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Sample records for a356 solidification cast

  1. Interplay among Coating Thickness, Strip Size, and Thermal and Solidification Characteristics in A356 Lost Foam Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, S. G.; Divandari, M.; Ghoncheh, M. H.; Jamali, V.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research was evaluation of the solidification parameters of A356 alloy, e.g., dendrite arm spacing (DAS), correlation between cooling rate (CR) and DAS, hot tearing, and microstructural analysis at different coating thicknesses and strip sizes during the lost foam casting process (LFC). To achieve this goal, the DAS was measured at six coating thicknesses and six different strip sizes. In addition, thermal characteristics, such as the CR, temperatures of start and finish points of solidification, recalescence undercooling, and hot tearing susceptibility (HCSC), at five coating thicknesses were recognized from the cooling curves and their first derivative and the solid fraction curves, which have been plotted through the thermal analysis technique. The pouring temperature and strip size were fixed at 1063 K (790 °C) and 12 mm, respectively. Besides, to derive a numerical equation to predict the CR by measuring the DAS in this alloy, a microstructural evaluation was carried out on samples cast through 12-mm strip size. The results showed that both coating thickness and strip size had similar influences on the DAS, in which, by retaining one parameter at a constant value and simultaneous enhancement in the other parameter, the DAS increased significantly. Furthermore, at thinner coating layer, the higher amount of the CR was observed, which caused reduction in the temperatures of both the start and finish points of solidification. Also, increasing the CR caused a nonlinear increase in both the recalescence undercooling and the HCSC.

  2. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  3. Centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc alloy and composite A356/silicon carbide: Study and modeling of phases' and particles' segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, Bahaa

    Centrifugation is a casting technology that allows the production of cylindrical and graduated parts with different mechanical properties through the section. The need for materials with good quality and specific mechanical properties has been driven this technology in order to produce different types of materials such as zinc alloys and graduated metal matrix composites reinforced by hard and wear resistant particles. The goal of this research project is to study and model the eutectic macrosegregation, the solidification speed, and the speeds of solidification fronts during centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc-aluminum alloy in order to improve the part quality and increase its strength and field reliability. Moreover, the segregation of the particles during centrifugal casting of an aluminum matrix composite reinforced by silicon carbide particles (A356/SiC) is also studied to improve and control the graduation of the parts. The cooling rate, the speed, acceleration/deceleration, displacement, and segregation of the particles across the section will be modeled by discretization of Stokes' law in time in order to take into consideration the change in the centrifugal radius and melt viscosity during cooling process. This study will allow the control of the graduation degree of particles across the section in order to improve the properties and wear resistance of the composite. This composite can be used in systems where friction is critical and load is high (reinforcements of parts for the cylinders of pneumatic systems). The results show that the maximum macrosegregation zone of the eutectic across the casting section corresponds to the last point of solidification. The eutectic macrosegregation produced during centrifugal casting of thin walled part is a normal segregation which varies depending on the solidification speed and the ratio between the speeds of solidification fronts. On the other hand, it was found that the position and volume fraction of the particles

  4. Mathematical Model of Solidification During Electroslag Casting of Pilger Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fubin; Li, Huabing; Jiang, Zhouhua; Dong, Yanwu; Chen, Xu; Geng, Xin; Zang, Ximin

    A mathematical model for describing the interaction of multiple physical fields in slag bath and solidification process in ingot during pilger roll casting with variable cross-section which is produced by the electroslag casting (ESC) process was developed. The commercial software ANSYS was applied to calculate the electromagnetic field, magnetic driven fluid flow, buoyancy-driven flow and heat transfer. The transportation phenomenon in slag bath and solidification characteristic of ingots are analyzed for variable cross-section with variable input power under the conditions of 9Cr3NiMo steel and 70%CaF2 - 30%Al2O3 slag system. The calculated results show that characteristic of current density distribution, velocity patterns and temperature profiles in the slag bath and metal pool profiles in ingot have distinct difference at variable cross-sections due to difference of input power and cooling condition. The pool shape and the local solidification time (LST) during Pilger roll ESC process are analyzed.

  5. Effect of holding pressure on microstructure and fracture behavior of low-pressure die cast A356-T6 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Yun, Ying; Zhang, Huarui; Ma, Zhen; Jia, Lina; Tao, Tongxiang; Zhang, Hu

    2017-12-01

    The effect of different holding pressures on microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of A356-T6 aluminum alloy was investigated. It was observed that the ultimate strength, yield strength and elongation of A356-T6 aluminum alloy increased with the increasing of holding pressure from 85 kPa to 300 kPa. This was attributed to the finer microstructure and the elimination of porosity defects caused by high holding pressure. The fractographs of specimens obtained under lower holding pressure displayed mixed quasi-cleavage and dimple type morphology with flat dimples and large amount of porosities. However, the fractographs of specimens obtained under high holding pressure of 300 kPa clearly exhibited a dimple morphology with small and deep dimples. The differences in the tensile fracture were attributed to the different shape of eutectic Si particle and different amount of porosity defects.

  6. On the Solidification and Structure Formation during Casting of Large Inserts in Ferritic Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Abel; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2018-06-01

    The graphite nodule count and size distributions for boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) inserts were investigated by taking samples at heights of 2160 and 1150 mm, respectively. In each cross section, two locations were taken into consideration for both the microstructural and solidification modeling. The numerical solidification modeling was performed in a two-dimensional model by considering the nucleation and growth in eutectic ductile cast iron. The microstructural results reveal that the nodule size and count distribution along the cross sections are different in each location for both inserts. Finer graphite nodules appear in the thinner sections and close to the mold walls. The coarser nodules are distributed mostly in the last solidified location. The simulation result indicates that the finer nodules are related to a higher cooling rate and a lower degree of microsegregation, whereas the coarser nodules are related to a lower cooling rate and a higher degree of microsegregation. The solidification time interval and the last solidifying locations in the BWR and PWR are also different.

  7. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baicheng; Xu, Qingyan; Jing, Tao; Shen, Houfa; Han, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-01

    The development of the aviation, energy and automobile industries requires an advanced integrated product/process R&D systems which could optimize the product and the process design as well. Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a promising approach to fulfill this requirement and make the product and process development efficient, economic, and environmentally friendly. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes, including mathematical models as well as engineering applications are presented in the paper. Dendrite morphology of magnesium and aluminum alloy of solidification process by using phase field and cellular automaton methods, mathematical models of segregation of large steel ingot, and microstructure models of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade casting are studied and discussed. In addition, some engineering case studies, including microstructure simulation of aluminum casting for automobile industry, segregation of large steel ingot for energy industry, and microstructure simulation of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade castings for aviation industry are discussed.

  8. Detection and reconstruction of solidification cracks - Laser ultrasonic measurements during the continuous casting process of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitter, Thomas; Grün, Hubert; Roither, Jürgen; Betz, Andreas; Bozorgi, Salar; Reitinger, Bernhard; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In the continuous casting process the avoidance and rapid detection of occurring solidification cracks in the slab is a crucial issue, in particular for the maintenance of a high quality level in further production processes. Due to the elevated temperatures of the slab surface a remote sensing non-destructive tool for quality inspection is required, which is also applicable for the harsh industrial environment. In this work the application of laser ultrasound (LUS) technique during the continuous casting process in industrial environment is shown. The proof of principle of the detection of the centered solidification cracks is shown by pulse-echo measurements with laser ultrasonic equipment for inline quality inspection. Preliminary examinations in the lab of different casted samples have shown the distinguishability of slabs with and without any solidification cracks. Furthermore the damping of the bulk wave has been used for the prediction of the dimension of the crack. With an adapted "synthetic aperture focusing technique" (SAFT) algorithm the image reconstruction of multiple measurements at different positions around the circumference has provided enough information for the estimation of the localization and extension of the centered solidification cracks. Subsequent first measurements using this laser ultrasonic setup during the continuous casting of aluminum were carried out and showed the proof of principle in an industrial environment with elevated temperatures, dust, cooling water and vibrations.

  9. Effect of magnesium content on the microstructure and dry sliding wear behavior of centrifugally cast functionally graded A356-Mg2Si in situ composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Subhash Chandra; Chattopadhyay, K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2018-04-01

    Functionally graded A356 alloy (Al–7.2Si–0.3Mg) –Mg2Si in situ composites have been synthesized via centrifugal casting route. Mg2Si particles tend to migrate towards the core of the tubular product by centrifugal force. The in situ formed Mg2Si particles in composites are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), Optical, Scanning Electron and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Apart from primary blocky Mg2Si particles the matrix contains other phases viz. Al-Si eutectic, pseudo-binary Al-Mg2Si eutectic and Al-Fe-Si intermetallics. Density is found to decrease and %porosity is increased with increase in volume fraction of Mg2Si. Maximum hardness was observed at the inner core region due to maximum segregation of Mg2Si particles and gradually decreases towards the outer periphery region. The dry sliding wear was evaluated with varying parameters such as normal loads (N) and sliding distances (m). A substantial increase in wear resistance at the inner core region is observed. From the worn surface characterization, the wear mechanisms have been explained.

  10. Elimination of Hot Tears in Steel Castings by Means of Solidification Pattern Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Thorborg, Jesper; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-06-01

    A methodology of how to exploit the Niyama criterion for the elimination of various defects such as centerline porosity, macrosegregation, and hot tearing in steel castings is presented. The tendency of forming centerline porosity is governed by the temperature distribution close to the end of the solidification interval, specifically by thermal gradients and cooling rates. The physics behind macrosegregation and hot tears indicate that these two defects also are dependent heavily on thermal gradients and pressure drop in the mushy zone. The objective of this work is to show that by optimizing the solidification pattern, i.e., establishing directional and progressive solidification with the help of the Niyama criterion, macrosegregation and hot tearing issues can be both minimized or eliminated entirely. An original casting layout was simulated using a transient three-dimensional (3-D) thermal fluid model incorporated in a commercial simulation software package to determine potential flaws and inadequacies. Based on the initial casting process assessment, multiobjective optimization of the solidification pattern of the considered steel part followed. That is, the multiobjective optimization problem of choosing the proper riser and chill designs has been investigated using genetic algorithms while simultaneously considering their impact on centerline porosity, the macrosegregation pattern, and primarily on hot tear formation.

  11. Premature melt solidification during mold filling and its influence on the as-cast structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Ahmadein, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2018-03-01

    Premature melt solidification is the solidification of a melt during mold filling. In this study, a numerical model is used to analyze the influence of the pouring process on the premature solidification. The numerical model considers three phases, namely, air, melt, and equiaxed crystals. The crystals are assumed to have originated from the heterogeneous nucleation in the undercooled melt resulting from the first contact of the melt with the cold mold during pouring. The transport of the crystals by the melt flow, in accordance with the socalled "big bang" theory, is considered. The crystals are assumed globular in morphology and capable of growing according to the local constitutional undercooling. These crystals can also be remelted by mixing with the superheated melt. As the modeling results, the evolutionary trends of the number density of the crystals and the volume fraction of the solid crystals in the melt during pouring are presented. The calculated number density of the crystals and the volume fraction of the solid crystals in the melt at the end of pouring are used as the initial conditions for the subsequent solidification simulation of the evolution of the as-cast structure. A five-phase volume-average model for mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification is used for the solidification simulation. An improved agreement between the simulation and experimental results is achieved by considering the effect of premature melt solidification during mold filling. Finally, the influences of pouring parameters, namely, pouring temperature, initial mold temperature, and pouring rate, on the premature melt solidification are discussed.

  12. MPS solidification model. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Maples, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Work performed on several existing solidification models for which computer codes and documentation were developed is presented. The models describe the solidification of alloys in which there is a time varying zone of coexisting solid and liquid phases; i.e., the S/L zone. The primary purpose of the models is to calculate macrosegregation in a casting or ingot which results from flow of interdendritic liquid in this S/L zone during solidification. The flow, driven by solidification contractions and by gravity acting on density gradients in the interdendritic liquid, is modeled as flow through a porous medium. In Model 1, the steady state model, the heat flow characteristics are those of steady state solidification; i.e., the S/L zone is of constant width and it moves at a constant velocity relative to the mold. In Model 2, the unsteady state model, the width and rate of movement of the S/L zone are allowed to vary with time as it moves through the ingot. Each of these models exists in two versions. Models 1 and 2 are applicable to binary alloys; models 1M and 2M are applicable to multicomponent alloys.

  13. Integrated System of Thermal/Dimensional Analysis for Quality Control of Metallic Melt and Ductile Iron Casting Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Stelian; Chisamera, Mihai; Riposan, Iulian; Neacsu, Loredana; Cojocaru, Ana Maria; Stan, Iuliana

    2018-03-01

    The main objective of the present work is to introduce a specific experimental instrument and technique for simultaneously evaluating cooling curves and expansion or contraction of cast metals during solidification. Contraction/expansion analysis illustrates the solidification parameters progression, according to the molten cast iron characteristics, which are dependent on the melting procedure and applied metallurgical treatments, mold media rigidity and thermal behavior [heat transfer parameters]. The first part of the paper summarizes the performance of this two-mold device. Its function is illustrated by representative shrinkage tendency results in ductile cast iron as affected by mold rigidity (green sand and furan resin sand molds) and inoculant type (FeSi-based alloys), published in part previously. The second part of the paper illustrates an application of this equipment adapted for commercial foundry use. It conducts thermal analysis and volume change measurements in a single ceramic cup so that mold media as well as solidification conditions are constants, with cast iron quality as the variable. Experiments compared gray and ductile cast iron solidification patterns. Gray iron castings are characterized by higher undercooling at the beginning and at the end of solidification and lower graphitic expansion. Typically, ductile cast iron exhibits higher graphitic, initial expansion, conducive for shrinkage formation in soft molds.

  14. Solidification structures grown under induced flow and continuous casting of steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsavaras, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of induced flow as a means to control solidification structures in strand cast steel is investigated. The quality problems in strand cast steel stemming from columnar growth can be partially controlled, by Electro Magnetic Stirring (EMS). Induced flow changes the normal morphology of dendrites. Solids grown under intense stirring conditions show both negative and positive segregation which is considered unacceptable by some steel producers. The inclusion size and population is strongly affected by induced flow (EMS). Laboratory and industrial data show substantial reduction in inclusion size and content, but the overall effect of flow on inclusions is affected by the particular type of flow patterns utilized in each case. Productivity and quality are raised substantially in steel strand casting by utilizing EMS.

  15. Effect of Slag-Steel Reaction on the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel during Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Lou, Zhican; Zhang, Haihui

    2018-03-01

    With the mold simulator technique, the effect of slag-steel reaction on the initial shell solidification as well as the heat transfer and lubrication behavior of the infiltrated mold/shell slag film was studied in this article. The results showed that the Al2O3 content, the CaO/SiO2 ratio, and the viscosity of mold flux were increased with the progress of the slag-steel reaction during casting. The slag-steel reaction has two major effects on the initial shell solidification: one is increasing the mold heat flux and shell thickness by the decrease of slag film thickness. The other is the reduction of mold heat flux by the increase of crystal fraction in slag film. Mold flux with a lower basicity, viscosity, and crystallization temperature would result in a larger liquid slag consumption and the uneven infiltration of slag into the mold and shell gap that eventually leads to the irregular solidification of initial shell with a poor surface quality, such as slag entrapment and depressions as well as glaciation marks. Conversely, mold flux with a higher viscosity, basicity, and crystallization temperature would result in a smaller liquid slag consumption, which would cause the poor mold lubrication, the longitudinal shell surface defects, and drag marks.

  16. Effect of Slag-Steel Reaction on the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel during Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Lou, Zhican; Zhang, Haihui

    2018-06-01

    With the mold simulator technique, the effect of slag-steel reaction on the initial shell solidification as well as the heat transfer and lubrication behavior of the infiltrated mold/shell slag film was studied in this article. The results showed that the Al2O3 content, the CaO/SiO2 ratio, and the viscosity of mold flux were increased with the progress of the slag-steel reaction during casting. The slag-steel reaction has two major effects on the initial shell solidification: one is increasing the mold heat flux and shell thickness by the decrease of slag film thickness. The other is the reduction of mold heat flux by the increase of crystal fraction in slag film. Mold flux with a lower basicity, viscosity, and crystallization temperature would result in a larger liquid slag consumption and the uneven infiltration of slag into the mold and shell gap that eventually leads to the irregular solidification of initial shell with a poor surface quality, such as slag entrapment and depressions as well as glaciation marks. Conversely, mold flux with a higher viscosity, basicity, and crystallization temperature would result in a smaller liquid slag consumption, which would cause the poor mold lubrication, the longitudinal shell surface defects, and drag marks.

  17. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Directional Solidification Process of Single Crystal Superalloy Casting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of numerical modeling techniques has led to more accurate results in modeling metal solidification processes. In this study, the cellular automaton-finite difference (CA-FD) method was used to simulate the directional solidification (DS) process of single crystal (SX) superalloy blade samples. Experiments were carried out to validate the simulation results. Meanwhile, an intelligent model based on fuzzy control theory was built to optimize the complicate DS process. Several key parameters, such as mushy zone width and temperature difference at the cast-mold interface, were recognized as the input variables. The input variables were functioned with the multivariable fuzzy rule to get the output adjustment of withdrawal rate (v) (a key technological parameter). The multivariable fuzzy rule was built, based on the structure feature of casting, such as the relationship between section area, and the delay time of the temperature change response by changing v, and the professional experience of the operator as well. Then, the fuzzy controlling model coupled with CA-FD method could be used to optimize v in real-time during the manufacturing process. The optimized process was proven to be more flexible and adaptive for a steady and stray-grain free DS process. PMID:28788535

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  19. Grain Refinement and Improvement of Solidification Defects in Direct-Chill Cast Billets of A4032 Alloy by Melt Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hu-Tian; Zhao, Pizhi; Yang, Rongdong; Patel, Jayesh B.; Chen, Xiangfu; Fan, Zhongyun

    2017-10-01

    Melt-conditioned, direct-chill (MC-DC) casting is an emerging technology to manipulate the solidification process by melt conditioning via intensive shearing in the sump during DC casting to tailor the solidification microstructure and defect formation. When using MC-DC casting technology in an industrial scale DC cast billet of an A4032 aluminum alloy, significant grain refinement and uniform microstructure can be achieved in the primary α-Al phase with fine secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS). Improved macrosegregation is quantitatively characterized and correlated with the suppression of channel segregation. The mechanisms for the prevention of channel segregation are attributed to the increased local cooling rate in the liquid-solid phase region in the sump and the formation of fine equiaxed dendritic grains under intensive melt shearing during MC-DC casting. A critical cooling rate has been identified to be around 0.5 to 1 K/s (°C/s) for the channel segregation to happen in the investigated alloy based on quantitative metallographic results of SDAS. Reduction and refinement of microporosity is attributed to the improved permeability in the liquid-solid phase region estimated by the Kozeny-Carman relationship. The potential improvement in the mechanical properties achievable in MC-DC cast billets is indicated by the finer and more uniform forging streamline in the forgings of MC-DC cast billet.

  20. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  1. Solidification, growth mechanisms, and associated properties of aluminum-silicon and magnesium lightweight casting alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosch, Timothy Al

    Continually rising energy prices have inspired increased interest in weight reduction in the automotive and aerospace industries, opening the door for the widespread use and development of lightweight structural materials. Chief among these materials are cast Al-Si and magnesium-based alloys. Utilization of Al-Si alloys depends on obtaining a modified fibrous microstructure in lieu of the intrinsic flake structure, a process which is incompletely understood. The local solidification conditions, mechanisms, and tensile properties associated with the flake to fiber growth mode transition in Al-Si eutectic alloys are investigated here using bridgman type gradient-zone directional solidification. Resulting microstructures are examined through quantitative image analysis of two-dimensional sections and observation of deep-etched sections showing three-dimensional microstructural features. The transition was found to occur in two stages: an initial stage dominated by in-plane plate breakup and rod formation within the plane of the plate, and a second stage where the onset of out-of-plane silicon rod growth leads to the formation of an irregular fibrous structure. Several microstructural parameters were investigated in an attempt to quantify this transition, and it was found that the particle aspect ratio is effective in objectively identifying the onset and completion velocity of the flake to fiber transition. The appearance of intricate out-of-plane silicon instability formations was investigated by adapting a perturbed-interface stability analysis to the Al-Si system. Measurements of silicon equilibrium shape particles provided an estimate of the anisotropy of the solid Si/liquid Al-Si system and incorporation of this silicon anisotropy into the model was found to improve prediction of the instability length scale. Magnesium alloys share many of the benefits of Al-Si alloys, with the added benefit of a 1/3 lower density and increased machinability. Magnesium castings

  2. Influence of Secondary Cooling Mode on Solidification Structure and Macro-segregation Behavior for High-carbon Continuous Casting Bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Kun; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Qing; Huang, Yunhua; Dong, Hongbiao

    2017-07-01

    A cellular automaton-finite element coupling model for high-carbon continuously cast bloom of GCr15 steel is established to simulate the solidification structure and to investigate the influence of different secondary cooling modes on characteristic parameters such as equiaxed crystal ratio, grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing, in which the effect of phase transformation and electromagnetic stirring is taken into consideration. On this basis, evolution of carbon macro-segregation for GCr15 steel bloom is researched correspondingly via industrial tests. Based on above analysis, the relationship among secondary cooling modes, characteristic parameters for solidification structure as well as carbon macro-segregation is illustrated to obtain optimum secondary cooling strategy and alleviate carbon macro-segregation degree for GCr15 steel bloom in continuous casting process. The evaluating method for element macro-segregation is applicable in various steel types.

  3. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The software developed for the solidification model is presented. A link between the calculations and the FORTRAN code is provided, primarily in the form of global flow diagrams and data structures. A complete listing of the solidification code is given.

  4. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 3: Operating manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of solidification model 1 is described. Model 1 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The calculation is restricted to steady-state solidification; there is no variation in final local average composition in the direction of isotherm movement. The physics of the model are given.

  5. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 1: Formulation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.; Poirier, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The physical and numerical formulation of a model for the horizontal solidification of a binary alloy is described. It can be applied in an ingot. The major purpose of the model is to calculate macrosegregation in a casting ingot which results from flow of interdendritic liquid during solidification. The flow, driven by solidification contractions and by gravity acting on density gradients in the interdendritic liquid, was modeled as flow through a porous medium. The symbols used are defined. The physical formulation of the problem leading to a set of equations which can be used to obtain: (1) the pressure field; (2) the velocity field: (3) mass flow and (4) solute flow in the solid plus liquid zone during solidification is presented. With these established, the model calculates macrosegregation after solidification is complete. The numerical techniques used to obtain solution on a computational grid are presented. Results, evaluation of the results, and recommendations for future development of the model are given. The macrosegregation and flow field predictions for tin-lead, aluminum-copper, and tin-bismuth alloys are included as well as comparisons of some of the predictions with published predictions or with empirical data.

  6. Combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach for numerical simulation of nodular cast iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, E.; Huang, C.; Jakumeit, J.; Hediger, F.

    2015-06-01

    The ongoing increase in the size and capacity of state-of-the-art wind power plants is highlighting the need to reduce the weight of critical components, such as hubs, main shaft bearing housings, gear box housings and support bases. These components are manufactured as nodular iron castings (spheroid graphite iron, or SGI). A weight reduction of up to 20% is achievable by optimizing the geometry to minimize volume, thus enabling significant downsizing of wind power plants. One method for enhancing quality control in the production of thick-walled SGI castings, and thus reducing tolerances and, consequently, enabling castings of smaller volume is via a casting simulation of mould filling and solidification based on a combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach. Coupled fluid flow with heat transport and phase transformation kinetics during solidification is described by partial differential equations and solved using the finite volume method. The flow of multiple phases is described using a volume of fluid approach. Mass conservation equations are solved separately for both liquid and solid phases. At the micro-level, the diffusion-controlled growth model for grey iron eutectic grains by Wetterfall et al. is combined with a growth model for white iron eutectic grains. The micro-solidification model is coupled with macro-transport equations via source terms in the energy and continuity equations. As a first step the methodology was applied to a simple geometry to investigate the impact of mould-filling on the grey-to-white transition prediction in nodular cast iron.

  7. Determining casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts by computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiehua; Oberdorfer, Bernd; Habe, Daniel; Schumacher, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Three types of near-net shape casting aluminum parts were investigated by computed tomography to determine casting defects and evaluate quality. The first, second, and third parts were produced by low-pressure die casting (Al-12Si-0.8Cu-0.5Fe-0.9Mg-0.7Ni-0.2Zn alloy), die casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), and semi-solid casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), respectively. Unlike die casting (second part), low-pressure die casting (first part) significantly reduced the formation of casting defects (i.e., porosity) due to its smooth filling and solidification under pressure. No significant casting defect was observed in the third part, and this absence of defects indicates that semi-solid casting could produce high-quality near-net shape casting aluminum parts. Moreover, casting defects were mostly distributed along the eutectic grain boundaries. This finding reveals that refinement of eutectic grains is necessary to optimize the distribution of casting defects and reduce their size. This investigation demonstrated that computed tomography is an efficient method to determine casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts.

  8. Predictive Capabilities of Multiphysics and Multiscale Models in Modeling Solidification of Steel Ingots and DC Casting of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combeau, Hervé; Založnik, Miha; Bedel, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of solidification defects, such as macrosegregation and inhomogeneous microstructures, constitutes a key issue for industry. The development of models of casting processes needs to account for several imbricated length scales and different physical phenomena. For example, the kinetics of the growth of microstructures needs to be coupled with the multiphase flow at the process scale. We introduce such a state-of-the-art model and outline its principles. We present the most recent applications of the model to casting of a heavy steel ingot and to direct chill casting of a large Al alloy sheet ingot. Their ability to help in the understanding of complex phenomena, such as the competition between nucleation and growth of grains in the presence of convection of the liquid and of grain motion is shown, and its predictive capabilities are discussed. Key issues for future developments and research are addressed.

  9. A Simplified Three-Phase Model of Equiaxed Solidification for the Prediction of Microstructure and Macrosegregation in Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveito, Knut Omdal; Pakanati, Akash; M'Hamdi, Mohammed; Combeau, Hervé; Založnik, Miha

    2018-04-01

    Macrosegregation is a result of the interplay of various transport mechanisms, including natural convection, solidification shrinkage, and grain motion. Experimental observations also indicate the impact of grain morphology, ranging from dendritic to globular, on macrosegregation formation. To avoid the complexity arising due to modeling of an equiaxed dendritic grain, we present the development of a simplified three-phase, multiscale equiaxed dendritic solidification model based on the volume-averaging method, which accounts for the above-mentioned transport phenomena. The validity of the model is assessed by comparing it with the full three-phase model without simplifications. It is then applied to qualitatively analyze the impact of grain morphology on macrosegregation formation in an industrial scale direct chill cast aluminum alloy ingot.

  10. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Casting of Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Superalloys by HRS and LMC Directional Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xuewei; Wang, Run'nan; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2017-04-01

    Mathematical models for dynamic heat radiation and convection boundary in directional solidification processes are established to simulate the temperature fields. Cellular automaton (CA) method and Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi (KGT) growth model are used to describe nucleation and growth. Primary dendritic arm spacing (PDAS) and secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS) are calculated by the Ma-Sham (MS) and Furer-Wunderlin (FW) models respectively. The mushy zone shape is investigated based on the temperature fields, for both high-rate solidification (HRS) and liquid metal cooling (LMC) processes. The evolution of the microstructure and crystallographic orientation are analyzed by simulation and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique, respectively. Comparison of the simulation results from PDAS and SDAS with experimental results reveals a good agreement with each other. The results show that LMC process can provide both dendritic refinement and superior performance for castings due to the increased cooling rate and thermal gradient.

  11. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  12. Preliminary science report on the directional solidification of hypereutectic cast iron during KC-135 low-G maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An ADSS-P directional solidification furnace was reconfigured for operation on the KC-135 low-g aircraft. The system offers many advantages over quench ingot methods for study of the effects of sedimentation and convection on alloy formation. The directional sodification furnace system was first flown during the September 1982 series of flights. The microstructure of the hypereutectic cast iron sample solidified on one of these flights suggests a low-g effect on graphite morphology. Further experiments are needed to ascertain that this effect is due to low-gravity and to deduce which of the possible mechanisms is responsible for it.

  13. Determination for the Entrapment Criterion of Non-metallic Inclusions by the Solidification Front During Steel Centrifugal Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the three-dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification in steel centrifugal continuous casting strands were simulated. The volume of fluid model was used to solve the multiphase phenomena between the molten steel and the air. The entrapment and final distribution of inclusions in the solidified shell were studied with the discussion on the effect of rotation behavior of the caster system. Main results indicate that after applying the rotation of the shell, the fluid flow transformed from a recirculation flow to a rotation flow in the mold region and was driven to flow around in the casting direction. As the distance below the meniscus increased, the distribution of the tangential speed of the flow and the centrifugal force along one diameter of the strand became symmetrical gradually. The jet flow from the nozzle hardly impinged on the same location on the shell due to the rotation of the shell during solidification. Thus, the shell thickness on the same height was uniform around, and the thinning shell and a hot spot on the surface of shell were avoided. Both of the measurement and the calculation about the distribution of oxide inclusions along the radial direction indicated the number of inclusions at the side and the center was more than that at the quarter on the cross section of billet. With a larger diameter, inclusions tended to be entrapped toward the center area of the billet.

  14. Development of an inverse heat conduction model and its application to determination of heat transfer coefficient during casting solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liqiang; Reilly, Carl; Li, Luoxing; Cockcroft, Steve; Yao, Lu

    2014-07-01

    The interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) is required for the accurate simulation of heat transfer in castings especially for near net-shape processes. The large number of factors influencing heat transfer renders quantification by theoretical means a challenge. Likewise experimental methods applied directly to temperature data collected from castings are also a challenge to interpret because of the transient nature of many casting processes. Inverse methods offer a solution and have been applied successfully to predict the IHTC in many cases. However, most inverse approaches thus far focus on use of in-mold temperature data, which may be a challenge to obtain in cases where the molds are water-cooled. Methods based on temperature data from the casting have the potential to be used however; the latent heat released during the solidification of the molten metal complicates the associated IHTC calculations. Furthermore, there are limits on the maximum distance the thermocouples can be placed from the interface under analysis. An inverse conduction based method have been developed, verified and applied successfully to temperature data collected from within an aluminum casting in proximity to the mold. A modified specific heat method was used to account for latent heat evolution in which the rate of change of fraction solid with temperature was held constant. An analysis conducted with the inverse model suggests that the thermocouples must be placed no more than 2 mm from the interface. The IHTC values calculated for an aluminum alloy casting were shown to vary from 1,200 to 6,200 Wm-2 K-1. Additionally, the characteristics of the time-varying IHTC have also been discussed.

  15. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-04-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  16. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  17. Experimental study of the continuous casting slab solidification microstructure by the dendrite etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. G.; Xu, Q. T.; Wu, C. L.; Chen, Y. S.

    2017-12-01

    The relationship between the microstructure of the continuous casting slab (CCS) and quality defects of the steel products, as well as evolution and characteristics of the fine equiaxed, columnar, equiaxed zones and crossed dendrites of CCS were systematically investigated in this study. Different microstructures of various CCS samples were revealed. The dendrite etching method was proved to be quite efficient for the analysis of solidified morphologies, which are essential to estimate the material characteristics, especially the CCS microstructure defects.

  18. Effect of Solidification Behavior on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Ni-Cr-Fe Superalloy Investment Casting

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Maodong; Wang, Jun; Gao, Haiyan; Han, Yanfeng; Wang, Guoxiang; He, Shuxian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of solidification behavior on the microstructures and mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-Fe superalloy investment casting is given. Metallographic and image analysis have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructures’ evolution. For the parts with the thickness of 3 mm and 24 mm, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of the Laves phase increases from 0.3% to 1.2%, from 11.7 μm to 23.4 μm, respectively. Meanwhile, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of carbides increase from 0.3% to 0.5%, from 8.1 μm to 9.9 μm, respectively. In addition, the volume fraction of microporosity increases from 0.3% to 2.7%. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength is reduced from 1125.5 MPa to 820.9 MPa, the elongation from 13.3% to 7.7%, and the quality index from 1294.2 MPa to 954.0 MPa, respectively. A typical brittle fracture is observed on the tensile fracture. As the cooling rate decreases, the microstructures become coarser. PMID:28772611

  19. Simulation of the as-cast structure of Al-4.0wt.%Cu ingots with a 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Ahmadein, M.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Li, J. H.; Schumacher, P.

    2012-07-01

    Empirical knowledge about the formation of the as-cast structure, mostly obtained before 1980s, has revealed two critical issues: one is the origin of the equiaxed crystals; one is the competing growth of the columnar and equiaxed structures, and the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). Unfortunately, the application of empirical knowledge to predict and control the as-cast structure was very limited, as the flow and crystal transport were not considered. Therefore, a 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was recently proposed by the current authors based on modeling the multiphase transport phenomena. The motivation of the recent work is to determine and evaluate the necessary modeling parameters, and to validate the mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model by comparison with laboratory castings. In this regard an experimental method was recommended for in-situ determination of the nucleation parameters. Additionally, some classical experiments of the Al-Cu ingots were conducted and the as-cast structural information including distinct columnar and equiaxed zones, macrosegregation, and grain size distribution were analysed. The final simulation results exhibited good agreement with experiments in the case of high pouring temperature, whereas disagreement in the case of low pouring temperature. The reasons for the disagreement are discussed.

  20. Relationship Between Solidification Microstructure and Hot Cracking Susceptibility for Continuous Casting of Low-Carbon and High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steels: A Phase-Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2013-08-01

    Hot cracking is one of the major defects in continuous casting of steels, frequently limiting the productivity. To understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low-carbon and two high-strength low-alloyed steels. 2D simulation of the initial stage of solidification is performed in a moving slice of the slab using proprietary multiphase-field software and taking into account all elements which are expected to have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during solidification. To account for the correct thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the multicomponent alloy grades, the simulation software is online coupled to commercial thermodynamic and mobility databases. A moving-frame boundary condition allows traveling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. From the simulation results, significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are quantitatively evaluated and correlated with their hot cracking behavior according to the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) hot cracking criterion. The possible role of the microalloying elements in hot cracking, in particular of traces of Ti, is analyzed. With the assumption that TiN precipitates trigger coalescence of the primary dendrites, quantitative evaluation of the critical strain rates leads to a full agreement with the observed hot cracking behavior.

  1. Parabolic aircraft solidification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Susan

    1996-01-01

    A number of solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental environment which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Two techniques of interest are directional solidification and isothermal casting. Because of the wide-spread use of these experimental techniques in space-based research, several MSAD experiments have been manifested for space flight. In addition to the microstructural analysis for interpretation of the experimental results from previous work with parabolic flights, it has become apparent that a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible. Our university has performed in several experimental studies such as this in recent years. The most recent was in visualizing the effect of convective flow phenomena on the KC-135 and prior to that were several successive contracts to perform directional solidification and isothermal casting experiments on the KC-135. Included in this work was the modification and utilization of the Convective Flow Analyzer (CFA), the Aircraft Isothermal Casting Furnace (ICF), and the Three-Zone Directional Solidification Furnace. These studies have contributed heavily to the mission of the Microgravity Science and Applications' Materials Science Program.

  2. Numerical simulation of the solidification microstructure of a 17-4PH stainless steel investment casting and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You Yun; Tsai, DeChang; Hwang, Weng Sing

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique of numerically simulating the microstructure of 17-4PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel during investment casting. A cellular automation (CA) algorithm was adopted to simulate the nucleation and grain growth. First a calibration casting was made, and then by comparing the microstructures of the calibration casting with those simulated using different kinetic growth coefficients (a2, a3) in CA, the most appropriate set of values for a2 and a3 would be obtained. Then, this set of values was applied to the microstructure simulation of a separate casting, where the casting was actually made. Through this approach, this study has arrived at a set of growth kinetic coefficients from the calibration casting: a2 is 2.9 × 10-5, a3 is 1.49 × 10-7, which is then used to predict the microstructure of the other test casting. Consequently, a good correlation has been found between the microstructure of actual 17-4PH casting and the simulation result.

  3. Modeling of interdendritic porosity defects in an integrated computational materials engineering approach for metal casting

    DOE PAGES

    Sabau, Adrian S.

    2016-04-22

    Modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components in order to accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys. The data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. Here in this paper, the required models for the prediction of interdendritic casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Numerical simulation results for microporosity are presented for A356, 356 and 319 aluminummore » alloys using ProCAST TM software. The calculated pressure drop of the interdendritic liquid was observed to be quite significant and the regions of high-pressure drop can be used as an indicator of the severity of interdendritic microporosity defects.« less

  4. Modeling of Casting Defects in an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys the modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake of completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. The data on casting defects including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component.

  5. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm × 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  6. Effect of Holding Pressure on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huarui; Ma, Zhen; Jia, Lina; Zhang, Hu

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of holding pressure on microstructure and mechanical properties of low-pressure die cast A356 aluminum alloy was investigated. The results showed that the application of high holding pressure (300 kPa) generated castings with denser structure and superior mechanical properties. By increasing the holding pressure up to 300 kPa, the size of secondary dendrite arm spacing greatly reduced by 22.7% at the cooling rate of 1°C/s and decreased by 12.8% at 10°C/s. The Feret's diameter and aspect ratio of eutectic silicon particles decreased by 8.4 and 5.1% at the cooling rate of 1°C/s and decreased by 9.3 and 6.4% at 10°C/s, respectively. Meanwhile, the density of A356 aluminum alloy increased to 2.678 g/cm3 and the area fraction of porosity decreased to 0.035%. Thus, tensile properties of A356 aluminum alloy obtained at high holding pressure were enhanced, especially the ductility. All these could be associated with the better filling capability and faster cooling rate caused by high holding pressure. In the analytical range of experimental conditions, the correlation of mechanical properties with process parameters was established by statistical models to predict the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of low-pressure die cast A356 aluminum alloy.

  7. Influence of Low-Frequency Vibration and Modification on Solidification and Mechanical Properties of Al-Si Casting Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Selivorstov, Vadim; Dotsenko, Yuri; Borodianskiy, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    One of the major aims of the modern materials foundry industry is the achievement of advanced mechanical properties of metals, especially of light non-ferrous alloys such as aluminum. Usually an alloying process is applied to obtain the required properties of aluminum alloys. However, the presented work describes an alternative approach through the application of vibration treatment, modification by ultrafine powder and a combination of these two methods. Microstructural studies followed by image analysis revealed the refinement of α-Al grains with an increase in the Si network area around them. As evidence, the improvement of the mechanical properties of Al casting alloy was detected. It was found that the alloys subjected to the vibration treatment displayed an increase in tensile and yield strengths by 20% and 10%, respectively. PMID:28772922

  8. Influence of Low-Frequency Vibration and Modification on Solidification and Mechanical Properties of Al-Si Casting Alloy.

    PubMed

    Selivorstov, Vadim; Dotsenko, Yuri; Borodianskiy, Konstantin

    2017-05-20

    One of the major aims of the modern materials foundry industry is the achievement of advanced mechanical properties of metals, especially of light non-ferrous alloys such as aluminum. Usually an alloying process is applied to obtain the required properties of aluminum alloys. However, the presented work describes an alternative approach through the application of vibration treatment, modification by ultrafine powder and a combination of these two methods. Microstructural studies followed by image analysis revealed the refinement of α-Al grains with an increase in the Si network area around them. As evidence, the improvement of the mechanical properties of Al casting alloy was detected. It was found that the alloys subjected to the vibration treatment displayed an increase in tensile and yield strengths by 20% and 10%, respectively.

  9. Preparation of A356 Foam Aluminum by Means of Titanium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajan, Zohair

    2017-09-01

    The effect of heating temperature and stirring time during preparation of foam aluminum alloy A356 on its relative porosity is studied. The optimum amount of the foam-forming agent, i.e., titanium hydride TiH2, facilitating uniform distribution of pores throughout the whole cross section of a hardened casting is determined. Optimum conditions are established for foam formation in a melt during stirring using a mixer are described.

  10. The role of ultrasonic cavitation in refining the microstructure of aluminum based nanocomposites during the solidification process.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yang; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies showed that the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum based nanocomposites can be significantly improved when ultrasonic cavitation and solidification processing is used. This is because ultrasonic cavitation processing plays an important role not only in degassing and dispersion of the nanoparticles, but also in breaking up the dendritic grains and refining the as-cast microstructure. In the present study, A356 alloy and Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles are used as the matrix alloy and the reinforcement, respectively. Nanoparticles were added into the molten A356 alloy and dispersed via ultrasonic cavitation processing. Ultrasonic cavitation was applied over various temperature ranges during molten alloy cooling and solidification to investigate the grain structure formation and the nanoparticle dispersion behavior. Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to investigate in detail the differences in the microstructure characteristics and the nanoparticle distribution. Experimental results indicated that the ultrasonic cavitation processing and Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles play an important role for microstructure refinement. In addition, it was shown in this study that the Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles modified the eutectic phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Dang, B; Zhang, X; Chen, Y Z; Chen, C X; Wang, H T; Liu, F

    2016-08-09

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy.

  12. Breaking through the strength-ductility trade-off dilemma in an Al-Si-based casting alloy

    PubMed Central

    Dang, B.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, C. X.; Wang, H. T.; Liu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Al-Si-based casting alloys have a great potential in various industrial applications. Common strengthening strategies on these alloys are accompanied inevitably by sacrifice of ductility, known as strength-ductility trade-off dilemma. Here, we report a simple route by combining rapid solidification (RS) with a post-solidification heat treatment (PHT), i.e. a RS + PHT route, to break through this dilemma using a commercial Al-Si-based casting alloy (A356 alloy) as an example. It is shown that yield strength and elongation to failure of the RS + PHT processed alloy are elevated simultaneously by increasing the cooling rate upon RS, which are not influenced by subsequent T6 heat treatment. Breaking through the dilemma is attributed to the hierarchical microstructure formed by the RS + PHT route, i.e. highly dispersed nanoscale Si particles in Al dendrites and nanoscale Al particles decorated in eutectic Si. Simplicity of the RS + PHT route makes it being suitable for industrial scaling production. The strategy of engineering microstructures offers a general pathway in tailoring mechanical properties of other Al-Si-based alloys. Moreover, the remarkably enhanced ductility of A356 alloy not only permits strengthening further the material by work hardening but also enables possibly conventional solid-state forming of the material, thus extending the applications of such an alloy. PMID:27502444

  13. Quality Assessment of A356 Ingots from Different Suppliers in Wheel Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koca, Emre; Yuksel, Caglar; Erzi, Eray; Dışpınar, Derya

    In a typical foundry floor, several precautions are taken prior to the casting in order to achieve pore-free, high quality parts. In low pressure die castings, these operations involve runner design, pressure adjustment, die temperature selection, cooling locations etc. For the melt, it is important to determine the degassing duration and gas flow rate. In addition, the period of modification (Ti, Sr) addition also plays a significant role. Even after optimization of all these parameters, reject parts can still be found. What has always been disregarded is the quality assessment of the ingot suppliers. Therefore, in this work, four different A356 ingot provider's quality has been investigated in the wheel producer company. Reduced pressure test was used to quantify melt quality by means of bifilm index measurement. In addition, fluidity, feedability and tensile tests have been carried out. The rejection rates were compared according to provider's quality level.

