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Sample records for a356 solidification cast

  1. Processing and Microstructure Characteristics of As-Cast A356 Alloys Manufactured via Ultrasonic Cavitation during Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Yang; Jia, Shian; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have showed that the microstructure and mechanical properties of A356 alloy can be significantly improved when ultrasonic cavitation and solidification processing is used. This is because during the fabrication of A356 castings, ultrasonic cavitation processing plays an important role in degassing and refining the as-cast microstructure. In the present study, A356 alloy and Al2O3/SiC nanoparticles are used as the matrix alloy and the reinforcements, respectively. Nanoparticles are injected into the molten alloy and dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation. Ultrasonic cavitation was also applied during solidification of these nanocomposites. The microstructure and nanoparticle distribution of the cast samples have been investigated in detail. The current experimental results indicated that ultrasonic cavitation during solidification will greatly improve the microstructure of the samples. Al2O3 and SiC nanoparticle reinforced nanocomposites have different nanoparticle distributions in the matrix.

  2. Interplay among Coating Thickness, Strip Size, and Thermal and Solidification Characteristics in A356 Lost Foam Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, S. G.; Divandari, M.; Ghoncheh, M. H.; Jamali, V.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was evaluation of the solidification parameters of A356 alloy, e.g., dendrite arm spacing (DAS), correlation between cooling rate (CR) and DAS, hot tearing, and microstructural analysis at different coating thicknesses and strip sizes during the lost foam casting process (LFC). To achieve this goal, the DAS was measured at six coating thicknesses and six different strip sizes. In addition, thermal characteristics, such as the CR, temperatures of start and finish points of solidification, recalescence undercooling, and hot tearing susceptibility (HCSC), at five coating thicknesses were recognized from the cooling curves and their first derivative and the solid fraction curves, which have been plotted through the thermal analysis technique. The pouring temperature and strip size were fixed at 1063 K (790 °C) and 12 mm, respectively. Besides, to derive a numerical equation to predict the CR by measuring the DAS in this alloy, a microstructural evaluation was carried out on samples cast through 12-mm strip size. The results showed that both coating thickness and strip size had similar influences on the DAS, in which, by retaining one parameter at a constant value and simultaneous enhancement in the other parameter, the DAS increased significantly. Furthermore, at thinner coating layer, the higher amount of the CR was observed, which caused reduction in the temperatures of both the start and finish points of solidification. Also, increasing the CR caused a nonlinear increase in both the recalescence undercooling and the HCSC.

  3. Interplay among Coating Thickness, Strip Size, and Thermal and Solidification Characteristics in A356 Lost Foam Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, S. G.; Divandari, M.; Ghoncheh, M. H.; Jamali, V.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research was evaluation of the solidification parameters of A356 alloy, e.g., dendrite arm spacing (DAS), correlation between cooling rate (CR) and DAS, hot tearing, and microstructural analysis at different coating thicknesses and strip sizes during the lost foam casting process (LFC). To achieve this goal, the DAS was measured at six coating thicknesses and six different strip sizes. In addition, thermal characteristics, such as the CR, temperatures of start and finish points of solidification, recalescence undercooling, and hot tearing susceptibility (HCSC), at five coating thicknesses were recognized from the cooling curves and their first derivative and the solid fraction curves, which have been plotted through the thermal analysis technique. The pouring temperature and strip size were fixed at 1063 K (790 °C) and 12 mm, respectively. Besides, to derive a numerical equation to predict the CR by measuring the DAS in this alloy, a microstructural evaluation was carried out on samples cast through 12-mm strip size. The results showed that both coating thickness and strip size had similar influences on the DAS, in which, by retaining one parameter at a constant value and simultaneous enhancement in the other parameter, the DAS increased significantly. Furthermore, at thinner coating layer, the higher amount of the CR was observed, which caused reduction in the temperatures of both the start and finish points of solidification. Also, increasing the CR caused a nonlinear increase in both the recalescence undercooling and the HCSC.

  4. A Combined Numerical-Experimental Approach to Quantify the Thermal Contraction of A356 During Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macht, J. P.; Maijer, D. M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2017-07-01

    A process for generating thermal contraction coefficients for use in the solidification modeling of aluminum castings is presented. Sequentially coupled thermal-stress modeling is used in conjunction with experimentation to empirically generate the thermal contraction coefficients for a strontium-modified A356 alloy. The impact of cooling curve analysis on the modeling procedure is studied. Model results are in good agreement with experimental findings, indicating a sound methodology for quantifying the thermal contraction. The technique can be applied to other commercially relevant aluminum alloys, increasing the utility of solidification modeling in the casting industry.

  5. Fundamental research regarding the ultrasonic stirring effects on the microstructure of A356 castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shian

    Ultrasonic stirring treatment (UST) of molten metal has significant effects on the solidification microstructure of A356 alloy, which includes grain structure, distribution of inclusions, refinement of secondary phases, etc. The primary causes are due to ultrasonic cavitation, acoustic streaming and propagation of ultrasound waves in media. However, the mechanism of how those effects happen are not fully understood and quantified. In this research, molten A356 alloy was treated with high power ultrasound at a frequency of 18 kHz, and then at relatively high superheat, the melt was cast into a permanent metal mold which complies with ASTM B108-02. The UST processing system was custom built to perform the present UST study. The relatively high superheat condition is similar to the one used in the standard foundry practice, which will assist in the scale up of practical application of ultrasonic stirring technology. The selected parameters for the ultrasonic stirring technology (UST) were determined by using an UST modeling software tool that was recently developed and validated. The UST modeling software tool is capable of modeling and simulating the acoustic streaming and ultrasonic cavitation as well as the microstructure evolution during the solidification of cast alloys. Since the UST was preceded in the molten alloy, no dendrites are growing during the UST processing. Besides, more energy is required for homogeneous nucleation to occur. Consequently, the dominant mechanism of nucleation in this research is heterogeneous nucleation. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the A356 alloy processed with and without UST were analyzed and compared in detail in this study. It was demonstrated that the ultrasonically-stirred A356 alloy shows superior microstructure characteristics with very low micro-porosity levels and improved tensile properties when compared with the standard A356 alloy.

  6. Microstructural effects on the tensile and fracture behavior of aluminum casting alloys A356/357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. G.

    2003-12-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of cast aluminum alloys A356 and A357 strongly depend on secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), Mg content, and, in particular, the size and shape of eutectic silicon particles and Fe-rich intermetallics. In the unmodified alloys, increasing the cooling rate during solidification refines both the dendrites and eutectic particles and increases ductility. Strontium modification reduces the size and aspect ratio of the eutectic silicon particles, leading to a fairly constant particle size and aspect ratio over the range of SDAS studied. In comparison with the unmodified alloys, the Sr-modified alloys show higher ductility, particularly the A356 alloy, but slightly lower yield strength. In the microstructures with large SDAS (>50 µm), the ductility of the Sr-modified alloys does not continuously decrease with SDAS as it does in the unmodified alloy. Increasing Mg content increases both the matrix strength and eutectic particle size. This decreases ductility in both the Sr-modified and unmodified alloys. The A356/357 alloys with large and elongated particles show higher strain hardening and, thus, have a higher damage accumulation rate by particle cracking. Compared to A356, the increased volume fraction and size of the Fe-rich intermetallics ( π phase) in the A357 alloy are responsible for the lower ductility, especially in the Sr-modified alloy. In alloys with large SDAS (>50 µm), final fracture occurs along the cell boundaries, and the fracture mode is transgranular. In the small SDAS (<30 µm) alloys, final fracture tends to concentrate along grain boundaries. The transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture mode is accompanied by an increase in the ductility of the alloys.

  7. Modeling of microporosity formation in A356 aluminum alloy casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. D.; Cockcroft, S. L.; Maijer, D. M.

    2006-03-01

    A numerical model for predicting microporosity formation in aluminum castings has been developed, which describes the redistribution of hydrogen between solid and liquid phases, the transport of hydrogen in liquid by diffusion, and Darcy flow in the mushy zone. For simulating the nucleation of hydrogen pores, the initial pore radius is assumed to be a function of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, whereas pore growth is based on the assumption that hydrogen activity within the pore and the liquid are in equilibrium. One of the key features of the model is that it uses a two-stage approach for porosity prediction. In the first stage, the volume fraction of porosity is calculated based on the reduced pressure, whereas, in the second stage, at fractions solid greater than the liquid encapsulation point, the fraction porosity is calculated based on the volume of liquid trapped within the continuous solid network, which is estimated using a correlation based on the Niyama parameter. The porosity model is used in conjunction with a thermal model solved using the commercial finite-element package ABAQUS. The parameters influencing the formation of microporosity are discussed including a means to describe the supersaturation of hydrogen necessary for pore nucleation. The model has been applied to examine the evolution of porosity in a series of experimental samples cast using unmodified A356 in which the initial hydrogen content was varied from 0.048 to 0.137 (cc/100 g). A comparison between the model predictions and the experimental measurements indicates good agreement in terms of the variation in porosity with distance from the chill and the variation resulting from initial hydrogen content.

  8. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  9. Wear analysis of A356 alloy cast through rheometal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Robin; Sharma, Ashok; Pandel, Upender; Ratke, Lorenz

    2017-04-01

    In present investigation, correlation between microstructure, mechanical properties and wear analysis for the non-heat-treated and heat-treated A356 was observed. The rheometal process changed the dendritic morphology into globular morphology which improved the mechanical properties and wear resistance of the alloy. Mechanical properties of non-heat-treated and heat-treated A356 alloy were studied. Wear tests for the non-heat-treated and heat-treated samples were performed. The SEM analysis was employed for microstructural feature of worn surfaces. The results showed that the rheometal process along with the use of baffles, addition of grain refiner and T5 heat treatment showed better mechanical properties and wear resistance of A356 alloy as compared to other processing conditions.

  10. Plastic deformation behavior of aluminum casting alloys A356/357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. G.

    2004-09-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of aluminum casting alloys A356 and A357 has been investigated at various solidification rates with or without Sr modification using monotonic tensile and multi-loop tensile and compression testing. The results indicate that at low plastic strains, the eutectic particle aspect ratio and matrix strength dominate the work hardening, while at large plastic strains, the hardening rate depends on secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). For the alloys studied, the average internal stresses increase very rapidly at small plastic strains and gradually saturate at large plastic strains. Elongated eutectic particles, small SDAS, or high matrix strength result in a high saturation value. The difference in the internal stresses, due to different microstructural features, determines the rate of eutectic particle cracking and, in turn, the tensile instability of the alloys. The higher the internal stresses, the higher the damage rate of particle cracking and then the lower the Young’s modulus. The fracture strain of alloys A356/357 corresponds to the critical amount of damage by particle cracking locally or globally, irrespective of the fineness of the microstructure. In the coarse structure (large SDAS), this critical amount of damage is easily reached, due to the clusters of large and elongated particles, leading to alloy fracture before global necking. However, in the alloy with the small SDAS, the critical amount of damage is postponed until global necking takes place due to the small and round particles. Current models for dispersion hardening can be used to calculate the stresses induced in the particles. The calculations agree well with the results inferred from the experimental results.

  11. Study on particle distribution in A356/SiCp upward suction castings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feifan; Zhao, Haidong; Sun, Fengzhen; Zhao, Yu

    2014-10-01

    In this investigation, cylindrical A356-5%50 μm SiCp and A356-10%100 μm SiCp castings of 40 mm diameter and 350 mm height were produced by stirring preparation and vertically upward suction casting process. The SiCp fractions in the casting different sections along the filling direction were quantitatively measured. The composite slurry flow during the casting mold filling was simulated based on the Euler method while the particle flow was calculated with the Lagrangian method for predicting the SiCp distribution. The simulated distributions were compared and validated with the experiment. It has shown that as the filling distance increased, the particle fractions decreased dramatically in the A356-10%100 μm SiCp casting while varied slightly in the A356-5%50 μm SiCp casting, and that the particles were prone to be aggregated near the mold wall at the filling beginning parts whereas more particles concentrated in the centre and fewer particles were present near the wall region in the casting front.

  12. Effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol. pct SiC composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, G. A.; Lewandowski, J. J.; Wallace, J. F.; Altmisoglu, A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on the mechanical properties of unreinforced A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol pct SiC composite were investigated by tensile properties in these compounds fabricated by either sand casting or squeeze casting techniques followed by hot working to 33, 50, 90, and 95 percent reductions. The evolution of the microstructure and values of tensile properties were evaluated for the cast materials in each of the hot worked conditions. It was found that, while the deformation processing of the sand-cast composite resulted in banding of the Al and SiC particles within the microstructure, such features were not observed in the squeeze-cast microstructure. The tensile strengths of the squeeze cast materials was found to be higher than those of the sand cast materials, for both the unreinforced and composite samples, while increased amounts of deformation were found to improve the ductility of the composite.

  13. Effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol. pct SiC composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, G. A.; Lewandowski, J. J.; Wallace, J. F.; Altmisoglu, A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on the mechanical properties of unreinforced A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol pct SiC composite were investigated by tensile properties in these compounds fabricated by either sand casting or squeeze casting techniques followed by hot working to 33, 50, 90, and 95 percent reductions. The evolution of the microstructure and values of tensile properties were evaluated for the cast materials in each of the hot worked conditions. It was found that, while the deformation processing of the sand-cast composite resulted in banding of the Al and SiC particles within the microstructure, such features were not observed in the squeeze-cast microstructure. The tensile strengths of the squeeze cast materials was found to be higher than those of the sand cast materials, for both the unreinforced and composite samples, while increased amounts of deformation were found to improve the ductility of the composite.

  14. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  15. A comparative assessment of crystallite size and lattice strain in differently cast A356 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Roy, H.; Lohar, A. K.; Samanta, S. K.; Tiwari, S.; Dutta, K.

    2015-02-01

    In this investigation, A356 aluminium alloy has been prepared by different routes viz. gravity casting, rheo pressure die casting (RPDC) and RPDC with T6 heat treatment. X-ray diffraction studies of these samples have been done in the scanning range of 20 - 90°. X-ray peak broadening analysis has been used to estimate the crystallite size and lattice stain, in all the samples. The sample prepared by RPDC with T6 treatment has comparatively smaller crystallite size and lesser lattice strain than gravity cast and RPDC samples.

  16. Mechanical Behaviour and Morphology of A356/SiC Nanocomposites Using Stir Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanwir Alam, Md.; Arif, Sajjad; Husain Ansari, Akhter

    2017-08-01

    In this research an attempt has been made to explore the experimental investigation of A356/SiC nanocomposites using two step stir casting process. A356 alloy ingot was selected for the matrix and the reinforcement (aluminium fine powder (99.9%) plus nano size SiC mechanically forged by using ball mill at 100 rpm for duration of 10 hours). Ball milling process enhances the wettability of the particles. Reinforcement was varied from 1% to 5% with a step of 1% by weight. The stirring process was carried out at 500±50 rpm with stirring duration 10 minutes in two steps. The melt composites were poured at 680±20° C into the die to fabricate the composites. In this process of fabrication, less oxides/segregations were depicted. Tensile strengths of fabricated composites were evaluated by using UTM and toughness was calculated from area under stress-strain curve. To identify the involvement and presence of the nanoreinforcement into the matrix alloy (A356), fractured surfaces of the fabricated nanocomposites were examined using SEM and EDX. Tensile test results have shown the fracture mechanism and enhanced mechanical properties with the addition of forged nanoreinforcements. Yield tensile strength (YTS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of A356 parent alloy found as 212.76 MPa and 219.90 MPa respectively. The improvement of 41% in YTS and 45% in UTS in case of A356/SiC nanocomposites were investigated. Decrease in % elongation and toughness with increase in forged nanoreinforcement were predicted. Proper distribution of reinforcement was attributed by SEM micrographs. EDX spectrum disclosed the presence of the constituents in the parent alloy (A356) and stir cast nanocomposites.

  17. Microstructure and fracture of SiC-particulate-reinforced cast A356 aluminum alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Suh, D.; Kwon, D.

    1996-12-01

    A microstructural analysis of local microfracture of cast A356 Al-SiC{sub p} composites fabricated by permanent mold re-casting and squeeze-casting methods was made. Notch fracture toughness tests were conducted on these composites to identify critical fracture parameters using a stress-modified critical-strain criterion. The composite microstructure shows continuous networks of densely populated SiC and eutectic Si particles along the intercellular regions. Squeeze casting produces a more homogeneous structure and larger spacing of brittle particles and increases the tensile ductility and fracture toughness, while strength levels are almost identical to the re-casting case. The calculated values of the microstructurally characteristic distance l* for the re-cast and squeeze-cast composites are about 40 {micro}m, which is comparable to the average sizes of the intercellular network. However, the reference critical strain {bar {var_epsilon}}*{sub 0} for squeeze casting is larger than that for re-casting, showing a trend to higher ductility and fracture toughness.

  18. The Effect of Iron Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356 Cast Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçay, Tansel; Bayoğlu, Samet

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, microstructure and mechanical properties of A356 alloy including various amounts (0.2 to 1.2 wt pct) of iron were investigated. The alloys were produced by conventional gravity sand casting method. In order to determine the effect of iron addition to A356, optical and scanning electron microscopes (SEM/EDS) were used for microstructural examinations, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was carried out for phase characterization. Tensile tests were also conducted in order to determine effect of the Fe content on mechanical properties. It was found that as the Fe content of A356 was increased, the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) was decreased and the morphology of Al-Si eutectic became finer. From XRD examinations, different iron-based intermetallic compounds (β-Al5FeSi and α-Al8Fe2Si) formations were observed. It was also observed that as iron content increased, α-Al8Fe2Si intermetallic was transformed into β-Al5FeSi intermetallic. The tensile test results revealed that tensile strength and elongation values were reduced by increasing Fe content. It was also determined that β-Al5FeSi intermetallics were more negatively effective on tensile strength than α-Al8Fe2Si intermetallics.

  19. The Effect of Iron Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356 Cast Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçay, Tansel; Bayoğlu, Samet

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, microstructure and mechanical properties of A356 alloy including various amounts (0.2 to 1.2 wt pct) of iron were investigated. The alloys were produced by conventional gravity sand casting method. In order to determine the effect of iron addition to A356, optical and scanning electron microscopes (SEM/EDS) were used for microstructural examinations, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was carried out for phase characterization. Tensile tests were also conducted in order to determine effect of the Fe content on mechanical properties. It was found that as the Fe content of A356 was increased, the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) was decreased and the morphology of Al-Si eutectic became finer. From XRD examinations, different iron-based intermetallic compounds ( β-Al5FeSi and α-Al8Fe2Si) formations were observed. It was also observed that as iron content increased, α-Al8Fe2Si intermetallic was transformed into β-Al5FeSi intermetallic. The tensile test results revealed that tensile strength and elongation values were reduced by increasing Fe content. It was also determined that β-Al5FeSi intermetallics were more negatively effective on tensile strength than α-Al8Fe2Si intermetallics.

  20. Effect of Oxide Level on Pore Formation in A356 Alloy by X-Ray Imaging and Directional Solidification Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Song, Wan; Wang, Qigui; Zhao, Lei; Fan, Ran

    Effect of oxide level on porosity formation in an A356 alloy was investigated using micro-focus X-ray imaging and directional solidification technology. The increase of oxide level in liquid aluminum was achieved by violently stirring molten metal at elevated temperature. During solidification, the increased oxide content in melt significantly increases the amount of active nucleation sites for porosity and thus raises the nucleation temperature of pores. The fast growth of those early formed pores further restrains the succeeding nucleation operations of new pores in local regions and results in a considerable reduction in pore density. It was also found that the melt with high oxide content shows less dependency of growth rate reduction with local temperature.

  1. Damage by eutectic particle cracking in aluminum casting alloys A356/357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. G.; Caceres, C. H.; Griffiths, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    The strain dependence of particle cracking in aluminum alloys A356/357 in the T6 temper has been studied in a range of microstructures produced by varying solidification rate and Mg content, and by chemical (Sr) modification of the eutectic silicon. The damage accumulates linearly with the applied strain for all microstructures, but the rate depends on the secondary dendrite arm spacing and modification state. Large and elongated eutectic silicon particles in the unmodified alloys and large π-phase (Al9FeMg3Si5) particles in alloy A357 show the greatest tendency to cracking. In alloy A356, cracking of eutectic silicon particles dominates the accumulation of damage while cracking of Fe-rich particles is relatively unimportant. However, in alloy A357, especially with Sr modification, cracking of the large π-phase intermetallics accounts for the majority of damage at low and intermediate strains but becomes comparable with silicon particle cracking at large strains. Fracture occurs when the volume fraction of cracked particles (eutectic silicon and Fe-rich intermetallics combined) approximates 45 pct of the total particle volume fraction or when the number fraction of cracked particles is about 20 pct. The results are discussed in terms of Weibull statistics and existing models for dispersion hardening.

  2. Centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc alloy and composite A356/silicon carbide: Study and modeling of phases' and particles' segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, Bahaa

    Centrifugation is a casting technology that allows the production of cylindrical and graduated parts with different mechanical properties through the section. The need for materials with good quality and specific mechanical properties has been driven this technology in order to produce different types of materials such as zinc alloys and graduated metal matrix composites reinforced by hard and wear resistant particles. The goal of this research project is to study and model the eutectic macrosegregation, the solidification speed, and the speeds of solidification fronts during centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc-aluminum alloy in order to improve the part quality and increase its strength and field reliability. Moreover, the segregation of the particles during centrifugal casting of an aluminum matrix composite reinforced by silicon carbide particles (A356/SiC) is also studied to improve and control the graduation of the parts. The cooling rate, the speed, acceleration/deceleration, displacement, and segregation of the particles across the section will be modeled by discretization of Stokes' law in time in order to take into consideration the change in the centrifugal radius and melt viscosity during cooling process. This study will allow the control of the graduation degree of particles across the section in order to improve the properties and wear resistance of the composite. This composite can be used in systems where friction is critical and load is high (reinforcements of parts for the cylinders of pneumatic systems). The results show that the maximum macrosegregation zone of the eutectic across the casting section corresponds to the last point of solidification. The eutectic macrosegregation produced during centrifugal casting of thin walled part is a normal segregation which varies depending on the solidification speed and the ratio between the speeds of solidification fronts. On the other hand, it was found that the position and volume fraction of the particles

  3. Carburizer Effect on Cast Iron Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janerka, Krzysztof; Kondracki, Marcin; Jezierski, Jan; Szajnar, Jan; Stawarz, Marcin

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the effect of carburizing materials on cast iron solidification and crystallization. The studies consisted of cast iron preparation from steel scrap and different carburizers. For a comparison, pig iron was exclusively used in a solid charge. Crystallization analysis revealed the influence of the carburizer material on the crystallization curves as well as differences in the solidification paths of cast iron prepared with the use of different charge materials. The carburizers' influence on undercooling during the eutectic crystallization process was analyzed. The lowest undercooling rate was recorded for the melt with pig iron, then for synthetic graphite, natural graphite, anthracite, and petroleum coke (the highest undercooling rate). So a hypothesis was formulated that eutectic cells are created most effectively with the presence of carbon from pig iron (the highest nucleation potential), and then for the graphite materials (crystallographic similarity with the carbon precipitation in the cast iron). The most difficult eutectic crystallization is for anthracite and petroleum coke (higher undercooling is necessary). This knowledge can be crucial when the foundry plant is going to change the solid charge composition replacing the pig iron by steel scrap and the recarburization process.

  4. Near-congruent solidification of castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, Kevin J.

    A study on the microstructure development of as-cast Cu-Mn alloys based around the congruent minimum at 34.6 wt % Mn and 873 °C was performed. Initially, this was to evaluate the alloy as an alternative to wide freezing range Pb and Sn bronzes that are plagued with porosity. The shallow minimum and associated narrow freezing ranges around the congruent point result in a completely cellular (non-dendritic) solidification morphology for a composition range ~3 wt % Mn about the congruent composition (C c). The degree of cellular solidification was found to depend on the mold material. Increased mold conductivity lead to a narrower composition range of complete cellular solidification. By casting alloys of different compositions into a composite mold, the effect of the mold conductivity allowed an evaluation of the congruent point reported by Gokcen. These results fit well with the constitutional supercooling criterion. While solidification at a point ideally would be planar, this was not observed even with minor deviations from the Cc. An additional study of the microstructure development along the minimum trough in the liquidus surface between the Cu-Mn and Ni-Mn binary congruent points of the Cu-Mn-Ni ternary system was conducted. This study revealed that alloys near the binary congruent minima were more cellular than alloys near the middle of the phase diagram, along the trough. As the composition approached the center of the Cu-Mn-Ni diagram, the morphology became more dendritic, characteristic of an isomorphous system. Even though these alloys did not solidify in a completely cellular manner, they were free of any microshrinkage porosity. The alloys in this study (Cu-Mn and Cu-Mn-Ni) show promise for use in structural applications due to the lack of microshrinkage porosity, potent solution strengthening of manganese and strong aging response.

  5. Microstructural Inclusion Influence on Fatigue of a Cast A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordon, J. B.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Yang, N.; Major, J. F.; Gall, K. A.; Fan, J.; McDowell, D. L.

    2010-02-01

    We examine the dependence of fatigue properties on the different size scale microstructural inclusions of a cast A356 aluminum alloy in order to quantify the structure-property relations. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on fatigue specimens that included three different dendrite cell sizes (DCSs). Where past studies have focused upon DCSs or pore size effects on fatigue life, this study includes other metrics such as nearest neighbor distance (NND) of inclusions, inclusion distance to the free surface, and inclusion type (porosity or oxides). The present study is necessary to separate the effects of numerous microstructural inclusions that have a confounding effect on the fatigue life. The results clearly showed that the maximum pore size (MPS), NND of gas pores, and DCS all can influence the fatigue life. These conclusions are presumed to be typical of other cast alloys with similar second-phase constituents and inclusions. As such, the inclusion-property relations of this work were employed in a microstructure-based fatigue model operating on the crack incubation and MSC with good results.

  6. Electron beam welding of 6061-T6 covers to A356-T6 machined cast housings: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.P.

    1988-03-01

    An electron beam welding process was developed to replace the manual gas tungsten arc welding process for welding 6061-T6 aluminum covers to the A356-T6 cast aluminum machined housing for a Filter Pack Assembly. Design change recommendations must be incorporated prior to implementation of the electron beam welding process. 3 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Thermal fatigue crack behavior of SiCp/A356 composites prepared by stirring casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Like; Han, Jianmin; Yang, Zhiyong; Li, Xiang; Wang, Jialin; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Weijing

    The thermal fatigue crack initiation and propagation behavior of SiCp/A356 composites which is produced by stirring casting were studied. Specimens with a V-shaped notch were used in the thermal fatigue experiment. Optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to observe the crack growth. Crack initiated at the notch tip after about 150 cycles of heating and cooling from room temperature to 250 °C. The crack propagation stage was dominated during the whole crack growth. Cracks mainly propagated along the interface of particle and through the matrix. The propagation stage experienced the cycle of slow propagation and fast propagation, and a Step-Like shape was observed during the crack growth process. The micro cracks appeared in the interface of particle and the matrix after repeated thermal cycles, and induced fast propagation by coalescing with the main cracks. Distributions of the particle play an important role in hindering thermal fatigue crack propagation. Hardness of the composites decreased with the increase of the number of cycles, and decreased by 46.1% after thermal 290 cycles.

  8. Solidification science in cast MMCs: The influence of merton flemings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, Pradeep; Asthana, Rajiv

    2001-09-01

    The solidification science of cast metalmatrix composites (MMC) evolved as a subset of the broad field of solidification of monolithic alloys pioneered by Merton Flemings and his students. As a result of advances in solidification, the cast MMC field has evolved from its early incarnation—employing empirical research to engineer novel materials using versatile and cost-effective casting techniques—to using solidification-science-based approaches to tailor advanced materials for application-specific needs. The current and emerging applications of cast MMCs in a variety of automotive, aerospace, electronic packaging, and consumer-good industries exemplify the maturity of the field and the materials. Innovations in composite-forming techniques and efforts at wider industrial acceptance of MMCs will undoubtedly continue. However, the scientific principles underlying the solidification microstructure evolution that governs the composite properties have become well established, to a great extent, due to Flemings’ early, pioneering work on monolithic alloys and some of his more recent studies on solidification of reinforced metals. This paper reviews some aspects of solidification of discontinuously reinforced cast metals that owe their current understanding to Flemings’ contributions, in particular, the scientific understanding of macro- and microsegregation, fluidity and rheology of multiphase slurries, and stircasting, semi-solid casting, and preform infiltration. Current research to develop and test prototype components made from cast composites, including Al-flyash, Cu-graphite, Al-graphite, Al-alumina, and SiC-Al, is also presented, along with directions for future research.

  9. Multistage Fatigue Modeling of Cast A356-T6 and A380-F Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; Burton, C. L.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; McDowell, D. L.; Berry, J. T.

    2007-08-01

    This article presents a microstructure-based multistage fatigue (MSF) model extended from the model developed by McDowell et al.[1,2] to an A380-F aluminum alloy to consider microstructure-property relations of descending order, signifying deleterious effects of defects/discontinuities: (1) pores or oxides greater than 100 μm, (2) pores or oxides greater than 50 μm near the free surface, (3) a high porosity region with an area greater than 200 μm, and (4) oxide film of an area greater than 10,000 μm2. These microconstituents, inclusions, or discontinuities represent different casting features that may dominate fatigue life at stages of fatigue damage evolutions. The incubation life is estimated using a modified Coffin Mansion law at the microscale based on the microplasticity at the discontinuity. The microstructurally small crack (MSC) and physically small crack (PSC) growth was modeled using the crack tip displacement as the driving force, which is affected by the porosity and dendrite cell size (DCS). When the fatigue damage evolves to several DCSs, cracks behave as long cracks with growth subject to the effective stress intensity factor in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Based on an understanding of the microstructures of A380-F and A356-T6 aluminum alloys, an engineering treatment of the MSF model was introduced for A380-F aluminum alloys by tailoring a few model parameters based on the mechanical properties of the alloy. The MSF model is used to predict the upper and lower bounds of the experimental fatigue strain life and stress life of the two cast aluminum alloys.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Squeeze-Cast A356 Composites Reinforced With B4C Particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazahery, Ali; Ostad Shabani, Mohsen

    2012-02-01

    In this study, different volume fractions of B4C particles were incorporated into the aluminum alloy by a mechanical stirrer, and squeeze-cast A356 matrix composites reinforced with B4C particles were fabricated. Microstructural characterization revealed that the B4C particles were distributed among the dendrite branches, leaving the dendrite branches as particle-free regions in the material. It also showed that the grain size of aluminum composite is smaller than that of monolithic aluminum. X-ray diffraction studies also confirmed the existence of boron carbide and some other reaction products such as AlB2 and Al3BC in the composite samples. It was observed that the amount of porosity increases with increasing volume fraction of composites. The porosity level increased, since the contact surface area was increased. Tensile behavior and the hardness values of the unreinforced alloy and composites were evaluated. The strain-hardening behavior and elongation to fracture of the composite materials appeared very different from those of the unreinforced Al alloy. It was noted that the elastic constant, strain-hardening and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the MMCs are higher than those of the unreinforced Al alloy and increase with increasing B4C content. The elongation to fracture of the composite materials was found very low, and no necking phenomenon was observed before fracture. The tensile fracture surface of the composite samples was indicative of particle cracking, interface debonding, and deformation constraint in the matrix and revealed the brittle mode of fracture.

  11. Initial solidification phenomena in continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Adam

    Continuous casting is the main process route for the mass production of steel today, yielding in excess of 560 million tons annually, corresponding to 80% of total steel production worldwide. As with any process, as improvements are introduced and quality is enhanced, there is the ever greater push to reduce problems that were once minor. The restrictions on quality for certain products require that defects be kept to a minimum. Currently, the industry has developed a wealth of experience in how to deal with slabs with oscillation marks. However, these practices are circumventions of the symptoms of the problems, not solutions for the causes. By understanding the formation mechanism, one can then develop practices based on a logical consideration oft he causes. The goals of this current work were to develop a mold simulator that could replicate the surface quality of industrial slabs. The techniques developed allowed for a more detailed examination of the heat transfer interactions during continuous casting, such that the variations of heat flux due to irregular solidification could be observed. It is shown that the mechanisms proposed in the literature are not individually sufficient for the formation of an oscillation mark, but several are necessary and must occur in concert for one to form. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of oscillation marks based upon the experimental results. This hypothesis is formulated as a series of necessary conditions that must be satisfied for an oscillation mark to be formed. This hypothesis is described, and shown to be in agreement with the trends observed and reported in the literature. It can explain both the overflow- and depression-type mark seen in industrial slabs. Additionally, this hypothesis was successfully used as a method of predicting the locations of oscillation marks on cast shells based upon the mold heat transfer measurements.

  12. Directional solidification of white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.

    1996-08-01

    Several studies of the ledeburite eutectic (Fe-Fe3C), in pure Fe-C alloys have shown that it has a lamellar morphology under plane front growth conditions. The structure of ledeburite in white cast irons, Fe-C-Si, consists of a rod morphology. It is generally not possible to produce plane front growth of Fe-C-Si eutectic alloys in the Fe-Fe3C form, because at the slow growth rates required for plane front growth, the Fe3C phase is replaced by graphite. By using small additions of Te, the growth of graphite was suppressed, and the plane front growth of the ledeburite eutectic in Fe-C-Si alloys was carried out with Si levels up to 1 wt pct. It was found that the growth morphology became a faceted rod morphology at 1 wt pct Si, but in contrast to the usual rod morphology of white cast irons, the rod phase was Fe3C rather than iron. It was shown that the usual rod morphology only forms at the sides of the two-phase cellular or dendritic growth fronts in Fe-C-Si alloys. Possible reasons for the inability of plane front directional solidification to produce the usual rod morphology in Fe-C-Si alloys are discussed. Also, data are presented on the spacing of the lamellar eutectic in pure Fe-C ledeburite, which indicates that this system does not follow the usual λ2 V = constant relation of regular eutectics.

  13. Mathematical modeling and experimental study of squeeze casting of magnesium alloy AM50A and aluminum alloy A356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang

    In recent years, the squeeze casting process has been widely used with various aluminum alloys to manufacture near-net shape automotive components. Preliminary research has also demonstrated technical feasibility potential of squeeze casting for magnesium. A better understanding of squeeze casting process is essential for applying the process for the production of large automotive components, such as engine block, using aluminum and magnesium. Meanwhile, simulation can help to achieve the analysis and optimization of the casting process. Unfortunately, for squeeze casting, no appropriate model is presently available. In this study, a mathematical model has been developed to simulate the transport phenomena and solidification occurring in squeeze casting process. The model was based on the control-volume finite difference approach and on an enthalpy method. An experimental system was developed capable of characterizing local in-cavity pressures, determining casting/die interfacial heat transfer, and observing pressurized solidification phenomena taking place in squeeze casting of aluminum and magnesium alloys. It was found that, during squeeze casting process, the local cavity pressure distribution was inhomogeneous. Experimental correlations of heat transfer coefficient were integrated into the model with local cavity pressures estimated by a force balance approach. Hence, instead of using static boundary condition, a dynamic boundary condition was established in the model. In order to minimize the deviation of calculation, experimental correlations between solidification temperatures and applied pressures were also integrated into the model. The predicted results, including cooling curves, solidification times, and local pressure cavity pressures, were compared with the experimental measurements and they were found to be in good agreement. The model was further advanced to predict shrinkage porosity during squeeze casting by a newly proposed criterion based on

  14. Effects of the location of a cast in the furnace on flatness of the solidification front in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yuanyuan; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Many defects of single crystals are caused by the nonplanar solidification front. The transverse temperature gradient at melt-crystal interface results in nonplanar solidification fronts. The location of a cast in the directional solidification furnace affects heat dissipation and thus influences the transverse temperature gradient. This paper presents a criterion and a searching algorithm to find the optimal location of the cast for flattening the solidification front. A numerical simulation was employed for the verification of our method. Additionally, the effects of the size of the cooling device of the furnace on the optimal location, the transverse temperature gradient and the solidification time were discussed. The transverse temperature gradient is reduced about 50% without increasing much solidification time when setting the cast with a varying thickness mould at the optimal location. In addition, the optimal location is mainly influenced by the radius of the cooling ring.

  15. Microstructural effects on high-cycle fatigue-crack initiation in A356.2 casting alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Poirier, D.R.; Chen, W.

    1999-10-01

    The effects of various microconstituents on crack initiation and propagation in high-cycle fatigue (HCF) were investigated in an aluminum casting alloy (A356.2). Fatigue cracking was induced in both axial and bending loading conditions at strain/stress ratios of {minus}1, 0.1, and 0.2. The secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) and porosity (maximum size and density distribution) were quantified in the directionally solidified casting alloy. Using scanning electron microscopy, the authors observed that cracks initiate at near-surface porosity, at oxides, and within the eutectic microconstituents, depending on the SDAS. When the SDAS is greater than {approximately}25 to 28{micro}m, the fatigue cracks initiate from surface and subsurface porosity. When the SDAS is less than {approximately}25 to 28{micro}m, the fatigue cracks initiate from the interdendritic eutectic constituents, where the silicon particles are segregated. Fatigue cracks initiated at oxide inclusions whenever they were near the surface, regardless of the SDAS. The fatigue life of a specimen whose crack initiated at a large eutectic constituent was about equal to that when the crack initiated at a pore or oxide of comparable size.

  16. Initial solidification phenomena: Factors affecting heat transfer in strip casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolli, Paolo

    In the last few years a few companies have announced the final stage of the commercial development of strip casting of steels. In strip casting heat extraction and productivity are limited by the thermal resistance at the interface between processed material and moving mold (rolls for twin-roll strip casters). Among many factors influencing interfacial heat transfer, films of various composition, either formed during casting or deposited before casting on the surface of the rolls, melt superheat and gas atmosphere composition can have a significantly positive or negative effect on the achieved heat transfer rate. From an industrial point view, methods to improve interfacial heat transfer rates must be found, in order to increase productivity. The objective of this research project is to assess if it is feasible to improve heat transfer rates during solidification of steel in direct contact with a copper mold: (1) by the application of thin coatings on the mold surface; (2) by adding a reactive gas species containing sulfur in the gas shrouding where casting is performed. To address the former, solidification experiments were performed with the mold surface either kept uncoated or coated with coatings of different compositions. To address the latter, the experiments were performed in gas shrouding atmospheres with or without sulphydric acid. It was observed that the resulting heat extraction rates were improved by the application of certain coatings and by the addition of H2S to the gas atmosphere. These findings prove that the application of coatings and the use of small amounts of reactive gaseous species containing sulfur may be methods to increase productivity in strip casting. The effect of superheat and the effect of naturally deposited oxides (Mn-oxide) were also evaluated experimentally. A numerical study of the effect of the critical undercooling on the productivity of a twin-roll strip caster showed that the maximum allowable casting speed can be increased

  17. Production of semi-solid feedstock of A356 alloy and A356-5TiB2 in-situ composite by cooling slope casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Deepak; Acharya, Mihira; Mandal, A.; Chakraborty, M.

    2015-02-01

    Cooling Slope casting process has gained significant importance for manufacturing of semi-solid feedstock Al alloys and composites which find applications in automotive and aerospace industries. The primary objective of this research is to generate the semi-solid feedstock suitable for thixoforming process. The current work discusses the phenomena involved in the evolution of microstructure of the semi-solid feed stock by Cooling Slope casting process and the effect of various parameters. The process parameters like the angle and length of inclined plate affect the size and morphology of α-Al phase. The Cooling slope process resulted in the formation of fine grain size of about 38 μm of α-Al phase, compared to that of 98 μm processed conventionally. Further, the pouring temperature played a crucial role in the generation of semi-solid microstructures in case of both the alloy and composites. Moreover, fine TiB2 particles of size 0.2-0.5 μm are uniformly distributed in the almost spherical α-Al grains and at the grain boundaries in the composite feed stock. Cooling slope casting route is a suitable and economical route for semi-solid slurry generation by effectively varying the process parameters.

  18. Microstructure evolution in grey cast iron during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xian-fei; Li, Xiao-zheng; Feng, Qiang; Matthias, Warkentin; Huang, Shi-yao

    2017-08-01

    The solidification characteristics and microstructure evolution in grey cast iron were investigated through Jmat-Pro simulations and quenching performed during directional solidification. The phase transition sequence of grey cast iron was determined as L → L + γ → L + γ + G → γ + G → P (α + Fe3C) + α + G. The graphite can be formed in three ways: directly nucleated from liquid through the eutectic reaction (L → γ + G), independently precipitated from the oversaturated γ phase (γ → γ + G), and produced via the eutectoid transformation (γ → G + α). The area fraction and length of graphite as well as the primary dendrite spacing decrease with increasing cooling rate. Type-A graphite is formed at a low cooling rate, whereas a high cooling rate results in the precipitation of type-D graphite. After analyzing the graphite precipitation in the as-cast and transition regions separately solidified with and without inoculation, we concluded that, induced by the inoculant addition, the location of graphite precipitation changes from mainly the γ interdendritic region to the entire γ matrix. It suggests that inoculation mainly acts on graphite precipitation in the γ matrix, not in the liquid or at the solid-liquid front.

  19. Four-phase fully-coupled mold-filling and solidification simulation for gas porosity prediction in aluminum sand casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakumeit, J.; Jana, S.; Waclawczyk, T.; Mehdizadeh, A.; Sadiki, A.; Jouani, J.

    2012-07-01

    The impact of mold-filling and oxide film enclosure on gas porosity in A356 was investigated using a three-phase, fully-coupled, mold-filling and solidification simulation. For the prediction of gas porosity, a fourth hydrogen phase was added. At the solidification front hydrogen is rejected from the solid and accumulates in the melt. Pores nucleate if the solute gas exceeds the solubility limit. Air and melt are separated by a volume of fluid interface and special treatment of the hydrogen phase convection was necessary to limit the hydrogen to the melt. Folding of the melt surface was used as a source for oxide film entrainment. These oxide films were transported with the melt and used as nucleation sites for gas porosity formation. The influence of melt flow due to filling and oxide film distribution was analyzed using a simple 3-block test geometry. The test geometry was cast in A356 and analyzed by computer tomography to validate the porosity prediction.

  20. The effect of heat transfer on local solidification kinetics of eutectic Al-Si cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rivera, C.; H. Cruz, M.; A. García, H.; Juarez-Islas, J. A.

    1999-02-01

    Recently, Fourier thermal analysis (FTA) has been proposed as a suitable technique to obtain information about local solidification kinetics in casting alloys. In this work, FTA was applied to a near-eutectic aluminum-silicon cast alloy in order to seek experimental evidence supporting the solidification kinetics obtained from this method. Also, a heat-transfer/solidification-kinetics model was used to compare predictions with experimental results. The metallographic findings, focused on interlamellar eutectic spacings in different locations within a cylindrical casting, support the solidification kinetics obtained from FTA. The model and experimental outcome including FTA results and metallographic observations suggest that local solidification kinetics depend strongly on local heat transfer, and the analysis of this dependence may be used to explain the observed changes in microstructural characteristics at different locations within castings.

  1. Science of Casting and Solidification: ASM Handbook Contributions — Honoring Professor Doru Michael Stefanescu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupulescu, Afina; Henry, Scott; Marken, Karen; Lampman, Steven

    Many of the metal casting processes are still empirical in nature. Many others are deeply rooted in mathematics and therefore, suitable for modeling. Science of casting and solidification is a major technical asset for foundry operations and of extreme importance in understanding different length scales microstructural changes and evolution as well as developing new processes and materials. In his attempt to describe combinations of solidification theory, research results and industrial practice, Professor Doru Michael Stefanescu (ASM Fellow, 1997) has made tremendous contributions to the field. Many of his views on casting and solidification are valued as important impacts within professional environments such as TMS and ASM International. He has written many articles for the ASM Handbook series on subjects including basic metallurgy of cast iron, compacted graphite irons, solidification, thermodynamic properties of iron-base alloys, and computational modeling. He was also Volume Chair for Volume 15: Casting, of the 9th Edition Metals Handbook.

  2. Low-gravity solidification of cast iron and space technology applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of analyses relating to cast iron solidification were conducted. A theoretical analysis using a computer to predict the cooling versus time relationship throughout the test specimen was performed. Tests were also conducted in a ground-based laboratory to generate a cooling time curve for cast iron. In addition, cast iron was cooled through the solidification period on a KC-135 and an F-104 aircraft while these aircraft were going through a period of low gravity. Future subjects for low gravity tests are enumerated.

  3. Comparison of the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-Cast A356/SiC MMC Processed by ARB and CAR Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaati, Roohollah; Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad

    2012-07-01

    Accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and continual annealing and roll-bonding (CAR) processes were used in this study for improving the microstructure and mechanical properties of the A356/10 vol.% SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) produced by semi-solid metal processing (SSM). The results showed that using the ARB and CAR processes led to the following points: (a) the uniformity of the silicon and silicon carbide in the aluminum matrix improved, (b) the Si particles became finer and more spheroidal in appearance, (c) the porosity disappeared, (d) the bonding quality between the reinforcement and the matrix improved, (e) the particle-free zone disappeared, and therefore (f) the tensile strength (TS), elongation, and formability index of the MMC samples improved. However, it was found that the CAR process is a better method for improvement of microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast MMC compared to ARB process.

  4. Control of solidification boundary in continuous casting by asymmetric cooling and mold offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution, developed to obtain solidification-interface shapes for complex situations in which both the ingot cooling and mold geometry are asymmetric, is analyzed. The effect of mold offsett and of unequal ingot side temperatures on the interface shapes is illustrated in graphs. The results of the analysis show how the solidification interface in continuous casting can be controlled by asymmetries in both mold geometry and cooling of the ingot sides.

  5. Control of solidification boundary in continuous casting by asymmetric cooling and mold offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution, developed to obtain solidification-interface shapes for complex situations in which both the ingot cooling and mold geometry are asymmetric, is analyzed. The effect of mold offsett and of unequal ingot side temperatures on the interface shapes is illustrated in graphs. The results of the analysis show how the solidification interface in continuous casting can be controlled by asymmetries in both mold geometry and cooling of the ingot sides.

  6. Heat transfer and solidification microstructure evolution of continuously cast steel by non-steady physical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Peng; Nguyen, Diem Ai; Lee, Soo-Yeon; Cho, Jung-Wook

    2017-05-01

    The heat transfer and solidification microstructure evolution during continuous casting were experimentally studied in this work. A new approach to physically simulate the steel solidification behavior during continuous casting was developed. Six steel grades with different solidification mode were introduced to elucidate the carbon equivalent dependent mold heat flux, prior austenite grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing. It is found that the non-steady mold heat fluxes in the experiment against time for all steel grades are comparative to that versus distance in practical continuous casting. Due to the occurrence of L→L+δ→δ+γ→γ transformation with the largest amount of volume contraction in hypo-peritectic steel, it shows the lowest mold heat flux among these six steel grades. It is also demonstrated from the solidification microstructure results that the prior austenite grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing in the physical simulation are in good agreement with those in continuously cast strand. In addition, the steel with a higher temperature for the onset of δ→γ transformation reveals the larger prior austenite grains resulted from the higher grains growth rate in the post solidification process.

  7. Improvement in Mechanical Properties of A356 Tensile Test Bars Cast in a Permanent Mold by Application of a Knife Ingate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaou; Schwam, David; Neff, David V.; Chen, Chai-Jung; Zhu, Xuejun

    2012-03-01

    As a standard test-bar permanent mold, the "Stahl" Mold has been widely used in foundries to assess the properties of cast alloys. However, inferior mechanical properties are often obtained with this mold due to shrinkage-induced microporosity in the gage section. In order to improve the mechanical properties, a design modification comprising a thin knife ingate between the feeder and test-bar cavity was evaluated in this work. The new design was studied by computer-aided simulation. Simulations predicted that the knife ingate improved the metal feeding capability and reduced the shrinkage microporosity at the gage section from 3 to 1 pct. Experimental verification work has been undertaken with aluminum alloy A356, and the results were analyzed by a statistics theory-based factorial analysis method. The new design resulted in main effects with ultimate tensile strength (UTS) improvement of 20 MPa (relative 12 pct) and elongation increment of 2 pct (relative 45 pct) for the as-cast test bars.

