Science.gov

Sample records for a3ar expression level

  1. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR): therapeutic target and predictive biological marker in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Pnina; Cohen, Shira

    2016-09-01

    The Gi protein-associated A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is over-expressed in inflammatory cells, and this high expression is also reflected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. CF101, a selective agonist with high affinity to the A3AR, is known to induce robust anti-inflammatory effect in experimental animal models of adjuvant-, collagen-, and tropomyosin-induced arthritis. The effect is mediated via a definitive molecular mechanism entailing deregulation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the Wnt signal transduction pathways resulting in apoptosis of inflammatory cells. CF101 was found to be safe and well tolerated in all preclinical, phase I, and phase II human clinical studies. In two phase II clinical studies where CF101 was administered to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as a stand-alone drug, a significant anti-rheumatic effect and a direct significant correlation were found between receptor expression at baseline and patients' response to the drug, suggesting that A3AR may be utilized as a predictive biomarker. The A3AR is a promising therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis and can be used also as a biological marker to predict patients' response to CF101. This is a unique type of a personalized medicine approach which may pave the way for a safe and efficacious treatment for this patient population.

  2. Engagement of the GABA to KCC2 Signaling Pathway Contributes to the Analgesic Effects of A3AR Agonists in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Amanda; Castonguay, Annie; Cottet, Martin; Little, Joshua W.; Chen, Zhoumou; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M.; Doyle, Timothy; Egan, Terrance M.; Vanderah, Todd W.; De Konnick, Yves; Tosh, Dilip K.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 1.5 billion people worldwide suffer from chronic pain, yet current treatment strategies often lack efficacy or have deleterious side effects in patients. Adenosine is an inhibitory neuromodulator that was previously thought to mediate antinociception through the A1 and A2A receptor subtypes. We have since demonstrated that A3AR agonists have potent analgesic actions in preclinical rodent models of neuropathic pain and that A3AR analgesia is independent of adenosine A1 or A2A unwanted effects. Herein, we explored the contribution of the GABA inhibitory system to A3AR-mediated analgesia using well-characterized mouse and rat models of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain. The deregulation of GABA signaling in pathophysiological pain states is well established: GABA signaling can be hampered by a reduction in extracellular GABA synthesis by GAD65 and enhanced extracellular GABA reuptake via the GABA transporter, GAT-1. In neuropathic pain, GABAAR-mediated signaling can be further disrupted by the loss of the KCC2 chloride anion gradient. Here, we demonstrate that A3AR agonists (IB-MECA and MRS5698) reverse neuropathic pain via a spinal mechanism of action that modulates GABA activity. Spinal administration of the GABAA antagonist, bicuculline, disrupted A3AR-mediated analgesia. Furthermore, A3AR-mediated analgesia was associated with reductions in CCI-related GAD65 and GAT-1 serine dephosphorylation as well as an enhancement of KCC2 serine phosphorylation and activity. Our results suggest that A3AR-mediated reversal of neuropathic pain increases modulation of GABA inhibitory neurotransmission both directly and indirectly through protection of KCC2 function, underscoring the unique utility of A3AR agonists in chronic pain. PMID:25878279

  3. Methotrexate enhances the anti-inflammatory effect of CF101 via up-regulation of the A3 adenosine receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ochaion, Avivit; Bar-Yehuda, Sara; Cohn, Shira; Del Valle, Luis; Perez-Liz, Georginia; Madi, Lea; Barer, Faina; Farbstein, Motti; Fishman-Furman, Sari; Reitblat, Tatiana; Reitblat, Alexander; Amital, Howard; Levi, Yair; Molad, Yair; Mader, Reuven; Tishler, Moshe; Langevitz, Pnina; Zabutti, Alexander; Fishman, Pnina

    2006-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) exerts an anti-inflammatory effect via its metabolite adenosine, which activates adenosine receptors. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) was found to be highly expressed in inflammatory tissues and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). CF101 (IB-MECA), an A3AR agonist, was previously found to inhibit the clinical and pathological manifestations of AIA. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of MTX on A3AR expression level and the efficacy of combined treatment with CF101 and MTX in AIA rats. AIA rats were treated with MTX, CF101, or both agents combined. A3AR mRNA, protein expression and exhibition were tested in paw and PBMC extracts from AIA rats utilizing immunohistochemistry staining, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A3AR level was tested in PBMC extracts from patients chronically treated with MTX and healthy individuals. The effect of CF101, MTX and combined treatment on A3AR expression level was also tested in PHA-stimulated PBMCs from healthy individuals and from MTX-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Combined treatment with CF101 and MTX resulted in an additive anti-inflammatory effect in AIA rats. MTX induced A2AAR and A3AR over-expression in paw cells from treated animals. Moreover, increased A3AR expression level was detected in PBMCs from MTX-treated RA patients compared with cells from healthy individuals. MTX also increased the protein expression level of PHA-stimulated PBMCs from healthy individuals. The increase in A3AR level was counteracted in vitro by adenosine deaminase and mimicked in vivo by dipyridamole, demonstrating that receptor over-expression was mediated by adenosine. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that MTX induces increased A3AR expression and exhibition, thereby potentiating the inhibitory effect of CF101 and supporting combined use of these drugs to treat RA. PMID:17101059

  4. A Comparison of Artificial Subtle Expressions with Human-like Expressions on Expressing Confidence Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Yamada, Seiji; Funakoshi, Kotaro; Nakano, Mikio

    Expressing the confidence level of a system's suggestions by using speech sounds is an important cue to users of the system for perceiving how likely it is for the suggestions to be correct. We assume that expressing confidence levels by using human-like expressions would cause users to have a poorer impression of the systems than if artificial subtle expressions (ASEs) were used when the quality of the presented information does not match the expressed confidence level. We confirmed that this assumption was correct by conducting a psychological experiment.

  5. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly ‘housekeeping’, whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research. PMID:24670764

  6. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J; Meehan, Terrence F; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A; Ishizu, Yuri; Young, Robert S; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M; Arakawa, Takahiro; Archer, John A C; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Rennie, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S B; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Favorov, Alexander V; Fisher, Malcolm E; Frith, Martin C; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furino, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Gibson, Andrew P; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Hofmann, Oliver M; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Furni; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S; Kenna, Tony J; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S Peter; Knox, Alan J; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; de Lima Morais, David A; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Noma, Shohei; Noazaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohimiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G D; Rackham, Owen J L; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaai; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Naoko; Swoboda, Rolf K; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyodo, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Elvind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M; Verado, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A; Winteringham, Louise N; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Susan E; Zhang, Peter G; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B; Taylor, Martin S; Makeev, Vsevolod J; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-03-27

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly 'housekeeping', whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research.

  7. Analysis of baseline gene expression levels from ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The use of gene expression profiling to predict chemical mode of action would be enhanced by better characterization of variance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis of microarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the control arm of toxicogenomics studies has yielded useful information on baseline fluctuations in gene expression. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Technical Committee on the Application of Genomics in Mechanism Based Risk Assessment in order to provide a public resource for assessments of variability in baseline gene expression. Data from over 500 Affymetrix microarrays from control rat liver and kidney were collected from 16 different institutions. Thirty-five biological and technical factors were obtained for each animal, describing a wide range of study characteristics, and a subset were evaluated in detail for their contribution to total variability using multivariate statistical and graphical techniques. The study factors that emerged as key sources of variability included gender, organ section, strain, and fasting state. These and other study factors were identified as key descriptors that should be included in the minimal information about a toxicogenomics study needed for interpretation of results by an independent source. Genes that are the most and least variable, gender-selectiv

  8. Influence of HLA-C Expression Level on HIV Control

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Richard; Qi, Ying; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Chen, Haoyan; Gao, Xiaojiang; Thomas, Rasmi; Yuki, Yuko; Del Prete, Greg Q.; Goulder, Philip; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brumme, Chanson J.; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Nelson, George; Bosch, Ronald; Heckerman, David; Stein, Judy L.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Moody, M. Anthony; Denny, Thomas N.; Zeng, Xue; Fang, Jingyuan; Moffett, Ashley; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Goedert, James J.; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Fellay, Jacques; McLaren, Paul; Deeks, Steven G.; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce; Michael, Nelson L.; Weintrob, Amy; Wolinsky, Steven; Liao, Wilson; Carrington, Mary

    2013-01-01

    A variant upstream of human leukocyte antigen C (HLA-C) shows the most significant genome-wide effect on HIV control in European Americans and is also associated with the level of HLA-C expression. We characterized the differential cell surface expression levels of all common HLA-C allotypes and tested directly for effects of HLA-C expression on outcomes of HIV infection in 5243 individuals. Increasing HLA-C expression was associated with protection against multiple outcomes independently of individual HLA allelic effects in both African and European Americans, regardless of their distinct HLA-C frequencies and linkage relationships with HLA-B and HLA-A. Higher HLA-C expression was correlated with increased likelihood of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and frequency of viral escape mutation. In contrast, high HLA-C expression had a deleterious effect in Crohn’s disease, suggesting a broader influence of HLA expression levels in human disease. PMID:23559252

  9. The Level of Expressed Emotion Scale: A Useful Measure of Expressed Emotion in Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelis, Sharon M.; Rae, Gordon; Liddell, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Research has suggested that self-report measures of expressed emotion (EE) may be employed as a proxy measure of environmental stress in the home. The appropriateness of the Level of Expressed Emotion scale as a measure of perceived expressed emotion was examined in a sample of adolescents. Participants were 239 male and 422 female adolescents…

  10. Sequence determinants of prokaryotic gene expression level under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Heng; Yang, Yi; Hu, Xiao-Pan; He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2014-11-01

    Prokaryotic gene expression is environment-dependent and temperature plays an important role in shaping the gene expression profile. Revealing the regulation mechanisms of gene expression pertaining to temperature has attracted tremendous efforts in recent years particularly owning to the yielding of transcriptome and proteome data by high-throughput techniques. However, most of the previous works concentrated on the characterization of the gene expression profile of individual organism and little effort has been made to disclose the commonality among organisms, especially for the gene sequence features. In this report, we collected the transcriptome and proteome data measured under heat stress condition from recently published literature and studied the sequence determinants for the expression level of heat-responsive genes on multiple layers. Our results showed that there indeed exist commonness and consistent patterns of the sequence features among organisms for the differentially expressed genes under heat stress condition. Some features are attributed to the requirement of thermostability while some are dominated by gene function. The revealed sequence determinants of bacterial gene expression level under heat stress complement the knowledge about the regulation factors of prokaryotic gene expression responding to the change of environmental conditions. Furthermore, comparisons to thermophilic adaption have been performed to reveal the similarity and dissimilarity of the sequence determinants for the response to heat stress and for the adaption to high habitat temperature, which elucidates the complex landscape of gene expression related to the same physical factor of temperature.

  11. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  12. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  13. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  14. The expression levels of the sirtuins in patients with BCC.

    PubMed

    Temel, Metin; Koç, Mustafa Nihat; Ulutaş, Saffet; Göğebakan, Bülent

    2016-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common tumor in humans. Reduced expression of sirtuins interferes with DNA repair, which may cause mutations and genomic instability, and eventually leads to tumor development. In the present study, we investigate the expression levels of SIRT genes in non-tumoral and tumor tissues of patients with BCC. A total of 27 patients (16 males, 11 females) with BCC were included in the study; the mean age was 65.40 ± 10.74 years and mean follow-up was 2.5 ± 0.5 years. There were multiple synchronous lesions in six patients, and the remaining 21 patients had a single lesion. Tumor and non-tumoral tissue samples were collected from all patients, and mRNA expression levels of SIRT1-7 (Sirt1.1, Sirt1.2, Sirt2, Sirt3, Sirt4, Sirt5, Sirt6, and Sirt7) were examined by real-time PCR. The results showed that expressions of SIRT1.1, SIRT1.2, SIRT4, SIRT5, SIRT6, and SIRT7 mRNAs were unchanged in tumor tissues of BCC patients compared with non-tumoral tissue samples. Importantly, the expressions of SIRT2 and SIRT3 mRNAs were significantly reduced in tumor tissue samples from BCC patients compared with non-tumoral tissues (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). In light of the previous reports that have demonstrated a link between SIRT proteins and cancer, our findings suggest that SIRT2 and SIRT3 may plan important roles in BCC pathogenesis and could be candidate prognostic biomarkers for BCC.

  15. Localizing PRL-2 expression and determining the effects of dietary Mg(2+) on expression levels.

    PubMed

    Gungabeesoon, Jeremy; Tremblay, Michel L; Uetani, Noriko

    2016-07-01

    The phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of protein tyrosine phosphatases that play a key role in cancer progression and metastasis. We previously showed that PRL-2 modulates intracellular Mg(2+) levels and sustains cancer phenotypes by binding to the Mg(2+) transporter CNNM3. However, the physiological functions of PRL-2 in animals remain largely unknown. To better understand which cell types are associated with PRL-2 function, we characterized its expression in mouse tissues using a PRL-2 β-galactosidase reporter mouse model. Our results demonstrated that PRL-2 was ubiquitously expressed, with the highest expression levels observed in the hippocampal pyramidal neurons, ependymal cells, cone and rod photoreceptor cells, endocardium, vascular and bronchial smooth muscle, and collecting ducts in the kidney. On the other hand, PRL-2 expression was undetectable or very low in the parenchymal cells of the liver and pancreas. Our results also indicated that PRL-2 is involved in cell-type-specific Mg(2+) homeostasis and that PRL-2 expression is potentially inversely regulated by dietary Mg(2+) levels.