  14. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part I Microstructure evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres; ...

    2017-03-06

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to themore » dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ''θ'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ'θ' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β'β' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.« less

  15. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part I Microstructure evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to themore » dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ''θ'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ'θ' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β'β' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.« less

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part I—Microstructure Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-05-01

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to the dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ^'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ^' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β^' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.

  17. Effect of foaming temperature on the mechanical properties of produced closed-cell A356Aluminum foams with melting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, N.; Mirbagheri, S. M. H.; Hoseini, S. R.

    2014-07-01

    In this study an attempt was carried out to determine the effect of production temperature on the mechanical properties and energy absorption behavior of closed-cell A356 alloy foams under uniaxial compression test. For this purpose, three different A356 alloy closed-cell foams were synthesized at three different casting temperatures, 650 °C, 675 °C and 700 °C by adding the same amounts of granulated calcium as thickening and TiH2 as blowing agent. The samples were characterized by SEM to study the pore morphology at different foaming temperatures. Compression tests of the A356 foams were carried out to assess their mechanical properties and energy absorption behavior. The results indicated that increasing the foaming temperature from 650 °C to 675 °C and 700 °C reduces the relative density of closed cell A356 alloys by 18.3% and 38% respectively and consequently affects the compressive strength and energy absorption of cellular structures by changing them from equiaxed polyhedral closed cells to distorted cells. Also at 700 °C foaming temperature, growth of micro-pores and coalescence with other surrounding pores leads to several big voids.

  18. CASTING DEFECT MODELING IN AN INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL MATERIALS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2015-01-01

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys, the simultaneous modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake ofmore » completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. Thus, the data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Nemak Inc., and Chrysler Co. for the project "High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines. The author would also like to thank Amit Shyam for reviewing the paper and Andres Rodriguez of Nemak Inc. Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, as part of the Propulsion Materials Program under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. Part of this research was conducted through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program, which is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program.« less

  19. Relationships Between Solidification Parameters in A319 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersluis, E.; Ravindran, C.

    2018-03-01

    The design of high-performance materials depends on a comprehensive understanding of the alloy-specific relationships between solidification and properties. However, the inconsistent use of a particular solidification parameter for presenting materials characterization in the literature impedes inter-study comparability and the interpretation of findings. Therefore, there is a need for accurate expressions relating the solidification parameters for each alloy. In this study, A319 aluminum alloy castings were produced in a permanent mold with various preheating temperatures in order to control metal cooling. Analysis of the cooling curve for each casting enabled the identification of its liquidus, Al-Si eutectic, and solidus temperatures and times. These values led to the calculation of the primary solidification rate, total solidification rate, primary solidification time, and local solidification time for each casting, which were related to each other as well as to the average casting SDAS and material hardness. Expressions for each of their correlations have been presented with high coefficients of determination, which will aid in microstructural prediction and casting design.

  20. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-24

    pearlite (See Figure 1). No evidence of the as-cast austenite dendrite structure was observed. The gating system for this sample resides at the thermal...possible nucleating compounds. 3) Extend grain refinement theory and solidification knowledge through experimental data. 4) Determine structure ...refine the structure of a casting through heat treatment. The energy required for grain refining via thermomechanical processes or heat treatment

  1. Effect of porosity on ductility variation in investment cast 17-4PH.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Robert D.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grant, Richard P.

    2005-02-01

    by Gokhale et al. and Surappa et al. in cast A356 Al and by Gokhale et al. for a cast Mg alloys. The quantitative fractography and metallography work by Gokhale et al. illustrated the strong preference for fracture in regions of porosity in cast material. That is, the fracture process is not correlated to the average microstructure in the material but is related to the extremes in microstructure (local regions of high void content). In the present study, image analysis on random cross-sections of several heats indicated an overall porosity content of 0.03%. In contrast, the area % porosity was as high as 16% when measured on fracture surfaces of tensile specimens using stereology techniques. The results confirm that the fracture properties of cast 17-4PH cannot be predicted based on the overall 'average' porosity content in the castings.« less

  2. Thermophysical property sensitivity effects in steel solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Tony

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of advanced solidification processes via digital computer techniques has gained widespread acceptance during the last decade or so. Models today can predict transient temperature fields, fluid flow fields, important microstructural parameters, and potential defects in castings. However, the lack of accurate thermophysical property data on important industrial alloys threatens to limit the ability of manufacturers to fully capitalize on the technology's benefits. A study of the sensitivity of one such numerical model of a steel plate casting to imposed variations in the data utilized for the thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, and heat of fusion is described. The sensitivity of the data's variability is characterized by its effects on the net solidification time of various points along the centerline of the plate casting. Recommendations for property measurements are given and the implications of data uncertainty for modelers are discussed.

  3. Effect of iron-intermetallics and porosity on tensile and impact properties of aluminum-silicon-copper and aluminum-silicon-magnesium cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheyuan

    Aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are an important class of materials that constitute the majority of aluminum cast parts produced, due to their superior properties and excellent casting characteristics. Within this family of alloys, Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg cast alloys are frequently employed in automotive applications. The commercially popular 319 and 356 alloys, representing these two alloy systems, were selected for study in the present work, with the aim of investigating the effect of iron intermetallics and porosity on the alloy performance. This was carried out through a study of the tensile and impact properties, these being two of the important mechanical properties used in design calculations. Iron, through the precipitation of second phase intermetallic constituents, in particular the platelike beta-Al5FeSi phase, is harmful to the alloy properties. Likewise, gas- or shrinkage porosity in castings is also detrimental to the mechanical properties. By determining the optimum alloying, melt processing and solidification parameters (viz., Fe content, Sr modification and cooling rate) required to minimize the harmful effects of porosity and iron intermetallics, and studying their role on the fracture behavior, the fracture mechanism in the alloys could be determined. Castings were prepared from both industrial and experimental 319.2, B319.2 and A356.2 alloy melts, containing Fe levels of 0.2--1.0 wt%. Sr-modified (˜200 ppm) melts were also prepared for each alloy Fe level. The end-chilled refractory mold used provided directional solidification and a range of cooling rates (or dendrite arm spacings, DAS) within the same casting. Tensile and impact test samples machined from specimen blanks sectioned from the castings at various heights above the chill end provided DASs of 23--85mum. All samples were T6-heat-treated before testing. Tests were carried out employing Instron Universal and Instrumented Charpy testing machines. Optical microscopy, image analysis, SEM

  4. Influence of friction stir processing on the room temperature fatigue cracking mechanisms of A356 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelaturu, Phalgun; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.

    Here, failure by fatigue is a common problem associated with cast aluminum alloys due to defects like shrinkage porosities, non-metallic inclusions, etc. Friction stir processing (FSP) has recently emerged as an effective technique for local modification of microstructure. This study investigates the fatigue crack initiation and growth mechanisms in cast and FSPed A356 aluminum alloy. Two sets of parameters were used to friction stir the cast alloy resulting in the complete modification the cast microstructure to a wrought microstructure. Both the FSPed microstructures exhibited severe abnormal grain growth (AGG) after heat treatment leading to a multimodal grain size distribution –more » the grain sizes ranging from a few microns to a few millimeters. One of the FSP conditions displayed an excellent improvement in fatigue life by an order of magnitude, while the other condition displayed an unexpectedly large scatter in fatigue lives. Detailed study of the fractured fatigue specimens by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed that both, fatigue crack initiation and propagation, were intimately tied to the grain size as well as the grain misorientations in the microstructure.« less

  5. Influence of friction stir processing on the room temperature fatigue cracking mechanisms of A356 aluminum alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Nelaturu, Phalgun; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.; ...

    2018-01-11

    Here, failure by fatigue is a common problem associated with cast aluminum alloys due to defects like shrinkage porosities, non-metallic inclusions, etc. Friction stir processing (FSP) has recently emerged as an effective technique for local modification of microstructure. This study investigates the fatigue crack initiation and growth mechanisms in cast and FSPed A356 aluminum alloy. Two sets of parameters were used to friction stir the cast alloy resulting in the complete modification the cast microstructure to a wrought microstructure. Both the FSPed microstructures exhibited severe abnormal grain growth (AGG) after heat treatment leading to a multimodal grain size distribution –more » the grain sizes ranging from a few microns to a few millimeters. One of the FSP conditions displayed an excellent improvement in fatigue life by an order of magnitude, while the other condition displayed an unexpectedly large scatter in fatigue lives. Detailed study of the fractured fatigue specimens by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed that both, fatigue crack initiation and propagation, were intimately tied to the grain size as well as the grain misorientations in the microstructure.« less

  6. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The long range goal of this program is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification and to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  7. Modelling Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Weijun

    1992-01-01

    The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  8. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  9. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  10. Modelling direction solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop an improved understanding of some phenomena of importance to directional solidification. The aim of this research is also to help predict differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and solidification in space. In this report, the validity of the Burton-Primslichter equation is explored. The influence of operating variables on grain and twin generation and propagation in single crystals of In sub (x) Ga sub (1-x) Sb is also investigated.

  11. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood ... The urine sample you provide may need to be from your first morning urine. The sample needs to be ...

  12. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  13. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  14. Riser Feeding Evaluation Method for Metal Castings Using Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nadiah

    One of the design aspects that continues to create a challenge for casting designers is the optimum design of casting feeders (risers). As liquid metal solidifies, the metal shrinks and forms cavities inside the casting. In order to avoid shrinkage cavities, risers are added to the casting shape to supply additional molten metal when shrinkage occurs during solidification. The shrinkage cavities in the casting are compensated by controlling the cooling rate to promote directional solidification. This control can be achieved by designing the casting such that the cooling begins at the sections that are farthest away from the risers and ends at the risers. Therefore, the risers will solidify last and feed the casting with the molten metal. As a result, the shrinkage cavities formed during solidification are in the risers which are later removed from the casting. Since casting designers have to usually go through iterative processes of validating the casting designs which are very costly due to expensive simulation processes or manual trials and errors on actual casting processes, this study investigates more efficient methods that will help casting designers utilize their casting experiences systematically to develop good initial casting designs. The objective is to reduce the casting design method iterations; therefore, reducing the cost involved in that design processes. The aim of this research aims at finding a method that can help casting designers design effective risers used in sand casting process of aluminum-silicon alloys by utilizing the analysis of solidification simulation. The analysis focuses on studying the significance of pressure distribution of the liquid metal at the early stage of casting solidification, when heat transfer and convective fluid flow are taken into account in the solidification simulation. The mathematical model of casting solidification was solved using the finite volume method (FVM). This study focuses to improve our

  15. AMCC casting development, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    PCC successfully cast and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC castings. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the castings and the remaining six castings were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six castings shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more castings have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC casting has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment casting arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.

  16. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.

    1994-01-01

    This grant, NAG8-831, was a continuation of a previous grant, NAG8-541. The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis in the recently completed grant was on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification of InSb and InSb-GaSb alloys. In particular, the objective was to determine the influence of spin-up/spin-down (ACRT), electric current pulses and vibrations on compositional homogeneity and grain size.

  17. Microsegregation during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the directional solidification of alloys, solute inhomogeneities transverse to the growth direction arise due to morphological instabilities (leading to cellular or dendritic growth) and/or due to convection in the melt. In the absence of convection, the conditions for the onset of morphological instability are given by the linear stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka. For ordinary solidification rates, the predictions of linear stability analysis are similar to the constitutional supercooling criterion. However, at very rapid solidification rates, linear stability analysis predicts a vast increase in stabilization in comparison to constitutional supercooling.

  18. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  19. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    casting from entrapped air. This fact, together with the lower amount of solidification shrinkage of semi-solid alloys , results in the now firmly...compositions and solidification ranges. Figures 5 and 6 illustrate -24- typical quenched microstructures obtained for several of the alloys investi...COBALT SUPERALLOY Cu - 10%Sn - 2%Zn Fe - 2.6%C - 3.2% Si Fe - 17%Cr - l% Si l%Mn - 1.1%C Fe - 17%Cr - USi l%Mn - 0.6%C Fe - 18.5%Cr - 9.5% Ni 0.08

  20. Improved Foundry Castings Utilizing CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/ Computer Aided Manufacture). Volume 1. Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    casting. 68 Figure 1-9: Line printer representation of roll solidification. 69 Figure I1-1: Test casting model. 76 Figure 11-2: Division of test casting...writing new casting analysis and design routines. The new routines would take advantage of advanced criteria for predicting casting soundness and cast...properties and technical advances in computer hardware and software. 11 2. CONCLUSIONS UPCAST, a comprehensive software package, has been developed for

  1. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) Coatings on an A356 Alloy for Improved Corrosion and Wear Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhijing

    Plasma electrolytic oxidizing (PEO) is an advanced technique that has been used to deposit thick and hard ceramic coatings on aluminium (Al) alloys. This work was however to use the PEO process to produce thin ceramic oxide coatings on an A356 Al alloy for improving corrosion and wear resistance of the alloy. Effects of current density and treatment time on surface morphologies and thickness of the PEO coatings were investigated. The improvement of galvanic corrosion properties of the coated A356 alloy vs. steel and carbon fibre were evaluated in E85 fuel or NaCl environments. Tribological properties of the coatings were studied with comparison to the uncoated A356 substrate and other commercially-used engine bore materials. The research results indicated that the PEO coatings could have excellent tribological and corrosion properties for aluminium engine applications.

  2. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  3. Application of Solidification Theory to Rapid Solidification Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    solubility; _NiAl -Cr quasibinary alloys ; Rapid solidification ; Solidification theory I’.ASRACT ICfene an roerso aid it 000e..yV SON identify0 by Week...110100a) ~j ~apid solidification allows the production of alloys with new compositions and * uphases and also allows production of improved alloys by...control of microstructure;L and homogeneity. The effect of rapid solidification velocity on the micro- structure of Ag-Cu alloys is comprehensively

  4. Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide is intended to inform site cleanup managers of recently-published materials such as field reports and guidance documents that address issues relevant to solidification/stabilization technologies.

  5. Solidification processing of intermetallic Nb-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Preston P.; Oliver, Ben F.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1992-01-01

    Several Nb-Al alloys, including single-phase NbAl3 and the eutectic of Nb2Al and NbAl3, were prepared either by nonconsumable arc melting in Ar or by zone processing in He following initial induction melting and rod casting, and the effect of the solidification route on the microstructure and room-temperature mechanical properties of these alloys was investigated. Automated control procedures and melt conditions for directional solidification of NbAl3 and the Nb2Al/Nb3Al eutectic were developed; high purity and stoichiometry were obtained. The effects of ternary additions of Ti and Ni are described.

  6. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1987-01-01

    An improved understanding of the phenomena of importance to directional solidification is attempted to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis is now on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection. A correlation is sought between heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneities using naphthalene doped with anthracene. The influence of spin-up/spin-down is determined on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide. The effect is determined of imposed melting - freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide. The mechanism behind the increase of grain size caused by using spin-up/spin-down in directional solidification of mercury cadimum telluride is sought.

  7. Pattern selection in solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Directional solidification of alloys produces a wide variety of cellular or lamellar structures which, depending upon growth conditions, may be reproducibly regular or may behave chaotically. It is not well understood how these patterns are selected and controlled or even whether there ever exist sharp selection mechanisms. A related phenomenon is the spatial propagation of a pattern into a system which has been caused to become unstable against pattern-forming deformations. This phenomenon has some features in common with the propagation of sidebranching modes in dendritic solidification. In a class of one-dimensional models, the nonlinear system can be shown to select the propagating mode in which the leading edge of the pattern is just marginally stable. This stability principle, when applicable, predicts both the speed of propagation and the geometrical characteristics of the pattern which forms behind the moving front. A boundary-layer model for fully two or three dimensional solidification problems appears to exhibit similar mathematical behavior.

  8. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  9. Microstructural development during solidification of stainless steel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, J. W.; Allen, S. M.; Eagar, T. W.

    1989-10-01

    The microstructures that develop during the solidification of stainless steel alloys are related to the solidification conditions and the specific alloy composition. The solidification conditions are determined by the processing method, i.e., casting, welding, or rapid solidification, and by parametric variations within each of these techniques. One variable that has been used to characterize the effects of different processing conditions is the cooling rate. This factor and the chemical composition of the alloy both influence (1) the primary mode of solidification, (2) solute redistribution and second-phase formation during solidification, and (3) the nucleation and growth behavior of the ferrite-to-austenite phase transformation during cooling. Consequently, the residual ferrite content and the microstructural morphology depend on the cooling rate and are governed by the solidification process. This paper investigates the influence of cooling rate on the microstructure of stainless steel alloys and describes the conditions that lead to the many microstructural morphologies that develop during solidification. Experiments were performed on a series of seven high-purity Fe-Ni-Cr alloys that spanned the line of twofold saturation along the 59 wt pct Fe isopleth of the ternary alloy system. High-speed electron-beam surface-glazing was used to melt and resolidify these alloys at scan speeds up to 5 m/s. The resulting cooling rates were shown to vary from 7°C/s to 7.5×106°C/s, and the resolidified melts were analyzed by optical metallographic methods. Five primary modes of solidification and 12 microstructural morphologies were characterized in the resolidified alloys, and these features appear to be a complete “set” of the possible microstructures for 300-series stainless steel alloys. The results of this study were used to create electron-beam scan speed vs composition diagrams, which can be used to predict the primary mode of solidification and the

  10. Novel technologies for the lost foam casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenming; Fan, Zitian

    2018-03-01

    Lost foam casting (LFC) is a green precision casting process categorized as a near net forming technology. Yet, despite its popularity, it still suffers from some technological problems, such as poor filling ability of the castings, coarse and non-dense microstructure, low mechanical properties for the Al and Mg LFC processes, and defective carburization for the low carbon steel LFC process. These drawbacks restrict the development and widespread application of the LFC process. To solve these problems, the present study developed several novel LFC technologies, namely, LFC technologies under vacuum and low pressure, vibration solidification, and pressure solidification conditions; expendable shell casting technology; and preparation technology of bimetallic castings based on the LFC process. The results showed that the LFC under vacuum and low pressure evidently improved the filling ability and solved the oxidization problem of the alloys, which is suitable for producing complex and thinwall castings. The vibration and pressure solidifications increased the compactness of the castings and refined the microstructure, significantly improving the mechanical properties of the castings. The expendable shell casting technology could solve the pore, carburization, and inclusion defects of the traditional LFC method, obtaining castings with acceptable surface quality. Moreover, the Al/Mg and Al/Al bimetallic castings with acceptable metallurgical bonding were successfully fabricated using the LFC process. These proposed novel LFC technologies can solve the current technological issues and promote the technological progress of the LFC process.

  11. Mold with improved core for metal casting operation

    DOEpatents

    Gritzner, Verne B.; Hackett, Donald W.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a mold containing an improved core for use in casting hollow, metallic articles. The core is formed of, or covered with, a layer of cellular material which possesses sufficient strength to maintain its structural integrity during casting, but will crush to alleviate the internal stresses that build up if the normal contraction during solidification and cooling is restricted.

  12. Cauchy integral method for two-dimensional solidification interface shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, R.; Sosoka, D. J.

    1982-07-01

    A method is developed to determine the shape of steady state solidification interfaces formed when liquid above its freezing point circulates over a cold surface. The solidification interface, which is at uniform temperature, will form in a shape such that the non-uniform energy convected to it is locally balanced by conduction into the solid. The interface shape is of interest relative to the crystal structure formed during solidification; regulating the crystal structure has application in casting naturally strengthened metallic composites. The results also pertain to phase-change energy storage devices, where the solidified configuration and overall heat transfer are needed. The analysis uses a conformal mapping technique to relate the desired interface coordinates to the components of the temperature gradient at the interface. These components are unknown because the interface shape is unknown. A Cauchy integral formulation provides a second relation involving the components, and a simultaneous solution yields the interface shape.

  13. Modeling transport phenomena and uncertainty quantification in solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, Kyle S.

    Direct chill (DC) casting is the primary processing route for wrought aluminum alloys. This semicontinuous process consists of primary cooling as the metal is pulled through a water cooled mold followed by secondary cooling with a water jet spray and free falling water. To gain insight into this complex solidification process, a fully transient model of DC casting was developed to predict the transport phenomena of aluminum alloys for various conditions. This model is capable of solving mixture mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation equations during multicomponent solidification. Various DC casting process parameters were examined for their effect on transport phenomena predictions in an alloy of commercial interest (aluminum alloy 7050). The practice of placing a wiper to divert cooling water from the ingot surface was studied and the results showed that placement closer to the mold causes remelting at the surface and increases susceptibility to bleed outs. Numerical models of metal alloy solidification, like the one previously mentioned, are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. However, uncertainty in model inputs cause uncertainty in results and those insights. The analysis of model assumptions and probable input variability on the level of uncertainty in model predictions has not been calculated in solidification modeling as yet. As a step towards understanding the effect of uncertain inputs on solidification modeling, uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis were first performed on a transient solidification model of a simple binary alloy (Al-4.5wt.%Cu) in a rectangular cavity with both columnar and equiaxed solid growth models. This analysis was followed by quantifying the uncertainty in predictions from the recently developed transient DC casting model. The PRISM Uncertainty Quantification (PUQ) framework quantified the uncertainty and sensitivity in macrosegregation, solidification

  14. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  15. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The long range goal is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis during the period of this grant was on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneties were correlated using naphthalene doped with azulene. In addition the influence of spin-up/spin-down on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide and the effect of imposed melting-freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide are discussed.

  16. Directional solidification at ultra-high thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Lee, D. S.; Neff, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A high gradient controlled solidification (HGC) furnace was designed and operated at gradients up to 1800 C/cm to continuously produce aluminum alloys. Rubber '0' rings for the water cooling chamber were eliminated, while still maintaining water cooling directly onto the solidified metal. An HGC unit for high temperature ferrous alloys was also designed. Successful runs were made with cast iron, at thermal gradients up to 500 C/cm.

  17. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  18. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  19. The Solidification of Multicomponent Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Boettinger, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Various topics taken from the author’s research portfolio that involve multicomponent alloy solidification are reviewed. Topics include: ternary eutectic solidification and Scheil-Gulliver paths in ternary systems. A case study of the solidification of commercial 2219 aluminum alloy is described. Also described are modifications of the Scheil-Gulliver analysis to treat dendrite tip kinetics and solid diffusion for multicomponent alloys. PMID:28819348

  20. Optimization to Develop Multiple Response Microstructure and Hardness of Ductile Iron Casting by using GRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabnure, Bahubali Bhupal; Shinde, Vasudev Dhondiram; Kolhapure, Rakesh Ramchandra

    2018-05-01

    Ductile irons are important engineering materials because of its high strength to weight ratio and castability. The ductile iron castings are used widely for automobile applications due to their wide spectrum of property range. Weight reduction is important in automobile to improve its fuel efficiency which can be achieved by thinning down the casting sections without altering its functionality. Generally, automobile castings are having varying section thickness. Varying thickness castings offers different cooling rates while solidification of the casting. The solidification cooling rate decides the final microstructure of the cast components. Cooling rate was found to affect directly the amount of pearlite and ultimately the as cast properties in varying thickness ductile iron castings. In view of this, the automobile impeller casting is selected for study in the present work as it consists of varying section thickness in which small sections are connected to central hub. The casting solidification simulations were performed and analyzed. The solidification cooling rates were analyzed further to correlate the experimental processing parameters. The samples from poured castings were analyzed for microstructure and hardness at different section thickness. Multiple response optimization of microstructure and hardness was carried out by combined Taguchi and Grey Relational Analysis (GRA). Contribution of input variables on the output variables is attained using ANOVA.

  1. AMCC casting development. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Combustion Chamber Casting (AMCC) has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or Thermal Gradient Control. This method, of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification, represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. Metallurgical integrity of the final four castings was very good. Only the areas of the parts that utilized 'TGC Shape & Location System #2' showed any significant areas of microshrinkage when evaluated by non-destructive tests. Alumina oxides detected by FPI on the 'float' surfaces (top sid surfaces of the casting during solidification) of the part were almost entirely less than the acceptance criteria of .032 inches in diameter. Destructive chem mill of the castings was required to determine the effect of the process variables used during the processing of these last four parts (with the exception of the 'Shape & Location of TGC' variable).

  2. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  3. The fractography of casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    Several types of casting alloys were fractured using various loading modes (uniaxial tension, bending, impact, and torsion, and cyclic stressing), and the corresponding mechanical properties were determined. The unetched and etched fracture surfaces and the microstructures were examined using conventional techniques. The types of casting alloys that were the subjects f these investigations include gray iron, ductile iron, cast steel, and aluminum-base alloys (A380, A356, and 319). The fractographic studies have yielded these generalizations regarding the topography of the fracture surfaces. In the case of low-ductility alloys such as gray iron and the aluminum-base alloys, the tensile edge of amore » fracture surface produced by a stress system with a strong bending-moment component has a highly irregular contour, whereas the compressive edge of the fracture surface is quite straight and parallel to the bend axis. On the other hand, the periphery of a fracture surface produced by uniaxial tension has a completely irregular contour. The fracture surface produced by cyclic loading of a gray iron does not display any macroscopic evidence (such as a thumb nail) of the loading mode. However, the fracture surface of each of the other casting alloys displays clear, macroscopic evidence of failure induced by fatigue. The aluminum-base alloys fracture completely within the interdendritic region of the microstructure when subjected to monotonic loading by uniaxial tension or bending, whereas a fatigue crack propagates predominantly through the primary crystals of the microstructure.« less

  4. Lens and dendrite formation during colloidal solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worster, Grae; You, Jiaxue

    2017-11-01

    Colloidal particles in suspension are forced into a variety of morphologies when the suspending fluid medium is frozen: soil is compacted between ice lenses during frost heave; ice templating is a recent and growing technology to produce bio-inspired, micro-porous materials; cells and tissue can be damaged during cryosurgery; and metal-matrix composites with tailored microstructure can be fabricated by controlled casting. Various instabilities that affect the microscopic morphology are controlled by fluid flow through the compacted layer of particles that accumulates ahead of the solidification front. By analysing the flow in connection with equilibrium phase relationships, we develop a theoretical framework that identifies two different mechanisms for ice-lens formation, with and without a frozen fringe, identifies the external parameters that differentiates between them and the possibility of dendritic formations, and unifies a range of apparently disparate conclusions drawn from previous experimental studies. China Scholarship Council and the British Council.

  5. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  6. Solidification of undercooled liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, J. H.; Shiohara, Y.; Paik, J. S.; Flemmings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    During rapid solidification processing (RSP) the amount of liquid undercooling is an important factor in determining microstructural development by controlling phase selection during nucleation and morphological evolution during crystal growth. While undercooling is an inherent feature of many techniques of RSP, the deepest undercoolings and most controlled studies have been possible in carefully prepared fine droplet samples. From past work and recent advances in studies of nucleation kinetics it has become clear that the initiation of crystallization during RSP is governed usually by heterogeneous sites located at surfaces. With known nucleant sites, it has been possible to identify specific pathways of metastable phase formation and microstructural development in alloys. These advances have allowed for a clearer assessment of the interplay between undercooling, cooling rate and particle size statistics in structure formation. New approaches to the examination of growth processes have been developed to follow the thermal behavior and morphology in small samples in the period of rapid crystallization and recalescence. Based upon the new experimental information from these studies, useful models can be developed for the overall solidification process to include nucleation behavior, thermodynamic constraints, thermal history, growth kinetics, solute redistribution and resulting structures. From the refinement of knowledge concerning the underlying factors that govern RSP a basis is emerging for an effective alloy design and processing strategy.

  7. Computational Multi-Scale Modeling of the Microstructure and Segregation of Cast Mg Alloys at Low Superheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastac, Laurentiu; El-Kaddah, Nagy

    It is well known that casting at low superheat has a strong influence on the solidification structures of the cast alloy. Recent studies on casting magnesium AZ alloys at low superheat using the Magnetic Suspension Melting (MSM) process have shown that the cast alloy exhibit a fine globular grain structure, and the grain size depend on the cooling rate. This paper describes a stochastic mesoscopic model for predicting the grain structure and segregation in cast alloys at low superheat. This model was applied to predict the globular solidification morphology and solute redistribution of Al in cast Mg AZ31B alloy at different cooling rates. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the observed grain structure and Al segregation. This makes the model a very useful tool for optimizing the solidification structure of cast magnesium alloys.

  8. Microstructural investigation of D2 tool steel during rapid solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delshad Khatibi, Pooya

    Solidification is considered as a key processing step in developing the microstructure of most metallic materials. It is, therefore, important that the solidification process can be designed and controlled in such a way so as to obtain the desirable properties in the final product. Rapid solidification refers to the system's high undercooling and high cooling rate, which can yield a microstructure with unique chemical composition and mechanical properties. An area of interest in rapid solidification application is high-chromium, high-carbon tool steels which experience considerable segregation of alloying elements during their solidification in a casting process. In this dissertation, the effect of rapid solidification (undercooling and cooling rate) of D2 tool steel on the microstructure and carbide precipitation during annealing was explored. A methodology is described to estimate the eutectic and primary phase undercooling of solidifying droplets. The estimate of primary phase undercooling was confirmed using an online measurement device that measured the radiation energy of the droplets. The results showed that with increasing primary phase and eutectic undercooling and higher cooling rate, the amount of supersaturation of alloying element in metastable retained austenite phase also increases. In the case of powders, the optimum hardness after heat treatment is achieved at different temperatures for constant periods of time. Higher supersaturation of austenite results in obtaining secondary hardness at higher annealing temperature. D2 steel ingots generated using spray deposition have high eutectic undercooling and, as a result, high supersaturation of alloying elements. This can yield near net shape D2 tool steel components with good mechanical properties (specifically hardness). The data developed in this work would assist in better understanding and development of near net shape D2 steel spray deposit products with good mechanical properties.

  9. Microstructural evolution during reheating of A356 machining chips at semisolid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Wen-qiang; Xiao, Wen-long; Yamagata, Hiroshi; Ma, Chao-li

    2017-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of A356 machining chips in the semisolid state was studied at different temperatures and holding times. The results showed that the elongated α-Al grains first recrystallized in the semisolid state and then became globular with a high shape factor (SF). Both the temperature and the holding time clearly affected the grain size and SF. When the heating temperature or holding time was increased, the grain size and SF gradually increased and finally became stable. Moreover, the Vickers hardness of primary α-Al grains gradually decreased with increasing heating temperature. The optimal slurry for semisolid processing, with a good combination of grain size and SF, was obtained when the chips were held at 600°C for 15 min. The semisolid slurry of A356 chips exhibited a lower coarsening rate of α-Al grains than those produced by most of the conventional semisolid processes. The coarsening coefficient was determined to be 436 μm3·s-1 on the basis of the linear Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) relationship.

  10. Fundamentals of rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Shiohara, Yuh

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate the continuous change that occurs in the solidification behavior of undercooled melts, as cooling rates increase from 0.0001 K/sec to about 1000 K/sec. At the higher cooling rates, more significant changes occur as the dendrite tip temperature begins to drop from the equilibrium liquidus. Discontinuous solidification behavior changes will occur if absolute stability is reached, or a metastable phase forms, or solidification proceeds to a glass rather than to a crystalline solid, or if there is significant undercooling prior to nucleation.

  11. Multiscale X-ray and Proton Imaging of Bismuth-Tin Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; Imhoff, S. D.; Morris, C. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.; Nedrow, P.; Mariam, F. G.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.-K.; Clarke, A. J.

    2014-08-01

    The formation of structural patterns during metallic solidification is complex and multiscale in nature, ranging from the nanometer scale, where solid-liquid interface properties are important, to the macroscale, where casting mold filling and intended heat transfer are crucial. X-ray and proton imaging can directly interrogate structure, solute, and fluid flow development in metals from the microscale to the macroscale. X-rays permit high spatio-temporal resolution imaging of microscopic solidification dynamics in thin metal sections. Similarly, high-energy protons permit imaging of mesoscopic and macroscopic solidification dynamics in large sample volumes. In this article, we highlight multiscale x-ray and proton imaging of bismuth-tin alloy solidification to illustrate dynamic measurement of crystal growth rates and solute segregation profiles that can be that can be acquired using these techniques.

  12. Application of Solidification Theory to Rapid Solidification Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    1879 (1982). E 7] W. J. Boettinger, R. J. Schaefer, F. Biancaniello, and D. Shechtman, Met. Trans. A ., to be published. E 8] W. J. Bettinger , S. R...solidification velocity which produce a special "banded" microstructure in Ag-Cu alloys. Related lower bound to theoretical limits on solidification...partitionless rapid solidifi- cation of NiAl-Cr quasibinary eutectic alloy rather than a disordered structure incorporating Ni and Al into Cr randomly

  13. The use of molten salts as physical models for the study of solidification in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Jurek K.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that molten salts possess attributes rendering them attractive as physical models of cast metals in solidification studies. Molten alkali halides have an approximately correct Prandtl number for this modeling of metallic melts, and are transparent to visible light. Attention is given to solidification in the LiCl-KCl system, in order to determine whether such phenomena as solute rejection can be observed and characterized through the application of laser schlieren imaging.

  14. Experimental investigation on in-situ microwave casting of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman Mishra, Radha; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2018-04-01

    The in-situ microwave casting of metallic materials is a recently developed casting process. The process works on the principles of hybrid microwave heating and is accomplished inside the applicator cavity. The process involves – melting of the charge, in-situ pouring and solidification of the melt. The electromagnetic and thermal properties of the charge affects microwave-material interaction and hence melting of the charge. On the other hand, cooling conditions inside the applicator controls solidification process. The present work reports on in-situ casting of copper developed inside a multimode cavity at 2.45 GHz using 1400 W. The molten metal was allowed to get poured in-situ inside a graphite mold and solidification was carried out in the same mold inside the applicator cavity. The interaction of microwave with the charge during exposure was studied and the role of oxide layer during meltingthe copper blocks has been presented. The developed in-situ cast was characterized to access the cast quality. Microstructural study revealed the homogeneous and dense structure of the cast. The X-ray diffraction pattern indicated presence of copper in different orientations with (1 1 1) as the dominant orientation. The average micro indentation hardness of the casts was found 93±20 HV.

  15. Direct chill casting of aluminium alloys under electromagnetic interaction by permanent magnet assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarevičs, Andris; Kaldre, Imants; Milgrāvis, Mikus; Beinerts, Toms

    2018-05-01

    Direct chill casting is one of the methods used in industry to obtain good microstructure and properties of aluminium alloys. Nevertheless, for some alloys grain structure is not optimal. In this study, we offer the use of electromagnetic interaction to modify melt convection near the solidification interface. Solidification under various electromagnetic interactions has been widely studied, but usually at low solidification velocity and high thermal gradient. This type of interaction may succeed fragmentation of dendrite arms and transport of solidification nuclei thus leading to improved material structure and properties. Realization of experimental small-scale crystallizer and electromagnetic system has been described in this article.

  16. Fabrication of Carbon Nanofibers/A356 Nanocomposites by High-Intensity Ultrasonic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Jie; Yan, Hong

    2018-06-01

    A356 alloy reinforced with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was fabricated by high-intensity ultrasonic vibration processing. The microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The distribution of CNFs became more and more uniform with the increase of ultrasonic power, and the mechanical properties of nanocomposites were significantly enhanced accordingly. The yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and microhardness of the nanocomposite increased by 38.3, 21.9, and 43.2 pct, respectively, at a CNF content of 0.9 wt pct compared with the matrix without CNF addition. The improvement in mechanical properties was the effect of CNFs on the thermal expansion mismatch strengthening of the nanocomposite, the grain refinement of the nanocomposite, and the load transfer from the matrix to the nanofibers.

  17. Fabrication of Carbon Nanofibers/A356 Nanocomposites by High-Intensity Ultrasonic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Jie; Yan, Hong

    2018-03-01

    A356 alloy reinforced with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was fabricated by high-intensity ultrasonic vibration processing. The microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The distribution of CNFs became more and more uniform with the increase of ultrasonic power, and the mechanical properties of nanocomposites were significantly enhanced accordingly. The yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and microhardness of the nanocomposite increased by 38.3, 21.9, and 43.2 pct, respectively, at a CNF content of 0.9 wt pct compared with the matrix without CNF addition. The improvement in mechanical properties was the effect of CNFs on the thermal expansion mismatch strengthening of the nanocomposite, the grain refinement of the nanocomposite, and the load transfer from the matrix to the nanofibers.

  18. Macrosegregation Resulting from Directional Solidification Through an Abrupt Change in Cross-Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, M.; Poirier, D. R.; Ghods, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Grugel, R. N.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations of the directional solidification of two hypoeutectic alloys (Al-7Si alloy and Al-19Cu) and resulting macrosegregation patterns are presented. The casting geometries include abrupt changes in cross-section from a larger width of 9.5 mm to a narrower 3.2 mm width then through an expansion back to a width of 9.5 mm. The alloys were chosen as model alloys because they have similar solidification shrinkages, but the effect of Cu on changing the density of the liquid alloy is about an order of magnitude greater than that of Si. The simulations compare well with experimental castings that were directionally solidified in a graphite mold in a Bridgman furnace. In addition to the simulations of the directional solidification in graphite molds, some simulations were effected for solidification in an alumina mold. This study showed that the mold must be included in numerical simulations of directional solidification because of its effect on the temperature field and solidification. For the model alloys used for the study, the simulations clearly show the interaction of the convection field with the solidifying alloys to produce a macrosegregation pattern known as "steepling" in sections with a uniform width. Details of the complex convection- and segregation-patterns at both the contraction and expansion of the cross-sectional area are revealed by the computer simulations. The convection and solidification through the expansions suggest a possible mechanism for the formation of stray grains. The computer simulations and the experimental castings have been part of on-going ground-based research with the goal of providing necessary background for eventual experiments aboard the ISS. For casting practitioners, the results of the simulations demonstrate that computer simulations should be applied to reveal interactions between alloy solidification properties, solidification conditions, and mold geometries on macrosegregation. The simulations also presents the

  19. A Review of Permanent Magnet Stirring During Metal Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing; Yang, Yindong; Mclean, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Rather than using conventional electromagnetic stirring (EMS) with three-phase alternating current, permanent magnet stirring (PMS), based on the use of sintered NdFeB material which has excellent magnetic characteristics, can be employed to generate a magnetic field for the stirring of liquid metal during solidification. Recent experience with steel casting indicates that PMS requires less than 20 pct of the total energy compared with EMS. Despite the excellent magnetic density properties and low power consumption, this relatively new technology has received comparatively little attention by the metal casting community. This paper reviews simulation modeling, experimental studies, and industrial trials of PMS conducted during recent years. With the development of magnetic simulation software, the magnetic field and associated flow patterns generated by PMS have been evaluated. Based on the results obtained from laboratory experiments, the effects of PMS on metal solidification structures and typical defects such as surface pinholes and center cavities are summarized. The significance of findings obtained from trials of PMS within the metals processing sector, including the continuous casting of steel, are discussed with the aim of providing an overview of the relevant parameters that are of importance for further development and industrial application of this innovative technology.

  20. Cold Cracking During Direct-Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, D. G.; Lalpoor, M.; Katgerman, L.

    Cold cracking phenomenon is the least studied, yet very important defect occurring during direct chill casting. The spontaneous nature of this defect makes its systematic study almost impossible, and the computer simulation of the thermomechanical behavior of the ingot during its cooling after the end of solidification requires constitutive parameters of high-strength aluminum alloys in the as-cast condition, which are not readily available. In this paper we describe constitutive behavior of high strength 7xxx series aluminum alloys in the as-cast condition based on experimentally measured tensile properties at different strain rates and temperatures, plane strain fracture toughness at different temperatures, and thermal contraction. In addition, fracture and structure of the specimens and real cold-cracked billets are examined. As a result a fracture-mechanics-based criterion of cold cracking is suggested based on the critical crack length, and is validated upon pilot-scale billet casting.

  1. Direct Cast U-6Nb – 2017 Progress on Cylindrical Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M.

    2017-10-04

    This report describes work to further develop a sound technical basis and best practices for mold design and process parameters for the Direct Casting of U-6wt%Nb components. One major challenge to the production of U-6Nb components is the propensity for niobium segregation during casting and solidification. This is especially true for cylindrical castings where the vertical side walls allow flotation of Nb resulting in severe inverse macrosegregation. In this work, a small (120 mm diameter by 180 mm tall) and large cylinder (250 mm diameter by 310 mm tall) are examined with a focus on reducing, or eliminating, niobium segregation.more » It is demonstrated that counter gravity casting (top-to-bottom solidification) can be used to minimize segregation in the small cylinder. Attempts to counter gravity cast the large cylinder were unsuccessful, in large part due to size limitations of the current furnace. A path forward for casting of the large cylinders is discussed.« less

  2. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes (ICASP - 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Gerhard; Ratke, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes was held in the Rolduc Abbey in the Netherlands a few kilometres away from Aachen. Around 200 scientists from 24 countries come in for the four day meeting. They found a stimulating but also relaxing environment and atmosphere, with beautiful weather and the medieval abbey inviting for walks, discussions, sitting outside and drinking a beer or wine. The contributions given at the conference reflected recent advances in various topics of solidification processes, ranging from fundamental aspects to applied casting technologies. In 20 oral sessions and a large poster session innovative results of segregation phenomena, microstructure evolution, nucleation and growth, phase formation, polyphase solidification, rapid solidification and welding, casting technology, thermophysics of molten alloys, solidification with forced melt flow and growth of single crystals and superalloys together with innovative diagnostic techniques were presented. Thereby, findings from experiments as well as from numerical modeling on different lengths scales were jointly discussed and contribute to new insight in solidification behaviour. The papers presented in this open access proceedings cover about half the oral and poster presentations given. They were carefully reviewed as in classical peer reviewed journals by two independent referees and most of them were revised and thus improved according to the reviewers comments. We think that this collection of papers presented at ICASP-3 gives an impression of the excellent contributions made. The papers embrace both the basic and applied aspects of solidification. We especially wish to express our appreciation for the team around Georg Schmitz and Margret Nienhaus organising this event and giving us their valued advice and support at every stage in preparing the conference. We also thank Lokasenna Lektorat for taking the task of checking all language-associated issues and

  3. Effects of Process Parameters on Solidification Structure of A390 Aluminum Alloy Hollow Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Kesheng; Zhang, Haitao; Qin, Ke; Cui, Jianzhong; Chen, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of process parameters on the solidification structure of A390 aluminum alloy hollow billets prepared by direct-chill casting were investigated. The decrease of casting temperature deteriorated the homogeneity and increased the size of primary Si particles in the hollow billet. Although the average size of primary Si particles was not obviously affected by the increase of casting speed, the thickness of Si-depleted layer at the inner wall increased with the higher casting speed. The tensile strength of A390 alloy is a function of the percentage of coarse Si particles (larger than 35 μm) and the average size of primary Si particles. Higher and more stable tensile strength can be received in the hollow billet with the casting temperature of 1050 K (777 °C), because the fine and uniformly distributed primary Si particles were obtained in the hollow billet.