  8. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  9. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baicheng; Xu, Qingyan; Jing, Tao; Shen, Houfa; Han, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-01

    The development of the aviation, energy and automobile industries requires an advanced integrated product/process R&D systems which could optimize the product and the process design as well. Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a promising approach to fulfill this requirement and make the product and process development efficient, economic, and environmentally friendly. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes, including mathematical models as well as engineering applications are presented in the paper. Dendrite morphology of magnesium and aluminum alloy of solidification process by using phase field and cellular automaton methods, mathematical models of segregation of large steel ingot, and microstructure models of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade casting are studied and discussed. In addition, some engineering case studies, including microstructure simulation of aluminum casting for automobile industry, segregation of large steel ingot for energy industry, and microstructure simulation of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade castings for aviation industry are discussed.

  10. Investigation on the Mechanical Properties of A356 Alloy Reinforced AlTiB/SiCp Composite by Semi-Solid Stir Casting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhiftime, E. I.; Gueterres, N. F. D. S.

    2017-05-01

    Employing the semi-solid stir casting method to strengthen MMCs by SiCp particle was the simplest way in the casting process. The strength and toughness of a composite material can be obtained through a combination of the A356 / Al7Si composites and SiCp particle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in the mechanical properties of Al7Si1Mg/SiCp and Al7Si1Mg1.5TiB/SiCp composites, as well as the changing effects on the extra level of SiCp particle. Al7Si was used as matrix strengthened by SiCp with the percentage variations of 10, 15, 20 wt%. The additional level of 1.5 wt% AlTiB aimed for increasing the matrix grain refinement. The semi-solid stir casting method was performed to spread the SiCp particles evenly in the liquid matrix. The results of the study were the tensile strength value of as much as 143 MPa or the increase of 22.16%. The biggest yield strength on the Al7Si1Mg1.5TiB/SiCp composite was averagely as much as 106 MPa. The highest impact toughness was averagely amounted to 4.74 J/mm2. The lowest porosity value was averagely 2.10%. The morphology of the composite between the reinforcing particle and the matrix was able to unite and to be dispersed evenly. The present study was conducted through density test, tensile test, impact test, microstructure test, and SEM.

  11. A Thermal Simulation Method for Solidification Process of Steel Slab in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Honggang; Chen, Xiangru; Han, Qingyou; Han, Ke; Zhai, Qijie

    2016-10-01

    Eighty years after the invention of continuous cast of steels, reproducibility from few mm3 samples in the laboratory to m3 product in plants is still a challenge. We have engineered a thermal simulation method to simulate the continuous casting process. The temperature gradient ( G L ) and dendritic growth rate ( v) of the slab were reproduced by controlling temperature and cooling intensity at hot and chill end, respectively, in our simulation samples. To verify that our samples can simulate the cast slab in continuous casting process, the heat transfer, solidification structure, and macrosegregation of the simulating sample were compared to those of a much larger continuous casting slab. The morphology of solid/liquid interface, solidified shell thickness, and dendritic growth rate were also investigated by in situ quenching the solidifying sample. Shell thickness ( δ) determined by our quenching experiment was related to solidification time ( τ) by equation: δ = 4.27 × τ 0.38. The results indicated that our method closely simulated the solidification process of continuous casting.

  12. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santella, M. L.; Feng, Z.

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in. and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in. specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2-2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni(sub 5)Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results.

  13. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-09-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni{sub 5}Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results.

  14. Solidification Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Magnesium-Aluminum-Tin Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Alan A.; Fu, Penghuai; Peng, Liming; Kang, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Tianyu

    2012-01-01

    The solidification microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast Mg-Al-Sn alloys have been investigated using computational thermodynamics and experiments. The as-cast microstructure of Mg-Al-Sn alloys consists of α-Mg, Mg17Al12, and Mg2Sn phases. The amount of Mg17Al12 and Mg2Sn phases formed increases with increasing Al and Sn content and shows good agreement between the experimental results and the Scheil solidification calculations. Generally, the yield strength of as-cast alloys increases with Al and Sn content, whereas the ductility decreases. This study has confirmed an early development of Mg-7Al-2Sn alloy for structural applications and has led to a promising new Mg-7Al-5Sn alloy with significantly improved strength and ductility comparable with commercial AZ91 alloy.

  15. Influence of FC-Mold on the Full Solidification of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification for slab continuous casting process with flow control mold (FC-Mold) was constructed. The full solidification process from the meniscus to the solidification end of slab was obtained for the first time. The calculation domain was designed according to the actual dimension of the continuous caster. The main results show that the calculated flow speed on the meniscus at different casting speeds and the calculated shell profile had a good agreement with the measured flow speed using nail board measurement and the shell with breakout. The application of FC-Mold could improve the symmetry of flow in width, and suppress the formation of vortices on the meniscus. The decrease of upper magnetic field intensity of FC-Mold reduced the washing effect on the solidifying front, and favored the shell growth in the mold region. In the secondary cooling zone, the shell thickness increased gradually, and the shell grew quickly at the final stage of solidification for the whole mushy form of steel. In addition, FC-Mold had an effect on the shape and position of the solidification end.

  16. Effect of the Solidification Rate on Microstructure of Cast Mg Alloys at Low Superheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Gregory; Rimkus, Nathan; Murphy, Aeriel; Boehmcke, Paige; El-Kaddah, Nagy

    This paper investigates the effect of cooling rate on the grain size and microstructure of Mg AZ31B alloy cast at a superheat of 8°C using the Magnetic Suspension Melting (MSM) process, which is capable of melting and casting at superheats less than 5°C. In this study, the Mg alloy was unidirectionally solidified in a bottom-chill mold with stainless steel and copper chill blocks. The solidification parameters, namely growth velocity (V) and temperature gradient (G), were determined from numerical simulation of the cooling curves, which was found to be in good agreement with measurements. For the investigated solidification rates, metallographic examination showed globular solidification morphology, and the grain size was inversely proportional to the square root of the cooling rate. Microprobe analysis of the cast ingots also showed that Al segregation occurs primarily at the grain boundaries, and the solidification rate affects the size and distribution of both the secondary α phase and the intermetallic Mg17Al12 phase.

  17. Transient thermal analysis of solidification in a centrifugal casting for composite materials containing particle segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.G.; Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-04-01

    One-dimensional heat-transfer analysis during centrifugal casting of aluminum alloy and copper base metal matrix composites containing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC{sub p}, and graphite particles has been studied. The model of the particle segregation is calculated by varying the volume fraction during centrifugal casting, and a finite difference technique has been adopted. The results indicate that the thickness of the region in which dispersed particles are segregated due to the centrifugal force is strongly influenced by the speed of rotation of the mold, the solidification time, and the density difference between the base alloy and the reinforcement. In the case where the base alloy density is larger than that of the particles, the thickness of the particle-rich region near the inner periphery decreases with an increase in speed, thereby increasing the volume fraction of dispersion. The solidification time of the casting is also dependent upon the speed of rotation of the mold, and it decreases with an increase in speed. This study also indicates that the presence of particles increases the solidification time of the casting.

  18. Premature melt solidification during mold filling and its influence on the as-cast structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Ahmadein, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2017-05-01

    Premature melt solidification is the solidification of a melt during mold filling. In this study, a numerical model is used to analyze the influence of the pouring process on the premature solidification. The numerical model considers three phases, namely, air, melt, and equiaxed crystals. The crystals are assumed to have originated from the heterogeneous nucleation in the undercooled melt resulting from the first contact of the melt with the cold mold during pouring. The transport of the crystals by the melt flow, in accordance with the socalled "big bang" theory, is considered. The crystals are assumed globular in morphology and capable of growing according to the local constitutional undercooling. These crystals can also be remelted by mixing with the superheated melt. As the modeling results, the evolutionary trends of the number density of the crystals and the volume fraction of the solid crystals in the melt during pouring are presented. The calculated number density of the crystals and the volume fraction of the solid crystals in the melt at the end of pouring are used as the initial conditions for the subsequent solidification simulation of the evolution of the as-cast structure. A five-phase volume-average model for mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification is used for the solidification simulation. An improved agreement between the simulation and experimental results is achieved by considering the effect of premature melt solidification during mold filling. Finally, the influences of pouring parameters, namely, pouring temperature, initial mold temperature, and pouring rate, on the premature melt solidification are discussed.

  19. Impact Behavior of A356 Foundry Alloys in the Presence of Trace Elements Ni and V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casari, Daniele; Ludwig, Thomas H.; Merlin, Mattia; Arnberg, Lars; Garagnani, Gian Luca

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the impact behavior of unmodified A356 alloys with the addition of Ni or V in as-cast and T6 heat-treated conditions was assessed. Charpy V-notched specimens obtained from sand and permanent mold casting showed low total absorbed energy average values ( W t < 2 J). SEM analysis of fracture profiles and surfaces indicated a Si-driven crack propagation with a predominant transgranular fracture mode. Occasionally, intergranular contributions to fracture were detected in the permanent mold cast alloys due to the locally finer microstructure. Concurrent mechanisms related to the chemical composition, solidification conditions and heat treatment were found to control the impact properties of the alloys. While the trace element Ni exerted only minor effects on the impact toughness of the A356 alloy, V had a strong influence: (i) V-containing sand cast alloys absorbed slightly higher impact energies compared to the corresponding A356 base alloys; (ii) in the permanent mold cast alloys, V in solid solution led to a considerable loss of ductility, which in turn decreased the total absorbed energy.

  20. PREFACE: MCWASP XIII: International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Due to fast-paced development in computer technologies during the last three decades, computer-based process modeling has become an important tool for the improvement of existing process technologies and the development of new, innovative technologies. With the help of numerical process simulations, complex and costly experimental trials can now be reduced to a minimum. For metallurgical processes in particular, computer simulations are of outstanding importance, as the flow and solidification of molten alloys or the formation of microstructure and defects can hardly be observed experimentally. Corresponding computer simulations allow us inside views into the key process phenomena and so offer great potential for optimization. In 1980 the conference series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up, and has now been continued by holding the 13th international conference on 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes', MCWASP XIII, in Schladming, Austria, from June 17-22 2012. Around 200 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 20 countries around the globe attended 78 oral and 50 poster presentations on different aspects of solidification-related modeling topics. Besides process-related sessions such as (i) Ingot and Shape Casting, (ii) Continuous Casting and Direct Chill Casting, (iii) Directional Solidification and Zone Melting, (iv) Welding, and (v) Centrifugal Casting, a larger focus was put on (vi) Experimental Investigation and In-Situ Observations. In recent years, this topic has been significantly strengthened as advanced synchrotron technologies allow fantastic in-situ observations of phenomena happening inside small metallic samples. These observations will definitely serve as a benchmark for the modeling community. Further macroscopic aspects of advanced solidification science were tackled in the sessions (vii) Electromagnetic Coupling, (viii) Thermomechanics, (ix

  1. Thermal Microstructural Multiscale Simulation of Solidification and Eutectoid Transformation of Hypereutectic Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Alejandro; Celentano, Diego J.; Gunasegaram, Dayalan R.; Deeva, Natalia

    2014-08-01

    Although the gray cast iron solidification process has been the subject of several modeling studies, almost all available models appear to deal with only the more widely used hypoeutectic compositions. Models related to hypereutectic gray iron compositions with lamellar (or flake) graphite, and in particular for the proeutectic and eutectoid zones, are hard to find in the open literature. Hence, in the present work, a thermal microstructural multiscale model is proposed to describe the solidification and eutectoid transformation of a slightly hypereutectic composition leading to lamellar graphite gray iron morphology. The main predictions were: (a) temperature evolutions; (b) fractions of graphite, ferrite, and pearlite; (c) density; and (d) size of ferrite, pearlite, and gray eutectic grains; (e) average interlamellar graphite spacing; and (f) its thickness. The predicted cooling curves and fractions for castings with two different compositions and two different pouring temperatures were validated using experimental data. The differences between this model and existing models for hypoeutectic compositions are discussed.

  2. Estimation of solidification time during casting by use of a heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Takahashi, J; Kimura, H; Ida, K

    1982-10-01

    Time-dependent temperature profiles in dental casting molds were analyzed by an unsteady heat conduction model. The thermal conductivity and initial temperature of the mold greatly affected the heat transfer in the mold. The thermal conductivities of gypsum- and phosphate-bonded investments at high temperatures were accurately measured by means of the hot wire method. From the data obtained, the solidification times of Ag, Ag alloy, and Co-Cr alloy were calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  3. MPS solidification model. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Maples, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Work performed on several existing solidification models for which computer codes and documentation were developed is presented. The models describe the solidification of alloys in which there is a time varying zone of coexisting solid and liquid phases; i.e., the S/L zone. The primary purpose of the models is to calculate macrosegregation in a casting or ingot which results from flow of interdendritic liquid in this S/L zone during solidification. The flow, driven by solidification contractions and by gravity acting on density gradients in the interdendritic liquid, is modeled as flow through a porous medium. In Model 1, the steady state model, the heat flow characteristics are those of steady state solidification; i.e., the S/L zone is of constant width and it moves at a constant velocity relative to the mold. In Model 2, the unsteady state model, the width and rate of movement of the S/L zone are allowed to vary with time as it moves through the ingot. Each of these models exists in two versions. Models 1 and 2 are applicable to binary alloys; models 1M and 2M are applicable to multicomponent alloys.

  4. Effect of Pressure and Temperature Factors on the Solidification of Cast Iron and Its Structure in Liquid Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosenushkin, E. N.; Frantsuzova, L. S.; Kozlova, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the properties and microstructure of cast iron after fabrication of grinding balls by different kinds of casting and forging, with crystallization of the metal under pressure. A mathematical model of the process of solidification of a forging in a die is presented. Joint solution of two Fourier equations of heat conduction for the melt and for the solid skin is used to derive a kinetic equation of solidification and hence to determine the rate of solidification of the forging in the die. The effect of the pressure on the structure of the crystallizing metal and the quality of the forged grinding balls that are obtained is determined.

  5. Solidification structures grown under induced flow and continuous casting of steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsavaras, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of induced flow as a means to control solidification structures in strand cast steel is investigated. The quality problems in strand cast steel stemming from columnar growth can be partially controlled, by Electro Magnetic Stirring (EMS). Induced flow changes the normal morphology of dendrites. Solids grown under intense stirring conditions show both negative and positive segregation which is considered unacceptable by some steel producers. The inclusion size and population is strongly affected by induced flow (EMS). Laboratory and industrial data show substantial reduction in inclusion size and content, but the overall effect of flow on inclusions is affected by the particular type of flow patterns utilized in each case. Productivity and quality are raised substantially in steel strand casting by utilizing EMS.

  6. Modeling of the flow-solidification interaction in thin slab casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhrushev, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.; Tang, Y.; Hackl, G.; Nitzl, G.

    2012-07-01

    A key issue for modelling the thin slab casting (TSC) is to consider the evolution of the solid shell, which strongly interacts with the turbulent flow and in the meantime is subject to continuous deformation due to the funnel shape (curvature) of the mould. Here an enthalpy-based mixture solidification model with consideration of turbulent flow [Prescott and Incropera, ASME HTD, vol. 280, 1994, pp. 59] is employed, and further enhanced to include the deforming solid shell. The solid velocity in the fully-solidified strand shell and partially-solidified mushy zone is estimated by solving the Laplace's equation. Primary goals of this work are to examine the sensitivity of the modelling result to different model implementation schemes, and to explore the importance of the deforming and moving solid shell in the solidification. Therefore, a 2D benchmark, to mimic the solidification and deformation behaviour of the thin slab casting, is firstly simulated and evaluated. An example of 3D TSC is also presented. Due to the limitation of the current computation resources additional numerical techniques like parallel computing and mesh adaptation are necessarily applied to ensure the calculation accuracy for the full-3D TSC.

  7. Solidification Microstructure of AISI M2 High Speed Steel Manufactured by the Horizontal Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. F.; Fang, F.; Jiang, J. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, AISI M2 high speed steel is produced by the horizontal continuous casting process. The difference of solidification microstructure in ingots by mould casting and continuous casting has been examined by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution electron microscope (HREM). The results show that the as-cast structure consists of iron matrix and networks of M2C eutectic carbides, which are greatly refined in the continuous casting ingot compared to the case of ingot by mould casting. Meanwhile, the morphology of M2C eutectic carbides changes from the plate-like shape into the fibrous one. Micro-twining and stacking faults are observed in the plate-like M2C, whereas they are rarely identified in the fibrous M2C. Based on the characteristic of morphology and microstructure, it is expected that the plate-like M2C is a faceted phase while the fibrous M2C is a non-faceted phase.

  8. Modeling of Centrifugal Force Field and the Effect on Filling and Solidification in Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wenbin; Ma, Chunxue; Gu, Wanli

    2011-06-01

    Based on the steady flow in a tube, a mathematical model has been established for the consideration of centrifuging force field by combining the equations of continuity, conservation of momentum and general energy. Effects of centrifugal field on the filling and solidification are modeled by two accessional terms: centrifugal force and Chorios force. In addition, the transfer of heat by convection is considered to achieve a coupling calculation of velocity field and temperature field. The solution of pressure item is avoided by introducing the stream function ψ(x,y) and the eddy function ξ(x,y). Corresponding difference formats for the simultaneous equations of centrifugal filling, the accessional terms and the solidifying latent heat have been established by the finite difference technique. Furthermore, the centrifugal filling and solidification processes in a horizontal tube are summarized to interpret the mechanism by which internal defects are formed in centrifugal castings.

  9. On the Formation of Macrosegregation and Interdendritic Cracks During Dendritic Solidification of Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current article is to elucidate the significant effects of macrosegregation distribution and its level on the different stages of interdendritic crack formation during dendritic solidification in continuously cast steel slabs. Couple formations of macrosegregation and interdendritic crack phenomena during dendritic solidification of peritectic carbon steels have been investigated by metallographic study of collected slab samples and by performing a set of mathematical analyses. The metallographic study involved plant trails to measure slab surface temperature of different secondary spray cooling conditions. Also, macro-microexaminations, measurements of dendrite arm spacing, macrosegregation analysis, and interdendritic distance between the dendrites of collected samples from plant trials have been performed. The experimental results show a fluctuation of carbon segregation with respect to distance from slab surface. These results also reveal that the interdendritic cracks vary with this fluctuation in various nano, macro, and microscales based on the cooling conditions. A mathematical model of heat transfer, solidification, structure evolution, interdendritic strain, macrosegregation, and elementary interdendritic area "EIA" has been developed. This model takes also into account the calculating of interdendritic distance between the dendrites "IDD" to evaluate the interdendritic crack width. The model predictions of different thermal and solidification phenomena show a good agreement with measurements. The results pointed out also that the coupled effect of interdendritic strain and macrosegregation phenomena and their distributions can be considered as the most important tools to evaluate the surface and internal interdendritic cracks in continuously cast steel slabs. The formation mechanisms of different types of interdendritic crack with interdendritic strain patterns and fluctuation of macrosegregation levels during various cooling zones have

  10. Solidification interface shape for continuous casting in an offset mold - Two analytical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1984-01-01

    A solution method for finding the unknown solidification interface in manufacturing slab ingots as a continuous casting is presented, which involves a product solution in the potential plane and the use of conjugate harmonic functions. It is argued that the method may be more direct for some geometries than the Cauchy boundary value method. Moreover, the usefulness of the Cauchy boundary value method is demonstrated through the example of a nonsymmetric horizontal mold where the walls are offset to support the lower ingot boundary.

  11. Solidification interface shape for continuous casting in an offset mold - Two analytical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1984-01-01

    A solution method for finding the unknown solidification interface in manufacturing slab ingots as a continuous casting is presented, which involves a product solution in the potential plane and the use of conjugate harmonic functions. It is argued that the method may be more direct for some geometries than the Cauchy boundary value method. Moreover, the usefulness of the Cauchy boundary value method is demonstrated through the example of a nonsymmetric horizontal mold where the walls are offset to support the lower ingot boundary.

  12. Directional solidification of large cross-section nickel-base superalloy castings via liquid-metal cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Andrew J.

    The drive for higher efficiency in very large industrial gas turbines (IGTs) used in power generation applications has led to the need for directional solidification of large cross-section components, such as turbine blades, used in the hot gas path sections of the IGTs. The Bridgman directional solidification technique, which is currently used to produce these components, has been optimized for much smaller aero-engine components. The scale-up of this technique to produce large parts has resulted in numerous problems, and consequently low casting yield, which can all be related to the limited cooling capability of the Bridgman process. In this dissertation, a higher cooling efficiency process, liquid-metal cooling (LMC) using Sn as the cooling medium, has been evaluated for improved capability to cast large cross-section components. A series of castings were made for direct comparison using both the conventional Bridgman and the high thermal gradient LMC processes. Casting conditions were selected to simulate the state of the art for the Bridgman method and to assess the limits of casting with the less familiar LMC method. The experiments were evaluated through thermocouple analyses of casting conditions and post-casting analyses of grain defects, microstructural features, and mechanical behavior. Additionally, a finite element model of the solidification process was developed to further elucidate casting conditions. The casting parameters and elements of the LMC process that had the greatest influence on casting conditions were determined. Results indicated that the LMC process is capable of significantly enhancing cooling efficiency during directional solidification of large cross-section components. The enhanced cooling allowed much faster solidification withdrawal rates and resulted in substantially refined cast microstructure. The LMC process eliminated freckle-type defects in all cases and considerably reduced other casting defects under optimal conditions

  13. A Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Simulation on Squeeze Casting Solidification Process of Three-Dimensional Geometrically Complex Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Han, Zhiqiang; Wang, Feifan; Sun, Jue; Xu, Shanxin

    A coupled thermo-mechanical simulation method for three-dimensional squeeze casting components has been developed. The simulation was achieved by using ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). The effect of volume shrinkage due to cooling and solidification, the effect of pressure on the latent heat release, the mutual dependence of interfacial heat transfer and casting deformation, and materials behavior under elevated temperatures were taken into account in the simulation. A step-shaped trial casting was simulated, which demonstrates the ability of the method to simulate the pressure transmission and decline inside the casting as well as the distribution and evolution of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient. Finally, the method was applied to simulate the solidification of an automotive sub-frame component, based on which the squeeze casting process of the component was optimized.

  14. Solidification and solid state transformations during cooling of chromium-molybdenum white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demello, J. D. B.; Durand-Charre, M.; Hamar-Thibault, S.

    1983-09-01

    Two series of Cr, Mo white cast irons were investigated by different techniques. Differential thermal analysis was carried out to determine the liquidus and eutectic temperatures. Unidirectional solidification was used to promote coarser structures easier to analyze. Furthermore, the microstructures of the sample, quenched during a slow unidirectional solidification, illustrate the behavior of the alloy during continuous cooling. The precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microprobe analysis. The main findings are reported: (1) a correlation was found between the end of solidification and the chromium to carbon ratio; (2) the determination was made of the crystallization path; (3) in some high Cr/C ratio alloys a peritectic reaction occurs on the border of the grain giving a δ ferritic phase; (4) then this δ ferrite was found to decompose in a complex manner giving austenite and ferrite probably in a lamellar structure, then precipitates of M6C and Mo2C in the austenitic and ferritic phases, respectively; and (5) according to the kinetics of cooling, some alloys undergo martensitic and bainitic transformations.

  15. Numerical simulation of casting processes: coupled mould filling and solidification using VOF and enthalpy-porosity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Ole; Turnow, Johann; Kornev, Nikolai; Hassel, Egon

    2016-12-01

    Within the scope of industrial casting applications a numerical model for the simultaneous mould filling and solidification process has been formulated, implemented in a finite volume code and successfully validated using analytical and experimental data. In order to account for the developing of free surface flow and the liquid/solid phase change, respectively, the volume-of-fluid and enthalpy-porosity method have been coupled under a volume averaging framework on a fixed Eulerian grid. The coupled method captures the basic physical effects of a combined mould filling and solidification process and provides a trustful method for comprehensive casting simulations.

  16. Numerical simulation of casting processes: coupled mould filling and solidification using VOF and enthalpy-porosity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Ole; Turnow, Johann; Kornev, Nikolai; Hassel, Egon

    2017-06-01

    Within the scope of industrial casting applications a numerical model for the simultaneous mould filling and solidification process has been formulated, implemented in a finite volume code and successfully validated using analytical and experimental data. In order to account for the developing of free surface flow and the liquid/solid phase change, respectively, the volume-of-fluid and enthalpy-porosity method have been coupled under a volume averaging framework on a fixed Eulerian grid. The coupled method captures the basic physical effects of a combined mould filling and solidification process and provides a trustful method for comprehensive casting simulations.

  17. Influence of solidification variables on the cast microstructure and porosity in directionally solidified Mar-M247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesell, Harry Smith, III

    The solidification microstructure is critical in determining the amount and distribution of porosity that develops during the freezing of castings. As the solidification velocity Vs increases, the microstructural length scales (primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings) decrease; thus (1) the mushy zone permeability would be expected to decrease; and (2) nucleated pores would be increasingly isolated. Although the first effect would tend to increase the observed porosity, the second effect would tend to decrease the porosity. As solidification velocity decreases, the cooling rate decreases allowing additional time for carbide growth. Large carbide size may block feeding in the intercellular spaces increasing observed porosity. To better understand these competitive mechanisms, a series of controlled unidirectional experiments were performed on bars of nickel-base superalloy Mar-M247. Samples were produced with constant dendrite arm spacing throughout an extended length of each cast bar. The axial thermal gradient and withdrawal velocity imposed on each casting were varied between castings to produce a range of microstructures from aligned cellular dendritic to aligned dendritic to misaligned dendritic. Macrosegregation effects along the lengths of the bars were evaluated and the resultant impact upon the density along the lengths of each casting was also characterized. The density measurements were found to be very sensitive to both (1) compositional macrosegregation in these castings and (2) internal porosity. Statistical analyses of microporosity in castings were based upon metallographic measurements. The development of microporosity in the unidirectionally solidified castings is shown to be dependent upon the hydrogen gas content of the samples and the imposed solidification velocity through the sample's cast microstructures. An optimum intermediate withdrawal velocity of 0.005--0.01 cm/s was found, which led to closely spaced dendrite arms, a large number of

  18. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Directional Solidification Process of Single Crystal Superalloy Casting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of numerical modeling techniques has led to more accurate results in modeling metal solidification processes. In this study, the cellular automaton-finite difference (CA-FD) method was used to simulate the directional solidification (DS) process of single crystal (SX) superalloy blade samples. Experiments were carried out to validate the simulation results. Meanwhile, an intelligent model based on fuzzy control theory was built to optimize the complicate DS process. Several key parameters, such as mushy zone width and temperature difference at the cast-mold interface, were recognized as the input variables. The input variables were functioned with the multivariable fuzzy rule to get the output adjustment of withdrawal rate (v) (a key technological parameter). The multivariable fuzzy rule was built, based on the structure feature of casting, such as the relationship between section area, and the delay time of the temperature change response by changing v, and the professional experience of the operator as well. Then, the fuzzy controlling model coupled with CA-FD method could be used to optimize v in real-time during the manufacturing process. The optimized process was proven to be more flexible and adaptive for a steady and stray-grain free DS process. PMID:28788535

  19. Solidification and solid-state transformation mechanisms in Si alloyed high-chromium white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, George; Powell, Graham L. F.

    1993-04-01

    Chromium white cast irons are widely used in environments where severe abrasion resistance is a dominant requirement. To improve the wear resistance of these commercially important irons, the United States Bureau of Mines and CSIRO Australia are studying their solidification and solid-state transformation kinetics. A ternary Fe-Cr-C iron with 17.8 wt pct (pct) Cr and 3.0 pct C was compared with commercially available irons of similar Cr and C contents with Si contents between 1.6 and 2.2 pct. The irons were solidified and cooled at rates of 0.03 and 0.17 K · s-1 to 873 K. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) showed that Si depresses the eutectic reaction temperature and suggests that is has no effect upon the volume of eutectic carbides formed during solidification. Microprobe analysis revealed that austenite dendrites within the Si alloyed irons cooled at 0.03 and 0.17 K·s-1 had C and Cr contents that were lower than those of dendrites within the ternary alloy cooled at the same cooling rate and a Si alloyed iron that was water quenched from the eutectic temperature. These lower values were shown by image analysis to be the result of both solid-state growth (coarsening) of the eutectic carbides and some secondary carbide formation. Hardness measurements in the as-cast condition and after soaking in liquid nitrogen suggest an increase in the martensite start temperature as the Si content was increased. It is concluded that Si’s effect on increasing the size and volume fraction of eutectic carbides and increasing the matrix hardness should lead to improved wear resistance over regular high-chromium white cast irons.

  20. The rheological behavior of semi-solid A356 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Omid

    The semi-solid-metal, SSM, processing deals with semi solid slurries, in which non dendritic solid particles are dispersed in a liquid matrix with apparent viscosity values near to that of liquid. It is able to flow easily under pressure and fills complicated die cavities to manufacture sound as-cast products with high integrity. The SSM slurry is prepared through different methods. In the current study conventional casting and the SEED process were employed to produce SSM billets with different morphologies of primary alpha-Al phase in A356 Al-Si alloy. For conventional casting, a range of solid particle morphologies, microstructure, were realized through variation of pouring temperature while for the SEED billets, as a new patent of ALCAN international for semi solid casting, changes in the morphology were achieved by control of process parameters during solidification of the melt. In order to investigate the morphological evolution due to the effect of different process parameters, pouring temperature and swirling intensities, the SSM billets prepared by both methods were studied using quantitative metallography. The microstructure of SSM A356 alloy has also been characterized using an innovative method, parallel plate compression viscometry, where a correlation was made between the morphology and viscosity. The main objective of the current research was the implication of rheological principles to study the deformation behavior of A356 alloy at different morphologies and fraction of solid, while treating the SSM billets as Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids respectively. Furthermore, two empirical relationships were proposed to underline the correlation among the viscosity, and fraction solid and its morphology. In order to further confirm the reliability of the tests results in this research and to highlight that the sample size has no effect on the final deformation and viscosity values, a new series of tests were performed using two sets of specimens with

  1. The Role of Silicon in the Solidification of High-Cr Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Rainforth, M. W.; Mejía, I.

    2013-02-01

    This work analyzes the effect of different additions of silicon (0 to 5.0 pct) on the structure of a high-Chromium white cast iron, with chromium content of 16.8 pct and carbon 2.56 pct. The alloys were analyzed in both as-cast and heat-treated conditions. Casting was undertaken in metallic molds that yielded solidification rates faster than in commercial processes. Nevertheless, there was some degree of segregation of silicon; this segregation resulted in a refinement in the microstructure of the alloy. Silicon also generated a greater influence on the structure by destabilizing the austenitic matrix, and promoted greater precipitation of eutectic carbides. Above 3 pct silicon, pearlite formation occurred in preference to martensite. After the destabilization heat treatment, the matrix structure of the irons up to 3 pct Si consisted of secondary carbides in a martensitic matrix with some retained austenite; higher Si additions produced a ferritic matrix. The different as-cast and heat-treated microstructures were correlated with selected mechanical properties such as hardness, matrix microhardness, and fracture toughness. Silicon additions increased matrix microhardness in the as-cast conditions, but the opposite phenomenon occurred in the heat-treated conditions. Microhardness decreased as silicon content was increased. Bulk hardness showed the same behavior. Fracture toughness was observed to increase up to 2 pct Si, and then decreased for higher silicon contents. These results are discussed in terms of the effect of eutectic carbides' size and the resulting matrix due to the silicon additions.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  3. Mathematical Modelling of Solidification in a Curved Strand During Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Ambrish; Jha, Pradeep Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A two dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification model has been developed for a curved shape continuous steel slab caster. The strand has been divided in various sections depending upon cooling conditions in the mold and Secondary Cooling Zone (SCZ). The model was validated against the experimental results reported in the literature for solid shell thickness in the mold. CFD software ANSYS Fluent has been used for solving the differential equations of heat transfer and fluid flow. Surface temperature distribution has been predicted while; the thickness of solid shell formed in the mold and SCZ has been calculated by finding the liquid fraction of steel within the domain. Process parameters such as, casting speed and cooling rate has been varied to analyse their effects on metallurgical length and solid shell thickness at the mold exit. The analysis was based on keeping the shell thickness between 10 and 14 mm at mold exit and metallurgical length less than the cut-off length but having complete solidification after the straightening zone.

  4. Transient Simulation of Mold Heat Transfer and Solidification Phenomena of Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive model of heat transfer and solidification phenomena has been developed including microstructure evolution and fluctuation macrosegregation in continuously cast steel slabs with an objective of evaluation of various mold cooling conditions. The study contains plant trials, metallographic examinations, and formulation of mathematical modeling. The plant trials involved sample collection from three slab casters in use at two different steel plants. The metallographic study combined measurements of dendrite arm spacings and macrosegregation analysis of collected samples. A one-dimensional mathematical model has been developed to characterize the thermal, solidification phases, microstructure evolution, interdendritic strain, and therefore, the macrosegregation distributions. Two cooling approaches were proposed in this study to evaluate the Newtonian heat transfer coefficient in various mold regions. The first approach is a direct estimation approach (DEA), whereas the second one is a coupled approach of the interfacial resistor model and direct estimation approach (CIR/DEA). The model predictions and standard analytical models as well as the previous measurements were compared to verify and to calibrate the model where good agreements were obtained. The comparison between the model predictions and the measurements of dendrite arm spacings and fluctuated carbon concentration profiles were performed to determine the model accuracy level with different cooling approaches. Good agreements were obtained by different accuracy levels with different cooling approaches. The model predictions of thermal parameters and isotherms were analyzed and discussed.

  5. Effect of pouring temperature on A356-TiB2 MMCs cast in sand and permanent moulds by in-situ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaravi, C.; Lakshminarayanan, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes a different condition of pouring temperature by sand and permanent mould to produce A356-6 wt% TiB2 metal matrix composites by in-situ method salt metal reaction route. The observation of SEM micrographs shows particle distribution of the TiB2 and it appears in hexagonal shape in Al matrix. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the formation of those TiB2 particulates and the results showed TiB2 particles are homogeneously dispersed throughout the matrix metal. Subsequent structure-property evaluation studies indicated sub-micron size reinforcement of in-situ formed TiB2 particles with improved physical and mechanical properties as compared to sand and permanent mould of Al-TiB2 composites. From, the permanent mould Al-TiB2 composite has an advantage of increase the properties over sand mould Al-TiB2 composite.

  6. Grain Refinement and Improvement of Solidification Defects in Direct-Chill Cast Billets of A4032 Alloy by Melt Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hu-Tian; Zhao, Pizhi; Yang, Rongdong; Patel, Jayesh B.; Chen, Xiangfu; Fan, Zhongyun

    2017-10-01

    Melt-conditioned, direct-chill (MC-DC) casting is an emerging technology to manipulate the solidification process by melt conditioning via intensive shearing in the sump during DC casting to tailor the solidification microstructure and defect formation. When using MC-DC casting technology in an industrial scale DC cast billet of an A4032 aluminum alloy, significant grain refinement and uniform microstructure can be achieved in the primary α-Al phase with fine secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS). Improved macrosegregation is quantitatively characterized and correlated with the suppression of channel segregation. The mechanisms for the prevention of channel segregation are attributed to the increased local cooling rate in the liquid-solid phase region in the sump and the formation of fine equiaxed dendritic grains under intensive melt shearing during MC-DC casting. A critical cooling rate has been identified to be around 0.5 to 1 K/s (°C/s) for the channel segregation to happen in the investigated alloy based on quantitative metallographic results of SDAS. Reduction and refinement of microporosity is attributed to the improved permeability in the liquid-solid phase region estimated by the Kozeny-Carman relationship. The potential improvement in the mechanical properties achievable in MC-DC cast billets is indicated by the finer and more uniform forging streamline in the forgings of MC-DC cast billet.

  7. Grain Refinement and Improvement of Solidification Defects in Direct-Chill Cast Billets of A4032 Alloy by Melt Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hu-Tian; Zhao, Pizhi; Yang, Rongdong; Patel, Jayesh B.; Chen, Xiangfu; Fan, Zhongyun

    2017-06-01

    Melt-conditioned, direct-chill (MC-DC) casting is an emerging technology to manipulate the solidification process by melt conditioning via intensive shearing in the sump during DC casting to tailor the solidification microstructure and defect formation. When using MC-DC casting technology in an industrial scale DC cast billet of an A4032 aluminum alloy, significant grain refinement and uniform microstructure can be achieved in the primary α-Al phase with fine secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS). Improved macrosegregation is quantitatively characterized and correlated with the suppression of channel segregation. The mechanisms for the prevention of channel segregation are attributed to the increased local cooling rate in the liquid-solid phase region in the sump and the formation of fine equiaxed dendritic grains under intensive melt shearing during MC-DC casting. A critical cooling rate has been identified to be around 0.5 to 1 K/s (°C/s) for the channel segregation to happen in the investigated alloy based on quantitative metallographic results of SDAS. Reduction and refinement of microporosity is attributed to the improved permeability in the liquid-solid phase region estimated by the Kozeny-Carman relationship. The potential improvement in the mechanical properties achievable in MC-DC cast billets is indicated by the finer and more uniform forging streamline in the forgings of MC-DC cast billet.

  8. Inverse problem for the solidification of binary alloy in the casting mould solved by using the bee optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetmaniok, Edyta

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the procedure for solving the inverse problem for the binary alloy solidification in the casting mould is presented. Proposed approach is based on the mathematical model suitable for describing the investigated solidification process, the lever arm model describing the macrosegregation process, the finite element method for solving the direct problem and the artificial bee colony algorithm for minimizing the functional expressing the error of approximate solution. Goal of the discussed inverse problem is the reconstruction of heat transfer coefficient and distribution of temperature in investigated region on the basis of known measurements of temperature.

  9. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Infiltration and Solidification Processes for Squeeze Cast Al Composites with Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. K.; Jang, J. H.; Han, K. S.

    2008-11-01

    An axisymmetric finite element (FE) model is developed for the process of squeeze casting the metal-matrix composites (MMCs). The flow in the mold, the infiltration into the porous preform, and the solidification of the molten metal are studied numerically. The saturated porous flow model is adopted to simulate metal infiltration into the fibrous preform. To track the fluid front during the mold filling and infiltration, the level-set method is used. The enthalpy method is used to deal with transient heat transfer, including phase changes. Also, a simple preform deformation model is used to predict the permeability change caused by preform compression during infiltration. A numerical model representing the experiment setup is proposed. The infiltration and cooling behaviors during a process were calculated using pure aluminum as the matrix and a Saffil fiber preform. To validate the assumptions used in the numerical model, a series of infiltration experiments was carried out. The infiltration kinetics and the preform deformation were studied at different inlet pressures and at different preheat temperatures of the aluminum and the mold. A comparison with the experimental data shows that the developed FE program successfully predicts the actual squeeze casting process.

  11. Casting Simulation Within the Framework of ICME: Coupling of Solidification, Heat Treatment, and Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianzheng; Scott, Sam; Cao, Weisheng; Köser, Ole

    2016-05-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is becoming a compulsory practice for developing advanced materials, re-thinking manufacturing processing, and engineering components to meet challenging design goals quickly and cost-effectively. As a key component of the ICME approach, a numerical approach is being developed for the prediction of casting microstructure, defects formation and mechanical properties from solidification to heat treatment. Because of the processing conditions and complexity of geometry, material properties of a cast part are not normally homogeneous. This variation and the potential weakening inherent in manufacturing are currently accommodated by incorporating large safety factors that counter design goals. The simulation of the different manufacturing process stages is integrated such that the resultant microstructure of the previous event is used as the initial condition of the following event, ensuring the tracking of the component history while maintaining a high level of accuracy across these manufacturing stages. This paper explains the significance of integrated analytical prediction to obtain more precise simulation results and sets out how available techniques may be applied accordingly.

  12. Solidification Structure and Macrosegregation of Billet Continuous Casting Process with Dual Electromagnetic Stirrings in Mold and Final Stage of Solidification: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Coupling macroscale heat transfer and fluid flow with microscale grain nucleation and crystal growth, a mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was established to study the SWRT82B steel solidification structure and macrosegregation in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting with dual electromagnetic stirrings in mold and final stage of solidification (M-EMS and F-EMS). In the model, the phases of liquid, columnar, and equiaxed were treated separately and the initial growing equiaxed phase, which could move freely with liquid, was regarded as slurry. To obtain the equiaxed grains nucleation and columnar front evolution, the unit tracking method and the columnar front tracking model were built. The model was validated by magnetic induction intensity of stirrer, billet surface temperature, and carbon segregation. The equiaxed phase evolution and the solute transport with effect of fluid flow and grains transport were described in this article. The results show that the equiaxed phase ratio will not increase obviously with higher current intensity of M-EMS, while the negative segregation near the strand surface becomes more serious. The negative segregation zone near the billet center and the center positive segregation come into being with the effect of equiaxed grains sedimentation and liquid thermosolutal flow. It is also found that the liquid solute transport in the F-EMS zone becomes the main factor with higher current intensity rather than the solidification rate, and therefore, the final billet center segregation decreases first and then turns to rise with the current intensity. The optimal current intensities of M-EMS and F-EMS proposed for SWRT82B billet continuous casting are 200 and 400 A, respectively.

  13. Simulation of low carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization in continuous casting using a multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Choi, Joo; Park, Jun-Yong; Sohn, Il

    2014-01-01

    An inverted water-cooled multi-mold continuous casting simulator was used to investigate initial solidification of low-carbon steels and crystallization of mold flux. Embedded mold thermocouples showed characteristic temperature profiles dependent on parameters including casting speed, oscillation frequency, and stroke. Higher maximum temperatures for thermocouples at higher casting speeds, higher frequencies, and lower stroke lengths were observed. The surface of the as-cast steel strips showed oscillation marks similar to those of industrially cast slabs and higher casting speeds resulted in shallower oscillation marks. The measured pitch agreed well with the theoretical pitch suggesting the multi-mold simulator to be a cost-effective alternative to pursue fundamental studies on initial solidification in the mold. Analysis of the mold flux taken between the copper mold and solidified steel shell showed highly dendritic uni-directional crystallization occurring within the flux film suggesting that the heat transfer direction is dominantly horizontal towards the water-cooled copper mold. In addition, the solidified flux located at the upper to lower part of the mold suggested morphological differences in the size and shape of the crystalline phases indicating that crystallization ratio can increase depending upon the retention in the mold and subsequently decrease radiative heat transfer as the flux traverses down the mold.

  14. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification in a Twin-Roll Strip Continuous Casting Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong; Wang, Guodong

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional enthalpy-porosity mixture solidification model is employed to describe the basic rules of heat transfer and solidification in a twin-roll strip continuous casting machine equipped with a multi-port trough-shaped feeding system, and reasons for the formation of these rules are analyzed. The two-layer zonal turbulence model is used to incorporate the turbulence in fluid flow, and the fluid flow in the wedge-shaped pool region in various conditions is studied. The results show that the fluid flow field in the pool region is quite different with/without the consideration of rotating rolls when the solidification is ignored, which indicates the importance of the consideration of rotating rolls in the water modeling equipment design. There are three aspects including molten steel jet impingement, roll rotating, and backward flow of the mushy zone, which strongly influence the temperature distribution in the pool region. The solidification process in the pool region could be divided into three stages: at the first stage, there exists a fast solidification region which obeys the square root law, and an approximately linear growth region could be found at the second stage, while a parabolic growth region could be found at the last stage. The formation of the first stage and the last stage could be mainly due to the geometry of the feeding system and the backward flow of the mushy zone, respectively. The first stage of solidification could be modified by a better designed feeding system, but the backward flow of mushy zone determined by the properties of metals and casting parameters could be one of the biggest obstacles for commercial production of steel sheets by a twin-roll caster.

  15. Solidification, growth mechanisms, and associated properties of Al-Si and magnesium lightweight casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosch, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Continually rising energy prices have inspired increased interest in weight reduction in the automotive and aerospace industries, opening the door for the widespread use and development of lightweight structural materials. Chief among these materials are cast Al-Si and magnesium-based alloys. Utilization of Al-Si alloys depends on obtaining a modified fibrous microstructure in lieu of the intrinsic flake structure, a process which is incompletely understood. The local solidification conditions, mechanisms, and tensile properties associated with the flake to fiber growth mode transition in Al-Si eutectic alloys are investigated here using bridgman type gradient-zone directional solidification. Resulting microstructures are examined through quantitative image analysis of two-dimensional sections and observation of deep-etched sections showing three-dimensional microstructural features. The transition was found to occur in two stages: an initial stage dominated by in-plane plate breakup and rod formation within the plane of the plate, and a second stage where the onset of out-of-plane silicon rod growth leads to the formation of an irregular fibrous structure. Several microstructural parameters were investigated in an attempt to quantify this transition, and it was found that the particle aspect ratio is effective in objectively identifying the onset and completion velocity of the flake to fiber transition. The appearance of intricate out-of-plane silicon instability formations was investigated by adapting a perturbed-interface stability analysis to the Al-Si system. Measurements of silicon equilibrium shape particles provided an estimate of the anisotropy of the solid Si/liquid Al-Si system and incorporation of this silicon anisotropy into the model was found to improve prediction of the instability length scale. Magnesium alloys share many of the benefits of Al-Si alloys, with the added benefit of a 1/3 lower density and increased machinability. Magnesium castings

  16. Solidification, growth mechanisms, and associated properties of aluminum-silicon and magnesium lightweight casting alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosch, Timothy Al

    Continually rising energy prices have inspired increased interest in weight reduction in the automotive and aerospace industries, opening the door for the widespread use and development of lightweight structural materials. Chief among these materials are cast Al-Si and magnesium-based alloys. Utilization of Al-Si alloys depends on obtaining a modified fibrous microstructure in lieu of the intrinsic flake structure, a process which is incompletely understood. The local solidification conditions, mechanisms, and tensile properties associated with the flake to fiber growth mode transition in Al-Si eutectic alloys are investigated here using bridgman type gradient-zone directional solidification. Resulting microstructures are examined through quantitative image analysis of two-dimensional sections and observation of deep-etched sections showing three-dimensional microstructural features. The transition was found to occur in two stages: an initial stage dominated by in-plane plate breakup and rod formation within the plane of the plate, and a second stage where the onset of out-of-plane silicon rod growth leads to the formation of an irregular fibrous structure. Several microstructural parameters were investigated in an attempt to quantify this transition, and it was found that the particle aspect ratio is effective in objectively identifying the onset and completion velocity of the flake to fiber transition. The appearance of intricate out-of-plane silicon instability formations was investigated by adapting a perturbed-interface stability analysis to the Al-Si system. Measurements of silicon equilibrium shape particles provided an estimate of the anisotropy of the solid Si/liquid Al-Si system and incorporation of this silicon anisotropy into the model was found to improve prediction of the instability length scale. Magnesium alloys share many of the benefits of Al-Si alloys, with the added benefit of a 1/3 lower density and increased machinability. Magnesium castings

  17. Influence of Secondary Cooling Mode on Solidification Structure and Macro-segregation Behavior for High-carbon Continuous Casting Bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Kun; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Qing; Huang, Yunhua; Dong, Hongbiao

    2017-07-01

    A cellular automaton-finite element coupling model for high-carbon continuously cast bloom of GCr15 steel is established to simulate the solidification structure and to investigate the influence of different secondary cooling modes on characteristic parameters such as equiaxed crystal ratio, grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing, in which the effect of phase transformation and electromagnetic stirring is taken into consideration. On this basis, evolution of carbon macro-segregation for GCr15 steel bloom is researched correspondingly via industrial tests. Based on above analysis, the relationship among secondary cooling modes, characteristic parameters for solidification structure as well as carbon macro-segregation is illustrated to obtain optimum secondary cooling strategy and alleviate carbon macro-segregation degree for GCr15 steel bloom in continuous casting process. The evaluating method for element macro-segregation is applicable in various steel types.