  16. Selenoprotein expression is regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Rebsch, Cheryl M; Penna, Frank J; Copeland, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    Selenium supplementation in a population with low basal blood selenium levels has been reported to decrease the incidence of several cancers including prostate cancer. Based on the clinical findings, it is likely that the antioxidant function of one or more selenoproteins is responsible for the chemopreventive effect, although low molecular weight seleno-compounds have also been posited to selectively induce apoptosis in transformed cells. To address the effects of selenium supplementation on selenoprotein expression in prostate cells, we have undertaken an analysis of antioxidant selenoprotein expression as well as selenium toxicity in non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC-3). Our results show that two of the glutathione peroxidase family members (GPX1 and GPX4) are highly induced by supplemental selenium in prostate cancer cells but only slightly induced in RWPE-1 cells. In addition, GPX1 levels are dramatically lower in PC-3 cells as compared to RWPE-1 or LNCaP cells. GPX2 protein and mRNA, however, are only detectable in RWPE-1 cells. Of the three selenium compounds tested (sodium selenite, sodium selenate and selenomethionine), only sodium selenite shows toxicity in a physiological range of selenium concentrations. Notably and in contrast to previous studies, RWPE-1 cells were significantly more sensitive to selenite than either of the prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that selenoproteins and selenium metabolism are regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

  17. Multi-level Expression Design Language: Requirement level (MEDL-R) system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the Multi-Level Expression Design Language Requirements Level (MEDL-R) system was conducted to determine whether it would be of use in the Goddard Space Flight Center Code 580 software development environment. The evaluation is based upon a study of the MEDL-R concept of requirement languages, the functions performed by MEDL-R, and the MEDL-R language syntax. Recommendations are made for changes to MEDL-R that would make it useful in the Code 580 environment.

  18. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments.

  19. The genetic basis of evolutionary change in gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, J. J.; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is an important determinant of organismal phenotype and evolution. However, the widespread recognition of this fact occurred long after the synthesis of evolution and genetics. Here, we give a brief sketch of thoughts regarding gene regulation in the history of evolution and genetics. We then review the development of genome-wide studies of gene regulatory variation in the context of the location and mode of action of the causative genetic changes. In particular, we review mapping of the genetic basis of expression variation through expression quantitative trait locus studies and measuring the cis/trans component of expression variation in allele-specific expression studies. We conclude by proposing a systematic integration of ideas that combines global mapping studies, cis/trans tests and modern population genetics methodologies, in order to directly estimate the forces acting on regulatory variation within and between species. PMID:20643748

  20. Circulating irisin levels and muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression are independent of IL-15 levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Quinn, LeBris S; Anderson, Barbara G; Conner, Jennifer D; Wolden-Hanson, Tami

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and irisin are exercise-induced myokines that exert favorable effects on energy expenditure and metabolism. IL-15 can induce PGC-1α expression, which in turn induces expression of irisin and its precursor, FNDC5. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that increases in circulating irisin levels and muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression are dependent on IL-15. Circulating irisin levels and gastrocnemius muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression were examined following acute exercise in control and IL-15-deleted (IL-15 KO) mice, following injection of IL-15 into IL-15 KO mice, and in transgenic mice with elevated circulating IL-15 levels (IL-15 Tg mice). Circulating IL-15 levels and muscle PGC-1α and PPARδ mRNA expressions were determined as positive controls. No effect of IL-15 deletion on post-exercise serum irisin levels or muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression was detected. While serum IL-15 levels and muscle PGC-1α expression were elevated post-exercise in control mice, both serum irisin levels and muscle FNDC5 expression decreased shortly after exercise in both control and IL-15 KO mice. A single injection of recombinant IL-15 into IL-15 KO mice that significantly increased muscle PPARδ and PGC-1α mRNA expressions had no effect on circulating irisin release, but modestly induced muscle FNDC5 expression. Additionally, serum irisin and gastrocnemius muscle FNDC5 expression in IL-15 Tg mice were similar to those of control mice. Muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression and irisin release are not IL-15-dependent in mice.

  1. Quantifying the Effect of DNA Packaging on Gene Expression Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Harold

    2010-10-01

    Gene expression, the process by which the genetic code comes alive in the form of proteins, is one of the most important biological processes in living cells, and begins when transcription factors bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region upstream of a gene. The relationship between gene expression output and transcription factor input which is termed the gene regulation function is specific to each promoter, and predicting this gene regulation function from the locations of transcription factor binding sites is one of the challenges in biology. In eukaryotic organisms (for example, animals, plants, fungi etc), DNA is highly compacted into nucleosomes, 147-bp segments of DNA tightly wrapped around histone protein core, and therefore, the accessibility of transcription factor binding sites depends on their locations with respect to nucleosomes - sites inside nucleosomes are less accessible than those outside nucleosomes. To understand how transcription factor binding sites contribute to gene expression in a quantitative manner, we obtain gene regulation functions of promoters with various configurations of transcription factor binding sites by using fluorescent protein reporters to measure transcription factor input and gene expression output in single yeast cells. In this talk, I will show that the affinity of a transcription factor binding site inside and outside the nucleosome controls different aspects of the gene regulation function, and explain this finding based on a mass-action kinetic model that includes competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors.

  2. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  3. Tumor endothelial cells express high pentraxin 3 levels.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Kenji; Hojo, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Masumi; Torii, Chisaho; Shinohara, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2016-12-01

    It has been described that tumor progression has many similarities to inflammation and wound healing in terms of the signaling processes involved. Among biological responses, angiogenesis, which is necessary for tumor progression and metastasis, is a common hallmark; therefore, tumor blood vessels have been considered as important therapeutic targets in anticancer therapy. We focused on pentraxin 3 (PTX3), which is a marker of cancer-related inflammation, but we found no reports on its expression and function in tumor blood vessels. Here we showed that PTX3 is expressed in mouse and human tumor blood vessels based on immunohistochemical analysis. We found that PTX3 is upregulated in primary mouse and human tumor endothelial cells compared to normal endothelial cells. We also showed that PTX3 plays an important role in the proliferation of the tumor endothelial cells. These results suggest that PTX3 is an important target for antiangiogenic therapy.

  4. Analysis of gelsolin expression pattern in developing chicken embryo reveals high GSN expression level in tissues of neural crest origin.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Antonina Joanna; Morosan-Puopolo, Gabriela; Makowiecka, Aleksandra; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria; Nowak, Dorota; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Gelsolin is one of the most intensively studied actin-binding proteins. However, in the literature comprehensive studies of GSN expression during development have not been performed yet in all model organisms. In zebrafish, gelsolin is a dorsalizing factor that modulates bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathways, whereas knockout of the gelsolin coding gene, GSN is not lethal in murine model. To study the role of gelsolin in development of higher vertebrates, it is crucial to estimate GSN expression pattern during development. Here, we examined GSN expression in the developing chicken embryo. We applied numerous methods to track GSN expression in developing embryos at mRNA and protein level. We noted a characteristic GSN expression pattern. Although GSN transcripts were present in several cell types starting from early developmental stages, a relatively high GSN expression was observed in eye, brain vesicles, midbrain, neural tube, heart tube, and splanchnic mesoderm. In older embryos, we observed a high GSN expression in the cranial ganglia and dorsal root ganglia. A detailed analysis of 10-day-old chicken embryos revealed high amounts of gelsolin especially within the head region: in the olfactory and optic systems, meninges, nerves, muscles, presumptive pituitary gland, and pericytes, but not oligodendrocytes in the brain. Obtained results suggest that GSN is expressed at high levels in some tissues of ectodermal origin including all neural crest derivatives. Additionally, we describe that silencing of GSN expression in brain vesicles leads to altered morphology of the mesencephalon. This implies gelsolin is crucial for chicken brain development.

  5. Correlation between liver cancer pain and the HIF-1 and VEGF expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng; Feng, Gui-Yin; Guo, Yan-Ru; Liang, Dong-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Hai-Lun

    2017-01-01

    A possible correlation between liver cancer pain and the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression levels was examined. From January, 2015 to January, 2016, 30 patients suffering from liver cancer with pain, 30 patients with liver cancer without pain and 30 hepatitis patients with pain were enrolled in the study. Pain level was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA were determined by RT-PCR and the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF proteins were examined by ELISA. Before intervention, the VAS in the hepatitis group was significantly higher than that of the liver cancer pain group. However, after intervention the VAS in the two groups was reduced. HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA expression levels in the liver cancer pain group were significantly higher than those in the liver cancer group before and after intervention. The expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA in the hepatitis group were the lowest. The expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA in the liver cancer pain group considerably increased after intervention. The expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA in the other two groups showed no changes before or after intervention. Before and after the intervention, VAS in the liver cancer pain group was positively correlated to the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF. Thus, pain occurrence and the pain level in liver cancer patients were correlated with the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF. As the regular three-step medicine analgesic ladder is ineffective in these cases, verification of HIF-1 and VEGF expression levels may be considered the new target for pain release. PMID:28123525

  6. Relationship between Legible Handwriting and Level of Success of Third Grade Students in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Seher; Küçükayar, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify third-grade students' performance levels for written expression and handwriting and to find the relationship between these performances. The study is based on relational screening model. It is carried out with 110 third grade students. Students' levels of success in handwriting and in written expression are evaluated…

  7. TIGIT expression levels on human NK cells correlate with functional heterogeneity among healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hou, Hongyan; Wu, Shiji; Tang, Qing; Liu, Weiyong; Huang, Min; Yin, Botao; Huang, Jing; Mao, Lie; Lu, Yanfang; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-10-01

    Human NK cells display extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among healthy individuals, but the mechanism responsible for this variation is still largely unknown. Here, we show that a novel immune receptor, T-cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), is expressed preferentially on human NK cells but shows wide variation in its expression levels among healthy individuals. We found that the TIGIT expression level is related to the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of NK cells, and that NK cells from healthy individuals can be divided into three categories according to TIGIT expression. NK cells with low levels of TIGIT expression show higher cytokine secretion capability, degranulation activity, and cytotoxic potential than NK cells with high levels of TIGIT expression. Blockade of the TIGIT pathway significantly increased NK-cell function, particularly in NK cells with high levels of TIGIT expression. We further observed that the TIGIT expression level was inversely correlated with the IFN-γ secretion capability of NK cells in patients with cancers and autoimmune diseases. Importantly, we propose a novel mechanism that links TIGIT expression with NK-cell functional heterogeneity, and this mechanism might partially explain why individuals have different susceptibilities to infection, autoimmune disease, and cancer.

  8. Gene expression levels in normal human lymphoblasts with variable sensitivities to arsenite: Identification of GGT1 and NFKBIE expression levels as possible biomarkers of susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarova, Elena V.; Li Ping; Uddin, Ahmed N.; Chen, Xuyan; Nadas, Arthur; Rossman, Toby G.

    2008-01-15

    Drinking arsenic-contaminated water is associated with increased risk of neoplasias of the skin, lung, bladder and possibly other sites, as well as other diseases. Earlier, we showed that human lymphoblast lines from different normal unexposed donors showed variable sensitivities to the toxic effects of arsenite. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to compare the basal gene expression profiles between two arsenite-resistant (GM02707, GM00893) and two arsenite-sensitive lymphoblast lines (GM00546, GM00607). A number of genes were differentially expressed in arsenite-sensitive and arsenite-resistant cells. Among these, {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase 1 (GGT1) and NF{kappa}B inhibitor-epsilon (NFKBIE) showed higher expression levels in arsenite-resistant cells. RT-PCR analysis with gene-specific primers confirmed these results. Reduction of GGT1 expression level in arsenite-resistant lymphoblasts with GGT1-specific siRNA resulted in increased cell sensitivity to arsenite. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that expression levels of GGT1 and possibly NFKBIE might be useful as biomarkers of genetic susceptibility to arsenite. Expression microarrays can thus be exploited for identifying additional biomarkers of susceptibility to arsenite and to other toxicants.

  9. Expression of neurexin and neuroligin in the enteric nervous system and their down-regulated expression levels in Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangye; Wang, Jian; Li, Aiwu; Liu, Hongzhen; Zhang, Wentong; Cui, Xinhai; Wang, Kelai

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the expression levels of neurexins and neuroligins in the enteric nervous system (ENS) in Hirschsprung Disease (HSCR). Longitudinal muscles with adherent mesenteric plexus were obtained by dissection of the fresh gut wall of mice, guinea pigs, and humans. Double labeling of neurexin I and Hu (a neuron marker), neuroligin 1 and Hu, neurexin I and synaptophysin (a presynaptic marker), and neuroligin 1 and PSD95 (a postsynaptic marker) was performed by immunofluorescence staining. Images were merged to determine the relative localizations of the proteins. Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin in different segments of the ENS in HSCR were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Neurexin and neuroligin were detected in the mesenteric plexus of mice, guinea pigs, and humans with HSCR. Neurexin was located in the presynapse, whereas neuroligin was located in the postsynapse. Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin were significant in the ganglionic colonic segment of HSCR, moderate in the transitional segment, and negative in the aganglionic colonic segment. The expressions of neurexin and neuroligin in the transitional segments were significantly down-regulated compared with the levels in the normal segments (P < 0.05). Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin in ENS are significantly down-regulated in HSCR, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of HSCR.

