, T. A.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of preliminary low-temperature annealing on the creep of a submicrocrystalline 1570 aluminum alloy fabricated by severe plastic deformation is studied. The creep rate is found to increase with the annealing time, but long-term annealing for 4 h decreases the creep rate to the value characteristic of the alloy not subjected to preliminary annealing. The increase in the creep rate of the alloy subjected to preliminary annealing is likely to be caused by an increase in the nonequilibrium excess volume in grain boundaries as a result of the dissolution of grain-boundary nanopores upon annealing and, hence, by an increase in the grain-boundary diffusion rate and the grain-boundary sliding rate.

  5. Thermomechanical treatment of 2124 PM aluminum alloys with low and high dispersoid levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, B.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of thermomechanical treatment (TMT) on the mechanical properties and metallurgical structure of 2124 powder metallurgy aluminum alloys prepared from rapidly solidified powders were investigated. The alloys were prepared by using a standard canning/vacuum degassing/hot consolidation/extrusion sequence. Two compositions, with manganese contents of 0.5 and 1.5 percent, were investigated to examine the effects of low and high dispersoid levels. The results indicate that significant improvements in strength can be accomplished through TMT for this PM alloy system with little loss in toughness. The increase in strength observed is attributed to the presence of much finer, more homogeneous S-prime precipitation than that observed without TMT. Rolling deformation at room temperature resulted in some tendency for nonuniform (planar) deformation and resulted in slightly lower notch strength values. The lower notch strengths observed in the higher manganese composition were attributed to the coarser, more dense dispersoids observed in this material.

  6. Structure-composition-property relationships in 5xxx series aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Kinga A.

    Al-Mg alloys are well suited for marine applications due to their low density, ease of fabrication, structural durability, and most notably resistance to corrosion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of alloying additions, mechanical processing and heat treatments on the development of grain boundary phases that have an effect on intergranular corrosion (IGC). Cu, Zn, and Si modified compositions of AA5083 were produced that were subjected to a low and high degree of cold work and various heat treatments. ASTM G67 (NAMLT) intergranular corrosion testing and detailed microstructural characterization for various alloys was carried out. An optimal composition and processing condition that yielded the best intergranular corrosion resistant material was identified based on the ASTM G67 test screening. Further, the outstanding modified AA5083 was selected for further microstructural analysis. This particular alloy with has a magnesium level high enough to make it susceptible to intergranular corrosion is very resistant to IGC. It was found that development of the appropriate sub-structure with some Cu, Si and Zn resulted in a material very resistant to IGC. Formation of many sinks, provided by sub-boundaries, within microstructure is very beneficial since it produces a relatively uniform distribution of Mg in the grain interiors, and this can suppress sensitization of this alloy very successfully. This is a very promising rote for the production of high-strength, and corrosion resistant aluminum alloys. Additionally in this study, TEM sample preparation become very crucial step in grain boundary phase investigation. Focus Ion Beam (FIB) milling was used as a primary TEM sample preparation technique because it enables to extract the samples from desired and very specific locations without dissolving grain boundary phases as it was in conventional electropolishing method. However, other issues specifically relevant to FIB milling of aluminum alloys

  7. X-ray studies of dynamic aging in an aluminum alloy subjected to severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sitdikov, V.D., E-mail: svil@mail.rb.ru; Laboratory for Mechanics of Bulk Nanomaterials, Saint Petersburg State University, 28 Universitetsky pr., Saint Petersburg 198504; Chizhov, P.S.

    In this work, X-ray scattering methods were applied for a quantitative characterization of the microstructure of an aluminum alloy of the Al–Mg–Si system during dynamic aging realized through the high pressure torsion technique. A qualitative and quantitative phase analysis of the alloy was performed, together with Al alloy lattice parameter determination. From the reflections broadening the effective size of the coherent scattering domains and the lattice microstrain were determined in the framework of the Halder–Wagner approach. Using the method of small-angle X-ray scattering, the quantitative characteristics of the size, shape and spatial distribution of the secondary phase particles formed inmore » the Al alloy during dynamic aging were established. In order to validate the obtained results, the method of small-angle X-ray scattering was preliminarily tested on similar samples after artificial aging and compared with the results from small-angle neutron diffraction widely known in literature. - Highlights: • Spherical fcc β-Mg2Si precipitates formed in Al 6201 alloy during dynamic aging in the course of severe plastic deformation. • The size, shape and distribution of the precipitates due to artificial and dynamic aging were revealed by SAXS method. • Monoclinic needle-like β' precipitates and Al5FeSi intermetallic phase were detected in 6201 alloy after T6 treatment.« less

  8. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  9. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue behavior of an Al-Mg-Si based heat-resistant aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Sik; Sung, Si-Young; Han, Bum-Suck; Park, Joong-Cheol; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2015-11-01

    High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue behavior of the new heat-resistant aluminum alloy was investigated in this study. The aluminum alloy consists of aluminum matrix and small amount of precipitated Mg2Si and (Co, Ni)3Al4 strengthening particles. At room temperature and 523 K, the yield and tensile strengths of Al-Mg-Si-(Co, Ni) the aluminum alloy were maintained with no significant decrease, and elongation increased slightly. Low-cycle fatigue tests controlled by total strain were performed with strain ratio (R) = -1, strain rate = 2×10-3 s-1 at 523 K. The fatigue limit of the low-cycle fatigue of this alloy showed plastic strain amplitude (Δ ɛ pa) of 0.22% at 103 cycles. This value was superior to that of conventional aluminum alloy such as A319. The results of the fractographical observation showed that second phases, especially (Co, Ni)3Al4 particles, affected fatigue behavior. This study also attempted to clarify the mechanism of high-temperature, low-cycle fatigue deformation of Al-Mg-Si-(Co, Ni) alloy in relation to its microstructure and energy dissipation analysis.

  10. Composites of aluminum alloy and magnesium alloy with graphite showing low thermal expansion and high specific thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, Valerio; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-12-01

    High thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and low density are three important features in novel materials for high performance electronics, mobile applications and aerospace. Spark plasma sintering was used to produce light metal-graphite composites with an excellent combination of these three properties. By adding up to 50 vol.% of macroscopic graphite flakes, the thermal expansion coefficient of magnesium and aluminum alloys was tuned down to zero or negative values, while the specific thermal conductivity was over four times higher than in copper. No degradation of the samples was observed after thermal stress tests and thermal cycling. Tensile strength and hardness measurements proved sufficient mechanical stability for most thermal management applications. For the production of the alloys, both prealloyed powders and elemental mixtures were used; the addition of trace elements to cope with the oxidation of the powders was studied.

  11. Composites of aluminum alloy and magnesium alloy with graphite showing low thermal expansion and high specific thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Oddone, Valerio; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract High thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and low density are three important features in novel materials for high performance electronics, mobile applications and aerospace. Spark plasma sintering was used to produce light metal–graphite composites with an excellent combination of these three properties. By adding up to 50 vol.% of macroscopic graphite flakes, the thermal expansion coefficient of magnesium and aluminum alloys was tuned down to zero or negative values, while the specific thermal conductivity was over four times higher than in copper. No degradation of the samples was observed after thermal stress tests and thermal cycling. Tensile strength and hardness measurements proved sufficient mechanical stability for most thermal management applications. For the production of the alloys, both prealloyed powders and elemental mixtures were used; the addition of trace elements to cope with the oxidation of the powders was studied. PMID:28458742

  12. Composites of aluminum alloy and magnesium alloy with graphite showing low thermal expansion and high specific thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Oddone, Valerio; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    High thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and low density are three important features in novel materials for high performance electronics, mobile applications and aerospace. Spark plasma sintering was used to produce light metal-graphite composites with an excellent combination of these three properties. By adding up to 50 vol.% of macroscopic graphite flakes, the thermal expansion coefficient of magnesium and aluminum alloys was tuned down to zero or negative values, while the specific thermal conductivity was over four times higher than in copper. No degradation of the samples was observed after thermal stress tests and thermal cycling. Tensile strength and hardness measurements proved sufficient mechanical stability for most thermal management applications. For the production of the alloys, both prealloyed powders and elemental mixtures were used; the addition of trace elements to cope with the oxidation of the powders was studied.

  13. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  14. Fatigue properties of an 1421 aluminum alloy processed by ECAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogucheva, A.; Kaibyshev, R.

    2010-07-01

    Fatigue properties and fatigue crack growth rate were examined in an Al-Mg-Li-Sc-Zr allow subjected to equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) with rectangular shape of channels up to a total strain of ~4 at a temperature of 325°C followed by solution treatment with subsequent oil quenching with aging. After this processing the fraction recrystallized was ~80pct; the deformed microstructure remains essentially unchanged under solution treatment due to high density of Al3Sc coherent dispersoids playing a role of effective pinning agents. It was shown that the fatigue limit of this material attained a value of ~185 MPa. Thermomechanical processing provided a decrease in fatigue crack propagation growth rate and an increase in the stress intensity factor, K1c, in comparison with extruded bar. However, characteristics of crack propagation resistance did not attain values suitable for application of this alloy for critical aircraft components.