  4. Rapid solidification of metallic particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to maximize the heat transfer coefficient the most important variable in rapid solidification is the powder particle size. The finer the particle size, the higher the solidification rate. Efforts to decrease the particle size diameter offer the greatest payoff in attained quench rate. The velocity of the liquid droplet in the atmosphere is the second most important variable. Unfortunately the choices of gas atmospheres are sharply limited both because of conductivity and cost. Nitrogen and argon stand out as the preferred gases, nitrogen where reactions are unimportant and argon where reaction with nitrogen may be important. In gas atomization, helium offers up to an order of magnitude increase in solidification rate over argon and nitrogen. By contrast, atomization in vacuum drops the quench rate several orders of magnitude.

  5. Deformation behaviour of Rheocast A356 Al alloy at microlevel considering approximated RVEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sk. Tanbir; Das, Prosenjit; Das, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    A micromechanical approach is considered here to predict the deformation behaviour of Rheocast A356 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy. Two representative volume elements (RVEs) are modelled in the finite element (FE) framework. Two dimensional approximated microstructures are generated assuming elliptic grains, based on the grain size, shape factor and area fraction of the primary Al phase of the said alloy at different processing condition. Plastic instability is shown using stress and strain distribution between the Al rich primary and Si rich eutectic phases under different boundary conditions. Boundary conditions are applied on the approximated RVEs in such a manner, so that they represent the real life situation depending on their position on a cylindrical tensile test sample. FE analysis is carried out using commercial finite element code ABAQUS without specifying any damage or failure criteria. Micro-level in-homogeneity leads to incompatible deformation between the constituent phases of the rheocast alloy and steers plastic strain localisation. Plastic stain localised regions within the RVEs are predicted as the favourable sites for void nucleation. Subsequent growth of nucleated voids leads to final failure of the materials under investigation.

  6. Formation of Hot Tear Under Controlled Solidification Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subroto, Tungky; Miroux, Alexis; Bouffier, Lionel; Josserond, Charles; Salvo, Luc; Suéry, Michel; Eskin, Dmitry G.; Katgerman, Laurens

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum alloy 7050 is known for its superior mechanical properties, and thus finds its application in aerospace industry. Vertical direct-chill (DC) casting process is typically employed for producing such an alloy. Despite its advantages, AA7050 is considered as a "hard-to-cast" alloy because of its propensity to cold cracking. This type of cracks occurs catastrophically and is difficult to predict. Previous research suggested that such a crack could be initiated by undeveloped hot tears (microscopic hot tear) formed during the DC casting process if they reach a certain critical size. However, validation of such a hypothesis has not been done yet. Therefore, a method to produce a hot tear with a controlled size is needed as part of the verification studies. In the current study, we demonstrate a method that has a potential to control the size of the created hot tear in a small-scale solidification process. We found that by changing two variables, cooling rate and displacement compensation rate, the size of the hot tear during solidification can be modified in a controlled way. An X-ray microtomography characterization technique is utilized to quantify the created hot tear. We suggest that feeding and strain rate during DC casting are more important compared with the exerted force on the sample for the formation of a hot tear. In addition, we show that there are four different domains of hot-tear development in the explored experimental window—compression, microscopic hot tear, macroscopic hot tear, and failure. The samples produced in the current study will be used for subsequent experiments that simulate cold-cracking conditions to confirm the earlier proposed model.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Cast Distortion in Gas Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Dubrovskaya, A. S.; Dongauser, K. A.; Trufanov, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper the process of multiple airfoilvanes manufacturing through investment casting is considered. The mathematical model of the full contact problem is built to determine stress strain state in a cast during the process of solidification. Studies are carried out in viscoelastoplastic statement. Numerical simulation of the explored process is implemented with ProCASTsoftware package. The results of simulation are compared with the real production process. By means of computer analysis the optimization of technical process parameters is done in order to eliminate the defect of cast walls thickness variation.

  8. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  9. On the origin of subgrain boundaries during conventional solidification of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, R.; Biermann, H.; Volkova, O.; Mola, J.

    2018-06-01

    The origin of subgrain formation during conventional casting and solidification of stainless steels was studied using two austenitic stainless steels with 0 and 4 mass-% Al. Whereas the Al-free alloy showed no subgrain formation, the Al-added alloy developed a high density of subgrains separated by low-angle grain boundaries. The occurrence of subgrains in the Al-added alloy was justified by its ferritic mode of solidification as predicted by thermodynamic calculations and confirmed by dynamic scanning calorimetry measurements. The subgrains might be a consequence of the plastic deformation of soft primary ferrite dendrites by the fluid flow and their subsequent inheritance by the austenite. Alternatively, they might have been induced during the austenite formation from delta ferrite, most likely via a peritectic reaction. The absence of subgrains in the Al-free alloy was justified by its austenitic mode of solidification.

  10. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  11. CASTING FURNACES

    DOEpatents

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  12. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  13. Evaluation of the microstructure, secondary dendrite arm spacing, and mechanical properties of Al-Si alloy castings made in sand and Fe-Cr slag molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Murthy, I.; Babu Rao, J.

    2017-07-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast A356 (Al-Si) alloy castings were investigated. A356 alloy was cast into three different molds composed of sand, ferrochrome (Fe-Cr) slag, and a mixture of sand and Fe-Cr. A sodium silicate-CO2 process was used to make the necessary molds. Cylindrical-shaped castings were prepared. Cast products with no porosity and a good surface finish were achieved in all of the molds. These castings were evaluated for their metallography, secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), and mechanical properties, including hardness, compression, tensile, and impact properties. Furthermore, the tensile and impact samples were analyzed by fractography. The results show that faster heat transfer in the Fe-Cr slag molds than in either the silica sand or mixed molds led to lower SDAS values with a refined microstructure in the products cast in Fe-Cr slag molds. Consistent and enhanced mechanical properties were observed in the slag mold products than in the castings obtained from either sand or mixed molds. The fracture surface of the slag mold castings shows a dimple fracture morphology with a transgranular fracture nature. However, the fracture surfaces of the sand mold castings display brittle fracture. In conclusion, products cast in Fe-Cr slag molds exhibit an improved surface finish and enhanced mechanical properties compared to those of products cast in sand and mixed molds.

  14. Application of Solidification Theory to Rapid Solidification Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    period were achieved in the following areas : Extended Solid Solubilities -- for Produetion of Alloys with New Compositions and Phases o At high growth... Areas where significant improvements In alloy properties can be produced by rapid solidification will be emphasized. Technical Problem and General...focussed on the science underlying areas where Improved materials can be obtained in order to provide such prediction and control. This work is both

  15. Eutectic Formation During Solidification of Ni-Based Single-Crystal Superalloys with Additional Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Ma, Dexin; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    γ/ γ' eutectics' nucleation behavior during the solidification of a single-crystal superalloy with additional carbon was investigated by using directional solidification quenching method. The results show that the nucleation of the γ/ γ' eutectics can directly occur on the existing γ dendrites, directly in the remaining liquid, or on the primary MC-type carbides. The γ/γ' eutectics formed through the latter two mechanisms have different crystal orientations than that of the γ matrix. This suggests that the conventional Ni-based single-crystal superalloy castings with additional carbon only guarantee the monocrystallinity of the γ matrix and some γ/ γ' eutectics and, in addition to the carbides, there are other misoriented polycrystalline microstructures existing in macroscopically considered "single-crystal" superalloy castings.

  16. Solidification and Microstructure of Ni-Containing Al-Si-Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li; Ren, Luyang; Geng, Xinyu; Hu, Henry; Nie, Xueyuan; Tjong, Jimi

    2018-01-01

    2 wt. % nickel (Ni) addition was introduced into a conventional cast aluminum alloy A380. The influence of transition alloying element nickel on the solidification behavior of cast aluminum alloy A380 was investigated via thermal analyses based on temperature measurements recorded on cooling curves. The corresponding first and second derivatives of the cooling curves were derived to reveal the details of phase changes during solidification. The nucleation of the primary α-Al phase and eutectic phases were analyzed. The microstructure analyses by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicate that different types and amount of eutectic phases are present in the tested two alloys. The introduction of Ni forms the complex Ni-containing intermetallic phases with Cu and Al.

  17. Low-Temperature Aging Characteristics of Type 316L Stainless Steel Welds: Dependence on Solidification Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2008-06-01

    Thermal aging embrittlement of light water reactor (LWR) components made of stainless steel cast has been recognized as a potential degradation issue, and careful attention has been paid to it. Although welds of austenitic stainless steels have γ-δ duplex microstructure, which is similar to that of the stainless steel cast, examination of the thermal aging characteristics of the stainless steel welds is very limited. In this investigation, two types of type 316L stainless steel weld metal with different solidification modes were prepared using two kinds of filler metals having tailored Ni equivalent and Cr equivalent. Differences between the two weld metals in the morphology of microstructure, in the composition of δ-ferrite, and in hardening behaviors with isothermal aging at 335 °C have been investigated. The hardness of the ferrite phase has increased with aging time, while the hardness of austenite phase has stayed the same. The mottled aspect has been observed in δ-ferrite of aged samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. These characteristics suggest that spinodal decomposition has occurred in δ-ferrite by aging at 335 °C. The age-hardening rate of δ-ferrite was faster for the primary austenite solidification mode (AF mode) sample than the primary ferrite solidification mode (FA mode) sample in the initial stage of the aging up to 2000 hours. It has been suggested that the solidification mode can affect the kinetics of spinodal decomposition.

  18. The Solidification Behavior of AA2618 Aluminum Alloy and the Influence of Cooling Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ming; Luo, Lei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2014-01-01

    In AA2618 aluminum alloy, the iron- and nickel-rich intermetallics formed during solidification are of great effect on the mechanical properties of the alloy at both room temperature and elevated temperatures. However, the solidification behavior of the alloy and the formation mechanism of the intermetallics during solidification of the alloy are not clear. This research fills the gap and contributes to understanding the intermetallic of the alloy. The results showed that cooling rate was of great influence on the formation of the intermetallics. Under the condition of slow cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy were complex with many coarse eutectic compounds including Al9FeNi, Al7(CuNi)5, Si, Al2Cu and Al2CuMg. The phase Al9FeNi was the dominant intermetallic compound, which precipitated at the earlier stage of the solidification by eutectic reaction L → α-Al + Al9FeNi. Increasing the cooling rate would suppress the formation of the coarse eutectic intermetallics. Under the condition of near-rapid cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy consisted of metastable intermetallics Al9FeNi and Al2Cu; the equilibrium eutectic compounds were suppressed. This research concluded that intermetallics could be refined to a great extent by near-rapid cooling. PMID:28788281

  19. Interfacial and capillary phenomena in solidification processing of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical and hydrodynamic aspects of wetting and interfacial phenomena during the solidification processing of metal-matrix composites are reviewed. Significant experimental results on fiber-matrix interactions and wetting under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions in composites of engineering interest have been compiled, based on a survey of the recent literature. Finally, certain aspects of wetting relevant to stir-casting and infiltration processing of composites are discussed.

  20. Numerical simulation and optimization of casting process for complex pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueqin; Dong, Anping; Wang, Donghong; Lu, Yanling; Zhu, Guoliang

    2017-09-01

    The complex shape of the casting pump body has large complicated structure and uniform wall thickness, which easy give rise to casting defects. The numerical simulation software ProCAST is used to simulate the initial top gating process, after analysis of the material and structure characteristics of the high-pressure pump. The filling process was overall smooth, not there the water shortage phenomenon. But the circular shrinkage defects appear at the bottom of casting during solidification process. Then, the casting parameters were optimized and adding cold iron in the bottom. The shrinkage weight was reduced from 0.00167g to 0.0005g. The porosity volume was reduced from 1.39cm3 to 0.41cm3. The optimization scheme is simulated and actual experimented. The defect has been significantly improved.

  1. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, John C.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  2. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  3. Modeling the surface contamination of dental titanium investment castings.

    PubMed

    Atwood, R C; Lee, P D; Curtis, R V

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a computational tool for assisting the design of titanium dental castings with minimal defects and to compare computational simulations with casting experiments. Modeling. An in-house cellular-automata solidification and finite-difference diffusion program was coupled with a commercial casting program and applied to (a) simple geometric wedge models and (b) a 3D-laser scan of a molar crown casting. Experimental. Wedges and molar crowns were hand-waxed and investment cast in commercial purity grade 1 (CP-1) titanium by a commercial dental laboratory. The castings were sectioned and analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and microhardness testing. In the wedge sample, contamination with impurities (Al, Si), including intermetallic precipitates, was found to extend to a depth ranging from 30 to 120 microm depending on the section thickness and hence the local cooling rate. Microstructural and mechanical (hardness) effects were found to a depth ranging from 80 to 250 microm. The coupled micro/macro model predictions showed reasonable agreement for the pattern of contamination. Dental and medical applications demand close dimensional tolerance and freedom from surface impurities and structural flaws in castings having unique shapes. The ability to predict the structural, mechanical, and chemical changes resulting from the casting process will help to design the casting and post-casting processes to minimize these problems.

  4. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  5. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  6. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  7. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  8. Technique Incorporating Cooling & Contraction / Expansion Analysis to Illustrate Shrinkage Tendency in Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, S.; Chisamera, M.; Riposan, I.; Neacsu, L.; Cojocaru, A. M.; Stan, I.

    2017-06-01

    With the more widespread adoption of thermal analysis testing, thermal analysis data have become an indicator of cast iron quality. The cooling curve and its first derivative display patterns that can be used to predict the characteristics of a cast iron. An experimental device was developed with a technique to simultaneously evaluate cooling curves and expansion or contraction of cast metals during solidification. Its application is illustrated with results on shrinkage tendency of ductile iron treated with FeSiMgRECa master alloy and inoculated with FeSi based alloys, as affected by mould rigidity (green sand and resin sand moulds). Undercooling at the end of solidification relative to the metastable (carbidic) equilibrium temperature and the expansion within the solidification sequence appear to have a strong influence on the susceptibility to macro - and micro - shrinkage in ductile iron castings. Green sand moulds, as less rigid moulds, encourage the formation of contraction defects, not only because of high initial expansion values, but also because of a higher cooling rate during solidification, and consequently, increased undercooling below the metastable equilibrium temperature up to the end of solidification.

  9. The solidification behavior of calcium oxide-aluminum oxide slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prapakorn, Kritsada

    The binary CaO-Al2O3 based slag and the ternary CaO-Al2O3-MgO based slag are common slags covering and inclusions that are found in calcium treated Al-killed, continuously cast steels. However, the effect of cooling conditions and chemistry on the solidification behavior of these slags is not well characterized. To better understand this phenomena, the solidification behavior of these slags was studied by using double hot thermocouple technique. TTT and CCT diagrams of these slags were determined to quantify the solidification behavior in both dry and humid atmospheres. In this work, these slag samples were easily undercooled and the solidification behavior of these slags was found to be a strong function of cooling conditions. The crystallization tendency of these slags follows the trends suggested by the phase diagram. In CaO-Al2O3 based slags, The eutectic composition (50%CaO) give the lowest crystallization tendency due to the lowest liquidus temperature. In a eutectic CaO-Al2O3 slag sample, dissolved water in the sample increases crystallization tendency and enhances the growth. It was also found that the crystalline phase that formed during cooling in both the dry and humid conditions is the mixture between 3CaO.Al2O 3 and CaO.Al2O3 phases. In CaO-Al2O3-MgO based slags, the crystallization tendency increases with MgO content because the high MgO content leads to the high liquidus temperature. The effect of dissolved of water on the crystallization of CaO-Al2O3-MgO based slags is not as prominent as in the eutectic CaO-Al2O3 slag. Thus, the addition of MgO to CaO-Al2O3 slags was seen to minimize or eliminate the effect of humidity on the solidification of CaO-Al2O3 based slags. In this work, Uhlmann's method was used to estimate the solid-liquid interfacial energy of CaO-Al2O3 based slag for the temperature between 1100--1250°C. The result is between 0.25--0.4 Joules/m 2.

  10. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  11. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are

  12. Solidification of a binary mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    The time dependent concentration and temperature profiles of a finite layer of a binary mixture are investigated during solidification. The coupled time dependent Stefan problem is solved numerically using an implicit finite differencing algorithm with the method of lines. Specifically, the temporal operator is approximated via an implicit finite difference operator resulting in a coupled set of ordinary differential equations for the spatial distribution of the temperature and concentration for each time. Since the resulting differential equations set form a boundary value problem with matching conditions at an unknown spatial point, the method of invariant imbedding is used for its solution.

  13. Stochastic modelling of microstructure formation in solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastac, Laurentiu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    1997-07-01

    To relax many of the assumptions used in continuum approaches, a general stochastic model has been developed. The stochastic model can be used not only for an accurate description of the fraction of solid evolution, and therefore accurate cooling curves, but also for simulation of microstructure formation in castings. The advantage of using the stochastic approach is to give a time- and space-dependent description of solidification processes. Time- and space-dependent processes can also be described by partial differential equations. Unlike a differential formulation which, in most cases, has to be transformed into a difference equation and solved numerically, the stochastic approach is essentially a direct numerical algorithm. The stochastic model is comprehensive, since the competition between various phases is considered. Furthermore, grain impingement is directly included through the structure of the model. In the present research, all grain morphologies are simulated with this procedure. The relevance of the stochastic approach is that the simulated microstructures can be directly compared with microstructures obtained from experiments. The computer becomes a `dynamic metallographic microscope'. A comparison between deterministic and stochastic approaches has been performed. An important objective of this research was to answer the following general questions: (1) `Would fully deterministic approaches continue to be useful in solidification modelling?' and (2) `Would stochastic algorithms be capable of entirely replacing purely deterministic models?'

  14. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kinds of Casts? Most casts are made of fiberglass. Fiberglass is a kind of plastic that can be ... to the body part. It dries hard. Some fiberglass casts are waterproof. Doctors only use this type ...

  15. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  16. Optimal design of solidification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal design algorithm is presented for the analysis of general solidification processes, and is demonstrated for the growth of GaAs crystals in a Bridgman furnace. The system is optimal in the sense that the prespecified temperature distribution in the solidifying materials is obtained to maximize product quality. The optimization uses traditional numerical programming techniques which require the evaluation of cost and constraint functions and their sensitivities. The finite element method is incorporated to analyze the crystal solidification problem, evaluate the cost and constraint functions, and compute the sensitivities. These techniques are demonstrated in the crystal growth application by determining an optimal furnace wall temperature distribution to obtain the desired temperature profile in the crystal, and hence to maximize the crystal's quality. Several numerical optimization algorithms are studied to determine the proper convergence criteria, effective 1-D search strategies, appropriate forms of the cost and constraint functions, etc. In particular, we incorporate the conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods for unconstrained problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of each algorithm is presented in the example problem.

  17. Measurement and simulation of deformation and stresses in steel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galles, D.; Monroe, C. A.; Beckermann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Experiments are conducted to measure displacements and forces during casting of a steel bar in a sand mold. In some experiments the bar is allowed to contract freely, while in others the bar is manually strained using embedded rods connected to a frame. Solidification and cooling of the experimental castings are simulated using a commercial code, and good agreement between measured and predicted temperatures is obtained. The deformations and stresses in the experiments are simulated using an elasto-viscoplastic finite-element model. The high temperature mechanical properties are estimated from data available in the literature. The mush is modeled using porous metal plasticity theory, where the coherency and coalescence solid fraction are taken into account. Good agreement is obtained between measured and predicted displacements and forces. The results shed considerable light on the modeling of stresses in steel casting and help in developing more accurate models for predicting hot tears and casting distortions.

  18. Casting Simulation of an Austrian Bronze Age Sword Hilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Annalisa; Mödlinger, Marianne; Piccardo, Paolo; Montesano, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    Bronze Age swords with a metal hilt can be considered the peak of Bronze Age casting technologies. To reconstruct the casting techniques used more than 3000 years ago, a metal hilted sword of the Schalenknauf type from Lower Austria was studied with the aid of macroscopic analyses and simulation of mold filling and casting solidification. A three-dimensional model of the hilt was created based on optical scanner measurements performed on a hilt recently discovered during archaeological excavations. Three different configurations of the gating system were considered, two on the pommel disk and one on the knob, and the effect of its location on the formation of casting defects was investigated. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to detect internal defects, such as gas and shrinkage porosity, which were then compared with those calculated by simulation. The best match between actual and predicted hilt quality demonstrated the location of the gating system, which turned out to be on the pommel disk.

  19. Progress on Numerical Modeling of the Dispersion of Ceramic Nanoparticles During Ultrasonic Processing and Solidification of Al-Based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojie; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2016-12-01

    In present study, 6061- and A356-based nano-composites are fabricated by using the ultrasonic stirring technology (UST) in a coreless induction furnace. SiC nanoparticles are used as the reinforcement. Nanoparticles are added into the molten metal and then dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming assisted by electromagnetic stirring. The applied UST parameters in the current experiments are used to validate a recently developed magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) model, which is capable of modeling the cavitation and nanoparticle dispersion during UST processing. The MHD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification, and electromagnetic field, as well as the complex interaction between the nanoparticles and both the molten and solidified alloys by using ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Fluent. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to analyze the complex interactions between the nanoparticle and the liquid/solid interface. The current modeling results demonstrate that a strong flow can disperse the nanoparticles relatively well during molten metal and solidification processes. MD simulation results prove that ultrafine particles (10 nm) will be engulfed by the solidification front instead of being pushed, which is beneficial for nano-dispersion.

  20. Effect of steady and time-harmonic magnetic fields on macrosegragation in alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Incropera, F.P.; Prescott, P.J.

    Buoyancy-induced convection during the solidification of alloys can contribute significantly to the redistribution of alloy constituents, thereby creating large composition gradients in the final ingot. Termed macrosegregation, the condition diminishes the quality of the casting and, in the extreme, may require that the casting be remelted. The deleterious effects of buoyancy-driven flows may be suppressed through application of an external magnetic field, and in this study the effects of both steady and time-harmonic fields have been considered. For a steady magnetic field, extremely large field strengths would be required to effectively dampen convection patterns that contribute to macrosegregation. However, bymore » reducing spatial variations in temperature and composition, turbulent mixing induced by a time-harmonic field reduces the number and severity of segregates in the final casting.« less

  1. The Relationship between Dendrite Arm Spacing and Cooling Rate of Al-Si Casting Alloys in High Pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae-Ik; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Se-Weon; Kang, Chang-Seog

    The effects of cooling rate on the solidification behavior of Al-8.5%Si-3%Cu and Al-11%Si-3%Cu alloys were studied during high pressure die casting (HPDC). The HPDC experiment was conducted by using the dies with 3 steps for 3 different cooling rates. Because of the high in both melt temperature and pressure, it was difficult to obtain the temperature profile directly from HPDC specimen. Therefore, in this study, cylindrical bar castings with different diameter were poured to acquire the cooling curves at the solidification range of 15°C/s up to 100°C/s and then the microstructures were compared to estimate the cooling rate in HPDC. The solidification characteristics including liquidus/solidus temperature and dendrite arm spacing of each alloy and each cooling rate was analyzed and the results showed strong proportional relationship between dendrite arm spacing and cooling rate in HPDC. The results were also compared with the actual die casting specimens and MAGMA simulation.

  2. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  3. Minimizing Segregation during the Controlled Directional Solidification of Dendric Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, Alex; Kim, Shin-Woo

    2003-01-01

    Gravity-driven convection induced in the liquid by density gradients of temperature or composition disrupts uniform dendritic growth during controlled directional solidification and promotes severe macrosegregation. The solute-rich region about the dendrite tip appears to play a pivotal role in channel initiation. Allen and Hunt referred to this region as an "initial transient" or dynamic region constituting steep concentration gradients. Experimental investigation also point to the role the tip region plays in developing microstructure. Hellawell and co-workers showed that flow-through dendritic channels could be effectively disrupted, and segregation minimized, during the gradient freezing of bulk castings by rotating the melt through a slight angle with respect to Earth's gravity vector. Adapting this principle to controlled directional solidification, it has been shown" that segregation in dendritic alloys can be minimized, and properties improved, by processing the sample near horizontal in conjunction with a slow axial rotation of the crucible. It is postulated that the observed microstructural uniformity arises by maintaining the developing solute field about the dendrite tip. Solute rejected during vertical directional solidification will rise or sink parallel to the primary dendrite arms during axial rotation setting the stage for accumulation, instabilities, and segregation. In contrast, during horizontal growth, the rejected solute will sink or rise perpendicular to the primary dendrite. Now, in the presence of a slight axial rotation, solute that was initially sinking (or rising) will find itself above (or below) its parent dendrite, i.e., still about the tip region. The following is intended to experimentally demonstrate the viability of this concept in coordination with a model that gives predictive insight regarding solute distribution about growing dendrites. Alloys based on the lead-tin eutectic system were used in this study. The system is well

  4. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  5. Experimental Procedure for Warm Spinning of Cast Aluminum Components.

    PubMed

    Roy, Matthew J; Maijer, Daan M

    2017-02-01

    High performance, cast aluminum automotive wheels are increasingly being incrementally formed via flow forming/metal spinning at elevated temperatures to improve material properties. With a wide array of processing parameters which can affect both the shape attained and resulting material properties, this type of processing is notoriously difficult to commission. A simplified, light-duty version of the process has been designed and implemented for full-size automotive wheels. The apparatus is intended to assist in understanding the deformation mechanisms and the material response to this type of processing. An experimental protocol has been developed to prepare for, and subsequently perform forming trials and is described for as-cast A356 wheel blanks. The thermal profile attained, along with instrumentation details are provided. Similitude with full-scale forming operations which impart significantly more deformation at faster rates is discussed.

  6. Experimental Procedure for Warm Spinning of Cast Aluminum Components

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Matthew J.; Maijer, Daan M.

    2017-01-01

    High performance, cast aluminum automotive wheels are increasingly being incrementally formed via flow forming/metal spinning at elevated temperatures to improve material properties. With a wide array of processing parameters which can affect both the shape attained and resulting material properties, this type of processing is notoriously difficult to commission. A simplified, light-duty version of the process has been designed and implemented for full-size automotive wheels. The apparatus is intended to assist in understanding the deformation mechanisms and the material response to this type of processing. An experimental protocol has been developed to prepare for, and subsequently perform forming trials and is described for as-cast A356 wheel blanks. The thermal profile attained, along with instrumentation details are provided. Similitude with full-scale forming operations which impart significantly more deformation at faster rates is discussed. PMID:28190063

  7. Investigation on the modification behavior of A356.2 alloy with Yb-La composite modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaochen; Leng, Jinfeng; Wang, Zhibin; Wang, Qi; Shao, Yuewen; Teng, Xinying

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an investigation was conducted to evaluate the influence of the Yb + La addition on the microstructures and mechanical properties of A356.2 alloy. The results show that the the grain size was refined and morphological structure of Si changed from needle-like to fine spheroidal particle by adding Yb + La. The eutectic temperature decreased from 589 °C to 581 °C and the freezing range of primary α-Al become wider after adding Yb + La. The mechanical properties showed great improvement after T6 heat treatment. The ultimate tensile strength and microhardness of the composites were increased to 279.0 MPa and 99.2 HB after T6 heat treatment which increased by 28.2% and 47.3%, respectively. The fracture mechanism was analyzed using the scanning electron microscopy and proved to be a transgranular/intergranular fracture modes.

  8. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wei, H L; Mazumder, J; DebRoy, T

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  9. Efficient estimation of diffusion during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeum, K. S.; Poirier, D. R.; Laxmanan, V.

    1989-01-01

    A very efficient finite difference method has been developed to estimate the solute redistribution during solidification with diffusion in the solid. This method is validated by comparing the computed results with the results of an analytical solution derived by Kobayashi (1988) for the assumptions of a constant diffusion coefficient, a constant equilibrium partition ratio, and a parabolic rate of the advancement of the solid/liquid interface. The flexibility of the method is demonstrated by applying it to the dendritic solidification of a Pb-15 wt pct Sn alloy, for which the equilibrium partition ratio and diffusion coefficient vary substantially during solidification. The fraction eutectic at the end of solidification is also obtained by estimating the fraction solid, in greater resolution, where the concentration of solute in the interdendritic liquid reaches the eutectic composition of the alloy.

  10. Solidification/Stabilization Use at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To provide interested stakeholders such as project managers, technology service providers, consulting engineers, site owners, and the general public with the most recent information about solidification/stabilization applications at Superfund sites...

  11. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  12. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS, SOLIDTECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Soliditech solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous waste materials in soils or sludges with pozzolanic material (cement, fly ash, or kiln dust), a proprietary additive called Urrichem, other proprietary additives, and water. The process is designed to aid ...

  13. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  14. Microstructure of ceramics fabricated by unidirectional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokubo, T.

    1984-01-01

    The unidirectional solidification methods are zone melting, crystal pulling, Bridgemen, and slow cooling. In order to obtain excellent properties (such as transparency), pores, voids and cracks must be avoided, and elimination of such defects is described.

  15. A Citizen's Guide to Solidification and Stabilization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide describes how solidification and stabilization refer to a group of cleanup methods that prevent or slow the release of harmful chemicals from wastes, such as contaminated soil, sediment, and sludge.

  16. Modeling of Microstructure Evolution During Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingfang; Pan, Shiyan; Sun, Dongke

    In recent years, considerable advances have been achieved in the numerical modeling of microstructure evolution during solidification. This paper presents the models based on the cellular automaton (CA) technique and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which can reproduce a wide variety of solidification microstructure features observed experimentally with an acceptable computational efficiency. The capabilities of the models are addressed by presenting representative examples encompassing a broad variety of issues, such as the evolution of dendritic structure and microsegregation in two and three dimensions, dendritic growth in the presence of convection, divorced eutectic solidification of spheroidal graphite irons, and gas porosity formation. The simulations offer insights into the underlying physics of microstructure formation during alloy solidification.

  17. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most tomore » the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.« less

  18. Modelling of the Thermo-Physical and Physical Properties for Solidification of Al-Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, N.; Li, X.; Miodownik, A. P.; Schillé, J.-P.

    The thermo-physical and physical properties of the liquid and solid phases are critical components in casting simulations. Such properties include the fraction solid transformed, enthalpy release, thermal conductivity, volume and density, all as a function of temperature. Due to the difficulty in experimentally determining such properties at solidification temperatures, little information exists for multi-component alloys. As part of the development of a new computer program for modelling of materials properties (JMatPro) extensive work has been carried out on the development of sound, physically based models for these properties. Wide ranging results will presented for Al-based alloys, which will include more detailed information concerning the density change of the liquid that intrinsically occurs during solidification due to its change in composition.

  19. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Wagner, I; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of this paper were to simulate the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges; to predict and control porosity defect. A casting simulation software, MAGMASOFT, was used. The geometry of the crowns with fine details of the occlusal surface were digitized by means of laser measuring technique, then converted and read in the simulation software. Both mold filling and solidification were simulated, the shrinkage porosity was predicted by a "feeding criterion", and the gas pore sensitivity was studied based on the mold filling and solidification simulations. Two types of dental prostheses (a single-crown casting and a three-unit-bridge) with various sprue designs were numerically "poured", and only one optimal design for each prosthesis was recommended for real casting trial. With the numerically optimized design, real titanium dental prostheses (five replicas for each) were made on a centrifugal casting machine. All the castings endured radiographic examination, and no porosity was detected in the cast prostheses. It indicates that the numerical simulation is an efficient tool for dental casting design and porosity control. Copyright 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  20. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Gershinsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    The generalized problem of determining the temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation was mathematically formulated. Realistic initial and boundary conditions were defined, and a computer program was developed and checked out. The programs computes the positions of two moving boundaries, evaporation and solidification, and their velocities. Temperature and solute concentration profiles in the semiinfinite material body at selected instances of time are also computed.

  1. Heat Treatment of Closed-Cell A356 + 4 wt.%Cu + 2 wt.%Ca Foam and Its Effect on the Foam Mechanical Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, S. M. H.; Vali, H.; Soltani, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this investigation, aluminum-silicon alloy foam is developed by adding certain amounts of copper and calcium elements in A356 alloy. Addition of 4 wt.%Cu + 2 wt.%Ca to the melt changed bubbles morphology from ellipsoid to spherical by decreasing Reynolds number and increasing Bond number. Compression behavior and energy absorption of the foams are assessed before and after aging. Solid solution treatment and aging lead to the best mechanical properties with 170% enhancement in yield strength and 185% improvement in energy absorption capacity as compared to non-heat-treated foams. The metallographic observations showed that bubbles geometry and structure in the A356 + 4wt.% Cu + 2 wt.%Ca foam are more homogeneous than the A356 foam.

  2. Experimental Studies of Heat-Transfer Behavior at a Casting/Water-Cooled-Mold Interface and Solution of the Heat-Transfer Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. D.; Wang, F.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we propose an experimental model for forming an air gap at the casting/mold interface during the solidification process of the casting, with the size and formation time of the air gap able to be precisely and manually controlled. Based on this model, experiments of gravity casting were performed, and on the basis of the measured temperatures at different locations inside the casting and the mold, the inverse analysis method of heat transfer was applied to solve for the heat-transfer coefficient at the casting/mold interface during the solidification process. Furthermore, the impacts of the width and formation time of the air gap on the interface heat-transfer coefficient (IHTC) were analyzed. The results indicate that the experimental model succeeds in forming an air gap having a certain width at any moment during solidification of the casting, thus allowing us to conveniently and accurately study the impact of the air gap on IHTC using the model. In addition, the casting/mold IHTC is found to first rapidly decrease as the air gap forms and then slowly decrease as the solidification process continues. Moreover, as the width of the air gap and the formation time of the air gap increase, the IHTC decreases.

  3. Secondary Waste Simulant Development for Cast Stone Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a waste form testing program to implement aspects of the Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Cast Stone Technology Development Plan (Ashley 2012) and the Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap (PNNL 2009) related to the development and qualification of Cast Stone as a potential waste form for the solidification of aqueous wastes from the Hanford Site after the aqueous wastes are treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The current baseline is that the resultant Cast Stone (or grout) solid waste forms would be disposed at the Integratedmore » Disposal Facility (IDF). Data and results of this testing program will be used in the upcoming performance assessment of the IDF and in the design and operation of a solidification treatment unit planned to be added to the ETF. The purpose of the work described in this report is to 1) develop simulants for the waste streams that are currently being fed and future WTP secondary waste streams also to be fed into the ETF and 2) prepare simulants to use for preparation of grout or Cast Stone solid waste forms for testing.« less

  4. Wear mechanisms in hybrid composites of Graphite-20 Pct SiC in A356 Aluminum Alloy (Al-7 Pct Si-0.3 Pct Mg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, W.; Alpas, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    The wear behavior of A356 aluminum alloy (Al-7 Pct Si-0.3 Pct Mg) matrix composites reinforced with 20 vol Pct SiC particles and 3 or 10 vol Pct graphite was investigated. These hybrid composites represent the merging of two philosophies in tribological material design: soft-particle lubrication by graphite and hard-particle reinforcement by carbide particles. The wear tests were performed using a block-on-ring (SAE 52100 steel) wear machine under dry sliding conditions within a load range of 1 to 441 N. The microstructural and compositional changes that took place during wear were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXA), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The wear resistance of 3 Pct graphite-20 Pct SiC-A356 hybrid composite was comparable to 20 Pct SiC-A356 without graphite at low and medium loads. At loads below 20 N, both hybrid and 20 Pct SiC-A356 composites without graphite demonstrated wear rates up to 10 times lower than the unreinforced A356 alloy due to the load-carrying capacity of SiC particles. The wear resistance of 3 Pct graphite 20 Pct SiC-A356 was 1 to 2 times higher than 10 Pct graphite-containing hybrid composites at high loads. However, graphite addition reduced the counterface wear. The unreinforced A356 and 20 Pct SiC-A356 showed a transition from mild to severe wear at 95 N and 225 N, respectively. Hybrid composites with 3 Pct and 10 Pct graphite did not show such a transition over the entire load range, indicating that graphite improved the seizure resistance of the composites. Tribolayers, mainly consisting of a compacted mixture of graphite, iron oxides, and aluminum, were generated on the surfaces of the hybrid composites. In the hybrid composites, the elimination of the severe wear (and hence the improvement in seizure resistance) was attributed to the reduction in friction-induced surface heating due to the presence of graphite- and iron

  5. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  6. Macrosegregation in aluminum alloy ingot cast by the semicontinuous direct chill method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, H.; Granger, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of the semicontinuous DC casting method is developed to predict the positive segregation observed at the subsurface and the negative segregation commonly found at the center of large commercial-size aluminum alloy ingot. Qualitative analysis of commercial-size aluminum alloy semicontinuous cast direct chill (DC) ingot is carried out. In the analysis, both positive segregation in the ingot subsurface and negative segregation at the center of the ingot are examined. Ingot subsurface macrosegregation is investigated by considering steady state casting of a circular cross-section binary alloy ingot. Nonequilibrium solidification is assumed with no solid diffusion, constant equilibrium partition ratio, and constant solid density.

  7. Development of an Optimization Methodology for the Aluminum Alloy Wheel Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianglan; Reilly, Carl; Maijer, Daan M.; Cockcroft, Steve L.; Phillion, Andre B.

    2015-08-01

    An optimization methodology has been developed for the aluminum alloy wheel casting process. The methodology is focused on improving the timing of cooling processes in a die to achieve improved casting quality. This methodology utilizes (1) a casting process model, which was developed within the commercial finite element package, ABAQUS™—ABAQUS is a trademark of Dassault Systèms; (2) a Python-based results extraction procedure; and (3) a numerical optimization module from the open-source Python library, Scipy. To achieve optimal casting quality, a set of constraints have been defined to ensure directional solidification, and an objective function, based on the solidification cooling rates, has been defined to either maximize, or target a specific, cooling rate. The methodology has been applied to a series of casting and die geometries with different cooling system configurations, including a 2-D axisymmetric wheel and die assembly generated from a full-scale prototype wheel. The results show that, with properly defined constraint and objective functions, solidification conditions can be improved and optimal cooling conditions can be achieved leading to process productivity and product quality improvements.

  8. Hot cracking during welding and casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoping

    Aluminum welds are susceptible to liquation cracking in the partially melted zone (PMZ). Using the multicomponent Scheil model, curves of temperature vs. fraction solid (T-fS) during solidification were calculated for the PMZ and weld metals (WMs). These curves were used to predict the crack susceptibility by checking if the harmful condition of WM fS > PMZ fS exists during PMZ solidification and reduce the susceptibility by minimizing this condition. This approach was tested against full-penetration welds of alloys 7075 and 2024 and it can be used to guide the selection or development of filler metals. Liquation cracking in the PMZ in welds of Al-Si cast alloys was also investigated. The crack susceptibility was evaluated by circular-patch test, and full-penetration welds made with filler metals 1100, 4043, 4047 and 5356. Liquation cracking was significant with filler metals 1100 and 5356 but slight with filler metals 4043 and 4047. In all welds, liquation cracks were completely backfilled, instead of open as in full-penetration welds of wrought alloys 2219 and 6061. The T-fS curves showed that alloy A357 has a much higher fraction liquid for backfilling before PMZ solidification was essentially over. Hot tearing in Mg-xAl-yCa alloys was studied by constrained rod casting (CRC) in a steel mold. The hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Ca content (y) but did not change much with the Al content (x). An instrumented CRC with a steel mold was developed to detect the onset of hot tearing. The secondary phases, eutectic content, solidification path, and freezing range were examined. Hot tearing in Mg-Al-Sr alloys was also studied by CRC in a steel mold. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-1.5Sr alloys, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Al content. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-3Sr alloys, the trend was similar but not as significant. At the same Al content, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Sr

  9. Liquid-liquid phase separation and solidification behavior of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic alloy with different cooling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Lin; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Lin; Wu, Di; Zuo, Min; Zhao, Degang

    2018-03-01

    The cooling rate has a significant effect on the solidification behavior and microstructure of monotectic alloy. In this study, different cooling rate was designed through casting in the copper mold with different bore diameters. The effects of different cooling rate on the solidification behavior of Al55Bi36Cu9 (at.%) immiscible alloy have been investigated. The liquid-liquid phase separation of Al55Bi36Cu9 immiscible alloy melt was investigated by resistivity test. The solidification microstructure and phase analysis of Al55Bi36Cu9 immiscible alloy were performed by the SEM and XRD, respectively. The results showed that the liquid-liquid phase separation occurred in the solidification of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic melt from 917 °C to 653 °C. The monotectic temperature, liquid phase separation temperature and immiscibility zone of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic alloy was lower than those of Al-Bi binary monotectic alloy. The solidification morphology of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic alloy was very sensitive to the cooling rate. The Al/Bi core-shell structure formed when Al55Bi36Cu9 melt was cast in the copper mold with a 8 mm bore diameter.

  10. Interactions between solidification and compositional convection in mushy layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae

    1994-01-01

    Mushy layers are ubiquitous during the solidification of alloys. They are regions of mixed phase wherein solid crystals are bathed in the melt from which they grew. The matrix of crystals forms a porous medium through which the melt can flow, driven either by external forces or by its own buoyancy in a gravitational field. Buoyancy-driven convection of the melt depends both on temperature gradients, which are necessary for solidification, and on compositional gradients, which are generated as certain components of the alloy are preferentially incorporated in the solid phase and the remaining components are expelled into the melt. In fully liquid regions, the combined action of temperature and concentration on the density of the liquid can cause various forms of double-diffusive convection. However, in the interior of mushy regions the temperature and concentration are thermodynamically coupled so only single-diffusive convection can occur. Typically, the effect of composition on the buoyancy of the melt is much greater than the effect of temperature, and thus convection in mushy layers in driven primarily by the computational gradients within them. The rising interstitial liquid is relatively dilute, having come from colder regions of the mushy layer, where the liquidus concentration is lower, and can dissolve the crystal matrix through which it flows. This is the fundamental process by which chimneys are formed. It is a nonlinear process that requires the convective velocities to be sufficiently large, so fully fledged chimneys (narrow channels) might be avoided by means that weaken the flow. Better still would be to prevent convection altogether, since even weak convection will cause lateral, compositional inhomogeneities in castings. This report outlines three studies that examine the onset of convection within mushy layers.