  10. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  11. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  12. Genetic analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression levels in whole blood of healthy human subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The predominant model for regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation is an inverse association in which increased methylation results in decreased gene expression levels. However, recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic variation, DNA methylation and expression is more complex. Results Systems genetic approaches for examining relationships between gene expression and methylation array data were used to find both negative and positive associations between these levels. A weighted correlation network analysis revealed that i) both transcriptome and methylome are organized in modules, ii) co-expression modules are generally not preserved in the methylation data and vice-versa, and iii) highly significant correlations exist between co-expression and co-methylation modules, suggesting the existence of factors that affect expression and methylation of different modules (i.e., trans effects at the level of modules). We observed that methylation probes associated with expression in cis were more likely to be located outside CpG islands, whereas specificity for CpG island shores was present when methylation, associated with expression, was under local genetic control. A structural equation model based analysis found strong support in particular for a traditional causal model in which gene expression is regulated by genetic variation via DNA methylation instead of gene expression affecting DNA methylation levels. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms between genetic markers, epigenetic mechanisms and gene expression. We find strong support for the classical model of genetic variants regulating methylation, which in turn regulates gene expression. Moreover we show that, although the methylation and expression modules differ, they are highly correlated. PMID:23157493

  13. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Otoupal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment

  14. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Keesha E; Otoupal, Peter B; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment through stress

  15. Hypoxia disrupts the expression levels of circadian rhythm genes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Yang, Sheng-Li; Fang, Xiefan; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Sun, Cheng-Yi; Huang, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Disturbance in the expression of circadian rhythm genes is a common feature in certain types of cancer, however the mechanisms mediating this disturbance remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the expression of circadian rhythm genes in liver cancer cells and to identify the mechanisms underlying this effect in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HCC cell line, PLC/PRF/5. was treated with either a vehicle control or CoCl2 at 50, 100 or 200 µΜ for 24 h. Following treatment, the protein expression levels of hypoxia‑inducible factor (HIF)‑1α and HIF‑2α were detected by western blotting and the mRNA expression levels of circadian rhythm genes, including circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock), brain and muscle Arnt‑like 1 (Bmal1), period (Per)1, Per2, Per3, cryptochrome (Cry)1, Cry2 and casein kinase Iε (CKIε), were detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR). Expression plasmids containing HIF‑1α or HIF‑2α were transfected into the PLC/PRF/5 cells using liposomes and RT‑qPCR was used to determine the effects of the transfections on the expression levels of circadian rhythm genes. Following treatment with CoCl2, the protein expression levels of HIF‑1α and HIF‑2α were upregulated in a CoCl2 concentration‑dependent manner. The mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1 and Cry2 were increased, and the mRNA expression levels of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and CKIε were decreased following CoCl2 treatment (P<0.05). In the PLC/PRF/5 cells transfected with the plasmid containing HIF‑1α, the mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1 and Cry2 were increased, and the mRNA expression levels of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and CKIε were decreased. In the PLC/PRF/5 cells transfected with the plasmid containing HIF‑2α, the mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Cry1, Cry2 and CKIε were upregulated, and the mRNA expression levels of Per2 and Per3 were

  16. HER2 over-expressing high grade endometrial cancer expresses high levels of p95HER2 variant

    PubMed Central

    Growdon, Whitfield B.; Groeneweg, Jolijn; Byron, Virginia; DiGloria, Celeste; Borger, Darrell R.; Tambouret, Rosemary; Foster, Rosemary; Chenna, Ahmed; Sperinde, Jeff; Winslow, John; Rueda, Bo R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subsets of high grade endometrial cancer (EnCa) over-express HER2 (ERBB2), yet clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any anti-tumor activity utilizing trastuzumab, an approved platform for HER2 positive breast cancer (BrCa). A truncated p95HER2 variant lacking the trastuzumab binding site may confer resistance. The objective of this investigation was to characterize the expression of the p95HER2 truncated variant in EnCa. Materials and Methods With institutional approval, 86 high grade EnCa tumors were identified with tumor specimens from surgeries performed between 2000-2011. Clinical data were collected and all specimens underwent tumor genotyping, HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC, HercepTest®), HER2 fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), along with total HER2 (H2T) and p95HER2 assessment with VeraTag® testing. Regression models were used to compare a cohort of 86 breast tumors selected for equivalent HER2 protein expression. Results We identified 44 high grade endometrioid and 42 uterine serous carcinomas (USC). IHC identified high HER2 expression (2+ or 3+) in 59% of the tumors. HER2 gene amplification was observed in 16 tumors (12 USC, 4 endometrioid). Both HER2 gene amplification and protein expression correlated with H2T values. High p95HER2 expression above 2.8 RF/mm2 was observed in 53% (n = 54) with significant correlation with H2T levels. When matched to a cohort of 107 breast tumors based on HercepTest HER2 expression, high grade EnCa presented with higher p95 levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that compared to BrCa, high grade EnCa expresses higher levels of p95HER2 possibly providing rationale for the trastuzumab resistance observed in EnCa. PMID:25602714

  17. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles linked to monoamine metabolite levels in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Luykx, J J; Olde Loohuis, L M; Neeleman, M; Strengman, E; Bakker, S C; Lentjes, E; Borgdorff, P; van Dongen, E P A; Bruins, P; Kahn, R S; Horvath, S; de Jong, S; Ophoff, R A

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier separates circulating blood from the central nervous system (CNS). The scope of this barrier is not fully understood which limits our ability to relate biological measurements from peripheral to central phenotypes. For example, it is unknown to what extent gene expression levels in peripheral blood are reflective of CNS metabolism. In this study, we examine links between central monoamine metabolite levels and whole-blood gene expression to better understand the connection between peripheral systems and the CNS. To that end, we correlated the prime monoamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with whole-genome gene expression microarray data from blood (N=240 human subjects). We additionally applied gene-enrichment analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) to identify modules of co-expressed genes in blood that may be involved with monoamine metabolite levels in CSF. Transcript levels of two genes were significantly associated with CSF serotonin metabolite levels after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing: THAP7 (P=2.8 × 10−8, β=0.08) and DDX6 (P=2.9 × 10−7, β=0.07). Differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for genes expressed in the brain tissue (P=6.0 × 10−52). WGCNA revealed significant correlations between serotonin metabolism and hub genes with known functions in serotonin metabolism, for example, HTR2A and COMT. We conclude that gene expression levels in whole blood are associated with monoamine metabolite levels in the human CSF. Our results, including the strong enrichment of brain-expressed genes, illustrate that gene expression profiles in peripheral blood can be relevant for quantitative metabolic phenotypes in the CNS. PMID:27959337

  18. Substrates and inhibitors display different sensitivity to expression level of the dopamine transporter in heterologously expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nianhang; Reith, Maarten E A

    2007-04-01

    The use of heterologous expression systems for studying dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function has provided important information corroborating and complementing in situ obtained knowledge. Preliminary experiments with human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) heterologously expressing varying amounts of DAT suggested fluctuations in the potency of cocaine in inhibiting DA uptake and led to the present systematic assessment of the impact of the density of DAT on its function. Transiently expressing intact HEK293 cells, transfected with increasing amounts of DAT cDNA, displayed increasing levels of surface DAT, binding of the cocaine analog [(3)H]2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane ([(3)H]CFT), and uptake of [(3)H]DA, [(3)H]N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ([(3)H]MPP(+)), [(3)H]norepinephrine, and [(3)H]serotonin. However, the amount of DAT cDNA and the DAT expression level required to produce 50% of maximal activity was threefold higher for CFT binding than for DA uptake. Increased DAT expression was accompanied by weakened potency in inhibiting [(3)H]DA uptake for cocaine, CFT, benztropine, and its analog JHW025, GBR 12909 and mazindol; their potency in inhibiting [(3)H]CFT binding was unaffected. Inhibition of uptake by the substrates DA, m-tyramine, d-amphetamine, or MPP(+) was also unaffected. Increasing DAT in stably expressing HEK293 cells by stimulation of gene expression with sodium butyrate also decreased the uptake inhibitory potency of a number of the above blockers without affecting the interaction between substrates and DAT. The present results prompt discussion of models explaining how factors regulating DAT expression at the plasma membrane can regulate DAT function and pharmacology.

  19. Criteria for high-level expression of a fungal laccase gene in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Hood, Elizabeth E; Bailey, Michele R; Beifuss, Katherine; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Horn, Michael E; Callaway, Evelyn; Drees, Carol; Delaney, Donna E; Clough, Richard; Howard, John A

    2003-03-01

    Expression of industrial enzymes in transgenic plants offers an alternative system to fungal fermentation for large-scale production. Very high levels of expression are required to make the enzymes cost-effective. We tested several parameters to determine the best method for achieving high levels of expression for a fungal laccase gene. Transgenic maize plants were generated using an Agrobacterium-mediated system. The molecular parameters that induced the highest expression were the maize embryo-preferred globulin 1 promoter and targeting of the protein to the cell wall. Two independent transgenic events that yielded multiple clonal plants were characterized in detail. Independent transgenic events 01 and 03 contained two or one copies of T-DNA, respectively. Plants derived from a single transgenic event varied in expression level, and the variation in expression levels was heritable. Within the seed, expression in these plants was primarily within the embryo, and was associated with seed browning and limited germination. High oil germplasm was used to increase germination, as well as to assist in increasing expression 20-fold in five generations through breeding and selection.

  20. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  1. Predicting Gene Expression Level from Relative Codon Usage Bias: An Application to Escherichia coli Genome

    PubMed Central

    Roymondal, Uttam; Das, Shibsankar; Sahoo, Satyabrata

    2009-01-01

    We present an expression measure of a gene, devised to predict the level of gene expression from relative codon bias (RCB). There are a number of measures currently in use that quantify codon usage in genes. Based on the hypothesis that gene expressivity and codon composition is strongly correlated, RCB has been defined to provide an intuitively meaningful measure of an extent of the codon preference in a gene. We outline a simple approach to assess the strength of RCB (RCBS) in genes as a guide to their likely expression levels and illustrate this with an analysis of Escherichia coli (E. coli) genome. Our efforts to quantitatively predict gene expression levels in E. coli met with a high level of success. Surprisingly, we observe a strong correlation between RCBS and protein length indicating natural selection in favour of the shorter genes to be expressed at higher level. The agreement of our result with high protein abundances, microarray data and radioactive data demonstrates that the genomic expression profile available in our method can be applied in a meaningful way to the study of cell physiology and also for more detailed studies of particular genes of interest. PMID:19131380

  2. FMRP Expression Levels in Mouse Central Nervous System Neurons Determine Behavioral Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Jason; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Niibori, Yosuke; Pacey, Laura K; Halder, Sebok K; Koxhioni, Enea; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hampson, David R

    2016-12-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is absent or highly reduced in Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic disorder causing cognitive impairment and autistic behaviors. Previous proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that restoring FMRP in the brain using viral vectors can improve pathological abnormalities in mouse models of fragile X. However, unlike small molecule drugs where the dose can readily be adjusted during treatment, viral vector-based biological therapeutic drugs present challenges in terms of achieving optimal dosing and expression levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of expressing varying levels of FMRP selectively in neurons of Fmr1 knockout and wild-type (WT) mice. A wide range of neuronal FMRP transgene levels was achieved in individual mice after intra-cerebroventricular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors coding for FMRP. In all treated knockout mice, prominent FMRP transgene expression was observed in forebrain structures, whereas lower levels were present in more caudal regions of the brain. Reduced levels of the synaptic protein PSD-95, elevated levels of the transcriptional modulator MeCP2, and abnormal motor activity, anxiety, and acoustic startle responses in Fmr1 knockout mice were fully or partially rescued after expression of FMRP at about 35-115% of WT expression, depending on the brain region examined. In the WT mouse, moderate FMRP over-expression of up to about twofold had little or no effect on PSD-95 and MeCP2 levels or on behavioral endophenotypes. In contrast, excessive over-expression in the Fmr1 knockout mouse forebrain (approximately 2.5-6-fold over WT) induced pathological motor hyperactivity and suppressed the startle response relative to WT mice. These results delineate a range of FMRP expression levels in the central nervous system that confer phenotypic improvement in fragile X mice. Collectively, these findings are pertinent to the development of long-term curative