  15. Structure and properties of a splat cooled 2024 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebo, M.; Grant, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the investigation the alloy was melted, heated to 750 C, and atomized into fine droplets. The droplets were rapidly quenched against a heavy copper disk rotating at 1725 rpm. The resultant splat cooled flakes were screened. Three flake sizes were finally separated. Flakes of each size were separately processed. The characteristics of the splat cooling process and the properties of the obtained products are discussed. Splat cooling against a metallic substrate permits cooling rates up to about 1,000,000 deg C/sec. Increases in yield strength and tensile strength of 14 to 19% are observed for the splat products. Other improvements are connected with increases in fatigue life and stress rupture performance.

  16. Robust biomimetic-structural superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingjie; Huang, Tao; Lei, Jinglei; He, Jianxin; Qu, Linfeng; Huang, Peiling; Zhou, Wei; Li, Nianbing; Pan, Fusheng

    2015-01-28

    The following facile approach has been developed to prepare a biomimetic-structural superhydrophobic surface with high stabilities and strong resistances on 2024 Al alloy that are robust to harsh environments. First, a simple hydrothermal treatment in a La(NO3)3 aqueous solution was used to fabricate ginkgo-leaf like nanostructures, resulting in a superhydrophilic surface on 2024 Al. Then a low-surface-energy compound, dodecafluoroheptyl-propyl-trimethoxylsilane (Actyflon-G502), was used to modify the superhydrophilic 2024 Al, changing the surface character from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. The water contact angle (WCA) of such a superhydrophobic surface reaches up to 160°, demonstrating excellent superhydrophobicity. Moreover, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface shows high stabilities in air-storage, chemical and thermal environments, and has strong resistances to UV irradiation, corrosion, and abrasion. The WCAs of such a surface almost remain unchanged (160°) after storage in air for 80 days, exposure in 250 °C atmosphere for 24 h, and being exposed under UV irradiation for 24 h, are more than 144° whether in acidic or alkali medium, and are more than 150° after 48 h corrosion and after abrasion under 0.98 kPa for 1000 mm length. The remarkable durability of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface can be attributed to its stable structure and composition, which are due to the existence of lanthanum (hydr)oxides in surface layer. The robustness of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface to harsh environments will open their much wider applications. The fabricating approach for such robust superhydrophobic surface can be easily extended to other metals and alloys.

  17. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R. P.; Pao, P. S.; Hart, R. G.; Weir, T. W.; Simmons, G. W.

    1980-12-01

    Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies were carried out to develop further understanding of the influence of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloys. The room temperature fatigue crack growth response was determined for 2219-T851 aluminum alloy exposed to water vapor at pressures from 1 to 30 Pa over a range of stress intensity factors ( K). Data were also obtained in vacuum (at < 0.50 μPa), and dehumidified argon. The test results showed that, at a frequency of 5 Hz, the rate of crack growth is essentially unaffected by water vapor until a threshold pressure is reached. Above this threshold, the rates increased, reaching a maximum within one order of magnitude increase in vapor pressure. This maximum crack growth rate is equal to that obtained in air (40 to 60 pct relative humidity), distilled water and 3.5 pct NaCl solution on the same material. Parallel studies of the reactions of water vapor with fresh alloy surfaces (produced either by in situ impact fracture or by ion etching) were made by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The extent of surface reaction was monitored by changes in the oxygen AES and XPS signals. Correlation between the fatigue crack growth response and the surface reaction kinetics has been made, and is consistent with a transport-limited model for crack growth. The results also suggest that enhancement of fatigue crack growth by water vapor in the aluminum alloys occurs through a “hydrogen embrittle ment” mechanism.

  18. Dynamic Behavior of AA2519-T8 Aluminum Alloy Under High Strain Rate Loading in Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasumboye, A. T.; Owolabi, G. M.; Odeshi, A. G.; Yilmaz, N.; Zeytinci, A.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, the effects of strain rate on the dynamic behavior, microstructure evolution and hence, failure of the AA2519-T8 aluminum alloy were investigated under compression at strain rates ranging from 1000 to 3500 s-1. Cylindrical specimens of dimensions 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm (L/D = 1) were tested using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar integrated with a digital image correlation system. The microstructure of the alloy was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Results showed that the dynamic yield strength of the alloy is strain rate dependent, with the maximum yield strength attained by the material being 500 MPa. The peak flow stress of 562 MPa was attained by the material at 3500 s-1. The alloy also showed a significant rate of strain hardening that is typical of other Al-Cu alloys; the rate of strain hardening, however, decreased with increase in strain rate. It was determined that the strain rate sensitivity coefficient of the alloy within the range of high strain rates used in this study is approximately 0.05 at 0.12 plastic strain; a more significant value than what was reported in literature under quasi-static loading. Micrographs obtained showed potential sites for the evolution of adiabatic shear band at 3500 s-1, with a characteristic circular-shaped surface profile comprising partially dissolved second phase particles in the continuous phase across the incident plane of the deformed specimen. The regions surrounding the site showed little or no change in the size of particles. However, the constituent coarse particles were observed as agglomerations of fractured pieces, thus having a shape factor different from those contained in the as-received alloy. Since the investigated alloy is a choice material for military application where it can be exposed to massive deformation at high strain rates, this study provides information on its microstructural and mechanical responses to such extreme loading condition.

  19. Static Recovery Modeling of Dislocation Density in a Cold Rolled Clad Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penlington, Alex

    Clad alloys feature one or more different alloys bonded to the outside of a core alloy, with non-equilibrium, interalloy interfaces. There is limited understanding of the recovery and recrystallization behaviour of cold rolled clad aluminum alloys. In order to optimize the properties of such alloys, new heat treatment processes may be required that differ from what is used for the monolithic alloys. This study examines the recovery behaviour of a cold rolled Novelis Fusion(TM) alloy containing an AA6XXX core with an AA3003 cladding on one side. The bond between alloys appears microscopically discrete and continuous, but has a 30 microm wide chemical gradient. The as-deformed structure at the interalloy region consists of pancaked sub-grains with dislocations at the misorientation boundaries and a lower density organized within the more open interiors. X-ray line broadening was used to extract the dislocation density from the interalloy region and an equivalently deformed AA6XXX following static annealing using a modified Williamson-Hall analysis. This analysis assumed that Gaussian broadening contributions in a pseudo-Voigt function corresponded only to strain from dislocations. The kinetics of the dislocation density evolution to recrystallization were studied isothermally at 2 minute intervals, and isochronally at 175 and 205°C. The data fit the Nes model, in which the interalloy region recovered faster than AA6XXX at 175°C, but was slower at 205°C. This was most likely caused by change in texture and chemistry within this region such as over-aging of AA6XXX . Simulation of a continuous annealing and self homogenization process both with and without pre-recovery indicates a detectable, though small change in the texture and grain size in the interalloy region.

  20. Dynamic Behavior of AA2519-T8 Aluminum Alloy Under High Strain Rate Loading in Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasumboye, A. T.; Owolabi, G. M.; Odeshi, A. G.; Yilmaz, N.; Zeytinci, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effects of strain rate on the dynamic behavior, microstructure evolution and hence, failure of the AA2519-T8 aluminum alloy were investigated under compression at strain rates ranging from 1000 to 3500 s-1. Cylindrical specimens of dimensions 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm (L/D = 1) were tested using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar integrated with a digital image correlation system. The microstructure of the alloy was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Results showed that the dynamic yield strength of the alloy is strain rate dependent, with the maximum yield strength attained by the material being 500 MPa. The peak flow stress of 562 MPa was attained by the material at 3500 s-1. The alloy also showed a significant rate of strain hardening that is typical of other Al-Cu alloys; the rate of strain hardening, however, decreased with increase in strain rate. It was determined that the strain rate sensitivity coefficient of the alloy within the range of high strain rates used in this study is approximately 0.05 at 0.12 plastic strain; a more significant value than what was reported in literature under quasi-static loading. Micrographs obtained showed potential sites for the evolution of adiabatic shear band at 3500 s-1, with a characteristic circular-shaped surface profile comprising partially dissolved second phase particles in the continuous phase across the incident plane of the deformed specimen. The regions surrounding the site showed little or no change in the size of particles. However, the constituent coarse particles were observed as agglomerations of fractured pieces, thus having a shape factor different from those contained in the as-received alloy. Since the investigated alloy is a choice material for military application where it can be exposed to massive deformation at high strain rates, this study provides information on its microstructural and mechanical responses to such extreme loading condition.