  11. Mechanical properties of aluminium fused SiO2 particulate composites cast using metallic and non-metallic chills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshith, H. S.; Hemanth, Joel

    2018-04-01

    This research work aims at developing and mechanical characterization of aluminium (LM13) based metal matrix composite reinforced with varying percentage of fused SiO2 (3%,6%,9%,12%). The mechanical properties are completely dependent on the microstructural parameters of the system. Also the microstructure further depends on the cooling rates during solidification process. Various Chills like Silicon carbide, Mild steel, Copper were used during the casting process to increase the rate of solidification, which enhances the mechanical properties of the composite. The chill casted specimens were subjected to tensile and hardness tests followed by microstructure studies. A casting produced using mild steel chill exhibited higher young's modulus and was found to be maximum at 9% reinforcement. Finer microstructure and better UTS were seen for specimen's casted using copper chills, whereas silicon carbide and mild steel chills gave rise to very coarse structure with reduced UTS values compared to copper chills.

  12. Prediction of as-cast grain size of inoculated aluminum alloys melt solidified under non-isothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qiang; Li, Yanjun

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a multi-scale as-cast grain size prediction model is proposed to predict as-cast grain size of inoculated aluminum alloys melt solidified under non-isothermal condition, i.e., the existence of temperature gradient. Given melt composition, inoculation and heat extraction boundary conditions, the model is able to predict maximum nucleation undercooling, cooling curve, primary phase solidification path and final as-cast grain size of binary alloys. The proposed model has been applied to two Al-Mg alloys, and comparison with laboratory and industrial solidification experimental results have been carried out. The preliminary conclusion is that the proposed model is a promising suitable microscopic model used within the multi-scale casting simulation modelling framework.

  13. Ageless Aluminum-Cerium-Based Alloys in High-Volume Die Casting for Improved Energy Efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Stromme, Eric T.; Henderson, Hunter B.; Sims, Zachary C.; ...

    2018-04-25

    Strong chemical reactions between Al and Ce lead to the formation of intermetallics with exceptional thermal stability. The rapid formation of intermetallics directly from the liquid phase during solidification of Al-Ce alloys leads to an ultrafine microconstituent structure that effectively strengthens as-cast alloys without further microstructural optimization via thermal processing. Die casting is a high-volume manufacturing technology that accounts for greater than 40% of all cast Al products, whereas Ce is highly overproduced as a waste product of other rare earth element (REE) mining. Reducing heat treatments would stimulate significant improvements in manufacturing energy efficiency, exceeding (megatonnes/year) per large-scale heat-treatmentmore » line. In this study, multiple compositions were evaluated with wedge mold castings to test the sensitivity of alloys to the variable solidification rate inherent in high-pressure die casting. Once a suitable composition was determined, it was successfully demonstrated at 800 lbs/h in a 600-ton die caster, after which the as-die cast parts performed similarly to ubiquitous A380 in the same geometry without requiring heat treatment. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the compatibility of Al REE alloys with high-volume die-casting applications with minimal heat treatments.« less

  14. Ageless Aluminum-Cerium-Based Alloys in High-Volume Die Casting for Improved Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromme, Eric T.; Henderson, Hunter B.; Sims, Zachary C.; Kesler, Michael S.; Weiss, David; Ott, Ryan T.; Meng, Fanqiang; Kassoumeh, Sam; Evangelista, James; Begley, Gerald; Rios, Orlando

    2018-06-01

    Strong chemical reactions between Al and Ce lead to the formation of intermetallics with exceptional thermal stability. The rapid formation of intermetallics directly from the liquid phase during solidification of Al-Ce alloys leads to an ultrafine microconstituent structure that effectively strengthens as-cast alloys without further microstructural optimization via thermal processing. Die casting is a high-volume manufacturing technology that accounts for greater than 40% of all cast Al products, whereas Ce is highly overproduced as a waste product of other rare earth element (REE) mining. Reducing heat treatments would stimulate significant improvements in manufacturing energy efficiency, exceeding (megatonnes/year) per large-scale heat-treatment line. In this study, multiple compositions were evaluated with wedge mold castings to test the sensitivity of alloys to the variable solidification rate inherent in high-pressure die casting. Once a suitable composition was determined, it was successfully demonstrated at 800 lbs/h in a 600-ton die caster, after which the as-die cast parts performed similarly to ubiquitous A380 in the same geometry without requiring heat treatment. This work demonstrates the compatibility of Al REE alloys with high-volume die-casting applications with minimal heat treatments.

  15. Ageless Aluminum-Cerium-Based Alloys in High-Volume Die Casting for Improved Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromme, Eric T.; Henderson, Hunter B.; Sims, Zachary C.; Kesler, Michael S.; Weiss, David; Ott, Ryan T.; Meng, Fanqiang; Kassoumeh, Sam; Evangelista, James; Begley, Gerald; Rios, Orlando

    2018-04-01

    Strong chemical reactions between Al and Ce lead to the formation of intermetallics with exceptional thermal stability. The rapid formation of intermetallics directly from the liquid phase during solidification of Al-Ce alloys leads to an ultrafine microconstituent structure that effectively strengthens as-cast alloys without further microstructural optimization via thermal processing. Die casting is a high-volume manufacturing technology that accounts for greater than 40% of all cast Al products, whereas Ce is highly overproduced as a waste product of other rare earth element (REE) mining. Reducing heat treatments would stimulate significant improvements in manufacturing energy efficiency, exceeding (megatonnes/year) per large-scale heat-treatment line. In this study, multiple compositions were evaluated with wedge mold castings to test the sensitivity of alloys to the variable solidification rate inherent in high-pressure die casting. Once a suitable composition was determined, it was successfully demonstrated at 800 lbs/h in a 600-ton die caster, after which the as-die cast parts performed similarly to ubiquitous A380 in the same geometry without requiring heat treatment. This work demonstrates the compatibility of Al REE alloys with high-volume die-casting applications with minimal heat treatments.

  16. Development of the Electromagnetic Continuous Casting Technology for of Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Pyo; Kim, Myoung-Gyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Gyu-Chang

    Currently, magnesium billets produced by ingot casting or direct chill casting process, result in low-quality surfaces and low productivity, Continuous casting technology to solve these problem has not only high-quality surface billets with fine-grained and homogeneous microstructure but also cost down. The latent heat of fusion per weight (J/g) of magnesium is similar to other metals, however, considering the heat emitted to the mold surface during continuous casting in meniscus region and converting it to the latent heat of fusion per volume, magnesium will be rapidly solidified in the mold during continuous casting, which induces subsequent surface defect formation. In this study, electromagnetic casting and stirring (EMC and EMS) techniques are proposed to control solidification process conveniently by compensating the low latent heat of solidification by volume and to fabricate magnesium billet with high-quality surface. This technique was extended to large scale billets up to 300 mm diameter and continuous casting was successfully conducted. Then magnesium billet was used for the fabrication of prototype automobile pulley.

  17. Ageless Aluminum-Cerium-Based Alloys in High-Volume Die Casting for Improved Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Stromme, Eric T.; Henderson, Hunter B.; Sims, Zachary C.

    Strong chemical reactions between Al and Ce lead to the formation of intermetallics with exceptional thermal stability. The rapid formation of intermetallics directly from the liquid phase during solidification of Al-Ce alloys leads to an ultrafine microconstituent structure that effectively strengthens as-cast alloys without further microstructural optimization via thermal processing. Die casting is a high-volume manufacturing technology that accounts for greater than 40% of all cast Al products, whereas Ce is highly overproduced as a waste product of other rare earth element (REE) mining. Reducing heat treatments would stimulate significant improvements in manufacturing energy efficiency, exceeding (megatonnes/year) per large-scale heat-treatmentmore » line. In this study, multiple compositions were evaluated with wedge mold castings to test the sensitivity of alloys to the variable solidification rate inherent in high-pressure die casting. Once a suitable composition was determined, it was successfully demonstrated at 800 lbs/h in a 600-ton die caster, after which the as-die cast parts performed similarly to ubiquitous A380 in the same geometry without requiring heat treatment. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the compatibility of Al REE alloys with high-volume die-casting applications with minimal heat treatments.« less

  18. Die Soldering in Aluminium Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Kenik, E.A.; Viswanathan, S.

    2000-03-15

    Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-richmore » phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs. conditions, an aluminum-rich soldering layer may also form over the intermetallic layer. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted on the nature of these intermetallics, little is known about the conditions under which soldering occurs.« less

  19. Convection and Solidification with Applications to Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVahl Davis, Graham

    1994-01-01

    An outline is given of research on the directional solidification of a liquid, and of the effects of natural convection thereon. Three problems which have been studied are described. Finally, current work on solidification in microgravity conditions is discussed.

  20. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  1. Enthalpies of a binary alloy during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Nandapurkar, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a method of calculating the enthalpy of a dendritic alloy during solidification. The enthalpies of the dendritic solid and interdendritic liquid of alloys of the Pb-Sn system are evaluated, but the method could be applied to other binaries, as well. The enthalpies are consistent with a recent evaluation of the thermodynamics of Pb-Sn alloys and with the redistribution of solute in the same during dendritic solidification. Because of the heat of mixing in Pb-Sn alloys, the interdendritic liquid of hypoeutectic alloys (Pb-rich) of less than 50 wt pct Sn has enthalpies that increase as temperature decreases during solidification.

  2. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  3. Novel Directional Solidification Processing of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity driven separation precludes uniform microstructural development during controlled directional solidification (DS) processing of hypermonotectic alloys. It is well established that liquid/liquid suspensions, in which the respective components are immiscible and have significant density differences, can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. A historical introduction to this work is presented with the intent of establishing the basis for applying the phenomena to promote microstructural uniformity during controlled directional solidification processing of immiscible mixtures. Experimental work based on transparent organics, as well as salt systems, will be presented in view of the processing parameters.

  4. Absence of solute drag in solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittl, J. A.; Aziz, M. J.; Brunco, D. P.; Thompson, M. O.

    1994-05-01

    The interface response functions for alloy solidification were measured in the nondegenerate regime of partial solute trapping. We used a new technique to measure temperatures and velocities simultaneously during rapid solidification of Si-As alloys induced by pulsed laser melting. In addition, partition coefficients were determined using Rutherford backscattering. The results are in good agreement with predictions of the Continuous Growth Model without solute drag of M. J. Aziz and T. Kaplan [Acta Metall. 36, 1335 (1988)] and are inconsistent with all solute drag models.

  5. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thangirala, Mani

    which demonstrated the importance of proper heat treat cycles for Homogenization, and Solutionizing parameters selection and implementation. 3) Step blocks casting of Nimonic 263: Carried out casting solidification simulation analysis, NDT inspection methods evaluation, detailed test matrix for Chemical, Tensile, LCF, stress rupture, CVN impact, hardness and J1C Fracture toughness section sensitivity data and were reported. 4) Centrifugal Casting of Haynes 282, weighing 1400 lbs. with hybrid mold (half Graphite and half Chromite sand) mold assembly was cast using compressor casing production tooling. This test provided Mold cooling rates influence on centrifugally cast microstructure and mechanical properties. Graphite mold section out performs sand mold across all temperatures for 0.2% YS; %Elongation, %RA, UTS at 1400°F. Both Stress-LMP and conditional Fracture toughness plots data were in the scatter band of the wrought alloy. 5) Fundamental Studies on Cooling rates and SDAS test program. Evaluated the influence of 6 mold materials Silica, Chromite, Alumina, Silica with Indirect Chills, Zircon and Graphite on casting solidification cooling rates. Actual Casting cooling rates through Liquidus to Solidus phase transition were measured with 3 different locations based thermocouples placed in each mold. Compared with solidification simulation cooling rates and measurement of SDAS, microstructure features were reported. The test results provided engineered casting potential methods, applicable for heavy section Haynes 282 castings for optimal properties, with foundry process methods and tools. 6) Large casting of Haynes 282 Drawings and Engineering FEM models and supplemental requirements with applicable specifications were provided to suppliers for the steam turbine proto type feature valve casing casting. Molding, melting and casting pouring completed per approved Manufacturing Process Plan during 2014 Q4. The partial valve casing was successfully cast after casting

  6. Modeling and simulation of clutch pressure plate casting using alternate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhuraj, H. N.; Bharath, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    Clutch Pressure Plate is a stress bearing component in the clutch assembly. Cast iron alloys like FG300, G2500 are commonly used for clutch pressure plate castings. These materials have high compressive strength, low tensile strength & no ductility but these cost high for the manufacturers. There is a need for alternate material so as to reduce cost, defects in castings without losing the life and effectiveness of the clutch plate. The work carried out here is modeling the clutch pressure plate using CAD tool. And then the casting process is simulated by casting simulation for fluid flow and solidification analysis by trying alternate material. Here the castability of the alternate material En-Gjs-400-15 and the commonly used material FG300 for the clutch pressure plate component is analyzed by designing and optimizing a proper gating system.

  7. Simulation Computation of 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ruipeng; Li, Changrong; Wang, Fuming; Hu, Lifu

    The solidification structure of 430 ferritic stainless steel has been calculated in the solidification process by using 3D-CAFE model under the condition of water cooling. The calculated results consistent with those obtained from experiment. Under watercooling condition, the solidification structure consists of chilled layer, columnar grain zone, transition zone and equiaxed grain zone.

  8. Mechanism of Macrosegregation Formation in Continuous Casting Slab: A Numerical Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dongbin; Wang, Weiling; Luo, Sen; Ji, Cheng; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-12-01

    Solidified shell bulging is supposed to be the main reason for slab center segregation, while the influence of thermal shrinkage rarely has been considered. In this article, a thermal shrinkage model coupled with the multiphase solidification model is developed to investigate the effect of the thermal shrinkage, solidification shrinkage, grain sedimentation, and thermal flow on solute transport in the continuous casting slab. In this model, the initial equiaxed grains contract freely with the temperature decrease, while the coherent equiaxed grains and columnar phase move directionally toward the slab surface. The results demonstrate that the center positive segregation accompanied by negative segregation in the periphery zone is mainly caused by thermal shrinkage. During the solidification process, liquid phase first transports toward the slab surface to compensate for thermal shrinkage, which is similar to the case considering solidification shrinkage, and then it moves opposite to the slab center near the solidification end. It is attributed to the sharp decrease of center temperature and the intensive contract of solid phase, which cause the enriched liquid to be squeezed out. With the effect of grain sedimentation and thermal flow, the negative segregation at the external arc side (zone A1) and the positive segregation near the columnar-to-equiaxed transition at the inner arc side (position B1) come into being. Besides, it is found that the grain sedimentation and thermal flow only influence solute transport before equiaxed grains impinge with each other, while the solidification and thermal shrinkage still affect solute redistribution in the later stage.

  9. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang

    2002-07-30

    must remain open until the casting is solidified and pressure is maintained on the solidifying casting. Fanned gates, particularly on the smaller section castings avoid jetting effects at the ingate end. The fan type ingate helps accomplish a rapid fill without high velocities. The molten metal has to fill the cavity before localized solidification occurs. This is best accomplished with a larger ingate to attain rapid filling without excessive velocity or jetting that occurs at high metal velocities. Straight gates are prone to case jetting of the metal stream even a low velocities. Fanned gates allow use of higher fill velocity without excessive jetting. A higher metal pressure provides a more complete fill of the die including improved compensation for solidification shrinkage. With the proper filling pattern, ingates, overflows and die temperature for a given die, very good tensile properties can be attained in squeeze casting. In general, the smaller squeeze castings require higher die temperatures. Computer models using the UES Procast and MagmaSoft finite element software can, after suitable adjustments, predict the flow pattern in the die cavity.« less

  10. Triple Plate Mold Final Report: Optimization of the Mold Design and Casting Parameters for a Thin U-10mo Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M.

    This work describes the experiments and modeling that have been performed to improve and try to optimize the simultaneous casting of three plates of U-10wt%Mo in a single coil vacuum induction melting (VIM) furnace. The plates of interest are 280 mm wide by 203 mm tall by 5 mm thick (11" x 8" x 0.2"). The initial mold design and processing parameters were supplied by Y-12. The mold and casting cavity were instrumented with a number of thermocouples, and the casting performed to determine the thermal history of the mold and casting. The resulting cast plates were radiographed and numerousmore » defects identified. Metallography was performed to help identify the nature of the radiographically observed defects. This information was then used to validate a mold filling and solidification model of that casting. Based on the initial casting, good casting design practice, and process simulation of several design alternatives, a revised design was developed with the goal of minimizing casting defects such as porosity. The redesigned mold had a larger hot-top and had its long axis along the horizontal direction. These changes were to try to develop a strong thermal gradient conducive to good feeding and minimization of micro- and macroporosity in the cast plates. An instrumented casting was then performed with the revised mold design and a linear distributor. This design yielded cast plates with significantly less radiographically identified defects. Unfortunately, there was significant variation in plate weight and metal content in their hot-tops. Fluid flow simulations were then performed on this mold/distributor design. This helped identify the issue with this linear distributor design. Additional simulations were then performed on candidate distributor redesigns and a preferred distributor annular design was identified. This improved annular design was used to produce a third instrumented casting with favorable results. These refined designs and their radiographic

  11. Numerical study of coupled turbulent flow and solidification for steel slab casters

    SciTech Connect

    Aboutalebi, M.R.; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R.I.L.

    1995-09-01

    A two-dimensional numerical modeling study was undertaken to account for coupled turbulent flow and heat transfer with solidification in the mold and submold regions of a steel slab coaster. Liquid steel is introduced into a water-cooled mold through a bifurcated submerged entry nozzle. Turbulence phenomena in the melt pool of the caster were accounted for, using a modified version of the low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model of Launder and Sharma. The mushy region solidification, in the presence of turbulence, was taken into account by modifying the standard enthalpy-porosity technique, which is presently popular for modeling solidification problems. Thermocapillary and buoyancy effectsmore » have been considered in this model to evaluate the influences of the liquid surface tension gradient at the meniscus surface, and natural convection on flow patterns in the liquid pool. Parametric studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of typical variables, such as inlet superheat and casting speed, on the fluid flow and heat transfer results. The numerical predictions were compared with available experimental data.« less

  12. Successful Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) Proves Current Theories of Dendritic Solidification are Flawed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The scientific objective of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is to test fundamental assumptions about dendritic solidification of molten materials. "Dendrites"-- from the ancient Greek word for tree--are tiny branching structures that form inside molten metal alloys when they solidify during manufacturing. The size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites have a major effect on the strength, ductility (ability to be molded or shaped), and usefulness of an alloy. Nearly all of the cast metal alloys used in everyday products (such as automobiles and airplanes) are composed of thousands to millions of tiny dendrites. Gravity, present on Earth, causes convection currents in molten alloys that disturb dendritic solidification and make its precise study impossible. In space, gravity is negated by the orbiting of the space shuttle. Consequently, IDGE (which was conducted on the space shuttle) gathered the first precise data regarding undisturbed dendritic solidification. IDGE is a microgravity materials science experiment that uses an apparatus which was designed, built, tested, and operated by people from the NASA Lewis Research Center. This experiment was conceived by the principal investigator, Professor Martin E. Glicksman, from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. The experiment was a team effort of Lewis civil servants, contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication Inc. (ADF), and personnel at Rensselaer.

  13. Microstructural and mechanical evolutions during the forging step of the COBAPRESS, a casting/forging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Desrayaud, Christophe; Bouvier, Véronique

    Aluminum casting/forging processes are used to produce parts for the automotive industry. In this study, we examined the influence of the forging step on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of an A356 aluminum alloy modified with strontium. Firstly, a design of samples which allows us to test mechanically the alloy before and after forging was created. A finite element analysis with the ABAQUS software predicts a maximum of strain in the core of the specimens. Observations with the EBSD technique confirm a more intense sub-structuration of the dendrite cells in this zone. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation and fatigue lives were then improved for the casting/forging samples compared to the only cast specimens. The closure of the porosities and the improvement of the surface quality during the forging step enhance also the fatigue resistance of the samples.

  14. Quantitative Experimental Study of Defects Induced by Process Parameters in the High-Pressure Die Cast Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, P.; Jamali, J.; Sadayappan, K.; Wood, J. T.

    2018-05-01

    A quantitative experimental study of the effects of process parameters on the formation of defects during solidification of high-pressure die cast magnesium alloy components is presented. The parameters studied are slow-stage velocity, fast-stage velocity, intensification pressure, and die temperature. The amount of various defects are quantitatively characterized. Multiple runs of the commercial casting simulation package, ProCAST™, are used to model the mold-filling and solidification events. Several locations in the component including knit lines, last-to-fill region, and last-to-solidify region are identified as the critical regions that have a high concentration of defects. The area fractions of total porosity, shrinkage porosity, gas porosity, and externally solidified grains are separately measured. This study shows that the process parameters, fluid flow and local solidification conditions, play major roles in the formation of defects during HPDC process.

  15. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steelsmore » were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.« less

  16. Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-05

    Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations andmore » leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.« less

  17. Hot Extrusion of A356 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Carbon Nanotube/Al2O3 Hybrid Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Babu, J. S. S.; Kang, C. G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, the attention of material scientists and engineers has shifted from conventional composite materials to nanocomposite materials for the development of light weight and high-performance devices. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), many researchers have tried to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) with CNT reinforcements. However, CNTs exhibit low dispersibility in metal melts owing to their poor wettability and large surface-to-volume ratio. The use of an array of short fibers or hybrid reinforcements in a preform could overcome this problem and enhance the dispersion of CNTs in the matrix. In this study, multi-walled CNT/Al2O3 preform-based aluminum hybrid composites were fabricated using the infiltration method. Then, the composites were extruded to evaluate changes in its mechanical properties. In addition, the dispersion of reinforcements was investigated using a hardness test. The required extrusion pressure of hybrid MMCs increased as the Al2O3/CNT fraction increased. The deformation resistance of hybrid material was over two times that of the original A356 aluminum alloy material due to strengthening by the Al2O3/CNTs reinforcements. In addition, an unusual trend was detected; primary transition was induced by the hybrid reinforcements, as can be observed in the pressure-displacement curve. Increasing temperature of the material can help increase formability. In particular, temperatures under 623 K (350 °C) and over-incorporating reinforcements (Al2O3 20 pct, CNTs 3 pct) are not recommended owing to a significant increase in the brittleness of the hybrid material.

  18. The role of heat transfer in strip casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Paretosh

    The last few years have witnessed rapid developments in the area of strip casting of steel. It involves smaller capital and operating cost, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and an opportunity to create newer products due to a faster solidification rate that leads to a different solidification structure. Thus, ample reasons for interest in the technology exist. At the same time, it needs to be determined if the properties of a strip cast product can match those of a conventional product and if it is possible to produce steel strip at high production rates. The first objective of this work was to characterize the quality, structure, and properties of strip cast material of different chemistries and cast at different machines, to identify the critical operating conditions that would result in the best properties. Determination of the possible range of properties was also aimed, given that the structure of the material is different from the traditional material. The second objective was to investigate ways to increase the rate of heat transfer in strip casting, as that will also enhance the productivity of a strip caster. It was also envisaged to see what effect a high rate of heat transfer will have on the properties of the strip cast material. Results from the strip cast material characterization that was carried out to achieve the first objective indicated that an effective control of heat transfer is very important to get the best properties. Samples that showed best properties had a uniform solidification structure consisting of columnar grains running from the edge of a strip to the centerline, indicating a good control of heat transfer, and their dendrite spacings pointed towards a relatively faster rate of cooling between the rolls. These findings indicated that heat transfer is a core issue in strip casting. The mechanism of increase in the rate of heat transfer in strip casting due to the presence of liquid oxide films at the metal-mold interface was examined

  19. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, Randall Sidney

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses.more » Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.« less

  20. Modeling diffusion-governed solidification of ternary alloys - Part 2: Macroscopic transport phenomena and macrosegregation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Li, J; Ludwig, A; Kharicha, A

    2014-09-01

    Part 1 of this two-part investigation presented a multiphase solidification model incorporating the finite diffusion kinetics and ternary phase diagram with the macroscopic transport phenomena (Wu et al., 2013). In Part 2, the importance of proper treatment of the finite diffusion kinetics in the calculation of macrosegregation is addressed. Calculations for a two-dimensional (2D) square casting (50 × 50 mm 2 ) of Fe-0.45 wt.%C-1.06 wt.%Mn considering thermo-solutal convection and crystal sedimentation are performed. The modeling result indicates that the infinite liquid mixing kinetics as assumed by classical models (e.g., the Gulliver-Scheil or lever rule), which cannot properly consider the solute enrichment of the interdendritic or inter-granular melt at the early stage of solidification, might lead to an erroneous estimation of the macrosegregation. To confirm this statement, further theoretical and experimental evaluations are desired. The pattern and intensity of the flow and crystal sedimentation are dependent on the crystal morphologies (columnar or equiaxed); hence, the potential error of the calculated macrosegregation caused by the assumed growth kinetics depends on the crystal morphology. Finally, an illustrative simulation of an engineering 2.45-ton steel ingot is performed, and the results are compared with experimental results. This example demonstrates the model applicability for engineering castings regarding both the calculation efficiency and functionality.

  1. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiCp particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiCp) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiCp composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiCp particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  2. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION: IS IT ALWAYS APPROPRIATE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The findings of recent research and evaluation efforts are assessed to determine whether solidification/stabilization (S/S) has been properly and appropriately applied for different types of hazardous wastes. Results from these studies are mixed and, as a result, the need for pro...

  3. Experimental study of directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.; Chen, Falin

    1991-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been carried out using the analog casting system of NH4Cl-H2O solution by cooling it from below with a constant-temperature surface ranging from -31.5 C to +11.9 C. The NH4Cl concentration was 26 percent in all solutions, with a liquidus temperature of 15 C. It was found that finger convection occurred in the fluid region just above the mushy layer in all experiments. Plume convection with associated chimneys in the mush occurred in experiments with bottom temperatures as high as +11.0 C. However, when the bottom temperature was raised to +11.9 C, no plume convection was observed, although finger convection continued as usual. A method has been devised to determine the porosity of the mush by computed tomography. Using the mean value of the porosity across the mush layer and the permeability calculated by the Kozeny-Carman relationship, the critical solute Rayleigh number across the mush layer for onset of plume convection was estimated to be between 200 and 250.

  4. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium removable partial denture frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghuai; Wagner, Ingo; Sahm, Peter R; Augthun, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this work was to study the filling incompleteness and porosity defects in titanium removal partial denture frameworks by means of numerical simulation. Two frameworks, one for lower jaw and one for upper jaw, were chosen according to dentists' recommendation to be simulated. Geometry of the frameworks were laser-digitized and converted into a simulation software (MAGMASOFT). Both mold filling and solidification of the castings with different sprue designs (e.g. tree, ball, and runner-bar) were numerically calculated. The shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by a feeding criterion, the potential filling defect and gas pore sensitivity were estimated based on the filling and solidification results. A satisfactory sprue design with process parameters was finally recommended for real casting trials (four replica for each frameworks). All the frameworks were successfully cast. Through X-ray radiographic inspections it was found that all the castings were acceptably sound except for only one case in which gas bubbles were detected in the grasp region of the frame. It is concluded that numerical simulation aids to achieve understanding of the casting process and defect formation in titanium frameworks, hence to minimize the risk of producing defect casting by improving the sprue design and process parameters.

  5. Prediction of the As-Cast Structure of Al-4.0 Wt Pct Cu Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadein, Mahmoud; Wu, M.; Li, J. H.; Schumacher, P.; Ludwig, A.

    2013-06-01

    A two-stage simulation strategy is proposed to predict the as-cast structure. During the first stage, a 3-phase model is used to simulate the mold-filling process by considering the nucleation, the initial growth of globular equiaxed crystals and the transport of the crystals. The three considered phases are the melt, air and globular equiaxed crystals. In the second stage, a 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model is used to simulate the formation of the as-cast structure including the distinct columnar and equiaxed zones, columnar-to-equiaxed transition, grain size distribution, macrosegregation, etc. The five considered phases are the extradendritic melt, the solid dendrite, the interdendritic melt inside the equiaxed grains, the solid dendrite, and the interdendritic melt inside the columnar grains. The extra- and interdendritic melts are treated as separate phases. In order to validate the above strategy, laboratory ingots (Al-4.0 wt pct Cu) are poured and analyzed, and a good agreement with the numerical predictions is achieved. The origin of the equiaxed crystals by the "big-bang" theory is verified to play a key role in the formation of the as-cast structure, especially for the castings poured at a low pouring temperature. A single-stage approach that only uses the 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model and ignores the mold filling can predict satisfactory results for a casting poured at high temperature, but it delivers false results for the casting poured at low temperature.

  6. A Real Time Investigation of Morphological Evolution During Solidification of Different Alloy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification phenomenon which occur at the solid/liquid (s/I) interface play a major role in the determination of structure and hence the technologically important properties of a casting. However, metals being opaque, conclusions related to several important phenomenon such as boundary layer thickness, morphological evolution, and eutectic and cell spacing are deduced from quenching experiments and subsequent post solidification metallographic analysis. Consequently, limited information is obtained about the dynamics of the process. This paper will discuss the recent efforts at the Space Science Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, to view and quantify in-situ and in real time the dynamics of the solidification process and to measure interfacial undercooling. First, a high resolution x-ray transmission microscope (XTM) has been developed to monitor fundamental interfacial phenomena during directional solidification of metals and alloys. The XTM operates in the range of 10-100 KeV and through projection is capable of achieving magnification of up to 16OX. Secondly, an innovative collapsible furnace has been designed to quantify interfacial undercooling by measuring the temperature of a moving s/I interface in reference to a fixed s/l interface. This measurement technique is non-intrusive in nature and is based on the Seebeck principle. In this paper real time results obtained to characterize the dynamics of irregular eutectic spacing will be presented. As an example fiber to lamella or plate transition in the Al-Al2Au eutectic system will be discussed. Further, a resolution limit of 25 micron has permitted viewing in real time morphological instability and cellular growth in Al-Au and Al-Ag systems. Simultaneously, a systematic investigation has been carried out to measure interfacial undercooling for Pb-1 wt.% Sn at and near the marginal stability regime. In conjunction with the XTM observations this study attempts to validate existing relationships

  7. Improving Metal Casting Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine casting. More accurate metal casting processes may reduce the weight of some cast metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called casting. Ford Motor Company's casting plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the casting process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.

  8. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  9. Advanced Casting Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    components with consequent cost and weight benefits but there is traditionally a reluctance by designers to trust castings. The object of the...Specialist Meeting was to present the current state of developments of advanced casting technology, and to bring together designers and materials and...significantly in the near future. The discussion highlighted areas needing further attention, which included: — Designers need to design for casting, not

  10. Effect of Casting Material on the Cast Pressure After Sequential Cast Splitting.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aaron; Shaw, K Aaron; Boomsma, Shawn E; Cameron, Craig D

    2017-01-01

    Circumferential casting is a vital component of nonoperative fracture management. These casts are commonly valved to release pressure and decrease the risk of complications from swelling. However, little information exists regarding the effect of different casting supplies on the pressure within the cast. Seventy-five long-arm casts were performed on human volunteers, divided between 5 experimental groups with 15 casts in each groups. Testing groups consisted of 2 groups with a plaster short-arm cast overwrapped with fiberglass to a long arm with either cotton or synthetic cast padding. The 3 remaining groups included fiberglass long-arm casts with cotton, synthetic, or waterproof cast padding. A pediatric blood pressure cuff bladder was placed within the cast and inflated to 100 mm Hg. After inflation, the cast was sequentially released with pressure reading preformed after each stage. Order of release consisted of cast bivalve, cast padding release, and cotton stockinet release. After release, the cast was overwrapped with a loose elastic bandage. Difference in pressure readings were compared based upon the cast material. Pressures within the cast were found to decrease with sequential release of cast. The cast type had no effect of change in pressure. Post hoc testing demonstrated that the type of cast padding significantly affected the cast pressures with waterproof padding demonstrating the highest pressure readings at all time-points in the study, followed by synthetic padding. Cotton padding had the lowest pressure readings at all time-points. Type of cast padding significantly influences the amount of pressure within a long-arm cast, even after bivalving the cast and cutting the cast padding. Cotton cast padding allows for the greatest change in pressure. Cotton padding demonstrates the greatest change in pressure within a long-arm cast after undergoing bivalve. Synthetic and waterproof cast padding should not be used in the setting of an acute fracture to

  11. Study of FES/CAST/HGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Cummings, Rick; Jones, Brian

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity materials processing program has been instrumental in providing the crystal growth community with an experimental environment to better understand the phenomena associated with the growing of crystals. In many applications one may pursue the growth of large single crystals which cannot be grown on earth due to convective driven flows. A microgravity environment is characterized by neither convection of buoyancy. Consequently superior crystals are able to be grown in space. On the other hand, since neither convection nor buoyancy dominates the fluid flow in a microgravity environment, then lesser dominating phenomena can affect crystal growth, such as surface driven flows or diffusion limited solidification. In the case of experiments that are to be flown in space using the Fluid Experiments System (FES), diffusion limited growth should be the dominating phenomenon. The use of holographic and Schlieren optical techniques for studying the concentration gradients in solidification processes has been used by several investigators over the years. The Holographic Ground System (HGS) facility at MSFC has been a primary resource in researching this capability. Consequently scientific personnel have been able to utilize these techniques in both ground based research and in space experiments. An important event in the scientific utilization of the HGS facilities was the TGS (triglycine sulfate) Crystal Growth and the Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiments that were flown on the International Microgravity Lab (IML) mission in March of this year. The preparation and processing of these space observations are the primary experiments reported in this work. This project provides some ground-based studies to optimize on the holographic techniques used to acquire information about the crystal growth processes flown on IML. Since the ground-based studies will be compared with the space-based experimental results, it is necessary to conduct

  12. The Grain Structure of Castings: Some Aspects of Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellawell, A.

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of the modelling of the solidification of castings is typically tested against observed cooling curves and the final grain structures and sizes. Without thermo solutal convection, equiaxed grain formation is promoted by introduction of heterogeneous substrates into the melt, as grain refiners. With efficient thermo solutal convection, dendrite fragments from the mushy zone can act as an intrinsic source of equiaxed grains and resort to grain refining additions is unnecessary. The mechanisms of dendrite fragmentation and transport of these fragments are briefly considered.

  13. Some Consequences of Thermosolutal Convection: The Grain Structure of Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G.; Hellawell, A.; Lu, S. Z.; Steube, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The essential principles of thermosolutal convection are outlined, and how convection provides a transport mechanism between the mushy region of a casting and the open bulk liquid is illustrated. The convective flow patterns which develop assist in heat exchange and macroscopic solute segregation during solidification; they also provide a mechanism for the transport of dendritic fragments from the mushy region into the bulk liquid. Surviving fragments become nuclei for equiaxed grains and so lead to blocking of the parental columnar, dendritic growth front from which they originated. The physical steps in such a sequence are considered and some experimental data are provided to support the argument.

  14. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot, exhibits C and E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Maples, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer model which describes the solidification of a binary metal alloy in an insulated rectangular mold with a temperature gradient is presented. A numerical technique, applicable to a broad class of moving boundary problems, was implemented therein. The solidification model described is used to calculate the macrosegregation within the solidified casting by coupling the equations for liquid flow in the solid/liquid or mushy zone with the energy equation for heat flow throughout the ingot and thermal convection in the bulk liquid portion. The rate of development of the solid can be automatically calculated by the model. Numerical analysis of such solidification parameters as enthalpy and boundary layer flow is displayed. On-line user interface and software documentation are presented.

  15. Multiphase Model of Semisolid Slurry Generation and Isothermal Holding During Cooling Slope Rheoprocessing of A356 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prosenjit; Samanta, Sudip K.; Mondal, Biswanath; Dutta, Pradip

    2018-04-01

    In the present paper, we present an experimentally validated 3D multiphase and multiscale solidification model to understand the transport processes involved during slurry generation with a cooling slope. In this process, superheated liquid alloy is poured at the top of the cooling slope and allowed to flow along the slope under the influence of gravity. As the melt flows down the slope, it progressively loses its superheat, starts solidifying at the melt/slope interface with formation of solid crystals, and eventually exits the slope as semisolid slurry. In the present simulation, the three phases considered are the parent melt as the primary phase, and the solid grains and air as secondary phases. The air phase forms a definable air/liquid melt interface as the free surface. After exiting the slope, the slurry fills an isothermal holding bath maintained at the slope exit temperature, which promotes further globularization of microstructure. The outcomes of the present model include prediction of volume fractions of the three different phases considered, grain evolution, grain growth, size, sphericity and distribution of solid grains, temperature field, velocity field, macrosegregation and microsegregation. In addition, the model is found to be capable of making predictions of morphological evolution of primary grains at the onset of isothermal coarsening. The results obtained from the present simulations are validated by performing quantitative image analysis of micrographs of the rapidly oil-quenched semisolid slurry samples, collected from strategic locations along the slope and from the isothermal slurry holding bath.

  16. Producing Foils From Direct Cast Titanium Alloy Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, T. A.; Gaspar, T. A.; Sukonnik, I. M.; Semiatan, S. L.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J. A.; Fraser, H. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of producing high-quality, thin-gage, titanium foil from direct cast titanium strip. Melt Overflow Rapid Solidification Technology (MORST) was used to cast several different titanium alloys into 500 microns thick strip, 10 cm wide and up to 3 m long. The strip was then either ground, hot pack rolled or cold rolled, as appropriate, into foil. Gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) was cast and ground to approximately 100 microns thick foil and alpha-2 titanium aluminide (Ti3AI) was cast and hot pack rolled to approximately 70 microns thick foil. CP Ti, Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo, and Ti22AI23Nb (Orthorhombic), were successfully cast and cold-rolled into good quality foil (less than 125 microns thick). The foils were generally fully dense with smooth surfaces, had fine, uniform microstructures, and demonstrated mechanical properties equivalent to conventionally produced titanium. By eliminating many manufacturing steps, this technology has the potential to produce thin gage, titanium foil with good engineering properties at significantly reduced cost relative to conventional ingot metallurgy processing.

  17. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the α-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the β-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was <0.4 mm/year compared with ∼2 mm/year for the conventionally cast alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  19. Performance Steel Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Development of Sand Properties 103 Advanced Modeling Dataset.. 105 High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) Steels 107 Steel Casting and Engineering Support...to achieve the performance goals required for new systems. The dramatic reduction in weight and increase in capability will require high performance...for improved weapon system reliability. SFSA developed innovative casting design and manufacturing processes for high performance parts. SFSA is

  20. Solidification processing of monotectic alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frier, Nancy L.; Shiohara, Yuh; Russell, Kenneth C.

    1989-01-01

    Directionally solidified aluminum-indium alloys of the monotectic composition were found to form an in situ rod composite which obeys a lambda exp 2 R = constant relation. The experimental data shows good agreement with previously reported results. A theoretical boundary between cellular and dendritic growth conditions was derived and compared with experiments. The unique wetting characteristics of the monotectic alloys can be utilized to tailor the interface structure in metal matrix composites. Metal matrix composites with monotectic and hypermonotectic Al-In matrices were made by pressure infiltration, remelted and directionally solidified to observe the wetting characteristics of the alloys as well as the effect on structure of solidification in the constrained field of the fiber interstices. Models for monotectic growth are modified to take into account solidification in these constrained fields.

  1. TEMHD Effects on Solidification Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Andrew; Pericleous, Koulis

    2012-01-01

    An unexplored potential exists to control microstructure evolution through the use of external DC magnetic fields. Thermoelectric currents form during solidification and interact with this external field to drive microscopic fluid dynamics within the inter-dendritic region. The convective heat and mass transport can lead to profound changes on the dendritic structure. In this paper the effect of high magnetic fields is demonstrated through the use of both 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional numerical models. The results show that the application of a magnetic field causes significant disruption to the dendritic morphology. Investigation into the underlying mechanism gives initial indicators of how external magnetic fields can either lead to unexpected growth behaviour, or alternatively can be used to control the evolution of microstructure in undercooled melts as encountered in levitated droplet solidification.

  2. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  3. Positive Ion Induced Solidification of He4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroshkin, P.; Lebedev, V.; Weis, A.

    2009-03-01

    We have observed bulk solidification of He4 induced by nucleation on positive alkali ions in pressurized superfluid helium. The ions are extracted into the liquid from alkali-doped solid He by a static electric field. The experiments prove the existence of charged particles in a solid structure composed of doped He that was recently shown to coexist with superfluid helium below the He solidification pressure. This supports our earlier suggestion that the Coulomb interaction of positive ions surrounded by a solid He shell (snowballs) and electrons trapped in spherical cavities (electron bubbles), together with surface tension, is responsible for the stability of that structure against melting. We have determined the density of charges in the sample by two independent methods.

  4. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; ...

    2016-07-05

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (H ci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (B r) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH) max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of highermore » Ti compositions yielded anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m 2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying superior magnetic properties in the 7

  5. Controlled Directional Solidification of Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Comparison Between Samples Processed on Earth and in the Microgravity Environment Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Tewari, Surendra N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the international "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys" (MICAST) program is given. Directional solidification processing of metals and alloys is described, and why experiments conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are expected to promote our understanding of this commercially relevant practice. Microstructural differences observed when comparing the aluminum - 7 wt% silicon alloys directionally solidified on Earth to those aboard the ISS are presented and discussed.

  6. IJEMS: Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendle, John R.; Mashl, Steven J.; Hardin, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification (IJEMS) is a cooperative effort between Iowa State University and the University of Iowa to study the formation of metal-matrix composites in a microgravity environment. Of particular interest is the interaction between the solid/liquid interface and the particles in suspension. The experiment is scheduled to fly on STS-69, Space Shuttle Endeavor on August 3, 1995. This project is unique in its heavy student participation and cooperation between the universities involved.

  7. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  8. Solidification Using the Baffle in Sealed Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrogorsky, A.; Marin, C.; Churilov, A.; Volz, M. P.; Bonner, W. A.; Spivey, R. A.; Smith, G.

    2003-01-01

    Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) is the first investigation conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility at the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha. In July, August and September of 2002, 8 single crystals of InSb, doped with Te and Zn, were directionally solidified in microgravity. Ground based tests, related numerical modeling and images of the growth process obtained in microgravity are presented.