  3. Secondary Data Analytics of Aquaporin Expression Levels in Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C; Graham, Barbara E; Pacurari, Maricica; Sims, Jennifer N; Udensi, Udensi K; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults in which recurrence has been attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. On the basis of tumor formation in vivo and growth type in vitro, two published microarray gene expression profiling studies grouped nine glioblastoma stem-like (GS) cell lines into one of two groups: full (GSf) or restricted (GSr) stem-like phenotypes. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are water transport proteins that are highly expressed in primary glial-derived tumors. However, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 have not been previously described in a panel of 92 glioma samples. Therefore, we designed secondary data analytics methods to determine the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in GS cell lines and glioblastoma neurospheres. Our investigation also included a total of 2,566 expression levels from 28 Affymetrix microarray probe sets encoding 13 human aquaporins (AQP0–AQP12); CXCR4 (the receptor for stromal cell derived factor-1 [SDF-1], a potential glioma stem cell therapeutic target]); and PROM1 (gene encoding CD133, the widely used glioma stem cell marker). Interactive visual representation designs for integrating phenotypic features and expression levels revealed that inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 correlate with distinct phenotypes in a set of cell lines grouped into full and restricted stem-like phenotypes. Discriminant function analysis further revealed that AQP1 and AQP4 expression are better predictors for tumor formation and growth types in glioblastoma stem-like cells than are CXCR4 and PROM1. Future investigations are needed to characterize the molecular mechanisms for inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in the glioblastoma stem-like neurospheres. PMID:26279619

  4. Histidine tag fusion increases expression levels of active recombinant amelogenin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Andersson, Christer; Reseland, Janne E; Lyngstadaas, Petter; Bülow, Leif

    2006-07-01

    Amelogenin is a dental enamel matrix protein involved in formation of dental enamel. In this study, we have expressed two different recombinant murine amelogenins in Escherichia coli: the untagged rM179, and the histidine tagged rp(H)M180, identical to rM179 except that it carries the additional N-terminal sequence MRGSHHHHHHGS. The effects of the histidine tag on expression levels, and on growth properties of the amelogenin expressing cells were studied. Purification of a crude protein extract containing rp(H)M180 was also carried out using IMAC and reverse-phase HPLC. The results of this study showed clearly that both growth properties and amelogenin expression levels were improved for E. coli cells expressing the histidine tagged amelogenin rp(H)M180, compared to cells expressing the untagged amelogenin rM179. The positive effect of the histidine tag on amelogenin expression is proposed to be due to the hydrophilic nature of the histidine tag, generating a more hydrophilic amelogenin, which is more compatible with the host cell. Human osteoblasts treated with the purified rp(H)M180 showed increased levels of secreted osteocalcin, compared to untreated cells. This response was similar to cells treated with enamel matrix derivate, mainly composed by amelogenin, suggesting that the recombinant protein is biologically active. Thus, the histidine tag favors expression and purification of biologically active recombinant amelogenin.

  5. CCR5 Expression Levels in HIV-Uninfected Women Receiving Hormonal Contraception.

    PubMed

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Wang, Cuiwei; Hu, Haihong; Anastos, Kathryn; Merhi, Zaher; Nowicki, Marek; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T; Watts, D Heather; Alter, Galit; Young, Mary A; Tsibris, Athe M N

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity increases as receptor/coreceptor expression levels increase. We determined peripheral CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 expression levels in HIV-uninfected women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA; n = 32), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; n = 27), oral contraceptive pills (n = 32), or no hormonal contraception (n = 33). The use of LNG-IUD increased the proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that expressed CCR5; increases in the magnitude of T-cell subset CCR5 expression were observed with DMPA and LNG-IUD use (P < .01 for all comparisons). LNG-IUD and, to a lesser extent, DMPA use were associated with increased peripheral T-cell CCR5 expression.

  6. CCR5 Expression Levels in HIV-Uninfected Women Receiving Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Wang, Cuiwei; Hu, Haihong; Anastos, Kathryn; Merhi, Zaher; Nowicki, Marek; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Watts, D. Heather; Alter, Galit; Young, Mary A.; Tsibris, Athe M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity increases as receptor/coreceptor expression levels increase. We determined peripheral CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 expression levels in HIV-uninfected women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA; n = 32), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; n = 27), oral contraceptive pills (n = 32), or no hormonal contraception (n = 33). The use of LNG-IUD increased the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that expressed CCR5; increases in the magnitude of T-cell subset CCR5 expression were observed with DMPA and LNG-IUD use (P < .01 for all comparisons). LNG-IUD and, to a lesser extent, DMPA use were associated with increased peripheral T-cell CCR5 expression. PMID:25895986

  7. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression. PMID:28083102

  8. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-12-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression.

  9. Regulatory logic driving stable levels of defective proventriculus expression during terminal photoreceptor specification in flies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jenny; Anderson, Caitlin; Viets, Kayla; Tran, Sang; Goldberg, Gregory; Small, Stephen; Johnston, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    How differential levels of gene expression are controlled in post-mitotic neurons is poorly understood. In the Drosophila retina, expression of the transcription factor Defective Proventriculus (Dve) at distinct cell type-specific levels is required for terminal differentiation of color- and motion-detecting photoreceptors. Here, we find that the activities of two cis-regulatory enhancers are coordinated to drive dve expression in the fly eye. Three transcription factors act on these enhancers to determine cell-type specificity. Negative autoregulation by Dve maintains expression from each enhancer at distinct homeostatic levels. One enhancer acts as an inducible backup ('dark' shadow enhancer) that is normally repressed but becomes active in the absence of the other enhancer. Thus, two enhancers integrate combinatorial transcription factor input, feedback and redundancy to generate cell type-specific levels of dve expression and stable photoreceptor fate. This regulatory logic may represent a general paradigm for how precise levels of gene expression are established and maintained in post-mitotic neurons.

  10. Neuromodulation independently determines correlated channel expression and conductance levels in motor neurons of the stomatogastric ganglion.

    PubMed

    Temporal, Simone; Desai, Mohati; Khorkova, Olga; Varghese, Gladis; Dai, Aihua; Schulz, David J; Golowasch, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal identity depends on the regulated expression of numerous molecular components, especially ionic channels, which determine the electrical signature of a neuron. Such regulation depends on at least two key factors, activity itself and neuromodulatory input. Neuronal electrical activity can modify the expression of ionic currents in homeostatic or nonhomeostatic fashion. Neuromodulators typically modify activity by regulating the properties or expression levels of subsets of ionic channels. In the stomatogastric system of crustaceans, both types of regulation have been demonstrated. Furthermore, the regulation of the coordinated expression of ionic currents and the channels that carry these currents has been recently reported in diverse neuronal systems, with neuromodulators not only controlling the absolute levels of ionic current expression but also, over long periods of time, appearing to modify their correlated expression. We hypothesize that neuromodulators may regulate the correlated expression of ion channels at multiple levels and in a cell-type-dependent fashion. We report that in two identified neuronal types, three ionic currents are linearly correlated in a pairwise manner, suggesting their coexpression or direct interactions, under normal neuromodulatory conditions. In each cell, some currents remain correlated after neuromodulatory input is removed, whereas the correlations between the other pairs are either lost or altered. Interestingly, in each cell, a different suite of currents change their correlation. At the transcript level we observe distinct alterations in correlations between channel mRNA amounts, including one of the cell types lacking a correlation under normal neuromodulatory conditions and then gaining the correlation when neuromodulators are removed. Synaptic activity does not appear to contribute, with one possible exception, to the correlated expression of either ionic currents or of the transcripts that code for the respective

  11. Krüppel expression levels are maintained through compensatory evolution of shadow enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D.J.; Vincent, Ben J.; White, Jonathan A.; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many developmental genes are controlled by shadow enhancers, pairs of enhancers that drive overlapping expression patterns. We hypothesized that compensatory evolution can maintain the total expression of a gene while individual shadow enhancers diverge between species. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression driven by orthologous pairs of shadow enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila yakuba, and Drosophila pseudoobscura that control expression of Krüppel, a transcription factor that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of blastoderm embryos. We find that the expression driven by the pair of enhancers is conserved between these three species, but expression levels driven by the individual enhancers are not. Using sequence analysis and experimental perturbation, we show that each shadow enhancer is activated by different transcription factors. These results support the hypothesis that compensatory evolution can occur between shadow enhancers, which has implications for mechanistic and evolutionary studies of gene regulation. PMID:26344774

  12. Krüppel Expression Levels Are Maintained through Compensatory Evolution of Shadow Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Vincent, Ben J; White, Jonathan A; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-09-22

    Many developmental genes are controlled by shadow enhancers—pairs of enhancers that drive overlapping expression patterns. We hypothesized that compensatory evolution can maintain the total expression of a gene, while individual shadow enhancers diverge between species. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression driven by orthologous pairs of shadow enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila yakuba, and Drosophila pseudoobscura that control expression of Krüppel, a transcription factor that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of blastoderm embryos. We found that the expression driven by the pair of enhancers is conserved between these three species, but expression levels driven by the individual enhancers are not. Using sequence analysis and experimental perturbation, we show that each shadow enhancer is regulated by different transcription factors. These results support the hypothesis that compensatory evolution can occur between shadow enhancers, which has implications for mechanistic and evolutionary studies of gene regulation.

  13. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  14. Effects of porcine oocytes on the expression levels of transcripts encoding glycolytic enzymes in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yuta; Onuma, Asuka; Fujioka, Yoshie A; Emori, Chihiro; Fujii, Wataru; Naito, Kunihiko; Sugiura, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Oocytes play critical roles in regulating the expression of transcripts encoding the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase, platelet (PFKP) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) in granulosa cells in mice, but whether this is the case in pigs or other mammals has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether porcine oocytes regulate the expression levels of these transcripts in granulosa cells in vitro. Porcine cumulus cells expressed higher levels of PFKP and LDHA transcripts than mural granulosa cells (MGCs). However, co-culturing with oocytes had no significant effect on the isolated cumulus cells. While murine oocytes promoted the expression of both Pfkp and Ldha transcripts by murine MGCs, porcine oocytes promoted the expression of only Pfkp, but not Ldha transcripts by murine MGCs. Neither murine nor porcine oocytes affected PFKP and LDHA expression by porcine MGCs. Moreover, in the presence of porcine follicular fluid, porcine oocytes maintained the expression of PFKP, but not LDHA by porcine cumulus cells. Therefore, porcine oocytes are capable of regulating the expression of PFKP but not LDHA in granulosa cells in coordination with unknown factor(s) present in the follicular fluid.

  15. A simple and immediate method for simultaneously evaluating expression level and plasmid maintenance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Jun; Izawa, Keiko; Matsumura, Shizuka; Wakamura, Kanako; Tanino, Takanori; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-06-01

    To allow the comprehensive assessments of yeast expression systems, a simple and immediate method for simultaneously evaluating the expression level and plasmid maintenance in yeast was demonstrated. This method uses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and flow cytometry (FCM) and is characterized by a dual analysis of the average intensity of GFP fluorescence and the population of GFP-expressing cells. The FCM analysis of GFP fluorescence intensity rapidly quantifies the expression level without complex manipulations, such as the enzymatic reaction of a lacZ reporter assay. Moreover, the single-cell analysis revealed that the proportion of cells expressing GFP in the cell cluster reflects the plasmid retention rate; therefore, the FCM analysis of the GFP-expressing population allows the immediate estimation of the plasmid retention rate without the 2- or 3-day incubation required for colony counting. We show that the FCM analysis with GFP reporter is a suitable method to explore the hopeful expression vector and host strain or establish the several expression systems exhibiting the characteristic properties in yeast.

  16. Gene expression and nucleotide composition are associated with genic methylation level in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The methylation of cytosines at CpG dinucleotides, which plays an important role in gene expression regulation, is one of the most studied epigenetic modifications. Thus far, the detection of DNA methylation has been determined mostly by experimental methods, which are not only prone to bench effects and artifacts but are also time-consuming, expensive, and cannot be easily scaled up to many samples. It is therefore useful to develop computational prediction methods for DNA methylation. Our previous studies highlighted the existence of correlations between the GC content of the third codon position (GC3), methylation, and gene expression. We thus designed a model to predict methylation in Oryza sativa based on genomic sequence features and gene expression data. Results We first derive equations to describe the relationship between gene methylation levels, GC3, expression, length, and other gene compositional features. We next assess gene compositional features involving sixmers and their association with methylation levels and other gene level properties. By applying our sixmer-based approach on rice gene expression data we show that it can accurately predict methylation (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = 0.79) for the majority (79%) of the genes. Matlab code with our model is included. Conclusions Gene expression variation can be used as predictors of gene methylation levels. PMID:24447369

  17. DNA Repair Gene Expression Levels as Indicators of Breast Cancer in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    KAPPIL, MAYA A.; LIAO, YUYAN; TERRY, MARY BETH; SANTELLA, REGINA M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim The expression level of DNA repair-related genes and their association with breast cancer status among participants of the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry was investigated. Materials and Methods RNA from mononuclear cells in 194 sister sets (n=475 women) were assayed for ATM, BRCA1, MSH2, MUTYH and XPC gene expression levels and analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Individuals with decreased ATM and MSH2 expression had significantly higher odds for breast cancer compared to individuals with higher levels of expression (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02, 1.18) and (OR=1.90, 95% CI=1.21, 2.97), respectively. Upon stratifying the GEE model, reductions in ATM and MSH2 expression levels was heightened among women with an extended family history (FH) of breast cancer. Conclusion Reduced expression of ATM and MSH2 compromises DNA repair capacity and, thereby, increases breast cancer prevalence. PMID:27466510

  18. High levels of protein expression using different mammalian CMV promoters in several cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Bringmann, Peter; McClary, John; Jones, Patrick P; Manzana, Warren; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Soujuan; Liu, Yi; Harvey, Susan; Madlansacay, Mary Rose; McLean, Kirk; Rosser, Mary P; MacRobbie, Jean; Olsen, Catherine L; Cobb, Ronald R

    2006-01-01

    With the recent completion of the human genome sequencing project, scientists are faced with the daunting challenge of deciphering the function of these newly found genes quickly and efficiently. Equally as important is to produce milligram quantities of the therapeutically relevant gene products as quickly as possible. Mammalian expression systems provide many advantages to aid in this task. Mammalian cell lines have the capacity for proper post-translational modifications including proper protein folding and glycosylation. In response to the needs described above, we investigated the protein expression levels driven by the human CMV in the presence or absence of intron A, the mouse and rat CMV promoters with intron A, and the MPSV promoter in plasmid expression vectors. We evaluated the different promoters using an in-house plasmid vector backbone. The protein expression levels of four genes of interest driven by these promoters were evaluated in HEK293EBNA and CHO-K1 cells. Stable and transient transfected cells were utilized. In general, the full-length human CMV, in the presence of intron A, gave the highest levels of protein expression in transient transfections in both cell lines. However, the MPSV promoter resulted in the highest levels of stable protein expression in CHO-K1 cells. Using the CMV driven constitutive promoters in the presence of intron A, we have been able to generate >10 microg/ml of recombinant protein using transient transfections.