  18. Macrotransport-solidification kinetics modeling of equiaxed dendritic growth. Part 2: Computation problems and validation on INCONEL 718 superalloy castings

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M.

    1996-12-01

    In Part 1 of the article, a new analytical model that describes solidification of equiaxed dendrites was presented. In this part of the article, the model is used to simulate the solidification of INCONEL 718 superalloy castings. The model was incorporated into a commercial finite-element code, PROCAST. A special procedure called microlatent heat method (MLHM) was used for coupling between macroscopic heat flow and microscopic growth kinetics. A criterion for time-stepping selection in microscopic modeling has been derived in conjunction with MLHM. Reductions in computational (CPU) time up to 90 pct over the classic latent heat method were found by adopting this coupling. Validation of the model was performed against experimental data for an INCONEL 718 superalloy casting. In the present calculations, the model for globulitic dendrite was used. The evolution of fraction of solid calculated with the present model was compared with Scheil`s model and experiments. An important feature in solidification of INCONEL 718 is the detrimental Laves phase. Laves phase content is directly related to the intensity of microsegregation of niobium, which is very sensitive to the evolution of the fraction of solid. It was found that thee is a critical cooling rate at which the amount of Laves phase is maximum. The critical cooling rate is not a function of material parameters (diffusivity, partition coefficient, etc.). It depends only on the grain size and solidification time. The predictions generated with the present model are shown to agree very well with experiments.

  19. On the effect of natural convection on the thermal-microstructural evolution in gray cast-iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celentano, Diego J.; Cruchaga, Marcela A.; Schulz, Bernd J.

    2006-04-01

    A coupled analysis involving natural convection, thermal balance, and microstructural evolution that take place in the solidification process of a hypoeutectic gray cast iron is presented in this work. The microstructural formulation used in this study includes classical models of primary-austenite and eutectic (gray and white) transformations. The influence of both natural convection and heat-transfer conditions on the thermal-microstructural response is particularly assessed in a simple cylindrical casting system. The evolutions of temperature and different microstructural variables are compared and validated with available experimental measurements.

  20. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The software developed for the solidification model is presented. A link between the calculations and the FORTRAN code is provided, primarily in the form of global flow diagrams and data structures. A complete listing of the solidification code is given.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Hot Tearing in the Solidification of Continuously Cast Round Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, Maria Rita; Fraschetti, Stefano; De Vito, Andrea; Ferro, Luis A.

    2010-12-01

    Billets produced by continuous casting sometimes show the presence of subsurface cracks that can compromise the quality of the final product. The presence of these cracks is revealed by Baumann prints of billet cross sections in which the chill zone is visible and the short radial cracks are located only where the chill zone thickness is thinner. This experimental finding induces the hypothesis that cracks are formed as a result of the presence of unevenness in the mold heat extraction around the billet perimeter. Cracks start to open in the dendritic front in regions where the shell growth in the mold is slower. The study presented in this article focused on steels with a sulfur content of about 300 ppm. The Baumann prints taken from billet samples of numerous different heats allowed detecting the presence of subsurface cracks and their location nearby visible chill zone thinning areas. To understand the mechanisms of crack formation and to define the possible corrections, a modeling activity has been carried out using the finite element technique on 148-mm diameter billets continuously cast at TenarisDalmine (Dalmine, Italy). The model performs a two-dimensional thermomechanical analysis of the solidification in the mold and within about 4 cm below the mold exit, along which the shell surface is cooled only by radiation to the environment, before the sprays of the first ring impact on the strand. The model includes the contact of the shell with the mold inner surface, which moves according to taper and distortion (this last part is calculated by means of a separate mold model); the steel creep behavior; the calculation of the heat transfer through the gap depending on the local mutual distance between the two surfaces; the effect of the liquid steel fluid dynamics on the solidification growth as a result of the temperature distribution; and the calculation of a hot tearing indicator represented by the porosity fraction caused by mechanical strains applied at the

  2. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 1: Formulation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.; Poirier, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The physical and numerical formulation of a model for the horizontal solidification of a binary alloy is described. It can be applied in an ingot. The major purpose of the model is to calculate macrosegregation in a casting ingot which results from flow of interdendritic liquid during solidification. The flow, driven by solidification contractions and by gravity acting on density gradients in the interdendritic liquid, was modeled as flow through a porous medium. The symbols used are defined. The physical formulation of the problem leading to a set of equations which can be used to obtain: (1) the pressure field; (2) the velocity field: (3) mass flow and (4) solute flow in the solid plus liquid zone during solidification is presented. With these established, the model calculates macrosegregation after solidification is complete. The numerical techniques used to obtain solution on a computational grid are presented. Results, evaluation of the results, and recommendations for future development of the model are given. The macrosegregation and flow field predictions for tin-lead, aluminum-copper, and tin-bismuth alloys are included as well as comparisons of some of the predictions with published predictions or with empirical data.

  3. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 3: Operating manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of solidification model 1 is described. Model 1 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The calculation is restricted to steady-state solidification; there is no variation in final local average composition in the direction of isotherm movement. The physics of the model are given.

  4. Combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach for numerical simulation of nodular cast iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, E.; Huang, C.; Jakumeit, J.; Hediger, F.

    2015-06-01

    The ongoing increase in the size and capacity of state-of-the-art wind power plants is highlighting the need to reduce the weight of critical components, such as hubs, main shaft bearing housings, gear box housings and support bases. These components are manufactured as nodular iron castings (spheroid graphite iron, or SGI). A weight reduction of up to 20% is achievable by optimizing the geometry to minimize volume, thus enabling significant downsizing of wind power plants. One method for enhancing quality control in the production of thick-walled SGI castings, and thus reducing tolerances and, consequently, enabling castings of smaller volume is via a casting simulation of mould filling and solidification based on a combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach. Coupled fluid flow with heat transport and phase transformation kinetics during solidification is described by partial differential equations and solved using the finite volume method. The flow of multiple phases is described using a volume of fluid approach. Mass conservation equations are solved separately for both liquid and solid phases. At the micro-level, the diffusion-controlled growth model for grey iron eutectic grains by Wetterfall et al. is combined with a growth model for white iron eutectic grains. The micro-solidification model is coupled with macro-transport equations via source terms in the energy and continuity equations. As a first step the methodology was applied to a simple geometry to investigate the impact of mould-filling on the grey-to-white transition prediction in nodular cast iron.

  5. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-15

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  6. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-01

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  7. Predictive Capabilities of Multiphysics and Multiscale Models in Modeling Solidification of Steel Ingots and DC Casting of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combeau, Hervé; Založnik, Miha; Bedel, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of solidification defects, such as macrosegregation and inhomogeneous microstructures, constitutes a key issue for industry. The development of models of casting processes needs to account for several imbricated length scales and different physical phenomena. For example, the kinetics of the growth of microstructures needs to be coupled with the multiphase flow at the process scale. We introduce such a state-of-the-art model and outline its principles. We present the most recent applications of the model to casting of a heavy steel ingot and to direct chill casting of a large Al alloy sheet ingot. Their ability to help in the understanding of complex phenomena, such as the competition between nucleation and growth of grains in the presence of convection of the liquid and of grain motion is shown, and its predictive capabilities are discussed. Key issues for future developments and research are addressed.

  8. Validated thermodynamic prediction of AlP and eutectic (Si) solidification sequence in Al-Si cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S. M.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.

    2016-03-01

    The eutectic microstructure in hypoeutectic Al-Si cast alloys is strongly influenced by AlP particles which are potent nuclei for the eutectic (Si) phase. The solidification sequence of AlP and (Si) phases is, thus, crucial for the nucleation of eutectic silicon with marked impact on its morphology. This study presents this interdependence between Si- and P-compositions, relevant for Al-Si cast alloys, on the solidification sequence of AlP and (Si). These data are predicted from a series of thermodynamic calculations. The predictions are based on a self-consistent thermodynamic description of the Al-Si-P ternary alloy system developed recently. They are validated by independent experimental studies on microstructure and undercooling in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys. A constrained Scheil solidification simulation technique is applied to predict the undercooling under clean heterogeneous nucleation conditions, validated by dedicated experimental observations on entrained droplets. These specific undercooling values may be very large and their quantitative dependence on Si and P content of the Al alloy is presented.

  9. Influence of gravity acceleration on macrosegregation and macrostructure during the unidirectional solidification of cast binary alloys: A numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.

    1999-02-12

    A comprehensive numerical approach was developed for modeling of macrosegregation during the solidification of cast binary alloy. The model accounts for the competition between dendritic (columnar and equiaxed) and eutectic structures through the use of the solidification-kinetics modeling for fraction of solid evolution. Microsegregation analytical calculations are performed assuming molecular diffusion in both solid and liquid. The coupling between the macroscopic and microscopic calculations is accomplished with the micro-latent heat method. A numerical analysis was performed of the thermosolutal convection effects on macrosegregation and macrostructure (grain structure) during the solidification of a liquid Pb-10 wt.% Sn alloy cooled from below in terrestrial and low-gravity (g) environments. Below 0.01 g, the macrosegregation tendency is insignificant. Freckles, fingers (which are caused by plumes), and channels enriched in Sn as well as isolated pockets poor in Sn develop for 1 g and sufficiently low thermosolutal Rayleigh number. For the simulation conditions used in this work (e.g., high thermal gradients), small effects of the thermosolutal convection on the solidification macrostructure were observed.

  10. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Casting of Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Superalloys by HRS and LMC Directional Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xuewei; Wang, Run'nan; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2017-04-01

    Mathematical models for dynamic heat radiation and convection boundary in directional solidification processes are established to simulate the temperature fields. Cellular automaton (CA) method and Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi (KGT) growth model are used to describe nucleation and growth. Primary dendritic arm spacing (PDAS) and secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS) are calculated by the Ma-Sham (MS) and Furer-Wunderlin (FW) models respectively. The mushy zone shape is investigated based on the temperature fields, for both high-rate solidification (HRS) and liquid metal cooling (LMC) processes. The evolution of the microstructure and crystallographic orientation are analyzed by simulation and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique, respectively. Comparison of the simulation results from PDAS and SDAS with experimental results reveals a good agreement with each other. The results show that LMC process can provide both dendritic refinement and superior performance for castings due to the increased cooling rate and thermal gradient.

  11. Mold Simulator Study on the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel Near the Corner of Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Peisheng; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Haihui

    2017-02-01

    Corner cracks are one of the most widespread surface defects of continuous casting slabs, and they are especially severe for peritectic steels and low-alloy steels. Therefore, a clear understanding of molten steel initial solidification around mold corner would be of great importance for the inhibition of corner cracks. This paper has been conducted with the aim to elucidate this understanding, by using a novel mold simulator equipped with a right-angle copper mold. The responding temperatures and heat fluxes across the mold hot-face and corner were firstly calculated through a 2D-inverse heat conduction program mathematical model, and the results suggested that the cooling ability and the fluctuation of heat fluxes around the mold corner are stronger than those for mold hot-face. With the help of power spectral density analysis and fast Fourier transformation, the four characteristic signals of heat fluxes were discussed in this paper. Next, the relation between the thickness of solidified shell and solidification time was fitted with the solidification square root law; as a result, the average solidification factor bar{K} for the hot-face shell is 2.32 mm/s1/2, and it is 2.77 mm/s1/2 for the shell near-corner. For the same oscillation marks (OMs), it appeared that the OMs positions on the shell corner are lower than those on the shell hot-face along the casting direction, because the stronger shrinkage of shell at the corner allows the overflowing steel to penetrate deeper into the larger gap between the shell corner and mold, which is demonstrated through the heat transfer analysis and metallographic examination. Finally, the interrelation between shell profile, mold oscillation, variation rate of heat flux, high-frequency heat flux and high-frequency temperature was discussed for above two cases, and the results suggested that meniscus conditions (heat transfer and melt flow) around the mold corner are more unsteady.

  12. Preliminary science report on the directional solidification of hypereutectic cast iron during KC-135 low-G maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An ADSS-P directional solidification furnace was reconfigured for operation on the KC-135 low-g aircraft. The system offers many advantages over quench ingot methods for study of the effects of sedimentation and convection on alloy formation. The directional sodification furnace system was first flown during the September 1982 series of flights. The microstructure of the hypereutectic cast iron sample solidified on one of these flights suggests a low-g effect on graphite morphology. Further experiments are needed to ascertain that this effect is due to low-gravity and to deduce which of the possible mechanisms is responsible for it.

  13. Directional solidification of flake and nodular cast iron during KC-135 low-g maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Alloys solidified in a low-gravity environment can, due to the elimination of sedimentation and convection, form unique and often desirable microstructures. One method of studying the effects of low-gravity (low-g) on alloy solidification was the use of the NASA KC-135 aircraft flying repetitive low-g maneuvers. Each maneuver gives from 20 to 30 seconds of low-g which is between about 0.1 and 0.001 gravity. A directional solidification furnace was used to study the behavior of off eutectic composition case irons in a low-g environment. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite case irons was slowly advanced through a rod sample, 5 mm in diameter. Controlled solidification was continued through a number of aircraft parabolas. The known solidification rate of the sample was then correlated with accelerometer data to determine the gravity level during solidification for any location of the sample. The thermal gradient and solidification rate were controlled independently. Samples run on the KC-135 aircraft exhibited bands of coarser graphite or of larger nodules usually corresponding to the regions solidified under low-g. Samples containing high phosphorous (used in order to determine the eutectic cell) exhibited larger eutectic cells in the low-g zone, followed by a band of coarser graphite.

  14. Impact properties of A356-T6 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, S.; Wang, L.; Keller, C.

    1994-02-01

    The Charpy impact energy of A356 alloys has been measured. Instrumented Charpy impact tests have been conducted at 25,100,150, and 200 °C. The Charpy specimens were machined from plate castings ortapered cylindrical castings. The plates were produced in sand molds, and tapered cylinders were produced in water-cooled copper molds. Both unmodified and strontium-modified castings were tested. The results indicate that strontium modification improves the impact properties of sand and permanent mold castings. The impact energy increases with solution treatment time. Strontium modification reduces the solution treatment time for attaining a specific impact property level in the casting.

  15. A356 Reinforced with Nanoparticles: Numerical Analysis of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazahery, Ali; Shabani, Mohsen Ostad

    2012-02-01

    Commercial casting Al-Si (A356)-based composites reinforced with different volume fractions of alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticulates (average particle size 50 nm) were synthesized in this study. Particle distribution, hardness, and tensile properties in the as-cast condition were experimentally investigated. The A356 alloy composite showed an increase in hardness, elastic modulus, and tensile strength compared with monolithic alloys. Finally, a combination of an artificial neural network and the finite element method (FEM) was implemented to predict the microstructure and mechanical properties including grain size, length of silicon rods, amount of porosity, hardness, tensile yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and elongation percentage.

  16. Determination for the Entrapment Criterion of Non-metallic Inclusions by the Solidification Front During Steel Centrifugal Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the three-dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification in steel centrifugal continuous casting strands were simulated. The volume of fluid model was used to solve the multiphase phenomena between the molten steel and the air. The entrapment and final distribution of inclusions in the solidified shell were studied with the discussion on the effect of rotation behavior of the caster system. Main results indicate that after applying the rotation of the shell, the fluid flow transformed from a recirculation flow to a rotation flow in the mold region and was driven to flow around in the casting direction. As the distance below the meniscus increased, the distribution of the tangential speed of the flow and the centrifugal force along one diameter of the strand became symmetrical gradually. The jet flow from the nozzle hardly impinged on the same location on the shell due to the rotation of the shell during solidification. Thus, the shell thickness on the same height was uniform around, and the thinning shell and a hot spot on the surface of shell were avoided. Both of the measurement and the calculation about the distribution of oxide inclusions along the radial direction indicated the number of inclusions at the side and the center was more than that at the quarter on the cross section of billet. With a larger diameter, inclusions tended to be entrapped toward the center area of the billet.

  17. Analysis of the solidification and deformation behaviors of twin roll cast Mg-6Al-X alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Jun; Jung, Hwa Chul; Shin, Kwang Seon

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the solidification and deformation behaviors in twin roll cast (TRC) Mg-6Al-X alloys have been investigated. The TRC simulation results showed that the AX60 alloy tended to have lower segregation while the AZ60 had the highest segregation due to the different solidification behavior and thermal properties. Compared to the as-cast microstructure, the segregation area was well matched with the melt to roll nip distance predicted in simulation. Mg alloys with Ca or Sr elements showed weaker textures when compared to A6 alloys rolled at 350 °C. In addition, there was a significant change in (0002) pole figures from strong basal textures to random textures when the rolling temperature increased from 350 °C to 450 °C. This may be attributed to the non-basal slip system activity at high temperatures. The results of visco-plastic self-consistent simulation revealed that critical resolved shear stress of the tension twin increased with increasing rolling temperature. This led to tension twin suppression in compression, which were associated with enhancing the yield isotropy of Mg alloys. Furthermore, the relative activities of basal slip in AX60 alloy were higher than the other Mg alloys. This means they were responsible for enhancing the formability and yield isotropy of Mg alloys.

  18. Casting-chill interface heat transfer during solidification of an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, E.; Cano, S.; Valtierra, S.; Mojica, J.F.; Talamantes, J.; Colas, R.

    1999-08-01

    Unidirectional solidification tests on an aluminum alloy were conducted with a computer-controlled instrumented rig. The alloys employed in this study were poured into isolated ingot molds (made of recrystallized alumina and covered with ceramic fiber) placed on top of a steel plate, coated either with a graphite- or ceramic-based paint in order to avoid sticking or the material. Thermal evolution during the test was captured by type-K thermocouples placed at different positions in both the ingot and the plate. The bottom surface of the plate was either cooled with water or left to cool in air. The heat-transfer coefficients across the aluminum-steel interface were evaluated by means of a finite-difference model. It was concluded that the heat-transfer rate depends on the conditions at the interface, such as the type of coating used to protect the plate, and the solidification reactions occurring on the aluminum during its solidification.

  19. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-01-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  20. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-04-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  1. Numerical simulation of the solidification processes of copper during vacuum continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, D. C.; Hwang, W. S.

    2012-03-01

    A numerical simulation method is used to analyze the microstructure evolution of 8-mm-diameter copper rods during the vacuum continuous casting (VCC) process. The macro-microscopic coupling method is adopted to develop a temperature field model and a microstructure prediction model. The effects of casting parameters, including casting speed, pouring temperature, cooling rate, and casting dimension on the location and shape of the solid-liquid (S/L) interface and solidified microstructure are considered. Simulation results show that the casting speed has a large effect on the position and shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology. With an increase of casting speed, the shape of the S/L interface changes from a planar shape into an elliptical shape or a narrow, pear shape, and the grain morphology indicates a change from axial growth to axial-radial growth or completely radial growth. The simulation predictions agree well with the microstructure observations of cast specimens. Further analysis of the effects of other casting parameters on the position and shape of the S/L interface reveals that the casting dimension has more influence on the position and shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology than do pouring temperature and cooling rate. The simulation results can be summarized to obtain a discriminant of shape factor (η), which defines the shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology.

  2. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  3. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  4. The Through Process Simulation of Mold filling, Solidification, and Heat Treatment of the Al Alloy Bending Beam Low-pressure Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yajun; Zhou, Jianxin; Guo, Zhao; Wang, Huan; Liao, Dunming; Chen, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The research on the simulation for the through process of low-pressure casting and heat treatment is conducive to combine information technology and advanced casting technology, which will help to predict the defects and mechanical properties of the castings in the through process. In this paper, we focus on the simulation for through process of low-pressure casting and heat treatment of ZL114A Bending beam. Firstly, we analyzethe distribution of the shrinkage and porosities in filling and solidification process, and simulate the distribution of stress and strain in the late solidification of casting. Then, the numerical simulation of heat treatment process for ZL114A Bending beam is realized according to the heat treatment parameters and the corresponding simulation results of temperature field, stress, strain, and aging performance are given. Finally, we verify that simulation platform for the through process of low-pressure casting and heat treatment can serve the production practice perfectly and provide technical guidance and process optimization for the through process of low-pressure casting and heat treatment.

  5. Industrial application of a numerical model to simulate lubrication, mould oscillation, solidification and defect formation during continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Lopez, Pavel E.; Sjöström, Ulf; Jonsson, Thomas; Lee, Peter D.; Mills, Kenneth C.; Petäjäjärvi, Marko; Pirinen, Jarno

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, the addition of the slag phase to numerical models of the Continuous Casting (CC) process has opened the door to a whole new range of predictions. These include the estimation of slag infiltration and powder consumption (lubrication), heat transfer and cooling through the cooper mould (solidification) and investigating the effect of operational parameters such as mould oscillation and powder composition on surface quality / defect formation. This work presents 2D and 3D CC models capable of describing the dynamic behaviour of the liquid/solid slag in both the shell mould-gap and bed as well as its effects on heat extraction and shell formation. The present paper also illustrates the application of the model to a variety of casters and the challenges faced during its implementation. The model attained good agreement on the prediction of mould temperatures and shell thicknesses as well as slag film formation and heat flux variations during the casting sequence. The effect of different oscillation strategies (sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal) was explored in order to enhance powder consumption and surface quality. Furthermore, the modelling approach allows one to predict the conditions leading to irregular shell growth and uneven lubrication; these are responsible for defects such as, stickers, cracking and, in the worst case scenario, to breakouts. Possible mechanisms for defect formation are presented together with strategies to enhance process stability and productivity of the CC machine.

  6. The Influence of ScF3 Nanoparticles on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of New Metal Matrix Composites Based on A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.; Zhukov, I.; Promakhov, V.; Naydenkin, E.; Khrustalyov, A.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of the aerospace and automotive industries demands the development of aluminum alloys and composites reinforced with new nanoparticles. In this work, metal matrix composites (MMC) with an A356 aluminum alloy matrix reinforced with 0.2 wt.% and 1 wt.% of ScF3 nanoparticles were produced by ultrasonic dispersion of nanoparticles in the melt followed by casting in a metallic mold. Structure as well as physical and mechanical properties of the cast samples were examined using electron and optical microscopy, hardness and tensile testing. It is shown that nanoparticles clusters are formed during the solidification at grain boundaries and silicon inclusions. Increasing nanoparticles content significantly reduced the grain size in the MMC and increased the mechanical properties—ultimate tensile strength, elongation and hardness. The contribution of different strengthening mechanisms is discussed. It is suggested that the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the nanoparticles ScF3 and the aluminum matrix is a dominant strengthening mechanism.

  7. Numerical modeling of solidification morphologies and segregation patterns in cast dendritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.

    1999-11-26

    A comprehensive stochastic model for simulating the evolution of dendritic crystals during the solidification of binary alloys was developed. The model includes time-dependent calculations for temperature distribution, solute redistribution in the liquid and solid phases, curvature, and growth anisotropy without further assumptions on the nucleation and growth of dendritic crystals. Stochastic procedures previously developed by Nastac and Stefanescu for simulating dendritic grains were used to control the nucleation and growth of dendrites. A numerical algorithm based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach was developed to explicitly track the sharp solid/liquid (S/L) interface on a fixed Cartesian grid. Two-dimensional mesoscopic calculations (i.e., at the dendrite tip length scale) were performed to simulate the evolution of columnar and equiaxed dendritic morphologies including the formation of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition. The effects of solutal and curvature undercoolings on the evolution of both the dendrite morphology and segregation patterns during the solidification of binary alloys were analyzed in detail.

  8. Elaboration of AlSi10Mg casting alloys using directional solidification processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghedjati, Khadoudja; Fleury, Eric; Hamani, Mohamed Seghir; Benchiheub, Mostefa; Bouacha, Khaider; Bolle, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    The effects of pulling velocity on the solidification behavior and microstructural parameters of AlSi10Mg alloys prepared in a Bridgman-type directional solidification furnace were investigated. The microstructure, particularly the secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS), and the Brinell hardness (BH) of the solidified AlSi10Mg alloys were characterized for samples with cylindrical shapes and different conicities ( θ = 0°, 5°, and 10°). Microstructural studies revealed an increased density of α-Al phase dendrites and a decreased interdendritic distance with increasing pulling velocity. The dendrites were found to be preferentially oriented along the pulling direction for low pulling velocities. For larger pulling velocities, the dendrites grew first in the cooling direction but then broke as others nucleated and coarsened. The HB values of the solidified samples increased as the pulling velocity increased. In regard to sample conicity, smaller dendrites were observed for an apex angle of θ = 5°, resulting in the largest HB value. This result was interpreted in terms of the favorable orientation of the dendrite along the pulling direction.

  9. Mold Simulator Study of Heat Transfer Phenomenon During the Initial Solidification in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, mold simulator trials were firstly carried out to study the phenomena of the initial shell solidification of molten steel and the heat transfer across the initial shell to the infiltrated mold/shell slag film and mold. Second, a one-dimensional inverse heat transfer problem for solidification (1DITPS) was built to determine the temperature distribution and the heat transfer behavior through the solidifying shell from the measured shell thickness. Third, the mold wall temperature field was recovered by a 2DIHCP mathematical model from the measured in-mold wall temperatures. Finally, coupled with the measured slag film thickness and the calculations of 1DITPS and 2DIHCP, the thermal resistance and the thickness of liquid slag film in the vicinity of the meniscus were evaluated. The experiment results show that: the total mold/shell thermal resistance, the mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, the liquid film thermal resistance, and the solid film thermal resistance is 8.0 to 14.9 × 10-4, 2.7 to 4.8 × 10-4, 1.5 to 4.6 × 10-4, and 3.9 to 6.8 × 10-4 m2 K/W, respectively. The percentage of mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, liquid film thermal resistance, and solid film thermal resistance over the total mold/shell thermal resistance is 27.5 to 34.4, 17.2 to 34.0, and 38.5 to 48.8 pct, respectively. The ratio of radiation heat flux is around 14.1 to 51.9 pct in the liquid slag film.

  10. Mold Simulator Study of Heat Transfer Phenomenon During the Initial Solidification in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, mold simulator trials were firstly carried out to study the phenomena of the initial shell solidification of molten steel and the heat transfer across the initial shell to the infiltrated mold/shell slag film and mold. Second, a one-dimensional inverse heat transfer problem for solidification (1DITPS) was built to determine the temperature distribution and the heat transfer behavior through the solidifying shell from the measured shell thickness. Third, the mold wall temperature field was recovered by a 2DIHCP mathematical model from the measured in-mold wall temperatures. Finally, coupled with the measured slag film thickness and the calculations of 1DITPS and 2DIHCP, the thermal resistance and the thickness of liquid slag film in the vicinity of the meniscus were evaluated. The experiment results show that: the total mold/shell thermal resistance, the mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, the liquid film thermal resistance, and the solid film thermal resistance is 8.0 to 14.9 × 10-4, 2.7 to 4.8 × 10-4, 1.5 to 4.6 × 10-4, and 3.9 to 6.8 × 10-4 m2 K/W, respectively. The percentage of mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, liquid film thermal resistance, and solid film thermal resistance over the total mold/shell thermal resistance is 27.5 to 34.4, 17.2 to 34.0, and 38.5 to 48.8 pct, respectively. The ratio of radiation heat flux is around 14.1 to 51.9 pct in the liquid slag film.

  11. Bonding of Aluminum Alloys in Compound Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian; Ye, Bing; Zuo, Lijie; Wang, Qudong; Wang, Qigui; Jiang, Haiyan; Ding, Wenjiang

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the coating materials, coating thickness, and casting process on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of the overcast A6061 bars with aluminum A356 and A6061 alloys was studied by OM, SEM/EDS, and mechanical testing. Results indicate that Ni coating has better thermal stability than Cu coating that heavily reacts with liquid Al alloy and forms a reaction zone around 130-150 μm during gravity casting. In the gravity casting, coarse and cracked Al3Ni phase distributes along the interfacial region and degrades the mechanical properties of the overcast joints. In squeeze casting, however, fine and dispersed Ni-rich strengthening phases form uniformly in the interfacial zone and improve the metallurgical bonding of the joints. The heat transition and application of pressure during solidification are two key factors in determining the integrity and mechanical properties of the overcast joints.

  12. Monitoring of solidification in the continuous casting mold by temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyszko, René; Příhoda, Miroslav; Čarnogurská, Mária

    2016-06-01

    Defects of continuously cast strand, such as unevenness of shell thickness or cracks as well as unstable casting parameters result in changes of strand surface temperature which affect heat flux and temperature field in the mold wall. Methods based on the principle of measurement and mathematical processing of temperatures in the mold wall are used for the purposes of diagnostics of the shell formation process, prediction of surface and subsurface quality and breakout danger, adjustment of the casting axis or condition monitoring of the oscillating mechanism. Measured values of temperatures in the wall depend on the exact position of the sensor in the wall, especially in the normal direction to the mold working surface. Ensuring the accurate and constant distance between the sensor and the mold surface is technically demanding; therefore it is necessary to correct the measured temperatures mathematically. The article describes two methods for correcting the measured temperatures, based on physical and statistical principles that have been developed and used in a real diagnostics system. Practical applications of the methods for diagnostics of strand surface quality and breakout prediction are presented.

  13. Preventing solidification defects in large superalloy castings used in advanced electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes Ortiz, Jairo Antonio

    solidification reaction to depart from the equilibrium model and being closer to the Scheil model. The minimization of the error function defined from the Scheil equation was found to be an appropriate method for describing the segregation profiles of the quenched samples and permitted good estimations of the partition coefficients of the solute elements. A criterion for freckling prediction that includes the effect of tilted solidification front was proposed. The form includes the effect of the tilt angle by preserving the anisotropic nature of the permeability tensor throughout the derivation and uses Poirier's experimentally determined functional forms for the parallel and perpendicular components. The proposed form of Rayleigh number criterion was found to provide better resolution when evaluated against available experimental data in the literature. Especially, it showed that the nucleation of channels in the mushy layer leading to freckles is equally probable in the proximity of the tips of the dendrites or deeper in the mushy layer, for example at approximately 0.7 liquid fraction and 0.4 liquid fraction respectively, depending on the angle of tilt of the solidification front.

  14. Effect of Solidification Behavior on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Ni-Cr-Fe Superalloy Investment Casting.

    PubMed

    Kang, Maodong; Wang, Jun; Gao, Haiyan; Han, Yanfeng; Wang, Guoxiang; He, Shuxian

    2017-03-01

    The effect of solidification behavior on the microstructures and mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-Fe superalloy investment casting is given. Metallographic and image analysis have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructures' evolution. For the parts with the thickness of 3 mm and 24 mm, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of the Laves phase increases from 0.3% to 1.2%, from 11.7 μm to 23.4 μm, respectively. Meanwhile, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of carbides increase from 0.3% to 0.5%, from 8.1 μm to 9.9 μm, respectively. In addition, the volume fraction of microporosity increases from 0.3% to 2.7%. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength is reduced from 1125.5 MPa to 820.9 MPa, the elongation from 13.3% to 7.7%, and the quality index from 1294.2 MPa to 954.0 MPa, respectively. A typical brittle fracture is observed on the tensile fracture. As the cooling rate decreases, the microstructures become coarser.

  15. Effect of Solidification Behavior on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Ni-Cr-Fe Superalloy Investment Casting

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Maodong; Wang, Jun; Gao, Haiyan; Han, Yanfeng; Wang, Guoxiang; He, Shuxian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of solidification behavior on the microstructures and mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-Fe superalloy investment casting is given. Metallographic and image analysis have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructures’ evolution. For the parts with the thickness of 3 mm and 24 mm, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of the Laves phase increases from 0.3% to 1.2%, from 11.7 μm to 23.4 μm, respectively. Meanwhile, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of carbides increase from 0.3% to 0.5%, from 8.1 μm to 9.9 μm, respectively. In addition, the volume fraction of microporosity increases from 0.3% to 2.7%. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength is reduced from 1125.5 MPa to 820.9 MPa, the elongation from 13.3% to 7.7%, and the quality index from 1294.2 MPa to 954.0 MPa, respectively. A typical brittle fracture is observed on the tensile fracture. As the cooling rate decreases, the microstructures become coarser. PMID:28772611

  16. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification During the Twin-Roll Continuous Casting of Steel and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2016-02-01

    The commercialization of aluminum twin-roll casting was realized in the early 1950s, while it is still a dream for engineers to produce steel strip by this process. In the present paper, a two-dimensional mathematical model is employed to study the fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification during the twin-roll casting for both steel and aluminum. The turbulent flow in the pool is examined using the Lam and Bremhorst low-Reynolds-number turbulence model. In order to facilitate the comparison and analysis, a new transformed coordinate system ( r, φ) is established. Characteristics of the momentum boundary layer and the solidification front are described. Reasons of the formation of the wedge-shaped zone near the surface of rotating roll are given. In the transformed coordinate system ( r, φ), the effect of the centrifugal force induced by the rotating roll is presented using the velocity component in the r direction and the pressure gradient in the r direction. At last, the evaluation of the solidified shell in the pool is analyzed. The results show that the twin-roll casting is a roll-rotating-driven process. The variation of the thickness of the momentum boundary layer can be divided into three stages and its thickness is very uniform at the last stage. Near the roll surface, there exists a wedge-shaped zone induced by the near-roll-surface shear flow that washes the mushy zone front, which increases the depth of the liquid pool and decreases the length of the rolling region. The rotating roll gives rise to the stirring effect to the pool region and the metal is moving away from the roll surface in the positive radial velocity region, and the effect of the centrifugal force becomes weak in the lower part of the pool. At the solidification front, the non-dimensional effective heat transfer coefficient distribution in steel twin-roll casting is larger than that in aluminum twin-roll casting. Considering that the turbulence level is determined by the flow

  17. Prediction of ALLOY SHRINKAGE FACTORS FOR THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of alloy shrinkage factors (SFs) related to the investment casting process. The dimensions of the A356 aluminum alloy casting were determined from the numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and deformation phenomena. The investment casting process was carried out using wax patterns of unfilled wax and shell molds that were made of fused silica with a zircon prime coat. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured, in order to determine the actual tooling allowances. Several numerical simulations were carried out, to assess the level of accuracy for the casting shrinkage. The solid fraction threshold, at which the transition from the fluid dynamics to the solid dynamics occurs, was found to be important in predicting shrinkage factors (SFs). It was found that accurate predictions were obtained for all measued dimensions when the shell mold was considered a deformable material.

  18. Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles during Ultrasonic Processing of A356-based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojie; Nastac, Laurentiu

    The metal-matrix-nano-composite in this study consist of a A356 alloy matrix reinforced with 1.0 wt.% SiC-nanoparticles dispersed within the matrix via ultrasonic cavitation system, available in the Solidification Laboratory at The University of Alabama. The required ultrasonic parameters to achieve cavitation for adequate degassing and refining of the A356 alloy as well as the fluid flow and solidification characteristics for uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles into the aluminum alloy matrix are being investigated via CFD ultrasonic cavitation modeling. The multiphase CFD model for nanoparticle dispersion accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification as well as the complex interaction between the molten alloy and nanoparticles by using the Ansys's Fluent DDPM model. The modeling parametric study includes the effects of ultrasonic probe location, the fluid flow intensity, and the initial location where the nanoparticles are released into the molten alloy.

  19. Experimental and Mathematical Procedure for Characterization of the Thermal Profile in a Quasi-Unidirectional Solidification Aluminum Alloy AA354 Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Bruno; Santos, Henrique

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the authors show how to build a semi-industrial scale macrothermal analysis experimental apparatus for low-pressure aluminum casting AA354 with quasi-unidirectional solidification. Several thermocouples were connected to a multichannel electronic device allowing a sampling rate up to 10 Hz; the thermocouples were installed in the mold at different locations to acquire the discontinuous cooling curves at those same locations. With this type of experiment and appropriate mathematical procedures, it was possible to build a reasonable response surface T = f( x,t) and the respective derivatives: partial T/partial t and partial T/partial x. Exponential polynomials were applied for modeling the curves and linear interpolation to relate the several cooling curves. Mathematical tools applied to the modeled curves allowed the authors to identify different solidification events and correlate them with the specific thermal gradient and cooling conditions.

  20. Solidification modeling: Status and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantzig, J. A.

    2000-12-01

    Solidification modeling is a complex and highly advanced field. This article examines the state of the art in solidification modeling, including physical phenomena of solidification such as heat extraction, transport processes within a casting, and dimensional changes in the casting and mold during solidification. Also examined are current efforts to model these phenomena and the strengths and weaknesses of these efforts. Finally, obstacles to solidification modeling, such as speed and cost of the process, are considered, along with the likelihood those obstacles will be overcome.

  1. The Effects of Molding Materials on Microstructure and Wear Behavior of A356 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Musa; Özyürek, Dursun; Tunçay, Tansel

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the effect of molding materials on microstructure and wear behavior of A356 alloy was investigated. Different microstructures were obtained by casting A356 alloy into the molds made from three different materials. Homogenization and aging heat treatments were applied as cast blocks. The aged samples were tested by pin-on-disk-type standard wear equipment. The results showed that casting into different mold materials resulted in different microstructures of A356 alloy. Microstructures of the Al-Si-Mg alloy differ depending on the mold materials. Secondary dendrite arm space (SDAS) decreased proportionally with increasing cooling rate. Based on the cooling rate, hardness values of the alloy also differ. As the cooling rate increased, hardness of the alloy increased. The SDAS increased due to the decreasing cooling rate. In wear tests, increasing weight loss was observed with decreasing cooling rate.

  2. Grain Refiner Effect on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of the A356 Automotive Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-De la Torre, E.; Afeltra, U.; Gómez-Esparza, C. D.; Camarillo-Cisneros, J.; Pérez-Bustamante, R.; Martínez-Sánchez, R.

    2013-12-01

    A356 aluminum alloy automotive wheels, 17 inch in diameter, were produced by low-pressure die casting. Contents of Al-5Ti-B (ATB) master alloy were added from 0 to 0.79 wt.%. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated under industrial casting process conditions. The obtained results from mechanical testing provide evidence that additions of 0.13 and 0.27 wt.% of ATB have an improvement on the mechanical performance of the automotive wheels. This can be compared with the use of a grain refiner's higher concentrations, leading to a significant reduction in the cost-benefit ratio for the manufacturing of A356 automotive wheels.

  3. Parabolic aircraft solidification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Susan

    1996-01-01

    A number of solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental environment which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Two techniques of interest are directional solidification and isothermal casting. Because of the wide-spread use of these experimental techniques in space-based research, several MSAD experiments have been manifested for space flight. In addition to the microstructural analysis for interpretation of the experimental results from previous work with parabolic flights, it has become apparent that a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible. Our university has performed in several experimental studies such as this in recent years. The most recent was in visualizing the effect of convective flow phenomena on the KC-135 and prior to that were several successive contracts to perform directional solidification and isothermal casting experiments on the KC-135. Included in this work was the modification and utilization of the Convective Flow Analyzer (CFA), the Aircraft Isothermal Casting Furnace (ICF), and the Three-Zone Directional Solidification Furnace. These studies have contributed heavily to the mission of the Microgravity Science and Applications' Materials Science Program.

  4. Modeling of interdendritic porosity defects in an integrated computational materials engineering approach for metal casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.

    2016-04-22

    Modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components in order to accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys. The data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. Here in this paper, the required models for the prediction of interdendritic casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Numerical simulation results for microporosity are presented for A356, 356 and 319 aluminum alloys using ProCASTTM software. The calculated pressure drop of the interdendritic liquid was observed to be quite significant and the regions of high-pressure drop can be used as an indicator of the severity of interdendritic microporosity defects.

  5. Modeling of interdendritic porosity defects in an integrated computational materials engineering approach for metal casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.

    2016-04-22

    Modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components in order to accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys. The data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. Here in this paper, the required models for the prediction of interdendritic casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Numerical simulation results for microporosity are presented for A356, 356 and 319 aluminum alloys using ProCASTTM software. The calculated pressure drop of the interdendritic liquid was observed to be quite significant and the regions of high-pressure drop can be used as an indicator of the severity of interdendritic microporosity defects.

  6. Factors Affecting the Nucleation Kinetics of Microporosity Formation in Aluminum Alloy A356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Reilly, Carl; Zhu, Jindong

    2012-03-01

    Metal cleanliness is one of the most critical parameters affecting microporosity formation in aluminum alloy castings. It is generally acknowledged that oxide inclusions in the melt promote microporosity formation by facilitating pore nucleation. In this study, microporosity formation under different casting conditions, which aimed to manipulate the tendency to form and entrain oxide films in small directionally cast A356 samples was investigated. Castings were prepared with and without the aid of argon gas shielding and with a varying pour surface area. Two alloy variants of A356 were tested in which the main difference was Sr content. Porous disc filtration analysis was used to assess the melt cleanliness and identify the inclusions in the castings. The porosity volume fraction and size distribution were measured using X-ray micro-tomography analysis. The measurements show a clear increment in the volume fraction, number density, and pore size in a manner consistent with an increasing tendency to form and entrain oxide films during casting. By fitting the experimental results with a comprehensive pore formation model, an estimate of the pore nucleation population has been made. The model predicts that increasing the tendency to form oxide films increases both the number of nucleation sites and reduces the supersaturation necessary for pore nucleation in A356 castings. Based on the model predictions, Sr modification impacts both the nucleation kinetics and the pore growth kinetics via grain structure.

  7. Elemental segregation and subsequent precipitation during solidification of continuous cast Nb–V–Ti high-strength low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Shuguo; Davis, Claire; Strangwood, Martin

    2014-09-15

    In this study, elemental segregation during solidification and subsequent precipitation behaviour in a continuous cast Nb–V–Ti high-strength low-alloy steel was investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermodynamic modelling. It is known that for steels with low carbon contents the pearlite that forms on slow cooling does so where the interdendritic liquid was present prior to final solidification. The alloying elements of Nb, Ti, Mn and V segregate into the interdendritic liquid during solidification, while Al preferentially segregates into the solidifying solid phase. The composition analysis on the slab samples verified the predicted element segregation behaviour, with a smaller difference in the concentrations of Mn and V in the pearlite and dendritic ferrite regions being observed compared to the Nb levels. Small (30–100 nm) spherical or irregular shaped Nb-rich precipitates (Nb(C, N) and (Nb, V)(C, N)) were mainly found in the pearlite regions, while angular Al-rich (60–300 nm) precipitates were found in the dendritic ferrite regions, in the form of AlN and complex AlN–V(C, N) precipitates. Small isolated ferrite regions surrounded by pearlite were observed in the microstructure and has two origins: one type is dendritic ferrite that appears as an isolated island due to a sectioning effect when observing the two-dimensional microstructure; the other is a ferrite idiomorph that forms in the interdendritic region due to the low carbon content of the steel. Accordingly, in these isolated ferrite islands two different precipitation behaviours are found; predominantly Al-rich particles in the dendritic regions or predominantly Nb-rich precipitates in the interdendritic ferrite idiomorphs. No Al-rich precipitates were observed in the interdendritic regions (pearlite or isolated ferrite idiomorphs) despite the Thermo-Calc predictions indicating a higher volume fraction of AlN in these

  8. Microstructures and superplastic behavior of eutectic Fe-C and Ni-Cr white cast irons produced by rapid solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, D. W.; Frommeyer, G.; Grant, N. J.; Sherby, O. D.

    1987-10-01

    Superplastic behavior of two commercial grade white cast irons, eutectic Fe-C and Ni-Cr white cast irons, was investigated at intermediate temperatures (650 to 750 °C). For this purpose, rapidly solidified powders of the cast irons were fully consolidated by compaction and rolling at about 650 °C. The volume fractions of cementite in the eutectic cast iron and in the Ni-Cr cast iron were 64 pct and 51 pct, respectively, and both cast irons consisted of fine equiaxed grains of cementite (1 to 2 μm) and ferrite (0.5 to 2 μm). The cast iron compacts exhibited high strain-rate sensitivity (strain-rate-sensitivity exponent of 0.35 to 0.46) and high tensile ductility (total elongation of 150 pct to 210 pct) at strain rates of 10-4 to 10-3 s-1 and at 650 °C to 750 °C. Microstructure evaluations were made by TEM, SEM, and optical microscopy methods. The equiaxed grains in the as-compacted samples remained unchanged even after large tensile deformation. It is concluded that grain boundary sliding ( e.g., along cementite grain boundaries in the case of the eutectic cast iron) is the principal mode of plastic deformation in both cast irons during superplastic testing conditions.

  9. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  10. The New Heat Treatment Technology of A356 Aluminium Alloy Prepared by Ptc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianyong; Jiang, Yanhua; Ma, Zhuang; Wang, Wenkui

    Phase Transition Cooling (PTC), using the absorbed latent heat during the melting of phase transition cooling medium to cool and solidify alloys in the process of casting, is a new casting technology. Specimens of A356 casting aluminum alloy were prepared by this method in the paper. The new heat treatment process (cast and then aging directly without solid solution) of A356 alloy was performed. For comparison, the conventional T6 heat treatment (solution and then aging treatment) was performed too. The mechanical properties of A356 alloy with different heat treatments were measured by tensile strength testing methods and microstructures of the alloy with different heat treatment process were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) too. The results show that ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of A356 alloy with the new heat treatment process is much higher than that with conventional heat treatment while the elongations with the two heat treatment processes are very close. This is due to the grain refinement obtained after PTC processing.

  11. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  12. Numerical simulation of the solidification microstructure of a 17-4PH stainless steel investment casting and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You Yun; Tsai, DeChang; Hwang, Weng Sing

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique of numerically simulating the microstructure of 17-4PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel during investment casting. A cellular automation (CA) algorithm was adopted to simulate the nucleation and grain growth. First a calibration casting was made, and then by comparing the microstructures of the calibration casting with those simulated using different kinetic growth coefficients (a2, a3) in CA, the most appropriate set of values for a2 and a3 would be obtained. Then, this set of values was applied to the microstructure simulation of a separate casting, where the casting was actually made. Through this approach, this study has arrived at a set of growth kinetic coefficients from the calibration casting: a2 is 2.9 × 10-5, a3 is 1.49 × 10-7, which is then used to predict the microstructure of the other test casting. Consequently, a good correlation has been found between the microstructure of actual 17-4PH casting and the simulation result.

  13. Solid fraction evolution characteristics of semi-solid A356 alloy and in-situ A356-TiB2 composites investigated by differential thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak Kumar, S.; Mandal, A.; Chakraborty, M.

    2015-04-01

    The key factor in semi-solid metal processing is the solid fraction at the forming temperature because it affects the microstructure and mechanical properties of the thixoformed components. Though an enormous amount of data exists on the solid fraction-temperature relationship in A356 alloy, information regarding the solid fraction evolution characteristics of A356-TiB2 composites is scarce. The present article establishes the temperature-solid fraction correlation in A356 alloy and A356- xTiB2 ( x = 2.5wt% and 5wt%) composites using differential thermal analysis (DTA). The DTA results indicate that the solidification characteristics of the composites exhibited a variation of 2°C and 3°C in liquidus temperatures and a variation of 3°C and 5°C in solidus temperatures with respect to the base alloy. Moreover, the eutectic growth temperature and the solid fraction ( f s) vs. temperature characteristics of the composites were found to be higher than those of the base alloy. The investigation revealed that in-situ formed TiB2 particles in the molten metal introduced more nucleation sites and reduced undercooling.