  1. Intergranular corrosion in AA5XXX aluminum alloys with discontinuous precipitation at the grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumiller, Elissa

    The US Navy currently uses AA5xxx aluminum alloys for structures exposed to a marine environment. These alloys demonstrate excellent corrosion resistance over other aluminum alloys (e.g., AA2xxx or AA7xxx) in this environment, filling a niche in the marine structures market when requiring a light-weight alternative to steel. However, these alloys are susceptible to localized corrosion; more specifically, intergranular corrosion (IGC) is of concern. IGC of AA5xxx alloys due to the precipitation of beta phase on the grain boundaries is a well-established phenomenon referred to as sensitization. At high degrees of sensitization, the IGC path is a continuous anodic path of beta phase particles. At lower degrees of sensitization, the beta phase coverage at the grain boundaries is not continuous. The traditional ranges of susceptibility to IGC as defined by ASTM B928 are in question due to recent studies. These studies showed that even at mid range degrees of sensitization where the beta phase is no longer continuous, IGC may still occur. Previous thoughts on IGC of these alloy systems were founded on the idea that once the grain boundary precipitate became discontinuous the susceptibility to IGC was greatly reduced. Additionally, IGC susceptibility has been defined metallurgically by compositional gradients at the grain boundaries. However, AA5xxx alloys show no compositional gradients at the grain boundaries, yet are still susceptible to IGC. The goal of this work is to establish criteria necessary for IGC to occur given no continuous beta phase path and no compositional gradient at the grain boundaries. IGC performance of the bulk alloy system AA5083 has been studied along with the primary phases present in the IGC system: alpha and beta phases using electrochemistry and modeling as the primary tools. Numerical modeling supports that at steady-state the fissure tip is likely saturated with Mg in excess of the 4% dissolved in the matrix. By combining these results

  2. Nickel-aluminum alloy clusters -- structural and dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.; Krissinel, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of mixed Ni{sub n}Al{sub m} alloy clusters mimicked by a many-body potential are studied computationally for all the possible compositions n and m such that n + m = 13. It is shown that the manifold of the usually very large number of the different possible structural forms can be systematized by introducing classes of structures corresponding to the same concentration of the components, geometry and type of the central atom. General definitions of mixing energy and mixing coefficient are introduced, and it is shown that the energy ordering of the structural forms within each classmore » is governed by the mixing coefficient. The peculiarities of the solid-to-liquid-like transition are described as a function of the concentration of the two types of atoms. These peculiarities are correlated with and explained in terms of the energy spectra of the structural forms. Class-dependent features of the dynamics are described and analyzed.« less

  3. Interdiffusion and reaction between pure magnesium and aluminum alloy 6061

    DOE PAGES

    Kammerer, C. C.; Fu, Mian; Zhou, Le; ...

    2015-06-01

    Using solid-to-solid couples investigation, this study characterized the reaction products evolved and quantified the diffusion kinetics when pure Mg bonded to AA6061 is subjected to thermal treatment at 300°C for 720 hours, 350°C for 360 hours, and 400°C for 240 hours. Characterization techniques include optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Parabolic growth constants were determined for γ-Mg 17Al 12, β-Mg 2Al 3, and the elusive ε-phase. Similarly, the average effective interdiffusion coefficients of major constituents were calculated for Mg (ss), γ-Mg 17Al 12, β-Mg 2Al 3, and AA6061. The activation energies andmore » pre-exponential factors for both parabolic growth constant and average effective interdiffusion coefficients were computed using the Arrhenius relationship. The activation energy for growth of γ-Mg 17Al 12 was significantly higher than that for β-Mg 2Al 3 while the activation energy for interdiffusion of γ-Mg 17Al 12 was only slightly higher than that for β-Mg 2Al 3. As a result, comparisons are made between the results of this study and those of diffusion studies between pure Mg and pure Al to examine the influence of alloying additions in AA6061.« less

  4. Theoretical studies of aluminum and aluminide alloys using CALPHAD and first-principles approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao

    Heat-treatable aluminum alloys have been widely used in the automobile and aerospace industries as structural materials due to their light weight and high strength. To study the age-hardening process in heat-treatable aluminum alloys, the Gibbs energies of the strengthening metastable phases, e.g. theta ' and theta″, are critical. However, those data are not included in the existing thermodynamic databases for aluminum alloys due to the semi-empirical nature of the CALPHAD approach. In the present study, the thermodynamics of the Al-Cu system, the pivotal age-hardening system, is remodeled using a combined CALPHAD and first-principles approach. The formation enthalpies and vibrational formation entropies of the stable and metastable phases in the Al-Cu system are provided by first-principles calculations. Special Quasirandom Structures (SQS's) are applied to model the substitutionally random fee and bee alloys. SQS's for binary bee alloys are developed and tested in the present study. Finally, a self-consistent thermodynamic description of the Al-Cu system including the two metastable theta″ and theta' phases is obtained. During welding of heat-treatable aluminum alloys, a detrimental phenomenon called constitutional liquation, i.e. the local eutectic melting of second-phase particles in a matrix at temperatures above the eutectic temperature but below the solidus of the alloy, may occur in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the present study, diffusion code DICTRA coupled with realistic thermodynamic and kinetic databases is used to simulate the constitutional liquation in the model Al-Cu system. The simulated results are in quantitative agreement with experiments. The critical heating rate to avoid constitutional liquation is also determined through computer simulations. Besides the heat-treatable aluminum alloys, intermetallic compounds based on transition metal aluminides, e.g. NiAl and FeAl, are also promising candidates for the next-generation of high

  5. A Fundamental Study of Laser Beam Welding Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2195 for Cryogenic Tank Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martukanitz, R. P.; Jan. R.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the potential for decreasing costs of joining stiffeners to skin by laser beam welding, a fundamental research program was conducted to address the impediments identified during an initial study involving laser beam welding of aluminum-lithium alloys. Initial objectives of the program were the identification of governing mechanism responsible for process related porosity while establishing a multivariant relationship between process parameters and fusion zone geometry for laser beam welds of alloy 2195. A three-level fractional factorial experiment was conducted to establish quantitative relationships between primary laser beam processing parameters and critical weld attributes. Although process consistency appeared high for welds produced during partial completion of this study, numerous cracks on the top-surface of the welds were discovered during visual inspection and necessitated additional investigations concerning weld cracking. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of filler alloy additions on crack sensitivity: the first experiment was used to ascertain the effects of various filler alloys on cracking and the second experiment involved modification to process parameters for increasing filler metal dilution. Results indicated that filler alloys 4047 and 4145 showed promise for eliminating cracking.

  6. Effects of V addition on recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloy after simulative hot deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jing; Shi, Cangji; Chen, X.-Grant, E-mail: xgrant_chen@uqac.ca

    2014-10-15

    The effects of different V contents (0.01 to 0.19 wt.%) on the recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloys during post-deformation heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural evolutions at as-cast, as-homogenized conditions and after post-deformation annealing were studied using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes and using the electron backscattered diffraction technique. The precipitation of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids was observed in alloys containing 0.11 to 0.19 wt.% V after homogenization. The dispersoids were mainly distributed in the dendrite cells, and the precipitate-free zones occurred in the interdendritic regions and near grain boundaries. V addition could significantly enhance the recrystallizationmore » resistance during post-deformation annealing, particularly in the presence of a great number of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids. Recrystallized grain growth was effectively restricted because of the dispersoid pinning effect. The alloy containing 0.15 wt.% V exhibited the highest recrystallization resistance amongst all V-containing alloys studied. - Highlights: • Investigated the effect of V level on microstructure and flow stress of 7150 alloys • Characterized microstructures using optical microscopy, SEM, TEM and EBSD • Described the precipitation behavior of V-dispersoids in the dendritic structure • Studied the V effect on recrystallization resistance during post heat treatment • V addition greatly enhanced the recrystallization resistance during annealing.« less

  7. Microstructure Analysis on 6061 Aluminum Alloy after Casting and Diffuses Annealing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Sun, W. L.; Xing, Y. Q.

    One factory using semi-continuous casting process produce the ф200×6000 mm 6061 aluminium alloy barstock, and then rotary forged for car wheels. 6061 distorting aluminium alloy is an forged aluminum alloy, and mainly containing Mg, Si, Cu and other alloying elements. The main strengthening phase is Mg2Si, and also has few phase of (FeMn) 3Si2Al15. In order to eliminate the segregation and separation which present in the crystal boundary, and make the distortion to be uniform, and does not present ear and fracture defects after the forging. So the 6061 distorting aluminium alloy adopt the diffusion annealing heat treatment before the forging process.According to the current conditions, we use the diffusion annealing which have the different heating temperature and different holding time.The best process we can obtain from the test which can improve the production efficiency and reduce the material waste, improve the mechanical properties, and eliminate the overheated film on the surface.Then,we using OM,SEM and EDS to analyse the microstructure and the chemical composition of compound between the surface and centre. The result shows that the amount of segregation were different in the surface and in the center, and the different diffusion annealing can cause the phase change in the surface and the center.