  19. Plastid-expressed 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase genes provide high level glyphosate tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ye, G N; Hajdukiewicz, P T; Broyles, D; Rodriguez, D; Xu, C W; Nehra, N; Staub, J M

    2001-02-01

    Plastid transformation (transplastomic) technology has several potential advantages for biotechnological applications including the use of unmodified prokaryotic genes for engineering, potential high-level gene expression and gene containment due to maternal inheritance in most crop plants. However, the efficacy of a plastid-encoded trait may change depending on plastid number and tissue type. We report a feasibility study in tobacco plastids to achieve high-level herbicide resistance in both vegetative tissues and reproductive organs. We chose to test glyphosate resistance via over-expression in plastids of tolerant forms of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Immunological, enzymatic and whole-plant assays were used to prove the efficacy of three different prokaryotic (Achromobacter, Agrobacterium and Bacillus) EPSPS genes. Using the Agrobacterium strain CP4 EPSPS as a model we identified translational control sequences that direct a 10,000-fold range of protein accumulation (to >10% total soluble protein in leaves). Plastid-expressed EPSPS could provide very high levels of glyphosate resistance, although levels of resistance in vegetative and reproductive tissues differed depending on EPSPS accumulation levels, and correlated to the plastid abundance in these tissues. Paradoxically, higher levels of plastid-expressed EPSPS protein accumulation were apparently required for efficacy than from a similar nuclear-encoded gene. Nevertheless, the demonstration of high-level glyphosate tolerance in vegetative and reproductive organs using transplastomic technology provides a necessary step for transfer of this technology to other crop species.

  20. Expression of FGF23 is correlated with serum phosphate level in isolated fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keisuke; Imanishi, Yasuo; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Wakasa, Kenichi; Kawata, Takehisa; Goto, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Koyano, Hajime M; Mochizuki, Ryuichi; Miki, Takami; Inaba, Masaaki; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-04-11

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) patients sometimes suffer from concomitant hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia, resulting from renal phosphate wasting. It was recently reported that FD tissue in the patients with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) expressed fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), which is now known to be as a pathogenic phosphaturic factor in patients with oncogenic osteomalacia and X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Since it remains controversial whether serum phosphate levels are influenced by FGF23 expressions in FD tissue, isolated FD patients without MAS syndrome were examined for the relationship between FGF23 expressions, circulating levels of FGF-23 and phosphate to negate the effects of MAS-associated endocrine abnormalities on serum phosphate. Eighteen paraffin embedded FD tissues and 2 frozen tissues were obtained for the study. Sixteen of 18 isolated FD tissues were successfully analyzed GNAS gene, which exhibited activated mutations observed in MAS. Eight of 16 FD tissues, which exhibited GNAS mutations, revealed positive staining for FGF-23. These evidence indicate that postzygotic activated mutations of GNAS is necessary for the FD tissue formation by mosaic distribution of mutated osteogenic cell lineage, but is not sufficient to elevate FGF23 expression causing generalized osteomalacia with severe renal phosphate wasting. The expression level of FGF23 in isolated FD tissue with hypophosphatemic osteomalacia determined by real-time PCR was abundant close to the levels in OOM tumors. Osteoblasts/osteocytes in woven bone were predominant source of circulating FGF-23 in FD tissues by immunohistochemistry. A negative correlation of the intensity of FGF-23 staining with serum inorganic phosphate levels indicated that the expression of FGF23 in focal FD tissues could be a prominent determinant of serum phosphate levels in isolated FD patient. These data provide novel insights into the regulatory mechanism of serum inorganic phosphate levels in

  1. The human phenolsulphotransferase polymorphism is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A L; Roberts, R C; Coughtrie, M W

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the expression of platelet phenolsulphotransferase (PST) in 60 individuals. Using an antibody which recognizes both forms of PST present in man (P-PST and M-PST), we determined that the polymorphism of platelet P-PST activity is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein. The implications for susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8257413

  2. Higher-order JWKB expressions for the energy levels and the wavefunction at the origin

    SciTech Connect

    Pasupathy, J.; Singh, V.

    1980-09-01

    An exact quantization condition is derived for the energy levels of a particle in a radial potential assumed finite at the origin. This is used to derive corrections to the semiclassical JWKB quantization condition. The normalization integral of the wavefunction is further related to the energy derivative of wavefunction at origin and use this expression to derive the corrections to the semiclassical JWKB expressions for the wavefunction at origin. An application to upsilon leptonic decay width is also given.

  3. An efficient plasmid vector for constitutive high-level expression of foreign genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-kyung; Rairakhwada, Dina; Seo, Pil-Soo; Choi, Min Ho; Song, Ki-Bang; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Kim, Chul Ho

    2009-06-01

    The levansucrase gene (lsrA) from Rahnella aquatilis was strongly expressed in a constitutive manner in Escherichia coli when cloned into a pBluescript KS-based pRL1CP plasmid vector. The native promoter upstream of lsrA and the lacZ promoter cooperatively enhanced the expression of lsrA to a level that was comparable to that of the T7 promoter, which is used in commercial pET expression vector system. A putative rho-independent transcription termination signal downstream of lsrA was crucial for gene expression. This plasmid vector also proved to be applicable for efficient expression of other foreign genes in E. coli.

  4. Stable Plastid Transformation for High-Level Recombinant Protein Expression: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Xianfeng; Long, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Plants are a promising expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of whole plant and plant cell bioproduction platform. Plastid genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgenic expression, transgenic containment via maternal inheritance, and multigene expression in a single transformation event. In recent years, the development of optimized expression strategies has given a huge boost to the exploitation of plastids in molecular farming. The driving forces behind the high expression level of plastid bioreactors include codon optimization, promoters and UTRs, genotypic modifications, endogenous enhancer and regulatory elements, posttranslational modification, and proteolysis. Exciting progress of the high expression level has been made with the plastid-based production of two particularly important classes of pharmaceuticals: vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, and antibiotics and enzymes. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include low transformation frequencies, the formation of inclusion bodies, and purification of recombinant proteins will also be discussed. PMID:23093835

  5. Probe-Level Analysis of Expression Microarrays Characterizes Isoform-Specific Degradation during Mouse Oocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Jesse; Hutchison, Keith W.; Wigglesworth, Karen; Eppig, John J.; Graber, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression microarrays have provided many insights into changes in gene expression patterns between different tissue types, developmental stages, and disease states. Analyses of these data focused primarily measuring the relative abundance of transcripts of a gene, while treating most or all transcript isoforms as equivalent. Differences in the selection between transcript isoforms can, however, represent critical changes to either the protein product or the posttranscriptional regulation of the transcript. Novel analyses on existing microarray data provide fresh insights and new interpretations into transcriptome-wide changes in expression. Methodology A probe-level analysis of existing gene expression arrays revealed differences in mRNA processing, primarily affecting the 3′-untranslated region. Working with the example of microarrays drawn from a transcriptionally silent period of mouse oocyte development, probe-level analysis (implemented here as rmodel) identified genes whose transcript isoforms have differing stabilities. Comparison of micorarrays measuring cDNA generated from oligo-dT and random primers revealed further differences in the polyadenylation status of some transcripts. Additional analysis provided evidence for sequence-targeted cleavage, including putative targeting sequences, as one mechanism of degradation for several hundred transcripts in the maturing oocyte. Conclusions The capability of probe-level analysis to elicit novel findings from existing expression microarray data was demonstrated. The characterization of differences in stability between transcript isoforms in maturing mouse oocytes provided some mechanistic details of degradation. Similar analysis of existing archives of expression microarray data will likely provide similar discoveries. PMID:19834616

  6. Effects of dietary roughage levels on the expression of adipogenic transcription factors in Wagyu steers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Kawakami, S-I; Nakanishi, N

    2009-12-01

    We hypothesized that dietary roughage level would alter the expression levels of adipogenic transcription factors in adipose tissue of Japanese black (Wagyu) steers. Steers were fed whole crop rice silage at three levels: (1) high-roughage feeding group, fed 8kg silage and 5kg concentrate (HR); (2) middle roughage feeding group, fed 5kg silage and 6kg concentrate (MR); and (3) low roughage feeding group, fed 2kg silage and 7kg concentrate (LR) from 22 to 30months of age. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, there were no significant differences in the expression of the adipogenic transcription factors and adipocyte size among feeding groups. In mesenteric adipose tissue, the expression of C/EBPα in the LR and MR groups was significantly higher than that in the HR group. Adipocyte size in the mesenteric adipose tissue of the LR group was significantly larger than that of the HR group. In intermuscular adipose tissue, the expression of C/EBPβ-LAP in the LR group was significantly higher than that in the HR group, and the expression of C/EBPβ-LIP in the LR and MR groups was significantly higher than that in the HR group. Adipocyte size in the intermuscular adipose tissue of the LR and MR groups was significantly smaller than that of the HR group. These results suggest that dietary roughage revel affects the adipose tissue depot-specific differences in C/EBP family expression pattern and adipocyte cellularity in Wagyu steers.

  7. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  8. Tissue Specific Expression Levels of Apoptosis Involved Genes Have Correlations with Codon and Amino Acid Usage

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Iman; Salavaty, Abbas; Nasiri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Different mechanisms, including transcriptional and post transcriptional processes, regulate tissue specific expression of genes. In this study, we report differences in gene/protein compositional features between apoptosis involved genes selectively expressed in human tissues. We found some correlations between codon/amino acid usage and tissue specific expression level of genes. The findings can be significant for understanding the translational selection on these features. The selection may play an important role in the differentiation of human tissues and can be considered for future studies in diagnosis of some diseases such as cancer. PMID:28154517

  9. Protein pheromone expression levels predict and respond to the formation of social dominance networks

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Adam C.; Cunningham, Christopher B.; Ruff, James S.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2015-01-01

    Communication signals are key regulators of social networks, and are thought to be under selective pressure to honestly reflect social status, including dominance status. The odors of dominants and nondominants differentially influence behavior, and identification of the specific pheromones associated with, and predictive of, dominance status is essential for understanding the mechanisms of network formation and maintenance. In mice, major urinary proteins (MUPs) are excreted in extraordinary large quantities and expression level has been hypothesized to provide an honest signal of dominance status. Here, we evaluate whether MUPs are associated with dominance in wild-derived mice by analyzing expression levels before, during, and after competition for reproductive resources over three days. During competition, dominant males have 24% greater urinary MUP expression than nondominants. The MUP darcin, a pheromone that stimulates female attraction, is predictive of dominance status: dominant males have higher darcin expression before competition. Dominants also have a higher ratio of darcin to other MUPs before and during competition. These differences appear transient, because there are no differences in MUPs or darcin after competition. We also find MUP expression is affected by sire dominance status: socially naive sons of dominant males have lower MUP expression, but this apparent repression is released during competition. A requisite condition for the evolution of communication signals is honesty, and we provide novel insight into pheromones and social networks by showing that MUP and darcin expression is a reliable signal of dominance status, a primary determinant of male fitness in many species. PMID:25867293

  10. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin.