  14. Modeling of Microporosity Size Distribution in Aluminum Alloy A356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Zhu, Jindong; Reilly, Carl

    2011-12-01

    Porosity is one of the most common defects to degrade the mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Prediction of pore size, therefore, is critical to optimize the quality of castings. Moreover, to the design engineer, knowledge of the inherent pore population in a casting is essential to avoid potential fatigue failure of the component. In this work, the size distribution of the porosity was modeled based on the assumptions that the hydrogen pores are nucleated heterogeneously and that the nucleation site distribution is a Gaussian function of hydrogen supersaturation in the melt. The pore growth is simulated as a hydrogen-diffusion-controlled process, which is driven by the hydrogen concentration gradient at the pore liquid interface. Directionally solidified A356 (Al-7Si-0.3Mg) alloy castings were used to evaluate the predictive capability of the proposed model. The cast pore volume fraction and size distributions were measured using X-ray microtomography (XMT). Comparison of the experimental and simulation results showed that good agreement could be obtained in terms of both porosity fraction and size distribution. The model can effectively evaluate the effect of hydrogen content, heterogeneous pore nucleation population, cooling conditions, and degassing time on microporosity formation.

  15. Solidification of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumanth, G. S.; Irons, G. A.

    1996-08-01

    The solidification behavior of ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is different from that of the bare matrix, not only because of the presence of the ceramic particles, but also due to their redistribution in the melt that results in nonhomogeneous thermophysical properties. The MMCs comprised of 10-to 15-μm SiC particles of varying volume fractions, dispersed uniformly in a modified aluminum A356 alloy by the melt stirring technique, were solidified unidirectionally in a thermocouple-instrumented cylindrical steel mold. The cooling rates were continually monitored by measuring temperatures at different depths in the melt, and the solidified MMCs were sectioned into disks and chemically analyzed for SiC volume fraction. The results point out that the cooling rate increased with increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. A small increase in the bulk SiC volume fraction of the cast MMC was observed due to particle settling during solidification. A one-dimensional enthalpy model of MMC solidification was formulated, wherein particle settling occurring in the solidifying matrix was coupled to the enthalpy equation by means of the Richardson-Zaki hindered settling correlation. A comparative study of simulations with experiments suggested that the thermal response of SiC particles used in this study was similar to that of single crystals, and their presence increased the effective thermal conductivity of the composite.

  16. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm × 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  17. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  18. Comparison of Uniform and Non-uniform Water Flux Density Approaches Applied on a Mathematical Model of Heat Transfer and Solidification for a Continuous Casting of Round Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assuncao, Charles Sostenes; Tavares, Roberto Parreiras; Oliveira, Guilherme; Pereira, Luiz Carlos

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the water flux densities of nozzles with flat jet and full cone jet were experimentally measured using an apparatus in industrial scale that reproduces the secondary cooling of the continuous casting of round billets of Vallourec Tubos do Brasil. A mathematical function was defined to express the water flux density in both longitudinal and angular directions of the strand. A mathematical model for heat transfer and solidification for the continuous casting of round billets was developed applying the experimental water flux density profile, establishing a non-uniform water distribution approach. The mathematical model was validated by experimental measurements of the billet superficial temperature, performed at the industrial plant. The results of the mathematical model using both uniform and non-uniform water flux density approaches were compared. The non-uniform water distribution approach enabled to identify important variations of the heat transfer coefficients and the billet temperatures, especially in the first cooling zones where the steel temperature is higher, and to assess more accurately the local effects of the water distribution on the thermal behavior of the strand. The non-uniform water flux density approach applied to the mathematical model was a useful and more accurate tool to improve the comprehension of the thermal behavior of the steel along the secondary cooling.

  19. Modeling of interdendritic porosity defects in an integrated computational materials engineering approach for metal casting

    DOE PAGES

    Sabau, Adrian S.

    2016-04-22

    Modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components in order to accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys. The data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. Here in this paper, the required models for the prediction of interdendritic casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Numerical simulation results for microporosity are presented for A356, 356 and 319 aluminummore » alloys using ProCASTTM software. The calculated pressure drop of the interdendritic liquid was observed to be quite significant and the regions of high-pressure drop can be used as an indicator of the severity of interdendritic microporosity defects.« less

  20. Microstructure design and heat treatment selection for casting alloys using the quality index

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, C.H.

    2000-04-01

    The ductility of casting allows is usually low and it is thus important to simultaneously assess the effect of changes to the microstructure and heat treatment on both ductility and strength of the material. The use for this purpose of the quality index charts is common in the casting industry with regard to the Al-Si-Mg casting alloys A356 and A357. An analytical method of generating quality index charts for any alloy system is presented. Applications of the method are illustrated with case studies involving Al-Si-Mg, Mg-Al-Zn, and Al-Si-Cu-Mg casting alloys. The analytically determined charts indicate the limits to microstructural improvement available for each material. The possibility of using the charts to optimize the relation between mechanical performance, chemical composition, solidification conditions, and temper is discussed.

  1. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold. Part I: Experiment Process and Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin; Ma, Fanjun; Zhou, Lejn

    2015-10-01

    A mold simulator has been successfully used to study the initial solidification behavior of the molten low carbon steel. Coupled with 2D-IHCD calculation and PSD analysis, the variations of the responding temperatures and heat fluxes, as well as the relationship between shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film, were investigated in this article. The results suggested that the mold high-frequency temperatures and heat fluxes above liquid steel level vary with the oscillation of the mold, and show an opposite variation pattern as those below the shell tip. The formed shell surface profile is directly correlated to the variation of high-frequency heat fluxes, where the formation of oscillation mark is associated with a sudden increase of the heat flux during negative strip time. Mold level fluctuation contributes to the formation of the extra oscillation marks. The growth of shell thickness follows the square root law, and the instantaneous solidification factor is large near the shell tip and becomes small in the area where the deep shell surface depression is formed. The thickness of the slag film in between mold and shell is in the range of 1.4 to 2.46 mm, and the crystallization of mold flux in mold/shell gap is dynamic.

  2. Unusual Solidification Behavior of the Suction-Cast Cu-Zr-Al-Y Alloy Doped with Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozieł, Tomasz; Cios, Grzegorz; Latuch, Jerzy; Pajor, Krzysztof; Bała, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    The effect of iron addition on the microstructure of the Cu-Zr-Al-Y glass-forming alloy was studied. Despite a high superficial cooling rate, small Fe additions (1.5 and 3 pct) induced formation of crystalline CuZr and AlCu2Zr phases on the outer layers of suction-cast rods. As the melt composition near the solid/liquid interface was depleted in Fe, the remaining melt vitrified at a relatively low cooling rate.

  3. Effect of TiN-Coated Al Powders on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiaoyu; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chunxia; Tang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    The core/shell nano-TiN-coated Al powders (TiN/Al) were prepared and added into A356 alloy by ultrasonic-assisted casting method in this work. The results show that TiN/Al has a better dispersion in A356 matrix and a stronger strengthening effect than TiN without the core/shell structure. With the addition of TiN/Al, most of the coarse primary α-Al dendrites of A356 turn into equiaxial. After T6 heat treatment, it is found that eutectic silicon in A356 with TiN/Al becomes columnar or globular in shape and smaller in size, which causes a greatly enhanced elongation of 11.7%. The results also suggest that the addition of nanoparticles can affect the precipitation behaviors and change the shapes and sizes of the precipitation.

  4. Influence of Low-Frequency Vibration and Modification on Solidification and Mechanical Properties of Al-Si Casting Alloy.

    PubMed

    Selivorstov, Vadim; Dotsenko, Yuri; Borodianskiy, Konstantin

    2017-05-20

    One of the major aims of the modern materials foundry industry is the achievement of advanced mechanical properties of metals, especially of light non-ferrous alloys such as aluminum. Usually an alloying process is applied to obtain the required properties of aluminum alloys. However, the presented work describes an alternative approach through the application of vibration treatment, modification by ultrafine powder and a combination of these two methods. Microstructural studies followed by image analysis revealed the refinement of α-Al grains with an increase in the Si network area around them. As evidence, the improvement of the mechanical properties of Al casting alloy was detected. It was found that the alloys subjected to the vibration treatment displayed an increase in tensile and yield strengths by 20% and 10%, respectively.

  5. Influence of Low-Frequency Vibration and Modification on Solidification and Mechanical Properties of Al-Si Casting Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Selivorstov, Vadim; Dotsenko, Yuri; Borodianskiy, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    One of the major aims of the modern materials foundry industry is the achievement of advanced mechanical properties of metals, especially of light non-ferrous alloys such as aluminum. Usually an alloying process is applied to obtain the required properties of aluminum alloys. However, the presented work describes an alternative approach through the application of vibration treatment, modification by ultrafine powder and a combination of these two methods. Microstructural studies followed by image analysis revealed the refinement of α-Al grains with an increase in the Si network area around them. As evidence, the improvement of the mechanical properties of Al casting alloy was detected. It was found that the alloys subjected to the vibration treatment displayed an increase in tensile and yield strengths by 20% and 10%, respectively. PMID:28772922

  6. Thixoforming of an ECAPed Aluminum A356 Alloy: Microstructure Evolution, Rheological Behavior, and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Kaio Niitsu; Zoqui, Eugênio José

    2016-04-01

    Thixoforming depends upon three aspects: (a) solid to liquid transformation; (b) size and morphology of the remaining solid phase in the semisolid state, and (c) the effect of both input factors on rheology of the semisolid slurry. The aluminum A356 alloy presents an ideal solid to liquid transformation, but the solidification process generates coarse aluminum dendrites surrounded by eutectic. In this regard, Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) has great potential as a method for manufacturing thixotropic raw material due to its grain refining effect. Therefore, the microstructure evolution and rheological behavior in the semisolid state of an ECAPed aluminum A356 alloy were investigated. Samples were heated up to 853 K (580 °C) and held for 0, 30, 60, 90, 210, and 600 seconds at this temperature. The isothermal heat treatment caused the globularization of the solid phase without any significant microstructure coarsening. Compression tests were carried out at the same temperature and holding times using an instrumented mechanical press. Apparent viscosities values close to 250 Pa s were obtained, revealing the exceptional rheological behavior of the produced samples. The thixoformed material also presented good mechanical properties, with high yield and ultimate tensile strength values (YS = 110/122 MPa, UTS = 173/202), and good ductility (E = 6.9/7.5 pct). These results indicate that the production of the A356 alloy via the ECAP process increases its thixoformability.

  7. The role of ultrasonic cavitation in refining the microstructure of aluminum based nanocomposites during the solidification process.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yang; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies showed that the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum based nanocomposites can be significantly improved when ultrasonic cavitation and solidification processing is used. This is because ultrasonic cavitation processing plays an important role not only in degassing and dispersion of the nanoparticles, but also in breaking up the dendritic grains and refining the as-cast microstructure. In the present study, A356 alloy and Al2O3 nanoparticles are used as the matrix alloy and the reinforcement, respectively. Nanoparticles were added into the molten A356 alloy and dispersed via ultrasonic cavitation processing. Ultrasonic cavitation was applied over various temperature ranges during molten alloy cooling and solidification to investigate the grain structure formation and the nanoparticle dispersion behavior. Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to investigate in detail the differences in the microstructure characteristics and the nanoparticle distribution. Experimental results indicated that the ultrasonic cavitation processing and Al2O3 nanoparticles play an important role for microstructure refinement. In addition, it was shown in this study that the Al2O3 nanoparticles modified the eutectic phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Magsimal-59, an AlMgMnSi-type squeeze-casting alloy designed for temper F

    SciTech Connect

    Hielscher, U.; Sternau, H.; Koch, H.; Franke, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    To get high mechanical properties using standard squeeze casting alloys (for example A356) it is indispensable to make a heat treatment. That means solution heat treatment and quenching and artificially aging. For this reason, the authors were challenged to develop an alloy that provides sophisticated mechanical properties without any heat treatment. Compared to A 356 T6 values in brackets, the new alloy has yield strength > 21 ksi (> 32 ksi) tensile strengths > 42 ksi (43 ksi) and elongation > 15% (10%) in temper F. fatigue strength (r = {minus}1, high frequency pulsation test) is > {+-} 16 ksi (13.5). To meet these properties, a casting process with high solidification velocity like squeeze casting or high pressure die-casting is necessary. Magsimal-59 is of the AlMgMnSi-type. The microstructure consists of {alpha}-Al and a very fine dispersed ternary eutectic. The microstructure and the influence of cooling rate on the mechanical properties will be discussed including some examples of castings.

  9. Solidification phenomena in metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cicco, Michael Peter

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticles in metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) were shown to act as catalysts for nucleation of solidification of the matrix alloy, as well as to alter the intermetallic phase formation. These phenomena were studied in zinc, aluminum, and magnesium alloys. In all alloys studied, a refinement of the microstructure was seen with the addition of the nanoparticles. Various types of nanoparticles were used and had varying degrees of refinement. In a zinc alloy, AC43A, SiC, TiC, and Al2O3 gamma nanoparticles were all found to refine the alloy. Thermal analysis of bulk samples showed the onset of solidification at reduced undercoolings, indicating nucleation catalysis. Nucleation of the primary phase was also observed by employing the droplet emulsion technique (DET). DET results showed that the secondary phase nucleation was also catalyzed by the nanoparticles. Exploiting the nucleation catalysis of the nanoparticles and the associated grain refinement, a semi-solid casting (SSC) process was demonstrated in AC43A + SiC nanocomposites. This novel process successfully incorporated the strength enhancement of MMNCs and the casting quality benefits of SSC. This process required no additional processing steps or material handling typical of existing SSC processes. The nucleation catalysis of the nanoparticles was sufficient to create semi-solid slurries appropriate for SSC. Nanoparticle induced nucleation catalysis was also examined in a common aluminum alloy, A356, using the DET. All nanoparticles catalyzed nucleation of the primary Al phase. However, undercoolings varied depending on the nanoparticle identity and average diameter. The variation in undercoolings generally agreed with a modified lattice disregistry theory and the free growth theory. For nanoparticles with a small lattice spacing mismatch with the Al phase, undercoolings approached the size dependent free growth limit. Binary alloys of magnesium and zinc showed significant strength and ductility

  10. Advances in aluminum casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiryakioglu, M.; Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the improvements of aluminum casting quality and reliability through a better understanding of processes and process variables, and explores the latest innovations in casting-process design that allow increasing use of the castings to replace complex assemblies and heavy steel and cast-iron components in aerospace and automotive applications. Presented are 35 papers by international experts in the various aspects of the subject. The contents include: Semisolid casting; Computer-aided designing of molds and castings; Casting-process modeling; Aluminum-matrix composite castings; HIPing of castings; Progress in the US car project; Die casting and die design; and Solidification and properties.

  11. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy

    PubMed Central

    Dang, B.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, C. X.; Wang, H. T.; Liu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy. PMID:27502444

  12. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, B.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, C. X.; Wang, H. T.; Liu, F.

    2016-08-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy.

  13. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Dang, B; Zhang, X; Chen, Y Z; Chen, C X; Wang, H T; Liu, F

    2016-08-09

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy.

  14. The Effect of Applied Pressure During Feeding of Critical Cast Aluminum Alloy Components With Particular Reference to Fatigue Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Berry; R. Luck; B. Zhang; R.P. Taylor

    2003-06-30

    the medium to long freezing range alloys of aluminum such as A356, A357, A206, 319 for example are known to exhibit dispersed porosity, which is recognized as a factor affecting ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance of light alloy castings. The local thermal environment, for example, temperature gradient and freezing from velocity, affect the mode of solidification which, along with alloy composition, heat treatment, oxide film occlusion, hydrogen content, and the extent to which the alloy contracts on solidification, combine to exert strong effects on the porosity formation in such alloys. In addition to such factors, the availability of liquid metal and its ability to flow through the partially solidified casting, which will be affect by the pressure in the liquid metal, must also be considered. The supply of molten metal will thus be controlled by the volume of the riser available for feeding the particular casting location, its solidification time, and its location together with any external pressure that might be applied at the riser.

  15. Nucleation Catalysis in Aluminum Alloy A356 Using Nanoscale Inoculants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cicco, Michael P.; Turng, Lih-Sheng; Li, Xiaochun; Perepezko, John H.

    2011-08-01

    Different types of nanoparticles in aluminum (Al) alloy A356 nanocomposites were shown to catalyze nucleation of the primary Al phase. Nanoparticles of SiC β, TiC, Al2O3 α, and Al2O3 γ were added to and dispersed in the A356 matrix as nucleation catalysts using an ultrasonic mixing technique. Using the droplet emulsion technique (DET), undercoolings in the nanocomposites were shown to be significantly reduced compared to the reference A356. None of the nanocomposites had a population of highly undercooled droplets that were observed in the reference samples. Also, with the exception of the A356/Al2O3 α nanocomposite, all nanocomposites showed a reduction in undercooling necessary for the onset of primary Al nucleation. The observed nanocomposite undercoolings generally agreed with the undercooling necessary for free growth. The atomic structure of the particles showed an influence on nucleation potency as A356/Al2O3 γ nanocomposites had smaller undercoolings than A356/Al2O3 α nanocomposites. The nucleation catalysis illustrates the feasibility of, and basis for, grain refinement in metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs).

  16. Solidification 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P. ); Dantzig, J.A. ); Trivedi, R. ); Hofmeister, W. ); Chu, M.G. ); Lavernia, E.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United Stat

    1998-01-01

    This book is the first volume of an annual proceedings series. Each book in this series will contain a selection of papers presented at Solidification Committee-sponsored symposia at the Annual Meeting and at the preceding Fall Meeting. These papers reflect the latest developments and applications of solidification research as covered by the committee's programming. Many of the sponsored symposia will also address related topics such as processing/property relationships, thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, and microstructure development. The volume contains papers based on talks presented at the following symposia: Microstructure Evolution, Characterization and Modeling, TMS Fall Meeting, Indianapolis, Indiana, Sept. 15--17, 1997; Rapid Solidification: Modeling and Experiments, TMS Annual Meeting, San Antonio, Texas, Feb. 16--17, 1998; and Solidification and Deposition of Molten Metal Droplets, TMS Annual Meeting, San Antonio, Texas, Feb. 16--17, 1998. Separate abstracts were prepared for all papers in this volume.

  17. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part I Microstructure evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres; ...

    2017-03-06

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to themore » dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ''θ'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ'θ' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β'β' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.« less

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part I—Microstructure Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-05-01

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to the dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ^'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ^' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β^' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part I—Microstructure Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-03-01

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to the dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ^'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ^' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β^' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.

  20. Effects of Mold Temperature and Pouring Temperature on the Hot Tearing of Cast Al-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shimin; Sadayappan, Kumar; Apelian, Diran

    2016-10-01

    The effects of mold temperature and pouring temperature on hot tearing formation and contraction behavior of a modified Al-Cu alloy 206 (M206) have been studied. The experiments were conducted using a newly developed Constrained Rod Mold, which simultaneously measures the contraction force/time/temperature during solidification for the restrained casting or linear contraction/time/temperature for a relaxed casting. Three mold temperatures [473 K, 573 K, and 643 K (200 °C, 300 °C, and 370 °C)] and three pouring temperatures [superheat of 50 K, 100 K, and 150 K (50 °C, 100 °C, and 150 °C)] were studied, and alloy A356 was used as reference for comparison. The results confirm that alloy A356 has high resistance to hot tearing. Hot tearing did not occur for the three mold temperatures evaluated, whereas alloy M206 exhibited significant hot tearing for the same casting and mold temperature conditions. Hot tearing severity and linear contraction in alloy 206 decreased significantly with increasing mold temperature. Increasing pouring temperature increases hot tearing in alloy M206, but the effect is not as significant as that of mold temperature. The results and underlying mechanism of these effects are discussed in correlation with the thermomechanical properties and microstructures.

  1. CASTING DEFECT MODELING IN AN INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL MATERIALS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2015-01-01

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys, the simultaneous modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake of completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. Thus, the data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Nemak Inc., and Chrysler Co. for the project "High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines. The author would also like to thank Amit Shyam for reviewing the paper and Andres Rodriguez of Nemak Inc. Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, as part of the Propulsion Materials Program under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. Part of this research was conducted through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program, which is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program.

  2. Assessment of refining effectiveness of self-prepared nano-(TiNb)C/(NbTi)/Al complex powder inoculation on A356 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Gui-ying; Wu, Da-yong; Wei, Teng-fei; Liao, Bo; Xiao, Fu-ren

    2017-07-01

    Inoculation plays an effective role to refine the microstructure of as-cast aluminium alloys, which strongly depend on the effectiveness of the inoculants. In this work, a new concept of nano-(TiNb)C/(NbTi)/Al complex powder as an inoculant for refining the as-cast aluminium alloys was proposed, and the nano-(TiNb)C/(NbTi)/Al complex powder was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) method, furthermore, the refining effectiveness of inoculation on A356 alloy was investigated. Results show that the nano-(TiNb)C/(NbTi)/Al complex powder consists of three phases of α-Al, nano-(TiNb)C and (NbTi) solid solution. The nano-(TiNb)C/(NbTi)/Al complex powder as an inoculant have higher refining effectiveness as well as good recyclability on the microstructure of cast A356 alloy, and improve the mechanical properties, especially the ductility.

  3. X-Ray Microtomographic Characterization of Porosity in Aluminum Alloy A356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Omid; Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Maijer, Daan

    2009-04-01

    The presence of microporosity can, in certain circumstances, lead to a significant reduction in the mechanical properties of cast aluminum alloys. The size of the microporosity is especially crucial to the performance of castings in fatigue applications. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of cooling rate and degassing time on the formation and evolution of microporosity in aluminum alloy A356 (Al-7Si-0.3Mg) castings using traditional metallography and X-ray microtomography (XMT) methods. The final results clearly confirm that increasing the cooling rate and degassing time yield lower microporosity within the microstructure. The XMT analysis enabled the calculation of the volume fraction and size distribution of microporosity. The XMT analysis revealed a bimodel distribution of pores with one population of small pores and a second population of large pores. The large population has been attributed to hydrogen gas solubility, whereas the smaller population is proposed to be linked to the localized entrapment of liquid metal occurring at the end of mass feeding.

  4. Effect of dendrite coarsening on the solidification of interdendritic liquid in iron alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Inskii, V. A.; Kostyleva, L. V.; Goremykina, S. S.

    2010-05-01

    The solidification of the interdendritic liquid in austenitic 110G13L steel and white cast iron is studied. In the absence of dendrite coarsening, the solidification mechanism of the interdendritic liquid in the manganese steel is shown to change and solidification occurs in the form of polycrystalline aggregates around dendrites from different centers. The relation between the standard solidification of the interdendritic liquid and the dendrite coarsening in iron alloys is grounded.

  5. Effects of Post-Fabrication Processing on the Tensile Properties of Centrifugally Cast SiC Particulate Reinforced Aluminum Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    number) A centrifugally cast A356 aluminum -matrix composite reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) particles was themo-mechanically processed by rolling and...Advisor Alan G. Fox, Second Reader Matthewn Department of Mechanical Engineering ii ABSTRACT A centrifugally cast A356 aluminum -matrix composite...used in this research, was commercial grade A356 Aluminum alloy. The material was supplied by Naval Surface Warefare Center, White Oak. The material

  6. Solidification studies of automotive heat exchanger materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, T.; Jaradeh, M.; Kamgou Kamaga, H.

    2006-11-01

    Modifications of the aluminum alloy AA 3003 have been studied to improve and tailorits properties for applications in automotive heat exchangers. Laboratory techniques have been applied to simulate industrial direct-chill casting, and some basic solidification studies have been conducted. The results are coupled to structures observed in industrial-size ingots and discussed in terms of structure-property relations.

  7. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-20

    thermodynamics . 2) Experimental verify the effectiveness of possible nucleating compounds. 3) Extend grain refinement theory and solidification...knowledge through experimental data. 4) Determine structure property relationships for the examined grain refiners. 5) Formulate processing techniques for...using grain refiners in the steel casting industry. During Fiscal Year 2010, this project worked on determining structure property -relationships

  8. Effect of porosity on ductility variation in investment cast 17-4PH.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Robert D.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grant, Richard P.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Susan, Donald Francis

    2005-02-01

    Gokhale et al. and Surappa et al. in cast A356 Al and by Gokhale et al. for a cast Mg alloys. The quantitative fractography and metallography work by Gokhale et al. illustrated the strong preference for fracture in regions of porosity in cast material. That is, the fracture process is not correlated to the average microstructure in the material but is related to the extremes in microstructure (local regions of high void content). In the present study, image analysis on random cross-sections of several heats indicated an overall porosity content of 0.03%. In contrast, the area % porosity was as high as 16% when measured on fracture surfaces of tensile specimens using stereology techniques. The results confirm that the fracture properties of cast 17-4PH cannot be predicted based on the overall 'average' porosity content in the castings.

  9. The Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on Mechanical Properties of a Cast 6061 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Conference Proceedings, 1990 19. Lewandowski, J. J. et al., "Effects of Casting Conditions and Deformation Processing on A356 Aluminum and A356 -20 Vol...CAST 6061 ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE by Werner Fletcher Hoyt December 1993 Thesis Advisor: Terry R. McNelley Approved for public release...Security Classification) THE EFFECT OF THERMOMECHANICAL PROCESSING ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A CAST 6061 ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE 12. PERSONAL

  10. Predicting the Effect of Pouring Temperature on the Crystallite Density, Remelting, and Crystal Growth Kinetics in the Solidification of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Tabandeh-Khorshid, Meysam; Mantas, John C.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Cho, Kyu; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, we developed an analytical model to describe the effect of pouring temperature on the crystallite density, remelting, growth kinetics, and the resultant final grain size for aluminum (Al)-based alloys synthesized using gravity casting. The model predicts that there are three regimes of pouring temperature/grain size-related behavior: (i) at low superheats, grain size is small and relatively constant; (ii) at intermediate levels of superheat, there appears to be a transitional behavior where grain size increases in a rapid, non-linear fashion; and (iii) at high superheats, grain size increases linearly with increasing temperature. This general pattern is expected to be shifted upward as distance from the bottom of the casting increases, which is likely a result of the slower cooling rates and/or longer solidification times with increasing distance from the bottom of the casting. To validate the model, a set of experiments has been conducted using Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys ( i.e., Al-3.0 wt pct Cu, Al-4.5 wt pct Cu, and Al-A356.2 alloys), and the experimental measurements showed consistent results with theoretical predictions.

  11. Thermophysical property sensitivity effects in steel solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Tony

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of advanced solidification processes via digital computer techniques has gained widespread acceptance during the last decade or so. Models today can predict transient temperature fields, fluid flow fields, important microstructural parameters, and potential defects in castings. However, the lack of accurate thermophysical property data on important industrial alloys threatens to limit the ability of manufacturers to fully capitalize on the technology's benefits. A study of the sensitivity of one such numerical model of a steel plate casting to imposed variations in the data utilized for the thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, and heat of fusion is described. The sensitivity of the data's variability is characterized by its effects on the net solidification time of various points along the centerline of the plate casting. Recommendations for property measurements are given and the implications of data uncertainty for modelers are discussed.

  12. The effect of ultrasonic vibration on the solidification of light alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xiaogang

    2005-11-01

    This exposition presents a novel thermodynamical and microstructural modification to light alloys, such as aluminum alloys and magnesium alloys, by ultrasonic vibrations. An experimental apparatus which supplied a powerful 1500 Watts at 20 kHz of ultrasonic power was designed and built. Thermodynamic simulations were carried out using the Scheil model to determine the temperature versus solid fraction curve of the alloys. Thermal analysis shows that, with ultrasonic vibration, the steady growth temperature and the minimum supercooling temperature have been elevated; the recalescence time decreased significantly, which indicates a much slower growth rate of primary fcc aluminum grains. Upon ultrasonic vibration, in A356 alloy, fine globular primary aluminum grains were obtained at an unprecedented level of 20 to 40 mum; superfine globular grains less than 20 mum in size were obtained in the area near the ultrasonic radiator; the morphology of eutectic silicon in the alloy was modified from a coarse acicular plate-like form to a finely dispersed rosette-like form, with significantly reduced length, width, and aspect ratio; fine globular grains were also obtained in other aluminum alloys, including A354, 319, 6063, 6061, 2618 alloys; 670°C is the optimum casting temperature for grain refinement of 2618 alloy; not only did magnesium AM60B alloy experience a reduction in size of primary alpha-Mg grains from 760 mum to about 25˜48 mum in diameter, which is much better than other traditional grain refinement methods, but also the volume fraction of eutectic phases was reduced significantly. The mechanisms for ultrasonic influence on solidification have been studied. It was concluded that acoustically induced heterogeneous nucleation, rather than dendrite fragmentation, played a dominant role in the formation of a globular microstructure; high acoustic amplitude/intensity favors the formation of small, spherical primary aluminum grains; the casting temperature of 630

  13. Modeling and control of casting and welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, S.; Mehrabian, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: process monitor and control in welding; plasma processing and refining; strip casting; modelling of welding processes; CAD/CAM in casting; investment and die casting; ingot, continuous and other shape casting; and rapid solidification and microstructural evolution.

  14. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  15. Mathematical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Minosyan, Ya.P.; Gerasimov, V.G.; Ryadno, A.A.; Solov'yev, Yu.G.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical description of centrifugal casting of long pipes in rapidly-rotating ingot molds is given. The effect of gravity force is neglected. A numerical solution is obtained for the solidification of a steel casting in a thermally insulated mold. The effect of the rate of metal pouring on the motion of the solidification interface is investigated. The disagreement with experimental data is less then 7 percent.

  16. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  17. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  18. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  19. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The long range goal of this program is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification and to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  20. Modelling Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Weijun

    1992-01-01

    The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  1. A benchmark for the validation of solidification modelling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; Heugenhauser, S.; Schumacher, P.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents two three-dimensional solidification models, which were solved by several commercial solvers (MAGMASOFT, FLOW-3D, ProCAST, WinCast, ANSYS, and OpenFOAM). Surprisingly, the results show noticeable differences. The results are analyzed similar to a round-robin test procedure to obtain reference values for temperatures and their uncertainties at selected positions in the model. The first model is similar to an adiabatic calorimeter with an aluminum alloy solidifying in a copper block. For this model, an analytical solution for the overall temperature at steady state can be calculated. The second model implements additional heat transfer boundary conditions at outer faces. The geometry of the models, the initial and boundary conditions as well as the material properties are kept as simple as possible but, nevertheless, close to a realistic solidification situation. The gained temperature results can be used to validate self-written solidification solvers and check the accuracy of commercial solidification programs.

  2. Mechanical behaviour of A356 alloy reinforced with high strength alloy particulate metallic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Mallarapu, Gopi; Kancharla, Praveen Kumar; Rao, J. B.; Bhargava, N. R. M. R.

    2017-08-01

    In the present investigation, work has been carried out to fabricate composites with high strength and good ductility by maximizing a uniform and smooth interface for effective transfer of load, and minimizing reinforcement cracking, agglomerations, and pull outs. A high-strength alloy (ternary) in particulate (HSA(P)) form was used as reinforcement in 356 aluminium. A 356-HSA(P) composite was prepared using the stir casting technique by dispersing an average particle size of 125 µm for reinforcement with various weight fractions varying between 5% and 15%. Secondary processing was done using the hot extrusion process to obtain 14 mm Ø rods (extrusion ratio of 18:1) and homogenized in an industrial furnace for 24 h. A decrease in reinforcement size was observed with increments in particulate content. The hardness of the composites was improved compared to the existing matrix. Mechanical properties such as UTS, yield strength, modulus of elasticity and ductility reveal superior specific properties than that of the alloy.

  3. Rapid solidification of Nb-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokhale, A. B.; Javed, K. R.; Abbaschian, G. J.; Lewis, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    New Nb-base alloys are of interest for aerospace structural applications at high temperatures, viz, 800 to 1650 C. Fundamental information regarding the effects of rapid solidification in achieving greatly refined microstructures, extended solid solubility, suppression of embrittling equilibrium phases, and formation of new phases is desired in a number of Nb-X alloys. The microstructures and selected properties of Nb-Si and other Nb-base alloys are presented for materials both rapidly quenched from the equilibrium liquidus and rapidly solidified following deep supercooling. Electromagnetic levitation was used to achieve melting and supercooling in a containerless inert gas environment. A variety of solidification conditions were employed including splatting or drop casting of supercooled samples. The morphology and composition of phases formed are discussed in terms of both solidification history and bulk composition.

  4. Eutectic-Free Superalloy Made By Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Dianne

    1995-01-01

    By suitable control of thermal conditions in directional-solidification process, supperalloy structural and machine components (e.g., turbine blades) cast with microstructures enhancing resistance to fatigue. Specific version of process and thermal conditions chosen to reduce micro-segregation during solidification and to minimize or eliminate script carbide and eutectic-phase inclusions, which are brittle inclusions found to decrease resistance to fatigue.

  5. Cellular Model Simulations of Solidification Structures in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsoruji, Ghazi H.

    Solidification processes are an important part of many modem manufacturing processes. They can be found in different casting and welding processes. The solidification structure is very important for the quality of any product manufactured by such processes. This is so because the casting or weldment microstructure determines their mechanical properties. For welding processes, solidification theories can explain the evolution of the fusion zone microstructure and how this microstructure is influenced by the solidification parameters such as the temperature gradient and the solidification rate. In order to investigate the solidification parameters' effect on the microstructure, a numerical model based on Cellular Automaton combined with the finite difference method (CA-FD) is presented in this thesis. The simulation is conducted on a finite three dimensional control volume of the fusion zone. The model takes into account the solute-, curvature-, and kinetic undercooling. The temperatures are assumed to be distributed linearly within the control volume. The model predicts the morphology and density of the microstructure according to different values of the cooling rate and initial temperatures. It is demonstrated that the solidification structure has a columnar morphology at high temperature gradients and low cooling rates. The morphology changes to dendritic as the temperature gradient decreases and/or the cooling rate increases. It is also shown that an increase in the cooling rate results in the densification of the solidification structure. The results demonstrate that an increase in the initial substrate roughness can result in the increase in the density of the solidification structure. The simulation results show an agreement with the constitutional undercooling theory of solidification structures.

  6. EBSD and DTA Characterization of A356 Alloy Deformed by ECAP During Reheating and Partial Re-melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Marzyeh; Nili-Ahmadabadi, Mahmoud; Poorganji, Behrang; Heidarian, Bashir; Furuhara, Tadashi

    2013-11-01

    Recrystallization and partial re-melting processes have been developed for producing semi-solid feedstock in a solid state in which a globular microstructure is obtained by plastic deformation followed by reheating. In this research, to induce strain, a cast- and solution-treated Aluminum A356 (7 wt pct Si) alloy was subjected to a repetitive equal channel angular pressing process using a 90 deg die, up to a total accumulated strain of approximately 8 in route A (increasing strain through a sequence of passes with no rotation of the sample after each pass) at ambient temperature. The microstructural evolutions of deformed and reheated materials were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron back-scattered diffraction analysis. In addition, the influences of pre-deformation on the recrystallization mechanism and liquid formation of A356 alloy were presented and discussed. The results are also supported by differential thermal analysis experiments. Evaluation of the observations indicated that the average cell boundary misorientation increased with increasing strain, so this increased misorientation accelerated the mobility of boundaries and recrystallization kinetics. Therefore, the recrystallization mechanism and kinetics affected by deformation, reheating condition, and intrinsic material properties determined the particle size in the semi-solid state.

  7. Characterization of Transport and Solidification in the Metal Recycling Processes

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C. Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1997-08-06

    The characterization of the transport and solidification of metal in the melting and casting processes is significant for the optimization of the radioactively contaminated metal recycling and refining processes. . In this research project, the transport process in the melting and solidification of metal was numerically predicted, and the microstructure and radionuclide distribution have been characterized by scanning electron microscope/electron diffractive X-ray (SEWEDX) analysis using cesium chloride (CSC1) as the radionuclide surrogate. In the melting and solidification process, a resistance furnace whose heating and cooling rates are program- controlled in the helium atmosphere was used. The characterization procedures included weighing, melting and solidification, weighing after solidification, sample preparation, and SEM/EDX analysis. This analytical methodology can be used to characterize metal recycling and refining products in order to evaluate the performance of the recycling process. The data obtained provide much valuable information that is necessary for the enhancement of radioactive contaminated metal decontamination and recycling technologies. The numerical method for the prediction of the melting and solidification process can be implemented in the control and monitoring system-of the melting and casting process in radioactive contaminated metal recycling. The use of radionuclide surrogates instead of real radionuclides enables the research to be performed without causing harmfid effects on people or the community. This characterization process has been conducted at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University since October 1995. Tests have been conducted on aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) using cesium chloride (CSCI) as a radionuclide surrogate, and information regarding the radionuclide transfer and distribution in melting and solidification process has been obtained. The numerical simulation of

  8. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Waxy casts; Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood cell casts ... a sign of many types of kidney diseases. Red blood cell casts mean there is a microscopic amount of ...

  9. Analysis of Pershing II Reentry Vehicle (RV) Control Ring Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    8217 fracture toughness Te RV rings are fabricated from A356 -T6 aluminum . - -ro- Analysis of cast tensile coupon specimens was also performed to...strength, 22.9 ksi (158 MPa) yield strength, and 1 percent elongation. The RV control ring is specified to be fabricated from A356 , Class 10 aluminum ...the RV ring [1]. The fracture tough- ness of the RV control ring ( A356 -T6 aluminum ) has been shown to be 15.05 ksi .An (16.6.MPa. /-M). Since primarily

  10. Modelling direction solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop an improved understanding of some phenomena of importance to directional solidification. The aim of this research is also to help predict differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and solidification in space. In this report, the validity of the Burton-Primslichter equation is explored. The influence of operating variables on grain and twin generation and propagation in single crystals of In sub (x) Ga sub (1-x) Sb is also investigated.

  11. Temperature and Pressure Evolution during Al Alloy Solidification at Different Squeeze Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junwen; Zhao, Haidong; Chen, Zhenming

    2015-06-01

    Squeeze casting is an advanced and near net-shape casting process, in which external high pressure is applied to solidifying castings. The castings are characterized with fine grains and good mechanical properties. In this study, a series of experiments were carried out to measure the temperature and pressure histories in cavity of Al-Si-Mg direct squeeze castings with different applied solidification pressures of 0.1, 50, 75, and 100 MPa. The evolution of the measured temperatures and pressures was compared and discussed. The effect of pressure change on formation of shrinkage defects was analyzed. Further the friction between the castings and dies during solidification was calculated. It is shown that the applied squeeze pressure has significant influence on the friction at die and casting interfaces, which affects the pressure evolution and transmission. The results could provide some benchmark data for future thermal-mechanics coupled modeling of squeeze castings.

  12. Investigation into the Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of A356 Aluminum Alloy-Based ZrO2-Particle-Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdizadeh, H.; Baghchesara, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, an investigation has been carried out into the influence of ZrO2 content and casting temperature on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of A356 Al/ZrO2 composites. A356 aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced with 5, 10 and 15 vol.% ZrO2 were fabricated at 750, 850, and 95 0°C via the stir-casting method. Based on the results obtained, the optimum amount of reinforcement and casting temperature were determined by evaluating the density and mechanical properties of the composites through the use of hardness and tensile tests. The fracture surfaces of composite specimens were also studied to identify the main fracture mechanisms of the composites. The results obtained indicated that all samples fractured due to the interdendritic cracking of the matrix alloy. Reinforcing the Al matrix alloy with ZrO2 particles increased the hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the alloy to the maximum values of 70 BHN and 232 MPa, respectively. The best mechanical properties were obtained for the specimens with 15 vol.% of ZrO2 produced at 75 0°C.

  13. Briquettes with nanostructured materials used to modify of cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znamenskii, L. G.; Ivochkina, O. V.; Varlamov, A. S.; Petrova, N. I.

    2016-05-01

    A method is developed to fabricate briquettes with nanostructured materials aimed at modification of cast iron resulting in the improvement of the physicochemical properties of cast iron and its castings. This improvement is achieved by grain refinement, stable modification, the elimination of pyroelectric effect upon modification, and a decrease in the sensitivity to chilling upon melt solidification.

  14. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  15. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Steinbach, I.; Karma, A.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during solidification of an assemblage of equiaxed dendritic crystals. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology (i.e., tip radii, branch spacings, etc.) and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of initial supercoolings and, thus, interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment thus extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and coworkers for steady growth of a single dendrite [Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), first flown on USMP-2] to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation more close to actual casting conditions. Corresponding earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will primarily be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  16. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during equiaxed dendritic solidification. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion-dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and co-workers isothermal dendritic growth experiment (IDGE) for steady growth of a single dendrite to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation closer to actual casting conditions. Corresponding Earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  17. Solidification Characteristics of Wrought Magnesium Alloys Containing Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaid, A.; Czerwinski, F.; Zavadil, R.; Aniolek, M.; Hadadzadeh, A.

    A significant barrier preventing use of magnesium sheet in automotive light-weighting initiatives is its high manufacturing cost and very limited formability at room temperature. This barrier can be overcome by the use of twin roll casting technology and new magnesium alloys, specifically designed for twin roll casting. Recent studies have shown that magnesium, when alloyed with rare earth elements, gave rise to weakening of the basal texture resulting in improved room temperature formability. In this research, a combination of calculations using the FACTsage software and examinations using a number of experimental techniques was explored to determine the solidification characteristics of wrought magnesium alloys containing rare earth metal of neodymium: ZEK100, Mg-1Zn-0.5Nd and Mg-1Zn-1Nd. As predicted by the FACTsage software, the solidification under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions affects the type and volume fractions of phases formed for a given chemical composition of the alloy. The thermal analysis identified temperatures of metallurgical reactions taking place during solidification and their changes with neodymium content. As verified by controlled solidification experiments the cooling rate during solidification affected the refinement level of the alloy microstructure, a volume fraction of intermetallic precipitates and their distribution. This research will help to design new magnesium alloys, specifically optimized for twin roll casting.

  18. Riser Feeding Evaluation Method for Metal Castings Using Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nadiah

    One of the design aspects that continues to create a challenge for casting designers is the optimum design of casting feeders (risers). As liquid metal solidifies, the metal shrinks and forms cavities inside the casting. In order to avoid shrinkage cavities, risers are added to the casting shape to supply additional molten metal when shrinkage occurs during solidification. The shrinkage cavities in the casting are compensated by controlling the cooling rate to promote directional solidification. This control can be achieved by designing the casting such that the cooling begins at the sections that are farthest away from the risers and ends at the risers. Therefore, the risers will solidify last and feed the casting with the molten metal. As a result, the shrinkage cavities formed during solidification are in the risers which are later removed from the casting. Since casting designers have to usually go through iterative processes of validating the casting designs which are very costly due to expensive simulation processes or manual trials and errors on actual casting processes, this study investigates more efficient methods that will help casting designers utilize their casting experiences systematically to develop good initial casting designs. The objective is to reduce the casting design method iterations; therefore, reducing the cost involved in that design processes. The aim of this research aims at finding a method that can help casting designers design effective risers used in sand casting process of aluminum-silicon alloys by utilizing the analysis of solidification simulation. The analysis focuses on studying the significance of pressure distribution of the liquid metal at the early stage of casting solidification, when heat transfer and convective fluid flow are taken into account in the solidification simulation. The mathematical model of casting solidification was solved using the finite volume method (FVM). This study focuses to improve our

  19. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  20. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  1. Computer simulation of solidification cracking in high strength aluminum alloys: Basic concepts and approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.M.; Lu, H.M.; Wan, J.; Harris, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    High-strength aluminum ingots are sensitive to hot cracking during solidification, and many finite element modelings have been applied to the solidification process of ingot casting. Most simulations can predict the thermal profile and thermal history quite accurately, but very few works succeed in estimating precise distribution of thermal stress because of no valid thermomechanical properties in the as-cast structure. As alloy strength is not only a function of temperature but also a function of microstructure which depends on the cooling history of the ingot, a constitutive modeling of these Al-alloys must be obtained by continuous cooling of different rates in the as-cast structure. In this study, methodology for prediction of solidification cracking, which considers cooling dependent properties, is presented, and thermomechanical properties of the as-cast material are measured, and results are employed in the finite element simulation of direct-chill casting of 7050 aluminum alloys to calculate thermal stress.

  2. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST) Structural Test and Evaluation (Phase 5). Part 3-Static Property Allowables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    mechanical properties . At first, it would appear that the mechanical properties of the A356 -T62 and those of the 320OF...Static Properties , his document contains static mechanical properties of A257-T 6 aluminum alloy castings. Properties of castings are relatable to...ELONGATION MEASUREMENTS 79 APPENDIX D. INTEGRAL COUPON PROPERTIES 83 APPENDIX E. STATIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES DATA 91 APPENDIX F. CORRELATIVE PROPERTIES

  3. The cast structure of a 7075 alloy produced by a water-cooling centrifugal casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.W. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Jong, S.H.

    1994-03-01

    A water-cooling centrifugal casting method was applied to cast the 7075 Al alloy to generate a much finer cast structure than that produced by conventional ingot casting methods. The effects of casting parameters, i.e., rotation speed, pouring temperature, water flow, and grain refiner, on casting structure were systematically studied so that the optimum casting condition and the solidification mechanism could be established. The typical cast structure along the thickness direction of a cast ring could be divided into four equiaxed zones, including the chill zone which is in contact with the mold wall. All zones have their characteristic grain size, morphology, and relative thickness, which are all dependent on the casting condition. The optimum casting condition yielding the finest structure available was found to be 3,000 rpm, 650 C, and sufficient water cooling. A uniform portion occupying 90 pct of the whole thickness and having a grain size of 17 [mu]m could be achieved under such a casting condition. When a grain refiner was added, the whole ring became further concentrated with grains of fine structure. A mechanism concerning the overall effects of rapid solidification, turbulent flow, and centrifugal force has been proposed for the present casting method and might explain the zone-structure formation and the effects of the casting parameters on microstructural features.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification of Modelling of Equiaxed Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metal alloy solidification are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to sparse experimental data, to which agreement can be misinterpreted due to both model and experimental uncertainty. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis are performed on a transient model of solidification of Al-4.5 wt.% Cu in a rectangular cavity, with equiaxed (grain refined) solidification morphology. This model solves equations for momentum, temperature, and species conservation; UQ and sensitivity analysis are performed for the degree of macrosegregation. A Smolyak sparse grid algorithm is used to select input values to construct a response surface fit to model outputs. The response surface is then used as a surrogate for the solidification model to determine the sensitivities and probability density functions of the model outputs. Uncertain model inputs of interest include the secondary dendrite arm spacing, equiaxed particle size, and fraction solid at which the rigid mushy zone forms. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient model of direct chill casting of the same alloy.

  5. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 2, Die casting research

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, D.

    1994-06-01

    Four subprojects were completed: development and evaluation of die coatings, accelerated die life characterization of die materials, evaluation of fluid flow and solidification modeling programs, selection and characterization of Al-based die casting alloys, and influence of die materials and coatings on die casting quality.

  6. AMCC casting development, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    PCC successfully cast and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC castings. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the castings and the remaining six castings were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six castings shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more castings have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC casting has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment casting arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.

  7. Microsegregation during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the directional solidification of alloys, solute inhomogeneities transverse to the growth direction arise due to morphological instabilities (leading to cellular or dendritic growth) and/or due to convection in the melt. In the absence of convection, the conditions for the onset of morphological instability are given by the linear stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka. For ordinary solidification rates, the predictions of linear stability analysis are similar to the constitutional supercooling criterion. However, at very rapid solidification rates, linear stability analysis predicts a vast increase in stabilization in comparison to constitutional supercooling.

  8. Fundamentals of Alloy Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F.

    1986-01-01

    Potential benefits of microgravity processing discussed. Symposium held at Lewis Research Center in September of 1984 on subject of microgravity and some basic metallurgical factors involved in production of metals. General metallurgical areas of interest were metal solidification and processing. Five specific areas covered included undercooling of liquids, porosity, microstructure, solidification, and segregation. Theme of symposium: Possible benefits of microgravity processing and beneficial effects on industry processing. Information readily lends itself to inclusion in educational programs at college level.