  9. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-27

    project (Tasks 7-9). An industrial trial on an investment casting was done using rare earth silicide additions in a furnace prior to pouring (Task 7...an investment casting was done using rare earth silicide additions in a furnace prior to pounng (la.sk 7). Some of the test parts had a finer...poured at the end of a six casting batch. One test tree with no RE addition was poured. Before the second test tree was poured, sufficient RE silicide was

  10. Limitation of Shrinkage Porosity in Aluminum Rotor Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Se-Weon; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Ik; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kang, Chang-Seog

    Aluminum rotor prone to have many casting defects especially large amount of air and shrinkage porosity, which caused eccentricity, loss and noise during motor operation. Many attempts have been made to develop methods of shrinkage porosity control, but still there are some problems to solve. In this research, the process of vacuum squeeze die casting is proposed for limitation of defects. The 6 pin point gated dies which were in capable of local squeeze at the end ring were used. Influences of filling patterns on HPDC were evaluated and the important process control parameters were high injection speed, squeeze length, venting and process conditions. By using local squeeze and vacuum during filling and solidification, air and shrinkage porosity were significantly reduced and the feeding efficiency at the upper end ring was improved 10%. As a result of controlling the defects, the dynamometer test showed improved motor efficiency by more than 4%.

  11. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptablemore » for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF« less

  12. Three-dimensional microstructure simulation of Ni-based superalloy investment castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2011-05-01

    An integrated macro and micro multi-scale model for the three-dimensional microstructure simulation of Ni-based superalloy investment castings was developed, and applied to industrial castings to investigate grain evolution during solidification. A ray tracing method was used to deal with the complex heat radiation transfer. The microstructure evolution was simulated based on the Modified Cellular Automaton method, which was coupled with three-dimensional nested macro and micro grids. Experiments for Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel investment casting were carried out, which showed a good correspondence with the simulated results. It is indicated that the proposed model is able to predict the microstructure of the casting precisely, which provides a tool for the optimizing process.

  13. Computation material science of structural-phase transformation in casting aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golod, V. M.; Dobosh, L. Yu

    2017-04-01

    Successive stages of computer simulation the formation of the casting microstructure under non-equilibrium conditions of crystallization of multicomponent aluminum alloys are presented. On the basis of computer thermodynamics and heat transfer during solidification of macroscale shaped castings are specified the boundary conditions of local heat exchange at mesoscale modeling of non-equilibrium formation the solid phase and of the component redistribution between phases during coalescence of secondary dendrite branches. Computer analysis of structural - phase transitions based on the principle of additive physico-chemical effect of the alloy components in the process of diffusional - capillary morphological evolution of the dendrite structure and the o of local dendrite heterogeneity which stochastic nature and extent are revealed under metallographic study and modeling by the Monte Carlo method. The integrated computational materials science tools at researches of alloys are focused and implemented on analysis the multiple-factor system of casting processes and prediction of casting microstructure.

  14. Simulation of the bimetal cast in the case of milling rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihut, G.; Popa, E.

    2015-06-01

    In the paper it is proposed, in main, to obtain of a model of numerical simulation, valid general and applicable the whole peculiars cases of bimetal casting, model with which help can be studied through the computer, the optimization possibility of flowing working condition of liquid alloy of the distribution of temperatures field, of the liquid phase and contraction during the solidification, with the minimum price (necessary reimbursement of the software and calculus equipment) in very short time etc.

  15. A computational study of low-head direct chill slab casting of aluminum alloy AA2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mainul; Begum, Latifa

    2016-04-01

    The steady state casting of an industrial-sized AA2024 slab has been modeled for a vertical low-head direct chill caster. The previously verified 3-D CFD code is used to investigate the solidification phenomena of the said long-range alloy by varying the pouring temperature, casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient from 654 to 702 °C, 60-180 mm/min, and 1.0-4.0 kW/(m2 K), respectively. The important predicted results are presented and thoroughly discussed.

  16. A Theoretical Analysis of the Interaction Between Pores and Inclusions During the Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, Arash Safavi; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is derived to predict the trajectories of pores and inclusions that are nucleated in the interdendritic region during the continuous casting of steel. Using basic fluid mechanics and heat transfer, scaling analysis, and asymptotic methods, the model accounts for the possible lateral drift of the pores as a result of the dependence of the surface tension on temperature and sulfur concentration. Moreover, the soluto-thermocapillary drift of such pores prior to final solidification, coupled to the fact that any inclusions present can only have a vertical trajectory, can help interpret recent experimental observations of pore-inclusion clusters in solidified steel castings.

  17. On the Coupling Mechanism of Equiaxed Crystal Generation with the Liquid Flow Driven by Natural Convection During Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-Kharicha, Mihaela; Kharicha, Abdellah; Wu, Menghuai; Ludwig, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    The influence of the melt flow on the solidification structure is bilateral. The flow plays an important role in the solidification pattern, via the heat transfer, grain distribution, and segregations. On the other hand, the crystal structure, columnar or equiaxed, impacts the flow, via the thermosolutal convection, the drag force applied by the crystals on the melt flow, etc. As the aim of this research was to further explore the solidification-flow interaction, experiments were conducted in a cast cell (95 * 95 * 30 mm3), in which an ammonium chloride-water solution (between 27 and 31 wt pct NH4Cl) was observed as it solidified. The kinetic energy (KE) of the flow and the average flow velocity were calculated throughout the process. Measurements of the volume extension of the mush in the cell and the velocity of the solid front were also taken during the solidification experiment. During the mainly columnar experiments (8 cm liquid height) the flow KE continuously decreased over time. However, during the later series of experiments at higher liquid height (9.5 cm), the flow KE evolution presented a strong peak shortly after the start of solidification. This increase in the total flow KE correlated with the presence of falling equiaxed crystals. Generally, a clear correlation between the strength of the flow and the occurrence of equiaxed crystals was evident. The analysis of the results strongly suggests a fragmentation origin of equiaxed crystals appearing in the melt. The transition from purely columnar growth to a strongly equiaxed rain (CET) was found to be triggered by (a) the magnitude of the coupling between the flow intensity driven by the equiaxed crystals, and (b) the release and transport of the fragments by the same flow recirculating within the mushy zone.

  18. The study of flow pattern and phase-change problem in die casting process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Wei, H.; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    The flow pattern and solidification phenomena in die casting process have been investigated in the first phase study. The flow pattern in filling process is predicted by using a VOF (volume of fluid) method. A good agreement with experimental observation is obtained for filling the water into a die cavity with different gate geometry and with an obstacle in the cavity. An enthalpy method has been applied to solve the solidification problem. By treating the latent heat implicitly into the enthalpy instead of explicitly into the source term, the CPU time can be reduced at least 20 times. The effect of material properties on solidification fronts is tested. It concludes that the dependence of properties on temperature is significant. The influence of the natural convection over the diffusion has also been studied. The result shows that the liquid metal solidification phenomena is diffusion dominant, and the natural convection can affect the shape of the interface. In the second phase study, the filling and solidification processes will be considered simultaneously.

  19. On the Role of Mantle Overturn during Magma Ocean Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukaré, C. E.; Parmentier, E.; Parman, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Solidification of potential global magma ocean(s) (MO) early in the history of terrestrial planets may play a key role in the evolution of planetary interiors by setting initial conditions for their long-term evolution. Constraining this initial structure of solid mantles is thus crucial but remains poorly understood. MO fractional crystallization has been proposed to generate gravitationally unstable Fe-Mg chemical stratification capable of driving solid-state mantle overturn. Fractional solidification and overturn hypothesis, while only an ideal limiting case, can explain important geochemical features of both the Moon and Mars. Current overturn models consider generally post-MO overturn where the cumulate pile remains immobile until the end of MO solidification. However, if the cumulate pile overturns during MO solidification, the general picture of early planet evolution might differ significantly from the static crystallization models. We show that the timing of mantle overturn can be characterized with a dimensionless number measuring the ratio of the MO solidification time and the purely compositional overturn timescale. Syn-solidification overturn occurs if this dimensionless parameter, Rc, exceeds a critical value. Rc is mostly affected by the competition between the MO solidification time and mantle viscosity. Overturn that occurs during solidification can result in smaller scales of mantle chemical heterogeneity that could persist for long times thus influencing the whole evolution of a planetary body. We will discuss the effects of compaction/percolation on mantle viscosity. If partially molten cumulate do not have time to compact during MO solidification, viscosity of cumulates would be significantly lower as the interstitcial melt fraction would be large. Both solid mantle remelting during syn-solidification overturn and porous convection of melt retained with the cumulates are expected to reduce the degree of fractional crystallization. Syn-solidification

  20. The Effects of Casting Porosity on the Tensile Behavior of Investment Cast 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, D. F.; Crenshaw, T. B.; Gearhart, J. S.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of casting porosity on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel was studied as well as the effect of heat treatment on the alloy's sensitivity to casting defects. Interdendritic porosity, formed during solidification and shrinkage of the alloy, reduces the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength roughly in proportion to the reduction in load bearing cross-section. The effects of casting porosity on ductility (% strain, % reduction in area) are more severe, in agreement with research on other alloy systems. In this study, 10% porosity reduced the ductility of 17-4PH stainless steel by almost 80% for the high-strength H925 condition. Tensile testing at -10°C (263 K) further reduces the alloy ductility with and without pores present. In the lower strength H1100 condition, the ductility is higher than the H925 condition, as expected, and somewhat less sensitive to porosity. By measuring the area % porosity on the fracture surface of tensile specimens, the trend in failure strain versus area % porosity was obtained and analyzed using two methods: an empirical approach to determine an index of defect susceptibility with a logarithmic fit and an analytical approach based on the constitutive stress-strain behavior and critical strain concentration in the vicinity of the casting voids. The applicability of the second method depends on the amount of non-uniform strain (necking) and, as such, the softer H1100 material did not correlate well to the model. The behavior of 17-4PH was compared to previous work on cast Al alloys, Mg alloys, and other cast materials.

  1. Novel casting processes for single-crystal turbine blades of superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dexin

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the current casting techniques for single-crystal (SC) blades, as well as an analysis of the solidification process in complex turbine blades. A series of novel casting methods based on the Bridgman process were presented to illustrate the development in the production of SC blades from superalloys. The grain continuator and the heat conductor techniques were developed to remove geometry-related grain defects. In these techniques, the heat barrier that hinders lateral SC growth from the blade airfoil into the extremities of the platform is minimized. The parallel heating and cooling system was developed to achieve symmetric thermal conditions for SC solidification in blade clusters, thus considerably decreasing the negative shadow effect and its related defects in the current Bridgman process. The dipping and heaving technique, in which thinshell molds are utilized, was developed to enable the establishment of a high temperature gradient for SC growth and the freckle-free solidification of superalloy castings. Moreover, by applying the targeted cooling and heating technique, a novel concept for the three-dimensional and precise control of SC growth, a proper thermal arrangement may be dynamically established for the microscopic control of SC growth in the critical areas of large industrial gas turbine blades.

  2. An Electron Microscopy Study of Graphite Growth in Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffont, L.; Jday, R.; Lacaze, J.

    2018-04-01

    Growth of graphite during solidification and high-temperature solid-state transformation has been investigated in samples cut out from a thin-wall casting which solidified partly in the stable (iron-graphite) and partly in the metastable (iron-cementite) systems. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize graphite nodules in as-cast state and in samples having been fully graphitized at various temperatures in the austenite field. Nodules in the as-cast material show a twofold structure characterized by an inner zone where graphite is disoriented and an outer zone where it is well crystallized. In heat-treated samples, graphite nodules consist of well-crystallized sectors radiating from the nucleus. These observations suggest that the disoriented zone appears because of mechanical deformation when the liquid contracts during its solidification in the metastable system. During heat-treatment, the graphite in this zone recrystallizes. In turn, it can be concluded that nodular graphite growth mechanism is the same during solidification and solid-state transformation.

  3. Tranpsort phenomena in solidification processing of functionally graded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Juwen

    A combined numerical and experimental study of the transport phenomena during solidification processing of metal matrix composite functionally graded materials (FGMs) is conducted in this work. A multiphase transport model for the solidification of metal-matrix composite FGMs has been developed that accounts for macroscopic particle segregation due to liquid-particle flow and particle-solid interactions. An experimental study has also been conducted to gain physical insight as well as to validate the model. A novel method to in-situ measure the particle volume fraction using fiber optic probes is developed for transparent analogue solidification systems. The model is first applied to one-dimensional pure matrix FGM solidification under gravity or centrifugal field and is extensively validated against the experimental results. The mechanisms for the formation of particle concentration gradient are identified. Two-dimensional solidification of pure matrix FGM with convection is then studied using the model as well as experiments. The interaction among convection flow, solidification process and the particle transport is demonstrated. The results show the importance of convection in the particle concentration gradient formation. Then, simulations for alloy FGM solidification are carried out for unidirectional solidification as well as two-dimensional solidification with convection. The interplay among heat and species transport, convection and particle motion is investigated. Finally, future theoretical and experimental work is outlined.

  4. Investigation of the Relationship between Undercooling and Solidification Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, Robert J.; Hofmeister, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This work was aimed at reconciling the differences between experimental measurements of the theoretical predictions of the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling. The theory proposed by Boettinger, Coriell and Trivedi (the BCT theory) has been one of the most widely used models for describing the nature of the solidification of undercooled metals and alloys. However, for undercoolings greater than about 5% of the absolute melting temperature, there is considerable discrepancy between theory and experiment. At these large undercoolings, experimental results exhibit a much lessened dependency of solidification velocity on undercooling than is predicted by theory. Furthermore, unpredicted plateaus in the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling are observed.

  5. Silicon-based Porous Ceramics via Freeze Casting of Preceramic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naviroj, Maninpat

    Freeze casting is a technique for processing porous materials that has drawn significant attention for its effectiveness in producing a variety of tailorable pore structures for ceramics, metals, and polymers. With freeze casting, pores are generated based on a solidification process where ice crystals act as a sacrificial template which can eventually be sublimated to create pores. While the majority of freeze-casting studies have been performed using conventional ceramic suspensions, this work explores an alternative processing route by freeze casting with preceramic polymer solutions. Significant differences exist between freeze casting of a particulate suspension and a polymeric solution. These changes affect the processing method, solidification behavior, and pore structure, thereby introducing new challenges and possibilities for the freeze-casting technique. The first part of this study explored the processing requirements involved with freeze casting of preceramic polymers, along with methods to control the resulting pore structure. Solvent choice, freezing front velocity, and polymer concentration were used as processing variables to manipulate the pore structures. A total of seven organic solvents were freeze cast with a polymethylsiloxane preceramic polymer to produce ceramics with isotropic, dendritic, prismatic, and lamellar pore morphologies. Changes in freezing front velocity and polymer concentration were shown to influence pore size, shape, and connectivity. Differences between suspension- and solution-based samples freeze cast under equivalent conditions were also investigated. Certain solidification microstructures were strongly affected by the presence of suspended particles, creating differences between pore structures generated from the same solvents. Additionally, processing of solution-based samples were found to be the more facile technique. Compressive strength and water permeability of dendritic and lamellar structures were analyzed to

  6. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  7. Symptomatic stent cast.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  8. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  9. Microstructural characterisation of Al-Si cast alloys containing rare earth additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgallad, E. M.; Ibrahim, M. F.; Doty, H. W.; Samuel, F. H.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a thorough study on the effect of rare earth elements, specifically La and Ce, on the microstructure characteristics of non-modified and Sr-modified A356 and A413 alloys. Several alloys were prepared by adding 1% La and 1% Ce either individually or in combination. Microstructural characterisation was carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis as well as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The results showed that the individual and combined additions of La and Ce did not bring about any modification or even refinement in the eutectic Si structure. Moreover, these additions were found to negate the modification effect of Sr, particularly in the presence of La. The A356 and A413 alloys containing La and/or Ce displayed high phase volume fractions owing to the formation of Al-Si-La/Ce/(La,Ce) and Al-Ti-La/Ce intermetallic phases. DSC analysis revealed that the formation temperatures of these phases varied from 560 to 568 °C and 568 to 574 °C, respectively. This analysis also showed that the addition of La and Ce whether individually or in combination resulted in a depression in the eutectic temperature and a considerable increase in the solidification range, particularly for the A413 alloy.

  10. HFIR Fuel Casting Support

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul Jacob; Solis, Eunice Martinez

    Process exploration for fuel production for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using cast LEU-10wt.%Mo as an initial processing step has just begun. This project represents the first trials concerned with casting design and quality. The studies carried out over the course of this year and information contained in this report address the initial mold development to be used as a starting point for future operations. In broad terms, the final billet design is that of a solid rolling blank with an irregular octagonal cross section. The work covered here is a comprehensive view of the initial attempts to producemore » a sound casting. This report covers the efforts to simulate, predict, cast, inspect, and revise the initial mold design.« less

  11. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  12. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  13. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  14. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  15. Development of High-Performance Cast Crankshafts. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Mark E

    -specific casting simulations with existing materials models to optimize crankshaft cost and performance. Prototype crankshafts of the final design were to be produced and validated using laboratory bench testing and on-engine durability testing. ICME process simulation tools were used to investigate a broad range of processing concepts. These concepts included casting orientation, various mold and core materials, and various filling and feeding strategies. Each crankshaft was first simulated without gating and risers, which is termed natural solidification. The natural solidification results were used as a baseline for strategy development of each concept. Casting process simulations and ICME tools were proven to be reasonable predictors of real world results. Potential alloys were developed that could meet the project material property goals with appropriate normalization and temper treatments. For the alloys considered, post-normalization temper treatments proved to be necessary to achieve the desired yield strengths and elongations and appropriate heat treatments were designed using ICME tools. The experimental data of all the alloys were analyzed in combination with ICME tools to establish chemistry-process-structure relations. Several GM small gas engine (SGE) crankshafts were successfully cast in sand molds using two different sprue, runner, gate, riser, chill designs. These crankshafts were cast in two different steel alloys developed during the project, but casting finishing (e.g. riser removal) remains a cost challenge. A long list of future work was left unfinished when this project was unexpectedly terminated.« less

  16. Application of heat pipe technology in permanent mold casting of nonferrous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elalem, Kaled

    The issue of mold cooling is one, which presents a foundry with a dilemma. On the one hand; the use of air for cooling is safe and practical, however, it is not very effective and high cost. On the other hand, water-cooling can be very effective but it raises serious concerns about safety, especially with a metal such as magnesium. An alternative option that is being developed at McGill University uses heat pipe technology to carry out the cooling. The experimental program consisted of designing a permanent mold to produce AZ91E magnesium alloy and A356 aluminum alloy castings with shrinkage defects. Heat pipes were then used to reduce these defects. The heat pipes used in this work are novel and are patent pending. They are referred to as McGill Heat Pipes. Computer modeling was used extensively in designing the mold and the heat pipes. Final designs for the mold and the heat pipes were chosen based on the modeling results. Laboratory tests of the heat pipe were performed before conducting the actual experimental plan. The laboratory testing results verified the excellent performance of the heat pipes as anticipated by the model. An industrial mold made of H13 tool steel was constructed to cast nonferrous alloys. The heat pipes were installed and initial testing and actual industrial trials were conducted. This is the first time where a McGill heat pipe was used in an industrial permanent mold casting process for nonferrous alloys. The effects of cooling using heat pipes on AZ91E and A356 were evaluated using computer modeling and experimental trials. Microstructural analyses were conducted to measure the secondary dendrite arm spacing, SDAS, and the grain size to evaluate the cooling effects on the castings. The modeling and the experimental results agreed quite well. The metallurgical differences between AZ91E and A356 were investigated using modeling and experimental results. Selected results from modeling, laboratory and industrial trials are presented. The

  17. Simulation of solidification in a Bridgman cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakhoul, Y. M.; Farmer, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Bridgman-type crystal growth techniques are attractive methods for producing homogeneous, high-quality infrared detector and junction device materials. However, crystal imperfections and interface shapes still must be controlled through modification of the temperature and concentration gradients created during solidification. The objective of this investigation was to study the temperature fields generated by various cell and heatpipe configurations and operating conditions. Continuum's numerical model of the temperature, species concentrations, and velocity fields was used to describe the thermal characteristics of Bridgman cell operation.

  18. Cellular solidification in a monotectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile-glycerol, SN-G, transparent organic monotectic alloy is studied with particular attention to cellular growth. The phase diagram is determined, near the monotectic composition, with greater accuracy than previous studies. A solidification interface stability diagram is determined for planar growth. The planar-to-cellular transition is compared to predictions from the Burton, Primm, Schlichter theory. A new technique to determine the solute segregation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is developed. Proposed models that involve the cellular interface for alignment of monotectic second-phase spheres or rods are compared with observations.

  19. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study.

  20. Solidification phenomena of binary organic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.

    1982-01-01

    The coalescence rates and motion of liquid bubbles in binary organic mixtures were studied. Several factors such as temperature gradient, composition gradient, interfacial tension, and densities of the two phases play important roles in separation of phases of immiscible liquids. An attempt was made to study the effect of initial compositions on separation rates of well-dispersed organic mixtures at different temperatures and, ultimately, on the homogeneity of solidification of the immiscible binary organic liquids. These organic mixtures serve as models for metallic pseudo binary systems under study. Two specific systems were investigated: ethyl salicylate - diethyl glycol and succinonitrile - water.

  1. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Robert Alan; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim; Hasz, Wayne Charles

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  2. Simulation of Channel Segregation During Directional Solidification of In—75 wt pct Ga. Qualitative Comparison with In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ali; Gandin, Charles-André; Bellet, Michel; Shevchenko, Natalia; Eckert, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Freckles are common defects in industrial casting. They result from thermosolutal convection due to buoyancy forces generated from density variations in the liquid. The present paper proposes a numerical analysis for the formation of channel segregation using the three-dimensional (3D) cellular automaton (CA)—finite element (FE) model. The model integrates kinetics laws for the nucleation and growth of a microstructure with the solution of the conservation equations for the casting, while introducing an intermediate modeling scale for a direct representation of the envelope of the dendritic grains. Directional solidification of a cuboid cell is studied. Its geometry, the alloy chosen as well as the process parameters are inspired from experimental observations recently reported in the literature. Snapshots of the convective pattern, the solute distribution, and the morphology of the growth front are qualitatively compared. Similitudes are found when considering the coupled 3D CAFE simulations. Limitations of the model to reach direct simulation of the experiments are discussed.

  3. Nature of solidification of nanoconfined organic liquid layers.

    PubMed

    Lang, X Y; Zhu, Y F; Jiang, Q

    2007-01-30

    A simple model is established for solidification of a nanoconfined liquid under nonequilibrium conditions. In terms of this model, the nature of solidification is the conjunct finite size and interface effects, which is directly related to the cooling rate or the relaxation time of the undercooled liquid. The model predictions are consistent with available experimental results.

  4. The solidification velocity of nickel and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altgilbers, Alex Sho

    2002-09-01

    The solidification velocity of several Ni-Ti, Ni-Sn, Ni-Si, Ti-Al and Ti-Ni alloys were measured as a function of undercooling. From these results, a model for alloy solidification was developed that can be used to predict the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling more accurately. During this investigation a phenomenon was observed in the solidification velocity that is a direct result of the addition of the various alloying elements to nickel and titanium. The additions of the alloying elements resulted in an additional solidification velocity plateau at intermediate undercoolings. Past work has shown a solidification velocity plateau at high undercoolings can be attributed to residual oxygen. It is shown that a logistic growth model is a more accurate model for predicting the solidification of alloys. Additionally, a numerical model is developed from simple description of the effect of solute on the solidification velocity, which utilizes a Boltzmann logistic function to predict the plateaus that occur at intermediate undercoolings.

  5. Directional solidification of silicon in carbon crucibles by an oscillating crucible technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Dumas, K. A.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Smetana, P.; Kim, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    The quality of silicon cast by present techniques is limited by the presence of dislocations and grain boundaries in unseeded growth and by cellular structures with dislocation networks in the case of the seeded growth. To address these concerns, a new method of directional solidification called the oscillating crucible technique (OCT) is developed. During growth, a carbon crucible is oscillated to provide for effective stirring of the melt. This growth technique (seeded growth only), along with material characterization and solar-cell fabrication and testing, is described. Solar-cell efficiencies of up to 13 percent at 100 mW/sq cm area obtained in the single crystalline areas. Minority-carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 100 microns are measured even in the polycrystalline areas of the wafers. Limitations of the present setup and possible future improvements are discussed.

  6. Rapid solidification of high-conductivity copper alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Theodore Atlas

    1989-01-01

    The main objective was to develop improved copper alloys of high strength and high thermal and electric conductivity. Chill block melt spinning was used to produce binary alloys of Cu-Cr and Cu-Zr, and ternary alloys of Cu-Cr-Ag. By quenching from the liquid state, up to 5 atomic percent of Cr and Zr were retained in metastable extended solid solution during the rapid solidification process. Eutectic solidification was avoided and the full strengthening benefits of the large volume fraction of precipitates were realized by subsequent aging treatment. The very low solid solubility of Cr and Zr in Cu result in a high conductivity Cu matrix strengthened by second phase precipitates. Tensile properties on as-cast and aged ribbons were measured at room and elevated temperatures. Precipitate coarsening of Cr in Cu was studied by changes in electrical resistance during aging. X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameter and the degree of supersaturation of the matrix. The microstructures were characterized by optical and electron microscopy.

  7. Stress-strain time-dependent behavior of A356.0 aluminum alloy subjected to cyclic thermal and mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrahi, G. H.; Ghodrati, M.; Azadi, M.; Rezvani Rad, M.

    2014-08-01

    This article presents the cyclic behavior of the A356.0 aluminum alloy under low-cycle fatigue (or isothermal) and thermo-mechanical fatigue loadings. Since the thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) test is time consuming and has high costs in comparison to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests, the purpose of this research is to use LCF test results to predict the TMF behavior of the material. A time-independent model, considering the combined nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law, was used to predict the TMF behavior of the material. Material constants of this model were calibrated based on room-temperature and high-temperature low-cycle fatigue tests. The nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening law could accurately estimate the stress-strain hysteresis loop for the LCF condition; however, for the out-of-phase TMF, the condition could not predict properly the stress value due to the strain rate effect. Therefore, a two-layer visco-plastic model and also the Johnson-Cook law were applied to improve the estimation of the stress-strain hysteresis loop. Related finite element results based on the two-layer visco-plastic model demonstrated a good agreement with experimental TMF data of the A356.0 alloy.

  8. Modeling of Dendritic Evolution of Continuously Cast Steel Billet with Cellular Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiling; Ji, Cheng; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-02-01

    In order to predict the dendritic evolution during the continuous steel casting process, a simple mechanism to connect the heat transfer at the macroscopic scale and the dendritic growth at the microscopic scale was proposed in the present work. As the core of the across-scale simulation, a two-dimensional cell automaton (CA) model with a decentered square algorithm was developed and parallelized. Apart from nucleation undercooling and probability, a temperature gradient was introduced to deal with the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) by considering its variation during continuous casting. Based on the thermal history, the dendritic evolution in a 4 mm × 40 mm region near the centerline of a SWRH82B steel billet was predicted. The influences of the secondary cooling intensity, superheat, and casting speed on the dendritic structure of the billet were investigated in detail. The results show that the predicted equiaxed dendritic solidification of Fe-5.3Si alloy and columnar dendritic solidification of Fe-0.45C alloy are consistent with in situ experimental results [Yasuda et al. Int J Cast Metals Res 22:15-21 (2009); Yasuda et al. ISIJ Int 51:402-408 (2011)]. Moreover, the predicted dendritic arm spacing and CET location agree well with the actual results in the billet. The primary dendrite arm spacing of columnar dendrites decreases with increasing secondary cooling intensity, or decreasing superheat and casting speed. Meanwhile, the CET is promoted as the secondary cooling intensity and superheat decrease. However, the CET is not influenced by the casting speed, owing to the adjusting of the flow rate of secondary spray water. Compared with the superheat and casting speed, the secondary cooling intensity can influence the cooling rate and temperature gradient in deeper locations, and accordingly exerts a more significant influence on the equiaxed dendritic structure.

  9. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS asmore » a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.« less

  10. Melt Flow Control in the Directional Solidification of Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabaras, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    Our main project objectives are to develop computational techniques based on inverse problem theory that can be used to design directional solidification processes that lead to desired temperature gradient and growth conditions at the freezing front at various levels of gravity. It is known that control of these conditions plays a significant role in the selection of the form and scale of the obtained solidification microstructures. Emphasis is given on the control of the effects of various melt flow mechanisms on the local to the solidification front conditions. The thermal boundary conditions (furnace design) as well as the magnitude and direction of an externally applied magnetic field are the main design variables. We will highlight computational design models for sharp front solidification models and briefly discuss work in progress toward the development of design techniques for multi-phase volume-averaging based solidification models.

  11. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  12. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm 3) during melting andmore » solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm 3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  13. Method for treating materials for solidification

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Martin, Hollis L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils.

  14. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  15. Prediction of Shrinkage Porosity Defect in Sand Casting Process of LM25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Hardik; Dhulia, Jay K.; Maniar, Nirav P.

    2017-08-01

    In the present worldwide and aggressive environment, foundry commercial enterprises need to perform productively with least number of rejections and create casting parts in shortest lead time. It has become extremely difficult for foundry industries to meet demands of defects free casting and meet strict delivery schedules. The process of casting solidification is complex in nature. Prediction of shrinkage defect in metal casting is one of the critical concern in foundries and is one of the potential research areas in casting. Due to increasing pressure to improve quality and to reduce cost, it is very essential to upgrade the level of current methodology used in foundries. In the present research work, prediction methodology of shrinkage porosity defect in sand casting process of LM25 using experimentation and ANSYS is proposed. The objectives successfully achieved are prediction of shrinkage porosity distribution in Al-Si casting and determining effectiveness of investigated function for predicting shrinkage porosity by correlating results of simulating studies to those obtained experimentally. The real-time application of the research reflects from the fact that experimentation is performed on 9 different Y junctions at foundry industry and practical data obtained from experimentation are used for simulation.

  16. In Situ Study of Microstructure Evolution in Solidification of Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloys with Application of Thermal Analysis and Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sediako, Dimitry G.; Kasprzak, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    Understanding of the kinetics of solid-phase evolution in solidification of hypereutectic aluminum alloys is a key to control their as-cast microstructure and resultant mechanical properties, and in turn, to enhance the service characteristics of actual components. This study was performed to evaluate the solidification kinetics for three P-modified hypereutectic Al-19 pct Si alloys: namely, Al-Si binary alloy and with the subsequent addition of 2.8 pct Cu and 2.8 pct Cu + 0.7 pct Mg. Metallurgical evaluation included thermodynamic calculations of the solidification process using the FactSage™ 6.2 software package, as well as experimental thermal analysis, and in situ neutron diffraction. The study revealed kinetics of solid α-Al, solid Si, Al2Cu, and Mg2Si evolution, as well as the individual effects of Cu and Mg alloying additions on the solidification path of the Al-Si system. Various techniques applied in this study resulted in some discrepancies in the results. For example, the FactSage computations, in general, resulted in 281 K to 286 K (8 °C to 13 °C) higher Al-Si eutectic temperatures than the ones recorded in the thermal analysis, which are also ~278 K (~5 °C) higher than those observed in the in situ neutron diffraction. None of the techniques can provide a definite value for the solidus temperature, as this is affected by the chosen calculation path [283 K to 303 K (10 °C to 30 °C) higher for equilibrium solidification vs non-equilibrium] for the FactSage analysis; and further complicated by evolution of secondary Al-Cu and Mg-Si phases that commenced at the end of solidification. An explanation of the discrepancies observed and complications associated with every technique applied is offered in the paper.

  17. Dimensional control of die castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Aniruddha Ajit

    The demand for net shape die castings, which require little or no machining, is steadily increasing. Stringent customer requirements are forcing die casters to deliver high quality castings in increasingly short lead times. Dimensional conformance to customer specifications is an inherent part of die casting quality. The dimensional attributes of a die casting are essentially dependent upon many factors--the quality of the die and the degree of control over the process variables being the two major sources of dimensional error in die castings. This study focused on investigating the nature and the causes of dimensional error in die castings. The two major components of dimensional error i.e., dimensional variability and die allowance were studied. The major effort of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively study the effects of casting geometry and process variables on die casting dimensional variability and die allowance. This was accomplished by detailed dimensional data collection at production die casting sites. Robust feature characterization schemes were developed to describe complex casting geometry in quantitative terms. Empirical modeling was utilized to quantify the effects of the casting variables on dimensional variability and die allowance for die casting features. A number of casting geometry and process variables were found to affect dimensional variability in die castings. The dimensional variability was evaluated by comparisons with current published dimensional tolerance standards. The casting geometry was found to play a significant role in influencing the die allowance of the features measured. The predictive models developed for dimensional variability and die allowance were evaluated to test their effectiveness. Finally, the relative impact of all the components of dimensional error in die castings was put into perspective, and general guidelines for effective dimensional control in the die casting plant were laid out. The results of

  18. Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-03-27

    . A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: • Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. • Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. • Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. • Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. • Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).« less

  19. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts. [effects of evaporation and solidification on crystalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs are developed and used in the study of the combined effects of evaporation and solidification in space processing. The temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation were mathematically formulated. Computer results are included along with an econotechnical model of crystal growth. This model allows: prediction of crystal size, quality, and cost; systematic selection of the best growth equipment or alloy system; optimization of growth or material parameters; and a maximization of zero-gravity effects. Segregation in GaAs crystals was examined along with vibration effects on GaAs crystal growth. It was found that a unique segregation pattern and strong convention currents exist in GaAs crystal growth. Some beneficial effects from vibration during GaAs growth were discovered. The implications of the results in space processing are indicated.

  20. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created a demand for new fabrication methods with an emphasis on simple, low-cost techniques. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) is an unconventional approach in comparison to low-temperature biomimetic approaches. A technical challenge for DSE is producing microstructural architectures on the nanometer scale. In both processes, the driving force is the minimization of Gibb's free energy. Selfassembly by biomimetic approaches depends on weak interaction forces between organic molecules to define the architectural structure. The architectural structure for solidification depends on strong chemical bonding between atoms. Constituents partition into atomic-level arrangements at the liquid-solid interface to form polyphase structures, and this atomic-level arrangement at the liquid-solid interface is controlled by atomic diffusion and total undercooling due to composition (diffusion), kinetics, and curvature of the boundary phases. Judicious selection of the materials system and control of the total undercooling are the keys to producing structures on the nanometer scale. The silicon-titanium silicide (Si-TiSi2) eutectic forms a rod structure under isothermal cooling conditions. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, directional solidification was employed along with a thermal gradient to promote uniform rods oriented with the thermal gradient. The preceding photomicrograph shows the typical transverse microstructure of a solidified Si-TiSi2 eutectic composition. The dark and light gray regions are Si and TiSi2, respectively. Preferred rod orientation along the thermal gradient was poor. The ordered TiSi2 rods have a narrow distribution in diameter of 2 to 3 m, as shown. The rod diameter showed a weak dependence on process conditions. Anisotropic etch behavior between different phases provides the opportunity to fabricate structures with high aspect ratios. The photomicrographs show the resulting microstructure after a wet chemical etch and a

  1. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Srikanth; Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, S Kranthikumar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  2. Improved Crystal Quality By Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Wang, Yaz-Hen; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long term goals have been: (1) To develop a complete understanding of all of the phenomena of detached solidification.; (2) To make it possible to achieve detached solidification reproducibly; (3) To increase crystallographic perfection through detached solidification. We have three major achievements to report here: (1) We obtained a new material balance solution for the Moving Meniscus Model of detached solidification. This solution greatly clarifies the physics as well as the roles of the parameters in the system; (2) We achieved detached solidification of InSb growing on earth in BN-coated ampoules; (3) We performed an extensive series of experiments on freezing water that showed how to form multiple gas bubbles or tubes on the ampoule wall. However, these did not propagate around the wall and lead to fully detached solidification unless the ampoule wall was extremely rough and non-wetted.

  3. Modeling the investment casting of a titanium crown.

    PubMed

    Atwood, R C; Lee, P D; Curtis, R V; Maijer, D M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply computational modeling tools to assist in the design of titanium dental castings. The tools developed should incorporate state-of-the-art micromodels to predict the depth to which the mechanical properties of the crown are affected by contamination from the mold. The model should also be validated by comparison of macro- and micro-defects found in a typical investment cast titanium tooth crown. Crowns were hand-waxed and investment cast in commercial purity grade 1 (CP-1) titanium by a commercial dental laboratory. The castings were analyzed using X-ray microtomography (XMT). Following sectioning, analysis continued with optical and scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness testing. An in-house cellular-automata solidification and finite-difference diffusion program was coupled with a commercial casting program to model the investment casting process. A three-dimensional (3D) digital image generated by X-ray tomography was used to generate an accurate geometric representation of a molar crown casting. Previously reported work was significantly expanded upon by including transport of dissolved oxygen and impurity sources upon the arbitrarily shaped surface of the crown, and improved coupling of micro- and macro-scale simulations. Macroscale modeling was found to be sufficient to accurately predict the location of the large internal porosity. These are shrinkage pores located in the thick sections of the cusp. The model was used to determine the influence of sprue design on the size and location of these pores. Combining microscale with macroscale modeling allowed the microstructure and depth of contamination to be predicted qualitatively. This combined model predicted a surprising result--the dissolution of silicon from the mold into the molten titanium is sufficient to depress the freezing point of the liquid metal such that the crown solidifies the subsurface. Solidification then progresses inwards and back out to the

  4. Columnar and Equiaxed Solidification of Al-7 wt.% Si Alloys in Reduced Gravity in the Framework of the CETSOL Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, G.; Sturz, L.; Nguyen-Thi, H.; Mangelinck-Noel, N.; Li, Y. Z.; Gandin, C.-A.; Fleurisson, R.; Guillemot, G.; McFadden, S.; Mooney, R. P.; Voorhees, P.; Roosz, A.; Ronaföldi, A.; Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Warnken, N.; Saad, A.; Grün, G.-U.; Grohn, M.; Poitrault, I.; Pehl, T.; Nagy, I.; Todt, D.; Minster, O.; Sillekens, W.

    2017-08-01

    During casting, often a dendritic microstructure is formed, resulting in a columnar or an equiaxed grain structure, or leading to a transition from columnar to equiaxed growth (CET). The detailed knowledge of the critical parameters for the CET is important because the microstructure affects materials properties. To provide unique data for testing of fundamental theories of grain and microstructure formation, solidification experiments in microgravity environment were performed within the European Space Agency Microgravity Application Promotion (ESA MAP) project Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in SOLidification Processing (CETSOL). Reduced gravity allows for purely diffusive solidification conditions, i.e., suppressing melt flow and sedimentation and floatation effects. On-board the International Space Station, Al-7 wt.% Si alloys with and without grain refiners were solidified in different temperature gradients and with different cooling conditions. Detailed analysis of the microstructure and the grain structure showed purely columnar growth for nonrefined alloys. The CET was detected only for refined alloys, either as a sharp CET in the case of a sudden increase in the solidification velocity or as a progressive CET in the case of a continuous decrease of the temperature gradient. The present experimental data were used for numerical modeling of the CET with three different approaches: (1) a front tracking model using an equiaxed growth model, (2) a three-dimensional (3D) cellular automaton-finite element model, and (3) a 3D dendrite needle network method. Each model allows for predicting the columnar dendrite tip undercooling and the growth rate with respect to time. Furthermore, the positions of CET and the spatial extent of the CET, being sharp or progressive, are in reasonably good quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) AND KEEPERS OF THE CAST HOUSE FLOOR, S.L. KIMBROUGH AND DAVID HOLMES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Blast Furnace No. 8, North of Valley Road, West of Ensley-Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Single Crystal Casting with Fluidized Carbon Bed Cooling: A Process Innovation for Quality Improvement and Cost Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, M.; Franke, M. M.; Koerner, C.; Singer, R. F.

    2017-12-01

    Superalloy gas turbine blades are being produced by investment casting and directional solidification. A new process, Fluidized Carbon Bed Cooling (FCBC), has been developed and is now being optimized in a prototype casting unit with 10 kg pouring weight. In early test runs with still rather simple mold cluster geometries, a reduction of the primary dendrite arm spacing of around 40 pct compared to the standard radiation cooling process (HRS) could be demonstrated. The improvement is mainly attributed to higher temperature gradients driving solidification, made possible by a functioning Dynamic Baffle. Compared to earlier development efforts in the literature, contamination of the melt and damage to the equipment are avoided using carbon-based fluidized bed materials and the so-called "counter pressure concept."

  7. Metallographic assessment of Al-12Si high-pressure die casting escalator steps.

    PubMed

    Vander Voort, George Frederic; Suárez-Peña, Beatriz; Asensio-Lozano, Juan

    2014-10-01

    A microstructural characterization study was performed on high-pressure die cast specimens extracted from escalator steps manufactured from an Al-12 wt.% Si alloy designed for structural applications. Black and white, color light optical imaging and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to conduct the microstructural analysis. Most regions in the samples studied contained globular-rosette primary α-Al grains surrounded by an Al-Si eutectic aggregate, while primary dendritic α-Al grains were present in the surface layer. This dendritic microstructure was observed in the regions where the melt did not impinge directly on the die surface during cavity filling. Consequently, microstructures in the surface layer were nonuniform. Utilizing physical metallurgy principles, these results were analyzed in terms of the applied pressure and filling velocity during high-pressure die casting. The effects of these parameters on solidification at different locations of the casting are discussed.

  8. A Study of the Oscillation Marks' Characteristics of Continuously Cast Incoloy Alloy 825 Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Saud; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of oscillation mark (OM) formation and its characteristics during the solidification of Incoloy alloy 825 in the continuous casting of blooms is investigated by plant trials and metallographic study. The experiments involved two heats with the same casting and mold conditions and sampling at different locations across the strand. The metallographic study combined macro/micro-examinations of OMs and segregation analysis of Cr, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Si by microprobe analysis. The results show that OMs have widely different characteristics, such as mark type, depth, segregation, and accompanying microstructure. Furthermore, the mark pitch can vary considerably even for the similar casting conditions, leading to different conditions for the marks' formation in relation to the mold's cyclic movement. Finally, a mechanism for the OM formation is discussed and proposed. Possible solutions for minimizing the observed defects by optimizing the mold conditions are suggested.

  9. Examination of Multiphase (Zr,Ti)(V,Cr,Mn,Ni)2 Ni-MH Electrode Alloys: Part I. Dendritic Solidification Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettinger, W. J.; Newbury, D. E.; Wang, K.; Bendersky, L. A.; Chiu, C.; Kattner, U. R.; Young, K.; Chao, B.

    2010-08-01

    The solidification microstructures of three nine-element Zr-Ni-based AB2 type C14/C15 Laves hydrogen storage alloys are determined. The selected compositions represent a class of alloys being examined for usage as an MH electrode in nickel metal-hydride batteries that often have their best properties in the cast state. Solidification is accomplished by dendritic growth of hexagonal C14 Laves phase, peritectic solidification of cubic C15 Laves phase, and formation of cubic B2 phase in the interdendritic regions. The B2 phase decomposes in the solid state into a complex multivariate platelike structure containing Zr-Ni-rich intermetallics. The observed sequence C14/C15 upon solidification agrees with predictions using effective compositions and thermodynamic assessments of the ternary systems, Ni-Cr-Zr and Cr-Ti-Zr. Experimentally, the closeness of the compositions of the C14 and C15 phases required the use of compositional mapping with an energy dispersive detector capable of processing a very high X-ray flux to locate regions in the microstructure for quantitative composition measurement and transmission electron microscope examination.