  11. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  12. Effects of phased joint intervention on Rho/ROCK expression levels in patients with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wen-Ying; Wang, Na; Wang, Ting; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of phased joint intervention on clinical efficacy and Rho/Rho-associated coil protein kinase (ROCK) expression in patients with portal hypertension complicated by esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) and hypersplenism. Patients with portal hypertension (n=53) caused by liver cirrhosis complicated by EVB and hypersplenism treated with phased joint intervention were assessed, and portal hemodynamics, blood, liver function, complications, and rebleeding incidence were analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells prior to and following phased joint intervention, and western blotting was employed to determine the protein expression levels of Rho, ROCK1, ROCK2, phosphorylated (p) myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) and total-MYPT1. All patients underwent an emergency assessment of hemostasis with a 100% success rate. Varicose veins were alleviated, and portal hemodynamics and liver function improved following intervention. Furthermore, preoperative and postoperative expression levels of Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 mRNA were higher compared with the control group. Notably, the mRNA expression levels of Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the postoperative group were significantly lower when compared with the preoperative group. Protein expression levels of Rho, ROCK1, ROCK2 and pMYPT1 in the postoperative group were lower, as compared with the preoperative group. Concentration levels of transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in peripheral blood were significantly reduced following phased joint intervention. Therefore, the present findings demonstrated that phased joint intervention is able to effectively treat EVB and hypersplenism, and improve liver function. The efficacy of phased joint intervention may be associated with its role in the regulation of the

  13. High VEGFR1/2 expression levels are predictors of poor survival in patients with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yun-Zhi; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jian-Ping; Hu, Jing; Li, Wei-Wei; Li, Pei; Wei, Li-Chun; Shi, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study to evaluate the prognostic significance of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (VEGFR1/2) expression levels and to correlate these levels with clinicopathological parameters in patients with cervical cancer. Forty-two patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIB–IVB cervical cancer were analyzed between January 2011 and December 2012. RNA expression levels of VEGFR1/2 were assessed by branched DNA-liquidchip technology and immunohistochemistry. Associations between RNA expression levels, important clinicopathological parameters, and patient survival were statistically evaluated. Higher VEGFR1/2 expression levels were predictive of poor overall survival (P = 0.009 and P = 0.024, respectively). Patients with higher VEGFR1 expression levels were associated with poorer progression-free survival than those with lower VEGFR1 expression levels (P = 0.043). In addition, patients with higher VEGFR1 expression levels were more likely to develop distant metastases than those with lower VEGFR1 expression levels (P = 0.049). Higher VEGFR2 expression levels were associated with larger tumor size (P = 0.037). VEGFR1/2 expression levels were prognostic factors for patients with cervical cancer. Higher VEGFR1/2 expression levels were also predictive of poor overall survival. PMID:28072723

  14. FMRP Expression Levels in Mouse Central Nervous System Neurons Determine Behavioral Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Jason; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Niibori, Yosuke; Pacey, Laura K.; Halder, Sebok K.; Koxhioni, Enea; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hampson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is absent or highly reduced in Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic disorder causing cognitive impairment and autistic behaviors. Previous proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that restoring FMRP in the brain using viral vectors can improve pathological abnormalities in mouse models of fragile X. However, unlike small molecule drugs where the dose can readily be adjusted during treatment, viral vector–based biological therapeutic drugs present challenges in terms of achieving optimal dosing and expression levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of expressing varying levels of FMRP selectively in neurons of Fmr1 knockout and wild-type (WT) mice. A wide range of neuronal FMRP transgene levels was achieved in individual mice after intra-cerebroventricular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors coding for FMRP. In all treated knockout mice, prominent FMRP transgene expression was observed in forebrain structures, whereas lower levels were present in more caudal regions of the brain. Reduced levels of the synaptic protein PSD-95, elevated levels of the transcriptional modulator MeCP2, and abnormal motor activity, anxiety, and acoustic startle responses in Fmr1 knockout mice were fully or partially rescued after expression of FMRP at about 35–115% of WT expression, depending on the brain region examined. In the WT mouse, moderate FMRP over-expression of up to about twofold had little or no effect on PSD-95 and MeCP2 levels or on behavioral endophenotypes. In contrast, excessive over-expression in the Fmr1 knockout mouse forebrain (approximately 2.5–6-fold over WT) induced pathological motor hyperactivity and suppressed the startle response relative to WT mice. These results delineate a range of FMRP expression levels in the central nervous system that confer phenotypic improvement in fragile X mice. Collectively, these findings are pertinent to the development of long

  15. Relationship between TLR4 and MCP2 expression levels and habitual abortion.

    PubMed

    Li, X P; Song, L N; Tian, L P; Zhang, Y S

    2016-04-25

    Habitual abortion is associated with the altered expression of multiple genes. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP2 or CCL8) and habitual abortion. This was done by detecting and comparing their relative expression in peripheral blood and placental villi of patients and healthy fertile women. Based on our previous research, 85 subjects with habitual abortion (study group) and 40 healthy fertile women (control group), who were admitted to our hospital between June 2013 and December 2014, were enrolled in this study. After these subjects signed written informed consent, peripheral blood samples and villous tissues were collected, from which the total RNA was extracted. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 was detected with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, using GAPDH as a reference control. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood and villous tissues of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the changes in expression levels of TLR4 and MCP2. In conclusion, TLR4 and MCP2 expression correlated with the occurrence of habitual abortion. Detecting expression changes in TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood is a feasible method for predicting the occurrence of abortion in women of child-bearing age.

  16. A comparison of brain gene expression levels in domesticated and wild animals.

    PubMed

    Albert, Frank W; Somel, Mehmet; Carneiro, Miguel; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Halbwax, Michel; Thalmann, Olaf; Blanco-Aguiar, Jose A; Plyusnina, Irina Z; Trut, Lyudmila; Villafuerte, Rafael; Ferrand, Nuno; Kaiser, Sylvia; Jensen, Per; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-09-01

    Domestication has led to similar changes in morphology and behavior in several animal species, raising the question whether similarities between different domestication events also exist at the molecular level. We used mRNA sequencing to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns in brain frontal cortex in three pairs of domesticated and wild species (dogs and wolves, pigs and wild boars, and domesticated and wild rabbits). We compared the expression differences with those between domesticated guinea pigs and a distant wild relative (Cavia aperea) as well as between two lines of rats selected for tameness or aggression towards humans. There were few gene expression differences between domesticated and wild dogs, pigs, and rabbits (30-75 genes (less than 1%) of expressed genes were differentially expressed), while guinea pigs and C. aperea differed more strongly. Almost no overlap was found between the genes with differential expression in the different domestication events. In addition, joint analyses of all domesticated and wild samples provided only suggestive evidence for the existence of a small group of genes that changed their expression in a similar fashion in different domesticated species. The most extreme of these shared expression changes include up-regulation in domesticates of SOX6 and PROM1, two modulators of brain development. There was almost no overlap between gene expression in domesticated animals and the tame and aggressive rats. However, two of the genes with the strongest expression differences between the rats (DLL3 and DHDH) were located in a genomic region associated with tameness and aggression, suggesting a role in influencing tameness. In summary, the majority of brain gene expression changes in domesticated animals are specific to the given domestication event, suggesting that the causative variants of behavioral domestication traits may likewise be different.

  17. A Comparison of Brain Gene Expression Levels in Domesticated and Wild Animals

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Frank W.; Somel, Mehmet; Carneiro, Miguel; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Halbwax, Michel; Thalmann, Olaf; Blanco-Aguiar, Jose A.; Trut, Lyudmila; Villafuerte, Rafael; Ferrand, Nuno; Kaiser, Sylvia; Jensen, Per; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Domestication has led to similar changes in morphology and behavior in several animal species, raising the question whether similarities between different domestication events also exist at the molecular level. We used mRNA sequencing to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns in brain frontal cortex in three pairs of domesticated and wild species (dogs and wolves, pigs and wild boars, and domesticated and wild rabbits). We compared the expression differences with those between domesticated guinea pigs and a distant wild relative (Cavia aperea) as well as between two lines of rats selected for tameness or aggression towards humans. There were few gene expression differences between domesticated and wild dogs, pigs, and rabbits (30–75 genes (less than 1%) of expressed genes were differentially expressed), while guinea pigs and C. aperea differed more strongly. Almost no overlap was found between the genes with differential expression in the different domestication events. In addition, joint analyses of all domesticated and wild samples provided only suggestive evidence for the existence of a small group of genes that changed their expression in a similar fashion in different domesticated species. The most extreme of these shared expression changes include up-regulation in domesticates of SOX6 and PROM1, two modulators of brain development. There was almost no overlap between gene expression in domesticated animals and the tame and aggressive rats. However, two of the genes with the strongest expression differences between the rats (DLL3 and DHDH) were located in a genomic region associated with tameness and aggression, suggesting a role in influencing tameness. In summary, the majority of brain gene expression changes in domesticated animals are specific to the given domestication event, suggesting that the causative variants of behavioral domestication traits may likewise be different. PMID:23028369

  18. Microfluidic continuum sorting of sub-populations of tumor cells via surface antibody expression levels.

    PubMed

    Jack, Rhonda; Hussain, Khadijah; Rodrigues, Danika; Zeinali, Mina; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2017-03-29

    The extent of inter- and intra-tumor cell heterogeneity observed in patient tumors appears to be directly associated with patient prognosis. Moreover, studies indicate that targeting distinct subpopulations of tumor cells may be more relevant to successfully managing cancer metastasis. The ability to distinguish and characterize unique tumor cell subpopulations within a given sample is thus exigent. Existing platforms separate cells binarily, based on some threshold level of phenotypic characteristics without consideration of the continuum levels of biomarker expression and the associated implications. Herein we describe how specific tumor cell groups have been immunomagnetically enriched according to a continuum of EpCAM surface marker expression levels. Even among a relatively homogenous group of cells such as the PANC-1 cell line, cells could be separated according to their EpCAM levels into low, moderate and high expression. To physiologically assess each subpopulation, a wound healing assay was performed which revealed distinct invasive potentials among each subset. Furthermore, the clinical relevance of the approach was demonstrated by isolating pancreatic cancer CTCs from the same patient sample based on their EpCAM levels. We demonstrate a robust method of isolating CTCs according to their varying protein levels, which enables extensive studies on tumor cell heterogeneity. Interestingly, 5 of 6 samples had CTCs that could be recovered at all three levels of EpCAM expression though the majority of CTCs were recovered as low expression events. Preliminary studies that compare tumor cell subpopulations in this continuum manner can potentially increase our understanding of the dynamic nature of cell heterogeneity and how it relates to patient outcomes. Ultimately further investigation may yield therapeutic targets against virulent cell subpopulations.

  19. Surface L-type Ca2+ channel expression levels are increased in aged hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Santana, Félix Luis; Oh, Myongsoo Matthew; Antion, Marcia Diana; Lee, Amy; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Disterhoft, John Francis

    2014-01-01

    Age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons has been hypothesized to underlie the increased Ca2+ influx and subsequent reduced intrinsic neuronal excitability of these neurons that lead to age-related cognitive deficits. Here, using specific antibodies against Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits of LTCCs, we systematically re-examined the expression of these proteins in the hippocampus from young (3 to 4 month old) and aged (30 to 32 month old) F344xBN rats. Western blot analysis of the total expression levels revealed significant reductions in both Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits from all three major hippocampal regions of aged rats. Despite the decreases in total expression levels, surface biotinylation experiments revealed significantly higher proportion of expression on the plasma membrane of Cav1.2 in the CA1 and CA3 regions and of Cav1.3 in the CA3 region from aged rats. Furthermore, the surface biotinylation results were supported by immunohistochemical analysis that revealed significant increases in Cav1.2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA3 regions of aged hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, we found a significant increase in the level of phosphorylated Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane in the dentate gyrus of aged rats. Taken together, our present findings strongly suggest that age-related cognitive deficits cannot be attributed to a global change in L-type channel expression nor to the level of phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane of hippocampal neurons. Rather, increased expression and density of LTCCs on the plasma membrane may underlie the age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:24033980

  20. Carcinoembryonic antigen expression level as a predictive factor for response to 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression has been shown to protect cancer cell lines from apoptosis and anoikis. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the role of CEA expression on resistance to anticancer drugs in human colorectal cancer (CRC). We transfected CEA negative CRC cell line SW742 as well as CHO cells to overexpress CEA and their chemoresistance were assessed by MTT assay. In comparison to the parental cell lines, transfected cells had significantly increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The results also showed a direct correlation between the amount of cellular CEA protein and 5-FU resistance in CEA expressing cells. We found no significant difference in sensitivity to cisplatin and methotrexate between CEA-transfected cells and their counter parental cells. We also compared the association between CEA expression and chemoresistance of 4 CRC cell lines which differed in the levels of CEA production. The CEA expression levels in monolayer cultures of these cell lines did not correlate with the 5-FU resistance. However, 5-FU treatment resulted in the selection of sub-populations of resistant cells that displayed increased CEA expression levels by increasing drug concentration. We analyzed the effect of 5-FU in a 3D multicellular culture generated from the two CRC cell lines, LS180 and HT29/219. Compared with monolayer culture, CEA production and 5-FU resistance in both cell lines were stimulated by 3D growth. In comparison to the 3D spheroids of parental CHO, we observed a significantly elevated 5-FU resistance in 3D culture of the CEA-expressing CHO transfectants. Our findings suggest that the CEA level may be a suitable biomarker for predicting tumor response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in CRC.

  1. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain.