  9. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  10. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  11. Solidification Modeling: Evolution, Benchmarks, Trends in Handling Turbulence, and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sudeep; Dewan, Anupam

    2014-08-01

    A systematic evolution of the solidification modeling is presented in this article. An approach starting from the basic governing equations to the intricate modeling of the alloy solidification using different approaches has been reviewed. Important advantages and issues related to different formulations and the use of fixed/moving grids for the modeling of solidification have been discussed. This article outlines the important solidification modeling approaches used in the literature. The mathematical description of the most frequently employed methods for modeling of solidification has been presented providing adequate references for other solidification models. This article highlights an important subdomain of solidification modeling, namely, the modeling of solidification processes having significant turbulence (such as welding, casting, and Czochralski crystal growth). A review of the use of different turbulence models along with the state-of-the-art techniques in these areas is presented. The paper also describes the important benchmarking studies (both experimental and numerical modeling results) used for the validation of solidification of both pure metals and alloys. Finally, the physical and numerical complexities associated with the solidification modeling phenomena along with the important challenges and future directions are presented.

  12. Contributions related to the control of steel ingot solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socalici, A.; Popa, E.; Hepuţ, T.; Vîlceanu, L.

    2014-03-01

    The paper introduces the influence of the control over steel ingot solidification upon the quality characteristics of carbon steels. The laboratory experiments focused on the solidification control of steel ingots with cylindrical cross-section, by addition of crystallizing germs (micro-coolers) in their central area, in order to influence their inner structure and quality characteristics. The use of graphical and analytical correlations allows the establishing of optimal technological domains of variation for the steel casting parameters, with use of micro-coolers, in order to obtain the desired values for their mechanical characteristics.

  13. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) Coatings on an A356 Alloy for Improved Corrosion and Wear Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhijing

    Plasma electrolytic oxidizing (PEO) is an advanced technique that has been used to deposit thick and hard ceramic coatings on aluminium (Al) alloys. This work was however to use the PEO process to produce thin ceramic oxide coatings on an A356 Al alloy for improving corrosion and wear resistance of the alloy. Effects of current density and treatment time on surface morphologies and thickness of the PEO coatings were investigated. The improvement of galvanic corrosion properties of the coated A356 alloy vs. steel and carbon fibre were evaluated in E85 fuel or NaCl environments. Tribological properties of the coatings were studied with comparison to the uncoated A356 substrate and other commercially-used engine bore materials. The research results indicated that the PEO coatings could have excellent tribological and corrosion properties for aluminium engine applications.

  14. High Integrity Castings: Proceedings of the Conference on Advances in High Integrity Castings Held in Conjunction with the 1988 World Materials Congress, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 24-30 September 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    tough competitor to wrought products with the design flexibility of a casting. Solidification models to aid in decreasing the lead time from concept...Technical Center, Livonia, MI; J. R. Keough, Atmosphere Group, Inc., Wixom, M/ Heat Transfer - Solidification Kinetics Modeling of Casting Solidification...34Diffusion Models for Hot Pressing with Surface Energy and Pressure Effects as Driving Forces", Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 41, No. 12, Nov. 1970

  15. Theoretical Study of Alpha Case Formation during Titanium Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, R. G.; Watkins, Gregory K.; Okabe, Toru; Koike, Marie

    2007-08-01

    Scale analyses indicate that three distinct contaminant mass-transfer processes, occurring on distinct time scales, underlie formation of the alpha case on small titanium castings. High rates of mold-to-liquid metal mass transfer occur during an extremely short induction period, the length of which is determined by the time required for heterogeneously nucleated solidification fronts to cover mold surface asperities. Following the induction period, but prior to complete cast solidification, mold contaminants diffuse through a rapidly growing solidification layer, where the solid-phase mass-diffusion boundary layer grows at a rate approximately an order of magnitude slower than the solidification front. Finally, following complete solidification and until the part is removed from the mold, contaminant mass transfer continues via solid diffusion. Based on the scale analyses, an analytical model that incorporates an empirical relation between titanium solid phase oxygen concentration and titanium microhardness is developed and compared against representative experimental near-surface microhardness measurements.

  16. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  17. Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide is intended to inform site cleanup managers of recently-published materials such as field reports and guidance documents that address issues relevant to solidification/stabilization technologies.

  18. Crystal morphology and gas evolution during solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marcus Vinicius Andrade

    A theoretical and experimental study of the solidification process has been performed to obtain fundamental understanding relevant to metal casting, solidification of alloys, freezing of biological materials and other areas. The emphasis is on the effect of the morphology of the crystals on the solidification of binary systems and the role of dissolved gas evolution on gas porosity formation. Of specific interest is the effect of gas bubble nucleation and of crystal morphology on the effective thermal conductivity of the solidifying system. An analytical and a semi-analytical method are used to calculate the gas species redistribution due to the movement of the solid-liquid interface during the freezing processes. The gas segregation at the interface strongly depends on the solidification rate (i.e., the interface velocity). The results are important to predict the formation of gas voids in castings and, most importantly, to avoid them. It is found that for a constant solidification rate, bubble nucleation always occurs at the interface despite the magnitude of the interface velocity. On the other hand, when the solidification rate is inversely proportional to the square root of time bubble nucleation can be avoided by ensuring that the initial gas concentration is smaller than a ratio involving the gas solubilities in the liquid and in the solid. An experimental apparatus is designed and constructed to study solidification on a microscopic scale. The temperature gradient and the solidification rate are controlled and aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride of different initial concentrations are frozen in a controlled manner in order to measure the microscopic characteristic lengths of the crystals grown from ammonium chloride solutions of low initial concentrations. Air-saturated water is also solidified and the dissolved gas bubble nucleation observed. Microscopic geometric lengths of the crystal that form the mushy zone are correlated with the velocity of the

  19. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  20. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1987-01-01

    An improved understanding of the phenomena of importance to directional solidification is attempted to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis is now on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection. A correlation is sought between heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneities using naphthalene doped with anthracene. The influence of spin-up/spin-down is determined on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide. The effect is determined of imposed melting - freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide. The mechanism behind the increase of grain size caused by using spin-up/spin-down in directional solidification of mercury cadimum telluride is sought.

  1. Mundrabilla: A Microgravity Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budka, P. Z.; Viertl, J. R. M.

    1993-07-01

    The name "Mundrabilla" is applied to two nickel-iron meteorite masses (combined mass over 22,700 kg), which apparently were a single mass before atmospheric entry [1]. A medium octahedrite, Mundrabilla exhibits the microstructural features common to other nickel-iron meteorites such as Widmanstatten structure and troilite; however, its macrostructure is anything but common. Described by Buchwald as "anomalous" [1], Mundrabilla's macrostructural morphology is characterized by strikingly prominent, rounded Widmanstatten areas separated by regions of sulfur segregation (Fig. 1). While microstructural development of a metal can reflect both solidification and solid state reactions, macrostructural features are determined during solidification. Thus, a typical metallurgist, unfamiliar with microgravity solidification, might describe Mundrabilla's macrostructure as an "anomalous" casting. Those familiar with microgravity solidification might characterize Mundrabilla's macrostructural features as due to solidification of two immiscible liquids [2]--one rich in nickel-iron, the other rich in sulfur. Combining these observations, Mundrabilla's macrostructural features are consistent with that of a liquid mass solidified under microgravity conditions [3,4]. Since nickel-iron meteorite cooling rates often serve as the foundation for assumptions about the formation of solar system bodies, information on the solidification time for the Mundrabilla mass may give additional insights. How long did it take for Mundrabilla, with a minimum "as received" mass of approximately 22,700 kg to solidify? Because Mundrabilla's mass before atmospheric entry is unknown, we take as an upper boundary a mass of 4.1 x 10^15kg. These masses, assumed spherical, range in diameter between 1.8 meters and 10 kilometers, respectively. Mundrabilla can be idealized as a pure iron liquid mass cooling from the melting point of pure iron (1535C) by radiation into space at absolute zero. The latent heat of

  2. Estimation of Volume Deficit Characteristic of Cast Al-Si-Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhi, S.; Sakri, S. B.; Rao, D. Hanumantha; Sundarrajan, S.

    2013-04-01

    Volume deficit characteristic of US A356 cast aluminium alloy has been discussed in the present study. The reduction in specific volume leads to volume deficit in castings and it can be visualized as a casting defect. The information regarding the volume deficit and its distribution is essential in minimizing casting defects. The volume deficit can be classified as macro cavities, internal porosity, surface sinks and volumetric contraction. These defects are measured using mathematical formulae and the actual volume deficit of the given casting has been arrived by adding all the defects. Influence of bottom chill and casting shape on the volume deficit characteristics have been studied.

  3. Models of Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, G. H.; Broughton, J. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Laser annealing studies provide much information on various consequences of rapid solidification, including the trapping of impurities in the crystal, the generation of vacancies and twins, and on the fundamental limits to the speed of the crystal-melt interface. Some results obtained by molecular dynamics methods of the solidification of a Lennard-Jones liquid are reviewed. An indication of the relationship of interface speed to undercooling for certain materials can be derived from this model. Ising model simulations of impurity trapping in silicon are compared with some of the laser annealing results. The consequences of interface segregation and atomic strain are discussed.

  4. Models of Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, G. H.; Broughton, J. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Laser annealing studies provide much information on various consequences of rapid solidification, including the trapping of impurities in the crystal, the generation of vacancies and twins, and on the fundamental limits to the speed of the crystal-melt interface. Some results obtained by molecular dynamics methods of the solidification of a Lennard-Jones liquid are reviewed. An indication of the relationship of interface speed to undercooling for certain materials can be derived from this model. Ising model simulations of impurity trapping in silicon are compared with some of the laser annealing results. The consequences of interface segregation and atomic strain are discussed.

  5. Mold with improved core for metal casting operation

    DOEpatents

    Gritzner, Verne B.; Hackett, Donald W.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a mold containing an improved core for use in casting hollow, metallic articles. The core is formed of, or covered with, a layer of cellular material which possesses sufficient strength to maintain its structural integrity during casting, but will crush to alleviate the internal stresses that build up if the normal contraction during solidification and cooling is restricted.

  6. Modeling transport phenomena and uncertainty quantification in solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, Kyle S.

    Direct chill (DC) casting is the primary processing route for wrought aluminum alloys. This semicontinuous process consists of primary cooling as the metal is pulled through a water cooled mold followed by secondary cooling with a water jet spray and free falling water. To gain insight into this complex solidification process, a fully transient model of DC casting was developed to predict the transport phenomena of aluminum alloys for various conditions. This model is capable of solving mixture mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation equations during multicomponent solidification. Various DC casting process parameters were examined for their effect on transport phenomena predictions in an alloy of commercial interest (aluminum alloy 7050). The practice of placing a wiper to divert cooling water from the ingot surface was studied and the results showed that placement closer to the mold causes remelting at the surface and increases susceptibility to bleed outs. Numerical models of metal alloy solidification, like the one previously mentioned, are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. However, uncertainty in model inputs cause uncertainty in results and those insights. The analysis of model assumptions and probable input variability on the level of uncertainty in model predictions has not been calculated in solidification modeling as yet. As a step towards understanding the effect of uncertain inputs on solidification modeling, uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis were first performed on a transient solidification model of a simple binary alloy (Al-4.5wt.%Cu) in a rectangular cavity with both columnar and equiaxed solid growth models. This analysis was followed by quantifying the uncertainty in predictions from the recently developed transient DC casting model. The PRISM Uncertainty Quantification (PUQ) framework quantified the uncertainty and sensitivity in macrosegregation, solidification

  7. Modeling of casting microstructures and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Summers, L.T.; Eckels, D.J.; Sahai, V.

    1997-09-26

    Casting is an ancient art that has been a trial-and-error process for more than 4000 years. To predict the size, shape, and quality of a cast product, casting manufacturers typically cast full-size prototypes. If one part of the process is done incorrectly, the entire process is repeated until an acceptable product is achieved. One way to reduce the time, cost, and waste associated with casting is to use computer modeling to predict not only the quality of a product on the macro- scale, such as distortion and part shape, but also on the micro-scale such as grain defects. Modeling of solidification is becoming increasingly feasible with the advent of parallel computers. There are essentially two approaches to solidification modeling.The first is that of macro-modeling where heat transfer codes model latent heat release during solidification as a constant and based solely on the local temperature. This approach is useful in predicting large scale distortion and final part shape. The second approach, micro-modeling, is more fundamental. The micro-models estimate the latent heat release during solidification using nucleation and grain growth kinetics. Micro-models give insight into cast grain morphology and show promise in the future to predict engineering properties such as tensile strength. The micro-model solidification kinetics can be evaluated using first principles or they can be evaluated using experiments. This work describes an implementation of a micro-model for uranium which uses experimental results to estimate nucleation and growth kinetics.

  8. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  9. Effect of Ce melt treatment on solidification path of ZA8 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, R.; Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    The solidification path of ZA8 alloy with Ce addition was characterized using Newtonian technique of thermal analysis. The solidification events were determined using cooling curve and its first derivative curve. The microstructure and chemical composition of various phases in the alloy were studied using EDS, SEM and XRD techniques. It was found that the addition of Ce did not cause formation of new phases. However, it hinders the nucleation of stable β dendrites in the alloy. The presence of Ce promotes the eutectoid phase transformation and increases the hardness of the alloy. Latent heat of solidification and heat of eutectoid transformation were found to increase on Ce addition. The upward solidification of the alloy against Cu chill was analysed. Chilling had significant influence on solidification parameters, and caused refinement of the microstructure. The addition of Ce to the melt had no effect during chill casting of the alloy.

  10. Microstructural evolution in Mg-Zn alloys during solidification: An experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Manas; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive microstructural evolution of Mg-1.5, 4.0 and 5.5 wt% Zn alloys with respect to the solidification parameters such as thermal gradient (G), solidification velocity (V), cooling rate (GV) and solute (Zn) content were investigated in the present study. Solidification techniques such as directional solidification and wedge casting were employed in order to obtain cooling rates between 0.05 and 250 K/s. Microstructural features such as secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), microsegregration along the secondary dendrites and secondary phase fractions were experimentally determined. A solidification model that incorporates solute back diffusion, secondary arm coarsening, dendrite tip undercooling and dynamically linked with accurate thermodynamic databases is used to explain the experimental results.

  11. Physical Simulation of Investment Casting of Complex Shape Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimian, Mehdi; Milenkovic, Srdjan; Maestro, Laura; De Azua, Aitor Eguidazu Ruiz; Sabirov, Ilchat

    2015-05-01

    Development of investment casting process has been a challenge for manufacturers of complex shape parts. Numerous experimental casting trials are typically carried out to determine the optimum casting parameters for fabrication of high-quality products. In this work, it is demonstrated that physical simulation of investment casting can successfully predict microstructure and hardness in as-cast complex shape parts. The physical simulation tool consists of a thermal model and melting/solidification experiments in thermo-mechanical simulator. The thermal model is employed to predict local cooling rate during solidification at each point of a casting. Melting/solidification experiments are carried out under controlled cooling rates estimated by the thermal model. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of the solidified specimens is performed; the obtained results predict the local microstructure and mechanical properties of the casting. This concept is applied to investment casting of complex shape nozzle guide vanes from Mar-M247 Ni-based superalloy. Experimental casting trials are performed and the outcomes of physical simulation tool are validated against experimental results. It is shown that phase composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing, grain size, γ/ γ' eutectic size and volume fraction, size and shape of carbide particles, and local microhardness can be predicted at each point of the casting via physical simulation.

  12. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  13. Solidification and phase equilibria in the Fe-C-Cr-NbC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregolin, J. A. R.; Alcantara, N. G.

    1991-10-01

    A solidification model is developed and experimentally checked for Fe-C-Cr-Nb alloys in the white cast irons range. It is based on a partial quaternary Fe-C-Cr-NbC phase diagram and predicts the possible solidification paths for the alloys containing γ, with (Fe,Cr)7C3 and NbC as the microconstituents at room temperature. The dendritic γ to massive (Fe,Cr)7C3 transition in experimental alloy microstructures with NbC contents up to 22 pet is explained by this model. Thermal analysis is also used to compare the solidification paths and model approach.

  14. Directional solidification at ultra-high thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Lee, D. S.; Neff, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A high gradient controlled solidification (HGC) furnace was designed and operated at gradients up to 1800 C/cm to continuously produce aluminum alloys. Rubber '0' rings for the water cooling chamber were eliminated, while still maintaining water cooling directly onto the solidified metal. An HGC unit for high temperature ferrous alloys was also designed. Successful runs were made with cast iron, at thermal gradients up to 500 C/cm.

  15. Solidification structure and abrasion resistance of high chromium white irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Laird, G.

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  16. The Influence of Ni and V Trace Elements on High-Temperature Tensile Properties and Aging of A356 Aluminum Foundry Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giovanni, Maria Teresa; Cerri, Emanuela; Casari, Daniele; Merlin, Mattia; Arnberg, Lars; Garagnani, Gian Luca

    2016-05-01

    High-temperature tensile properties of unmodified A356 alloy with and without the addition of Ni or V in traces (600 and 1000 ppm of Ni and V, respectively) were investigated by analyzing samples obtained from sand and permanent mold castings in the as-cast and T6 heat-treated conditions. Tensile tests were performed at 508 K (235 °C) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. In addition, samples were subjected to artificial aging at 508 K (235 °C) for different times, and corresponding hardness curves were plotted. Microstructures and fracture surfaces, analyzed by FEG-SEM equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, showed that neither Ni nor V addition had a detrimental effect on high-temperature tensile properties. Aging curves showed a strong loss of hardness affecting the T6 class between 30-min and 1-h exposure time. After 6-h aging, no evidence of aging treatment persisted on hardness of the tested material. Hardness values did not reveal any significant difference between the reference alloy and the Ni- and V-containing alloys in both casting conditions, in complete analogy with the tensile properties. Unmodified eutectic silicon particles provided inhomogeneity in the α-Al matrix and acted as the principal source of stress concentration leading to fracture.

  17. Structural features of atomized white cast iron powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, A. P.; Astakhov, S. I.

    1991-01-01

    White cast iron powder rapidly quenched from the liquid condition with presence of the same phases and structural components differs markedly in structure from normally cast white iron. With an increase in cooling rate vcool during solidification the amount of eutectic decreases. However, with an increase in carbon content this tendency is weakened and with 3.9% the structure of powder cast iron is almost entirely of eutectic.

  18. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  19. Solidification of undercooled metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the subject of undercooling (i.e., supercooling) in the case of metal alloys, taking into account the effects of undercooling on microstructure and microsegregation in alloys which solidify in a crystalline manner. Techniques for obtaining a large degree of undercooling are discussed. These techniques make it possible to eliminate heterogeneous nucleants from the melt and to remove container nucleation effects. The nucleation behavior of small metal droplets is considered along with the formation of a dispersion of fine droplets in a suitable inert medium, the mixing of fine metal powders with glass powder, and the levitation melting technique. Attention is given to solidification with rapid interface velocity, aspects of dendritic morphology, and thermal measurements during solidification of undercooled droplets.

  20. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The long range goal is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis during the period of this grant was on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneties were correlated using naphthalene doped with azulene. In addition the influence of spin-up/spin-down on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide and the effect of imposed melting-freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide are discussed.

  1. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  2. Fundamental studies on ultrasonic cavitation-assisted molten metal processing of A356-nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoda

    The usage of lightweight high-performance components is expected to increase significantly as automotive, military and aerospace industries are required to improve the energy efficiency and the performance of their products. A356, which is much lighter than steel, is an attractive replacement material. Therefore, it is of great interest to enhance its properties. There is strong evidence that the microstructure and mechanical properties can be considerably improved if nanoparticles are used as reinforcement to form metal-matrix-nano-composite (MMNC). Several recent studies revealed that ultrasonic vibration is highly efficient in dispersing nanoparticles into the melt and producing MMNC. In this thesis, a detailed analysis of the microstructure and mechanical properties is provided for an A356 alloy enhanced with Al2O 3 and SiC nanoparticles via ultrasonic processing. Each type of the nanoparticles was inserted into the A356 molten metal and dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming technology (UST) to avoid agglomeration or coalescence. The results showed that microstructures were greatly refined and with the addition of nanoparticles, tensile strength, yield strength and elongation increased significantly. SEM and EDS analyses were also performed to analyze the dispersion of nanoparticles in the A356 matrix. Since the ultrasonic energy is concentrated in a small region under the ultrasonic probe, it is difficult to ensure proper cavitation and acoustic streaming for efficient dispersion of the nanoparticles (especially in larger UST systems) without to determine the suitable ultrasonic parameters via modeling and simulation. Accordingly, another goal of this thesis was to develop well-controlled UST experiments that can be used in the development and validation of a recently developed UST modeling and simulation tool.

  3. Damage Assessment of A356 Al Alloy Under Ratcheting-Creep Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Srimant Kumar; Roy, H.; Mondal, A. K.; Dutta, Krishna

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this report was to examine the influence of asymmetric cyclic stress on the ratcheting behavior of A356 Al alloy with special emphasis on its postratcheting creep behavior. A series of A356 alloy specimens were deformed under asymmetrical cyclic loading with different combinations of mean stress and stress amplitude. These tests were carried out up to 2000 cycles. Followed by ratcheting, the specimens were subjected to impression creep tests under varied stresses and temperatures. It is revealed from the ratcheting tests that strain accumulation increases with increasing stress amplitude or mean stress. However, total accumulated ratcheting strain of the investigated alloy was significantly low compared to that reported for some other aluminum alloys. The results of creep tests indicated that predominantly dislocation climb-assisted creep occurred for the alloy. Postratcheted specimens exhibited higher creep rates compared to that of the as-received A356 alloy; this fact was attributed to the work softening of the specimens during the impression creep test. The extent of work softening was minimum in the specimen that accumulated the highest strain during ratcheting, leading to its lowest creep rate.

  4. Semi-Solid Forming of A356 Alloy by Rapid Slurry Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sharma, A.; Kumar, S.

    Rapid Slurry Forming (RSF) is a relatively new technique of semi-solid forming. RSF process has been used for A356, A356+Ti+B (grain refiner) and A356+Ti+B+Sr (grain refiner and modifier) Al alloys in the present investigation. All the three alloys were held at 597°C, at which about 30% solid fraction is obtained in the semi-solid slurry, for 0, 5, 10 and 15 minutes. After each holding time, the slurry was quenched in water to preserve the semi-solid microstructure. Microstructure of all the three alloys at each stage was examined and hardness was measured. A globular microstructure was obtained for the RSF-processed alloys. The globularity of a-grains increased but grain size also increased and hardness decreased with increase in holding time. The optimum hold time appeared to be 5 minutes. The grain refiner and modifier did not seem to have any effect on the formation of semi solid slurry. The coarsening kinetics of the globular a-grains was found to be faster than that predicted by the LSW theory.

  5. The Solidification of Multicomponent Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Boettinger, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Various topics taken from the author’s research portfolio that involve multicomponent alloy solidification are reviewed. Topics include: ternary eutectic solidification and Scheil-Gulliver paths in ternary systems. A case study of the solidification of commercial 2219 aluminum alloy is described. Also described are modifications of the Scheil-Gulliver analysis to treat dendrite tip kinetics and solid diffusion for multicomponent alloys. PMID:28819348

  6. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  7. AMCC casting development. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Combustion Chamber Casting (AMCC) has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or Thermal Gradient Control. This method, of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification, represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. Metallurgical integrity of the final four castings was very good. Only the areas of the parts that utilized 'TGC Shape & Location System #2' showed any significant areas of microshrinkage when evaluated by non-destructive tests. Alumina oxides detected by FPI on the 'float' surfaces (top sid surfaces of the casting during solidification) of the part were almost entirely less than the acceptance criteria of .032 inches in diameter. Destructive chem mill of the castings was required to determine the effect of the process variables used during the processing of these last four parts (with the exception of the 'Shape & Location of TGC' variable).

  8. AMCC casting development. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Combustion Chamber Casting (AMCC) has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or Thermal Gradient Control. This method, of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification, represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. Metallurgical integrity of the final four castings was very good. Only the areas of the parts that utilized 'TGC Shape & Location System #2' showed any significant areas of microshrinkage when evaluated by non-destructive tests. Alumina oxides detected by FPI on the 'float' surfaces (top sid surfaces of the casting during solidification) of the part were almost entirely less than the acceptance criteria of .032 inches in diameter. Destructive chem mill of the castings was required to determine the effect of the process variables used during the processing of these last four parts (with the exception of the 'Shape & Location of TGC' variable).

  9. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  10. Computer simulation using CaPS of an aluminum plate casting

    SciTech Connect

    Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Chuzhoy, L.; Nastac, L.

    1995-12-31

    A simulation of a benchmark test casting has been performed with the CaPS-3D casting process simulator software. The test casting was made at the University of Birmingham in the UK and for the 7th International Conference on the Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes. The measured results were not available prior to the simulation, hence the simulation is a blind prediction.

  11. Computer simulation with CaPS of an aluminum plate casting

    SciTech Connect

    Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Chuzhoy, L.; Nastac, L.

    1995-12-31

    A simulation of a benchmark test casting has been performed with the CaPS-3D casting process simulator software. The test casting was made at the University of Birmingham in the UK for the 7th International Conference on the Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes. The measured results were not available prior to the simulation, hence the simulation is a blind prediction.

  12. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  13. Melt Conditioned Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scamans, Geoff; Li, Hu-Tian; Fan, Zhongyun

    High shear melt conditioning of aluminum alloy melts disperses oxide films and provides potent nuclei to promote non-dendritic solidification leading to refined as cast microstructures for shape castings, semis or continuously cast product forms. A new generation of high shear melt conditioning equipment has been developed based on a dispersive mixer that can condition either a batch melt or can provide a continuous melt feed. Most significantly the melt conditioner can be used directly in the sump of a DC caster where it has a dramatic effect on the cast microstructure. The present goals are to expand the castable alloy range and to increase the tolerance of alloys used in transport applications to impurities to increase the use of recycled metal. The paper will review the current status of the melt conditioning technology across the range of casting options and will highlight development opportunities.

  14. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  15. Solidification of undercooled liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, J. H.; Shiohara, Y.; Paik, J. S.; Flemmings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    During rapid solidification processing (RSP) the amount of liquid undercooling is an important factor in determining microstructural development by controlling phase selection during nucleation and morphological evolution during crystal growth. While undercooling is an inherent feature of many techniques of RSP, the deepest undercoolings and most controlled studies have been possible in carefully prepared fine droplet samples. From past work and recent advances in studies of nucleation kinetics it has become clear that the initiation of crystallization during RSP is governed usually by heterogeneous sites located at surfaces. With known nucleant sites, it has been possible to identify specific pathways of metastable phase formation and microstructural development in alloys. These advances have allowed for a clearer assessment of the interplay between undercooling, cooling rate and particle size statistics in structure formation. New approaches to the examination of growth processes have been developed to follow the thermal behavior and morphology in small samples in the period of rapid crystallization and recalescence. Based upon the new experimental information from these studies, useful models can be developed for the overall solidification process to include nucleation behavior, thermodynamic constraints, thermal history, growth kinetics, solute redistribution and resulting structures. From the refinement of knowledge concerning the underlying factors that govern RSP a basis is emerging for an effective alloy design and processing strategy.

  16. Variations of Microsegregation and Second Phase Fraction of Binary Mg-Al Alloys with Solidification Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Manas; Kang, Dae Hoon; Essadiqi, Elhachmi; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-07-01

    A systematic experimental investigation on microsegregation and second phase fraction of Mg-Al binary alloys (3, 6, and 9 wt pct Al) has been carried out over a wide range of cooling rates (0.05 to 700 K/s) by employing various casting techniques. In order to explain the experimental results, a solidification model that takes into account dendrite tip undercooling, eutectic undercooling, solute back diffusion, and secondary dendrite arm coarsening was also developed in dynamic linkage with an accurate thermodynamic database. From the experimental data and solidification model, it was found that the second phase fraction in the solidified microstructure is not determined only by cooling rate but varied independently with thermal gradient and solidification velocity. Lastly, the second phase fraction maps for Mg-Al alloys were calculated from the solidification model.

  17. Multiscale X-ray and Proton Imaging of Bismuth-Tin Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Imhoff, S. D.; Morris, C. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.; Nedrow, P.; Mariam, F. G.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.-K.; Clarke, A. J.

    2014-08-01

    The formation of structural patterns during metallic solidification is complex and multiscale in nature, ranging from the nanometer scale, where solid-liquid interface properties are important, to the macroscale, where casting mold filling and intended heat transfer are crucial. X-ray and proton imaging can directly interrogate structure, solute, and fluid flow development in metals from the microscale to the macroscale. X-rays permit high spatio-temporal resolution imaging of microscopic solidification dynamics in thin metal sections. Similarly, high-energy protons permit imaging of mesoscopic and macroscopic solidification dynamics in large sample volumes. In this article, we highlight multiscale x-ray and proton imaging of bismuth-tin alloy solidification to illustrate dynamic measurement of crystal growth rates and solute segregation profiles that can be that can be acquired using these techniques.

  18. Effect of modification on the solidification of Al-Si aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, I. A.; Berezhnoi, D. V.; Ryakhovskii, A. P.; Moiseev, V. S.

    2017-03-01

    The solidification of the AK12 alloy processed by a standard flux and a combined modifying flux, which significantly increases the mechanical properties of the alloy at a significant increase in the modifying effect time, is studied. The experimental results are simulated using the ProCAST software package.

  19. Effect of Grade on Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Steel During Initial Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappulla, Matthew L. S.; Hibbeler, Lance C.; Thomas, Brian G.

    2017-08-01

    Thermal-mechanical analysis of solidification is important to understand crack formation, shape problems, and other aspects of casting processes. This work investigates the effect of grade on thermal-mechanical behavior during initial solidification of steels during continuous casting of a wide strand. The employed finite element model includes non-linear temperature-, phase-, and carbon content-dependent elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations. The model is verified using an analytical solution, and a mesh convergence study is performed. Four steel grades are simulated for 30 seconds of casting without friction: ultra-low-carbon, low-carbon, peritectic, and high-carbon steel. All grades show the same general behavior. Initially, rapid cooling causes tensile stress and inelastic strain near the surface of the shell, with slight complementary compression beneath the surface, especially with lower carbon content. As the cooling rate decreases with time, the surface quickly reverses into compression, with a tensile region developing toward the solidification front. Higher stress and inelastic strain are generated in the high-carbon steel, because it contains more high-strength austenite. Stress in the δ-ferrite phase near the solidification front is always very small, owing to the low strength of this phase. This modeling methodology is a step toward designing better mold taper profiles for continuous casting of different steels.

  20. Prediction of grain structures in various solidification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Gandin, C.A.; Desbiolles, J.L.; Thevoz, P.

    1996-03-01

    Grain structure formation during solidification can be simulated via the use of stochastic models providing the physical mechanisms of nucleation and dendrite growth are accounted for. With this goal in mind, a physically based cellular automaton (CA) model has been coupled with finite element (FE) heat flow computations and implemented into the code 3-MOS. The CA enmeshment of the solidifying domain with small square cells is first generated automatically from the FE mesh. Within each time-step, the variation of enthalpy at each node of the FE mesh is calculated using an implicit scheme and a Newton-type linearization method. After interpolation of the explicit temperature and of the enthalpy variation at the cell location, the nucleation and growth of grains are simulated using the CA algorithm. This algorithm accounts for the heterogeneous nucleation in the bulk and at the surface of the ingot, for the growth and preferential growth directions of the dendrites, and for microsegregation. The variation of volume fraction of solid at the cell location are then summed up at the FE nodes in order to find the new temperatures. This CAFE model, which allows the prediction and the visualization of grain structures during and after solidification, is applied to various solidification processes: the investment casting of turbine blades, the continuous casting of rods, and the laser remelting or welding of plates. Because the CAFE model is yet two-dimensional (2-D), the simulation results are compared in a qualitative way with experimental findings.

  1. Computer prediction of hot tears in castings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Sundarraj, S.; Jo, J.; Chandra, U.

    1996-12-31

    Hot tears occur frequently in parts made by a process involving solidification such as casting, welding or semi-solid metalworking. This paper presents an attempt to predict hot tears in castings utilizing Pellini`s strain theory and the finite element method. The proposed methodology involves two key steps: (1) the prediction of the thickness of liquid film surrounding the solid grains, and (2) the calculation of the accumulated strain in the liquid film; both of these quantities are computed as the solidification progresses. Then, by comparing the computed strain at each time step with the critical fracture or hot tear strain, the possibility of hot tears may be predicted. The critical fracture strain is a function of solid fraction and is predetermined experimentally. The thickness of the liquid film is predicted with the help of a microscopic solidification model. Also, a new constitutive model is proposed to compute the strain in liquid film. The two models are implemented in a commercial general purpose transient nonlinear thermo-mechanical finite element analysis software. The proposed methodology is applied to a two-dimensional casting made of a short freezing range alloy since an experimentally obtained set of necessary material constants is available for such an alloy. The extension of the proposed methodology to three-dimensional castings does not require any additional development.

  2. Simulation of weld solidification microstructure and its coupling to the macroscopic heat and fluid flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyk, Vitaliy; Dilthey, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure exerts a strong influence on the mechanical properties and on the integrity of welded joints. Prediction of the formation of the microstructure during welding and of other solidification processes may be an important and supporting factor for technology optimization. Nowadays, increasing computing power allows direct simulations of the dendritic and cell morphology of columnar grains in the molten zone for specific temperature conditions. Modelling is carried out, on the one hand, with the finite difference—cellular automata and, on the other hand, with the phase field method. Determination of the solidification conditions during fusion welding (temperature gradient, local solidification rate, weld pool shape) is carried out with a numerical macroscopic finite element modelling calculation of the weld pool fluid flow and of the temperature distribution, as presented in this paper. As with the use of accurate physical models, the simulations are carried out with a spatial resolution of the microstructure, and many assumptions and restrictions from traditional, analytical or phenomenological models may be eliminated. The possibilities of using numerical algorithms for generation and visualization of microstructure formation during solidification are demonstrated. The spectrum of applications extends from welding and casting to processes with rapid solidification. In particular, computer simulations of the solidification conditions and the formation of a dendritic morphology during the directional solidification in gas-tungsten-arc welding are described. Moreover, the simulation results are compared with the experimental findings.

  3. The use of molten salts as physical models for the study of solidification in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Jurek K.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that molten salts possess attributes rendering them attractive as physical models of cast metals in solidification studies. Molten alkali halides have an approximately correct Prandtl number for this modeling of metallic melts, and are transparent to visible light. Attention is given to solidification in the LiCl-KCl system, in order to determine whether such phenomena as solute rejection can be observed and characterized through the application of laser schlieren imaging.

  4. Microstructural evolution during reheating of A356 machining chips at semisolid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Wen-qiang; Xiao, Wen-long; Yamagata, Hiroshi; Ma, Chao-li

    2017-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of A356 machining chips in the semisolid state was studied at different temperatures and holding times. The results showed that the elongated α-Al grains first recrystallized in the semisolid state and then became globular with a high shape factor (SF). Both the temperature and the holding time clearly affected the grain size and SF. When the heating temperature or holding time was increased, the grain size and SF gradually increased and finally became stable. Moreover, the Vickers hardness of primary α-Al grains gradually decreased with increasing heating temperature. The optimal slurry for semisolid processing, with a good combination of grain size and SF, was obtained when the chips were held at 600°C for 15 min. The semisolid slurry of A356 chips exhibited a lower coarsening rate of α-Al grains than those produced by most of the conventional semisolid processes. The coarsening coefficient was determined to be 436 μm3·s-1 on the basis of the linear Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) relationship.

  5. Tribological Behavior of A356/Al2O3 Surface Nanocomposite Prepared by Friction Stir Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M. H.

    2014-04-01

    Surface A356 aluminum alloy matrix composites containing micro and nanosized Al2O3 are prepared by a new approach utilizing high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and friction stir processing (FSP). Optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness, and wear tests were used to characterize the surface composites. Results indicated that, the presence of Al2O3 in matrix can improve the mechanical properties of specimens. The microhardness of surface composites containing micro and nanosized Al2O3 were 89.8 ± 2.6 HV and 109.7 ± 2.5 HV, respectively, which were higher than those for the as-received (79.6 ± 1.1 HV) and the FSPed A356-T6 with no alumina powder (66.8 ± 0.9 HV). Surface composites revealed low friction coefficients and wear rates, which were significantly lower than those obtained for substrate. The wear mass losses of the as-received, the FSPed, and surface micro and nanocomposite specimens after 500-m sliding distance were 50.5, 55.6, 31, and 17.2 mg, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy tests revealed different wear mechanisms on the surface of the wear test specimens.

  6. Fundamentals of rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Shiohara, Yuh

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate the continuous change that occurs in the solidification behavior of undercooled melts, as cooling rates increase from 0.0001 K/sec to about 1000 K/sec. At the higher cooling rates, more significant changes occur as the dendrite tip temperature begins to drop from the equilibrium liquidus. Discontinuous solidification behavior changes will occur if absolute stability is reached, or a metastable phase forms, or solidification proceeds to a glass rather than to a crystalline solid, or if there is significant undercooling prior to nucleation.

  7. Formation of microstructures in the spheroidal graphite cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Daloz, D.; Bruneseaux, F.; Lesoult, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pipeline systems for hydraulic networks are obtained via centrifugal casting of spheroidal graphite cast iron. The very high cooling rate that is achieved in the skin of the product can sometimes lead to carbide instead of graphite in cast iron. An experimental device has been built in the laboratory that allows reproducing the extreme thermal conditions encountered during formation of skin of centrifugally cast pipes. Liquid metal droplets fall on a cold substrate. Rapid directional solidification occurs. The temperature evolution of the lower surface of the droplet is recorded during the very first moment of the solidification (t < 200 ms) thanks to a photodiode, which is located below the substrate. The microstructures that are obtained in laboratory are characterised in both the as-cast state and the heat-treated state. They are compared to the centrifugally cast ones. A model of directional solidification of cast iron under a very large temperature gradient has been built. It allows explaining the transition from stable to metastable micro structure that was observed in the products and reproduced in the laboratory samples.

  8. Influence of Refiner in ZA-12 Alloys During Centrifugal Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, P. N.; Shailesh, Rao A.; Jagath, M. C.; Channakeshavalu, K.

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of the molten melt plays a predominant role in determining the quality cast product. In continuous casting, addition of refiner 1% (Al+Ti+B2) onto the molten metal increases its mechanical properties as a result of the nucleation within the process. In this article, the effect of refiners in the centrifugal casting process was studied. Eutectic ZA-12 alloys were taken for our experiment and cast at various rotational speeds (400 rpm, 600 rpm, and 800 rpm) with and without the addition of refiners. Rather than increase in the solidification rate as in continuous casting, these refiners diminish the solidification rate, which in turn forms an irregular-shaped cast tube. The microstructure and hardness for the entire cast specimen were discussed finally.

  9. Structure characteristics in industrially centrifugally cast 25Cr20Ni stainless steel tubes solidified under different electromagnetic field intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.Q.; Yang, Y.S.; Zhang, J.S.; Jia, G.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    1999-10-01

    The influences of different electromagnetic field intensities on the solidification structures of industrially centrifugally cast 25Cr20Ni stainless steel tubes have been investigated in detail. The results reveal that the electromagnetic field exerted during the centrifugal solidification causes a marked variation in the structures of the cast tubes. With an increase of the electromagnetic field intensity, the area fraction of the equiaxed structures in transverse sections of the cast tubes increases, and the macrostructures are gradually refined. The distribution of the eutectic carbides changes from the dendrite boundaries to the grain boundaries. However, an excessive electromagnetic field intensity gives rise to many intergranular cast defects formed along the inner walls of the centrifugally cast tubes. The effects of fluid flow induced by the electromagnetic field on the solidification process of the centrifugally cast tubes are the primary reason for the previously mentioned structure variations.

  10. A Review of Permanent Magnet Stirring During Metal Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing; Yang, Yindong; Mclean, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Rather than using conventional electromagnetic stirring (EMS) with three-phase alternating current, permanent magnet stirring (PMS), based on the use of sintered NdFeB material which has excellent magnetic characteristics, can be employed to generate a magnetic field for the stirring of liquid metal during solidification. Recent experience with steel casting indicates that PMS requires less than 20 pct of the total energy compared with EMS. Despite the excellent magnetic density properties and low power consumption, this relatively new technology has received comparatively little attention by the metal casting community. This paper reviews simulation modeling, experimental studies, and industrial trials of PMS conducted during recent years. With the development of magnetic simulation software, the magnetic field and associated flow patterns generated by PMS have been evaluated. Based on the results obtained from laboratory experiments, the effects of PMS on metal solidification structures and typical defects such as surface pinholes and center cavities are summarized. The significance of findings obtained from trials of PMS within the metals processing sector, including the continuous casting of steel, are discussed with the aim of providing an overview of the relevant parameters that are of importance for further development and industrial application of this innovative technology.

  11. Comparison of residual stresses in sand- and chill casting of ductile cast iron wind turbine main shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonne, M. R.; Frandsen, J. O.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, simulations of pouring, solidification and cooling, and residual stress evolution of sand and chill cast wind turbine main shafts is performed. The models are made in the commercial software MAGMAsoft. As expected, the cooling rate of the sand casting is shown to be much lower than for the chill casting, resulting in a very course microstructure. From the simulations the nodule count is found to be 17 nodules per mm2 and 159 nodules per mm2 for the sand and chill casting, respectively, in the critical region of the main bearing seat. This is verified from nodule counts performed on the real cast main shafts. Residual stress evaluations show an overall increase of the maximum principal stress field for the chill casting, which is expected. However, the stresses are found to be in compression on the surface of the chill cast main shaft, which is unforeseen.

  12. Modeling fluid interactions with the rigid mush in alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkowski, Alexander J.

    Macrosegregation is a casting defect characterized by long range composition differences on the length scale of the ingot. These variations in local composition can lead to the development of unwanted phases that are detrimental to mechanical properties. Unlike microsegregation, in which compositions vary over the length scale of the dendrite arms, macrosegregation cannot be removed by subsequent heat treatment, and so it is critical to understand its development during solidification processing. Due to the complex nature of the governing physical phenomena, many researchers have turned to numerical simulations for these predictions, but properly modeling alloy solidification presents a variety of challenges. Among these is the appropriate treatment of the interface between the bulk fluid and the rigid mushy zone. In this region, the non-linear and coupled behavior of heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solute transport, and alloy thermodynamics has a dramatic effect on macrosegregation predictions. This work investigates the impact of numerical approximations at this interface in the context of a mixture model for alloy solidification. First, the numerical prediction of freckles in columnar solidification is investigated, and the predictive ability of the model is evaluated. The model is then extended to equiaxed solidification, in which the analogous interface is the transition of free-floating solid particles to a rigid dendritic network. Various models for grain attachment are investigated, and found to produce significant artifacts caused by the discrete nature of their implementation on the numerical grid. To reduce the impact of these artifacts, a new continuum grain attachment model is proposed and evaluated. The differences between these models are compared using uncertainty quantification, and recommendations for future research are presented.

  13. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  14. Interdiffusion between U(Mo,Pt) or U(Mo,Zr) and Al or Al A356 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar Varela, C.; Mirandou, M.; Aricó, S.; Balart, S.; Gribaudo, L.

    2009-12-01

    Solid state reactions in chemical diffusion couples U-7 wt.%Mo-0.9 wt.%Pt/Al at 580 °C and U-7 wt.%Mo-0.9 wt.%Pt/Al A356 alloy, U-7 wt.%Mo-1 wt.%Zr/Al and U-7 wt.%Mo-1 wt.%Zr/Al A356 alloy at 550 °C were characterized. Results were obtained from optical and scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. The UAl 3, UAl 4 and Al 20Mo 2U phases were identified in the interaction layers of γU(Mo,Pt)/Al and γU(Mo,Zr)/Al diffusion couples. Al 43Mo 4U 6 ternary compound was also identified in γU(Mo,Zr)/Al due to the decomposition of γU(Mo,Zr) phase. The U(Al,Si) 3 and U 3Si 5 phases were identified in the interaction layers of γU(Mo,Pt)/Al A356 and γU(Mo,Zr)/Al A356 diffusion couples. These phases are formed due to the migration of Si to the interaction layer. In the diffusion couple U(Mo,Zr)/Al A356, Zr 5Al 3 phase was also identified in the interaction layer. The use of synchrotron radiation at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS, CNPq, Campinas, Brazil) was necessary to achieve a complete crystallographic characterization.

  15. Numerical study of porosity in titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Sahm, P R; Augthun, M; Spiekermann, H; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J

    1999-09-01

    A commercial software package, MAGMASOFT (MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Aachen, Germany), was used to study shrinkage and gas porosity in titanium dental castings. A geometrical model for two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar was created. Both mold filling and solidification of this casting model were numerically simulated. Shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by means of a built-in feeding criterion. The risk of gas pore formation was investigated using the numerical filling and solidification results. The results of the numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which were carried out on a centrifugal casting machine with an investment block mold. The block mold was made of SiO2 based slurry with a 1 mm thick Zr2 face coat to reduce metal-mold reactions. Both melting and casting were carried out under protective argon (40 kPa). The finished castings were sectioned and the shrinkage porosity determined. The experimentally determined shrinkage porosity coincided with the predicted numerical simulation results. No apparent gas porosity was found in these model castings. Several running and gating systems for the above model casting were numerically simulated. An optimized running and gating system design was then experimentally cast, which resulted in porosity-free castings.

  16. Investigation of the beryllia ceramics molding process by the hot casting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Sattinova, Z. K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of mathematical simulation of the ceramics molding process by the hot casting method are presented. The mathematical model describes the motion of beryllia liquid thermoplastic slurry in a form-building cavity subject to solidification. Velocity and temperature profiles providing homogeneous properties of the beryllia ceramics in the process of molding by the hot casting method are obtained.

  17. Factors Governing the Formation of Feathery Crystals in DC-Cast Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullman, Lars-Otto; Johansson, Leif

    Feathery crystals occur in DC-cast ingots of nearly all aluminium alloys. This unique solidification structure was first noticed after the introduction of the DC casting process and has since then been the subject of several investigations (1-7).

  18. Effects of Solid-Liquid Mixing on Microstructure of Semi-Solid A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. M.; Wang, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Yang, X. J.

    2014-08-01

    The desired starting material for semi-solid processing is the semi-solid slurry in which the solid phase is present as fine and globular particles. A modified solid-liquid mixing (SLM) is reported wherein semi-solid slurry can be produced by mixing a solid alloy block into a liquid alloy, and mechanical vibration is utilized to enhance the mixing. Effects such as liquid alloy temperature, mass ratio, and mixing intensity on the microstructure and the cooling curves during SLM were evaluated. 2D and 3D microstructure analysis of treated A356 aluminum alloy shows that microstructure can be refined significantly with a considerable morphology change in primary Al phase. It is critical that the temperature of mixture after mixing is lower than its liquidus temperature to obtain a valid SLM process. Specially, mixing intensity is identified as a primary factor for a favorable microstructure of semi-solid slurry.

  19. Cold Cracking During Direct-Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, D. G.; Lalpoor, M.; Katgerman, L.

    Cold cracking phenomenon is the least studied, yet very important defect occurring during direct chill casting. The spontaneous nature of this defect makes its systematic study almost impossible, and the computer simulation of the thermomechanical behavior of the ingot during its cooling after the end of solidification requires constitutive parameters of high-strength aluminum alloys in the as-cast condition, which are not readily available. In this paper we describe constitutive behavior of high strength 7xxx series aluminum alloys in the as-cast condition based on experimentally measured tensile properties at different strain rates and temperatures, plane strain fracture toughness at different temperatures, and thermal contraction. In addition, fracture and structure of the specimens and real cold-cracked billets are examined. As a result a fracture-mechanics-based criterion of cold cracking is suggested based on the critical crack length, and is validated upon pilot-scale billet casting.