  10. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of melt segregation effects were studied: (1) evaporative segregation, or segregation due to surface evaporation; and (2) freezing segregation, or segregation due to liquid-solid phase transformation. These segregation effects are closely related. In fact, evaporative segregation always precedes freezing segregation to some degree and must often be studied prior to performing meaningful solidification experiments. This is particularly true since evaporation may cause the melt composition, at least at the critical surface regions or layers to be affected manyfold within seconds so that the surface region or layer melting point and other thermophysical properties, nucleation characteristics, base for undercooling, and critical velocity to avoid constitutional supercooling, may be completely unexpected. An important objective was, therefore, to develop the necessary normal evaporation equations for predicting the compositional changes within specified times at temperature and to correlate these equations with actual experimental data collected from the literature.

  11. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cementmore » type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing.« less

  12. Improved Crystal Quality by Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past four years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification, both in microgravity and on earth. A discussion of models of detachment, the meniscus models and results of theoretical modeling, and future plans are presented.

  13. Noise and Dynamical Pattern Selection in Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing. "Pattern-forming systems," in this context, are nonequilibrium contina whose state is determined by experimentally adjustable control parameter. Below some critical value of the control system then has available to it a range of linearly stable, spatially periodic steady states, each characterized by a spacing which can lie anywhere within some band of values. These systems like directional solidification, where the solidification front is planar when the ratio of growth velocity to thermal gradient is below its critical value, but takes on a cellular shape above critical. They also include systems without interfaces, such as Benard convection, where it is the fluid velocity field which changes from zero to something spatially periodic as the control parameter is increased through its critical value. The basic question to be addressed was that of how the system chooses one of its myriad possible spacings when the control parameter is above critical, and in particular the role of noise in the selection process. Previous work on explosive crystallization had suggested that one spacing in the range should be preferred, in the sense that weak noise should eventually drive the system to that spacing. That work had also suggested a heuristic argument for identifying the preferred spacing. The project had three main objectives: to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing; to investigate how noise drives a system to its preferred spacing; and to extend the heuristic argument for a preferred spacing in explosive crystallization to other pattern-forming systems.

  14. Undercooling-Induced macrosegregation in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groh, Henry C.

    1994-11-01

    The accepted primary mechanism for causing macrosegregation in directional solidification (DS) is thermal and solutal convection in the liquid. This article demonstrates the effects of under-cooling and nucleation on macrosegregation and shows that undercooling, in some cases, can be the cause of end-to-end macrosegregation. Alloy ingots of Pb-Sn were directionally solidified upward and downward, with and without undercooling. A thermal gradient of about 5.1 K/cm and a cooling rate of 7.7 K/h were used. Crucibles of borosilicate glass, stainless steel with Cu bottoms, and fused silica were used. High undercoolings were achieved in the glass crucibles, and very low undercoolings were achieved in the steel/Cu crucible. During under-cooling, large, coarse Pb dendrites were found to be present. Large amounts of macrosegregation developed in the undercooled eutectic and hypoeutectic alloys. This segre-gation was found to be due to the nucleation and growth of primary Pb-rich dendrites, continued coarsening of Pb dendrites during undercooling of the interdendritic liquid, Sn enrichment of the liquid, and dendritic fragmentation and settling during and after recalescence. Eutectic ingots that solidified with no undercooling had no macrosegregation, because both Pb and Sn phases were effectively nucleated at the start of solidification, thus initiating the growth of solid of eutectic composition. It is thus shown that undercooling and single-phase nucleation can cause significant macrosegregation by increasing the amount of solute rejected into the liquid and by the movement of unattached dendrites and dendrite fragments, and that macrosegregation in excess of what would be expected due to diffusion transport is not necessarily caused by convection in the liquid.

  15. ToxCast Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  16. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  17. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  18. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  19. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  20. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  1. Effect of Solutes on Grain Refinement of As-Cast Fe-4Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Li, Jian-Min; Zheng, Qing; Wang, Geoff; Zhang, Ming-Xing

    2018-03-01

    Grain size is one of the key microstructural factors that control the mechanical properties of steels. The present work aims to extend the theories of grain refinement which were established for cast light alloys to steel systems. Using a designed Fe-4 wt pct Si alloy (all-ferrite structure during whole solidification process), the solute effect on grain refinement/grain coarsening in ferritic systems was comprehensively investigated. Experimental results showed that boron (B), which is associated with the highest Q value (growth restriction factor) in ferrite, significantly refined the as-cast structure of the Fe-4 wt pct Si alloy. Cu and Mo with low Q values had no effect on grain refinement. However, although Y and Zr have relatively high Q values, addition of these two solutes led to grain coarsening in the Fe-4Si alloy. Understanding the results in regards to the growth restriction factor and the driving force for the solidification led to the conclusion that in addition to the grain growth restriction effect, the changes of thermodynamic driving force for solidification due to the solute addition also played a key role in grain refinement in ferritic alloys.

  2. Effect of Solutes on Grain Refinement of As-Cast Fe-4Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Li, Jian-Min; Zheng, Qing; Wang, Geoff; Zhang, Ming-Xing

    2018-06-01

    Grain size is one of the key microstructural factors that control the mechanical properties of steels. The present work aims to extend the theories of grain refinement which were established for cast light alloys to steel systems. Using a designed Fe-4 wt pct Si alloy (all-ferrite structure during whole solidification process), the solute effect on grain refinement/grain coarsening in ferritic systems was comprehensively investigated. Experimental results showed that boron (B), which is associated with the highest Q value (growth restriction factor) in ferrite, significantly refined the as-cast structure of the Fe-4 wt pct Si alloy. Cu and Mo with low Q values had no effect on grain refinement. However, although Y and Zr have relatively high Q values, addition of these two solutes led to grain coarsening in the Fe-4Si alloy. Understanding the results in regards to the growth restriction factor and the driving force for the solidification led to the conclusion that in addition to the grain growth restriction effect, the changes of thermodynamic driving force for solidification due to the solute addition also played a key role in grain refinement in ferritic alloys.

  3. High-Throughput Study of Diffusion and Phase Transformation Kinetics of Magnesium-Based Systems for Automotive Cast Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Alan A; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Riggi, Adrienne

    The objective of the proposed study is to establish a scientific foundation on kinetic modeling of diffusion, phase precipitation, and casting/solidification, in order to accelerate the design and optimization of cast magnesium (Mg) alloys for weight reduction of U.S. automotive fleet. The team has performed the following tasks: 1) study diffusion kinetics of various Mg-containing binary systems using high-throughput diffusion multiples to establish reliable diffusivity and mobility databases for the Mg-aluminum (Al)-zinc (Zn)-tin (Sn)-calcium (Ca)-strontium (Sr)-manganese (Mn) systems; 2) study the precipitation kinetics (nucleation, growth and coarsening) using both innovative dual-anneal diffusion multiples and cast model alloys to provide largemore » amounts of kinetic data (including interfacial energy) and microstructure atlases to enable implementation of the Kampmann-Wagner numerical model to simulate phase transformation kinetics of non-spherical/non-cuboidal precipitates in Mg alloys; 3) implement a micromodel to take into account back diffusion in the solid phase in order to predict microstructure and microsegregation in multicomponent Mg alloys during dendritic solidification especially under high pressure die-casting (HPDC) conditions; and, 4) widely disseminate the data, knowledge and information using the Materials Genome Initiative infrastructure (http://www.mgidata.org) as well as publications and digital data sharing to enable researchers to identify new pathways/routes to better cast Mg alloys.« less

  4. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANICS AND INORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refe...

  5. Fundamentals of Alloy Solidification Applied to Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solidification processes and phenomena, segregation, porosity, gravity effects, fluid flow, undercooling, as well as processing of materials in the microgravity environment of space, now available on space shuttle flights were discussed.

  6. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: CHEMFIX TECHNOLOGIES, INC. - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report evaluates the Chemfix Technologies, Inc. (Chemfix), solidification/stabilization technology for on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The Chemfix ...

  7. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION CASE STUDIES AT USEPA SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oral presentation dicumenting several completed Superfund remediations using solidification/stabilization, both in situ and ex-situ, to treat soils containing metals and organics.
    65 slide presentation.

  8. Technology Demonstration Summary, Chemfix Solidification/Stabilization Process, Clackamas, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    ChemfIx's* patented stabilization/solidification technology was demonstrated at the Portable Equipment Salvage Company (PESC) site in Clackamas, Oregon, as part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The Chemfix process is designed to solidify and sta...

  9. SURVEY OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stabilization/solidification or fixation is a process for treating industrial solid wastes (primarily sludges) that contain hazardous constituents to prevent dissolution and loss of toxic materials into the environment. Most of these treatment processes are designed to produce a ...

  10. Modeling on Fluid Flow and Inclusion Motion in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    During the centrifugal continuous casting process, unreasonable casting parameters can cause violent level fluctuation, serious gas entrainment, and formation of frozen shell pieces at the meniscus. Thus, in the current study, a three-dimensional multiphase turbulent model was established to study the transport phenomena during centrifugal continuous casting process. The effects of nozzle position, casting and rotational speed on the flow pattern, centrifugal force acting on the molten steel, level fluctuation, gas entrainment, shear stress on mold wall, and motion of inclusions during centrifugal continuous casting process were investigated. Volume of Fluid model was used to simulate the molten steel-air two-phase. The level fluctuation and the gas entrainment during casting were calculated by user-developed subroutines. The trajectory of inclusions in the rotating system was calculated using the Lagrangian approach. The results show that during centrifugal continuous casting, a large amount of gas was entrained into the molten steel, and broken into bubbles of various sizes. The greater the distance to the mold wall, the smaller the centrifugal force. Rotation speed had the most important influence on the centrifugal force distribution at the side region. Angular moving angle of the nozzle with 8° and keeping the rotation speed with 60 revolutions per minute can somehow stabilize the level fluctuation. The increase of angular angle of nozzle from 8 to 18 deg and rotation speed from 40 to 80 revolutions per minute favored to decrease the total volume of entrained bubbles, while the increase of distance of nozzle moving left and casting speed had reverse effects. The trajectories of inclusions in the mold were irregular, and then rotated along the strand length. After penetrating a certain distance, the inclusions gradually moved to the center of billet and gathered there. More work, such as the heat transfer, the solidification, and the inclusions entrapment

  11. Precision cast vs. wrought superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Borofka, J. C.; Casey, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    While cast polycrystalline superalloys recommend themselves in virtue of better 'buy-to-fly' ratios and higher strengthening gamma-prime volume fractions than those of wrought superalloys, the expansion of their use into such critical superalloy applications as gas turbine hot section components has been slowed by insufficient casting process opportunities for microstructural control. Attention is presently drawn, however, to casting process developments facilitating the production of defect-tolerant superalloy castings having improved fracture reliability. Integrally bladed turbine wheel and thin-walled turbine exhaust case near-net-shape castings have been produced by these means.

  12. Solute redistribution in dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of solute redistribution during dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid has been performed using numerical techniques. The extent of diffusion is characterized by the instantaneous and average diffusion parameters. These parameters are functions of the diffusion Fourier number, the partition ratio and the fraction solid. Numerical results are presented as an approximate model, which is used to predict the average diffusion parameter and calculate the composition of the interdendritic liquid during solidification.

  13. Solidification of basaltic magma during flow in a dike.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Pollard, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    A model for time-dependent unsteady heat transfer from magma flowing in a dyke is developed. The ratio of solidification T to magma T is the most important parameter. Observations of volcanic fissure eruptions and study of dykes near Ship Rock, New Mexico, show that the low T at dyke margins and the rapidly advancing solidification front predicted by the model are qualitatively correct.-M.S.

  14. Timing of mantle overturn during magma ocean solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukaré, C.-E.; Parmentier, E. M.; Parman, S. W.

    2018-06-01

    Solidification of magma oceans (MOs) formed early in the evolution of planetary bodies sets the initial condition for their evolution on much longer time scales. Ideal fractional crystallization would generate an unstable chemical stratification that subsequently overturns to form a stably stratified mantle. The simplest model of overturn assumes that cumulates remain immobile until the end of MO solidification. However, overturning of cumulates and thermal convection during solidification may act to reduce this stratification and introduce chemical heterogeneity on scales smaller than the MO thickness. We explore overturning of cumulates before the end of MO crystallization and the possible consequences for mantle structure and composition. In this model, increasingly dense iron-rich layers, crystallized from the overlying residual liquid MO, are deposited on a thickening cumulate layer. Overturn during solidification occurs if the dimensionless parameter, Rc, measuring the ratio of the MO time of crystallization τMO to the timescale associated with compositional overturn τov = μ / ΔρgH exceeds a threshold value. If overturn did not occur until after solidification, this implies that the viscosity of the solidified mantle must have been sufficiently high (possibly requiring efficient melt extraction from the cumulate) for a given rate of solidification. For the lunar MO, possible implications for the generation of the Mg-suites and mare basalt are suggested.

  15. In-Situ Observation of Horizontal Centrifugal Casting using a High-Speed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaka, Hisao; Kawai, Kohsuke; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Shinozuka, Kei

    2012-07-01

    In order to understand the solidification process of horizontal centrifugal casting, experimental equipment for in-situ observation using transparent organic substance has been constructed. Succinonitrile-1 mass% water alloy was filled in the round glass cell and the glass cell was completely sealed. To observe the movement of equiaxed grains more clearly and to understand the effect of movement of free surface, a high-speed camera has been installed on the equipment. The most advantageous point of this equipment is that the camera rotates with mold, so that one can observe the same location of the glass cell. Because the recording rate could be increased up to 250 frames per second, the quality of movie was dramatically modified and this made easier and more precise to pursue the certain equiaxed grain. The amplitude of oscillation of equiaxed grain ( = At) decreased as the solidification proceeded.

  16. [Variables effecting casting accuracy of quick heating casting investments].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Nakamura, H; Iwasaki, N; Morita, N; Habu, N; Nishimura, F

    1994-06-01

    Recently, several new products of investments for "quick heating" have been put on the Japanese market. The total casting procedure time for this quick heating method involves only one hour; 30-minutes waiting after the start of mixing before placing the mold directly into the 700 degrees C furnace and 30-minutes heating in the furnace. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two variables effecting casting accuracy using these new investments. The effect of thickness of the casting liner inside the casting ring and the effect of waiting time before placing the mold into the 700 degrees C furnace were evaluated. A stainless-steel die with a convergence angle of 8 degrees was employed. Marginal discrepancies of the crown between the wax patterns and castings were measured. The size of the cast crown became larger when the thickness of the ring liner was thick and when the waiting time before placing the mold into the furnace was long. These results suggest that these new investments have the advantage of providing sound castings using short-time casting procedures. However, it is necessary to pay careful attention to the casting conditions for obtaining reproducible castings.

  17. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  18. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  19. Casting and Splinting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-21

    mcludmg suggost1ons klr reducing lite burden, to the Department ar Defense. Executive Service Director> lte (07,IJ4-0188). Respondents should be...Orthoglass) Casting Material );;:- Fiberglass , .... • \\ \\ General Principles )- Measure out dry material at extremity being treated ~Plaster...shrinks slightly when wet; If too long can fold ends back ~Can be measured on contralateral extremity > Apply 2-3 layers of webril, avoid wrinkles

  20. Solidification and solidification cracking in nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Ann M.; Savage, Warren F.

    1986-04-01

    The solidification behavior of three heats of nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steel was examined and was correlated with solidification mode predictions and with hot cracking resistance. The heat of NITRONIC* 50 solidified by the austenitic-ferrite mode, and the NITRONIC 50W and NITRONIC 50W - Nb heats solidified by the ferritic-austenitic mode. This behavior was in good agreement with predictions based on Espy’s formulas for Cr and Ni equivalents. Both the NITRONIC 50W and NITRONIC 50W + Nb welds contained primary delta-ferrite, with the latter weld and the NITRONIC 50 weld also containing some eutectic ferrite. Solute profiles in austenite near the eutectic ferrite showed decreasing Fe and increasing Cr, Ni, Mn, and Mo relative to austenite in the dendrite cores. Numerous Nb-rich precipitates were found on the eutectic ferrite/austenite interfaces and within the eutectic ferrite. The precipitates were mainly Nb(C, N), with some Z-phase, a Nb-rich nitride, also detected. One instance of the transformation of eutectic ferrite to sigma-phase was observed to have occurred during cooling of the NITRONIC 50 weld. Hot cracking was seen in the NITRONIC 50 and NITRONIC 50W + Nb welds and resulted from the formation of a niobium carbonitride eutectic in the interdendritic regions. In the absence of Nb, the NITRONIC 50W heat formed no observable eutectic constituents and did not hot crack. The presence of hot cracks in the NITRONIC 50W + Nb weld indicates that solidification by the ferritic-austenitic mode did not counteract the effects of small Nb additions.

  1. Cast Iron Inoculation Enhanced by Supplementary Oxy-sulfides Forming Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riposan, Iulian; Stan, Stelian; Uta, Valentin; Stefan, Ion

    2017-09-01

    Inoculation is one of the most important metallurgical treatments applied to the molten cast iron immediately prior to casting, to promote solidification without excessive eutectic undercooling, which favors carbides formation usually with undesirable graphite morphologies. The paper focused on the separate addition of an inoculant enhancer alloy [S, O, oxy-sulfides forming elements] with a conventional Ca-FeSi alloy, in the production of gray and ductile cast irons. Carbides formation tendency decreased with improved graphite characteristics as an effect of the [Ca-FeSi + Enhancer] inoculation combination, when compared to other Ca/Ca, Ba/Ca, RE-FeSi alloy treatments. Adding an inoculant enhancer greatly enhances inoculation, lowers inoculant consumption up to 50% or more and avoids the need to use more costly inoculants, such as a rare earth bearing alloy. The Inoculation Specific Factor [ISF] was developed as a means to more realistically measure inoculant treatment efficiency. It compares the ratio between the improved characteristic level and total inoculant consumption for this effect. Addition of any of the commercial inoculants plus the inoculant enhancer offered outstanding inoculation power [increased ISF] even at higher solidification cooling rates, even though the total enhancer addition was at a small fraction of the amount of commercial inoculant used.

  2. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2016-05-01

    Sills are an integral part of the formation and development of larger plutons and magma reservoirs. Thus sills are essential for both the transport and the storage of magma in the Earth's crust. However, although cooling and solidification are central to magmatism, their effects on sills have been so far poorly studied. Here, the effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment and systematically varied between each experiment, in order to vary and quantify the amount of solidification between each experiments. The oil is injected directly at the interface between the two gelatine layers. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps of surface-area creation interspersed with periods of momentary arrest. The morphology of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of area creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the area of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. The morphology of sills, such as lobate structures (interpretation of 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basin) and ropy flow structures (field observations) can be related to solidification during emplacement. Moreover, a non-continuous morphology

  3. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  4. Interface Pattern Selection in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, Rohit; Tewari, Surendra N.

    2001-01-01

    The central focus of this research is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. Ground-based studies have established that the conditions under which cellular and dendritic microstructures form are precisely where convection effects are dominant in bulk samples. Thus, experimental data can not be obtained terrestrially under pure diffusive regime. Furthermore, reliable theoretical models are not yet possible which can quantitatively incorporate fluid flow in the pattern selection criterion. Consequently, microgravity experiments on cellular and dendritic growth are designed to obtain benchmark data under diffusive growth conditions that can be quantitatively analyzed and compared with the rigorous theoretical model to establish the fundamental principles that govern the selection of specific microstructure and its length scales. In the cellular structure, different cells in an array are strongly coupled so that the cellular pattern evolution is controlled by complex interactions between thermal diffusion, solute diffusion and interface effects. These interactions give infinity of solutions, and the system selects only a narrow band of solutions. The aim of this investigation is to obtain benchmark data and develop a rigorous theoretical model that will allow us to quantitatively establish the physics of this selection process.

  5. Solidification effects on sill formation: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2014-10-01

    Sills represent a major mechanism for constructing continental Earth's crust because these intrusions can amalgamate and form magma reservoirs and plutons. As a result, numerous field, laboratory and numerical studies have investigated the conditions that lead to sill emplacement. However, all previous studies have neglected the potential effect magma solidification could have on sill formation. The effects of solidification on the formation of sills are studied and quantified with scaled analogue laboratory experiments. The experiments presented here involved the injection of hot vegetable oil (a magma analogue) which solidified during its propagation as a dyke in a colder and layered solid of gelatine (a host rock analogue). The gelatine solid had two layers of different stiffness, to create a priori favourable conditions to form sills. Several behaviours were observed depending on the injection temperature and the injection rate: no intrusions (extreme solidification effects), dykes stopping at the interface (high solidification effects), sills (moderate solidification effects), and dykes passing through the interface (low solidification effects). All these results can be explained quantitatively as a function of a dimensionless temperature θ, which describes the experimental thermal conditions, and a dimensionless flux ϕ, which describes their dynamical conditions. The experiments reveal that sills can only form within a restricted domain of the (θ , ϕ) parameter space. These experiments demonstrate that contrary to isothermal experiments where cooling could not affect sill formation, the presence of an interface that would be a priori mechanically favourable is not a sufficient condition for sill formation; solidification effects restrict sill formation. The results are consistent with field observations and provide a means to explain why some dykes form sills when others do not under seemingly similar geological conditions.

  6. Wear behaviour and morphology of stir cast aluminium/SiC nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanwir Alam, Md; Arif, Sajjad; Husain Ansari, Akhter

    2018-04-01

    Wear and friction play a vital role in the service life of components. Aluminium matrix nanocomposites possess tremendous potential for a number of applications in addition to their present uses. It is valuable to the field of newer materials for better performance in tribological applications. In this work, dry sliding wear, friction coefficient and morphology of aluminium alloy (A356) reinforced with silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiCn) were investigated. A356/SiCn nanocomposites (AMNCs) containing 1–5 weight percentage of SiCn were prepared through two-step stir casting process via mechanical ball milling. The wear test was conducted on pin-on-disc test apparatus. Regression analysis was performed to develop mathematical functions to fit the experimental data points. Morphological studies of Al and SiCn as-received, wear debris and worn surfaces were further analysed by SEM along with EDS. The occurrence of oxide layers was observed on worn surfaces. Iron trace was identified by wear debris. It was found that the wear loss and friction coefficient were strongly influenced by mechanical milling and SiCn content. The results exhibited that the friction coefficient reduces with the addition of SiCn as well as with the increase in load. However, wear resistance increases as the reinforcement content increases because of the embedding and wettability effects.

  7. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part II: Mechanical and thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systemsmore » (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.« less

  8. Comparative evaluation of cast aluminum alloys for automotive cylinder heads: Part II: Mechanical and thermal properties

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Rodriguez, Andres; ...

    2017-03-08

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systemsmore » (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.« less

  9. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M [Livermore, CA; Sampayan, Stephen [Manteca, CA; Slenes, Kirk [Albuquerque, NM; Stoller, H M [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  10. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, Randall Sidney; Tolman, David Donald

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  11. Cast abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Kelly D; Goucher, Nicholas R

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a case in which a pediatric patient wounded his ankle when he stuck an object inside the cast while trying to scratch himself. The wound became infected and resulted in a limb-threatening abscess. Although most patients treated with casts do not have any significant problems, it is important to emphasize cast care instructions to young patients and their parents. In addition, it may be equally important to advise patients about safe methods to alleviate itching, such as blowing cool air under the cast. In this way, the risk of serious infectious complications can be minimized.

  12. Rapid Cycle Casting of Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    C’, and at temperature T, are Infiltrated by !L amougt of liquid of composition C’., such that ,C, 4 f+.C’L - X. V. 7 average carbon content of the...maximum liquid penetration was 100 mm at an infiltration pressure of 755 kPa. The average casting composition was 0.94 w/o carbon . The segregation at...content* at four casting locations. 2. Results The casting composition ( carbon content) as a function of casting location is given in Table D-IV. The

  13. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage. PMID:28098147

  14. Freckle Defect Formation near the Casting Interfaces of Directionally Solidified Superalloys

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jianping; Ma, Dexin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Fu; Sun, Baode; Dong, Anping; Li, Fei; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Freckle defects usually appear on the surface of castings and industrial ingots during the directional solidification process and most of them are located near the interface between the shell mold and superalloys. Ceramic cores create more interfaces in the directionally solidified (DS) and single crystal (SX) hollow turbine blades. In order to investigate the location of freckle occurrence in superalloys, superalloy CM247 LC was directionally solidified in an industrial-sized Bridgman furnace. Instead of ceramic cores, Alumina tubes were used inside of the casting specimens. It was found that freckles occur not only on the casting external surfaces, but also appear near the internal interfaces between the ceramic core and superalloys. Meanwhile, the size, initial position, and area of freckle were investigated in various diameters of the specimens. The initial position of the freckle chain reduces when the diameter of the rods increase. Freckle area follows a linear relationship in various diameters and the average freckle fraction is 1.1% of cross sectional area of casting specimens. The flow of liquid metal near the interfaces was stronger than that in the interdendritic region in the mushy zone, and explained why freckle tends to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of castings. This new phenomenon suggests that freckles are more likely to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of the hollow turbine blades. PMID:28774050

  15. Freckle Defect Formation near the Casting Interfaces of Directionally Solidified Superalloys.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jianping; Ma, Dexin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Fu; Sun, Baode; Dong, Anping; Li, Fei; Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas

    2016-11-16

    Freckle defects usually appear on the surface of castings and industrial ingots during the directional solidification process and most of them are located near the interface between the shell mold and superalloys. Ceramic cores create more interfaces in the directionally solidified (DS) and single crystal (SX) hollow turbine blades. In order to investigate the location of freckle occurrence in superalloys, superalloy CM247 LC was directionally solidified in an industrial-sized Bridgman furnace. Instead of ceramic cores, Alumina tubes were used inside of the casting specimens. It was found that freckles occur not only on the casting external surfaces, but also appear near the internal interfaces between the ceramic core and superalloys. Meanwhile, the size, initial position, and area of freckle were investigated in various diameters of the specimens. The initial position of the freckle chain reduces when the diameter of the rods increase. Freckle area follows a linear relationship in various diameters and the average freckle fraction is 1.1% of cross sectional area of casting specimens. The flow of liquid metal near the interfaces was stronger than that in the interdendritic region in the mushy zone, and explained why freckle tends to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of castings. This new phenomenon suggests that freckles are more likely to occur on the outer or inner surfaces of the hollow turbine blades.

  16. Linear Stability of Binary Alloy Solidification for Unsteady Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Mullins and Sekerka (MS) linear stability analysis to the unsteady growth rate case is considered for dilute binary alloys. In particular, the stability of the planar interface during the initial solidification transient is studied in detail numerically. The rapid solidification case, when the system is traversing through the unstable region defined by the MS criterion, has also been treated. It has been observed that the onset of instability is quite accurately defined by the "quasi-stationary MS criterion", when the growth rate and other process parameters are taken as constants at a particular time of the growth process. A singular behavior of the governing equations for the perturbed quantities at the constitutional supercooling demarcation line has been observed. However, when the solidification process, during its transient, crosses this demarcation line, a planar interface is stable according to the linear analysis performed.

  17. Solidification Dynamics of Spherical Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105 meter drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By varying a drop s initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approx. 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance ,of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  18. Solidification Dynamics of Metal Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Brush, L. N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of experimental observations were made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with the cooling of a molten drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Experimentally, silver drops (99.9%, 4-9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the drops initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  19. Solidification Dynamics of Silver Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    1999-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the initial superheat condition of the drop the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  20. Why solidification has an S-shaped history

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, A.; Lorente, S.; Yilbas, B. S.; Sahin, A. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Here we show theoretically that the history of solid growth during “rapid” solidification must be S-shaped, in accord with the constructal law of design in nature. In the beginning the rate of solidification increases and after reaching a maximum it decreases monotonically as the volume of solid tends toward a plateau. The S-history is a consequence of four configurations for the flow of heat from the solidification front to the subcooled surroundings, in this chronological order: solid spheres centered at nucleation sites, needles that invade longitudinally, radial growth by conduction, and finally radial lateral conduction to interstices that are warming up. The solid volume (Bs) vs time (t) is an S-curve because it is a power law of type Bs ~ tn where the exponent n first increases and then decreases in time (n = 3/2, 2, 1, …). The initial portion of the S curve is not an exponential.

  1. Education and Caste in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  2. Effects of Rapid Solidification on Phase Formation and Microstructure Evolution of AgSbTe₂-Based Thermoelectric Compounds.

    PubMed

    Castellero, Alberto; Fiore, Gianluca; Evenstein, Eliran; Baricco, Marcello; Amouyal, Yaron

    2017-03-01

    We report on rapid solidification of an Ag(16.7)Sb(30.0)Te(53.3) compound using planar flow casting to stabilize the δ-AgSbTe₂ single phase and avoid precipitation of the interconnected Sb₂Te₃ phase, which leads to deterioration of thermoelectric properties. Rapidly solidified samples are in form of flakes with different thickness (60–400 μm). Precipitation of Sb2Te₃ phase is fully inhibited in thin flakes (thickness below 100 μm), which consist of an homogeneous δ-AgSbTe₂ matrix, whereas isolated Sb₂Te₃ precipitates, dispersed throughout the δ-AgSbTe₂ matrix, were found in thick flakes (thickness above 100 μm). The lattice parameter of the δ-AgSbTe₂ phase progressively increases with the cooling rate, indicating progressive supersaturation of the matrix for high degree of supercooling. Bulk specimens were prepared by hot pressing of the rapidly solidified flakes to evaluate thermoelectric properties. After sintering of the rapidly solidified flakes, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces indicates partial decomposition of the non equilibrium δ-AgSbTe₂ into the stable phases. Measurements of the thermoelectric transport properties indicate the positive effects of rapid solidification on thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient and its negative effect on electrical conductivity, suggesting an operative way to improve thermoelectric performance.

  3. Mathematical modeling of microstructural development in hypoeutectic cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Maijer, D.; Cockcroft, S.L.; Patt, W.

    A mathematical heat-transfer/microstructural model has been developed to predict the evolution of proeutectic austenite, white iron eutectic, and gray iron eutectic during solidification of hypoeutectic cast iron, based on the commercial finite-element code ABAQUS. Specialized routines which employ relationships describing nucleation and growth of equiaxed primary austenite, gray iron eutectic, and white iron eutectic have been formulated and incorporated into ABAQUS through user-specified subroutines. The relationships used in the model to describe microstructural evolution have been adapted from relationships describing equiaxed growth in the literature. The model has been validated/fine tuned against temperature data collected from a QuiK-Cup sample, whichmore » contained a thermocouple embedded approximately in the center of the casting. The phase distribution predicted with the model has been compared to the measured phase distribution inferred from the variation in hardness within the QuiK-Cup sample and from image analysis of photomicrographs of the polished and etched microstructure. Overall, the model results were found to agree well with the measured distribution of the microstructure.« less

  4. Critical Thinking on the Introduction of Digitization Within Engineering Training Systems in the Manufacturing Stage of Cast Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehene, T. R.; Samoilă, V.; Soporan, V. F.; Pădurețu, S.; Vescan, M. M.

    2018-06-01

    The paper aims to present a methodology for the analysis of the engineering training systems at the manufacturing stage of castings through critical engineering thinking. Its use [4, 5] requires the development of procedures capable of responding to the problems faced by engineering training in terms of acquiring the tools and procedures. The structure of the analysis took into consideration the following aspects: the motivation to use the proposed procedure, considerations on the engineering behavior, the design of the reasoning adapted to the analysis of the engineering training systems, the determination of the correlations in the processes of obtaining the cast products, the definition and calibration of the digital experiment, the definition and analysis of the factors influencing the last solidification area (the nature of the alloy, the shape of the mold and the casting geometry).

  5. Effect of Mg2Sn Intermetallic on the Grain Refinement in As-cast AM Series Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, J.; Pan, F. S.; Hu, H. H.; Tang, A. T.; Yu, Z. W.; Song, K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, in order to investigate the grain refinement mechanism of AM containing Sn alloys, the as-cast AM60, AM90 alloys, and the alloys with addition of 1 wt.% Sn were fabricated by traditional casting, respectively. During the solidification of AM + Sn alloys, the morphology of divorced eutectic Mg17Al12 was refined by Mg2Sn intermetallic that served as the heterogeneous nucleation cores. The modified Mg17Al12 effectively restricted the grain growth and resulted in a grain refinement. As a result, the yield strength of as-cast AM alloys was significantly enhanced by addition of Sn, while the ductility also improved. Moreover, the edge-to-edge model was employed to predict the orientation relationship between Mg17Al12 and Mg2Sn.

  6. Compositional redistribution during casting of Hg sub 0.8 Cd sub 0.2 Te alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Perry, G. L. E.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te ingots was cast both vertically and horizontally under well-defined thermal conditions by using a two-zone furnace with isothermal heat-pipe liners. The main objective of the experiments was to establish correlations between casting parameters and compositional redistribution and to develop ground-based data for a proposed flight experiment of casting of Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys under reduced gravity conditions. The compositional variations along the axial and radial directions were determined by precision density measurements, infrared transmission spectra, and X-ray energy dispersion spectrometry. Comparison between the experimental results and a numerical simulation of the solidification process of Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te is described.

  7. Some Pecularities of Solidification of the Almandine Impact Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, V. I.; Kozlov, E. A.; Zhugin, Yu. N.

    1996-03-01

    SOME PECULIARITIES OF SOLIDIFICATION OF THE ALMANDINE IMPACT MELT. Feldman V.I. Moscow State University, Geological Faculty, Department of Petrology, 119899, Moscow, Russia. Kozlov E.A., Zhugin Yu.N. Russian Federal nuclear Center - Research Institute of Technical Physics, P.O.Box 245, 456770, Snezhinsk, Russia. The aim of these investigations is a description of the experiments and the first results of a loading of the garnet sand by spherical converging shock waves. These experiments show that impact liquid have by solidification three stage of liquid immiscibility.

  8. Three-dimensional phase-field simulations of directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plapp, Mathis

    2007-05-01

    The phase-field method has become the method of choice for simulating microstructural pattern formation during solidification. One of its main advantages is that time-dependent three-dimensional simulations become feasible, which makes it possible to address long-standing questions of pattern stability and pattern selection. Here, a brief introduction to the phase-field model and its implementation is given, and its capabilities are illustrated by examples taken from the directional solidification of binary alloys. In particular, the morphological stability of hexagonal cellular arrays and of eutectic lamellar patterns is investigated.

  9. X-ray imaging and controlled solidification of Al-Cu alloys toward microstructures by design

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Tourret, Damien; Imhoff, Seth D.; ...

    2015-01-30

    X-ray imaging, which permits the microscopic visualization of metal alloy solidification dynamics, can be coupled with controlled solidification to create microstructures by design. In this study, this x-ray image shows a process-derived composite microstructure being made from a eutectic Al-17.1 at.%Cu alloy by successive solidification and remelting steps.

  10. Effects of Manganese Content on Solidification Structures, Thermal Properties, and Phase Transformation Characteristics in Fe-Mn-Al-C Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Nan; Ruan, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Zhu, Kai; Fan, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Ying-Chun; Li, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Fang

    2015-04-01

    To assist developments of the continuous-casting technology of Fe-Mn-Al-C steels, the solidification structures and the thermal properties of Fe-Mn-Al-C steel ingots with different manganese contents have been investigated and the phase transformation characteristics have been revealed by FactSage (CRCT-ThermFact Inc., Montréal, Canada). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the 0Mn steel is the highest, whereas the thermal conductivity of the 8Mn steel is slightly higher than that of the 17Mn steel. Increasing the manganese content promotes a columnar solidification structure and coarse grains in steel. With the increase of manganese content, the mass fraction of austenite phase is increased. Finally, a single austenite phase is formed in the 17Mn steel. The mean thermal expansion coefficients of the steels are in the range from 1.3 × 10-5 to 2.3 × 10-5 K-1, and these values increase with the increase of manganese content. The ductility of the 17Mn steel and the 8Mn steel are higher than 40 pct in the temperature range from 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C), and the cracking during the straightening operation should be avoided. However, the ductility of the 0Mn steel is lower than 40 pct at 973 K and 1123 K (700 °C and 850 °C), which indicates that the temperature of the straightening operation during the continuous-casting process should be above 1173 K (900 °C). Manganese has the effect of enlarging the austenite phase region and reducing the δ-ferrite phase region and α-ferrite phase region. At the 2.1 mass pct aluminum level, the precipitate temperature of AlN is high. Thus, the formed AlN is too coarse to deteriorate the hot ductility of steel.

  11. 3D analysis of macrosegregation in twin-roll cast AA3003 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Šlapáková, Michaela, E-mail: slapakova@karlov.mff.

    Twin-roll cast aluminium alloys have a high potential for industrial applications. However, one of the drawbacks of such materials is an inhomogeneous structure generated by macrosegregation, which appears under certain conditions in the center of sheets during solidification. Segregations in AA3003 alloy form as manganese, iron and silicon rich channels spread in the rolling direction. Their spatial distribution was successfully detected by X-ray computed tomography. Scanning electron microscopy was used for a detailed observation of microstructure, morphology and chemical analysis of the segregation. - Highlights: •Macrosegregations in twin-roll cast sheets stretch along the rolling direction. •X-ray computed tomography is anmore » effective tool for visualization of the segregation. •The segregations copy the shape of grain boundaries.« less

  12. Fractographic and three body abrasion behaviour of Al-Garnet-C hybrid chill cast composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandekar, Nityanand; Prasad, M. G. Anantha

    2017-08-01

    Fractographic and tribological behaviour of hybrid composite of aluminum alloy LM13 matrix with garnet and carbon was investigated. Conventional stir casting technique was used to fabricate the composites with chill cast technique. Various chill materials like Copper, Steel, Iron and Silicon carbide were used to improve the directional solidification. The garnet being added ranges from 3 to 12 wt-% in steps of 3wt-% and constant 3wt-% of carbon. The experiment evaluates the mechanical, fractographic and three body abrasion behaviour of the hybrid composites for various parameters of load, garnet and chills. Microstructural characterization of the composite samples revealed a uniform distribution of reinforcements with minimum clustering. SEM was used for examine worn surfaces. The addition of garnet and carbon reinforcement decreases the wear rate of hybrid composites. Fracture behaviour showed the changes from ductile mode to brittle mode of failure. Further, directional chilling with copper chill improves the wear resistance of the composites.

  13. Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Die-Cast Mg Alloy AZ91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Luke; Anderson, Warwick; Jones, J. Wayne

    An investigation has been conducted on the influence of microstructure and artificial aging response (T6) on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AZ91. Fatigue lifetimes were determined from total strain-controlled fatigue tests for strain amplitudes of 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%, under fully reversed loading at a frequency of 5 Hz. Cyclic stress-strain behavior was determined using incremental step test (IST) methods. Two locations in a prototype casting with different thicknesses and, therefore, solidification rates, microstructure and porosity, were examined. In general., at all total strain amplitudes fatigue life was unaffected by microstructure refinement and was attributed to significant levels of porosity. Cyclic softening and a subsequent increased cyclic hardening rate, compared to monotonic tests, were observed, independent of microstructure. These results, fractography and damage accumulation processes, determined from metallographic sectioning, are discussed.

  14. Study of ultrasonic melt treatment on the quality of horizontal continuously cast Al-1%Si alloy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Tao; Li, Ting-Ju; Li, Xi-Meng; Jin, Jun-Ze

    2006-02-01

    The fluctuation of the melt temperature in a tundish was measured during casting and experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ultrasonic melt treatment on the surface quality and solidification structures of Al-1%Si ingots. The results show that the uniformity of melt temperature was enhanced with the application of ultrasonic melt treatment. When the ultrasonic power is 1,000W, the surface quality was evidently improved and grains of cast ingots were refined. Moreover, EPMA analysis was adopted to study the relationship between the ultrasonic power and boundary segregation of Si element. The result shows that boundary segregation is suppressed with the increase of ultrasonic power and the phenomenon was theoretically interpreted.

  15. Crystallography and Morphology of MC Carbides in Niobium-Titanium Modified As-Cast HP Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Karl G.; Kral, Milo V.; Bishop, Catherine M.

    2014-07-01

    The microstructures of two as-cast heats of HP alloy stainless steels modified with niobium and titanium were examined with particular attention paid to the interdendritic niobium-titanium-rich carbides formed during solidification of these alloys. Generally, these precipitates obtain a blocky morphology in the as-cast condition. However, the (NbTi)C precipitates may obtain a nodular morphology. To provide further insight to the origin of the two different morphologies obtained by the (NbTi)C precipitates in the HP-NbTi alloy, the microstructure and crystallography of each have been studied in detail using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, various electron diffraction methods (EBSD, SAD, and CBED), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  16. Heat Transfer Measurements during DC Casting of Aluminium Part I: Measurement Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, J. A.; Bergström, T.

    A method for determination of surface heat transfer to the cooling water and mould based on in-situ temperature measurements in the DC cast ingot has been developed. Three or more steel mantled coaxial thermocouples (0.5 mm diam.) are mounted on a wire frame called a "harp". Allowing the "harp" to freeze into the solid ingots during the casting time-temperature plots T1 (t), T2(t), T3 (t) are obtained for three moving points positioned typically 3, 7 and 11 mm from the ingot surface. From these measurements surface temperature, heat flux and heat transfer coefficients are computed as functions of vertical distance. The computer program is based on steady-state two-dimensional heat balances with convective terms for two fixed volume elements: one around thermocouple T1 and one surface element. A special numerical smoothing procedure is incorporated. The heat of solidification is taken into account.

  17. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; King, Edward L.; Schneider, Ken C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  18. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, D.W.; King, E.L.; Schneider, K.C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points. 8 figures.

  19. Fractography of cast gypsum.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Yamane, M

    1982-02-01

    A fractographical study of dental cast gypsum was made in order to correlate the mechanical properties with the microstructure. Wet specimens fractured under tensile stress showed intercrystalline fracture and the tensile strength depended on the porosity present. Thus, it was assumed that tensile strength was dependent on the contact area between individual gypsum crystals and changes in porosity approximated to changes in contact area. Strength differences among specimens of a given W/P ratio, therefore, can be related to differences in intercrystalline contact areas. These theoretical considerations suggest that the classification of dental die stone and dental stone into high and low strength types based on strength properties only would be more practical and less confusing than at present.

  20. Ohno continuous casting

    SciTech Connect

    Soda, H.; McLean, A.; Motoyasu, G.