  8. Surface alloying of aluminum with molybdenum by high-current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Han; Zhang, Conglin; Lv, Peng; Cai, Jie; Jin, Yunxue; Guan, Qingfeng

    2018-02-01

    The surface alloying of pre-coated molybdenum (Mo) film on aluminum (Al) substrate by high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) was investigated. The microstructure and phase analysis were conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that Mo particles were dissolved into Al matrix to form alloying layer, which was composed of Mo, Al and acicular or equiaxed Al5Mo phases after surface alloying. Meanwhile, various structure defects such as dislocation loops, high-density dislocations and dislocation walls were observed in the alloying surface. The corrosion resistance was tested by using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). Electrochemical results indicate that all the alloying samples had better corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution compared to initial sample. The excellent corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to the combined effect of the structure defects and the addition of Mo element to form a more stable passive film.

  9. Influence of scandium on the microstructure and strength properties of the welded joint at the laser welding of aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.; Golyshev, A. A.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2017-10-01

    Today, aeronautical equipment manufacture involves up-to-date high-strength aluminum alloys of decreased density resulting from lithium admixture. Various technologies of fusible welding of these alloys are being developed. Serious demands are imposed to the welded joints of aluminum alloys in respect to their strength characteristics. The paper presents experimental investigations of the optimization of the laser welding of aluminum alloys with the scandium-modified welded joint. The effect of scandium on the micro-and macro-structure has been studied as well as the strength characteristics of the welded joint. It has been found that scandium under in the laser welding process increases the welded joint elasticity for the system Al-Mg-Li, aluminum alloy 1420 by 20 %, and almost doubles the same for the system Al-Cu-Li, aluminum alloy 1441.

  10. Change of Hot Cracking Susceptibility in Welding of High Strength Aluminum Alloy AA 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, M.; Hofmann, K.; Mann, V.; Hugger, F.; Roth, S.; Schmidt, M.

    High strength aluminum alloys are known as hard to weld alloys due to their high hot crack susceptibility. However, they have high potential for applications in light weight constructions of automotive industry and therefore it is needed to increase weldability. One major issue is the high hot cracking susceptibility. Vaporization during laser beam welding leads to a change of concentration of the volatile elements magnesium and zinc. Hence, solidification range of the weld and therefore hot cracking susceptibility changes. Additionally, different welding velocities lead to changed solidification conditions with certain influence on hot cracking. This paper discusses the influence of energy per unit length during laser beam welding of AA 7075 on the change of element concentration in the weld seam and the resulting influence on hot cracking susceptibility. Therefore EDS-measurements of weld seams generated with different velocities are performed to determine the change of element concentration. These quantitative data is used to numerically calculate the solidification range in order to evaluate its influence on the hot cracking susceptibility. Besides that, relative hot crack length and mechanical properties are measured. The results increase knowledge about welding of high strength aluminum alloy AA 7075 and hence support further developing of the welding process.

  11. Use of Permanent Magnets in Electromagnetic Facilities for the Treatment of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beinerts, Toms; Bojarevičs, Andris; Bucenieks, Imants; Gelfgat, Yuri; Kaldre, Imants

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of applying the electromagnetic induction pump with permanent magnets for the transportation and stirring of aluminum melts in metallurgical furnaces is investigated. The electromagnetic and hydraulic characteristics of the pump have been investigated theoretically and experimentally with regard to its position in the furnace. The results of the experiments performed with a model in a eutectic InGaSn melt are in good agreement with the calculation data. Extrapolation of the experimental results on the physical characteristics of aluminum melts allows recommending such pumps for contactless control of motion and heat/mass transfer in aluminum melts in different technological processes. A high temperature and the aggressive properties of aluminum alloys make it complicated to use different mechanical devices to solve technological problems, such as liquid metal transportation, dosing, stirring, etc. In this case, any device units or elements moving in or contacting with the melt suffer from corrosion polluting the melt. Therefore, of more importance and topicality are contactless electromagnetic methods for processing of molten metals.

  12. Coupled thermal-fluid-mechanics analysis of twin roll casting of A7075 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun-Soo; Kim, Hyoung-Wook; Cho, Jae-Hyung; Chun, Se-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    Better understanding of temperature distribution and roll separation force during twin roll casting of aluminum alloys is critical to successfully fabricate good quality of aluminum strips. Therefore, the simulation techniques are widely applied to understand the twin roll casting process in a comprehensive way and to reduce the experimental time and cost of trial and error. However, most of the conventional approaches are considered thermally coupled flow, or thermally coupled mechanical behaviors. In this study, a fully coupled thermal-fluid-mechanical analysis of twin roll casting of A7075 aluminum strips was carried out using the finite element method. Temperature profile, liquid fraction and metal flow of aluminum strips with different thickness were predicted. Roll separation force and roll temperatures were experimentally obtained from a pilot-scale twin roll caster, and those results were compared with model predictions. Coupling the fluid of the liquid melt to the thermal and mechanical modeling reasonably predicted roll temperature distribution and roll separation force during twin roll casting.

  13. Fabrication of the micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy by sulfuric acid anodizing and polypropylene coating.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruomei; Liang, Shuquan; Liu, Jun; Pan, Anqiang; Yu, Y; Tang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    The preparation of the superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy by anodizing and polypropylene (PP) coating was reported. Both the different anodizing process and different PP coatings of aluminum alloy were investigated. The effects of different anodizing conditions, such as electrolyte concentration, anodization time and current on the superhydrophobic surface were discussed. By PP coating after anodizing, a good superhydrophobic surface was facilely fabricated. The optimum conditions for anodizing were determined by orthogonal experiments. After the aluminium-alloy was grinded with 600# sandpaper, pretreated by 73 g/L hydrochloric acid solution at 1 min, when the concentration of sulfuric acid was 180 g/L, the concentration of oxalic acid was 5 g/L, the concentration of potassium dichromate was 10 g/L, the concentration of chloride sodium was 50 g/L and 63 g/L of glycerol, anodization time was 20 min, and anodization current was 1.2 A/dm2, anodization temperature was 30-35 degrees C, the best micro-nanostructure aluminum alloy films was obtained. On the other hand, the PP with different concentrations was used to the PP with different concentrations was used to coat the aluminum alloy surface after anodizing. The results showed that the best superhydrophobicity was achieved by coating PP, and the duration of the superhydrophobic surface was improved by modifying the coat the aluminum alloy surface after anodizing. The results showed that the best superhydrophobicity was surface with high concentration PP. The morphologies of micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic surface were further confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The material of PP with the low surface free energy combined with the micro/nano-structures of the surface resulted in the superhydrophobicity of the aluminum alloy surface.

  14. Micro-mechanisms of Surface Defects Induced on Aluminum Alloys during Plastic Deformation at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gali, Olufisayo A.

    Near-surface deformed layers developed on aluminum alloys significantly influence the corrosion and tribological behavior as well as reduce the surface quality of the rolled aluminum. The evolution of the near-surface microstructures induced on magnesium containing aluminum alloys during thermomechanical processing has been investigated with the aim generating an understanding of the influence of individual forming parameters on its evolution and examine the microstructure of the roll coating induced on the mating steel roll through material transfer during rolling. The micro-mechanisms related to the various features of near-surface microstructure developed during tribological conditions of the simulated hot rolling process were identified. Thermomechanical processing experiments were performed with the aid of hot rolling (operating temperature: 550 to 460 °C, 4, 10 and 20 rolling pass schedules) and hot forming (operating temperature: 350 to 545 °C, strain rate: 4 x 10-2 s-1) tribo-simulators. The surface, near-surface features and material transfer induced during the elevated temperature plastic deformation were examined and characterized employing optical interferometry, SEM/EDS, FIB and TEM. Near-surface features characterized on the rolled aluminum alloys included; cracks, fractured intermetallic particles, aluminum nano-particles, oxide decorated grain boundaries, rolled-in oxides, shingles and blisters. These features were related to various individual rolling parameters which included, the work roll roughness, which induced the formation of shingles, rolling marks and were responsible for the redistribution of surface oxide and the enhancements of the depth of the near-surface damage. The enhanced stresses and strains experienced during rolling were related to the formation and propagation of cracks, the nanocrystalline structure of the near-surface layers and aluminum nano-particles. The mechanism of the evolution of the near-surface microstructure were

  15. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  16. Microstructure of Friction Stir Welded AlSi9Mg Cast with 5083 and 2017A Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, C.; Kopyściański, M.; Dymek, S.; Węglowska, A.; Pietras, A.