  2. Correlation of Cytohistlogical Expression and Serum Level of Ca125 in Ovarian Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chhanda; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita; Ghosh, Tarun; Saha, Ashis Kumar; Sengupta, Moumita

    2014-01-01

    Context or Background: CA125 is a biomarker that has potential utility across the spectrum: risk assessment, early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and therapy. Aims and Objectives: This study was conducted to establish the validity and reliability of correlation of CA125 serum level with immunochemistry expression in imprint cytology and tissues for diagnostic purpose. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done on 50 cases of clinically and radiologically diagnosed ovarian tumor. Imprint smears were made intraoperatively from fresh samples and stained with M.G.G. stain for air dried smears and Papanicoloau stain for alcohol fixed smears. Stained smear was assessed and compared with subsequent histopathology report. Preoperative blood samples were obtained from all patients and sent for the assay of serum CA125 levels. Analysis of CA125 immunochemistry expression in imprint cytology and tissue was done and correlated with preoperative serum blood CA125 levels. Results: Significant positive correlation was found between elevated serum CA125 levels and cytohistological expression of CA125. Overall sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 86%, positive predictive value was 74% and negative predictive value 100%. Diagnostic accuracy was 90% with high statistical significance (p<0.001). Conclusion: We considered 35 U/mL as the cut-off value when evaluating serum CA125 ovarian cancer. Patients with high serum levels show good cytohistological expression. PMID:24783076

  3. Optimizing heterologous protein production in the periplasm of E. coli by regulating gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Escherichia coli many heterologous proteins are produced in the periplasm. To direct these proteins to the periplasm, they are equipped with an N-terminal signal sequence so that they can traverse the cytoplasmic membrane via the protein-conducting Sec-translocon. For poorly understood reasons, the production of heterologous secretory proteins is often toxic to the cell thereby limiting yields. To gain insight into the mechanism(s) that underlie this toxicity we produced two secretory heterologous proteins, super folder green fluorescent protein and a single-chain variable antibody fragment, in the Lemo21(DE3) strain. In this strain, the expression intensity of the gene encoding the target protein can be precisely controlled. Results Both SFGFP and the single-chain variable antibody fragment were equipped with a DsbA-derived signal sequence. Producing these proteins following different gene expression levels in Lemo21(DE3) allowed us to identify the optimal expression level for each target gene. Too high gene expression levels resulted in saturation of the Sec-translocon capacity as shown by hampered translocation of endogenous secretory proteins and a protein misfolding/aggregation problem in the cytoplasm. At the optimal gene expression levels, the negative effects of the production of the heterologous secretory proteins were minimized and yields in the periplasm were optimized. Conclusions Saturating the Sec-translocon capacity can be a major bottleneck hampering heterologous protein production in the periplasm. This bottleneck can be alleviated by harmonizing expression levels of the genes encoding the heterologous secretory proteins with the Sec-translocon capacity. Mechanistic insight into the production of proteins in the periplasm is key to optimizing yields in this compartment. PMID:23497240

  4. HER-2 tissue expression correlated with serum levels in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pribylová, O; Springer, D; Vítková, I; Zima, T; Petruzelka, L

    2007-01-01

    We explored the relationship between circulating HER-2 extracellular domain and tissue HER-2 status in a group of 42 postmenopausal breast cancer patients. All patients were examined before adjuvant chemotherapy or other adjuvant treatment. Serum levels were measured by BAYER Advia Centaur System, Golden, CO (the cut-off level was in our conditions considered at 12 ng/ml). Tissue expression was assayed with the DAKO HercepTest, North America, Inc, Carpinteria, CA. Our findings that serum levels are in consonance with tissue expression could be important in metastatic breast cancer, when it is impossible to get a new tumour sample and establish the actual HER-2 status, which may be different from the primary tumour. Although we know that serum HER-2 concentration cannot be substituted for IHC or FISH, we have observed a statistically significant correlation between serum level concentration and tissue HER-2 status.

  5. Levels of Lycopene β-Cyclase 1 Modulate Carotenoid Gene Expression and Accumulation in Daucus carota

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of α-carotene and β-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of α-carotene and β-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and β-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots. PMID:23555569

  6. Levels of lycopene β-cyclase 1 modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of α-carotene and β-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of α-carotene and β-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and β-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots.

  7. Reduced beta 2-microglobulin mRNA levels in transgenic mice expressing a designed hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, S; Hotchkiss, G; Andäng, M; Nyholm, T; Inzunza, J; Jansson, I; Ahrlund-Richter, L

    1994-01-01

    We have generated three artificial hammerhead ribozymes, denoted 'Rz-b', 'Rz-c' and 'Rz-d', with different specificities for exon II of the mouse beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2M) mRNA. In this study we tested for ribozyme mediated reduction of beta 2M mRNA in a cell line and in transgenic mice. Transfections of either of the Rz-b, Rz-c or Rz-d plasmids into a mouse cell-line (NIH/3T3) revealed reductions of beta 2M mRNA substrate in each case. Ribozyme expression in individual transfected clones was accompanied with an up to 80% reduction of beta 2M mRNA levels. Rz-c was selected for a transgenic study. Seven Rz-c transgenic founder animals were identified from which three ribozyme expressing families were established and analysed. Expression of the ribozyme transgene was tested for and detected in lung, kidney and spleen. Expression was accompanied with reduction of the beta 2M mRNA levels of heterozygous (Rz+/-) animals compared to non-transgenic litter mates. The effect was most pronounced in lung with more than 90% beta 2M mRNA reduction in individual mice. In summary, expression of our ribozymes in a cell free system, in a cell-line and in transgenic mice were all accompanied with reductions of beta 2M mRNA levels. Images PMID:8036151

  8. Novel Bifidobacterium promoters selected through microarray analysis lead to constitutive high-level gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Kim, Jin Yong; Park, Myeong Soo; Ji, Geun Eog

    2012-08-01

    For the development of a food-grade expression system for Bifidobacterium, a strong promoter leading to high-level expression of cloned gene is a prerequisite. For this purpose, a promoter screening host-vector system for Bifidobacterium has been established using β-glucosidase from Bifidobacterium lactis as a reporter and Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 as a host, which is β-glucosidase negative strain. Seven putative promoters showing constitutive high-level expression were selected through microarray analysis based on the genome sequence of B. bifidum BGN4. They were cloned into upstream of β-glucosidase gene and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α and B. bifidum BGN4. Promoter activities were analyzed both in E. coli and B. bifidum BGN4 by measuring β-glucosidase activity. β-Glucosidase activities in all of the transformants showed growth-associated characteristics. Among them, P919 was the strongest in B. bifidum BGN4 and showed maximum activity at 18 h, while P895 was the strongest in E. coli DH5α at 7 h. This study shows that novel strong promoters such as P919 can be used for high-level expression of foreign genes in Bifidobacterium and will be useful for the construction of an efficient food-grade expression system.

  9. Quercetin promotes neurite growth through enhancing intracellular cAMP level and GAP-43 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Liao, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of quercetin on neurite growth in N1E-115 cells and the underlying mechanisms. Quercetin was evaluated for its effects on cell numbers of neurites, neurite length, intracellular cAMP content, and Gap-43 expression in N1E-115 cells in vitro by use of microscopy, LANCE(tm) cAMP 384 kit, and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that quercetin could increase the neurite length in a concentration-dependent manner, but had no effect on the numbers of cells. Quercetin significantly increased the expression of cellular cAMP in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The Gap-43 expression was up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, quercetin could promote neurite growth through increasing the intracellular cAMP level and Gap-43 expression.

  10. Expression levels of B7-H3 and TLT-2 in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SHAN-SHAN; TANG, JING; YU, SHU-YI; MA, LI; WANG, FENG; XIE, SHU-LE; JIN, LONG; YANG, HONG-YU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of immune regulatory molecules B7-H3 [also known as cluster of differentiation 276] and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript-2 (TLT-2) in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Human OSCC samples were obtained from 76 patients (female, 32; male, 44; age range, 23–81 years; median age, 50.9 years) that underwent resection for OSCC at Peking University Shenzhen Hospital (Shenzhen, China) between 2007 and 2010. In addition, control oral mucosal samples were obtained from 76 healthy individuals (female, 36; male, 40; age range, 21–62 years; median age, 45.3 years) during wisdom tooth extraction. Protein and gene expression levels of B7-H3 and TLT-2 were determined by immunohistochemical analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the healthy oral mucosa samples, B7-H3 expression was identified to be weak, while the expression of TLT-2 was only detected sporadically in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. By contrast, the two regulatory molecules were widely expressed in the aforementioned localizations in human OSCC specimens upon immunohistochemical examination. Furthermore, quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the presence of significantly higher B7-H3 and TLT-2 expression levels in OSCC specimens compared with the oral mucosa of healthy individuals. The significantly higher expression levels of B7-H3 and TLT-2 in human OSCC specimens may indicate an inhibitory role of these molecules in the antitumoral immune response. To investigate interactions between these two molecules and individual antitumoral immune response in OSCC patients, prospective clinical studies with an adequate sample size are required. PMID:26622626

  11. Gene expression in diplosporous and sexual Eragrostis curvula genotypes with differing ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Pessino, Silvina; Selva, Juan P; Díaz, Marina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    The molecular nature of gene expression during the initiation and progress of diplosporous apomixis is still unknown. Moreover, the basis of the close correlation between diplospory and polyploidy is not clarified yet. A comparative expression analysis was performed based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing and differential display in an Eragrostis curvula diplosporous tetraploid genotype (T, 4x apo), a sexual diploid derivative obtained from tissue culture (D, 2x sex) and an artificial sexual tetraploid obtained from the diploid seeds after colchicine treatment (C, 4x sex). From a total of 8,884 unigenes sequenced from inflorescence-derived libraries, 112 (1.26%) showed significant differential expression in individuals with different ploidy level and/or variable reproductive mode. Independent comparisons between plants with different reproductive mode (same ploidy) or different ploidy level (same reproductive mode) allowed the identification of genes modulated in response to diplosporous development or polyploidization, respectively. Surprisingly, a group of genes (Group 3) were differentially expressed or silenced only in the 4x sex plant, presenting similar levels of expression in the 4x apo and the 2x sex genotypes. A group of randomly selected differential genes was validated by QR-PCR. Differential display analysis showed that in general the 4x apo and 4x sex expression profiles were more related and different from the 2x sex one, but confirmed the existence of Group 3-type genes, in both inflorescences and leaves. The possible biological significance for the occurrence of this particular group of genes is discussed. In silico mapping onto the rice genome was used to identify candidates mapping to the region syntenic to the diplospory locus.

  12. N-cadherin expression level distinguishes reserved versus primed states of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haug, Jeffrey S; He, Xi C; Grindley, Justin C; Wunderlich, Joshua P; Gaudenz, Karin; Ross, Jason T; Paulson, Ariel; Wagner, Kathryn P; Xie, Yucai; Zhu, Ruihong; Yin, Tong; Perry, John M; Hembree, Mark J; Redenbaugh, Erin P; Radice, Glenn L; Seidel, Christopher; Li, Linheng

    2008-04-10

    Osteoblasts expressing the homophilic adhesion molecule N-cadherin form a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche. Therefore, we examined how N-cadherin expression in HSCs relates to their function. We found that bone marrow (BM) cells highly expressing N-cadherin (N-cadherin(hi)) are not stem cells, being largely devoid of a Lineage(-)Sca1(+)cKit(+) population and unable to reconstitute hematopoietic lineages in irradiated recipient mice. Instead, long-term HSCs form distinct populations expressing N-cadherin at intermediate (N-cadherin(int)) or low (N-cadherin(lo)) levels. The minority N-cadherin(lo) population can robustly reconstitute the hematopoietic system, express genes that may prime them to mobilize, and predominate among HSCs mobilized from BM to spleen. The larger N-cadherin(int) population performs poorly in reconstitution assays when freshly isolated but improves in response to overnight in vitro culture. Their expression profile and lower cell-cycle entry rate suggest N-cadherin(int) cells are being held in reserve. Thus, differential N-cadherin expression reflects functional distinctions between two HSC subpopulations.

  13. Elevated interleukin-6 expression levels are associated with intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    DENG, XIAO; ZHAO, FENG; KANG, BAOLIN; ZHANG, XIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression levels were associated with the onset and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A comprehensive meta-analysis of the scientific literature from numerous electronic databases was performed, in order to obtain published studies associated with the topic of interest. Relevant case-control studies that had previously assessed a correlation between IL-6 expression levels and IDD were identified using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The STATA version 12.0 software was used for statistical analysis of the extracted data. A total of 112 studies were initially retrieved, with eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These contained a total of 392 subjects, of which 263 were patients with IDD and 129 were healthy controls. A meta-analysis of the eight studies demonstrated that serum IL-6 protein expression levels may be associated with IDD, and this was irrespective of IDD subtype (bulging, protrusion, or sequestration). Notably, serum expression levels of the IL-6 protein were upregulated in intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion tissue, as compared with normal IVD tissue; thus suggesting that IL-6 may have an important role in the pathophysiological process of IDD. PMID:27073460

  14. Examination of Anxiety Levels and Anger Expression Manners of Undergraduate Table Tennis Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karademir, Tamer; Türkçapar, Ünal

    2016-01-01

    This research was done for the determination of how their anxiety levels' and anger expressions' get shaped according to some variances. For this reason there were 76 female 125 male totally 201 sportsmen, who participated to the table tennis championship between universities in 2016 and ages differ from 18 to 28, were included the research group.…

  15. High-level expression and preparation of recombinant human fibrinogen as biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Masaki; Imamura, Takayuki; Yano, Kentaro; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Meta, Akihiro; Tokieda, Yoshiyuki; Nakashima, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Fibrinogen is a large and complex glycoprotein containing two sets of each of three different chains (α, β and γ). There have been no reports of high-level expression of fibrinogen at commercial levels using mammalian cultured cells such as CHO cells because of the difficulty in highly expressing a protein with such a complex structure. We achieved high-level (1.3 g/l or higher) expression of recombinant human fibrinogen using CHO DG44 cells by optimizing the expression system and culture conditions. We also succeeded in establishing a high-recovery preparation method for recombinant fibrinogen that rarely yields degraded products. To characterize the properties of the recombinant human fibrinogen, we performed SDS-PAGE; western blotting of the α, β and γ chains using specific antibodies and scanning electron microscopy observations of fibrin fibres. We also evaluated the functional equivalence between recombinant fibrinogen and plasma fibrinogen with respect to the release of fibrinopeptides initiated by thrombin and its cross-linking properties. The basic properties of recombinant fibrinogen showed no apparent differences from those of plasma fibrinogen. Here, we report the development of methods for the culture and preparation of recombinant human fibrinogen of satisfactory quality that can be scaled up to the commercial level.