  20. Numerical investigation of a binary solidification design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Scott Wayne

    This exposition presents the development and application of a methodology for control of unidirectional solidification of a binary alloy. In particular, it is desired to produce a casting that has a uniform cast structure throughout its entire length. Furthermore, the methodology allows the specification, a priori, of the cast structure with respect to both scale, i.e., fine or coarse, and morphology, i.e., dentritic or cellular. This specification is in the form of a map that relates solidification characteristics, i.e., scale and morphology, to the solidification velocity and liquid-side interfacial temperature gradient. Thus design is accomplished by controlling these two parameters during the solidification process. With this in mind, the goal of what is termed the binary solidification design problem is the prediction of a set of boundary temperatures and heat fluxes which when applied will result in the desired interfacial motion and temperature gradient and therefore cast structure. Mathematical models for problems of this type lead to what are termed ill-posed systems in that they may not exhibit existence, uniqueness, or continuous dependence on boundary data. The resolution of this class of problems requires advanced techniques to overcome the instabilities encountered due to their ill-posed nature. The methodology developed herein employs the classical weight residual approach in a innovative manner. Normally, in the solution of a parabolic partial differential equation, such as the heat equation, a spatial series expansion with time varying coefficients is utilized along with a minimization technique to reduce the partial differential equation to a set of first order ordinary differential equations. This set can be solved using any number of numerical technique, i.e., Runge-Kutta, to obtain the temporal variation of the coefficients. These types of time stepping techniques eventually lead to the onset of instability when employed for the resolution of

  1. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes (ICASP - 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Gerhard; Ratke, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes was held in the Rolduc Abbey in the Netherlands a few kilometres away from Aachen. Around 200 scientists from 24 countries come in for the four day meeting. They found a stimulating but also relaxing environment and atmosphere, with beautiful weather and the medieval abbey inviting for walks, discussions, sitting outside and drinking a beer or wine. The contributions given at the conference reflected recent advances in various topics of solidification processes, ranging from fundamental aspects to applied casting technologies. In 20 oral sessions and a large poster session innovative results of segregation phenomena, microstructure evolution, nucleation and growth, phase formation, polyphase solidification, rapid solidification and welding, casting technology, thermophysics of molten alloys, solidification with forced melt flow and growth of single crystals and superalloys together with innovative diagnostic techniques were presented. Thereby, findings from experiments as well as from numerical modeling on different lengths scales were jointly discussed and contribute to new insight in solidification behaviour. The papers presented in this open access proceedings cover about half the oral and poster presentations given. They were carefully reviewed as in classical peer reviewed journals by two independent referees and most of them were revised and thus improved according to the reviewers comments. We think that this collection of papers presented at ICASP-3 gives an impression of the excellent contributions made. The papers embrace both the basic and applied aspects of solidification. We especially wish to express our appreciation for the team around Georg Schmitz and Margret Nienhaus organising this event and giving us their valued advice and support at every stage in preparing the conference. We also thank Lokasenna Lektorat for taking the task of checking all language-associated issues and

  2. The GTAW of Ti-6Al-4V castings and its effect on microstructural and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, James; Pillers, James; Veeck, Stewart

    2005-11-01

    The gas-tungsten arc welding of Ti-6Al-4V investment castings is an integral part of titanium casting processing due to the need to repair casting defects. It is speculated that the refined alpha/beta microstructure produced by faster solidification of the weld metal can affect the static and dynamic properties of the casting. This report examines the effects of weld repair on microstructure and mechanical properties.

  3. Directional solidification under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantat, Isabelle; Kassner, Klaus; Misbah, Chaouqi; Müller-Krumbhaar, Heiner

    1998-11-01

    Directional solidification under uniaxial stress is analyzed. In the absence of stress, it is well known that the moving planar front undergoes a morphological Mullins-Sekerka (MS) instability. Under uniaxial stress, even an interface at rest develops an instability known by the names of Asaro, Tiller, and Grinfeld (ATG). This paper analyzes the coupling between these two instabilities, a situation on which we have recently given a brief account [Durand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3013 (1996)]. We discover that under favorable circumstances a weak uniaxial stress of the order of 1 bar leads to a dramatic change of the Mullins-Sekerka instability. The threshold, together with the microstructure scale, are shifted by amounts going up to one (or several) decade(s). This effect should open new lines of both experimental and theoretical inquiries. A weakly nonlinear analysis is presented by means of a Landau expansion. It is known that the MS bifurcation is subcritical for a small enough solute partition coefficient, and is supercritical otherwise. The ATG instability is always subcritical. The nonlinear evolution of the ATG instability leads to cusps which grow unstably, leading ultimately to the fracture threshold. It is shown here that due to a subtle coupling between both instabilities, the MS bifurcation in its supercritical regime may cause the MS-ATG coupled bifurcation to be supercritical. Discussions and outlooks are presented. In particular it is appealing to speculate that the creation of giant causeways in igneous rocks can be interpreted within the present context.

  4. Interfacial Shear Strength of Cast and Directionally Solidified Nial-Sapphire Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  5. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chirita, G.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S.; Stefanescu, I.

    2008-02-15

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting)

  6. Effects of Process Parameters on Solidification Structure of A390 Aluminum Alloy Hollow Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Kesheng; Zhang, Haitao; Qin, Ke; Cui, Jianzhong; Chen, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of process parameters on the solidification structure of A390 aluminum alloy hollow billets prepared by direct-chill casting were investigated. The decrease of casting temperature deteriorated the homogeneity and increased the size of primary Si particles in the hollow billet. Although the average size of primary Si particles was not obviously affected by the increase of casting speed, the thickness of Si-depleted layer at the inner wall increased with the higher casting speed. The tensile strength of A390 alloy is a function of the percentage of coarse Si particles (larger than 35 μm) and the average size of primary Si particles. Higher and more stable tensile strength can be received in the hollow billet with the casting temperature of 1050 K (777 °C), because the fine and uniformly distributed primary Si particles were obtained in the hollow billet.

  7. A Numerical Model of the Temperature Field of the Cast and Solidified Ceramic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavicka, Frantisek; Dobrovska, Jana; Sekanina, Bohumil; Stransky, Karel; Stetina, Josef

    2010-06-01

    Corundo-baddeleyit material (CBM)—EUCOR—is a heat- and wear-resistant material even at extreme temperatures. This article introduces a numerical model of solidification and cooling of this material in a non-metallic mould. The model is capable of determining the total solidification time of the casting and also the place of the casting which solidifies last. Furthermore, it is possible to calculate the temperature gradient in any point and time, and also determine the local solidification time and the solidification interval of any point. The local solidification time is one of the input parameters for the cooperating model of chemical heterogeneity. This second model and its application on samples of EUCOR prove that the applied method of measurement of chemical heterogeneity provides detailed quantitative information on the material structure and makes it possible to analyse the solidification process. The analysis of this process entails statistical processing of the results of the measurements of the heterogeneity of the components of EUCOR and performs correlation of individual components during solidification. The crystallisation process seems to be very complicated, where the macro- and microscopic segregations differ significantly. The verification of both numerical models was conducted on a real cast 350×200×400 mm block.

  8. Analysis of Dendritic Primary Al Grain Ripening and Solid Fraction Measurement in A356 Alloy Semi-Solid Slurry Using Segregation Sensitive Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Harada, Yohei; Kumai, Shinji

    Ripening of dendritic primary Al grain in semi-solid state has been paid much attention to since it is the most economical way to produce semi-solid slurry containing spheroidal Al grains for thixocasting. Also, solid fraction is the key factor in all the semi-solid processes. A segregation sensitive reagent (Weck's reagent) can help to study both the two topics, revealing the inner-primary Al grain's optical microstructure evolution during semi-solid heat treatments (partial re-melting) of small A356 alloy samples cut from both as-DC cast and compressed ingots (Recrystallization and partial re-melting process). With the help of this etching technique, the influence of induced strain on the ripening mechanism of primary Al grains was investigated precisely. Furthermore, the peripheral part of the primary Al grain grown during water quenching was distinguished by the reagent. Therefore we could exclude this area when measuring the solid fraction and avoid overestimation by image analysis.

  9. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  10. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  11. Growth of tertiary dendritic arms during the transient directional solidification of hypoeutectic Pb-Sb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Emmanuelle S.; Rosa, Daniel M.; Garcia, Amauri; Spinelli, José E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the importance of a complete characterization of dendritic patterns in castings, the availability of studies on the development of tertiary dendrite arms is scarce in the literature. In the present study, the tip cooling rate, local solidification time, primary and tertiary dendrite arm spacings have been determined in Pb-Sb alloys castings directionally solidified under unsteady-state heat flow conditions. The alloys compositions experimentally examined are widely used in the as-cast condition for the manufacture of positive and negative grids of lead-acid batteries. The initial growth of tertiary dendritic arms from the secondary branches was found to occur only for a Pb-3.5 wt% Sb alloy at cooling rates in the range 0.4-0.2 K/s, with no evidence of this spacing pattern for Pb-Sb alloys having lower solute content. Tertiary dendritic branches have been observed along the entire casting lengths for alloys of the Pb-Sb hypoeutectic range having compositions higher than 4.0 wt% Sb. It is shown that a power function experimental law with a characteristic -0.55 exponent is able to characterize the tertiary spacing evolution with the solidification cooling rate for alloys compositions ≥4.0 wt% Sb. The only exception was the Pb-3.5 wt% Sb alloy for which λ 3 exhibited significant lower values when compared with the experimental values obtained for the other Pb-Sb alloys for a same solidification cooling rate.

  12. Investigation of Solidification of High Strength Steel Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-12-01

    2U9-259. 23. A. Kohn: "Etude de I’homogeneisation des segregations dendritiques de phosphore et ’ rsenic dans les aciers ...de la structure en bandes dans 1’ acier forge", Memoires Scientifiques de la Revue de Metallurgie, v. «j£, 6, I96I, pp. 423-^3...dans les aciers ". Revue de Metallurgie, February i960, pp. 117-134. 35. R. Castro and A. Gueussier: "La fragilite des aciers speciaux

  13. Applying MHD technology to the continuous casting of steel slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eiichi

    1995-05-01

    The application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the continuous casting process started with the electromagnetic stirring of the stand pool with a traveling magnetic field. It has now advanced to the electromagnetic stirring of molten steel in the mold and the control of molten steel flow by an in-mold direct current magnetic field brake. These applied MHD techniques are designed to further improve the continuous casting process capability. They improve the surface quality of cast steel by homogenizing the meniscus temperature, stabilizing initial solidification, and cleaning the surface layer. They also improve the internal quality of cast steel by preventing inclusions from penetrating deep into the pool and promoting the flotation of argon bubbles. Applied MHD technology is still advancing in scope and methods in addition to the improvement of conventional continuously cast slab qualities. The continuous casting of bimetallic slab by suppressing mixing in the pool is one example of this progress.

  14. Formation of Hot Tear Under Controlled Solidification Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subroto, Tungky; Miroux, Alexis; Bouffier, Lionel; Josserond, Charles; Salvo, Luc; Suéry, Michel; Eskin, Dmitry G.; Katgerman, Laurens

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum alloy 7050 is known for its superior mechanical properties, and thus finds its application in aerospace industry. Vertical direct-chill (DC) casting process is typically employed for producing such an alloy. Despite its advantages, AA7050 is considered as a "hard-to-cast" alloy because of its propensity to cold cracking. This type of cracks occurs catastrophically and is difficult to predict. Previous research suggested that such a crack could be initiated by undeveloped hot tears (microscopic hot tear) formed during the DC casting process if they reach a certain critical size. However, validation of such a hypothesis has not been done yet. Therefore, a method to produce a hot tear with a controlled size is needed as part of the verification studies. In the current study, we demonstrate a method that has a potential to control the size of the created hot tear in a small-scale solidification process. We found that by changing two variables, cooling rate and displacement compensation rate, the size of the hot tear during solidification can be modified in a controlled way. An X-ray microtomography characterization technique is utilized to quantify the created hot tear. We suggest that feeding and strain rate during DC casting are more important compared with the exerted force on the sample for the formation of a hot tear. In addition, we show that there are four different domains of hot-tear development in the explored experimental window—compression, microscopic hot tear, macroscopic hot tear, and failure. The samples produced in the current study will be used for subsequent experiments that simulate cold-cracking conditions to confirm the earlier proposed model.

  15. Model transport directional solidification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.T.; Eshelman, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    A model transport directional solidification apparatus is described. It has three functional components, each of which are described: the temperature gradient stage, the motor and drive mechanism, and the measuring systems. A small amount of sample is held between two glass slides on the temperature gradient stage so that the portion of sample in the hot chamber is molten and the portion in the cold chamber is solidified. Conditions are set so that the solid-liquid interface occurs in the gap between the chambers and can be observed through the microscope system. In-situ directional solidification is observed by driving the sample from the hot chamber to the cold chamber and observing the solidification process as it occurs. (LEW)

  16. Rapid solidification of metallic particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to maximize the heat transfer coefficient the most important variable in rapid solidification is the powder particle size. The finer the particle size, the higher the solidification rate. Efforts to decrease the particle size diameter offer the greatest payoff in attained quench rate. The velocity of the liquid droplet in the atmosphere is the second most important variable. Unfortunately the choices of gas atmospheres are sharply limited both because of conductivity and cost. Nitrogen and argon stand out as the preferred gases, nitrogen where reactions are unimportant and argon where reaction with nitrogen may be important. In gas atomization, helium offers up to an order of magnitude increase in solidification rate over argon and nitrogen. By contrast, atomization in vacuum drops the quench rate several orders of magnitude.

  17. Rapid Solidification of Magnetic Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalonji, G.; Deguire, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The enhanced control over microstructural evolution inherent in rapid solidification processing techniques are exploited to create novel ceramic magnetic materials. The great sensitivity of magnetic properties to local structure provides a powerful probe both for the study of structure and of microscopic solidification mechanisms. The first system studied is the SrO-Fe2O3 binary, which contains the commercially important hard magnetic compound strontium hexaferrite. The products were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and differential thermal analysis. As-quenched ribbons contain high concentrations of super-paramagnetic particles, 80 to 250 Angstroms in diameter, in a glassy matrix. This suggests the possibility of crystallizing monodomain strontium hexaferrite during subsequent heat treatment, with a resulting increase in coercivity over conventionally processed ferrite magnets. That magnetic properties can be controlled in solidification processing by varying the quench rate is demonstrated.

  18. Rapid Solidification of Magnetic Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalonji, G.; Deguire, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The enhanced control over microstructural evolution inherent in rapid solidification processing techniques are exploited to create novel ceramic magnetic materials. The great sensitivity of magnetic properties to local structure provides a powerful probe both for the study of structure and of microscopic solidification mechanisms. The first system studied is the SrO-Fe2O3 binary, which contains the commercially important hard magnetic compound strontium hexaferrite. The products were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and differential thermal analysis. As-quenched ribbons contain high concentrations of super-paramagnetic particles, 80 to 250 Angstroms in diameter, in a glassy matrix. This suggests the possibility of crystallizing monodomain strontium hexaferrite during subsequent heat treatment, with a resulting increase in coercivity over conventionally processed ferrite magnets. That magnetic properties can be controlled in solidification processing by varying the quench rate is demonstrated.

  19. Microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the widespread commercial use of peritectic alloys (e.g., steels, brass, bronze, intermetallic compounds, Co based superalloys and A3B type superconductors), the characterization of the microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectics has historically lagged behind similar efforts directed towards other types of binary invariant reactions such as eutectic or monotectic. A wide variety of possible microstructures has been shown to form in peritectics depending upon the imposed temperature gradient, G, the solidification velocity, V, as well as the presence or absence of convection in the melt. This has important technological implications since many commercially important alloys exhibit peritectics and processing methods such as casting and welding often involve widely changing conditions. It has been the aim of this project to examine, in a systematic fashion, both experimentally and theoretically, the influence of gravitationally driven convection on segregation and microstructural development during solidification in peritectic systems under terrestrial conditions. The scientific results of the project will be used to establish ground based data in support of a meaningful microgravity flight experiment.

  20. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  1. Solidification microstructure formation in HK40 and HH40 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xian-fei; Liu, Dong-fang; Guo, Pei-liang; Zheng, Yun-rong; Feng, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure formation processes in HK40 and HH40 alloys were investigated through JmatPro calculations and quenching performed during directional solidification. The phase transition routes of HK40 and HH40 alloys were determined as L → L + γ → L + γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 + M23C6→ γ + M23C6 and L → L + δ → L + δ + γ→ L + δ + γ + M23C6 δ + γ + M23C6, respectively. The solidification mode was determined to be the austenitic mode (A mode) in HK40 alloy and the ferritic-austenitic solidification mode (FA mode) in HH40 alloy. In HK40 alloy, eutectic carbides directly precipitate in a liquid and coarsen during cooling. The primary γ dendrites grow at the 60° angle to each other. On the other hand, in HH40 alloy, residual δ forms because of the incomplete transformation from δ to γ. Cr23C6 carbide is produced in solid delta ferrite δ but not directly in liquid HH40 alloy. Because of carbide formation in the solid phase and no rapid growth of the dendrite in a non-preferential direction, HH40 alloy is more resistant to cast defect formation than HK40 alloy.

  2. A fully coupled 2D model of equiaxed eutectic solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Charbon, Ch.; LeSar, R.

    1995-12-31

    We propose a model of equiaxed eutectic solidification that couples the macroscopic level of heat diffusion with the microscopic level of nucleation and growth of the eutectic grains. The heat equation with the source term corresponding to the latent heat release due to solidification is calculated numerically by means of an implicit finite difference method. In the time stepping scheme, the evolution of solid fraction is deduced from a stochastic model of nucleation and growth which uses the local temperature (interpolated from the FDM mesh) to determine the local grain density and the local growth rate. The solid-liquid interface of each grain is tracked by using a subdivision of each grain perimeter in a large number of sectors. The state of each sector (i.e. whether it is still in contact with the liquid or already captured by an other grain) and the increase of radius of each grain during one time step allows one to compute the increase of solid fraction. As for deterministic models, the results of the model are the evolution of temperature and of solid fraction at any point of the sample. Moreover the model provides a complete picture of the microstructure, thus not limiting the microstructural information to the average grain density but allowing one to compute any stereological value of interest. We apply the model to the solidification of gray cast iron.

  3. Effect of Process Parameters, Casting Thickness, and Alloys on the Interfacial Heat-Transfer Coefficient in the High-Pressure Die-Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Shou-Mei; Liu, Bai-Cheng; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2008-12-01

    The heat transfer at the metal-die interface is believed to have great influence on the solidification process and cast structure of the high-pressure die-casting (HPDC) process. The present article focused on the effects of process parameters, casting thickness, and alloys on the metal-die interfacial heat-transfer coefficient (IHTC) in the HPDC process. Experiment was carried out on a cold-chamber die-casting machine with two casting alloys AM50 and ADC12. A special casting, namely, “step-shape” casting, was used and cast against a H13 steel die. The IHTC was determined using an inverse approach based on the temperature measurements inside the die. Results show that the IHTC is different at different steps and changes as the solidification of the casting proceeds. Process parameters only influence the IHTC in its peak value, and for both AM50 and ADC12 alloys, a greater fast shot velocity leads to a greater IHTC peak value at steps 1 and 2. The initial die surface temperature has a more prominent influence on the IHTC peak values at the thicker steps, especially step 5. Results also show that a closer contact between the casting and die could be achieved when the casting alloy is ADC12 instead of AM50, which consequently leads to a higher IHTC.

  4. Application of Solidification Theory to Rapid Solidification Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    saturated NiAl microstructure for the NiAl-Cr quasibinary eutectic composition is determined as a function of growth rate by electron beam melting and...analysis has been performed on Ag-15 wt% Cu alloys produced V electron beam melting with solidification velocities of 2.5, 12 and 18 cm/s. Cellular

  5. Application of Solidification Theory to Rapid Solidification Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Rapid Solidification Microstructures in Al-Ag Alloys 15 from Electron Beam Melting Studies Metallic Glass Formation 18 3. Appendix - Papers Resulting...alloy system having retrograde solidus in phase diagram. o Experimentally achieved enhanced solid solubility from electron beam melting and...3) electron beam melting and rapid resolidification studies in Al-Ag alloys, and (4) investigations of critical velocities for metallic glass

  6. Modeling of different zones of as-cast structure of high carbon steel ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiye; Arnsfeld, Sonja; Senk, Dieter

    2012-07-01

    Ingot casting technology has been expanded to large parts during the last decades. As the ingot sizes increase, higher quality of the as-cast semi-products is demanded, with regard to the control of casting defects like macrosegregation and structure inhomogeneity. In order to investigate macrosegregation and to estimate the as-cast structure, theoretical study and simulation work on ingot solidification are carried out at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy of RWTH Aachen University (IEHK). A solidification model has been developed, and based on that, modeling of the structure morphology has been performed. A proper coupling of the developed solidification model with experimental results from IEHK is under investigation. This solidification model is a two-phase FVM model applied for high carbon steel with 0.6 wt.% [C]. The temperature and concentration fields of the solid and liquid phases have been calculated and these results can provide information for further prediction of the solidification structure such as CET (Columnar to Equiaxed Transition) zone and casting defects in an ingot. The structure morphology model introduces a shape factor of grains as the quantitative criterion for identification of the structure morphology. It focuses on the interaction between nuclei density and resulting macroscopic structure, and can calculate the strictly columnar zone, CET zone with mainly columnar characteristics and enclosed equiaxed crystals, and the pure equiaxed zone. The results will be presented, and the correlation of CET zone with development of macrosegregation in the inner part of an ingot will be discussed.

  7. Deformation behaviour of Rheocast A356 Al alloy at microlevel considering approximated RVEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sk. Tanbir; Das, Prosenjit; Das, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    A micromechanical approach is considered here to predict the deformation behaviour of Rheocast A356 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy. Two representative volume elements (RVEs) are modelled in the finite element (FE) framework. Two dimensional approximated microstructures are generated assuming elliptic grains, based on the grain size, shape factor and area fraction of the primary Al phase of the said alloy at different processing condition. Plastic instability is shown using stress and strain distribution between the Al rich primary and Si rich eutectic phases under different boundary conditions. Boundary conditions are applied on the approximated RVEs in such a manner, so that they represent the real life situation depending on their position on a cylindrical tensile test sample. FE analysis is carried out using commercial finite element code ABAQUS without specifying any damage or failure criteria. Micro-level in-homogeneity leads to incompatible deformation between the constituent phases of the rheocast alloy and steers plastic strain localisation. Plastic stain localised regions within the RVEs are predicted as the favourable sites for void nucleation. Subsequent growth of nucleated voids leads to final failure of the materials under investigation.

  8. Wear Performance of A356 Matrix Composites Reinforced with Different Types of Reinforcing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mostafa; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hasan; Asadi, Parviz; Khalkhali, Abolfazl

    2017-09-01

    To improve the wear resistance of Al-Si alloys, different types of reinforcing particles such as SiC, TiC, ZrO2, and B4C were used to produce matrix composites by friction stir processing (FSP). First, microstructural properties of different locations of stir zone (SZ) in the FSPed specimens such as advancing side, retreating side, shoulder-affected area, and pin-affected area were investigated. The results demonstrate that Si particles size is not the same in different SZ subdomains. SEM investigation was performed in order to investigate the particles distribution in different areas of the SZ as well as bonding quality between particles and metal matrix. Hardness and wear tests were carried out to determine mechanical and wear properties of the composites. The pin-on-disk wear tests were performed at room temperature, with the normal applied loads of 5, 10, and 20 N and sliding speed of 1 and 2 m/s. All fabricated composites show higher resistance in wear than A356 alloy. Wear test results show, by increasing the normal load and sliding velocity, the wear loss weight of all composites increased gradually.

  9. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  10. On the role of solidification modelling in Integrated Computational Materials Engineering “ICME”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, G. J.; Böttger, B.; Apel, M.

    2016-03-01

    Solidification during casting processes marks the starting point of the history of almost any component or product. Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) [1-4] recognizes the importance of further tracking the history of microstructure evolution along the subsequent process chain. Solidification during joining processes in general happens quite late during production, where the parts to be joined already have experienced a number of processing steps which affected their microstructure. Reliable modelling of melting and dissolution of these microstructures represents a key issue before eventually modelling ‘re’-solidification e.g. during welding or soldering. Some instructive examples of microstructure evolution during a joining process obtained on the basis of synthetic and simulated initial microstructures of an Al-Cu binary model system are discussed.

  11. Effect and kinetic mechanism of ultrasonic vibration on solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ripeng; Li, Xiaoqian; Chen, Pinghu; Li, Ruiqing; Zhang, Xue

    2014-07-01

    The work described in this paper dealt with the effect of ultrasonic vibration on the solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy. Two experiments were carried out through introducing ultrasound into the semi-continuous direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloy and into alloy solidifying in a crucible, respectively. Results show that ultrasonic vibration can refine grains in the whole cross-section of a billet in the first experiment and is able to increase the cooling rate within the temperature range from 625 °C to 590 °C in the other one. The mechanism of particle resonance caused by ultrasonic vibration was illustrated on the basis of theoretical analysis of the kinetics and energy conversion during the solidification. It is demonstrated that the kinetic energy of resonant particles are mainly from the latent heat energy of solidification, which can shorten the cooling time, inhibit the crystal growth and then lead to the grain refinement.

  12. Pattern selection in dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Kotliar, B. G.; Langer, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the dynamically selected velocity and tip radius of dendrites in the boundary-layer model of solidification have the special values which permit the existence of steady-state needle-crystal solutions. This result, in conjunction with considerations of stability, provides new insight concerning the validity of the marginal-stability hypothesis.

  13. Evaluation of the microstructure, secondary dendrite arm spacing, and mechanical properties of Al-Si alloy castings made in sand and Fe-Cr slag molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Murthy, I.; Babu Rao, J.

    2017-07-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast A356 (Al-Si) alloy castings were investigated. A356 alloy was cast into three different molds composed of sand, ferrochrome (Fe-Cr) slag, and a mixture of sand and Fe-Cr. A sodium silicate-CO2 process was used to make the necessary molds. Cylindrical-shaped castings were prepared. Cast products with no porosity and a good surface finish were achieved in all of the molds. These castings were evaluated for their metallography, secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), and mechanical properties, including hardness, compression, tensile, and impact properties. Furthermore, the tensile and impact samples were analyzed by fractography. The results show that faster heat transfer in the Fe-Cr slag molds than in either the silica sand or mixed molds led to lower SDAS values with a refined microstructure in the products cast in Fe-Cr slag molds. Consistent and enhanced mechanical properties were observed in the slag mold products than in the castings obtained from either sand or mixed molds. The fracture surface of the slag mold castings shows a dimple fracture morphology with a transgranular fracture nature. However, the fracture surfaces of the sand mold castings display brittle fracture. In conclusion, products cast in Fe-Cr slag molds exhibit an improved surface finish and enhanced mechanical properties compared to those of products cast in sand and mixed molds.

  14. Modeling microstructure development in gray cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsch, David D.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.

    1994-05-01

    Recent years have seen increasing use of solidification process modeling as a tool to aid in the analysis and elimination of manufacturing defects in castings. Grain size and other microstructural features such as second-phase morphology and distribution are the primary factors in determining the mechanical properties in cast metals. In this work, a representation of nucleation and growth kinetics for gray cast irons, based on a statistical description of the microstructure, has been coupled with a commercial finite-element method code for transient heat-flow calculation to determine microstructure. Features predicted include eutectic cell size, fractions of gray and white iron, graphite morphology, percent pearlite, percent ferrite, and pearlite spacing. The predicted microstructure can then be used to determine the strength and fatigue properties using published correlations. The theoretical development and results of the finite-elementbased model will be discussed and compared with experimental results.

  15. Application of Control Volume Method Using the Voronoi Tessellation in Numerical Modelling of Solidification Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, Zbigniew; Ciesielski, Mariusz; Mochnacki, Bohdan

    2010-03-01

    The paper presents the method to analyse the thermal processes occurring in the cast composite solidification. The cast is formed by a bundle of parallel fibres randomly immersed in a host metal matrix. The heat is transferred from the metal matrix and absorbed by the fibres. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the volumetric fraction of the fibres for which the solidification of the metal matrix occurs only due to the presence of fibres playing a role of internal chills. Our method is to compute Voronoi diagrams with Voronoi regions representing the geometric location of the fibres in the metal matrix and to use these regions as control volumes within a variant of the Control Volume Method.

  16. Low-Temperature Aging Characteristics of Type 316L Stainless Steel Welds: Dependence on Solidification Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2008-06-01

    Thermal aging embrittlement of light water reactor (LWR) components made of stainless steel cast has been recognized as a potential degradation issue, and careful attention has been paid to it. Although welds of austenitic stainless steels have γ-δ duplex microstructure, which is similar to that of the stainless steel cast, examination of the thermal aging characteristics of the stainless steel welds is very limited. In this investigation, two types of type 316L stainless steel weld metal with different solidification modes were prepared using two kinds of filler metals having tailored Ni equivalent and Cr equivalent. Differences between the two weld metals in the morphology of microstructure, in the composition of δ-ferrite, and in hardening behaviors with isothermal aging at 335 °C have been investigated. The hardness of the ferrite phase has increased with aging time, while the hardness of austenite phase has stayed the same. The mottled aspect has been observed in δ-ferrite of aged samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. These characteristics suggest that spinodal decomposition has occurred in δ-ferrite by aging at 335 °C. The age-hardening rate of δ-ferrite was faster for the primary austenite solidification mode (AF mode) sample than the primary ferrite solidification mode (FA mode) sample in the initial stage of the aging up to 2000 hours. It has been suggested that the solidification mode can affect the kinetics of spinodal decomposition.

  17. The Solidification Behavior of AA2618 Aluminum Alloy and the Influence of Cooling Rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ming; Luo, Lei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2014-12-09

    In AA2618 aluminum alloy, the iron- and nickel-rich intermetallics formed during solidification are of great effect on the mechanical properties of the alloy at both room temperature and elevated temperatures. However, the solidification behavior of the alloy and the formation mechanism of the intermetallics during solidification of the alloy are not clear. This research fills the gap and contributes to understanding the intermetallic of the alloy. The results showed that cooling rate was of great influence on the formation of the intermetallics. Under the condition of slow cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy were complex with many coarse eutectic compounds including Al₉FeNi, Al₇(CuNi)₅, Si, Al₂Cu and Al₂CuMg. The phase Al₉FeNi was the dominant intermetallic compound, which precipitated at the earlier stage of the solidification by eutectic reaction L → α-Al + Al₉FeNi. Increasing the cooling rate would suppress the formation of the coarse eutectic intermetallics. Under the condition of near-rapid cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy consisted of metastable intermetallics Al₉FeNi and Al₂Cu; the equilibrium eutectic compounds were suppressed. This research concluded that intermetallics could be refined to a great extent by near-rapid cooling.

  18. The Solidification Behavior of AA2618 Aluminum Alloy and the Influence of Cooling Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ming; Luo, Lei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2014-01-01

    In AA2618 aluminum alloy, the iron- and nickel-rich intermetallics formed during solidification are of great effect on the mechanical properties of the alloy at both room temperature and elevated temperatures. However, the solidification behavior of the alloy and the formation mechanism of the intermetallics during solidification of the alloy are not clear. This research fills the gap and contributes to understanding the intermetallic of the alloy. The results showed that cooling rate was of great influence on the formation of the intermetallics. Under the condition of slow cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy were complex with many coarse eutectic compounds including Al9FeNi, Al7(CuNi)5, Si, Al2Cu and Al2CuMg. The phase Al9FeNi was the dominant intermetallic compound, which precipitated at the earlier stage of the solidification by eutectic reaction L → α-Al + Al9FeNi. Increasing the cooling rate would suppress the formation of the coarse eutectic intermetallics. Under the condition of near-rapid cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy consisted of metastable intermetallics Al9FeNi and Al2Cu; the equilibrium eutectic compounds were suppressed. This research concluded that intermetallics could be refined to a great extent by near-rapid cooling. PMID:28788281

  19. Influence of Melt Feeding Scheme and Casting Parameters During Direct-Chill Casting on Microstructure of an AA7050 Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Eskin, D. G.; Miroux, A.; Subroto, T.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-12-01

    Direct-chill (DC) casting billets of an AA7050 alloy produced with different melt feeding schemes and casting speeds were examined in order to reveal the effect of these factors on the evolution of microstructure. Experimental results show that grain size is strongly influenced by the casting speed. In addition, the distribution of grain sizes across the billet diameter is mostly determined by melt feeding scheme. Grains tend to coarsen towards the center of a billet cast with the semi-horizontal melt feeding, while upon vertical melt feeding the minimum grain size was observed in the center of the billet. Computer simulations were preformed to reveal sump profiles and flow patterns during casting under different melt feeding schemes and casting speeds. The results show that solidification front and velocity distribution of the melt in the liquid and slurry zones are very different under different melt feeding scheme. The final grain structure and the grain size distribution in a DC casting billet is a result of a combination of fragmentation effects in the slurry zone and the cooling rate in the solidification range.

  20. Experimental measurement of investment shell properties and use of the data in casting simulation software

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.J.; Sayers, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a systematic program of experimental measurement of relevant properties of mould materials, conducted with the express purpose of generating data for use in casting (filling and solidification) simulation software. In particular the thermophysical properties of the ceramic shell built up for the investment casting process are measured. These properties include specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, gas permeability, density and surface emissivity. Much of the experimental measurements are taken as a function of temperature, up to the temperature at which moulds are typically fired or preheated. Typical results are presented. The data so generated is then used in a casting simulation model to simulate the investment casting of a prosthetic device. The results of the simulation are presented, and comparisons are made with measurements and observations from an experimental casting of the same part. In this way both the reliability of the data and the accuracy of the filling and solidification model are validated.

  1. Interfacial and capillary phenomena in solidification processing of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical and hydrodynamic aspects of wetting and interfacial phenomena during the solidification processing of metal-matrix composites are reviewed. Significant experimental results on fiber-matrix interactions and wetting under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions in composites of engineering interest have been compiled, based on a survey of the recent literature. Finally, certain aspects of wetting relevant to stir-casting and infiltration processing of composites are discussed.

  2. Design and implementation of a low-gravity solidification experiment package for the F-104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G.; Mead, R.; Bond, R.; Workman, G. L.; Curreri, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of the F-104 Interceptor for low gravity materials processing experiments is extended to include alloy solidification studies above 1000 C. The F-104 can provide up to 60 seconds of low gravity, but requires a unique experiment package for integration into the aircraft, both physically and electronically. The current research with the F-104 experimental furnace system which has been used to process cast iron samples is described. Results demonstrate the capability of the facility and its operation.

  3. Interfacial and capillary phenomena in solidification processing of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical and hydrodynamic aspects of wetting and interfacial phenomena during the solidification processing of metal-matrix composites are reviewed. Significant experimental results on fiber-matrix interactions and wetting under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions in composites of engineering interest have been compiled, based on a survey of the recent literature. Finally, certain aspects of wetting relevant to stir-casting and infiltration processing of composites are discussed.

  4. Inference of optimal speed for sound centrifugal casting of Al-12Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agari, Shailesh Rao; Mukunda, P. G.; Rao, Shrikantha S.; Sudhakar, K. G.

    2011-05-01

    True centrifugal casting is a standard casting technique for the manufacture of hollow, intricate and sound castings without the use of cores. The molten metal or alloy poured into the rotating mold forms a hollow casting as the centrifugal forces lift the liquid along the mold inner surface. When a mold is rotated at low and very high speeds defects are found in the final castings. Obtaining the critical speed for sound castings should not be a matter of guess or based on experience. The defects in the casting are mainly due to the behavior of the molten metal during the teeming and solidification process. Motion of molten metal at various speeds and its effect during casting are addressed in this paper. Eutectic Al-12Si alloy is taken as an experiment fluid and its performance during various rotational speeds is discussed.

  5. Application of Solidification Theory to Rapid Solidification Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Experiments are being performed on Al-Ag alloys to test this prediction. An electron beam melting system has been modified to produce a measurable energy...alloys and found agreement with results reported in the literature. o Experimentally achieved enhanced solid solubility from electron beam melting and...solidification conditions must be considered in more detail to determine if a region of instability is entered. Electron beam melting experiments with

  6. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, John C.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  7. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  8. Numerical simulation and optimization of casting process for complex pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueqin; Dong, Anping; Wang, Donghong; Lu, Yanling; Zhu, Guoliang

    2017-09-01

    The complex shape of the casting pump body has large complicated structure and uniform wall thickness, which easy give rise to casting defects. The numerical simulation software ProCAST is used to simulate the initial top gating process, after analysis of the material and structure characteristics of the high-pressure pump. The filling process was overall smooth, not there the water shortage phenomenon. But the circular shrinkage defects appear at the bottom of casting during solidification process. Then, the casting parameters were optimized and adding cold iron in the bottom. The shrinkage weight was reduced from 0.00167g to 0.0005g. The porosity volume was reduced from 1.39cm3 to 0.41cm3. The optimization scheme is simulated and actual experimented. The defect has been significantly improved.

  9. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... moving. The outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, ... color! These casts are lighter and stronger than plaster casts. Plaster casts are usually white and made ...

  10. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of CNTs/A356 Nanocomposites Fabricated by High-Intensity Ultrasonic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Qiu, Hong-Xu

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced A356 alloy nanocomposites were successfully fabricated by introducing a method of CNT predispersion and high-intensity ultrasonic treatment. The scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectrometer results showed that high-intensity ultrasonic treatment was able to disperse the CNTs into the melt. When the ultrasonic power was less than 2.1 kW, the microhardness and tensile properties (ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation) of the nanocomposites improved as the ultrasonic power increased. Further, the microhardness, UTS, and YS improved as the CNT content increased while elongation decreased. The microhardness, UTS, and YS of the 0.8 wt pct CNTs/A356 nanocomposites fabricated by high-intensity ultrasonic processing at an ultrasonic power of 2.1 kW were increased, respectively, by 27.8, 17, and 29.2 pct compared to the A356 alloy without CNT addition, and the ductility remained. The fracture analysis confirmed that CNTs were homogeneously distributed in the matrix, and strong interfacial bonding formed between CNTs and the matrix. Also, transmission electron microscope results confirmed that CNTs were stale embedded in the matrix and the formation of brittle Al4C3 was suppressed.

  11. Technique Incorporating Cooling & Contraction / Expansion Analysis to Illustrate Shrinkage Tendency in Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, S.; Chisamera, M.; Riposan, I.; Neacsu, L.; Cojocaru, A. M.; Stan, I.

    2017-06-01

    With the more widespread adoption of thermal analysis testing, thermal analysis data have become an indicator of cast iron quality. The cooling curve and its first derivative display patterns that can be used to predict the characteristics of a cast iron. An experimental device was developed with a technique to simultaneously evaluate cooling curves and expansion or contraction of cast metals during solidification. Its application is illustrated with results on shrinkage tendency of ductile iron treated with FeSiMgRECa master alloy and inoculated with FeSi based alloys, as affected by mould rigidity (green sand and resin sand moulds). Undercooling at the end of solidification relative to the metastable (carbidic) equilibrium temperature and the expansion within the solidification sequence appear to have a strong influence on the susceptibility to macro - and micro - shrinkage in ductile iron castings. Green sand moulds, as less rigid moulds, encourage the formation of contraction defects, not only because of high initial expansion values, but also because of a higher cooling rate during solidification, and consequently, increased undercooling below the metastable equilibrium temperature up to the end of solidification.

  12. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  13. CASTING FURNACES

    DOEpatents

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  14. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  15. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  16. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  17. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  18. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  19. Solidification Behavior and Weldability of Dissimilar Welds Between a Cr-Free, Ni-Cu Welding Consumable and Type 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Liang, Dong; Alexandrov, Boian T.; Frankel, Gerald S.; Lippold, John C.

    2012-04-01

    The solidification behavior of a Cr-free welding consumable based on the Ni-Cu system was evaluated in conjunction with Type 304L stainless steel. The weld metal microstructure evolution was evaluated with optical and secondary electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, button melting, and thermodynamic (CALPHAD-based) modeling. Solidification partitioning patterns showed that higher dilutions of the filler metal by Type 304L increased segregation of Ti, Cu, and Si to interdendritic regions. Button melting experiments showed a widening of the solidification temperature range with increasing dilution because of the expansion of the austenite solidification range and formation of Ti(C,N) via a eutectic reaction. The model predictions showed good correlation with button melting experiments and were used to evaluate the nature of the Ti(C,N) precipitation reaction. Solidification cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was shown to increase with dilution of 304L stainless steel based on testing conducted with the cast pin tear test. The increase in cracking susceptibility is associated with expansion of the solidification temperature range and the presence of eutectic liquid at the end of solidification that wets solidification grain boundaries.

  20. Heat transfer and microstructure during the early stages of metal solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muojekwu, C. A.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1995-04-01

    Transient heat transfer in the early stages of solidification of an alloy on a water-cooled chill and the consequent evolution of microstructure, quantified in terms of secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), have been studied. Based on dip tests of the chill, instrumented with thermocouples, into Al-Si alloys, the influence of process variables such as mold surface roughness, mold material, metal superheat, alloy composition, and lubricant on heat transfer and cast structure has been determined. The heat flux between the solidifying metal and substrate, computed from measurements of transient temperature in the chill by the inverse heat-transfer technique, ranged from low values of 0.3 to 0.4 MW/m2 to peak values of 0.95 to 2.0 MW/m2. A onedimensional, implicit, finite-difference model was applied to compute heat-transfer coefficients, which ranged from 0.45 to 4.0 kW/m2 °C, and local cooling rates of 10 °C/s to 100 °C/s near the chill surface, as well as growth of the solidifying shell. Near the chill surface, the SDAS varied from 12 to 22 ( µm while at 20 mm from the chill, values of up to 80 /smm were measured. Although the SDAS depended on the cooling rate and local solidification time, it was also found to be a direct function of the heat-transfer coefficient at distances very near to the casting/chill interface. A three-stage empirical heat-flux model based on the thermophysical properties of the mold and casting has been proposed for the simulation of the mold/casting boundary condition during solidification. The applicability of the various models proposed in the literature relating the SDAS to heat-transfer parameters has been evaluated and the extension of these models to continuous casting processes pursued.

  1. Apollo 14 composite casting demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This program assisted in the design and implementation of the composite casting demonstration for the Apollo 14 mission. Both flight and control samples were evaluated. Some conclusions resulting from a comparison of the flight and control samples were: (1) Solidification in neither the flight nor control samples was truly directional. (2) Apparent intermittent contact of the melt with the container in the flight samples led to unusual nucleation and growth structures. (3) There was greater uniformity, on a macro scale, of both pores and structural features in the flight sample; presumably the result of the reduced gravity conditions. (4) It seems quite feasible to produce enhanced dispersions of gases and dense phases in a melt which is solidified in reduced gravity. (5) A two-stage heating/cooling cycle may help directional solidification. (6) Sample materials should be selected from materials in which the dispersant fully wets the matrix material. (7) Experiments should be conducted in two modes: (1) where the melt is in good thermal contact with the container, and (2) where the melt is in a free-float condition.

  2. Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-05

    Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

  3. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.; Giese, S.R.; Lane, A.M.

    1996-01-31

    This is the final report covering work performed on research into methods of attaining clean ferrous castings. In this program methods were developed to minimize the formation of inclusions in steel castings by using a variety of techniques which decreased the tendency for inclusions to form during melting, casting and solidification. In a second project, a reaction chamber was built to remove inclusions from molten steel using electromagnetic force. Finally, a thorough investigation of the causes of sand penetration defects in iron castings was completed, and a program developed which predicts the probability of penetration formation and indicates methods for avoiding it.

  4. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are

  5. Application of Solidification Theory to Rapid Solidification Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    curve may be calculated to identify the stability limit of a solid solution . Again the extent of extrapolation usually indicates a need for model ...relation BdH B AH i. H - (H - x L ) (6)FP S ’L AdX’ A which reduces in the regular solution model to AH B -L XA 2 (7) til FP B A 20 - Fig. 5. Metastable...by zion -equilibrium partition coefficient effects. Where the solidification velocity is sufficiently high that k’ * 1 ( solute trapping)-r partitionless

  6. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  7. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  8. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  9. Columnar- Equiaxed Transition in Solidification processing: The ESA-MAP CETSOL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billia, Bernard; Gandin, Charles-André; Zimmermann, Gerhard; Browne, David; Dupouy, Marie-Danielle

    2005-03-01

    Many castings are the result of a competition between the growth of columnar and equiaxed grains. Indeed, microstructures are at the center of materials science and engineering, and solidification is the most important processing route for structural materials, especially metals and alloys. Presently, microstructure models remain mostly based on diffusive transport mechanisms so that there is a need of critical benchmark data to test fundamental theories of microstructure formation, which often necessitates to have recourse to solidification experiments in the reduced-gravity environment of space. Accordingly, the CETSOL (Columnar-Equiaxed Transition in SOLidification processing)-MAP project of ESA is gathering together European groups with complementary skills to carry out experiments and model the processes, in particular in view of the utilization of reduced-gravity environment that will be afforded by the International Space Station (ISS) to get benchmark data. The ultimate objective of the CETSOL research program is to significantly contribute to the improvement of integrated modeling of grain structure in industrially important castings. To reach this goal, the approach is devised to deepen the quantitative understanding of the basic physical principles that, from the microscopic to the macroscopic scales, govern microstructure formation in solidification processing under diffusive conditions and with fluid flow in the melt. Pending questions are attacked by well-defined model experiments on technical alloys and/or on model transparent systems, physical modeling at microstructure and mesoscopic scales (e.g. large columnar front or equiaxed crystals) and numerical simulation at all scales, up to the macroscopic scales of casting with integrated numerical models.

  10. Instability during directional solidification - Gravitational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1990-01-01

    After an elementary introduction to solidification, recent research that attempts to understand the interaction of fluid flow with a crystal-melt interface under gravitational influence using linear stability analysis is reviewed. Recent numerical calculations of fluid flow and interface morphology during alloy solidification are briefly discussed.

  11. Directional Solidification of Eutectic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Two major problems associated with structural ceramics are lack of damage tolerance and insufficient strength and creep resistance at very high temperatures of interest for aerospace application. This work demonstrated that the directionally solidified eutectics can have unique poly-phase microstructures and mechanical properties superior to either constituent alone. The constraining effect of unique eutectic microstructures result in higher resistance to slow crack growth and creep. Prospect of achieving superior properties through controlled solidification are presented and this technology can also be beneficial to produce new class of materials.

  12. Gravitational influence on eutectic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Robert S.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of gravity on eutectic solidification was investigated experimentally for Pb-Sn binary eutectic alloys. It is found that the separation of the primary crystals of the binary system from the coupled eutectic occurs over a wide range of cooling rates and gravitational fields (100-100,000 g). The separation is strongly influenced by the nucleation behavior of the particular alloy system. A mechanism for the strong phase separation is postulated on the basis of cloud convection models in atmospheric convection.

  13. Application of Numerical Optimization to Aluminum Alloy Wheel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J.; Reilly, C.; Maijer, D. M.; Cockcroft, S. L.; Phillion, A. B.

    2015-06-01

    A method of numerically optimizing the cooling conditions in a low- pressure die casting process from the standpoint of maintaining good directional solidification, high cooling rates and reduced cycle times has been developed for the production of aluminumalloy wheels. The method focuses on the optimization of cooling channel timing and utilizes an open source numerical optimization algorithm coupled with an experimentally validated, ABAQUS-based, heat transfer model of the casting process. Key features of the method include: 1) carefully designed constraint functions to ensure directional solidification along the centerlineof the wheel; and 2) carefully formulated objective functions to maximize cooling rate. The method has been implemented on a prototype production die and the results have been tested with plant trial test.

  14. Progress on Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles During Ultrasonic Processing and Solidification of Al-Based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojie; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2016-12-01

    In present study, 6061- and A356-based nano-composites are fabricated by using the ultrasonic stirring technology (UST) in a coreless induction furnace. SiC nanoparticles are used as the reinforcement. Nanoparticles are added into the molten metal and then dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming assisted by electromagnetic stirring. The applied UST parameters in the current experiments are used to validate a recently developed magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) model, which is capable of modeling the cavitation and nanoparticle dispersion during UST processing. The MHD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification, and electromagnetic field, as well as the complex interaction between the nanoparticles and both the molten and solidified alloys by using ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Fluent. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to analyze the complex interactions between the nanoparticle and the liquid/solid interface. The current modeling results demonstrate that a strong flow can disperse the nanoparticles relatively well during molten metal and solidification processes. MD simulation results prove that ultrafine particles (10 nm) will be engulfed by the solidification front instead of being pushed, which is beneficial for nano-dispersion.