    2018-03-01

    Wrought aluminum alloys 5083 and 2017A were each joined with cast aluminum alloy AlSi9Mg through friction stir welding in butt weld configurations. For each material system, the wrought and cast alloy positions, i.e., the advancing side or the retreating side, were exchanged between welding trials. The produced weldments were free from cracks and discontinuities. For each alloy configuration, a well-defined nugget comprised of alternating bands of the welded alloys characterized the microstructure. The degree of mixing, however, strongly depended on which wrought alloy was present and on its position during processing. In all cases, the cast AlSi9Mg alloy dominated the weld center regardless of its position during welding. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis showed that the grain size in both alloys (bands) constituting the nugget was similar and that the majority of grain boundaries exhibited a high angle character (20°-60°). Regardless of the alloy, however, all grains were elongated along the direction of the material plastic flow during welding. A numerical simulation of the joining process visualized the material flow patterns and temperature distribution and helped to rationalize the microstructural observations. The hardness profiles across the weld reflected the microstructure formed during welding and correlated well with the temperature changes predicted by the numerical model. Tensile specimens consistently fractured in the cast alloy near the weld nugget.

  17. Studying plastic shear localization in aluminum alloys under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalov, D. A.; Sokovikov, M. A.; Chudinov, V. V.; Oborin, V. A.; Bayandin, Yu. V.; Terekhina, A. I.; Naimark, O. B.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of plastic shear localization mechanisms observed under dynamic deformation using the shear-compression scheme on a Hopkinson-Kolsky bar has been carried out using specimens of AMg6 alloy. The mechanisms of plastic shear instability are associated with collective effects in the microshear ensemble in spatially localized areas. The lateral surface of the specimens was photographed in the real-time mode using a CEDIP Silver 450M high-speed infrared camera. The temperature distribution obtained at different times allowed us to trace the evolution of the localization of the plastic strain. Based on the equations that describe the effect of nonequilibrium transitions on the mechanisms of structural relaxation and plastic flow, numerical simulation of plastic shear localization has been performed. A numerical experiment relevant to the specimen-loading scheme was carried out using a system of constitutive equations that reflect the part of the structural relaxation mechanisms caused by the collective behavior of microshears with the autowave modes of the evolution of the localized plastic flow. Upon completion of the experiment, the specimens were subjected to microstructure analysis using a New View-5010 optical microscope-interferometer. After the dynamic deformation, the constancy of the Hurst exponent, which reflects the relationship between the behavior of defects and roughness induced by the defects on the surfaces of the specimens is observed in a wider range of spatial scales. These investigations revealed the distinctive features in the localization of the deformation followed by destruction to the script of the adiabatic shear. These features may be caused by the collective multiscale behavior of defects, which leads to a sharp decrease in the stress-relaxation time and, consequently, a localized plastic flow and generation of fracture nuclei in the form of adiabatic shear. Infrared scanning of the localization zone of the

  18. Blue-Light Hazard From Gas Metal Arc Welding of Aluminum Alloys.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2017-10-01

    The objective was to quantify the blue-light hazard from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminum alloys. The exposure level is expected to depend on the welding conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the blue-light hazard under various welding conditions. We experimentally conducted GMAW of aluminum alloys under various welding conditions and measured the spectral radiance of the arcs. The effective blue-light radiance, which the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists has defined to quantify the exposure level of blue light, was calculated from the measured spectral radiance. The maximum acceptable exposure duration per 10000 s for this effective blue-light radiance was calculated. The effective blue-light radiance measured in this study was in the range of 2.9-20.0 W cm-2·sr. The corresponding maximum acceptable exposure duration per 10000 s was only 5.0-34 s, so it is hazardous to view the welding arc. The effective blue-light radiance was higher at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents, when pulsed welding currents were used rather than steady welding currents, and when magnesium was included in the welding materials. It is very hazardous to view the arcs in GMAW of aluminum alloys. Welders and their helpers should use appropriate eye protection in arc-welding operations. They should also avoid direct light exposure when starting an arc-welding operation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  19. The development and characterization of a novel aluminum-copper-magnesium P/M alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Christopher Daniel

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) is a metal fabrication process that is characterized by high yield and ability to be automated, as well as the resultant part complexity and reproducibility. This press and sinter process is favoured by the automotive industry. Aluminum alloy P/M parts are particularly attractive because they have a high strength to weight ratio and they can be made to have high corrosion and wear resistance. There are few commercial Al P/M alloys currently in use and they occupy a small portion of the market. To expand the use of aluminum in the industry a new alloy was created, modeled after the wrought AC2024 family of alloys. P/M 2324, with a nominal composition of Al-4.4Cu-1.5Mg, was assessed using physical, chemical and mechanical methods to help maximize alloy properties through processing. The objective of this work was to develop a viable industrial alloy. The investigation of 2324 included the evaluation of starting powders, starting composition, processing methods, secondary treatments, and industrial response. All blending and compacting was completed at Dalhousie University, while sintering was undertaken at Dalhousie and GKN Sinter Metals. The green alloy was assessed for best compaction pressure using green density and strength. The sintered alloy was assessed to determine the best press and sinter variables, using dimensional change, sintered density, apparent hardness, tensile properties and microscopy. These same sintered properties were tested to determine if sintering done on a laboratory scale could be replicated industrially. The viability of heat treatment was tested using differential scanning calorimetry, hardness and tensile properties. The alloy was also subject to modifications of Cu and Mg amounts, as well as to the addition of tin to the base composition. It was determined that compaction at 400MPa and sintering at 600°C for 20min produced the best properties for the sintered bodies. The resultant mechanical properties were

  20. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of two powder metallurgy processed aluminum-lithium alloys were determined. Strength properties of 480 MPa yield and 550 MPa ultimate tensile strength with 5% strain to fracture were attained. Very little reduction in area was observed and fracture characteristics were brittle. The magnesium bearing alloy exhibited the highest strength and ductility, but fracture was intergranular. Recrystallization and grain growth, as well as coarse grain boundary precipitation, occurred in Alloy 2. The fracture morphology of the two alloys differed. Alloy 1 fractured along a plane of maximum shear stress, while Alloy 2 fractured along a plane of maximum tensile stress. It is found that a fixed orientation relationship exists between the shear fracture plane and the rolling direction which suggests that the PM alloys are strongly textured.

  1. Spectrum Fatigue of 7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy under Overloading and Underloading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-15

    underload, stress ratio, and environment on fatigue crack growth. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted with a 7075-T651 aluminum alloy under constant...the UniGrow equation, the variation of crack length with number of loading cycle was predicted. The prediction and the fatigue test life were found to...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 REPORT NO. NAWCADPAX/TIM-2015/282 ii SUMMARY Fatigue tests of 7075-T651

  2. Effect of Brake Forming on the Strength of 24S-T Aluminum-alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Woods, Walter

    1946-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effect of brake forming on the strength of 24S-T aluminum alloy sheet that had been formed to an inside bend radius of three times the sheet thickness. The results for both directions of the grain of the material showed that the compressive yield stresses were appreciably increased, that the tensile yield stresses were moderately increased, that the ultimate tensile stresses were only slightly increased, that the elongations were considerably reduced, and that the shapes of the tensile and compressive stress-strain curves were markedly changed.

  3. Morphology of an aluminum alloy eroded by a jet of angular particles impinging at normal incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The erosion of an aluminum alloy impinged by crushed glass particles at normal incidence was studied. The erosion patterns were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometer measurements. From the analysis of specimens tested at various driving gas pressures and time intervals, four distinct erosion regions were identified. A study of pit morphology and its relationship to cumulative erosion was made. Cutting wear is believed to be the predominant material removal mechanism; some evidence of deformation wear was found during the incubation period.

  4. Structural Phase Evolution in Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    The authors examined the structural and phase state of fixed joints produced by method of friction stir welding (FSW) and ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) from extruded profile of aluminum alloy AA2195. In order to identify the role of ultrasonic application in the course of welding, such characteristics, as volume fraction and average size of secondary particles are compared in the base material and stir zones of FSW and UAFSW joints. By applying the methods of SEM and TEM analysis, researchers established the complex character of phase transitions as a result of ultrasonic application.

  5. Microhardness and wear resistance of PEO-coated 5754 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyaliy, I. E.; Egorkin, V. S.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Minaev, A. N.; Gnedenkov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    We present results of the study aimed at assessing the effect of duty cycle (D) during plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on protective properties of the coatings produced on 5754 aluminum alloy. It is shown that increasing the duty cycle of a microsecond current pulses leads to increased hardness and reduced abrasive wear of the PEO-layers, improving mechanical properties. The obtained data allowed confirming, that increasing the amount of energy consumed for coating growth leads to the formation of thicker PEO-layers with improved tribological properties. The effect of duty cycle during plasma electrolytic oxidation on protective properties of the produced coatings was assessed.