    1995-04-01

    Production of net-shape products directly from the liquid is an attractive manufacturing route for alloys that are difficult to process or that cannot be rolled, drawn, or extruded. Developed at the Chiba Institute of Technology in Japan, the Ohno Continuous Casting (OCC) approach not only provides significant cost savings, but also has the potential to create new products. OCC process equipment includes a melting furnace, crucible, mold level-control block, cooling device, and pinch rolls. OCC is currently used to produce copper rods and wires for audio and video cables, and aluminum alloy welding rods for hard-surfacing applications. For example, Mitsuimore » Engineering and Ship Building Co. has used OCC to produce copper tubing products with internal fins and partitions for applications such as heat exchanger tubes and induction coils.« less

  1. Delta-Ferrite Distribution in a Continuous Casting Slab of Fe-Cr-Mn Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Cheng, Guoguang

    2017-10-01

    The delta-ferrite distribution in a continuous casting slab of Fe-Cr-Mn stainless steel grade (200 series J4) was analyzed. The results showed that the ferrite fraction was less than 3 pct. The "M" type distribution was observed in the thickness direction. For the distribution at the centerline, the maximum ferrite content was found in the triangular zone of the macrostructure. In addition, in this zone, the carbon and sulfur were severely segregated. Furthermore, an equilibrium solidification calculation by Thermo-Calc® software indicates that the solidification mode of the composition in this triangular zone is the same as the solidification mode of the averaged composition, i.e., the FA (ferrite-austenite) mode. None of the nickel-chromium equivalent formulas combined with the Schaeffler-type diagram could predict the ferrite fraction of the Cr-Mn stainless steel grade in a reasonable manner. The authors propose that more attention should be paid to the development of prediction models for the ferrite fraction of stainless steels under continuous casting conditions.

  2. Data on the effect of homogenization heat treatments on the cast structure and tensile properties of alloy 718Plus in the presence of grain-boundary elements.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Madar, Karim Zangeneh; Abbasi, Seyed Mehdi

    2017-08-01

    The segregation of the elements during solidification and the direct formation of destructive phases such as Laves from the liquid, result in in-homogeneity of the cast structure and degradation of mechanical properties. Homogenization heat treatment is one of the ways to eliminate destructive Laves from the cast structure of superalloys such as 718Plus. The collected data presents the effect of homogenization treatment conditions on the cast structure, hardness, and tensile properties of the alloy 718Plus in the presence of boron and zirconium additives. For this purpose, five alloys with different contents of boron and zirconium were cast by VIM/VAR process and then were homogenized at various conditions. The microstructural investigation by OM and SEM and phase analysis by XRD were done and then hardness and tensile tests were performed on the homogenized alloys.

  3. Microstructure formation in partially melted zone during gas tungsten arc welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Tianping; Chen, Zhan W.; Gao Wei

    2008-11-15

    During gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy, constitutional liquid forms locally in the original interdendritic regions in the partially melted zone (PMZ). The PMZ re-solidification behaviour has not been well understood. In this study, the gradual change of the re-solidification microstructure within PMZ from base metal side to weld metal side was characterised. High cooling rate experiments using Gleeble thermal simulator were also conducted to understand the morphological change of the {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase interface formed during re-solidification after partial melting. It was found that the original partially divorced eutectic structure has become a moremore » regular eutectic phase in most of the PMZ, although close to the fusion boundary the re-solidified eutectic is again a divorced one. Proceeding the eutectic re-solidification, if the degree of partial melting is sufficiently high, {alpha}-Mg re-solidified with a cellular growth, resulting in a serrated interface between {alpha}-Mg and {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} in the weld sample and between {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} (fully divorced eutectic) in Gleeble samples. The morphological changes affected by the peak temperature and cooling rate are also explained.« less

  4. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.

  5. STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION OF CERCLA AND RCRA WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides U.S. EPA regional staff responsible for reviewing CERCLA remedial action plans and RCRA permit applications with a tool for interpreting information on stabilization/solidification treatment. As a practical day-to-day reference guide, it will also provide t...

  6. Progress in modeling solidification in molten salt coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tano, Mauricio; Rubiolo, Pablo; Doche, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    Molten salts have been proposed as heat carrier media in the nuclear and concentrating solar power plants. Due to their high melting temperature, solidification of the salts is expected to occur during routine and accidental scenarios. Furthermore, passive safety systems based on the solidification of these salts are being studied. The following article presents new developments in the modeling of eutectic molten salts by means of a multiphase, multicomponent, phase-field model. Besides, an application of this methodology for the eutectic solidification process of the ternary system LiF-KF-NaF is presented. The model predictions are compared with a newly developed semi-analytical solution for directional eutectic solidification at stable growth rate. A good qualitative agreement is obtained between the two approaches. The results obtained with the phase-field model are then used for calculating the homogenized properties of the solid phase distribution. These properties can then be included in a mixture macroscale model, more suitable for industrial applications.

  7. Overview of the Tusas Code for Simulation of Dendritic Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Trainer, Amelia J.; Newman, Christopher Kyle; Francois, Marianne M.

    2016-01-07

    The aim of this project is to conduct a parametric investigation into the modeling of two dimensional dendrite solidification, using the phase field model. Specifically, we use the Tusas code, which is for coupled heat and phase-field simulation of dendritic solidification. Dendritic solidification, which may occur in the presence of an unstable solidification interface, results in treelike microstructures that often grow perpendicular to the rest of the growth front. The interface may become unstable if the enthalpy of the solid material is less than that of the liquid material, or if the solute is less soluble in solid than itmore » is in liquid, potentially causing a partition [1]. A key motivation behind this research is that a broadened understanding of phase-field formulation and microstructural developments can be utilized for macroscopic simulations of phase change. This may be directly implemented as a part of the Telluride project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), through which a computational additive manufacturing simulation tool is being developed, ultimately to become part of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program within the U.S. Department of Energy [2].« less

  8. Metal Solidification Imaging Process by Magnetic Induction Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Spagnul, Stefano; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2017-11-06

    There are growing number of important applications that require a contactless method for monitoring an object surrounded inside a metallic enclosure. Imaging metal solidification is a great example for which there is no real time monitoring technique at present. This paper introduces a technique - magnetic induction tomography - for the real time in-situ imaging of the metal solidification process. Rigorous experimental verifications are presented. Firstly, a single inductive coil is placed on the top of a melting wood alloy to examine the changes of its inductance during solidification process. Secondly, an array of magnetic induction coils are designed to investigate the feasibility of a tomographic approach, i.e., when one coil is driven by an alternating current as a transmitter and a vector of phase changes are measured from the remaining of the coils as receivers. Phase changes are observed when the wood alloy state changes from liquid to solid. Thirdly, a series of static cold phantoms are created to represent various liquid/solid interfaces to verify the system performance. Finally, a powerful temporal reconstruction method is applied to realise real time in-situ visualisation of the solidification and the measurement of solidified shell thickness, a first report of its kind.

  9. Hazcon Solidification Process, Douglassville, Pa.: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the HAZCON solidification technology and its applicability as an on-site treatment method for waste site cleanup. A Demonstration was held at the Douglassville, Pennsylvania Superfund site in the fall of 1987. Operational data and sampling and an...

  10. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  11. The influence of gravity level during directional solidification of immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. B.; Schmale, A. L.; Sandlin, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    During directional solidification of immiscible (hypermonotectic) alloys it is theoretically possible to establish a stable macroscopically-planar solidification front, and thus avoid sedimentation. Unfortunately, convective instabilities often occur which interfere with the directional solidification process. In this paper, stability conditions are discussed and results presented from directional solidification studies carried out aboard NASA's KC-135 zero-g aircraft. Samples were directionally solidified while the effective gravity level was varied from approximately 0.01 g for 25 s to 1.8 g for 45 s. Dramatic variations in microstructure were observed with gravity level during solidification.

  12. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  13. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  14. A laboratory model for solidification of Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Michael I.; Macleod-Silberstein, Marget; Haskel, Michael; Chandler, Benjamin; Akpan, Nsikan

    2005-11-01

    To better understand the influence of rotating convection in the outer core on the solidification of the inner core we have constructed a laboratory model for solidification of Earth's core. The model consists of a 15 cm radius hemispherical acrylic tank concentric with a 5 cm radius hemispherical aluminum heat exchanger that serves as the incipient inner core onto which we freeze ice from salt water. Long exposure photographs of neutrally buoyant particles in illuminated planes suggest reduction of flow parallel to the rotation axis. Thermistors in the tank near the heat exchanger show that in experiments with rotation the temperature near the pole is lower than near the equator, unlike for control experiments without rotation or with a polymer that increases the fluid viscosity. The photographs and thermistors suggest that our observation that ice grows faster near the pole than near the equator for experiments with rotation is a result of colder water not readily convecting away from the pole. Because of the reversal of the thermal gradient, we expect faster equatorial solidification in the Earth's core. Such anisotropy in solidification has been suggested as a cause of inner core elastic (and attenuation) anisotropy, though the plausibility of this suggestion will depend on the core Nusselt number and the slope of the liquidus, and the effects of post-solidification deformation. Previous experiments on hexagonal close-packed alloys such as sea ice and zinc-tin have shown that fluid flow in the melt can result in a solidification texture transverse to the solidification direction, with the texture depending on the nature of the flow. A comparison of the visualized flow and the texture of columnar ice crystals in thin sections from these experiments confirms flow-induced transverse textures. This suggests that the convective pattern at the base of the outer core is recorded in the texture of the inner core, and that outer core convection might contribute to the

  15. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  16. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  17. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  18. Freeze-cast alumina pore networks: Effects of freezing conditions and dispersion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S. M.; Xiao, X.; Faber, K. T.

    Alumina ceramics were freeze-cast from water- and camphene-based slurries under varying freezing conditions and examined using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Pore network characteristics, i.e., porosity, pore size, geometric surface area, and tortuosity, were measured from XCT reconstructions and the data were used to develop a model to predict feature size from processing conditions. Classical solidification theory was used to examine relationships between pore size, temperature gradients, and freezing front velocity. Freezing front velocity was subsequently predicted from casting conditions via the two-phase Stefan problem. Resulting models for water-based samples agreed with solidification-based theories predicting lamellar spacing of binary eutectic alloys,more » and models for camphene-based samples concurred with those for dendritic growth. Relationships between freezing conditions and geometric surface area were also modeled by considering the inverse relationship between pore size and surface area. Tortuosity was determined to be dependent primarily on the type of dispersion medium. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.« less

  19. Study of Fluid Experiment System (FES)/CAST/Holographic Ground System (HGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Cummings, Rick; Jones, Brian

    1992-01-01

    The use of holographic and schlieren optical techniques for studying the concentration gradients in solidification processes has been used by several investigators over the years. The HGS facility at MSFC has been primary resource in researching this capability. Consequently, scientific personnel have been able to utilize these techniques in both ground based research and in space experiments. An important event in the scientific utilization of the HGS facilities was the TGS Crystal Growth and the casting and solidification technology (CAST) experiments that were flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML) mission in March of this year. The preparation and processing of these space observations are the primary experiments reported in this work. This project provides some ground-based studies to optimize on the holographic techniques used to acquire information about the crystal growth processes flown on IML. Since the ground-based studies will be compared with the space-based experimental results, it is necessary to conduct sufficient ground based studies to best determine how the experiment worked in space. The current capabilities in computer based systems for image processing and numerical computation have certainly assisted in those efforts. As anticipated, this study has certainly shown that these advanced computing capabilities are helpful in the data analysis of such experiments.

  20. Nucleation and Growth of Graphite in Eutectic Spheroidal Cast Iron: Modeling and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of graphite growth during the continuous cooling of eutectic spheroidal cast iron is presented in this paper. The model considers the nucleation and growth of graphite from pouring to room temperature. The microstructural model of solidification accounts for the eutectic as divorced and graphite growth rate as a function of carbon gradient at the liquid in contact with the graphite. In the solid state, the microstructural model takes into account three stages for graphite growth, namely (1) from the end of solidification to the upper bound of intercritical stable eutectoid, (2) during the intercritical stable eutectoid, and (3) from the lower bound of intercritical stable eutectoid to room temperature. The micro- and macrostructural models are coupled using a sequential multiscale approach. Numerical results for graphite fraction and size distribution are compared with experimental results obtained from a cylindrical cup, in which the graphite volumetric fraction and size distribution were obtained using the Schwartz-Saltykov approach. The agreements between the experimental and numerical results for the fraction of graphite and the size distribution of spheroids reveal the importance of numerical models in the prediction of the main aspects of graphite in spheroidal cast iron.

  1. The influence of buoyant forces and volume fraction of particles on the particle pushing/entrapment transition during directional solidification of Al/SiC and Al/graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Moitra, Avijit; Kacar, A. Sedat; Dhindaw, Brij K.

    1990-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments in a Bridgman-type furnace were used to study particle behavior at the liquid/solid interface in aluminum metal matrix composites. Graphite or silicon-carbide particles were first dispersed in aluminum-base alloys via a mechanically stirred vortex. Then, 100-mm-diameter and 120-mm-long samples were cast in steel dies and used for directional solidification. The processing variables controlled were the direction and velocity of solidification and the temperature gradient at the interface. The material variables monitored were the interface energy, the liquid/particle density difference, the particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio, and the volume fraction of particles. These properties were changed by selecting combinations of particles (graphite or silicon carbide) and alloys (Al-Cu, Al-Mg, Al-Ni). A model which consideres process thermodynamics, process kinetics (including the role of buoyant forces), and thermophysical properties was developed. Based on solidification direction and velocity, and on materials properties, four types of behavior were predicted. Sessile drop experiments were also used to determine some of the interface energies required in calculation with the proposed model. Experimental results compared favorably with model predictions.

  2. The influence of buoyant forces and volume fraction of particles on the particle pushing/entrapment transition during directional solidification of Al/SiC and Al/graphite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Moitra, Avijit; Kacar, A. Sedat; Dhindaw, Brij K.

    1990-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments in a Bridgman-type furnace were used to study particle behavior at the liquid/solid interface in aluminum metal matrix composites. Graphite or siliconcarbide particles were first dispersed in aluminum-base alloys via a mechanically stirred vortex. Then, 100-mm-diameter and 120-mm-long samples were cast in steel dies and used for directional solidification. The processing variables controlled were the direction and velocity of solidification and the temperature gradient at the interface. The material variables monitored were the interface energy, the liquid/particle density difference, the particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio, and the volume fraction of particles. These properties were changed by selecting combinations of particles (graphite or silicon carbide) and alloys (Al-Cu, Al-Mg, Al-Ni). A model which considers process thermodynamics, process kinetics (including the role of buoyant forces), and thermophysical properties was developed. Based on solidification direction and velocity, and on materials properties, four types of behavior were predicted. Sessile drop experiments were also used to determine some of the interface energies required in calculation with the proposed model. Experimental results compared favorably with model predictions.

  3. Segregation and microstructure evolution in chill cast and directionally solidified Ni-Mn-Sn metamagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, P.; Wierzbicka-Miernik, A.; Rogal, Ł.

    2018-06-01

    A multiphase solidification behaviour is confirmed for a range of Ni-rich and Ni-deficient Ni-Mn-Sn induction cast and directionally solidified (Bridgman) alloys. The composition variation is primarily linked to the changing Mn/Sn ratio, whereas the content of Ni remains largely stable. The partitioning coefficients for the Ni50Mn37Sn13 and Ni46Mn41.5Sn12.5 Bridgman alloys were obtained according to the Scheil equation based on the composition distribution along the longitudinal cross section of the ingots. Homogenization heat treatment performed for 72 h at 1220 K turned out sufficient for ensuring chemical uniformity on the macro- and microscale. It is owed to a limited segregation length scale due to slow cooling rates adopted for the directional solidification process.

  4. 21 CFR 880.6185 - Cast cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cast cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and....6185 Cast cover. (a) Identification. A cast cover is a device intended for medical purposes that is made of waterproof material and placed over a cast to protect it from getting wet during a shower or a...

  5. Relationship between microstructure and ductility of investment cast ASTM F-75 implant alloy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Mancha, H; Salinas, A; Rodríguez, J L; Escobedo, J; Castro, M; Méndez, M

    1997-02-01

    Hip replacement implants fabricated using the ASTM F-75 alloy sometimes fail in a sudden catastrophic way. In general, fractures start at microstructural defects subjected to stress-corrosion under chemical attack by body fluids. In this paper the results of a study on the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure of ASTM F-75 are presented. The preheating mold temperature and the liquid temperature were varied between 900 and 1000 degrees C, and 1410 and 1470 degrees C, respectively. Optimum static strength and ductility were obtained when shrinkage microporosity and the volume fraction of M23C6 "eutectic" carbides precipitated at grain boundaries were minimized by increasing the preheating mold temperature to 1000 degrees C and by using intermediate pouring temperatures of 1455 degrees C. Under these casting conditions, however, the solidification rates are low, leading to large grain sizes, which, in turn, reduce the strength of the material under dynamic loading conditions. The volume fraction of the M23C6 "blocky" carbides appears to be independent of the casting conditions; however, their size and spatial distributions determine the strength of the as-cast alloys.

  6. The Simulation of Magnesium Wheel Low Pressure Die Casting Based on PAM-CAST™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yinghong; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Dayong; Zeng, Xiaoqin

    2004-06-01

    Magnesium is the lightest metal commonly used in engineering, with various excellent characteristics such as high strength and electromagnetic interference shielding capability. Particularly, the usage of magnesium in automotive industry can meet better the need to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. Nowadays, most current magnesium components in automobiles are made by die casting. In this paper, commercial software for die casting, PAM-CAST™, was utilized to simulate the low pressure die casting process of magnesium wheel. Through calculating temperature field and velocity field during filling and solidification stages, the evolution of temperature distribution and liquid fraction was analyzed. Then, the potential defects including the gas entrapments in the middle of the spokes, shrinkages between the rim and the spokes were forecasted. The analytical results revealed that the mold geometry and die casting parameters should be improved in order to get the sound magnesium wheel. The reasons leading to these defects were also analyzed and the solutions to eliminate them were put forward. Furthermore, through reducing the pouring velocity, the air gas entrapments and partial shrinkages were eliminated effectively.

  7. Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, A. L.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Allen, T. R.

    2012-07-01

    This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by thatmore » fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO{sub 2}) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models

  8. Crew Autonomous Scheduling Test (CAST)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-18

    iss052e016190 (July 18, 2017) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson is photographed sitting in front of the Cupola windows during the final Crew Autonomous Scheduling Test (CAST) session. The CAST investigation analyzes whether crews can develop plans in a reasonable period of time with appropriate input, whether proximity of planners to the planned operations increases efficiency, and if crew members are more satisfied when given a role in plan development.

  9. Vascular corrosion casting technique steps.

    PubMed

    Verli, Flaviana Dornela; Rossi-Schneider, Tissiana Raquel; Schneider, Felipe Luís; Yurgel, Liliane Soares; de Souza, Maria Antonieta Lopes

    2007-01-01

    The vascular corrosion casting technique produces a replica of vascular beds of normal or pathological tissues. Once associated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), this technique provides details of the three-dimensional anatomic arrangement of the vascular replica, which is the main advantage of this method. The present study is intended to describe the steps of the vascular corrosion casting technique and the different ways to perform them. them.

  10. In situ Neutron Diffraction during Casting: Determination of Rigidity Point in Grain Refined Al-Cu Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Drezet, Jean-Marie; Mireux, Bastien; Szaraz, Zoltan; Pirling, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The rigidity temperature of a solidifying alloy is the temperature at which the solid plus liquid phases are sufficiently coalesced to transmit long range tensile strains and stresses. It determines the point at which thermally induced deformations start to generate internal stresses in a casting. As such, it is a key parameter in numerical modelling of solidification processes and in studying casting defects such as solidification cracking. This temperature has been determined in Al-Cu alloys using in situ neutron diffraction during casting in a dog bone shaped mould. In such a setup, the thermal contraction of the solidifying material is constrained and stresses develop at a hot spot that is irradiated by neutrons. Diffraction peaks are recorded every 11 s using a large detector, and their evolution allows for the determination of the rigidity temperatures. We measured rigidity temperatures equal to 557 °C and 548 °C, depending on cooling rate, for a grain refined Al-13 wt% Cu alloy. At high cooling rate, rigidity is reached during the formation of the eutectic phase and the solid phase is not sufficiently coalesced, i.e., strong enough, to avoid hot tear formation. PMID:28788507

  11. In situ Neutron Diffraction during Casting: Determination of Rigidity Point in Grain Refined Al-Cu Alloys.

    PubMed

    Drezet, Jean-Marie; Mireux, Bastien; Szaraz, Zoltan; Pirling, Thilo

    2014-02-12

    The rigidity temperature of a solidifying alloy is the temperature at which the solid plus liquid phases are sufficiently coalesced to transmit long range tensile strains and stresses. It determines the point at which thermally induced deformations start to generate internal stresses in a casting. As such, it is a key parameter in numerical modelling of solidification processes and in studying casting defects such as solidification cracking. This temperature has been determined in Al-Cu alloys using in situ neutron diffraction during casting in a dog bone shaped mould. In such a setup, the thermal contraction of the solidifying material is constrained and stresses develop at a hot spot that is irradiated by neutrons. Diffraction peaks are recorded every 11 s using a large detector, and their evolution allows for the determination of the rigidity temperatures. We measured rigidity temperatures equal to 557 °C and 548 °C, depending on cooling rate, for a grain refined Al-13 wt% Cu alloy. At high cooling rate, rigidity is reached during the formation of the eutectic phase and the solid phase is not sufficiently coalesced, i.e. , strong enough, to avoid hot tear formation.

  12. Modeling of the Coupling of Microstructure and Macrosegregation in a Direct Chill Cast Al-Cu Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyvaert, Laurent; Bedel, Marie; Založnik, Miha; Combeau, Hervé

    2017-10-01

    The macroscopic multiphase flow and the growth of the solidification microstructures in the mushy zone of a direct chill (DC) casting are closely coupled. These couplings are the key to the understanding of the formation of the macrosegregation and of the non-uniform microstructure of the casting. In the present paper we use a multiphase and multiscale model to provide a fully coupled picture of the links between macrosegregation and microstructure in a DC cast billet. The model describes nucleation from inoculant particles and growth of dendritic and globular equiaxed crystal grains, fully coupled with macroscopic transport phenomena: fluid flow induced by natural convection and solidification shrinkage, heat, mass, and solute mass transport, motion of free-floating equiaxed grains, and of grain refiner particles. We compare our simulations to experiments on grain-refined and non-grain-refined industrial size billets from literature. We show that a transition between dendritic and globular grain morphology triggered by the grain refinement is the key to the explanation of the differences between the macrosegregation patterns in the two billets. We further show that the grain size and morphology are strongly affected by the macroscopic transport of free-floating equiaxed grains and of grain refiner particles.

  13. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  14. Phase-field simulation of weld solidification microstructure in an Al Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzadi, A.; Do-Quang, M.; Serajzadeh, S.; Kokabi, A. H.; Amberg, G.

    2008-09-01

    Since the mechanical properties and the integrity of the weld metal depend on the solidification behaviour and the resulting microstructural characteristics, understanding weld pool solidification is of importance to engineers and scientists. Thermal and fluid flow conditions affect the weld pool geometry and solidification parameters. During solidification of the weld pool, a columnar grain structure develops in the weld metal. Prediction of the formation of the microstructure during welding may be an important and supporting factor for technology optimization. Nowadays, increasing computing power allows direct simulations of the dendritic and cell morphology of columnar grains in the molten zone for specific temperature conditions. In this study, the solidification microstructures of the weld pool at different locations along the fusion boundary are simulated during gas tungsten arc welding of Al-3wt%Cu alloy using the phase-field model for the directional solidification of dilute binary alloys. A macroscopic heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to assess the solidification parameters, notably the temperature gradient and solidification growth rate. The effect of the welding speed is investigated. Computer simulations of the solidification conditions and the formation of a cellular morphology during the directional solidification in gas tungsten arc welding are described. Moreover, the simulation results are compared with existing theoretical models and experimental findings.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part II—Mechanical and Thermal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Porter, Wallace D.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-05-01

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systems (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.

  16. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizingmore » the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.« less

  17. A review of rapid solidification studies of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A review of rapid solidification studies of high-temperature ordered intermetallic compounds is presented. Emphasis is on the nickel - and iron- aluminides which are of potential interest as structural materials. The nickel-base aluminides which have been rapidly solidified exhibit changes in grain size, compositional segregation, and degree of long range order (as reflected in APB size and distribution) which markedly affect mechanical properties. Some experiments indicate the formation of a metastable L1(2) phase in rapidly solidified Fe-(Ni,Mn)-Al-C alloys, while other work observes only a metastable fcc phase in the same composition range. The metastable phases and/or microstructures in both nickel and iron aluminides are destroyed by annealing at temperatures above 750 K, with subsequent degradation of mechanical properties. Rapid solidification studies of several other intermetallic compounds are briefly noted.

  18. Numerical model for dendritic solidification of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felicelli, S. D.; Heinrich, J. C.; Poirier, D. R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element model capable of simulating solidification of binary alloys and the formation of freckles is presented. It uses a single system of equations to deal with the all-liquid region, the dendritic region, and the all-solid region. The dendritic region is treated as an anisotropic porous medium. The algorithm uses the bilinear isoparametric element, with a penalty function approximation and a Petrov-Galerkin formulation. Numerical simulations are shown in which an NH4Cl-H2O mixture and a Pb-Sn alloy melt are cooled. The solidification process is followed in time. Instabilities in the process can be clearly observed and the final compositions obtained.

  19. Gravitational modulation of thermosolutal convection during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, B. T.; Coriell, S. R.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.; Saunders, B. V.

    1993-03-01

    During directional solidification of a binary alloy at constant velocity, thermosolutal convection may occur due to the temperature and solute gradients associated with the solidification process. For vertical growth in an ideal furnace (lacking horizontal gradients) a quiescent state is possible. The effect of a time-periodic vertical gravitational acceleration (or equivalently vibration) on the onset of thermosolutal convection is calculated based on linear stability using Floquet theory. Numerical calculations for the onset of instability have been carried out for a semiconductor alloy with Schmidt number of 10 and Prandtl number of 0.1 with primary emphasis on large modulation frequencies in a microgravity environment for which the background gravitational acceleration is negligible. The numerical results demonstrate that there is a significant difference in stability depending on whether a heavier or lighter solute is rejected. For large modulation frequencies, the stability behavior can be described by either the method of averaging or an asymptotic resonant mode analysis.

  20. Continuous Solidification of Immiscible Alloys and Microstructure Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongxiang; Zhao, Jiuzhou

    2018-05-01

    Immiscible alloys have aroused considerable interest in last few decades due to their excellent physical and mechanical characteristics as well as potential industrial applications. Up to date, plenty of researches have been carried out to investigate the solidification of immiscible alloys on the ground or in space and great progress has been made. It is demonstrated that the continuous solidification technique have great future in the manufacturing of immiscible alloys, it also indicates that the addition of surface active micro-alloying or inoculants for the nucleation of the minority phase droplets and proper application of external fields, e.g., static magnetic field, electric current, microgravity field, etc. may promote the formation of immiscible alloys with an expected microstructure. The objective of this article is to review the research work in this field.

  1. Property measurements and solidification studies by electrostatic levitation.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Paul-François; Yu, Jianding; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    2004-11-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan has recently developed several electrostatic levitation furnaces and implemented new techniques and procedures for property measurement, solidification studies, and atomic structure research. In addition to the contamination-free environment for undercooled and liquid metals and semiconductors, the newly developed facilities possess the unique capabilities of handling ceramics and high vapor pressure materials, reducing processing time, and imaging high luminosity samples. These are exemplified in this paper with the successful processing of BaTiO(3). This allowed measurement of the density of high temperature solid, liquid, and undercooled phases. Furthermore, the material resulting from containerless solidification consisted of micrometer-size particles and a glass-like phase exhibiting a giant dielectric constant exceeding 100,000.

  2. Metastable and unstable cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deville, Sylvain; Maire, Eric; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Lasalle, Audrey; Bogner, Agnès; Gauthier, Catherine; Leloup, Jérôme; Guizard, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Colloidal particles are often seen as big atoms that can be directly observed in real space. They are therefore becoming increasingly important as model systems to study processes of interest in condensed-matter physics such as melting, freezing and glass transitions. The solidification of colloidal suspensions has long been a puzzling phenomenon with many unexplained features. Here, we demonstrate and rationalize the existence of instability and metastability domains in cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions, by direct in situ high-resolution X-ray radiography and tomography observations. We explain such interface instabilities by a partial Brownian diffusion of the particles leading to constitutional supercooling situations. Processing under unstable conditions leads to localized and global kinetic instabilities of the solid/liquid interface, affecting the crystal morphology and particle redistribution behaviour.

  3. Fluid mechanics and solidification investigations in low-gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Lundquist, C. A.; Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid mechanics of gases and liquids and solidification processes were investigated under microgravity conditions during Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions. Electromagnetic, acoustic, and aerodynamic levitation devices, drop tubes, aircraft parabolic flight trajectories, and vertical sounding rockets were developed for low-g simulation. The Spacelab 3 mission will be carried out in a gravity gradient flight attitude; analyses of sources of vehicle dynamic accelerations with associated g-levels and angular rates will produce results for future specific experiments.

  4. Formation of Nitrogen Bubbles During Solidification of Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kaiju; Wang, Bo; Xue, Fei; Liu, Shanshan; Huang, Junkai; Zhang, Jieyu

    2018-04-01

    The nucleation and growth of nitrogen bubbles for duplex stainless steels are of great significance for the formation mechanism of bubbles during solidification. In the current study, numerical method and theoretical analysis of formula derivation were used to study the formation of nitrogen bubbles during solidification. The critical sizes of the bubble for homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation at the solid-liquid interface during solidification were derived theoretically by the classical nucleation theory. The results show that the calculated values for the solubility of nitrogen in duplex stainless steel are in good agreement with the experimental values which are quoted by references: for example, when the temperature T = 1823 K and the nitrogen partial pressure P_{{N2 }} = 40P^{Θ} , the calculated value (0.8042 wt pct) for the solubility of Fe-12Cr alloy nitrogen in molten steel is close to the experimental value (0.780 wt pct). Moreover, the critical radii for homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation are identical during solidification. On the one hand, with the increasing temperature or the melt depth, the critical nucleation radius of bubbles at the solid-liquid interface increases, but the bubble growth rate decreases. On the other hand, with the decreasing initial content of nitrogen or the cooling rate, the critical nucleation radius of bubbles at the solid-liquid interface increases, but the bubble growth rate decreases. Furthermore, when the melt depth is greater than the critical depth, which is determined by the technological conditions, the change in the Gibbs free energy for the nucleation is not conducive enough to form new bubbles.

  5. Interface Pattern Selection Criterion for Cellular Structures in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Kurtze, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. We shall first address scientific concepts that are crucial in the selection of interface patterns. Next, the results of ground-based experimental studies in the Al-4.0 wt % Cu system will be described. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations will be presented to establish the need for microgravity experiments.

  6. Development Of A Magnetic Directional-Solidification Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Bill R.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes development of directional-solidification furnace in which axial magnetic field is imposed by surrounding ring permanent magnets and/or electromagnets and pole pieces. Furnace provides controlled axial temperature gradients in multiple zones, through which ampoule containing sample of material to be solidified is translated at controlled speed by low-vibration, lead-screw, stepping-motor-driven mechanism. Intended for use in low-gravity (spaceflight) experiments on melt growth of high-purity semiconductor crystals.

  7. Impact of Metal Droplets: A Numerical Approach to Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldeweij, Robin; Mandamparambil, Rajesh; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Layer-wise deposition of material to produce complex products is a subject of increasing technological relevance. Subsequent deposition of droplets is one of the possible 3d printing technologies to accomplish this. The shape of the solidified droplet is crucial for product quality. We employ the volume-of-fluid method (in the form of the open-source code Gerris) to study liquid metal (in particular tin) droplet impact. Heat transfer has been implemented based on the enthalpy approach for the liquid-solid phase. Solidification is modeled by adding a sink term to the momentum equations, reducing Navier-Stokes to Darcy's law for high solid fraction. Good agreement is found when validating the results against experimental data. We then map out a phase diagram in which we distinguish between solidification behavior based on Weber and Stefan number. In an intermediate impact regime impact, solidification due to a retracting phase occurs. In this regime the maximum spreading diameter almost exclusively depends on Weber number. Droplet shape oscillations lead to a broad variation of the morphology of the solidified droplet and determine the final droplet height. TNO.

  8. Resistivity Distribution of Multicrystalline Silicon Ingot Grown by Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. H.; Tan, Y.; Dong, W.; Zhang, H. X.; Zhang, J. S.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of impurities on the resistivity distribution and polarity of multicrystalline silicon ingot prepared by directional solidification were investigated in this article. The shape of the equivalence line of the resistivity in the vertical and cross sections was determined by the solid-liquid interface. Along the solidification height of silicon ingot, the conductive type changed from p-type in the lower part of the silicon ingot to n-type in the upper part of the silicon ingot. The resistivity in the vertical section of the silicon ingot initially increased along the height of the solidified part, and reached its maximum at the polarity transition position, then decreased rapidly along the height of solidified part and approached zero on the top of the ingot because of the accumulation of impurities. The variation of resistivity in the vertical section of the ingot has been proven to be deeply relevant to the distribution of Al, B, and P in the growth direction of solidification.

  9. Transient Effects in Planar Solidification of Dilute Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    The initial transient during planar solidification of dilute binary alloys is studied in the framework of the boundary integral method that leads to the non-linear Volterra integral governing equation. An analytical solution of this equation is obtained for the case of a constant growth rate which constitutes the well-known Tiller's formula for the solute transient. The more physically relevant, constant ramping down temperature case has been studied both numerically and analytically. In particular, an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained for the initial transient behavior. A numerical technique to solve the non-linear Volterra equation is developed and the solution is obtained for a family of the governing parameters. For the rapid solidification condition, growth rate spikes have been observed even for the infinite kinetics model. When recirculating fluid flow is included into the analysis, the spike feature is dramatically diminished. Finally, we have investigated planar solidification with a fluctuating temperature field as a possible mechanism for frequently observed solute trapping bands.

  10. Research on metal solidification in zero-g state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The containerless solidification of several pure metals and metallic alloys was studied in a low gravity environment. The tests were performed in the MSFC 4.2 s drop tower using a rapid wire melting apparatus designed and built for this purpose. Pure iron and nickel, and alloys of iron-nickel, iron-carbon, nickel-aluminum and tungsten-rhenium were all melted and solidified at a gravity level of approximately 100.000/-4 g. Interpretation of the results has led to an appreciation of the factors controlling the successful execution of this drop test experiment and to a delineation of the limits of applicability of the apparatus. Preliminary metallurgical evaluations are presented of the overall shapes, lattice parameters, surface microstructure,, cross-sectional microstructures, solidification and transformation sequences, evaporative segregation, and localized solute redistribution observed in the low-gravity specimens. The effects of low gravity on metallic solidification are discussed with particular emphasis on observations of spontaneous undercooling and evaporative segregation in uncontained melts.

  11. Study on solidification of immisible alloys (M-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamio, Akihiko

    1993-01-01

    Alloying of immiscible alloys under microgravity is of interest in metallurgical processes. Several experiments investigating the alloying of immiscible alloys, such as Al-In, Al-Bi, Zn-Bi, and Zn-Pb, were done in space. Homogeneous distribution of small L2 particles in the matrix, such as an emulsion structure, was expected in the space-solidifed alloys. However, the alloys demonstrated an extremely segregated structure. To date insufficient information was obtained to explain these unexpected results. Our experiment was proposed to clarify the solidification manner of immiscible alloys and to obtain fundamental information concerning structural control of the alloys. In space, density differences between the two liquids separated in immiscible regions can be neglected, so that no sedimentation of L(sub 2) phase will take place. When the growth of the alloys is interrupted and this status is frozen by an adequate rapid cooling procedure, it will provide much information concerning decomposing homogeneous liquid and the interaction between the monotectic growth front morphology and the distribution of L(sub 2) phase. It is anticipated that the results will be useful for elucidating the monotectic solidification manner and it will be instructive to explain the segregated structures obtained in the past space experiments.

  12. Heat Treatment Development for a Rapidly Solidified Heat Resistant Cast Al-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, W.; Chen, D. L.; Shaha, S. K.

    2013-07-01

    Existing heat treatment standards do not properly define tempers for thin-walled castings that solidified with high solidification rates. Recently emerged casting processes such as vacuum high pressure die casting should not require long solution treatment times due to the fine microstructures arising from rapid solidification rates. The heat treatment studies involving rapidly solidified samples with secondary dendrite arm spacing between 10 and 35 μm were conducted for solution times between 30 min and 9 h and temperatures of 510 and 525 °C and for various aging parameters. The metallurgical analysis revealed that an increase in microstructure refinement could enable a reduction of solution time up to 88%. Solution treatment resulted in the dissolution of Al2Cu and Al5Mg8Si6Cu2, while Fe- and TiZrV-based phases remained partially in the microstructure. The highest strength of approximately 351 ± 9.7 and 309 ± 3.4 MPa for the UTS and YS, respectively, was achieved for a 2-step solution treatment at 510 and 525 °C in the T6 peak aging conditions, i.e., 150 °C for 100 h. The T6 temper did not yield dimensionally stable microstructure since exceeding 250 °C during in-service operation could result in phase transformation corresponding to the over-aging reaction. The microstructure refinement had a statistically stronger effect on the alloy strength than the increase in solutionizing time. Additionally, thermal analysis and dilatometer results were presented to assess the dissolution of phases during solution treatment, aging kinetics as well as dimensional stability.

  13. Fan Fuel Casting Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, Seth D.

    LANL was approached to provide material and design guidance for a fan-shaped fuel element. A total of at least three castings were planned. The first casting is a simple billet mold to be made from high carbon DU-10Mo charge material. The second and third castings are for optimization of the actual fuel plate mold. The experimental scope for optimization is only broad enough for a second iteration of the mold design. It is important to note that partway through FY17, this project was cancelled by the sponsor. This report is being written in order to capture the knowledge gained shouldmore » this project resume at a later date.« less

  14. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  15. Novel method of realizing metal freezing points by induced solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. K.

    1997-07-01

    The freezing point of a pure metal, tf, is the temperature at which the solid and liquid phases are in equilibrium. The purest metal available is actually a dilute alloy. Normally, the liquidus point of a sample, tl, at which the amount of the solid phase in equilibrium with the liquid phase is minute, provides the closest approximation to tf. Thus the experimental realization of tf is a matter of realizing tl. The common method is to cool a molten sample continuously so that it supercools and recalesces. The highest temperature after recalescence is normally the best experimental value of tl. In the realization, supercooling of the sample at the sample container and the thermometer well is desirable for the formation of dual solid-liquid interfaces to thermally isolate the sample and the thermometer. However, the subsequent recalescence of the supercooled sample requires the formation of a certain amount of solid, which is not minute. Obviously, the plateau temperature is not the liquidus point. In this article we describe a method that minimizes supercooling. The condition that provides tl is closely approached so that the latter may be measured. As the temperature of the molten sample approaches the anticipated value of tl, a small solid of the same alloy is introduced into the sample to induce solidification. In general, solidification does not occur as long as the temperature is above or at tl, and occurs as soon as the sample supercools minutely. Thus tl can be obtained, in principle, by observing the temperature at which induced solidification begins. In case the solid is introduced after the sample has supercooled slightly, a slight recalescence results and the subsequent maximum temperature is a close approximation to tl. We demonstrate that the principle of induced solidification is indeed applicable to freezing point measurements by applying it to the design of a copper-freezing-point cell for industrial applications, in which a supercooled sample is

  16. Effect of solidification rate on microstructure evolution in dual phase microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Kostryzhev, A. G.; Slater, C. D.; Marenych, O. O.; Davis, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    In steels the dependence of ambient temperature microstructure and mechanical properties on solidification rate is not well reported. In this work we investigate the microstructure and hardness evolution for a low C low Mn NbTi-microalloyed steel solidified in the cooling rate range of 1–50 Cs−1. The maximum strength was obtained at the intermediate solidification rate of 30 Cs−1. This result has been correlated to the microstructure variation with solidification rate. PMID:27759109

  17. Al and Mg Alloys for Aerospace Applications Using Rapid Solidification and Power Metallurgy Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-07

    primary solidification phase in the alloy in this condition was identified by CBED as Mg 2 Si , which formed dendrites within the matrix. Each... solidification below the extended c-liquidus. Evolution of Microstructure in Melt-spun Mg- Si Alloys -, The microstructurcs observed in the alloys can...solidificaion pr(es .. in the cellular (dendritic) regime. Solidification of the 5.0 wt.% Si alloy occurs in the coupled eutectic region, and the 8.0 wt.% Si

  18. Rapid solidification of levitation melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets with high undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiohara, Yuh; Flemings, Merton C.; Wu, Yanzhong; Piccone, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results obtained by high-speed optical temperature sensing for the rapid solidification of highly undercooled, levitation-melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets are presented. These data suggest a solidification model proceeding according to overlapping steps: (1) dendritic growth within the bulk undercooled melt, (2) continued recalescence as supersaturation of the interdendritic liquid dissipates, (3) fine-scale remelting within the dendrites, (4) ripening of the fine structure, and (5) solidification of remaining liquid at the end of recalescence.

  19. Study of Solidification Cracking in a Transformation-Induced Plasticity-Aided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, G.; Kumar, A.; Gao, H.; Amirthalingam, M.; Moon, S. C.; Dippenaar, R. J.; Richardson, I. M.; Hermans, M. J. M.

    2018-04-01

    In situ high-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy is applied to study solidification cracking in a TRIP steel. Solidification cracking was observed in the interdendritic region during the last stage of solidification. Atom probe tomography revealed notable enrichment of phosphorus in the last remaining liquid. Phase field simulations also confirm phosphorus enrichment leading to severe undercooling of more than 160 K in the interdendritic region. In the presence of tensile stress, an opening at the interdendritic region is difficult to fill with the remaining liquid due to low permeability and high viscosity, resulting in solidification cracking.

  20. Rapid Solidification in Bulk Ti-Nb Alloys by Single-Track Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehling, John D.; Perron, Aurélien; Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Haxhimali, Tomorr; Guss, Gabe; Li, Tian T.; Bober, David; Stokes, Adam W.; Clarke, Amy J.; Turchi, Patrice E. A.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; McKeown, Joseph T.

    2018-05-01

    Single-track laser melting experiments were performed on bulk Ti-Nb alloys to explore process parameters and the resultant macroscopic structure and microstructure. The microstructures in Ti-20Nb and Ti-50Nb (at.%) alloys exhibited cellular growth during rapid solidification, with average cell size of approximately 0.5 µm. Solidification velocities during cellular growth were calculated from images of melt tracks. Measurements of the composition in the cellular and intercellular regions revealed nonequilibrium partitioning and its dependence on velocity during rapid solidification. Experimental results were used to benchmark a phase-field model to describe rapid solidification under conditions relevant to additive manufacturing.