  15. Effect of steady and time-harmonic magnetic fields on macrosegragation in alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Incropera, F.P.; Prescott, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Buoyancy-induced convection during the solidification of alloys can contribute significantly to the redistribution of alloy constituents, thereby creating large composition gradients in the final ingot. Termed macrosegregation, the condition diminishes the quality of the casting and, in the extreme, may require that the casting be remelted. The deleterious effects of buoyancy-driven flows may be suppressed through application of an external magnetic field, and in this study the effects of both steady and time-harmonic fields have been considered. For a steady magnetic field, extremely large field strengths would be required to effectively dampen convection patterns that contribute to macrosegregation. However, by reducing spatial variations in temperature and composition, turbulent mixing induced by a time-harmonic field reduces the number and severity of segregates in the final casting.

  16. Measurement and simulation of deformation and stresses in steel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galles, D.; Monroe, C. A.; Beckermann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Experiments are conducted to measure displacements and forces during casting of a steel bar in a sand mold. In some experiments the bar is allowed to contract freely, while in others the bar is manually strained using embedded rods connected to a frame. Solidification and cooling of the experimental castings are simulated using a commercial code, and good agreement between measured and predicted temperatures is obtained. The deformations and stresses in the experiments are simulated using an elasto-viscoplastic finite-element model. The high temperature mechanical properties are estimated from data available in the literature. The mush is modeled using porous metal plasticity theory, where the coherency and coalescence solid fraction are taken into account. Good agreement is obtained between measured and predicted displacements and forces. The results shed considerable light on the modeling of stresses in steel casting and help in developing more accurate models for predicting hot tears and casting distortions.

  17. Casting Simulation of an Austrian Bronze Age Sword Hilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Annalisa; Mödlinger, Marianne; Piccardo, Paolo; Montesano, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    Bronze Age swords with a metal hilt can be considered the peak of Bronze Age casting technologies. To reconstruct the casting techniques used more than 3000 years ago, a metal hilted sword of the Schalenknauf type from Lower Austria was studied with the aid of macroscopic analyses and simulation of mold filling and casting solidification. A three-dimensional model of the hilt was created based on optical scanner measurements performed on a hilt recently discovered during archaeological excavations. Three different configurations of the gating system were considered, two on the pommel disk and one on the knob, and the effect of its location on the formation of casting defects was investigated. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to detect internal defects, such as gas and shrinkage porosity, which were then compared with those calculated by simulation. The best match between actual and predicted hilt quality demonstrated the location of the gating system, which turned out to be on the pommel disk.

  18. Manufacturing Methods for Process Effects on Aluminum Casting Allowables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    YS 5% elongation Hardness per ASTM E18 Minimum of HRB 70 Electrical conductivity Minimum of 31% TACS per MIL-STD-1537 In addition, each foundry was...Min ( ASTM E18 ) A357-T6: 90HRB Min A Solidification A357-T6 A357-T6 Rate - DAS Control DAS Evaluation Max DAS (A357 Only) Per Proposed Det. by...defined in ASTM B557. 3.8.2 Hardness of Castings: Castings, should have hardness of ERE 90 minimum determined in accordance with ASTM E18 , but

  19. Optimization of Drilling Parameters for Reducing the Burr Height in Machining the Silicon Carbide Particle (SiCp) Coated with Multi Wall Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) Reinforced in Aluminum Alloy (A 356) Using Meta Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, M.; Prakash, S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper explains the optimization of drilling parameters using meta modeling approach to reduce the burr height while machining Silicon Carbide Particle (SiCp) coated with Multi Wall Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) and reinforced in aluminum alloy (A 356). The specimen is prepared by the combination of sonication and stir casting processes. The volume fraction of MWCNT used is 1.5% and the volume fraction of SiCp is 10%. The combination of input parameters for drilling the holes is designed using Taguchi experimental design technique. The input parameters chosen for drilling operations are spindle speed, feed rate and drill diameter. The ranges of input parameters are listed in Table 1. The tools used for drilling operation are made up of solid carbide drill bit. Meta model is a mathematical and statistical model whose second-order model can be fitted by factorial design. The optimization model can be improved significantly by the second-order model compared to the first-order model. Twenty-seven holes are drilled using vertical machining center in the prepared specimen (A 356/MWCNT coated SiCp). Desirability function shows the optimized values of input parameters to obtain minimum burr height. Meta modeling approach is used to design a model using input parameters and output response burr height. The residuals plot shows the predicted values are closer to the measured values. This plot explains that the Meta model is adequately used to predict the burr height. The optimized values of input parameters for obtaining minimum burr height are the combination of high speed, low feed and low drill diameter. The minimum value of burr height observed in this experiment is 0.002mm and it is obtained in the optimized combination of N3, f1 and d1.

  20. Dynamic Coarsening of 3.3C-1.9Si Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, Ruben; Diószegi, Attila

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic coarsening of primary austenite has been investigated by means of interrupted solidification in a hypoeutectic gray cast iron at three different cooling rates. The fundamental characteristic of the coarsening phenomenon, which is the reduction of the total interfacial area ( i.e., the primary austenite surface) over time, has been investigated along the solidification interval for the first time in gray cast iron. The primary austenite surface is confirmed to decrease with increasing solidification time. The relation between primary austenite surface reduction and the secondary dendrite arm spacing is reported as well as the time dependence of the inverse surface area of the primary phase per unit volume. The primary austenite surface has been determined via a stereological approach. The secondary dendrite arm spacing is observed to increase throughout the whole solidification range. A novel stereological relation, the modulus of primary dendrite, has been implemented on the calculation of the primary austenite surface. The size scale of the interdendritic phase has been determined by the hydraulic diameter of the interdendritic phase. The linear relations between secondary arm spacing and eutectic cells size and between secondary arm spacing and solidification time have been found to exist during solidification independently of cooling rate. The cooling rate dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing and the eutectic cells size is confirmed.

  1. Computational modeling of NbC/Laves formation in INCONEL 718 equiaxed castings

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M.

    1997-07-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a solidification kinetics model for prediction of NbC and Laves phase evolution during casting solidification. Previous studies on alloy 718 showed that both NbC and Laves produce intergranular liquid films due to the intergranular distribution of Nb and C. Also, the ability of Laves to promote intergranular liquation cracking (microfissuring and hot cracking) during heat treatment is much higher than that of NbC. This is because the temperature of Laves phase formation is usually lower than that of NbC, i.e., liquation initiates at the eutectic-Laves temperature. Experimental evidence demonstrates that the amount of NbC and Laves in cast alloy 718 is different from that predicted by phase equilibrium. The reason for this difference is that while in equilibrium processes mass diffusion transport is very fast compared with solidification kinetics (V {much_lt} D/L), in casting processes, solidification kinetics is much closer to diffusivity (V {le} D/L). Thus, solidification kinetics cannot be ignored.

  2. Optimal design of solidification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal design algorithm is presented for the analysis of general solidification processes, and is demonstrated for the growth of GaAs crystals in a Bridgman furnace. The system is optimal in the sense that the prespecified temperature distribution in the solidifying materials is obtained to maximize product quality. The optimization uses traditional numerical programming techniques which require the evaluation of cost and constraint functions and their sensitivities. The finite element method is incorporated to analyze the crystal solidification problem, evaluate the cost and constraint functions, and compute the sensitivities. These techniques are demonstrated in the crystal growth application by determining an optimal furnace wall temperature distribution to obtain the desired temperature profile in the crystal, and hence to maximize the crystal's quality. Several numerical optimization algorithms are studied to determine the proper convergence criteria, effective 1-D search strategies, appropriate forms of the cost and constraint functions, etc. In particular, we incorporate the conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods for unconstrained problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of each algorithm is presented in the example problem.

  3. The Evolution of As-cast Microstructure of Ternary Mg-Al-Zn Alloys: An Experimental and Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Manas; Kang, Dae Hoon; Essadiqi, Elhachmi; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-07-01

    A numerical formulation of solidification model which can predict the microsegregation and microstructural features for multicomponent alloys is presented. The model incorporates the kinetic features during solidification such as solute back diffusion, dendrite tip undercooling, and secondary arm coarsening. The model is dynamically linked to thermodynamic library for accurate input of thermodynamic data. The modeling results are tested against the directional solidification experiments for Mg-Al-Zn alloys. The experiments were conducted in the cooling rate range of 0.13 to 2.33 K/s and microstructural features such as secondary arm spacing, primary dendrite arm spacing, second phase fraction, and microsegregation were compared with the modeling results. Based on the model and the experimental data, a solidification map was built in order to provide guidelines for as-cast microstructural features of Mg-Al-Zn alloys in a wide range of solidification conditions.

  4. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  5. Numerical simulation of porosity-free titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this research was to analyse, predict and control the porosity in titanium dental castings by the use of numerical simulation. A commercial software package (MAGMASOFT) was used. In the first part of the study, a model casting (two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar) was simulated to analyse shrinkage porosity. Secondly, gas pores were numerically examined by means of a ball specimen with a "snake" sprue. The numerical simulation results were compared with the experimental casting results, which were made on a centrifugal casting machine. The predicted shrinkage levels coincided well with the experimentally determined levels. Based on the above numerical analyses, an optimised running and gating system design for the crown model was proposed. The numerical filling and solidification results of the ball specimen showed that this simulation model could be helpful for the explanation of the experimentally indicated gas pores. It was concluded that shrinkage porosity in titanium dental casting was predictable, and it could be minimised by improving the running and gating system design. Entrapped gas pores can be explained from the simulation results of the mould filling and solidification.

  6. Solidification of Liquid Distributed in its Primary Matrix Phase of Al-10Cu-Fe Alloy and Their Tribological Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, L. Sankara; Jha, A. K.; Ojha, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    Solidification behavior of liquid phase entrained in its primary solid has been investigated. A hypoeutectic alloy based on Al-Cu-Fe system containing Fe and Si was thermal cycled between semisolid regions to low temperatures. The freezing characteristics of the liquid were recorded in inverse rate cooling curves. The continuous network of the liquid phase progressively changed into isolated droplets with their different size and size distribution. Such droplets revealed undercooling of the melt varying from 20 to 35 °C below the eutectic temperature of the alloy. This behavior of melt undercooling is discussed in light of independent nucleation events associated with freezing of droplets. Solidification structure of droplets revealed particulate eutectic phases in contrast to lamellar eutectic microstructure in the interdendritic region of the as-cast alloy. The droplet distribution and their solidification structure resulted in an improvement in tribological characteristics of the alloy. This effect is correlated with features of wear surfaces generated on the matting surfaces.

  7. Solidification of Liquid Distributed in its Primary Matrix Phase of Al-10Cu-Fe Alloy and Their Tribological Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, L. Sankara; Jha, A. K.; Ojha, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    Solidification behavior of liquid phase entrained in its primary solid has been investigated. A hypoeutectic alloy based on Al-Cu-Fe system containing Fe and Si was thermal cycled between semisolid regions to low temperatures. The freezing characteristics of the liquid were recorded in inverse rate cooling curves. The continuous network of the liquid phase progressively changed into isolated droplets with their different size and size distribution. Such droplets revealed undercooling of the melt varying from 20 to 35 °C below the eutectic temperature of the alloy. This behavior of melt undercooling is discussed in light of independent nucleation events associated with freezing of droplets. Solidification structure of droplets revealed particulate eutectic phases in contrast to lamellar eutectic microstructure in the interdendritic region of the as-cast alloy. The droplet distribution and their solidification structure resulted in an improvement in tribological characteristics of the alloy. This effect is correlated with features of wear surfaces generated on the matting surfaces.

  8. The feasibility of low-G grey solidification of nodular iron in the F-104 experimental furnace package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Smith, G. A.; Workman, G.

    1983-01-01

    The rationale for low-g experiments with cast iron and the need for solidification in the grey form during these experiments are reviewed. The factors which determine whether an iron melt will solidify grey or white are discussed. Cooling rate versus microstructure was studied for a nodular iron candidate material for F-104 low-g solidification. The study determined that low-g grey solidification, using the present F-104 furnace system, of the nodular iron composition studied is not feasible. Specimen microstructure strongly suggested that the F-104 furnace's gas cooling system was causing excessive localized chill resulting in the nucleation of the unwanted iron carbide phase. A change is suggested, in the quench system design, that could possibly overcome this problem.

  9. Influence of forced convection on solidification and remelting in the developing mushy zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Vakhrushev, A.; Ludwig, A.; Kharicha, A.

    2016-03-01

    The mushy zone and solid shell formed during solidification of a continuous casting are mostly uneven, and this unevenness of shell growth might lead to surface defects or breakout. One known example is the unevenness of shell growth at the impingement point between the jet flow (coming from submerged entry nozzle) and the solidification front. This phenomenon is primarily understood as the local remelting caused by the superheat of the melt, which is continuously brought by the jet flow towards the solidification front. A recent study of the authors [Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2014, in press] hinted that, in addition to the aforementioned superheat-induced local remelting (1), two other factors also affect the shell growth. They are (2) the advection of latent heat in the semi-solid mushy zone and (3) the enhanced dissipation rate of energy by turbulence in the bulk-mush transition region. This paper is going to perform a detailed numerical analysis to gain an insight into the flow-solidification interaction phenomena. Contributions of each of the above factors to the shell formation are compared.

  10. Characteristics of medium carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization using the multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ko, Eun-yi; Choi, Joo; Sohn, Il

    2014-11-01

    An oscillating multi-mold simulator with embedded thermocouples was used to study the initial solidification of medium carbon steels and crystallization characteristics of the mold flux. Casting speed variations in the simulator from 0.7 m/min to 1.4 m/min at fixed oscillation frequency and stroke resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Frequency modifications from 2.5 Hz to 5.0 Hz and stroke changes from 8.1 mm to 5.4 mm at fixed casting speeds also resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Surface profile analysis of as-cast steel strips showed characteristic oscillation marks comparable to the narrow faces of the industrial cast slabs. The apparent effect of casting variables on the temperature and surface profiles during the solidification of the medium carbon steels could be correlated to the variations in the negative strip time and subsequent changes in the extent of mold flux infiltration. Back scattered scanning electron microscope analysis of the full length of the retrieved flux film after casting showed cuspidine crystallization ratio that increased from the upper to lower portion of the flux film. This dynamic crystallization and growth of the cuspidine phase increases as the flux is sustained at high temperatures for longer periods. Additional experiments with industrial fluxes designed for soft cooling of medium carbon steel grades showed comparable infiltration thickness of the flux, but the crystallization characteristics were significantly different, which could have a significant impact on the heat transfer rate and mechanism through the flux film.

  11. Optimization of Mold Yield in MultiCavity Sand Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Vasudev D.; Joshi, Durgesh; Ravi, B.; Narasimhan, K.

    2013-06-01

    The productivity of ductile iron foundries engaging in mass production of castings for the automobile and other engineering sectors depends on the number of cavities per mold. A denser packing of cavities, however, results in slower heat transfer from adjacent cavities, leading to delayed solidification, possible shrinkage defects, and lower mechanical properties. In this article, we propose a methodology to optimize mold yield by selecting the correct combination of the mold box size and the number of cavities based on solidification time and mold temperature. Simulation studies were carried out by modeling solid and hollow cube castings with different values of cavity-wall gap and finding the minimum value of the gap beyond which there is no change in casting solidification time. Then double-cavity molds were modeled with different values of cavity-cavity gap, and simulated to find the minimum value of gap. The simulation results were verified by melting and pouring ductile iron in green sand molds instrumented with thermocouples, and recording the temperature in mold at predetermined locations. The proposed approach can be employed to generate a technological database of minimum gaps for various combinations of part geometry, metal and process, which will be very useful to optimize the mold cavity layouts.

  12. Effect of sand dilation on core expansion during steel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galles, D.; Beckermann, C.

    2015-06-01

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of the bonded sand used for molds and cores has a strong effect on dimensions of steel castings. Experiments are conducted in which a thick- walled hollow carbon steel cylinder is cast using a silica sand core. The temporal evolution of the inner diameter of the cylinder is measured in-situ during solidification and cooling by utilizing quartz rods connected to LVDTs (Linear Variable Differential Transformers). It is found that the inner diameter increases significantly during the initial stages of solidification when the steel offers little restraint to core expansion. Without accurately modeling this initial core expansion, the final cylinder dimensions at room temperature cannot be predicted. Preliminary simulations using the measured linear thermal expansion coefficient of the core considerably under-predict the measurements, which suggests that shear induced sand dilation also contributes to core expansion. The Drucker-Prager Cap model, which can predict dilative behavior, is used to simulate the mechanical behavior of the core. Utilizing this model in conjunction with an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law for the steel, the stress simulations successfully predict the observed dimensional changes in the casting during solidification.

  13. Thermal Modelling In Pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasgado, M. T. Alonso; Davey, K.; Watari, H.

    2004-06-01

    The pressure die casting process is cyclic and the temperature levels in the die are principally dictated by the total energy received from the casting. It is thus extremely important that any solidification model for the casting is able to predict energy extraction rates to a high degree of accuracy. In this paper an efficient three dimensional hybrid thermal model for the pressure die casting process is described. The finite element method (FEM) is used for modelling heat transfer in the casting, coupled to a boundary element (BE) model for the die. The FEM can efficiently account for the non-linearity introduced by the release of latent heat on solidification, whereas the BEM is ideally suited for modelling linear heat conduction in the die, as surface temperatures are of principal importance. The FE formulation for the casting is based on a control volume capacitance method, which is shown to provide high accuracy and stability. This method is similar to the apparent and effective heat capacitance methods, which are popular approaches used where conduction predominates over other heat transfer mechanisms. These methods involve the specification of element or nodal capacitances to accommodate for the release of latent heat. Unfortunately they suffer from a major drawback in that energy is not correctly transported through elements and so providing a source of inaccuracy. The control volume capacitance method allows for the transport of mass arising from volumetric shrinkage and ensures that energy is correctly transported. The BE model caters for surface phenomena such as boiling in the cooling channels, which is important, as this effectively controls the manner in which energy is extracted. The die temperature is decomposed into two components, one a steady-state part and the other a time-dependent perturbation. This approach enables the transient die temperatures to be calculated in an efficient way, since only die surfaces close to the die cavity are

  14. Simulation of macrosegregation in a large vertical continuous casting of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Wu, M.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.

    2016-07-01

    A three-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model considering fluid flow, heat and solute transport is applied to simulate the solidification in a vertical continuous casting. The key features of solidification phenomena in this process, such as evolution of columnar phase, evolution and floatation/sedimentation of equi- axed crystals, thermal solutal convection of the melt and the flow caused by crystal sedimentation, development of as-cast structure, the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET), and formation of macrosegregation, are simulated. It is predicted that there is an equiaxed zone in the central part of the strand, and the rest section is filled with columnar phase (or dominant with columnar phase). A relatively strong negative segregation in the equiaxed zone and a mostly neutral concentration in the columnar region are found. Near the CET, there is a so-called middle radius positive segregation band. Formation mechanisms of this segregation pattern are discussed.

  15. Prediction of Hot Tear Formation in Vertical DC Casting of Aluminum Billets Using a Granular Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.; Rappaz, M.

    2013-09-01

    A coupled hydromechanical granular model aimed at predicting hot tear formation and stress-strain behavior in metallic alloys during solidification is applied to the semicontinuous direct chill casting of aluminum alloy round billets. This granular model consists of four separate three-dimensional (3D) modules: (I) a solidification module that is used for generating the solid-liquid geometry at a given solid fraction, (II) a fluid flow module that is used to calculate the solidification shrinkage and deformation-induced pressure drop within the intergranular liquid, (III) a semisolid deformation module that is based on a combined finite element/discrete element method and simulates the rheological behavior of the granular structure, and (IV) a failure module that simulates crack initiation and propagation. To investigate hot tearing, the granular model has been applied to a representative volume within the direct chill cast billet that is located at the bottom of the liquid sump, and it reveals that semisolid deformations imposed on the mushy zone open the liquid channels due to localization of the deformation at grains boundaries. At a low casting speed, only individual pores are able to form in the widest channels because liquid feeding remains efficient. However, as the casting speed increases, the flow of liquid required to compensate for solidification shrinkage also increases and as a result the pores propagate and coalesce to form a centerline crack.

  16. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  17. Effects of Treatment Duration and Cooling Rate on Pure Aluminum Solidification Upon Pulse Magneto-Oscillation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edry, Itzhak; Mordechai, Tomer; Frage, Nachum; Hayun, Shmuel

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulse magneto-oscillation (PMO) treatment on casting grain size has been widely investigated. Nevertheless, its mechanism remains unclear, especially when PMO is applied at different periods during solidification, namely when only applied above the melting point. In the present work, the effect of PMO treatment applied at different segments during solidification was investigated. It was found that the dendrite fragmentation model may well explain the effect of PMO applied during the dendrite growth stage. However, only the cavities activation model may account for the effect when PMO is conducted above the melting point. In current study, the effect of PMO treatment on grain size was also investigated at various cooling rates. It was established that the cooling rate had only a slight effect on grain size when PMO treatment was applied. Thus, PMO treatment may provide homogeneous grain size distribution in castings with different wall thicknesses that solidified with various cooling rates.

  18. Eutectic solidification patterns: Interest of microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plapp, Mathis; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Faivre, Gabriel; Akamatsu, Silvère

    2017-01-01

    The solidification of binary eutectic alloys produces two-phase composite materials in which the microstructure, that is, the geometrical distribution of the two solid phases, results from complex pattern-formation processes at the moving solid-liquid interface. Since the volume fraction of the two solids depends on the local composition, solidification dynamics can be strongly influenced by thermosolutal convection in the liquid. In this contribution, we review our experimental and numerical work devoted to the understanding of eutectic solidification under purely diffusive conditions, which will soon be tested and extended during the microgravity experiment TRANSPARENT ALLOYS planned by the European Space Agency (ESA). xml:lang="fr"

  19. Solidification of gold nanoparticles in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, S; Walther, J H; Poulikakos, D; Passerone, D; Koumoutsakos, P

    2005-03-18

    The structure and the solidification of gold nanoparticles in a carbon nanotube are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations indicate that the predicted solidification temperature of the enclosed particle is lower than its bulk counterpart, but higher than that observed for clusters placed in vacuum. A comparison with a phenomenological model indicates that, in the considered range of tube radii (R(CNT)) of 0.5 < R(CNT) < 1.6 nm, the solidification temperature depends mainly on the length of the particle with a minor dependence on R(CNT).

  20. Minimizing Segregation during the Controlled Directional Solidification of Dendric Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, Alex; Kim, Shin-Woo

    2003-01-01

    Gravity-driven convection induced in the liquid by density gradients of temperature or composition disrupts uniform dendritic growth during controlled directional solidification and promotes severe macrosegregation. The solute-rich region about the dendrite tip appears to play a pivotal role in channel initiation. Allen and Hunt referred to this region as an "initial transient" or dynamic region constituting steep concentration gradients. Experimental investigation also point to the role the tip region plays in developing microstructure. Hellawell and co-workers showed that flow-through dendritic channels could be effectively disrupted, and segregation minimized, during the gradient freezing of bulk castings by rotating the melt through a slight angle with respect to Earth's gravity vector. Adapting this principle to controlled directional solidification, it has been shown" that segregation in dendritic alloys can be minimized, and properties improved, by processing the sample near horizontal in conjunction with a slow axial rotation of the crucible. It is postulated that the observed microstructural uniformity arises by maintaining the developing solute field about the dendrite tip. Solute rejected during vertical directional solidification will rise or sink parallel to the primary dendrite arms during axial rotation setting the stage for accumulation, instabilities, and segregation. In contrast, during horizontal growth, the rejected solute will sink or rise perpendicular to the primary dendrite. Now, in the presence of a slight axial rotation, solute that was initially sinking (or rising) will find itself above (or below) its parent dendrite, i.e., still about the tip region. The following is intended to experimentally demonstrate the viability of this concept in coordination with a model that gives predictive insight regarding solute distribution about growing dendrites. Alloys based on the lead-tin eutectic system were used in this study. The system is well

  1. Numerical simulation of macrosegregation with grain motion during solidification of Mg-4wt.%Y alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing Ya; Liu, Dong-Rong; Zhang, Jian Jiao; Wang, Li Ping; Guo, Er Jun

    2016-12-01

    A two-phase solidification model was used that incorporates the descriptions of natural convection, heat transfer, solute transport and solid movement at macroscopic scale with microscopic relations for grain nucleation and growth. The implementation of the two-phase model was validated by comparisons with a consensus of previous numerical simulation for Sn-5wt.%Pb alloy and with experiment for Mg-4wt.%Y alloy cast in one-side-chilled resin sand mould. With free movement of globular grains in the bulk liquid, effects of melt superheat and nucleation density on fluid flow behavior and macrosegregation during solidification of Mg-4wt.%Y alloy were numerically investigated. It was found that a lower melt superheat and a higher nucleation density decrease the severity of macrosegregation by weakening the flotation of grains.

  2. Surface-Mediated Solidification of a Semiconducting Polymer during Time-Controlled Spin-Coating.

    PubMed

    Na, Jin Yeong; Kang, Boseok; Lee, Seung Goo; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Yeong Don

    2017-03-22

    Spin-casting a polymer semiconductor solution over a short period of only a few seconds dramatically improved the molecular ordering and charge transport properties of the resulting semiconductor thin films. In this process, it was quite important to halt spinning before the drying line propagation had begun. Here, we elucidated the effects of the substrate surface characteristics on the drying kinetics during spin-coating, systematically investigated the microstructural evolution during semiconducting polymer solidification, and evaluated the performances of the resulting polymer field-effect transistors. We demonstrated that the spin time required to enhance the molecular ordering and electrical properties of the polythiophene thin films was strongly correlated with the solidification onset time, which was altered by surface treatments introduced onto the substrate surfaces.

  3. Solidification of SiC/Al fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.; Saigal, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in the development and improvement of near net shape manufacturing processes for the fabrication of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Among the techniques available today, the solidification processing technique, including a casting process, provides the most direct route to a finished shape and stands out as potentially simple and economical. In the present study, the solidification of fiber-reinforced composites was investigated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The finite element formulation of general heat conduction equations is typically done by Galerkin's method, which is one of the weighted residual methods. Numerical results from FEM are compared with analytical solutions for the phase change problems. The interface between the solid and liquid phases and the temperature distribution in the composite are analyzed as a function of volume fraction of fibers. ABAQUS, a general purpose commercially available finite element code, was used in this study.

  4. Toward Understanding Pore Formation and Mobility During Controlled Directional Solidification in a Microgravity Environment Investigation (PFMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Luz, P.; Jeter, L.; Volz, M. P.; Spievy, R.; Smith, G.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Porosity in the form of "bubbles and pipes" can occur during controlled directional solidification processing of metal alloys. It is detrimental to material properties and precludes obtaining meaningful scientific results. On Earth, density differences allow an initiated bubble can rise through the liquid and "pop" at the surface resulting in a sound casting. This is not likely to occur in a microgravity environment and, unfortunately, a number of experiments conducted in microgravity have suffered from porosity effects. The current investigation is a systematic effort towards understanding porosity formation and mobility during controlled directional solidification in a microgravity environment. This will be investigated by utilizing a transparent material, succinonitrile (SCN), in conjunction with a translating temperature gradient stage so that direct observation and recording of pore generation and mobility can be made. The talk will cover the porosity problem, the details of the proposed experiments and the experimental hardware, and the expectations from the microgravity experiments.

  5. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  6. Interactions Between Solidification and Compositional Convection in Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Worster, M. G.; Chiareli, A. O. P.; Anderson, D. M.; Schultze, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    This project combined theoretical and experimental ground-based studies of the interactions between convection and solidification of binary melts. Particular attention was focused on the alteration of the composition and microstructure of castings caused by convective flows through the interstices of mushy layers. Two different mechanisms causing convection were investigated. (i) Compositional, buoyancy driven convection is known to cause chimneys and freckles in directionally cast alloys on Earth. The analytical studies provide quantitative criteria for the formation of chimneys that can be used to assess the expediency of producing alloys in Space. (ii) Flow of the melt is also driven by the contraction (expansion) that typically occurs during change of phase. Such convection will occur even in the absence of gravity, and may indeed be the primary cause of macrosegregation during the production of alloys in Space. The studies will employed asymptotic methods in order to determine conditions for the stability of various states of solidifying systems. Further, simple macroscopic models of complete systems were developed and solved. These analytical studies were augmented by laboratory experiments using aqueous solutions, in which the convective flows could be easily observed and the effects of convection could be readily measured. These y experiments guided the development of the theoretical models and provided data against which the predictions of the models can be tested.

  7. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  8. Solidification microstructures: A conceptual approach

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.; Kurz, W.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed theoretical models have been developed in the literature to correlate microstructural characteristics as a function of processing parameters. These results are examined with a broad perspective to show that various laws for microstructural transitions and microstructural spacings can be represented in terms of three simple characteristic lengths of the important physical processes. Initially, the important physical processes of solute and thermal transport and capillarity effect are considered, and they are related to the microstructural lengths such as dendrite tip radius, primary and secondary spacing, and eutectic spacing. It is shown that these microstructural lengths are simply given by the geometric mean of the characteristic lengths of physical processes that are important in a given problem. New characteristic lengths that become important under rapid solidification are then developed, and how these characteristic lengths influence microstructural transition and microstructural scales is also discussed.

  9. Shear stabilization of solidification fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Stephen H.; Schulze, T. P.

    1994-01-01

    A linear-stability analysis is performed on the interface formed during the directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy in the presence of a time-periodic flow. In general, the flow is generated by the elliptical motion of the crystal parallel to the interface. The presence of the flow can either stabilize or destabilize the system relative to the case without flow with the result depending on the frequency and amplitude of the oscillations as well as the properties of the material. In the particular, we find that the morphological instability present in the absence of flow can be entirely suppressed with respect to disturbances of the same frequency as the oscillation.

  10. High gradient directional solidification furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, B. R.; Whitt, W. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high gradient directional solidification furnace is disclosed which includes eight thermal zones throughout the length of the furnace. In the hot end of the furnace, furnace elements provide desired temperatures. These elements include Nichrome wire received in a grooved tube which is encapsulated y an outer alumina core. A booster heater is provided in the hot end of the furnace which includes toroidal tungsten/rhenium wire which has a capacity to put heat quickly into the furnace. An adiabatic zone is provided by an insulation barrier to separate the hot end of the furnace from the cold end. The old end of the furnace is defined by additional heating elements. A heat transfer plate provides a means by which heat may be extracted from the furnace and conducted away through liquid cooled jackets. By varying the input of heat via the booster heater and output of heat via the heat transfer plate, a desired thermal gradient profile may be provided.

  11. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Wagner, I; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of this paper were to simulate the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges; to predict and control porosity defect. A casting simulation software, MAGMASOFT, was used. The geometry of the crowns with fine details of the occlusal surface were digitized by means of laser measuring technique, then converted and read in the simulation software. Both mold filling and solidification were simulated, the shrinkage porosity was predicted by a "feeding criterion", and the gas pore sensitivity was studied based on the mold filling and solidification simulations. Two types of dental prostheses (a single-crown casting and a three-unit-bridge) with various sprue designs were numerically "poured", and only one optimal design for each prosthesis was recommended for real casting trial. With the numerically optimized design, real titanium dental prostheses (five replicas for each) were made on a centrifugal casting machine. All the castings endured radiographic examination, and no porosity was detected in the cast prostheses. It indicates that the numerical simulation is an efficient tool for dental casting design and porosity control.

  12. The microstructures of strip-cast low-carbon steels and their response to thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiang, L.-T.; Wray, P. J.

    1989-07-01

    The as-cast microstructure and its modification when subjected to heat treatment is examined for strip-cast low carbon steels. The local solidification rate in the twin-roll strip casting process is estimated to. be 590 to 850 °C/s, and the primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings are approximately 17 to 25 and 10 μm, respectively. The as-cast structure is predominantly Widmanstätten ferrite and, thereby, differs from the conventional hot-rolled sheet. It is suggested that the as-cast morphology is a result of the large initial austenite grain size and the cooling rate and is not a unique characteristic of rapid solidification of strip casting. By restricting the austenite grain size and cooling rate, polygonal ferrite morphology probably can be produced during strip casting. The response to heat treatment depends on the presence of aluminum; with a moderate amount of aluminum, the A1N precipitates in the as-cast structure inhibit the subsequent grain boundary movement and may affect the subsequent recrystallization behavior.

  13. Interfacial heat transfer in squeeze casting of magnesium alloy AM60 with variation of applied pressures and casting wall-thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Fang, Li; Sun, Zhizhong; Hu, Henry; Nie, Xueyuan; Tjong, Jimi

    2016-10-01

    The heat transfer coefficient at the casting-die interface is the most important factor on the solidification process. With the 75-ton hydraulic press machine and P20 steel die mold, 5-step castings of magnesium alloy AM60 with different wall-thicknesses (3, 5, 8, 12, 20 mm) were poured under various hydraulic pressures (30, 60, and 90 MPa) using an indirect squeeze casting process. Thermal histories throughout the die wall and the casting surface have been recorded by fine type-K thermocouples. The in-cavity local pressures measured by pressure transducers were explored at the casting-die interfaces of 5 steps. The casting-die interfacial heat transfer coefficients (IHTC) initially reached a maximum peak value followed by a gradually decline to the lower level. Similar characteristics of IHTC peak values can be observed at the applied pressures of 30, 60 and 90 MPa. With the applied pressure of 90 MPa, the peak IHTC values from steps 1 to 5 varied from 5623 to 10,649 W/m2 K. As the applied hydraulic pressure increased, the IHTC peak value of each step was increased accordingly. The wall thickness also affected IHTC peak values significantly. The peak IHTC value and heat flux increased as the step became thicker. The empirical equations relating the IHTCs to the local pressures and the solidification temperature at the casting surface were developed based on the multivariate linear and polynomial regression.

  14. Experimental Procedure for Warm Spinning of Cast Aluminum Components.

    PubMed

    Roy, Matthew J; Maijer, Daan M

    2017-02-01

    High performance, cast aluminum automotive wheels are increasingly being incrementally formed via flow forming/metal spinning at elevated temperatures to improve material properties. With a wide array of processing parameters which can affect both the shape attained and resulting material properties, this type of processing is notoriously difficult to commission. A simplified, light-duty version of the process has been designed and implemented for full-size automotive wheels. The apparatus is intended to assist in understanding the deformation mechanisms and the material response to this type of processing. An experimental protocol has been developed to prepare for, and subsequently perform forming trials and is described for as-cast A356 wheel blanks. The thermal profile attained, along with instrumentation details are provided. Similitude with full-scale forming operations which impart significantly more deformation at faster rates is discussed.

  15. Experimental Procedure for Warm Spinning of Cast Aluminum Components

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Matthew J.; Maijer, Daan M.

    2017-01-01

    High performance, cast aluminum automotive wheels are increasingly being incrementally formed via flow forming/metal spinning at elevated temperatures to improve material properties. With a wide array of processing parameters which can affect both the shape attained and resulting material properties, this type of processing is notoriously difficult to commission. A simplified, light-duty version of the process has been designed and implemented for full-size automotive wheels. The apparatus is intended to assist in understanding the deformation mechanisms and the material response to this type of processing. An experimental protocol has been developed to prepare for, and subsequently perform forming trials and is described for as-cast A356 wheel blanks. The thermal profile attained, along with instrumentation details are provided. Similitude with full-scale forming operations which impart significantly more deformation at faster rates is discussed. PMID:28190063

  16. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the α-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the β-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was <0.4 mm/year compared with ∼2 mm/year for the conventionally cast alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons.

  17. Modeling of Microstructure Evolution During Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingfang; Pan, Shiyan; Sun, Dongke

    In recent years, considerable advances have been achieved in the numerical modeling of microstructure evolution during solidification. This paper presents the models based on the cellular automaton (CA) technique and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which can reproduce a wide variety of solidification microstructure features observed experimentally with an acceptable computational efficiency. The capabilities of the models are addressed by presenting representative examples encompassing a broad variety of issues, such as the evolution of dendritic structure and microsegregation in two and three dimensions, dendritic growth in the presence of convection, divorced eutectic solidification of spheroidal graphite irons, and gas porosity formation. The simulations offer insights into the underlying physics of microstructure formation during alloy solidification.

  18. Microstructure of ceramics fabricated by unidirectional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokubo, T.

    1984-01-01

    The unidirectional solidification methods are zone melting, crystal pulling, Bridgemen, and slow cooling. In order to obtain excellent properties (such as transparency), pores, voids and cracks must be avoided, and elimination of such defects is described.

  19. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  20. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wei, H L; Mazumder, J; DebRoy, T

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  1. Solidification/Stabilization Use at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To provide interested stakeholders such as project managers, technology service providers, consulting engineers, site owners, and the general public with the most recent information about solidification/stabilization applications at Superfund sites...

  2. A Citizen's Guide to Solidification and Stabilization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide describes how solidification and stabilization refer to a group of cleanup methods that prevent or slow the release of harmful chemicals from wastes, such as contaminated soil, sediment, and sludge.

  3. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; Debroy, T.

    2015-11-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  4. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  5. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS, SOLIDTECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Soliditech solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous waste materials in soils or sludges with pozzolanic material (cement, fly ash, or kiln dust), a proprietary additive called Urrichem, other proprietary additives, and water. The process is designed to aid ...

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS, SOLIDTECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Soliditech solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous waste materials in soils or sludges with pozzolanic material (cement, fly ash, or kiln dust), a proprietary additive called Urrichem, other proprietary additives, and water. The process is designed to aid ...

  7. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  8. Fiber reinforcement of investment cast parts

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, M.; Neussl, E.; Schaedlich-Stubenrauch, J.; Sahm, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    For 3 years now the Foundry-Institute (Giesserei-Institut) of the Aachen Institute of Technology has worked on the development of a new, low-cost production process for longfiber-reinforced light alloy components. The process baseline is oriented on the precision casting process in its investment casting mode, also known as lost wax process. The investment casting process is well known as a typical near-net-shape process for the manufacture of high-quality cast components, predominantly for applications in the aerospace industry (structured components, turbine blades and parts etc.) and enjoys significant growth rates during the last decades. After preliminary studies on the modification of single process substeps R & D work concentrated on the final-shape production of Al-components (Al-alloys A356, A357, 201 etc.) reinforced with long ceramic fibers. Both SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers of several producers were used. Main interest focuses on techniques for a selective reinforcement of main stress sections. Without using conventional sintered preforms the fibers are infiltrated with molten metal under a support pressure of less than 1 MPa. Combined with a new developed wax pattern technique test specimens with a nearly homogeneous fiber distribution were produced. In addition, even reactive matrix alloys did not lead to destructive interface reactions. In most cases sufficient bonding between fibers and matrix could be observed. Following to these positive tendencies a considerable improvement of mechanical properties could be measured for longfiber reinforced Al-alloys. Both tensile strength and elastic modulus could be increased up to 100% compared with the unreinforced matrix alloy. Latest work concentrated on the production of small representative components for potential applications.

  9. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Asmussen, Robert M.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most to the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.

  10. Proceedings of structural metals by rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Savage, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-Si alloys containing V, Mn, Cr or Mo; Powder size distribution and heat treatment effects on the hardness of Al-Fe-Ce-W alloy; Consolidation and properties of thermally stable Al-Cr-Zr alloys produced by rapid solidification; and Feasibility of rapid solidification processing of aluminum-lithium-beryllium alloys.

  11. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Gershinsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    The generalized problem of determining the temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation was mathematically formulated. Realistic initial and boundary conditions were defined, and a computer program was developed and checked out. The programs computes the positions of two moving boundaries, evaporation and solidification, and their velocities. Temperature and solute concentration profiles in the semiinfinite material body at selected instances of time are also computed.

  12. Application of particle method to the casting process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Zulaida, Y. M.; Anzai, K.

    2012-07-01

    Casting processes involve many significant phenomena such as fluid flow, solidification, and deformation, and it is known that casting defects are strongly influenced by the phenomena. However the phenomena complexly interacts each other and it is difficult to observe them directly because the temperature of the melt and other apparatus components are quite high, and they are generally opaque; therefore, a computer simulation is expected to serve a lot of benefits to consider what happens in the processes. Recently, a particle method, which is one of fully Lagrangian methods, has attracted considerable attention. The particle methods based on Lagrangian methods involving no calculation lattice have been developed rapidly because of their applicability to multi-physics problems. In this study, we combined the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification simulation programs, and tried to simulate various casting processes such as continuous casting, centrifugal casting and ingot making. As a result of continuous casting simulation, the powder flow could be calculated as well as the melt flow, and the subsequent shape of interface between the melt and the powder was calculated. In the centrifugal casting simulation, the mold was smoothly modeled along the shape of the real mold, and the fluid flow and the rotating mold are simulated directly. As a result, the flow of the melt dragged by the rotating mold was calculated well. The eccentric rotation and the influence of Coriolis force were also reproduced directly and naturally. For ingot making simulation, a shrinkage formation behavior was calculated and the shape of the shrinkage agreed well with the experimental result.

  13. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  14. Formation of shrinkage porosity during solidification of steel: Numerical simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, M.; Michelic, S.; Bernhard, C.

    2016-07-01

    The phase transformations in solidification of steel are accompanied by shrinkage and sudden changes in the solubility of alloying elements, resulting in negative side effects as micro- and macrosegregation and the formation of gas and shrinkage porosities. This paper deals with the numerical and experimental simulation of the formation of shrinkage porosity during the solidification of steel. First the physical basics for the mechanism of shrinkage pore formation will be discussed. The main reason for this type of porosity is the restraint of fluid flow in the mushy zone which leads to a pressure drop. The pressure decreases from the dendrite tip to the root. When the pressure falls below a critical value, a pore can form. The second part of the paper deals with different approaches for the prediction of the formation of shrinkage porosity. The most common one according to these models is the usage of a simple criterion function, like the Niyama criterion. For the computation of the porosity criterion the thermal gradient, cooling rate and solidification rate must be known, easily to determine from numerical simulation. More complex simulation tools like ProCAST include higher sophisticated models, which allow further calculations of the shrinkage cavity. Finally, the different approaches will be applied to a benchmark laboratory experiment. The presented results deal with an ingot casting experiment under variation of taper. The dominant influence of mould taper on the formation of shrinkage porosities can both be demonstrated by the lab experiment as well as numerical simulations. These results serve for the optimization of all ingot layouts for lab castings at the Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy.

  15. Heat Treatment of Closed-Cell A356 + 4 wt.%Cu + 2 wt.%Ca Foam and Its Effect on the Foam Mechanical Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, S. M. H.; Vali, H.; Soltani, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this investigation, aluminum-silicon alloy foam is developed by adding certain amounts of copper and calcium elements in A356 alloy. Addition of 4 wt.%Cu + 2 wt.%Ca to the melt changed bubbles morphology from ellipsoid to spherical by decreasing Reynolds number and increasing Bond number. Compression behavior and energy absorption of the foams are assessed before and after aging. Solid solution treatment and aging lead to the best mechanical properties with 170% enhancement in yield strength and 185% improvement in energy absorption capacity as compared to non-heat-treated foams. The metallographic observations showed that bubbles geometry and structure in the A356 + 4wt.% Cu + 2 wt.%Ca foam are more homogeneous than the A356 foam.

  16. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  17. Macrosegregation in aluminum alloy ingot cast by the semicontinuous direct chill method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, H.; Granger, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of the semicontinuous DC casting method is developed to predict the positive segregation observed at the subsurface and the negative segregation commonly found at the center of large commercial-size aluminum alloy ingot. Qualitative analysis of commercial-size aluminum alloy semicontinuous cast direct chill (DC) ingot is carried out. In the analysis, both positive segregation in the ingot subsurface and negative segregation at the center of the ingot are examined. Ingot subsurface macrosegregation is investigated by considering steady state casting of a circular cross-section binary alloy ingot. Nonequilibrium solidification is assumed with no solid diffusion, constant equilibrium partition ratio, and constant solid density.

  18. Macrosegregation in aluminum alloy ingot cast by the semicontinuous direct chill method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, H.; Granger, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of the semicontinuous DC casting method is developed to predict the positive segregation observed at the subsurface and the negative segregation commonly found at the center of large commercial-size aluminum alloy ingot. Qualitative analysis of commercial-size aluminum alloy semicontinuous cast direct chill (DC) ingot is carried out. In the analysis, both positive segregation in the ingot subsurface and negative segregation at the center of the ingot are examined. Ingot subsurface macrosegregation is investigated by considering steady state casting of a circular cross-section binary alloy ingot. Nonequilibrium solidification is assumed with no solid diffusion, constant equilibrium partition ratio, and constant solid density.

  19. Secondary Waste Simulant Development for Cast Stone Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Swanberg, David J.; Mahoney, J.

    2015-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a waste form testing program to implement aspects of the Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Cast Stone Technology Development Plan (Ashley 2012) and the Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap (PNNL 2009) related to the development and qualification of Cast Stone as a potential waste form for the solidification of aqueous wastes from the Hanford Site after the aqueous wastes are treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The current baseline is that the resultant Cast Stone (or grout) solid waste forms would be disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Data and results of this testing program will be used in the upcoming performance assessment of the IDF and in the design and operation of a solidification treatment unit planned to be added to the ETF. The purpose of the work described in this report is to 1) develop simulants for the waste streams that are currently being fed and future WTP secondary waste streams also to be fed into the ETF and 2) prepare simulants to use for preparation of grout or Cast Stone solid waste forms for testing.

  20. Development of an Optimization Methodology for the Aluminum Alloy Wheel Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianglan; Reilly, Carl; Maijer, Daan M.; Cockcroft, Steve L.; Phillion, Andre B.

    2015-08-01

    An optimization methodology has been developed for the aluminum alloy wheel casting process. The methodology is focused on improving the timing of cooling processes in a die to achieve improved casting quality. This methodology utilizes (1) a casting process model, which was developed within the commercial finite element package, ABAQUS™—ABAQUS is a trademark of Dassault Systèms; (2) a Python-based results extraction procedure; and (3) a numerical optimization module from the open-source Python library, Scipy. To achieve optimal casting quality, a set of constraints have been defined to ensure directional solidification, and an objective function, based on the solidification cooling rates, has been defined to either maximize, or target a specific, cooling rate. The methodology has been applied to a series of casting and die geometries with different cooling system configurations, including a 2-D axisymmetric wheel and die assembly generated from a full-scale prototype wheel. The results show that, with properly defined constraint and objective functions, solidification conditions can be improved and optimal cooling conditions can be achieved leading to process productivity and product quality improvements.

  1. Hot ductility and strength of SiC{sub p}/A356 Al composite and matrix alloy by torsion testing

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, H.J.; Sakaris, P.; Bowles, J.

    1993-12-31

    Torsion testing was conducted on a metal-matrix composite (MMC, 15 v% SiC{sub p}A356 Al) and its matrix alloy over the range 300 to 540{degree}C and 0.1 to 5.0 s{sup {minus}1}. Comparison of flow stress ductility and other hot working parameters is presented. Flow stresses of the A356 MMC were found to be generally higher than A356 alloy but the difference was quite small at higher temperatures. Flow stresses were found to depend on the strain rate through a sinh function and on temperature through an Arrhenius term with activation energies of 263 kJ/mol for the composite and 161 kJ/mol for the matrix; the increased value for the composite suggests that the SiC particles force the matrix to undergo additional strain hardening. Dynamic recovery seems to be predominant in A356; however, dynamic recrystallization likely nucleates in the vicinity of silicon carbide particles in 15 v% SiC{sub p}/A356 Al. Ductility of the composite, about 25% below that of the alloy, rose by a factor of 4 between 400 and 500{degree}C to become higher than many wrought alloy composites. The low ductility of A356 was shown to result from linking up of the cracks nucleated at Si particles, whereas linkage of the decohesion voids at the SiC was associated with more plastic flow in the matrix which had much finer Si particles than the bulk alloy.