  6. The NBS: Processing/Microstructure/Property Relationships in 2024 Aluminum Alloy Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, L. K.; Swartzendruber, W. J.; Boettinger, W. J.; Rosen, M.; Ridder, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    As received plates of 2024 aluminum alloy were examined. Topics covered include: solidification segregation studies; microsegregation and macrosegregation in laboratory and commercially cast ingots; C-curves and nondestructive evaluation; time-temperature precipitation diagrams and the relationships between mechanical properties and NDE measurements; transmission electron microscopy studies; the relationship between microstructure and properties; ultrasonic characterization; eddy-current conductivity characterization; the study of aging process by means of dynamic eddy current measurements; and Heat flow-property predictions, property degradations due to improve quench from the solution heat treatment temperature.

  7. Characterization of large 2219 aluminum alloy hand forgings for the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennecke, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, and stress corrosion properties of four types of 2219-T852 aluminum alloy hand forgings are presented. Weight of the forgings varied between 450 and 3500 lb at the time of heat treatment and dimensions exceeded the maximum covered in existing specifications. The forgings were destructively tested to develop reliable mechanical property data to replace estimates employed in the design of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and to establish minimum guaranteed properties for structural refinement and for entry into specification revisions. The report summarizes data required from the forgers and from the SRB Structures contractor.

  8. High-temperature oxidation of aluminum electroplated Fe-Mn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabai, U.; Felli, F.; Capuano, G.A.

    1990-04-01

    Austenitic Mn-Al alloys (20-32 W/O Mn, 7-10 Al, 2-3 Si, 1C) were found to have satisfactory oxidation resistance up to 950{degree}C under isothermal conditions in air. Surface enrichment of aluminum is a necessary condition for obtaining an almost pure alumina scale for uses at higher temperatures. Four different Mn-steels were Al-coated by the Capuano electroplating process. In all the steels there was an increase in the hot-oxidation resistance. The best results were obtained with steels containing both Al and Si, and this for temperatures up to 1,100{degree}C.

  9. Electrochemical Behavior and Surface Chemistry of Nonequilibrium Aluminum Alloys: Passivity Mechanism and Fabrication Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-17

    alartl.rdentifvb bjock nurrber) FtELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Appreveo for LUDic release; OSirlOUtion unllmilTe. Reproduction in whole or in part is pemitted for any...INSPECTED 5 0eeesson For Mr.c EAi 0 Justi fioaL fo p ,l INTRODUCTION Aluminum alloys are generally designed for improved mechanical properties which...during spraying. The specifications for these samples are given in Table 1. In this report, W concentrations used to denote samples refer to design

  10. Evolution of microstructure and precipitates in 2xxx aluminum alloy after severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk-Cieslak, B.; Zdunek, J.; Mizera, J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the influence of precipitation on the microstructure development in a 2xxx aluminum alloy subjected to hydrostatic extrusion. A three step reduction of the diameter was performed using hydrostatic extrusion (HE) process: from 20mm (initial state) to 10 mm, 5 mm and 3 mm, which corresponds to the logarithmic deformations ɛ = 1.4, ɛ = 2.8 and ɛ = 3.8 respectively. The microstructure and precipitation analysis before and after deformation was performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a result of the tests, a very significant influence of precipitation on the degree of refinement and mechanism of microstructure transformation was stated.

  11. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  12. Effects of aluminum and copper chill on mechanical properties and microstructures of Cu-Zn-Al alloys with sand casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhyananta, Hosta; Wibisono, Alvian Toto; Ramadhani, Mavindra; Widyastuti, Farid, Muhammad; Gumilang, Muhammad Shena

    2018-04-01

    Cu-Zn-Al alloy is one type of brass, which has high strength and high corrosion resistant. It has been applied on ship propellers and marine equipment. In this research, the addition of aluminum (Al) with variation of 1, 2, 3, 4% aluminum to know the effect on mechanical properties and micro structure at casting process using a copper chill and without copper chill. This alloy is melted using furnace in 1100°C without holding. Then, the molten metal is poured into the mold with copper chill and without copper chill. The speciment of Cu-Zn-Al alloy were chracterized by using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES), Metallography Test, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Hardness Test of Rockwell B and Charpy Impact Test. The result is the addition of aluminum and the use of copper chill on the molds can reduce the grain size, increases the value of hardness and impact.

  13. Formability analysis of aluminum alloy sheets at elevated temperatures with numerical simulation based on the M-K method

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheriasl, Reza; Ghavam, Kamyar; Worswick, Michael

    2011-05-04

    The effect of temperature on formability of aluminum alloy sheet is studied by developing the Forming Limit Diagrams, FLD, for aluminum alloy 3000-series using the Marciniak and Kuczynski technique by numerical simulation. The numerical model is conducted in LS-DYNA and incorporates the Barlat's YLD2000 anisotropic yield function and the temperature dependant Bergstrom hardening law. Three different temperatures; room temperature, 250 deg. C and 300 deg. C, are studied. For each temperature case, various loading conditions are applied to the M-K defect model. The effect of the material anisotropy is considered by varying the defect angle. A simplified failure criterion ismore » used to predict the onset of necking. Minor and major strains are obtained from the simulations and plotted for each temperature level. It is demonstrated that temperature improves the forming limit of aluminum 3000-series alloy sheet.« less

  14. Study on the surface constitute properties of high-speed end milling aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Li, Hongwei; Yumeng, Ma

    2017-09-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of the metal surface will change after the metal cutting processing. The comprehensive study of the influence of machining parameters on surface constitute properties are necessary. A high-speed milling experiment by means of orthogonal method with four factors was conducted for aluminum alloy7050-T7451. The surface constitutive properties of the Al-Alloy surface were measured using SSM-B4000TM stress-strain microprobe system. Based on all the load-depth curves obtained, the characteristics parameters such as strain hardening exponent n and yield strength σy of the milling surface are calculated. The effect of cutting speed, feed rate, and width and depth of cut on n and σy was investigated using the ANOVA techniques. The affecting degree of milling parameters on n and σy was v>fz> ap < ae. The influence of milling parameters on n and σ y was described and discussed.

  15. Experiments and FEM simulations of fracture behaviors for ADC12 aluminum alloy under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yumei; Xiao, Yue; Jin, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Haoran; Zhou, Yinge; Shao, Jinhua

    2016-11-01

    Using the combination of experiment and simulation, the fracture behavior of the brittle metal named ADC12 aluminum alloy was studied. Five typical experiments were carried out on this material, with responding data collected on different stress states and dynamic strain rates. Fractographs revealed that the morphologies of fractured specimen under several rates showed different results, indicating that the fracture was predominantly a brittle one in nature. Simulations of the fracture processes of those specimens were conducted by Finite Element Method, whilst consistency was observed between simulations and experiments. In simulation, the Johnson- Cook model was chosen to describe the damage development and to predict the failure using parameters determined from those experimental data. Subsequently, an ADC12 engine mount bracket crashing simulation was conducted and the results indicated good agreement with the experiments. The accordance showed that our research can provide an accurate description for the deforming and fracture processes of the studied alloy.

  16. The Strength and Characteristics of VPPA Welded 2219-T87 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process and those factors that control the structure and properties of VPPA welded aluminum alloy 2219-T87 was conducted. The importance of joint preparation, alignment of parts and welding process variables are already established. Internal weld defects have been eliminated. However, a variation of properties was found to be due to the size variation of interdendritic particles in the fusion zone. These particles contribute to the void formation process, which controls the ultimate tensile strength of the welded alloy. A variation of 150 microns in particle size correlated with a 10 ksi variation of ultimate tensile strength. It was found that all fracture surfaces were of the dimple rupture type, with fracture initiating within the fusion zone.

  17. The column strength of aluminum alloy 75S-T extruded shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Marshall; Leary, J R

    1946-01-01

    Because the tensile strength and tensile yield strength of alloy 75S-T are appreciably higher than those of the materials used in the tests leading to the use of the straight-line column curve, it appeared advisable to establish the curve of column strength by test rather than by extrapolation of relations determined empirically in the earlier tests. The object of this investigation was to determine the curve of column strength for extruded aluminum alloy 75S-T. In addition to three extruded shapes, a rolled-and-drawn round rod was included. Specimens of various lengths covering the range of effective slenderness ratios up to about 100 were tested.

  18. Fatigue crack initiation and microcrack propagation in X7091 type aluminum P/M alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, S.; Fine, M. E.

    1983-06-01

    Fatigu crack initiation in extruded X7091 RSP-P/M aluminum type alloys o°Curs at grain boundaries at both low and high stresses. By a process of elimination this grain boundary embrittlement was attributed to Al2O3 particles formed mainly during atomization and segregated to some grain boundaries. It is not due to the small grain size, to Co2Al9, to η precipitates at grain boundaries, nor to a precipitate free zone. Thermomechanical processing after extrusion of X7091 with 0.8 pct Co was done by Alcoa to produce large recrystallized grains. This resulted in initiation of fatigue cracks at slip bands, and the resistance to initiation of fatigue cracks at low stresses was much greater. Microcrack growth is, however, much faster in the thermomechanically treated samples, as well as in ingot alloys, than in extruded and aged X7091.