  1. Evolutions of lamellar structure during melting and solidification of Fe9577 nanoparticle from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongquan; Shen, Tong; Lu, Xionggang

    2013-03-01

    A structural evolution during solidification and melting processes of nanoparticle Fe9577 was investigated from MD simulations. A perfect lamellar structure, consisting alternately of fcc and hcp layers, was obtained from solidification process. A structural heredity of early embryo is proposed to explain the structural preference of solidification. Defects were found inside the solid core and play the same role as surface premelting on melting. hcp was found more stable than fcc in high temperature. The difference between melting and solidification points can be deduced coming fully from the overcoming of thermodynamic energy barrier, instead of kinetic delay of structural relaxation.

  2. The Solidification Velocity of Undercooled Nickel and Titanium Alloys with Dilute Solute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Algoso, Paul R.; Altgilbers, A. S.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The study of solidification velocity is important for two reasons. First, understanding the manner in which the degree of undercooling of the liquid and solidification velocity affect the microstructure of the solid is fundamental. Second, there is disagreement between theoretical predictions of the relationship between undercooling and solidification velocity and experimental results. Thus, the objective of this research is to accurately and systematically quantify the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling for dilute nickel-and titanium-based alloys. The alloys chosen for study cover a wide range of equilibrium partition coefficients, and the results are compared to current theory.

  3. MPS Solidification Model. Volume 2: Operating guide and software documentation for the unsteady model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of solidification Model 2 is described and documentation of the software associated with the model is provided. Model 2 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of unsteady horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The solidification program allows interactive modification of calculation parameters as well as selection of graphical and tabular output. In batch mode, parameter values are input in card image form and output consists of printed tables of solidification functions. The operational aspects of Model 2 that differ substantially from Model 1 are described. The global flow diagrams and data structures of Model 2 are included. The primary program documentation is the code itself.

  4. Identification of a cast iron alloy containing nonstrategic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. V.; Anton, D. L.; Lemkey, F. D.; Nowotny, H.; Bailey, R. S.; Favrow, L. H.; Smeggil, J. G.; Snow, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    A program was performed to address the mechanical and environmental needs of Stirling engine heater head and regenerator housing components, while reducing the dependence on strategic materials. An alloy was developed which contained no strategic elemental additions per se. The base is iron with additions of manganese, molybdenum, carbon, silicon, niobium, and ferro-chromium. Such an alloy should be producible on a large scale at very low cost. The resulting alloy, designated as NASAUT 4G-Al, contained 15 Mn, 15 Cr, 2 Mo, 1.5 C, 1.0 Si, 1.0 Nb (in weight percent) with a balance of Fe. This alloy was optimized for chemistry, based upon tensile strength, creep-rupture strength, fracture behavior, and fatigue resistance up to 800 C. Alloys were also tested for environmental compatibility. The microstructure and mechanic properties (including hardness) were assessed in the as-cast condition and following several heat treatments, including one designed to simulate a required braze cycle. The alloy was fabricated and characterized in the form of both equiaxed and columnar-grained castings. The columnar grains were produced by directional solidification, and the properties were characterized in both the longitudinal and transverse orientations. The NASAUT 4G-Al alloy was found to be good in cyclic-oxidation resistance and excellent in both hydrogen and hot-corrosion resistance, especially in comparison to the baseline XF-818 alloy. The mechanical properties of yield strength, stress-rupture life, high-cycle-fatigue resistance, and low-cycle-fatigue resistance were good to excellent in comparison to the current alloy for this application, HS-31 (X-40), with precise results depending in a complex manner on grain orientation and temperature. If required, the ductility could be improved by lowering the carbon content.

  5. Quiet breathing in hindlimb casted mice.

    PubMed

    Receno, Candace N; Roffo, Katelynn E; Mickey, Marisa C; DeRuisseau, Keith C; DeRuisseau, Lara R

    2018-06-07

    The hindlimb casting model was developed to study skeletal muscle reloading following a period of unloading. It is unknown if ventilation parameters of mice are affected by the casting model. We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb casted mice have similar ventilatory patterns compared to mice with the casts removed. Male CD-1 mice underwent 14 days of hindlimb immobilization via plaster casting. Breathing parameters were obtained utilizing unrestrained barometric plethysmography (UBP). Breathing traces were analyzed with Ponemah software for breathing frequency, tidal volume (TV), and minute ventilation (MV). Frequency, TV and MV did not show any differences in quiet breathing patterns during or post-casting in mice. Thus, the hindlimb casting model does not complicate breathing during and after casting and should not interfere with the unloading and reloading of skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  7. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  8. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  9. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  10. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. Brock

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  11. Casting Freedom, 1860-1862

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was cast in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Clark Mills was a self-taught American sculptor with experience in casting…

  12. Math: Objectives Guide. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The guide lists math objectives needed for independent living by secondary special education students. One of a series of Project CAST (Community and School Together) life skills manuals, the guide outlines basic competencies in terms of goal statements, behavioral objectives, and specialized vocabulary for the following areas: money, making…

  13. Vancomycin-Associated Cast Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Yosu; Louis, Kevin; Jouanneau, Chantal; Placier, Sandrine; Esteve, Emmanuel; Bazin, Dominique; Rondeau, Eric; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Wolfromm, Alice; Gosset, Clément; Boueilh, Anna; Burbach, Maren; Frère, Perrine; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Langui, Dominique; Daudon, Michel; Frochot, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Vancomycin is a widely prescribed antibiotic, but the exact nature of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity is unclear, in particular when considering the frequent coadministration of aminoglycosides. We describe here the initial case of a 56-year-old woman with normal renal function developing unexplained ARF without hypovolemia after administration of vancomycin without coadministration of aminoglycosides. Studying the patient’s renal biopsy specimen, we ascertained that obstructive tubular casts composed of noncrystal nanospheric vancomycin aggregates entangled with uromodulin explained the vancomycin-associated ARF. We developed in parallel a new immunohistologic staining technique to detect vancomycin in renal tissue and confirmed retrospectively that deleterious vancomycin-associated casts existed in eight additional patients with acute tubular necrosis in the absence of hypovolemia. Concomitant high vancomycin trough plasma levels had been observed in each patient. We also reproduced experimentally the toxic and obstructive nature of vancomycin-associated cast nephropathy in mice, which we detected using different in vivo imaging techniques. In conclusion, the interaction of uromodulin with nanospheric vancomycin aggregates represents a new mode of tubular cast formation, revealing the hitherto unsuspected mechanism of vancomycin-associated renal injury. PMID:28082518

  14. Vancomycin-Associated Cast Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Louis, Kevin; Jouanneau, Chantal; Placier, Sandrine; Esteve, Emmanuel; Bazin, Dominique; Rondeau, Eric; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Wolfromm, Alice; Gosset, Clément; Boueilh, Anna; Burbach, Maren; Frère, Perrine; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Langui, Dominique; Daudon, Michel; Frochot, Vincent; Mesnard, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Vancomycin is a widely prescribed antibiotic, but the exact nature of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity is unclear, in particular when considering the frequent coadministration of aminoglycosides. We describe here the initial case of a 56-year-old woman with normal renal function developing unexplained ARF without hypovolemia after administration of vancomycin without coadministration of aminoglycosides. Studying the patient's renal biopsy specimen, we ascertained that obstructive tubular casts composed of noncrystal nanospheric vancomycin aggregates entangled with uromodulin explained the vancomycin-associated ARF. We developed in parallel a new immunohistologic staining technique to detect vancomycin in renal tissue and confirmed retrospectively that deleterious vancomycin-associated casts existed in eight additional patients with acute tubular necrosis in the absence of hypovolemia. Concomitant high vancomycin trough plasma levels had been observed in each patient. We also reproduced experimentally the toxic and obstructive nature of vancomycin-associated cast nephropathy in mice, which we detected using different in vivo imaging techniques. In conclusion, the interaction of uromodulin with nanospheric vancomycin aggregates represents a new mode of tubular cast formation, revealing the hitherto unsuspected mechanism of vancomycin-associated renal injury. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Reducing the Incidence of Cast-related Skin Complications in Children Treated With Cast Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Difazio, Rachel L; Harris, Marie; Feldman, Lanna; Mahan, Susan T

    2017-12-01

    Cast immobilization remains the mainstay of pediatric orthopaedic care, yet little is known about the incidence of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization. The purposes of this quality improvement project were to: (1) establish a baseline rate of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization, (2) identify trends in children who experienced cast-related skin complications, (3) design an intervention aimed at decreasing the rate of cast-related skin complications, and (4) determine the effectiveness of the intervention. A prospective interrupted time-series design was used to determine the incidence of cast-related skin complications overtime and compare the rates of skin complications before and after an intervention designed to decrease the incidence of cast-related heel complications. All consecutive patients who were treated with cast immobilization from September 2012 to September 2014 were included. A cast-related skin complications data collection tool was used to capture all cast-related skin complications. A high rate of heel events was noted in our preliminary analysis and an intervention was designed to decrease the rate of cast-related skin complications, including the addition of padding during casting and respective provider education. The estimated cast-related skin events rate for all patients was 8.9 per 1000 casts applied. The rate for the total preintervention sample was 13.6 per 1000 casts which decreased to 6.6 in the postintervention sample. When examining the heel-only group, the rate was 17.1 per 1000 lower extremity casts applied in the preintervention group and 6.8 in the postintervention group. Incorporating padding to the heel of lower extremity cast was an effective intervention in decreasing the incidence of cast-related skin complications in patients treated with cast immobilization. Level II.

  16. Stable Eutectoid Transformation in Nodular Cast Iron: Modeling and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new microstructural model of the stable eutectoid transformation in a spheroidal cast iron. The model takes into account the nucleation and growth of ferrite grains and the growth of graphite spheroids. Different laws are assumed for the growth of both phases during and below the intercritical stable eutectoid. At a microstructural level, the initial conditions for the phase transformations are obtained from the microstructural simulation of solidification of the material, which considers the divorced eutectic and the subsequent growth of graphite spheroids up to the initiation of the stable eutectoid transformation. The temperature field is obtained by solving the energy equation by means of finite elements. The microstructural (phase change) and macrostructural (energy balance) models are coupled by a sequential multiscale procedure. Experimental validation of the model is achieved by comparison with measured values of fractions and radius of 2D view of ferrite grains. Agreement with such experiments indicates that the present model is capable of predicting ferrite phase fraction and grain size with reasonable accuracy.

  17. Evaluation of Technetium Getters to Improve the Performance of Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. One of the major radionuclides that Cast Stone has the potential to immobilize is technetium (Tc). The mechanism for immobilization is through the reduction of the highly mobile Tc(VII)more » species to the less mobile Tc(IV) species by the blast furnace slag (BFS) used in the Cast Stone formulation. Technetium immobilization through this method would be beneficial because Tc is one of the most difficult contaminants to address at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site due to its complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes (vitrification, steam reformation, etc.), and high mobility in subsurface environments. In fact, the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC&WM EIS) identifies technetium-99 ( 99Tc) as one of the radioactive tank waste components contributing the most to the environmental impact associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site. The TC&WM EIS, along with an earlier supplemental waste-form risk assessment, used a diffusion-limited release model to estimate the release of different contaminants from the WTP process waste forms. In both of these predictive modeling exercises, where effective diffusivities based on grout performance data available at the time, groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well exceeded the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for 99Tc. (900 pCi/L). Recent relatively short-term (63

  18. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5940 Cast component. (a) Identification. A cast component is a...

  19. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5940 Cast component. (a) Identification. A cast component is a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5940 Cast component. (a) Identification. A cast component is a...

  1. The Ins and Outs of Relief Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on clay casting that introduces students to relief sculpture. The unit takes three 45 to 50 minute class periods three weeks apart. Discusses each class session in detail: (1) creating the casting; (2) turning out and rinsing the casting; and (3) enriching the surface with color. (CMK)

  2. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... a waterproof plastic cast protector instead of plastic bags. You can buy this at a drugstore. Keep the cast completely out of the water by propping it up on the side of the tub. If the cast or liner gets splashed, gently blow air into it from a hair dryer on the ...

  3. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... the cast heel, toe cap, cast support, and walking iron. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls...

  4. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... the cast heel, toe cap, cast support, and walking iron. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls...

  5. How to Avoid Cast Saw Complications.

    PubMed

    Halanski, Matthew A

    2016-06-01

    As casts are routinely used in pediatric orthopaedics, casts saws are commonly used to remove such casts. Despite being a viewed as the "conservative" and therefore often assumed safest treatment modality, complications associated with the use of casts and cast saws occur. In this manuscript, we review the risk factors associated with cast saw injuries. Cast saw injuries are thermal or abrasive (or both) in nature. Thermal risk factors include: cast saw specifications (including a lack of attached vacuum), use of a dull blade, cutting in a concavity, too thin padding, and overly thick casting materials. Risk factors associated with abrasive injuries include: sharp blades, thin padding, and cutting over boney prominences. Because nearly all clinicians contact the skin with the blade during cast removal, appropriate "in-out technique" is critical. Such technique prevents a hot blade from remaining in contact with the skin for any significant time, diminishing the risk of burn. Similarly, using such technique prevents "dragging the blade" that may pull the skin taught, cutting it. It may be useful to teach proper technique as perforating a cast rather than cutting a cast.

  6. Transitions between type A flake, type D flake, and coral graphite eutectic structures in cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Verhoeven, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    Directional solidification experiments were used to measure the transition velocities between the type A and coral eutectic structures in high-purity cast irons and between the type A and type D eutectic structures in S and Te doped cast irons. Introduction of O into the gas atmosphere was found to have little effect on the A {R_arrow} D transition velocities in S doped alloys, but it produced a strong reduction in the A {R_arrow} coral transition velocities in high-purity irons. Transmission electron microscopy revealed interesting variations in the defect structures of the graphite in the flake irons vs the type ofmore » flake (A or D) and the type of doping element. Scanning Auger microscopy demonstrated that both S and Te segregate to the iron/graphite interface. In the S doped alloys, type A flakes are generally covered with a monolayer of S with patches of O in the form of iron oxide having a thickness on the order of 2 nm. A series of experiments, including examination of fracture surfaces at the quenched solid/liquid growth front, have shown that S segregates to the iron/graphite interfaces from the liquid at the growth front, but O forms at these interfaces during the cooldown. These results are discussed in relation to current models of eutectic growth in cast irons.« less

  7. Novel Approach for Modeling of Nonuniform Slag Layers and Air Gap in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Kong, Lingwei; Yao, Man; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-02-01

    Various kinds of surface defects on the continuous casting slab usually originate from nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behavior, especially during the initial solidification inside the mold. In this article, a model-coupled inverse heat transfer problem incorporating the effect of slag layers and air gap is developed to study the nonuniform distribution of liquid slag, solid slag, and air gap layers. The model considers not only the formation and evolution of slag layers and air gap but also the temperatures in the mold copper as measured by thermocouples. The simulation results from the model and the measured temperatures from experiments are shown to be in good agreement with each other. At the casting speed of 0.65 m/min, the liquid slag film disappears and transforms into solid slag entirely at about 400 mm away from meniscus, and an air gap begins to form. Until the mold exit, the maximum thickness of the solid slag layer and air gap gradually increases to 1.34 and 0.056 mm, respectively. The results illustrate that the magnitude and nonuniform distribution of the slag layers and air gap along the cross direction, correlating with heat flux between the shell and mold, eventually determine the temperature profiles of the mold hot face and slab surface. The proposed model may provide a convenient approach for analyzing nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behaviors between the mold and slab in the real casting process.

  8. The cavitation erosion of ultrasonic sonotrode during large-scale metallic casting: Experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yang; Liu, Zhilin; Li, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Lihua; Li, Ruiqing; Jiang, Ripeng; Dong, Fang

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasonic sonotrodes play an essential role in transmitting power ultrasound into the large-scale metallic casting. However, cavitation erosion considerably impairs the in-service performance of ultrasonic sonotrodes, leading to marginal microstructural refinement. In this work, the cavitation erosion behaviour of ultrasonic sonotrodes in large-scale castings was explored using the industry-level experiments of Al alloy cylindrical ingots (i.e. 630 mm in diameter and 6000 mm in length). When introducing power ultrasound, severe cavitation erosion was found to reproducibly occur at some specific positions on ultrasonic sonotrodes. However, there is no cavitation erosion present on the ultrasonic sonotrodes that were not driven by electric generator. Vibratory examination showed cavitation erosion depended on the vibration state of ultrasonic sonotrodes. Moreover, a finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate the evolution and distribution of acoustic pressure in 3-D solidification volume. FE simulation results confirmed that significant dynamic interaction between sonotrodes and melts only happened at some specific positions corresponding to severe cavitation erosion. This work will allow for developing more advanced ultrasonic sonotrodes with better cavitation erosion-resistance, in particular for large-scale castings, from the perspectives of ultrasonic physics and mechanical design. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Al on Grain Refinement and Mechanical Properties of Mg-3Nd Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Feng, Yicheng; Wang, Liping; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Erjun

    2018-05-01

    The effect of Al on the grain refinement and mechanical properties of as-cast Mg-3Nd alloy was investigated systematically by a series of microstructural analysis, solidification analysis and tensile tests. The results show that Al has an obvious refining effect on the as-cast Mg-3Nd alloy. With increasing Al content, the grain size of the as-cast Mg-3Nd alloy decreases firstly, then increases slightly after the Al content reaching 3 wt.%, and the minimum grain size of the Mg-3Nd alloy is 48 ± 4.0 μm. The refining mechanism can be attributed to the formation of Al2Nd particles, which play an important role in the heterogeneous nucleation. The strength and elongation of the Mg-3Nd alloy refined by Al also increase with increasing Al content and slightly decrease when the Al content is more than 3 wt.%, and the strengthening mechanism is attributed to the grain refinement as well as dispersed intermetallic particles. Furthermore, the microstructural thermal stability of the Mg-3Nd-3Al alloy is higher than that of the Mg-3Nd-0.5Zr alloy. Overall, the Mg-3Nd alloy with Al addition is a novel alloy with wide and potential application prospects.

  10. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties weremore » accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.« less

  11. Alloy Shrinkage Factors for the Investment Casting of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Porter, Wallace D.

    2008-04-01

    In this study, alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made, in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed a different evolution on heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation was performed with thermal expansion obtained on heating, and another one was performed with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from the numerical simulation results of the solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly overpredicted.

  12. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengwu; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  13. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard; Motakef, Shariar

    2001-01-01

    TMF is based on imposing a controlled phase-shift in a train of electromagnets, forming a stack. Thus, the induced magnetic field can be considered to be travelling along the axis of the stack. The coupling of this traveling wave with an electrically conducting fluid results in a basic flow in a form of a single axisymmetric roll. The magnitude and direction of this flow can be remotely controlled. Furthermore, it is possible to localize the effect of this force field though activating only a number of the magnets. This force field generated in the fluid can, in principle, be used to control and modify convection in the molten material. For example, it can be used to enhance convective mixing in the melt, and thereby modify the interface shape, and macrosegregation. Alternatively, it can be used to counteract thermal and/or solutal buoyancy forces. High frequency TMF can be used in containerless processing techniques, such as float zoning, to affect the very edge of the fluid so that Marangoni flow can be counter balanced. The proposed program consists of basic fundamentals and applications. Our goal in conducting the following experiments and analyses is to establish the validity of TMF as a new tool for solidification processes. Due to its low power consumption and simplicity of design, this tool may find wide spread use in a variety of space experiments. The proposed ground based experiments are intended to establish the advantages and limitations of employing this technique. In the fundamentals component of the proposed program, we will use theoretical tools and experiments with mercury to establish the fundamental aspects of TMF-induced convection through a detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of flow field. In this work, we will conduct a detailed parametric study involving the effects of magnetic field strength, frequency, wave vector, and the fluid geometry. The applications component of this work will be focused on

  14. Incorporation of fragmentation into a volume average solidification model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Wu, M.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a volume average solidification model was extended to consider fragmentation as a source of equiaxed crystals during mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification. The formulation suggested for fragmentation is based on two hypotheses: the solute-driven remelting is the dominant mechanism; and the transport of solute-enriched melt through an interdendritic flow in the columnar growth direction is favorable for solute-driven remelting and is the necessary condition for fragment transportation. Furthermore, a test case with Sn-10 wt%Pb melt solidifying vertically downward in a 2D domain (50 × 60 mm2) was calculated to demonstrate the model’s features. Solidification started from the top boundary, and a columnar structure developed initially with its tip growing downward. Furthermore, thermo-solutal convection led to fragmentation in the mushy zone near the columnar tip front. The fragments transported out of the columnar region continued to grow and sink, and finally settled down and piled up in the bottom domain. The growing columnar structure from the top and pile-up of equiaxed crystals from the bottom finally led to a mixed columnar-equiaxed structure, in turn leading to a columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). A special macrosegregation pattern was also predicted, in which negative segregation occurred in both columnar and equiaxed regions and a relatively strong positive segregation occurred in the middle domain near the CET line. A parameter study was performed to verify the model capability, and the uncertainty of the model assumption and parameter was discussed.

  15. Development of Aerogel Molds for Metal Casting Using Lunar and Martian Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    series of aerogel plates suitable for thin plate metal casting and ingot metal castings. The influence of aerogels on thin wall metal castings was studied by placing aerogel plates into the cavities of thin sections of resin bonded sand molds. An 1 based commercial alloy ( 356) containing 7 percent Si was poured into these molds. Post-solidification studies provide evidence that aerogel inserts significantly reduce the cooling rate during solidification. The advantage of a lower rate using aerogel inserts was reflected in the reduction of casting defects such as shrinkage porosity. Quantitative results support the hypothesis that using aerogels as a mold material can offer definite advantages when used as casting thin sections. As a separate effort, silica aerogel with cylindrical cavities have been prepared and will be evaluated for casting commercial alloys.

  16. Soft cast versus rigid cast for treatment of distal radius buckle fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Witney-Lagen, Caroline; Smith, Christine; Walsh, Graham

    2013-04-01

    Buckle fractures are extremely common and their optimum management is still under debate. This study aimed to ascertain whether buckle fractures of the distal radius can be safely and effectively treated in soft cast with only a single orthopaedic outpatient clinic appointment. A total of 232 children with buckle fractures of the distal radius were included in the study. 111 children with 112 distal radius fractures were treated in full rigid cast and 121 children with 123 fractures were treated with soft cast. The rigid cast children attended outpatient clinic for removal of cast at 3 weeks. Soft casts were removed by parents unwinding the cast at home after 3 weeks. Follow-up was conducted prospectively by telephone questionnaire at an average of 6 weeks post-injury. Outcome data were available for 117 children treated in soft cast and for 102 children treated in rigid cast. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall sustained from standing or running, followed by falls from bikes and then trampoline accidents. Overall, both groups recovered well. Overall satisfaction with the outcome of treatment was 97.4% in soft cast and 95.2% in rigid cast. Casts were reported as comfortable by 95.7% in soft cast and 93.3% in rigid cast. Cast changes were required for 6.8% of soft casts and 11.5% of rigid casts. The most frequent cause for changing rigid casts was getting the cast wet. None of the improved scores seen in the soft cast group were statistically significant. No re-fractures were seen in either group. Nearly all (94.9%) children in soft cast did bathe, shower or swim in their cast. Parents of both groups preferred treatment with soft cast (p < 0.001). Reasons given for preferring the soft cast included the ability to get the cast wet, avoidance of the plaster saw and not having to take time off work to attend a follow-up visit for cast removal. Buckle fractures of the distal radius can be safely and effectively treated in soft cast with only a single

  17. Densities of Pb-Sn alloys during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Data for the densities and expansion coefficients of solid and liquid alloys of the Pb-Sn system are consolidated in this paper. More importantly, the data are analyzed with the purpose of expressing either the density of the solid or of the liquid as a function of its composition and temperature. In particular, the densities of the solid and of the liquid during dendritic solidification are derived. Finally, the solutal and thermal coefficients of volume expansion for the liquid are given as functions of temperature and composition.

  18. Top-down solidification of lunar magma ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Zhang, M.; Xu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The early Moon was wholly or mostly molten, known as Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) [1]. Most models suggest that the solidification of the LMO is bottom-up crystallization, because the liquidus temperature of the LMO increases with pressure more quickly than the adiabatic temperature [2]. In addition, the quenched lid is simply assumed to founder into the LMO [3, 4], because this solid lid is denser than the magma ocean liquids. Therefore, the dominated model for the solidification of the LMO is: olivine and pyroxene crystallized first at the base of the LMO and form the Moon's mantle; after ˜80% of the LMO had solidified, plagioclase began to crystallize and floated from dense silicate melt to the surface to form a global crust of anorthosite [5]. However, as the observational data on lunar meteorites accumulated, the standard model received challenges [6, 7]. Here we propose a new model suggesting the solidification of the LMO is top-down. Our model considers that olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase would crystalize at the mush region between the initially quenched lid and the interior of the LMO at the initial stage. Then the crystallized plagioclase floated and collected at the Moon's surface to form a stable anorthosite-crust; while the crystallized olivine and pyroxene would descend into the LMO and completely remelt away because the LMO interior is super-liquidus [2]. The overall result of our model is that plagioclase existed stably prior to olivine and pyroxene, rather than it crystallized after ˜80% LMO solidification. So, the model here is fundamentally different from previous models [5]. The plagioclase can crystallize from the very beginning to the end of the LMO, that is consistent with the ancient anorthosite age and long anorthosite-crystallization span which is over 200 Myr [6]. Importantly, our model can explain the coexistence of ferroan and magnesian anorthosite [7]. In addition, it is also understandable that the whole lunar mantle is depleted in Eu

  19. Crystal Growth and Fluid Mechanics Problems in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, Saleh A.; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Our work in directional solidification has been in the following areas: (1) Dynamics of dendrites including rigorous mathematical analysis of the resulting equations; (2) Examination of the near-structurally unstable features of the mathematically related Hele-Shaw dynamics; (3) Numerical studies of steady temperature distribution in a vertical Bridgman device; (4) Numerical study of transient effects in a vertical Bridgman device; (5) Asymptotic treatment of quasi-steady operation of a vertical Bridgman furnace for large Rayleigh numbers and small Biot number in 3D; and (6) Understanding of Mullins-Sererka transition in a Bridgman device with fluid dynamics is accounted for.

  20. Comprehensive Numerical Simulation of Filling and Solidification of Steel Ingots

    PubMed Central

    Pola, Annalisa; Gelfi, Marcello; La Vecchia, Giovina Marina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a complete three-dimensional numerical model of mold filling and solidification of steel ingots is presented. The risk of powder entrapment and defects formation during filling is analyzed in detail, demonstrating the importance of using a comprehensive geometry, with trumpet and runner, compared to conventional simplified models. By using a case study, it was shown that the simplified model significantly underestimates the defects sources, reducing the utility of simulations in supporting mold and process design. An experimental test was also performed on an instrumented mold and the measurements were compared to the calculation results. The good agreement between calculation and trial allowed validating the simulation. PMID:28773890

  1. Instabilities in rapid solidification of multi-component alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, Anthony L.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2017-10-01

    Rapid solidification of multi-component liquids occurs in many modern applications such as additive manufacturing. In the present work the interface departures from equilibrium consist of the segregation coefficient and liquidus slope depending on front speed, the one-sided, frozen-temperature approximation, and the alloy behaving as the superposition of individual components. Linear-stability theory is applied, showing that the cellular and oscillatory instabilities of the binary case are modified. The addition of components tends to destabilize the interface while the addition of a single large-diffusivity material can entirely suppress the oscillatory mode. Multiple minima in the neutral curve for the cellular mode occur.

  2. Cellular instability in rapid directional solidification - Bifurcation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, R. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    Merchant and Davis performed a linear stability analysis on a model for the directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy valid for all speeds. The analysis revealed that nonequilibrium segregation effects modify the Mullins and Sekerka cellular mode, whereas attachment kinetics has no effect on these cells. In this paper, the nonlinear stability of the steady cellular mode is analyzed. A Landau equation is obtained that determines the amplitude of the cells. The Landau coefficient here depends on both nonequilibrium segregation effects and attachment kinetics. This equation gives the ranges of parameters for subcritical bifurcation (jump transition) or supercritical bifurcation (smooth transition) to cells.

  3. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz body force induced in electrically conducting fluids can be utilized for a number of materials processing technologies. An application of strong static magnetic fields can be beneficial for damping convection present during solidification. On the other hand, alternating magnetic fields can be used to reduce as well as to enhance convection. However, only special types of time dependent magnetic fields can induce a non-zero time averaged Lorentz force needed for convection control. One example is the rotating magnetic field. This field configuration induces a swirling flow in circular containers. Another example of a magnetic field configuration is the traveling magnetic field (TMF). It utilizes axisymmetric magnetostatic waves. This type of field induces an axial recirculating flow that can be advantageous for controlling axial mass transport, such as during solidification in long cylindrical tubes. Incidentally, this is the common geometry for crystal growth research. The Lorentz force induced by TMF can potentially counter-balance the buoyancy force, diminishing natural convection, or even setting up the flow in reverse direction. Crystal growth process in presence of TMF can be then significantly modified. Such properties as the growth rate, interface shape and macro segregation can be affected and optimized. Melt homogenization is the other potential application of TMF. It is a necessary step prior to solidification. TMF can be attractive for this purpose, as it induces a basic flow along the axis of the ampoule. TMF can be a practical alloy mixing method especially suited for solidification research in space. In the theoretical part of this work, calculations of the induced Lorentz force in the whole frequency range have been completed. The basic flow characteristics for the finite cylinder geometry are completed and first results on stability analysis for higher Reynolds numbers are obtained. A theoretical model for TMF mixing is also developed

  4. Solidification in direct metal deposition by LENS processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, William; Griffith, Michelle

    2001-09-01

    Thermal imaging and metallographic analysis were used to study Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) processing of 316 stainless steel and H13 tool steel. The cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface were measured over a range of conduction conditions. The length scale of the molten zone controls cooling rates during solidification in direct metal deposition. In LENS processing, the molten zone ranges from 0.5 mm in length to 1.5 mm, resulting in cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface ranging from 200 6,000 Ks-1.

  5. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  6. Technology Performance Review: Selecting And Using Solidification/Stabilization Treatment For Site Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) is a widely used treatment technology to prevent migration and exposure of contaminants from a contaminated media (i.e., soil, sludge and sediment). Solidification refers to a process that binds a contaminated media with a reagent changing its ...

  7. Closed solutions to a differential-difference equation and an associated plate solidification problem.

    PubMed

    Layeni, Olawanle P; Akinola, Adegbola P; Johnson, Jesse V

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct and novel formalisms for deriving exact closed solutions of a class of variable-coefficient differential-difference equations arising from a plate solidification problem are introduced. Thereupon, exact closed traveling wave and similarity solutions to the plate solidification problem are obtained for some special cases of time-varying plate surface temperature.

  8. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION FOR REMEDIATON OF WOOD PRESERVING SITES: TREATMENT FOR DIOXINS, PCP, CREOSOTE, AND METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article discusses the use of solidification/stabilization (S/S) to treat soils contaminated with organic and inorganic chemicals at wood preserving sites. Solidification is defined for this article as making a material into a free standing solid. Stabilization is defined as ...

  9. Mechanism of competitive grain growth in a curvilinear channel of crystal-sorter during the orientational solidification of nickel-based heat-resistant alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrskiy, V. P.; Pozdnyakov, A. N.; Ershov, M. Yu.; Monastyrskiy, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Using numerical simulation in the ProCAST program complex, the conditions of the solidification of heat-resistant nickel alloy in curvilinear channels of a ceramic mold have been investigated. It has been shown that, in practically important cases, the vector of the temperature gradient is oriented along the axis of the curvilinear channel. In a spiral crystal selector, a cyclic change in the preferred direction of growth occurs because of the cyclic change in the direction of the vector of the temperature gradient. The fact that the vector of the temperature gradient is almost always directed along the axis of the curvilinear channel makes it possible to govern the orientation of the vector of the temperature gradient in space and, therefore, to obtain a grain with the preferred crystallographic orientation. Based on the results of this investigation, a method of the grain selection with a desired azimuthal orientation is proposed.

  10. Benefits of rapid solidification processing of modified LaNi{sub 5} alloys by high pressure gas atomization for battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Ting, J.

    1997-12-31

    A high pressure gas atomization approach to rapid solidification has been employed to investigate simplified processing of Sn modified LaNi{sub 5} powders that can be used for advanced Ni/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries. The current industrial practice involves casting large ingots followed by annealing and grinding and utilizes a complex and costly alloy design. This investigation is an attempt to produce powders for battery cathode fabrication that can be used in an as-atomized condition without annealing or grinding. Both Ar and He atomization gas were tried to investigate rapid solidification effects. Sn alloy additions were tested to promote subambient pressure absorption/desorptionmore » of hydrogen at ambient temperature. The resulting fine, spherical powders were subject to microstructural analysis, hydrogen gas cycling, and annealing experiments to evaluate suitability for Ni/MH battery applications. The results demonstrate that a brief anneal is required to homogenize the as-solidified microstructure of both Ar and He atomized powders and to achieve a suitable hydrogen absorption behavior. The Sn addition also appears to suppress cracking during hydrogen gas phase cycling in particles smaller than about 25 {micro}m. These results suggest that direct powder processing of a LaNi{sub 5{minus}x}Sn{sub x} alloy has potential application in rechargeable Ni/MH batteries.« less

  11. Benefits of rapid solidification processing of modified LaNi{sub 5} alloys by high pressure gas atomization for battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Ting, J.

    1998-07-01

    A high pressure gas atomization approach to rapid solidification has been employed to investigate simplified processing of Sn modified LaNi{sub 5} powders that can be used for advanced Ni/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries. The current industrial practice involves casting large ingots followed by annealing and grinding and utilizes a complex and costly alloy design. This investigation is an attempt to produce powders for battery cathode fabrication that can be used in an as-atomized condition without annealing or grinding. Both Ar and He atomization gas were tried to investigate rapid solidification effects. Sn alloy additions were tested to promote subambient pressure absorption/desorptionmore » of hydrogen at ambient temperature. The resulting fine, spherical powders were subject to microstructural analysis, hydrogen gas cycling, and annealing experiments to evaluate suitability for Ni/MH battery applications. The results demonstrate that a brief anneal is required to homogenize the as-solidified microstructure of both Ar and He atomized powders and to achieve a suitable hydrogen absorption behavior. The Sn addition also appears to suppress cracking during hydrogen gas phase cycling in particles smaller than about 25{micro}m. These results suggest that direct powder processing of a LaNi{sub 5{minus}x}Sn{sub x} alloy has potential application in rechargeable Ni/MH batteries.« less

  12. Core solidification and dynamo evolution in a mantle-stripped planetesimal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinberg, A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Schubert, G.; Bercovici, D.

    2016-01-01

    The physical processes active during the crystallization of a low-pressure, low-gravity planetesimal core are poorly understood but have implications for asteroidal magnetic fields and large-scale asteroidal structure. We consider a core with only a thin silicate shell, which could be analogous to some M-type asteroids including Psyche, and use a parameterized thermal model to predict a solidification timeline and the resulting chemical profile upon complete solidification. We then explore the potential strength and longevity of a dynamo in the planetesimal's early history. We find that cumulate inner core solidification would be capable of sustaining a dynamo during solidification, but less power would be available for a dynamo in an inward dendritic solidification scenario. We also model and suggest limits on crystal settling and compaction of a possible cumulate inner core.

  13. Search for chameleons with CAST

    DOE PAGES

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Arik, M.; Aune, S.; ...

    2015-07-28

    In this paper we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (β m) and to photons (β γ) via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons tomore » photons of β γ≲10 11 for 1< β m < 10 6.« less

  14. A study on polypropylene encapsulation and solidification of textile sludge.

    PubMed

    Kumari, V Krishna; Kanmani, S

    2011-10-01

    The textile sludge is an inevitable solid waste from the textile wastewater process and is categorised under toxic substances by statutory authorities. In this study, an attempt has been made to encapsulate and solidify heavy metals and dyes present in textile sludge using polypropylene and Portland cement. Sludge samples (2 Nos.) were characterized for pH (8.5, 9.5), moisture content (1.5%, 1.96%) and chlorides (245mg/L, 425.4mg/L). Sludge samples were encapsulated into polypropylene with calcium carbonate (additive) and solidified with cement at four different proportions (20, 30, 40, 50%) of sludge. Encapsulated and solidified cubes were made and then tested for compressive strength. Maximum compressive strength of cubes (size, 7.06cm) containing sludge (50%) for encapsulation (16.72 N/mm2) and solidification (18.84 N/mm2) was more than that of standard M15 mortar cubes. The leachability of copper, nickel and chromium has been effectively reduced from 0.58 mg/L, 0.53 mg/L and 0.07 mg/L to 0.28mg/L, 0.26mg/L and BDL respectively in encapsulated products and to 0.24mg/L, BDL and BDL respectively in solidified products. This study has shown that the solidification process is slightly more effective than encapsulation process. Both the products were recommended for use in the construction of non-load bearing walls.

  15. Convective and interfacial instabilities during solidification of succinonitrile containing ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Coriell, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Even though slow convective flow is difficult to detect in solidifying metals, it can readily be observed in transparent materials by observing the motion of small neutrally buoyant particles. Succinonitrile, which solidifies with an unfaceted solid/liquid interface and has well characterized physical properties, is considered an excellent material for such studies. For studies of solute-induced convection, ethanol is a useful addition to succinonitrile since it has a lower density and a somewhat similar molecular structure. Samples of high purity and ethanol-doped succinonitrile are unidirectionally solidified in a vertical temperature gradient. Latex mimcrospheres 2 microns in diameter are suspended in the liquid to reveal the convective flow. Convective and morphological stability is observed as a function of solute concentration and growth velocity. These measurements are compared with theoretical calculations that predict the transition from stability to instability as a function of solidification conditions. The predicted transitions occur at low concentrations and solidification velocities; for this reason, extreme care must be taken in order to eliminate the effects of impurities or thermally induced convection.

  16. Solidification and crystal growth of solid solution semiconducting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Problems associated with the solidification and crytal growth of solid-solution semiconducting alloy crystals in a terrestrial environment are described. A detailed description is given of the results for the growth of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) alloy crystals by directional solidification, because of their considerable technological importance. A series of HgCdTe alloy crystals are grown from pseudobinary melts by a vertical Bridgman method using a wide range of growth rates and thermal conditions. Precision measurements are performed to establish compositional profiles for the crystals. The compositional variations are related to compositional variations in the melts that can result from two-dimensional diffusion or density gradient driven flow effects ahead of the growth interface. These effects are discussed in terms of the alloy phase equilibrium properties, the recent high temperature thermophysical data for the alloys and the highly unusual heat transfer characteristics of the alloy/ampule/furnace system that may readily lead to double diffusive convective flows in a gravitational environment.

  17. Halo Formation During Solidification of Refractory Metal Aluminide Ternary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, N.; Feitosa, L. M.; West, G. D.; Dong, H. B.

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of eutectic morphologies following primary solidification has been studied in the refractory metal aluminide (Ta-Al-Fe, Nb-Al-Co, and Nb-Al-Fe) ternary systems. The undercooling accompanying solid growth, as related to the extended solute solubility in the primary and secondary phases can be used to account for the evolution of phase morphologies during ternary eutectic solidification. For small undercooling, the conditions of interfacial equilibrium remain valid, while in the case of significant undercooling when nucleation constraints occur, there is a departure from equilibrium leading to unexpected phases. In Ta-Al-Fe, an extended solubility of Fe in σ was observed, which was consistent with the formation of a halo of μ phase on primary σ. In Nb-Al-Co, a halo of C14 is formed on primary CoAl, but very limited vice versa. However, in the absence of a solidus projection it was not possible to definitively determine the extended solute solubility in the primary phase. In Nb-Al-Fe when nucleation constraints arise, the inability to initiate coupled growth of NbAl3 + C14 leads to the occurrence of a two-phase halo of C14 + Nb2Al, indicating a large undercooling and departure from equilibrium.

  18. Directional solidification of eutectic composites in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic and a nickel-base alloy containing 30 wt pct Ta were solidified unidirectionally in an electron beam floating zone melting apparatus. It was found that the volume fraction of the Ni3Ta phase in the Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic mixture was increased from 7.6 to 36 volume pct in agreement with the theory as predicted. Tensile properties of the randomly solidified and unidirectionally solidified Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic were determined as function of solidification rate and temperature. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength decreased as both the test temperature and solidification rate increased. An elongation of 40 pct was obtained for a nickelbase alloy containing 30 wt at room temperature. This unusually large elongation was attributed to the superplastic behavior of the alloy. The critical currents versus the external fields at 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.2 deg for the unidirectionally solidified Pb-Sn eutectic were measured. The values of critical fields at zero critical currents were obtained by extrapolation.

  19. Modelling morphology evolution during solidification of IPP in processing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pantani, R., E-mail: rpantani@unisa.it, E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it, E-mail: vsperanza@unisa.it, E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; De Santis, F., E-mail: rpantani@unisa.it, E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it, E-mail: vsperanza@unisa.it, E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it; Speranza, V., E-mail: rpantani@unisa.it, E-mail: fedesantis@unisa.it, E-mail: vsperanza@unisa.it, E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it

    During polymer processing, crystallization takes place during or soon after flow. In most of cases, the flow field dramatically influences both the crystallization kinetics and the crystal morphology. On their turn, crystallinity and morphology affect product properties. Consequently, in the last decade, researchers tried to identify the main parameters determining crystallinity and morphology evolution during solidification In processing conditions. In this work, we present an approach to model flow-induced crystallization with the aim of predicting the morphology after processing. The approach is based on: interpretation of the FIC as the effect of molecular stretch on the thermodynamic crystallization temperature; modelingmore » the molecular stretch evolution by means of a model simple and easy to be implemented in polymer processing simulation codes; identification of the effect of flow on nucleation density and spherulites growth rate by means of simple experiments; determination of the condition under which fibers form instead of spherulites. Model predictions reproduce most of the features of final morphology observed in the samples after solidification.« less

  20. Army Investment Casting Industry Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Page 9 #5 Capacity Utilization Rates Page 10 #6 Labor Intensity Indicator Page 11 #7 Market Share By Firm Size Page 12 #8 Market Share By Type of Firm...information gathered from the U.S. casters. These similarities coupled with the relatively small Canadian market share resulted in similar conclusions...investment castings further expanding into the Defense market some foreseeable difficulties that could arise would be: a. Lack of adequate tooling. b