  2. Simulation of metal matrix composite solidification in the presence of cooled fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. K.; Amano, R. S.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2008-09-01

    Metal matrix composite (MMC) has been well known for its superior material properties compared with traditional composite. A new method is introduced to improve the properties of MMC in the sense that the ends of the reinforcement phase of the composite are allowed to extend out of the mold and cooled by a heat sink in order to promote the rate of heat transfer through the fibers and promote the formation of primary alpha phase around the reinforcement. This paper presents the experimental results obtained from the foundry in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and some numerical simulation results of the solidification process in the cast mold.

  3. Status of the theory of macroscopic growth instability during directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, O.; Hector, L.G. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Cellular undulation is a condition in which the internal surface of a solidifying shell exhibits geometric irregularities which are large compared to microstructural features. These irregularities, which are periodic ripples, or in some cases raised humps, denote unstable growth of the shell thickness. Casting growth instability leads to a variety of process and product problems such as breakout, undesirable metallurgical structures, surface and subsurface cracking, and surface liquation, which necessitates ingot scalping prior to hot rolling. In this paper, the authors review thermomechanical models of shell growth instability during directional solidification of pure metals and alloys.

  4. Thermal stress analysis of fused-cast AZS refractories during production; Part 2: Development of thermo-elastic stress model

    SciTech Connect

    Cockcroft, S.L.; Brimacombe, J.K. . Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering); Walrod, D.G.; Myles, T.A. . Monofrax-S Plant)

    1994-06-01

    Mathematical models of heat flow and thermo-elastic stress, based on the finite-element method, have been developed and utilized to analyze the voidless,'' fused-cast, AZS, solidification process. The results of the mathematical analysis, in conjunction with information obtained in a comprehensive industrial study, presented in Part 1 of this paper, describe the mechanisms for the formation of the various crack types found in the fused-cast product. Thermal stresses are generated early in the solidification process by rapid cooling of the refractory surface as it contacts the initially cool mold and later in conjunction with the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation which occurs in the zirconia component of the AZS refractory. Applying this model, castings were made using a revised mold design. Preliminary results indicate these castings to be free of objectionable transverse cracks.

  5. Interactions between solidification and compositional convection in mushy layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae

    1994-01-01

    Mushy layers are ubiquitous during the solidification of alloys. They are regions of mixed phase wherein solid crystals are bathed in the melt from which they grew. The matrix of crystals forms a porous medium through which the melt can flow, driven either by external forces or by its own buoyancy in a gravitational field. Buoyancy-driven convection of the melt depends both on temperature gradients, which are necessary for solidification, and on compositional gradients, which are generated as certain components of the alloy are preferentially incorporated in the solid phase and the remaining components are expelled into the melt. In fully liquid regions, the combined action of temperature and concentration on the density of the liquid can cause various forms of double-diffusive convection. However, in the interior of mushy regions the temperature and concentration are thermodynamically coupled so only single-diffusive convection can occur. Typically, the effect of composition on the buoyancy of the melt is much greater than the effect of temperature, and thus convection in mushy layers in driven primarily by the computational gradients within them. The rising interstitial liquid is relatively dilute, having come from colder regions of the mushy layer, where the liquidus concentration is lower, and can dissolve the crystal matrix through which it flows. This is the fundamental process by which chimneys are formed. It is a nonlinear process that requires the convective velocities to be sufficiently large, so fully fledged chimneys (narrow channels) might be avoided by means that weaken the flow. Better still would be to prevent convection altogether, since even weak convection will cause lateral, compositional inhomogeneities in castings. This report outlines three studies that examine the onset of convection within mushy layers.

  6. Solidification of DOE problem wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1986-01-01

    Sodium nitrate waste has been successfully solidified in two types of polymeric materials: polyethylene, a thermoplastic material, and polyester styrene (PES), a thermosetting material. Waste form property evaluation tests such as ANS 16.1 leaching test and compressive strength measurements were performed on the waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate. A single-screw extruder was employed for incorporating dry waste into polyethylene at its melt temperature of 120/sup 0/C to produce a homogenous mixture. Results of the leaching test for polyethylene waste forms containing 30, 50, 60 and 70 wt% sodium nitrate are presented as cumulative fraction leached and leaching indices ranging from 11 to 7.8. Two PES systems are discussed. The first is for solidification of dry salt wastes and the second is a water extendible system that is compatible with wet waste streams. Leaching data for PES and water extendible PES waste forms containing 30 wt% sodium nitrate are presented as cumulative fraction leached and leaching indices of approximately 9. Results from compressive strength measurements are also included.

  7. Experimental and numerical study of the effect of mold vibration on aluminum castings alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Dheir, Numan

    2005-07-01

    The recent advances in scientific and engineering tools have allowed researchers to integrate more science into manufacturing, leading to improved and new innovative processes. As a result, important accomplishments have been reached in the area of designing and engineering new materials for various industrial applications. This subject is of critical significance because of the impact it could have on the manufacturing industry. In the casting industry, obtaining the desired microstructure and properties during solidification may reduce or eliminate the need for costly thermo-mechanical processing prior to secondary manufacturing processes. Several techniques have been developed to alter and control the microstructure of castings during solidification including semi-solid processing, electromagnetic stirring, electromagnetic vibration, and mechanical vibration. Although it is established that mold vibration can significantly influence the structure and properties of castings, however, most of the studies are generally qualitative, limited to a small range of conditions and no attempts have been made to simulate the effect of vibration on casting microstructure. In this work, a detailed experimental and numerical investigation is carried out to advance the utilization of mold vibration as an effective tool for controlling and modifying the casting microstructure. The effects of a wide range of vibration amplitudes and frequencies on the solidification kinetics, microstructure formation and mechanical properties of Al-Si alloys are examined. Results show strong influence of mold vibration on the resulting casting. The presence of porosity was significantly reduced as a result of mold vibration. In addition, the changes in microstructure and mechanical properties can be successfully represented by the changes in solidification characteristics. Increasing the vibration amplitude tends to reduce the lamellar spacing and change the silicon morphology to become more

  8. Development of the Electromagnetic Continuous Casting Technology for of Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Pyo; Kim, Myoung-Gyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Gyu-Chang

    Currently, magnesium billets produced by ingot casting or direct chill casting process, result in low-quality surfaces and low productivity, Continuous casting technology to solve these problem has not only high-quality surface billets with fine-grained and homogeneous microstructure but also cost down. The latent heat of fusion per weight (J/g) of magnesium is similar to other metals, however, considering the heat emitted to the mold surface during continuous casting in meniscus region and converting it to the latent heat of fusion per volume, magnesium will be rapidly solidified in the mold during continuous casting, which induces subsequent surface defect formation. In this study, electromagnetic casting and stirring (EMC and EMS) techniques are proposed to control solidification process conveniently by compensating the low latent heat of solidification by volume and to fabricate magnesium billet with high-quality surface. This technique was extended to large scale billets up to 300 mm diameter and continuous casting was successfully conducted. Then magnesium billet was used for the fabrication of prototype automobile pulley.

  9. Fiberglass cast application.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gillian D; Hart, Raymond G; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2005-05-01

    Plaster of Paris has been largely superceded for casting in orthopedic departments by synthetic cast materials. Despite its weight, its relative brittleness, its unpopularity with patients, and its messiness in application, plaster of Paris remains the mainstay of casting in the emergency department. This is due to a combination of economic reasons, the belief that synthetic casts leave less room for swelling and its relative ease of application compared to synthetic materials. We present a technique for synthetic cast application that avoids the problems of the rapidly setting cast and therefore allows the time for less experienced hands to produce a well-fitting cast or splint. We believe that this option, which allows the patient to have a lighter synthetic cast, rather than the traditional plaster of Paris cast, will be welcomed by both the patient and physician.

  10. Engineered Cooling Process for High Strength Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekakh, Simon N.; Mikhailov, Anthony; Kramer, Joseph

    Professor Stefanescu contributed fundamentally to the science of solidification and microstructural evolutions in ductile irons. In this article, the possibility of development of high strength ductile iron by applying an engineered cooling process after casting early shake out from the sand mold was explored. The structures in industrial ductile iron were experimentally simulated using a computer controlled heating/cooling device. CFD modeling was used for process simulation and an experimental bench scale system was developed. The process concept was experimentally verified by producing cast plates with 25 mm wall thickness. The tensile strength was increased from 550 MPa to 1000 MPa in as-cast condition without the need for alloying and heat treatment. The possible practical applications were discussed.

  11. Feeding and Distribution of Porosity in Cast Al-Si Alloys as Function of Alloy Composition and Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Taylor, John A.; Easton, Mark A.

    2012-12-01

    Unmodified, Na-modified, and Sr-modified castings of Al-7 pct Si and Al-12.5 pct Si alloys were cast in molds in which it was possible to create different cooling conditions. It is shown how solidification influences the distribution of porosity at the surface and the center of the castings as a function of modification and Si content in sand- and chill-cast samples. Eutectic modification, Si content, and cooling conditions have a great impact on the distribution of porosity. Unmodified and Na-modified castings are more easily fed with porosity tending to congregate near the centerline of the casting, while Sr-modified castings solidify in a mushy manner that creates a more homogeneous distribution of porosity in the casting. The amount of porosity was highest in the Sr-modified alloys, lower in the Na-modified alloys, and lowest in the unmodified alloys. The size of the porosity-free layer and the effectiveness of the feeders were greater in the castings made with the steel chills due to the increased thermal gradients and consequent increase in the directionality of solidification.

  12. Hot cracking during welding and casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoping

    Aluminum welds are susceptible to liquation cracking in the partially melted zone (PMZ). Using the multicomponent Scheil model, curves of temperature vs. fraction solid (T-fS) during solidification were calculated for the PMZ and weld metals (WMs). These curves were used to predict the crack susceptibility by checking if the harmful condition of WM fS > PMZ fS exists during PMZ solidification and reduce the susceptibility by minimizing this condition. This approach was tested against full-penetration welds of alloys 7075 and 2024 and it can be used to guide the selection or development of filler metals. Liquation cracking in the PMZ in welds of Al-Si cast alloys was also investigated. The crack susceptibility was evaluated by circular-patch test, and full-penetration welds made with filler metals 1100, 4043, 4047 and 5356. Liquation cracking was significant with filler metals 1100 and 5356 but slight with filler metals 4043 and 4047. In all welds, liquation cracks were completely backfilled, instead of open as in full-penetration welds of wrought alloys 2219 and 6061. The T-fS curves showed that alloy A357 has a much higher fraction liquid for backfilling before PMZ solidification was essentially over. Hot tearing in Mg-xAl-yCa alloys was studied by constrained rod casting (CRC) in a steel mold. The hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Ca content (y) but did not change much with the Al content (x). An instrumented CRC with a steel mold was developed to detect the onset of hot tearing. The secondary phases, eutectic content, solidification path, and freezing range were examined. Hot tearing in Mg-Al-Sr alloys was also studied by CRC in a steel mold. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-1.5Sr alloys, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Al content. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-3Sr alloys, the trend was similar but not as significant. At the same Al content, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Sr

  13. A study of solidification with a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roplekar, Jayant K.

    Due to the drive for weight reduction in the automobile industry, near net shape parts produced by semi-solid processing of aluminum alloys are increasingly replacing traditional steel parts. Magnetohydrodynamic direct chill casting (MHD-DC) process, developed in the mid-eighties, is the method of choice to produce rheocast metal alloys for semi-solid applications. In spite of commercial applicability of the MHD-DC process there is no integrated process model available for this process. In the present work we use an experimental setup that combines directional solidification with magnetic stirring to develop a numerical model for the MHD-DC process. We use the finite element method to solve the coupled equations of turbulent fluid flow, species transport and heat transfer with solidification on a fixed grid. Effects of the rotating magnetic field are incorporated through a body-force term which is determined a priori based on a detailed analytical study and experimental data. Due to the nature of temperature-solute coupling and the advection dominated evolution of the liquid fraction, special numerical procedures had to be implemented in the present work. The numerical procedure used in the present work is validated against two validation problems. In the first validation problem, we apply the two-phase methodology to solve the classical problem of diffusion-dominated solidification. The good agreement between the finite element solution and the analytical solution establishes soundness of the two-phase formulation developed in this work. In the second validation problem, a finite element prediction of the flow induced in a cylindrical cavity due to a rotating magnetic field is compared with an independent spectral solution. The close agreement between two radically different solution procedures establishes the accuracy in the formulation and implementation of the both procedures. We then simulate the experiments using the numerical model. The numerical model

  14. Numerical Simulation of Filling Process During Twin-Roll Strip Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Qinghua; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Jieyu

    2014-01-01

    The modeling and controlling of flow and solidification of melt metal in the filling process is important for obtaining the optimal pool level and the formation of the solidified metal layer on the surface of twin-rolls during the twin-roll strip casting. The proper delivery system and processing parameters plays a key role to control flow characteristics in the initial filling stage of the twin-roll strip casting process. In this paper, a commercial CFD software was employed to simulate the transient fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidifications behaviors during the pouring stage of twin-roll strip casting process using different delivery systems. A 3D model was set up to solve the coupled set of governing differential equations for mass, momentum, and energy balance. The transient free-surface problem was treated with the volume of fluid approach, a k-ɛ turbulence model was employed to handle the turbulence effect and an enthalpy method was used to predict phase change during solidification. The predicted results showed that a wedge-shaped delivery system might have a beneficial impact on the distribution of molten steel and solidification. The predicted surface profile agreed well with the measured values in water model.

  15. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION TO ENSURE MAXIMUM PRODUCTION AND QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  17. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  18. Die Soldering in Aluminium Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Kenik, E.A.; Viswanathan, S.

    2000-03-15

    Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-rich phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs. conditions, an aluminum-rich soldering layer may also form over the intermetallic layer. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted on the nature of these intermetallics, little is known about the conditions under which soldering occurs.

  19. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    demonstrated the importance of proper heat treat cycles for Homogenization, and Solutionizing parameters selection and implementation. 3) Step blocks casting of Nimonic 263: Carried out casting solidification simulation analysis, NDT inspection methods evaluation, detailed test matrix for Chemical, Tensile, LCF, stress rupture, CVN impact, hardness and J1C Fracture toughness section sensitivity data and were reported. 4) Centrifugal Casting of Haynes 282, weighing 1400 lbs. with hybrid mold (half Graphite and half Chromite sand) mold assembly was cast using compressor casing production tooling. This test provided Mold cooling rates influence on centrifugally cast microstructure and mechanical properties. Graphite mold section out performs sand mold across all temperatures for 0.2% YS; %Elongation, %RA, UTS at 1400°F. Both Stress-LMP and conditional Fracture toughness plots data were in the scatter band of the wrought alloy. 5) Fundamental Studies on Cooling rates and SDAS test program. Evaluated the influence of 6 mold materials Silica, Chromite, Alumina, Silica with Indirect Chills, Zircon and Graphite on casting solidification cooling rates. Actual Casting cooling rates through Liquidus to Solidus phase transition were measured with 3 different locations based thermocouples placed in each mold. Compared with solidification simulation cooling rates and measurement of SDAS, microstructure features were reported. The test results provided engineered casting potential methods, applicable for heavy section Haynes 282 castings for optimal properties, with foundry process methods and tools. 6) Large casting of Haynes 282 Drawings and Engineering FEM models and supplemental requirements with applicable specifications were provided to suppliers for the steam turbine proto type feature valve casing casting. Molding, melting and casting pouring completed per approved Manufacturing Process Plan during 2014 Q4. The partial valve casing was successfully cast after casting methods were

  20. Microstructure formation during solidification of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    The second symposium on solidification of metal matrix composites was organized at the TMS-ASM Materials Week in Chicago, in November 1992, to discuss the important issues in solidification of composites. In this collection of ten papers; several aspects of solidification of composites including nucleation, growth, heat flow, particle pushing, interface stability and segregation during solidification of metal matrix composites are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  1. Influence of Section Thickness on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Squeeze Cast Magnesium Alloy AM60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Wang, Meng; Sun, Zhizhong; Hu, Henry

    Squeeze cast light alloys has been approved for advanced engineering design of light integrity automotive applications. An understanding of the effect of section thicknesses on mechanical properties of squeeze cast magnesium alloys is essential for proper design of different applications. The present work studied the microstructure and tensile properties of magnesium alloy AM60 with different section thickness of 6, 10 and 20mm squeeze cast under an applied pressure of 30MPa. The results of tensile testing indicate that the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (Ef) increase with a decreasing in section thicknesses of squeeze cast AM60. The microstructure analysis shows that the improvement in the tensile properties of squeeze cast AM60 is mainly attributed to the low level of gas porosity and the high content of eutectic phases and fine grain structure which resulted from high solidification rates taking place in the thin section.

  2. Numerical simulation of casting process to assist in defects reduction in complex steel tidal power component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, E. J.; Zhao, S. C.; Wang, L. P.; Wu, T.; Xin, B. P.; Tan, J. J.; Jia, H. L.

    2016-03-01

    In order to reduce defects and improve casting quality, ProCAST software is performed to study the solidification process of discharge bowl. Simulated results of original casting process show that the hot tearing is serious at the intersection of blades and outer or inner rings. The shrinkage porosity appears at the bottom of discharge bowl and the transition area of wall thickness. Based on the formation mechanisms of the defects, the structure of chills attached on the outer surface of discharge bowl casting is optimized. The thickness of chills ranges from 25mm to 35mm. The positions of chills corresponded to the outer surface of the T-shaped parts. Compared to the original casting design (without chills), the hot tearing and shrinkage porosity of the discharge bowl are greatly improved with addition of chills.

  3. Solidification in syntectic and monotectic systems.

    PubMed

    Hüter, C; Boussinot, G; Brener, E A; Spatschek, R

    2012-08-01

    We present theoretical studies of syntectic and monotectic solidification scenarios. Steady-state solidification along the liquid-liquid interface in a syntectic system is considered by means of a boundary-integral technique developed previously. We study the case of small asymmetry of the pattern and extract from the results the scaling relations in terms of the undercooling and the asymmetry parameter. We also investigate monotectic solidification using the phase-field method. We present two kinds of two-phase fingers, with the solid phase being either the exterior phase or the interior phase, and the pattern corresponding to the growth along the solid-liquid interface. We finally analyze the asymptotic shape of these new morphologies far behind their tip.

  4. Enthalpies of a binary alloy during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Nandapurkar, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a method of calculating the enthalpy of a dendritic alloy during solidification. The enthalpies of the dendritic solid and interdendritic liquid of alloys of the Pb-Sn system are evaluated, but the method could be applied to other binaries, as well. The enthalpies are consistent with a recent evaluation of the thermodynamics of Pb-Sn alloys and with the redistribution of solute in the same during dendritic solidification. Because of the heat of mixing in Pb-Sn alloys, the interdendritic liquid of hypoeutectic alloys (Pb-rich) of less than 50 wt pct Sn has enthalpies that increase as temperature decreases during solidification.

  5. Effects of anisotropic heat conduction on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional solidification influenced by anisotropic heat conduction has been considered. The interfacial energy balance was derived to account for the heat transfer in one direction (x or y) depending on the temperature gradient in both the x and y directions. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of the Stefan number, aspect ratio, initial superheat, and thermal conductivity ratios on the solidification rate. Because of the imposed boundary conditions, the interface became skewed and sometimes was not a straight line between the interface position at the upper and lower adiabatic walls (spatially nonlinear along the height). This skewness depends on the thermal conductivity ratio k(yy)/k(yx). The nonlinearity of the interface is influenced by the solidification rate, aspect ratio, and k(yy/k(yx).

  6. Numerical study of coupled turbulent flow and solidification for steel slab casters

    SciTech Connect

    Aboutalebi, M.R.; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R.I.L.

    1995-09-01

    A two-dimensional numerical modeling study was undertaken to account for coupled turbulent flow and heat transfer with solidification in the mold and submold regions of a steel slab coaster. Liquid steel is introduced into a water-cooled mold through a bifurcated submerged entry nozzle. Turbulence phenomena in the melt pool of the caster were accounted for, using a modified version of the low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model of Launder and Sharma. The mushy region solidification, in the presence of turbulence, was taken into account by modifying the standard enthalpy-porosity technique, which is presently popular for modeling solidification problems. Thermocapillary and buoyancy effects have been considered in this model to evaluate the influences of the liquid surface tension gradient at the meniscus surface, and natural convection on flow patterns in the liquid pool. Parametric studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of typical variables, such as inlet superheat and casting speed, on the fluid flow and heat transfer results. The numerical predictions were compared with available experimental data.

  7. Melting and Solidification Behaviour of Bi-Pb Multiphase Alloy Nanoparticles Embedded in Aluminum Matrix.

    PubMed

    Khan, Patan Yousaf; Biswas, Krishanu

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation reports the result of the investigation on the phase transformation of biphasic Bi-Pb alloy nanoparticles embedded in the aluminum matrix. The samples are prepared by rapid solidification route involving melt spinning of Al-6 wt% (Bi55.9Pb44.1) alloy on a rotating copper wheel in an argon-filled evacuated chamber. The detailed transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigation shows presence of near cuboctahedral shaped biphasic nano-inclusions consisting of the (Bi) solid solution and β, the intermediate phase. β constitutes bulk of the nanoparticle with (Bi) forming the cap. Both the phases bear distinct orientation relationship with the matrix. The compositional analysis indicates substantial increase in solid solubilities of Pb in the (Bi) and Bi in the β-phases as compared to the as-cast sample. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies indicate substantial superheating (16.4 K) of the embedded nanoparticles with appearance of sharp melting peak. The solidification is observed to be diffused, taking place over a large temperature range (344.5 K to 332 K). The in situ heating stage experiments carried out in TEM indicate formation of core shell morphology during heating with β forming the shell around (Bi). The melting starts from Al/β/(Bi) triple point and then the liquid spreads along matrix-particle interface. The solidification occurs in eutectic manner.

  8. Permeability evolution during equiaxed dendritic solidification of Al-4.5 wt%Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajeh, Ehsan; Maijer, Daan M.

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of permeability in Al-4.5 wt%Cu during equiaxed dendritic solidification has been determined through physical and numerical modelling for solid fractions from 0.35 to 0.8. Cast samples solidified with a variety of cooling rates and quenched at different stages during dendritic solidification were used to generate 3D geometries of solidifying microstructure using x-ray microtomography. The permeability was then characterized (i) physically by passing glycerin through large-scale analogues of the microstructure and (ii) numerically by solving the continuity and momentum equations for the corresponding unstructured meshes of the 3D geometries used for the physical models. The numerically determined values of permeability are in good agreement with those measured and within the scatter of related studies. The permeability results have been compared with the Carman-Kozeny expression to determine the value of the Carman-Kozeny constant. Moreover, the correlation of secondary dendrite arm spacing and solid/liquid interfacial area per unit volume of solid with solidification time has been investigated for use as a practical means of characterizing the length scale for permeability determination.

  9. Successful Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) Proves Current Theories of Dendritic Solidification are Flawed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The scientific objective of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is to test fundamental assumptions about dendritic solidification of molten materials. "Dendrites"-- from the ancient Greek word for tree--are tiny branching structures that form inside molten metal alloys when they solidify during manufacturing. The size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites have a major effect on the strength, ductility (ability to be molded or shaped), and usefulness of an alloy. Nearly all of the cast metal alloys used in everyday products (such as automobiles and airplanes) are composed of thousands to millions of tiny dendrites. Gravity, present on Earth, causes convection currents in molten alloys that disturb dendritic solidification and make its precise study impossible. In space, gravity is negated by the orbiting of the space shuttle. Consequently, IDGE (which was conducted on the space shuttle) gathered the first precise data regarding undisturbed dendritic solidification. IDGE is a microgravity materials science experiment that uses an apparatus which was designed, built, tested, and operated by people from the NASA Lewis Research Center. This experiment was conceived by the principal investigator, Professor Martin E. Glicksman, from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. The experiment was a team effort of Lewis civil servants, contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication Inc. (ADF), and personnel at Rensselaer.

  10. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  11. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  12. Solidification of ternary systems with a nonlinear phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Dubovoi, G. Yu.; Malygin, A. P.; Nizovtseva, I. G.; Toropova, L. V.

    2017-02-01

    The directional solidification of a ternary system with an extended phase transition region is theoretically studied. A mathematical model is developed to describe quasi-stationary solidification, and its analytical solution is constructed with allowance for a nonlinear liquidus line equation. A deviation of the liquidus equation from a linear function is shown to result in a substantial change in the solidification parameters.

  13. Simulation Computation of 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ruipeng; Li, Changrong; Wang, Fuming; Hu, Lifu

    The solidification structure of 430 ferritic stainless steel has been calculated in the solidification process by using 3D-CAFE model under the condition of water cooling. The calculated results consistent with those obtained from experiment. Under watercooling condition, the solidification structure consists of chilled layer, columnar grain zone, transition zone and equiaxed grain zone.

  14. Effects of the Delay Between Quenching and Aging on Hardness and Tensile Properties of A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceschini, Lorella; Morri, Alessandro; Morri, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of heat treatment guidelines, generally followed in industrial practices, about the T6 heat treatment of A356 aluminum alloy. In particular, the effect of the delay between quenching and artificial aging (pre-aging time) on microstructure, hardness, and tensile behavior was studied using specimens extracted from different locations of a cylinder head, characterized by different cooling rates and, consequently, by different secondary dendrite arm spacing values. Hardness and tensile tests confirmed the detrimental effect of pre-aging with a 20% reduction in hardness and strength after approximately 1 h of pre-aging, both for samples with fine and large SDAS. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses on samples that were solutionized, quenched, and pre-aged between 0 and 96 h, suggested that the nature and composition of the clusters formed during pre-aging, rather than their size, influenced the subsequent precipitation process and the final mechanical properties of the alloy.

  15. Microstructure and hot deformation behavior of A356/Al2O3 composite fabricated by infiltration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seung-Baek; Jeon, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Mok-Soon; Lee, Jeung-Keun; Ryu, Kwan-Ho

    2017-07-01

    The hot deformation behavior of an A356/Al2O3 composite fabricated by the infiltration method was characterized in the temperature range of 300-500 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-1/s using compressive tests. The composite consists of an Al-Si based matrix and nano-sized Al2O3 particulates. A constitutive model was established based on the hyperbolic sine Arrhenius type equation and its hot workability was evaluated by means of processing maps based on Dynamic Material Modeling. The activation energy for hot deformation was calculated to be 223 kJ/mol, which is higher than the activation energy for self-diffusion of pure aluminum (142 kJ/mol). The optimum processing condition for the hot working of the composite was found to exist at 500 °C with a strain rate of 1/s, where a dynamic recrystallized microstructure was observed and the maximum efficiency was exhibited in the processing map. Voids were frequently detected at 500 °C with lower strain rates, deteriorating the workability of the composite.

  16. Influence of Initial Microstructure on Microstructural Stability and Mechanical Behavior of Cryorolled A356 Alloy Subjected to Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immanuel, R. J.; Panigrahi, S. K.

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, various heat treatment cycles are imposed on an A356 aluminum alloy to develop two different base microstructures, one with supersaturated aluminum matrix and the other with coarse and uniformly distributed precipitates. Both the developed materials are subjected to cryorolling and then isochronally annealed for 1 hour at various temperatures ranging from 373 K to 673 K (100 °C to 400 °C). The overall strength is maximum for the cryorolled material with supersaturated base microstructure due to the dominant dislocation strengthening and precipitation strengthening mechanisms. However, the cryorolled material with precipitated base microstructure is found to have superior microstructural stability with retained ultrafine-grained (UFG) microstructure up to the annealing temperature of 473 K (200 °C) due to effective grain boundary pinning by the precipitates. Also, the material retains about 85 pct of as-cryorolled strength with enhanced ductility even after annealing at 473 K (200 °C). A detailed investigation on the microstructural evolution of the material at various annealing temperatures along with their mechanical behavior is presented in this article.

  17. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  18. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  19. Novel Directional Solidification Processing of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity driven separation precludes uniform microstructural development during controlled directional solidification (DS) processing of hypermonotectic alloys. It is well established that liquid/liquid suspensions, in which the respective components are immiscible and have significant density differences, can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. A historical introduction to this work is presented with the intent of establishing the basis for applying the phenomena to promote microstructural uniformity during controlled directional solidification processing of immiscible mixtures. Experimental work based on transparent organics, as well as salt systems, will be presented in view of the processing parameters.

  20. Conditions Of Directional Solidification Affect Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. D.; Alter, W. S.; Hamilton, W. D.; Parr, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of gradient of temperature and rate of solidification on microstructure and fatigue properties of nickel-based superalloy MAR-M246(Hf). Enhancement of properties extends lifespans of objects, including turbo-pump blades of Space Shuttle Main Engines. Results indicate significant improvements in fatigue properties derived through manipulation of parameters of directional solidification. Particularly MAR-M246(Hf) for turbine blades contains small, well-dispersed blocky carbide and microstructure with small distances between dendrite arms, and without eutectic phase.

  1. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    remain open until the casting is solidified and pressure is maintained on the solidifying casting. Fanned gates, particularly on the smaller section castings avoid jetting effects at the ingate end. The fan type ingate helps accomplish a rapid fill without high velocities. The molten metal has to fill the cavity before localized solidification occurs. This is best accomplished with a larger ingate to attain rapid filling without excessive velocity or jetting that occurs at high metal velocities. Straight gates are prone to case jetting of the metal stream even a low velocities. Fanned gates allow use of higher fill velocity without excessive jetting. A higher metal pressure provides a more complete fill of the die including improved compensation for solidification shrinkage. With the proper filling pattern, ingates, overflows and die temperature for a given die, very good tensile properties can be attained in squeeze casting. In general, the smaller squeeze castings require higher die temperatures. Computer models using the UES Procast and MagmaSoft finite element software can, after suitable adjustments, predict the flow pattern in the die cavity.

  2. Cast articulation accuracy using rigid cast stabilization.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Ronald Bruce; Siegel, Sharon Crane

    2002-06-01

    This study evaluated the positional accuracy of casts articulated on a semi-adjustable articulator, with and without rigid cast stabilization using either laboratory plaster or mounting plaster. A reference articulation of melamine casts in maximum articulation was established and recorded in the horizontal and vertical dimensions using a verification device. The same casts were subsequently remounted 24 times using either laboratory plaster or mounting plaster. Half of the articulations from each group were stabilized using detachable mounting rods and sticky wax, and half were hand-articulated without stabilization, for a total of 6 articulations in each of 4 test groups. The resulting spatial positions established on the articulator were compared to the initial reference position on the verification device grid. Means and standard deviations of the absolute values of the horizontal and vertical displacement for each group were determined separately and compared using a one-way anaylsis of variance. Significant differences (p <0.05) were identified using Tukey's honestly significant difference multiple comparison test. Mean vertical mandibular cast displacement ranged from 0.26 +/-0.21mm for stabilized casts mounted with laboratory plaster to 1.58 +/-0.32 mm for unstabilized casts mounted with mounting plaster. For each mounting material, significantly less vertical displacement (p <0.001) was observed with the mandibular cast stabilized before mounting. The cast mounted with laboratory plaster exhibited horizontal displacement (0.87 +/-0.29 mm) that was significantly greater than the remaining groups (p <0.001), which did not differ from each other. Rigid stabilization of the mandibular to maxillary cast during mounting with laboratory and mounting plaster improved articulation accuracy. Copyright 2002 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Influence of Process Parameters on the Microstructure and Casting Defects of a LPDC Engine Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timelli, Giulio; Caliari, Daniele

    The growing demand in the automotive industry for lighter vehicles has led to increasing use of Al-Si based alloys in the production of engine blocks. Low-pressure die casting (LPDC) is an enhanced process generally used for parts with premium requirements, therefore it is one of the most promising technologies for the production of engine blocks. This work is aimed to study the effects of Sr modification and holding pressure on the microstructure and casting defects of a low-pressure die cast A356 engine block. The microstructural scale, evaluated by secondary dendrite arm spacing, the amount of porosity and inclusions, and the morphology of eutectic Si particles were investigated by metallographic and image analysis. The results were correlated with the variation of input process variables such as holding pressure and Sr level. The measured amount of porosity is low, therefore confirming LPDC as a useful foundry process for the production of Al blocks for high performance engines.

  4. Microstructural and mechanical evolutions during the forging step of the COBAPRESS, a casting/forging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Desrayaud, Christophe; Bouvier, Véronique

    Aluminum casting/forging processes are used to produce parts for the automotive industry. In this study, we examined the influence of the forging step on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of an A356 aluminum alloy modified with strontium. Firstly, a design of samples which allows us to test mechanically the alloy before and after forging was created. A finite element analysis with the ABAQUS software predicts a maximum of strain in the core of the specimens. Observations with the EBSD technique confirm a more intense sub-structuration of the dendrite cells in this zone. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation and fatigue lives were then improved for the casting/forging samples compared to the only cast specimens. The closure of the porosities and the improvement of the surface quality during the forging step enhance also the fatigue resistance of the samples.

  5. Microstructure, Macrosegregation, and Thermal Analysis of Direct Chill Cast AA5182 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaly, N.; Haghdadi, N.; Phillion, A. B.

    2015-05-01

    The variation in microstructure, macrosegregation, and solidification behavior during aluminum alloy Direct Chill casting is investigated with respect to geometry. Optical microscopy, energy-dispersive analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry were employed to study the grain size evolution, distribution of alloying elements, and solidification sequence across the cross section of DC cast AA5182 aluminum alloy. The results show that (1) grain size increases from the surface to center of the ingot, corresponding to a decrease in the heat extraction rate; (2) there is a considerable macrosegregation of Mg, Mn, and Cr, with Mg showing negative segregation at the center and positive segregation at the surface, Mn showing negative segregation both at center and surface and positive segregation elsewhere, and Cr showing positive segregation at the center and negative segregation at the surface; (3) the solidus and the reaction temperatures vary as a function of position due to the local chemical composition and cooling rate. These findings, which show the interconnectivity of grain size, segregation, and solidification sequence, are useful in further analysis of the DC casting process and in predicting casting-related defects, specifically hot tear formation.

  6. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  7. Modeling diffusion-governed solidification of ternary alloys - Part 2: Macroscopic transport phenomena and macrosegregation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Li, J; Ludwig, A; Kharicha, A

    2014-09-01

    Part 1 of this two-part investigation presented a multiphase solidification model incorporating the finite diffusion kinetics and ternary phase diagram with the macroscopic transport phenomena (Wu et al., 2013). In Part 2, the importance of proper treatment of the finite diffusion kinetics in the calculation of macrosegregation is addressed. Calculations for a two-dimensional (2D) square casting (50 × 50 mm(2)) of Fe-0.45 wt.%C-1.06 wt.%Mn considering thermo-solutal convection and crystal sedimentation are performed. The modeling result indicates that the infinite liquid mixing kinetics as assumed by classical models (e.g., the Gulliver-Scheil or lever rule), which cannot properly consider the solute enrichment of the interdendritic or inter-granular melt at the early stage of solidification, might lead to an erroneous estimation of the macrosegregation. To confirm this statement, further theoretical and experimental evaluations are desired. The pattern and intensity of the flow and crystal sedimentation are dependent on the crystal morphologies (columnar or equiaxed); hence, the potential error of the calculated macrosegregation caused by the assumed growth kinetics depends on the crystal morphology. Finally, an illustrative simulation of an engineering 2.45-ton steel ingot is performed, and the results are compared with experimental results. This example demonstrates the model applicability for engineering castings regarding both the calculation efficiency and functionality.

  8. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiCp particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiCp) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiCp composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiCp particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  9. Study of hot tearing of A206 aluminum alloy using Instrumented Constrained T-shaped Casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Esfahani, M.R. Nasr; Niroumand, B.

    2010-03-15

    The hot tearing susceptibility of A206 aluminum alloy was investigated using Instrumented Constrained T-shaped Casting method and the effect of the casting temperature on hot tearing was studied. The Instrumented Constrained T-shaped Casting apparatus enabled real-time measurements of the contraction load developed in the casting and the temperature variations during solidification as a function of time. Critical temperatures and points during solidification of the castings were extracted from these data. The contraction load developed at the coalescence point of the castings was identified as a comparative criterion for predicting the hot tearing susceptibility of the alloys which could be utilized even when no visual tearing had occurred. The results showed that hot tearing susceptibility increased with the casting temperature. This was associated with reduced cooling rate, increased solute segregation and more localized hot spot formation at the T-junction area. Increase in the casting temperature also increased the grain size which may in turn have affected the initiation of the hot tears. The visual observations were further validated with radiographic tests.

  10. Modelling of horizontal centrifugal casting of work roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhian; Song, Nannan; Tol, Rob Val; Luan, Yikun; Li, Dianzhong

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model to simulate horizontal centrifugal roll castings is presented in this paper. In order to simulate the flow fluid and solidification of horizontal centrifugal roll casting correctly, the model uses a body fitted mesh technique to represent the geometry. This new method maps a plate layer mesh to a circular mesh. The smooth body fitted mesh method gives more accurate calculation results for cylindrical geometries. A velocity depending on the angular velocity and inner radius of the mould is set up as a velocity boundary condition. The fluid flow coupled with heat transfer and solidification in a rapidly rotating roll is simulated. A gravity free falling method is applied as a pouring condition. A moveable pouring system is also used in the simulations. High speed steel is used to produce the work roll. Two different gating positions and a moveable gating system are simulated in this paper. Results show that the position of pouring system has a significant influence on the temperature distribution. The temperature distribution at a fixed central pouring system is more favourable than the distribution from a side pouring system. A moving gating system method is a better way to obtain a uniform temperature field in centrifugal casting and offers an alternative for existing techniques.

  11. The role of heat transfer in strip casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Paretosh

    The last few years have witnessed rapid developments in the area of strip casting of steel. It involves smaller capital and operating cost, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and an opportunity to create newer products due to a faster solidification rate that leads to a different solidification structure. Thus, ample reasons for interest in the technology exist. At the same time, it needs to be determined if the properties of a strip cast product can match those of a conventional product and if it is possible to produce steel strip at high production rates. The first objective of this work was to characterize the quality, structure, and properties of strip cast material of different chemistries and cast at different machines, to identify the critical operating conditions that would result in the best properties. Determination of the possible range of properties was also aimed, given that the structure of the material is different from the traditional material. The second objective was to investigate ways to increase the rate of heat transfer in strip casting, as that will also enhance the productivity of a strip caster. It was also envisaged to see what effect a high rate of heat transfer will have on the properties of the strip cast material. Results from the strip cast material characterization that was carried out to achieve the first objective indicated that an effective control of heat transfer is very important to get the best properties. Samples that showed best properties had a uniform solidification structure consisting of columnar grains running from the edge of a strip to the centerline, indicating a good control of heat transfer, and their dendrite spacings pointed towards a relatively faster rate of cooling between the rolls. These findings indicated that heat transfer is a core issue in strip casting. The mechanism of increase in the rate of heat transfer in strip casting due to the presence of liquid oxide films at the metal-mold interface was examined

  12. Prediction of the As-Cast Structure of Al-4.0 Wt Pct Cu Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadein, Mahmoud; Wu, M.; Li, J. H.; Schumacher, P.; Ludwig, A.

    2013-06-01

    A two-stage simulation strategy is proposed to predict the as-cast structure. During the first stage, a 3-phase model is used to simulate the mold-filling process by considering the nucleation, the initial growth of globular equiaxed crystals and the transport of the crystals. The three considered phases are the melt, air and globular equiaxed crystals. In the second stage, a 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model is used to simulate the formation of the as-cast structure including the distinct columnar and equiaxed zones, columnar-to-equiaxed transition, grain size distribution, macrosegregation, etc. The five considered phases are the extradendritic melt, the solid dendrite, the interdendritic melt inside the equiaxed grains, the solid dendrite, and the interdendritic melt inside the columnar grains. The extra- and interdendritic melts are treated as separate phases. In order to validate the above strategy, laboratory ingots (Al-4.0 wt pct Cu) are poured and analyzed, and a good agreement with the numerical predictions is achieved. The origin of the equiaxed crystals by the "big-bang" theory is verified to play a key role in the formation of the as-cast structure, especially for the castings poured at a low pouring temperature. A single-stage approach that only uses the 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model and ignores the mold filling can predict satisfactory results for a casting poured at high temperature, but it delivers false results for the casting poured at low temperature.

  13. TiC-reinforced cast Cr steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Schrems, K. K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5-4.5Ti, and 1-1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  14. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  15. Size distribution of inclusions in 12%Cr stainless steel with a wide range of solidification cooling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Han-song; Li, Jian-guo

    2015-11-01

    The effect of solidification cooling rate on the size and distribution of inclusions in 12%Cr stainless steel was investigated. A wide range of solidification cooling rates (from 0.05 to 106 K·s-1) was achieved using various solidification processes, including conventional casting, laser remelting, and melt spinning. The size and distribution of inclusions in the steel were observed and statistically collected. For comparison, mathematical models were used to calculate the sizes of inclusions at different solidification cooling rates. Both the statistical size determined from observations and that predicted from calculations tended to decrease with increasing cooling rate; however, the experimental and calculated results did not agree well with each other at excessively high or low cooling rate. The reasons for this discrepancy were theoretically analyzed. For the size distribution of inclusions, the effect of cooling rate on the number densities of large-sized (> 2 μm) inclusions and small-sized (≤ 2 μm) inclusions were distinct. The number density of inclusions larger than 1 µm was not affected when the cooing rate was less than or equal to 6 K·s-1 because inclusion precipitation was suppressed by the increased cooling rate.

  16. Investigation on the Interface Characteristics of Al/Mg Bimetallic Castings Processed by Lost Foam Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenming; Li, Guangyu; Fan, Zitian; Wang, Long; Liu, Fuchu

    2016-05-01

    The lost foam casting (LFC) process was used to prepare the A356 aluminum and AZ91D magnesium bimetallic castings, and the interface characteristics of the reaction layer between aluminum and magnesium obtained by the LFC process were investigated in the present work. The results indicate that a uniform and compact interface between the aluminum and magnesium was formed. The reaction layer of the interface with an average thickness of approximately 1000 μm was mainly composed of Al3Mg2 and Al12Mg17 intermetallic compounds, including the Al3Mg2 layer adjacent to the aluminum insert, the Al12Mg17 middle layer, and the Al12Mg17 + δ eutectic layer adjacent to the magnesium base. Meanwhile, the Mg2Si intermetallic compound was also detected in the reaction layer. An oxide film mainly containing C, O, and Mg elements generated at the interface between the aluminum and magnesium, due to the decomposed residue of the foam pattern, the oxidations of magnesium and aluminum alloys as well as the reaction between the magnesium melt and the aluminum insert. The microhardness tests show that the microhardnesses at the interface were obviously higher than those of the magnesium and aluminum base metals, and the Al3Mg2 layer at the interface had a high microhardness compared with the Al12Mg17 and Al12Mg17 + δ eutectic layers, especially the eutectic layer.

  17. A Real Time Investigation of Morphological Evolution During Solidification of Different Alloy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification phenomenon which occur at the solid/liquid (s/I) interface play a major role in the determination of structure and hence the technologically important properties of a casting. However, metals being opaque, conclusions related to several important phenomenon such as boundary layer thickness, morphological evolution, and eutectic and cell spacing are deduced from quenching experiments and subsequent post solidification metallographic analysis. Consequently, limited information is obtained about the dynamics of the process. This paper will discuss the recent efforts at the Space Science Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, to view and quantify in-situ and in real time the dynamics of the solidification process and to measure interfacial undercooling. First, a high resolution x-ray transmission microscope (XTM) has been developed to monitor fundamental interfacial phenomena during directional solidification of metals and alloys. The XTM operates in the range of 10-100 KeV and through projection is capable of achieving magnification of up to 16OX. Secondly, an innovative collapsible furnace has been designed to quantify interfacial undercooling by measuring the temperature of a moving s/I interface in reference to a fixed s/l interface. This measurement technique is non-intrusive in nature and is based on the Seebeck principle. In this paper real time results obtained to characterize the dynamics of irregular eutectic spacing will be presented. As an example fiber to lamella or plate transition in the Al-Al2Au eutectic system will be discussed. Further, a resolution limit of 25 micron has permitted viewing in real time morphological instability and cellular growth in Al-Au and Al-Ag systems. Simultaneously, a systematic investigation has been carried out to measure interfacial undercooling for Pb-1 wt.% Sn at and near the marginal stability regime. In conjunction with the XTM observations this study attempts to validate existing relationships

  18. A new freeze casting technique for ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kiyoshi

    A new freeze casting technique for ceramics capable of manufacturing near room temperature with a sublimable vehicle has been developed in order to eliminate expensive processes under extremely cold temperatures in the conventional freeze casting. Fluid concentrated slurries of Al2O 3 powder in molten camphene (C10H16) were successfully prepared at 55°C with a small amount of a dispersant. These slurries were quickly solidified (frozen) at room temperature to yield a rigid solid green body, where the frozen camphene was easily removed by sublimation (freeze-drying) with negligible shrinkage. Sintering was successfully conducted without any special binder burnout process to yield dense sintered bodies (over 98% T.D). An organic alloy with a eutectic composition in the naphthalene (C 10H8)-camphor (C10H16O) binary system with a eutectic temperature of 31°C was also found to be a successful vehicle for the new ceramic freeze casting. The fabrication processes are almost the same as those with camphene. It was found that vehicles with off-eutectic compositions resulted in large voids in the sintered body due to the ceramic particle rejection by pro-eutectic crystals during freezing. At the eutectic composition, fine lamellar microstructure in the solidified vehicle inhibits the particle rejection. The proposed advantages of the new freeze casting technique with a sublimable vehicle include; (1) elimination of extremely cold temperatures used in conventional freeze casting; (2) elimination of troublesome binder burnout process; and (3) fast manufacturing cycle due to quick solidification. Porous ceramic bodies with unique interconnected pore channels were fabricated by the new freeze casting with lower solid content. The unique channels surrounded by fully dense walls have nearly circular cross-sections unlike conventional aqueous freeze casting. The porosity and the channel diameters are controllable by the solid content in the slurry. The unique channels are

  19. Superior metallic alloys through rapid solidification processing (RSP) by design

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid solidification processing using powder atomization methods and the control of minor elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon can provide metallic alloys with superior properties and performance compared to conventionally processing alloys. Previous studies on nickel- and iron-base superalloys have provided the baseline information to properly couple RSP with alloy composition, and, therefore, enable alloys to be designed for performance improvements. The RSP approach produces powders, which need to be consolidated into suitable monolithic forms. This normally involves canning, consolidation, and decanning of the powders. Canning/decanning is expensive and raises the fabrication cost significantly above that of conventional, ingot metallurgy production methods. The cost differential can be offset by the superior performance of the RSP metallic alloys. However, without the performance database, it is difficult to convince potential users to adopt the RSP approach. Spray casting of the atomized molten droplets into suitable preforms for subsequent fabrication can be cost competitive with conventional processing. If the fine and stable microstructural features observed for the RSP approach are preserved during spray casing, a cost competitive product can be obtained that has superior properties and performance that cannot be obtained by conventional methods.

  20. Experimental study of directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.; Chen, Falin

    1991-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been carried out using the analog casting system of NH4Cl-H2O solution by cooling it from below with a constant-temperature surface ranging from -31.5 C to +11.9 C. The NH4Cl concentration was 26 percent in all solutions, with a liquidus temperature of 15 C. It was found that finger convection occurred in the fluid region just above the mushy layer in all experiments. Plume convection with associated chimneys in the mush occurred in experiments with bottom temperatures as high as +11.0 C. However, when the bottom temperature was raised to +11.9 C, no plume convection was observed, although finger convection continued as usual. A method has been devised to determine the porosity of the mush by computed tomography. Using the mean value of the porosity across the mush layer and the permeability calculated by the Kozeny-Carman relationship, the critical solute Rayleigh number across the mush layer for onset of plume convection was estimated to be between 200 and 250.