  19. Copper-nickel superalloys as inert alloy anodes for aluminum electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhongning; Xu, Junli; Qiu, Zhuxian; Wang, Zhaowen; Gao, Bingliang

    2003-11-01

    The superalloys Cu-Ni-Al, Cu-Ni-Fe, and Cu-Ni-Cr were studied as anodes for aluminum electrolysis. The alloys were tested for corrosion in acidic electrolyte molten salt and for oxidation in both air and oxygen. The results showed that the Cu-Ni-Al anodes possess excellent resistance to oxidation and corrosion, and the oxidation rates of Cu-Ni-Fe and Cu-Ni-Al anodes were slower than those of pure copper or nickel. During electrolysis, the cell voltage of the Cu-Ni-Al anode was affected most by the concentration of alumina in cryolite molten salt. The Cu-Ni-Fe anode exhibited corrosion resistance in electrolyte molten salt. Comparatively, the Cu-Ni-Cr anode showed poor resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The testing found that further study is warranted on the use of Cu-Ni-Al and Cu-Ni-Fe as inert alloy anodes.

  20. Development of the manufacture of billets based on high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, V. F.; Denisov, M. S.; Bol'shakov, A. E.; Van Khieu, Chan

    2017-09-01

    When pressure is applied upon casting as a factor of external impact on melt, the problems related mainly to filling of molds are solved; however, some casting defects cannot be avoided. The experimental results demonstrate that complete compensation of shrinkage under pressure can be achieved by compressing of casting by 8-10% prior to beginning of solidification and by 2-3% during the transition of a metal from the liquid to the solid state. It is mentioned that the procedure based on compressing a liquid metal can be efficiently applied for manufacture of high-strength aluminum alloy castings. The selection of engineering parameters is substantiated. Examples of castings made of V95 alloy according to the developed procedure are given. In addition, the article discusses the problems related to designing of engineering and special-purpose equipment, software, and control automation.

  1. Primary and secondary creep in aluminum alloys as a solid state transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; Bruno, G.; González-Doncel, G.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the massive literature and the efforts devoted to understand the creep behavior of aluminum alloys, a full description of this phenomenon on the basis of microstructural parameters and experimental conditions is, at present, still missing. The analysis of creep is typically carried out in terms of the so-called steady or secondary creep regime. The present work offers an alternative view of the creep behavior based on the Orowan dislocation dynamics. Our approach considers primary and secondary creep together as solid state isothermal transformations, similar to recrystallization or precipitation phenomena. In this frame, it is shown that the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, typically used to analyze these transformations, can also be employed to explain creep deformation. The description is fully compatible with present (empirical) models of steady state creep. We used creep curves of commercially pure Al and ingot AA6061 alloy at different temperatures and stresses to validate the proposed model.

  2. Fractal nature of aluminum alloys substructures under creep and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; Bruno, G.; González-Doncel, G.

    2018-04-01

    The present work offers an explanation for the variation of the power-law stress exponent, n, with the stress σ normalized to the shear modulus G in aluminum alloys. The approach is based on the assumption that the dislocation structure generated with deformation has a fractal nature. It fully explains the evolution of n with σ/G even beyond the so-called power law breakdown region. Creep data from commercially pure Al99.8%, Al-3.85%Mg, and ingot AA6061 alloy tested at different temperatures and stresses are used to validate the proposed ideas. Finally, it is also shown that the fractal description of the dislocation structure agrees well with current knowledge.

  3. Effects of Process Parameters on Solidification Structure of A390 Aluminum Alloy Hollow Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Kesheng; Zhang, Haitao; Qin, Ke; Cui, Jianzhong; Chen, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of process parameters on the solidification structure of A390 aluminum alloy hollow billets prepared by direct-chill casting were investigated. The decrease of casting temperature deteriorated the homogeneity and increased the size of primary Si particles in the hollow billet. Although the average size of primary Si particles was not obviously affected by the increase of casting speed, the thickness of Si-depleted layer at the inner wall increased with the higher casting speed. The tensile strength of A390 alloy is a function of the percentage of coarse Si particles (larger than 35 μm) and the average size of primary Si particles. Higher and more stable tensile strength can be received in the hollow billet with the casting temperature of 1050 K (777 °C), because the fine and uniformly distributed primary Si particles were obtained in the hollow billet.

  4. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  5. Metallurgical reactions in two industrially strip-cast aluminum-manganese alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, V.; Andersson, B.; Tibballs, J. E.; Gjønnes, J.

    1995-08-01

    Precipitation, phase transformation, subgrain growth, and recrystallization that occur during heat treatment of two strip-cast, cold-rolled, high manganese aluminum alloys have been studied mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The alloys differ in silicon content. The isothermal heat treatments have been performed in a salt bath at temperatures between 330 °C and 530 °C for times up to 1000 hours. Size distributions for each type of secondary particle have been determined. After short annealing times, small quasicrystals precipitated and subsequently transformed to α phase. The densities of these precipitates controlled dislocation movement and regulated subgrain sizes. Prolonged heating resulted in peritectoid reactions to Al6Mn or Al12Mn. Recrystallization, which is associated with the formation of Al12Mn, is advanced by increasing the silicon content; the nucleation and growth of Al12Mn occurs only at the expense of other phases that stabilize the subgrain network.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Study of Aluminum Alloys Using Electrochemical Noise Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, R. C.; Sapate, S. G.; Raman, R.; Rathod, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking studies of aluminum alloys AA2219, AA8090, and AA5456 in heat-treated and non heat-treated condition were carried out using electrochemical noise technique with various applied stresses. Electrochemical noise time series data (corrosion potential vs. time) was obtained for the stressed tensile specimens in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution at room temperature (27 °C). The values of drop in corrosion potential, total corrosion potential, mean corrosion potential, and hydrogen overpotential were evaluated from corrosion potential versus time series data. The electrochemical noise time series data was further analyzed with rescaled range ( R/ S) analysis proposed by Hurst to obtain the Hurst exponent. According to the results, higher values of the Hurst exponents with increased applied stresses showed more susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking as confirmed in case of alloy AA 2219 and AA8090.

  7. Scale Rules for Macrosegregation during Direct-Chill Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Dmitry G.; Du, Qiang; Katgerman, Laurens

    2008-05-01

    An analysis of published experimental and numerical results shows that there is a scaling relationship between the magnitude and direction of centerline segregation in direct-chill (DC) cast billets from aluminum alloys and the process parameters, i.e., billet diameter and casting speed. It seems that there is always a range of these process parameters where the centerline segregation is positive, and there is a threshold when the centerline segregation vanishes. Numerical simulations of macrosegregation during DC casting of a binary Al-Cu alloy were performed at different ratios of casting speed and billet diameter. The macrosegregation model takes into account only two mechanisms of macrosegregation, i.e., thermosolutal convection and shrinkage-induced flow. The results of these computer simulations fit well to the dependence obtained using numerous reference data. The results are discussed in terms of the contribution of different mechanisms of macrosegregation and the shape of the billet sump.

  8. Investigation of attenuation coefficients of some stainless steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caner, Zafer; Tufan, Mustafa ćaǧatay

    2018-02-01

    In this study, attenuation coefficients of two different stainless steel alloys (AISI 304 and AISI 310), which have a wide range of applications from home appliances to the automotive sector, and two different aluminum alloys (6013 and 5083), which have a high mechanical strength and a light weight structure and are used in many fields from aviation to military vehicles, has been determined. For this purpose, we used gamma spectrometer system with NaI(Tl) detector. In our measurements, we used Eu-152, Ra-226 and Co-60 as gamma ray sources. To narrow the beam of gamma rays, we designed the new steel based collimator. We also investigated the effect of using collimator. Obtained results were compared with the NIST XCOM values.

  9. Correlation of stress-wave-emission characteristics with fracture aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartbower, C. E.; Reuter, W. G.; Morais, C. F.; Crimmins, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    A study to correlate stress wave emission characteristics with fracture in welded and unwelded aluminum alloys tested at room and cryogenic temperature is reported. The stress wave emission characteristics investigated were those which serve to presage crack instability; viz., a marked increase in:(1) signal amplitude; (2) signal repetition rate; and (3) the slope of cumulative count plotted versus load. The alloys were 7075-T73, 2219-T87 and 2014-T651, welded with MIG and TIG using 2319 and 4043 filler wire. The testing was done with both unnotched and part-through-crack (PTC) tension specimens and with 18-in.-dia subscale pressure vessels. In the latter testing, a real time, acoustic emission, triangulation system was used to locate the source of each stress wave emission. With such a system, multiple emissions from a given location were correlated with defects found by conventional nondestructive inspection.

  10. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Stone, R. H.; Merchant, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    In a study of plastic fracture in five high-strength aluminum alloys (2014, 2024, 2124, 7075, and 7079), it has been shown that fracture toughness is affected primarily by the size and volume fraction of the larger (2 to 10 microms) second-phase particles. Certain of these particles crack at small plastic strains, nucleating voids which, with further plastic strain, coalesce to cause fracture. Not all second-phase particles crack at small plastic strains, and qualitative analysis of those which are primarily responsible for void nucleation shows that they contain iron or silicon or both. This result suggests that a reduction in the iron and silicon impurity content of the alloys should improve fracture toughness without loss of strength.

  11. Modeling the Hot Ductility of AA6061 Aluminum Alloy After Severe Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamei, A. A.; Dehghani, K.; Mahmudi, R.

    2015-05-01

    Solutionized AA6061 aluminum alloy was processed by equal-channel angular pressing followed by cold rolling. The hot ductility of the material was studied after severe plastic deformation. The hot tensile tests were carried out in the temperature range of 300-500°C and at the strain rates of 0.0005-0.01 s-1. Depending on the temperature and strain rate, the applied strain level exhibited significant effects on the hot ductility, strain-rate sensitivity, and activation energy. It can be suggested that the possible mechanism dominated the hot deformation during tensile testing is dynamic recovery and dislocation creep. Constitutive equations were developed to model the hot ductility of the severe plastic deformed AA6061 alloy.

  12. Dynamic fracture of the surface of an aluminum alloy under conditions of high-speed erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Atroshenko, S. A.; Kazarinov, N. A.; Evstifeev, A. D.; Solov'ev, V. Yu.

    2017-04-01

    The kinetics of fracture and deformation of the standard aluminum alloy AD1 and a similar alloy subjected to severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion under conditions of high-speed erosion has been investigated. It has been shown that, with an increase in the loading rate, the fraction of the brittle component on the fracture surface of the standard material, as well as the thickness of the damaged layer, increases more significantly than that for the material after the severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion. A relationship of the surface roughness of the material after the erosion with the loading rate and the thickness of the erosion-damaged layer has been established.

  13. Study of 2219 aluminum alloy using direct current A-TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Zou, Jiasheng

    2017-07-01

    Direct current A-TIG (DCEN A-TIG) welding using special active agent had eliminated the pores and the oxidation of 2219 high-strength aluminum alloy in welding. Addition of AlF3-25% LiF active agent to DCEN A-TIG welding and arc morphology showed a trailing phenomenon. However, the change in arc morphology was not remarkable when AlF3-75% LiF active agent was added. Addition of AlF3-75% LiF active agent can refine the grain size of DCEN A-TIG joint. The mechanical properties of the weld were optimal at 10% AlF3-75% LiF active agent. Compared with AC TIG and AC A-TIG welding, DCEN A-TIG welding yielded better results for 2219 Al alloy.

  14. Process for Producing a Cast Article from a Hypereutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon (Si) 14.0-25.0, Copper (CU) 5.5-8.0, Iron (Fe) 0-0.8, Magnesium (Mg) 0.5-1.5, Nickel (Ni) 0.05-1.2, Manganese (Mn) 0-1.0, Titanium (Ti) 0.05-1.2, Zirconium (Zr) 0.12-1.2, Vanadium (V) 0.05-1.2, Zinc (Zn) 0-0.9, Phosphorus (P) 0.001-0.1, Aluminum, balance. In this alloy the ration of Si:Mg is 15-35, and the ratio of Cu:Mg is 4-15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400 F to 500 F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 875 F to 1025 F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120 F to 300 F. The resulting cast article is highly suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  15. The fractography of casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    Several types of casting alloys were fractured using various loading modes (uniaxial tension, bending, impact, and torsion, and cyclic stressing), and the corresponding mechanical properties were determined. The unetched and etched fracture surfaces and the microstructures were examined using conventional techniques. The types of casting alloys that were the subjects f these investigations include gray iron, ductile iron, cast steel, and aluminum-base alloys (A380, A356, and 319). The fractographic studies have yielded these generalizations regarding the topography of the fracture surfaces. In the case of low-ductility alloys such as gray iron and the aluminum-base alloys, the tensile edge of amore » fracture surface produced by a stress system with a strong bending-moment component has a highly irregular contour, whereas the compressive edge of the fracture surface is quite straight and parallel to the bend axis. On the other hand, the periphery of a fracture surface produced by uniaxial tension has a completely irregular contour. The fracture surface produced by cyclic loading of a gray iron does not display any macroscopic evidence (such as a thumb nail) of the loading mode. However, the fracture surface of each of the other casting alloys displays clear, macroscopic evidence of failure induced by fatigue. The aluminum-base alloys fracture completely within the interdendritic region of the microstructure when subjected to monotonic loading by uniaxial tension or bending, whereas a fatigue crack propagates predominantly through the primary crystals of the microstructure.« less

  16. Impact of aluminum doping on the thermo-physical properties of refractory medium-entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fuyang; Wang, Yang; Vitos, Levente

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the elastic moduli, ideal tensile strength, and thermodynamic properties of TiVNb and AlTiVNb refractory medium-entropy alloys (HEAs) by using ab initio alloy theories: the coherent potential approximation (CPA), the special quasi-random supercell (SQS), and a 432-atom supercell (SC). We find that with increasing number of alloy components, the SQS elastic constants become sensitive to the supercell size. The predicted elastic moduli are consistent with the available experiments. Aluminum doping decreases the stability of the body centered cubic phase. The ideal tensile strength calculation indicates that adding equiatomic Al to TiVNb random solid solution increases the intrinsic strength (ideal strain increase from 9.6% to 11.8%) and decreases the intrinsic strength (from 9.6 to 5.7 GPa). Based on the equation of states calculated by the CPA and SC methods, the thermodynamic properties obtained by the two ab initio methods are assessed. The L21 AlTiVNb (Ti-Al-V-Nb) alloy is predicted to be thermodynamically and dynamically stable with respect to the solid solution.

  17. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of the study "Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft" which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX without Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys, and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  18. Liquid oxygen LOX compatibility evaluations of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys: Investigation of the Alcoa 2090 and MMC weldalite 049 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of liquid oxygen (LOX) compatibility of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys is investigated. Alloy systems of Alcoa 2090, vintages 1 to 3, and of Martin Marietta Corporation (MMC) Weldalite 049 were evaluated for their behavior related to the LOX compatibility employing liquid oxygen impact test conditions under ambient pressures and up to 1000 psi. The developments of these aluminum lithium alloys are of critical and significant interest because of their lower densities and higher specific strengths and improved mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. Of the different LOX impact tests carried out at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), it is seen that in certain test conditions at higher pressures, not all Al-Li alloys are LOX compatible. In case of any reactivity, it appears that lithium makes the material more sensitive at grain boundaries due to microstructural inhomogeneities and associated precipitate free zones (PFZ). The objectives were to identify and rationalize the microstructural mechanisms that could be relaxed to LOX compatibility behavior of the alloy system in consideration. The LOX compatibility behavior of Al-Li 2090 and Weldalite 049 is analyzed in detail using microstructural characterization techniques with light optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis, and surface studies using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), electron spectroscopy in chemical analysis (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Differences in the behavior of these aluminum lithium alloys are assessed and related to their chemistry, heat treatment conditions, and microstructural effects.

  19. Oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding for research and test reactor fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G. L.; Robinson, A. B.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Hanan, N.

    2008-08-01

    The oxide thicknesses on aluminum alloy cladding were measured for the test plates from irradiation tests RERTR-6 and 7A in the ATR (advanced test reactor). The measured thicknesses were substantially lower than those of test plates with similar power from other reactors available in the literature. The main reason is believed to be due to the lower pH (pH 5.1-5.3) of the primary coolant water in the ATR than in the other reactors (pH 5.9-6.5) for which we have data. An empirical model for oxide film thickness predictions on aluminum alloy used as fuel cladding in the test reactors was developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, surface heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The applicable ranges of pH and coolant flow rates cover most research and test reactors. The predictions by the new model are in good agreement with the in-pile test data available in the literature as well as with the RERTR test data measured in the ATR.

  20. Study on Microstructure and Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of PEO Coatings Formed on Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N.; Song, R. G.; Li, H.; Wang, C.; Mao, Q. Z.; Xiong, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated 6063 aluminum alloy was applied in a silicate- and borate-based alkaline solution. The microstructure and electrochemical corrosion behavior were studied by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The results showed that the silicate-based PEO coating was of a denser structure compared with that of borate-based PEO coating. In addition, the silicate-based PEO coating was composed of more phased (Al9Si) than borate-based PEO coating. The results of corrosion test indicated that the silicate-based PEO coating provided a superior protection to 6063 aluminum alloy substrate, while borate-based PEO coating with a porous structure showed an inferior conservancy against corrosive electrolyte. Furthermore, the EIS tests proved that both coatings were capable to resist the aggressive erosion in 0.5 M NaCl solution after 72 h of immersion. However, the borate-based PEO coating could not provide sufficient protection to the substrate after 72-h immersion in 1 M NaCl solution.