  16. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus th...

  17. High level expression of organophosphorus hydrolase in Pichia pastoris by multicopy ophcM assembly.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Shu, Min; Ma, Lixin; Ni, Hong; Yan, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The residues of organophosphorus pesticides bring serious impact on the environmental safety and people's health. Biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides is recognized as an ideal method. An organophosphorus hydrolase (OPHCM) from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes was synthesized and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The yield reached approximately 470 mg/l after a 6-d induction in shake flasks. To improve the enzyme production, we describe a novel approach to express OPHCM efficiently with a biobrick assembly method in vitro. Four recombinant plasmids containing 1-4 copies of ophcM-expressing cassettes were constructed and transformed into P. pastoris. Increasing the copy number of ophcM gene enhanced the expression level of OPHCM. The maximum yield and specific activity in P. pastoris harboring two-copy tandem ophcM-expressing cassettes reached 610 mg/l after a 6-d induction in shake flasks and 7.8 g/l in high-density fermentation with specific activity of 13.7 U/mg. The optimum pH and temperature of the recombinant OPHCM activity were 11.0 and 50 °C, respectively. In addition, the enzyme activity of recombinant OPHCM enhanced 57.6% and 30.1% in the presence of 1 mM Cd(2+) and 5% glycerol, respectively. The high expression and good properties of recombinant OPHCM provide an effective solution to solve the pollution of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment. Moreover, the approach for generating multicopy gene expressing vectors here will benefit the study for enhancing the expression level of genes of interest.

  18. Amplification of steroid-mediated SP-B expression by physiological levels of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Fehrholz, Markus; Hütten, Matthias; Kramer, Boris W; Speer, Christian P; Kunzmann, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Factors positively influencing surfactant homeostasis in general and surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression in particular are considered of clinical importance regarding an improvement of lung function in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to identify effects of physiological levels of caffeine on glucocorticoid-mediated SP-B expression in vitro and in vivo. Levels of SP-B and pepsinogen C were quantified by quantitative real-time RT-PCR or immunoblotting in NCI-H441 cells daily exposed to caffeine and/or dexamethasone (DEX). In vivo, SP-B expression was analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of preterm sheep exposed to antenatal DEX and/or postnatal caffeine. If DEX and caffeine were continuously present, SP-B mRNA and protein levels were increased for up to 6 days after induction (P < 0.05). Additionally, caffeine enhanced SP-B mRNA expression in DEX-pretreated cells (P < 0.05). Moreover, caffeine amplified DEX-induced pepsinogen C mRNA expression (P < 0.05). After short-term treatment with caffeine in vivo, only slightly higher SP-B levels could be detected in BAL of preterm sheep following antenatal DEX, combined with an increase of arterial oxygen partial pressure (P < 0.01). Our data demonstrated that the continuous presence of caffeine in vitro is able to amplify DEX-mediated SP-B expression. In contrast, short-term improvement of lung function in vivo is likely to be independent of altered SP-B transcription and translation. An impact of caffeine on release of surfactant reservoirs from lamellar bodies could, however, quickly affect SP-B content in BAL, which has to be further investigated. Our findings indicate that caffeine is able to amplify main effects of glucocorticoids that result from changes in surfactant production, maturation, and release.

  19. Is Nasal Polyposis Related to Levels of Serum Vitamin D and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Expression?

    PubMed Central

    Erdag, Omer; Turan, Mahfuz; Ucler, Rıfkı; Berkoz, Mehmet; Garca, Mehmet Fatih; Bozan, Nazım; Kıroglu, Ahmet Faruk; Cankaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasal polyposis (NP) is the most frequent cause of nasal masses. Despite considerable research on the subject, its etiology has not been fully elucidated, and effective treatment methods have not been developed. Some etiological factors causing low or high expression of genes in genetically predisposed individuals may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between levels of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene expression and serum vitamin D with NP. Material/Methods The study included 46 subjects with NP (NP group) and 40 volunteers (control group). Nasal polyp tissue samples were taken from the NP group and nasal mucosa samples were taken from the control group. Levels of VDR gene expression in the tissue samples were assessed using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Results Mean serum 25(OH)D levels were 13.38±14.08 ng/ml in the NP group and 10.57±6.44 ng/ml in the control group (p=0.249). VDR gene expression was present in 17.5% of the NP group and 3.3% of the control group, and the difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant (likelihood ratio χ2=3.887; p=0.049). Conclusions This is the first study to assess levels of VDR gene expression in subjects with NP. Our results suggest that VDR gene expression may be associated with the pathogenesis or progression of NP. PMID:27895321

  20. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-06

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  1. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-08-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells.

  2. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  3. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (P<0.05). Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in BAT significantly decreased in 5 °C group, but increased in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. Neither ROS levels (i.e. H2O2 levels), nor antioxidants in skeletal muscle, liver, heart or brain tissue, were affected by temperature. UCP1 expression in BAT was significantly up-regulated in 5 °C group, but down-regulated in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. UCP3 expression of skeletal muscle was also up-regulated significantly in hamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels.

  4. ClC-7 expression levels critically regulate bone turnover, but not gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Supanchart, C; Wartosch, L; Schlack, C; Kühnisch, J; Felsenberg, D; Fuhrmann, J C; de Vernejoul, M-C; Jentsch, T J; Kornak, U

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the 2Cl(-)/1H(+)-exchanger ClC-7 impair osteoclast function and cause different types of osteoclast-rich osteopetrosis. However, it is unknown to what extent ClC-7 function has to be reduced to become rate-limiting for bone resorption. In osteoclasts from osteopetrosis patients expression of the mutated ClC-7 protein did not correlate with disease severity and resorption impairment. Therefore, a series of transgenic mice expressing ClC-7 in osteoclasts at different levels was generated. Crossing of these mice with Clcn7(-/-) mutants rescued the osteopetrotic phenotype to variable degrees. One resulting double transgenic line mimicked human autosomal dominant osteopetrosis. The trabecular bone of these mice showed a reduction of osteoblast numbers, osteoid, and osteoblast marker gene expression indicative of reduced osteoblast function. In osteoclasts from these mutants ClC-7 expression levels were 20 to 30% of wildtype levels. These reduced levels not only impaired resorptive activity, but also increased numbers, size and nucleus numbers of osteoclasts differentiated in vitro. Although ClC-7 was expressed in the stomach and PTH levels were high in Clcn7(-/-) mutants loss of ClC-7 did not entail a relevant elevation of gastric pH. In conclusion, we show that in our model a reduction of ClC-7 function by approximately 70% is sufficient to increase bone mass, but does not necessarily enhance bone formation. ClC-7 does not appear to be crucially involved in gastric acid secretion, which explains the absence of an osteopetrorickets phenotype in CLCN7-related osteopetrosis.

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 gene (KDR) polymorphisms and expression levels in depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Berent, Dominika; Talarowska, Monika; Bobińska, Kinga; Gałecka, Elżbieta; Lewiński, Andrzej; Maes, Michael; Szemraj, Janusz

    2013-05-01

    Recent research findings suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) participates in the development of depressive disorder. VEGF is involved in neurogenesis and neuroprotection processes, mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). VEGFR2 also plays a role in angiogenesis, a process related to neurogenesis and other biological processes. We examined VEGFR2 (KDR) gene polymorphism, mRNA expression levels, as well as VEGFR2 protein levels in 268 patients diagnosed with a recurrent depressive disorder (rDD) using the ICD-10 criteria, and in 200 healthy controls. Genotyping and gene expression level analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used for measurement of KDR protein levels. Our study found that distribution of KDR polymorphism +1416T/A differs significantly in patients with rDD when compared to healthy subjects, while A allele and AA genotype are risk factors for rDD. KDR mRNA and protein expression are higher in patients with rDD. We also observed a significant association between the -271A/G variant and gene and protein levels. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the KDR gene may serve as a novel genetic marker that could participate in the etiology of rDD. This new pathway may play a role in the inflammatory pathophysiology of depression.

  6. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  7. High level constitutive expression of luciferase reporter by lsd90 promoter in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Verma, Hemant Kumar; Shukla, Poonam; Alfatah, Md; Khare, Asheesh Kumar; Upadhyay, Udita; Ganesan, Kaliannan; Singh, Jagmohan

    2014-01-01

    Because of a large number of molecular similarities with higher eukaryotes, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been considered a potentially ideal host for expressing human proteins having therapeutic and pharmaceutical applications. However, efforts in this direction are hampered by lack of a strong promoter. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a strong, constitutive promoter from S. pombe. A new expression vector was constructed by cloning the putative promoter region of the lsd90 gene (earlier reported to be strongly induced by heat stress) into a previously reported high copy number vector pJH5, which contained an ARS element corresponding to the mat2P flanking region and a truncated URA3m selectable marker. The resulting vector was used to study and compare the level of expression of the luciferase reporter with that achieved with the known vectors containing regulatable promoter nmt1 and the strong constitutive promoter adh1 in S. pombe and the methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter in Pichia pastoris. Following growth in standard media the new vector containing the putative lsd90 promoter provided constitutive expression of luciferase, at a level, which was 19-, 39- and 10-fold higher than that achieved with nmt1, adh1 and AOX1 promoters, respectively. These results indicate a great potential of the new lsd90 promoter-based vector for commercial scale expression of therapeutic proteins in S. pombe.

  8. Comparison of microRNA expression levels between initial and recurrent glioblastoma specimens.

    PubMed

    Ilhan-Mutlu, Aysegül; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Widhalm, Georg; Marosi, Christine; Wagner, Ludwig; Preusser, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent primary brain tumour in adults. Recent therapeutic advances increased patient's survival, but tumour recurrence inevitably occurs. The pathobiological mechanisms involved in glioblastoma recurrence are still unclear. MicroRNAs are small RNAs proposed o have important roles for cancer including proliferation, aggressiveness and metastases development. There exist only few data on the involvement of microRNAs in glioblastoma recurrence. We selected the following 7 microRNAs with potential relevance for glioblastoma pathobiology by means of a comprehensive literature search: microRNA-10b, microRNA-21, microRNA-181b, microRNA-181c, microRNA-195, microRNA-221 and microRNA-222. We further selected 15 primary glioblastoma patients, of whom formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue (FFPE) of the initial and recurrence surgery were available. All patients had received first line treatment consisting of postoperative combined radiochemotherapy with temozolomide (n = 15). Non-neoplastic brain tissue samples from 3 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy served as control. The expression of the microRNAs were analysed by RT-qPCR. These were correlated with each other and with clinical parameters. All microRNAs showed detectable levels of expressions in glioblastoma group, whereas microRNA-10b was not detectable in epilepsy patients. MicroRNAs except microRNA-21 showed significantly higher levels in epilepsy patients when compared to the levels of first resection of glioblastoma. Comparison of microRNA levels between first and second resections revealed no significant change. Cox regression analyses showed no significant association of microRNA expression levels in the tumor tissue with progression free survival times. Expression levels of microRNA-10b, microRNA-21, microRNA-181b, microRNA-181c, microRNA-195, microRNA-221 and microRNA-222 do not differ significantly between initial and recurrent glioblastoma.

  9. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Miyuki; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Moura, Ricardo Pereira; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Cabrera, Hector Navarro; Begnami, Marcos; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: 1) To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2) to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001). However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297). The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing), and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue. PMID:22012047

  10. Cleavage efficient 2A peptides for high level monoclonal antibody expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chng, Jake; Wang, Tianhua; Nian, Rui; Lau, Ally; Hoi, Kong Meng; Ho, Steven C L; Gagnon, Peter; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Linking the heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes required for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) production on a single cassette using 2A peptides allows control of LC and HC ratio and reduces non-expressing cells. Four 2A peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A), equine rhinitis A virus (E2A), porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) and Thosea asigna virus (T2A), respectively, were compared for expression of 3 biosimilar IgG1 mAbs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. HC and LC were linked by different 2A peptides both in the absence and presence of GSG linkers. Insertion of a furin recognition site upstream of 2A allowed removal of 2A residues that would otherwise be attached to the HC. Different 2A peptides exhibited different cleavage efficiencies that correlated to the mAb expression level. The relative cleavage efficiency of each 2A peptide remains similar for expression of different IgG1 mAbs in different CHO cells. While complete cleavage was not observed for any of the 2A peptides, GSG linkers did enhance the cleavage efficiency and thus the mAb expression level. T2A with the GSG linker (GT2A) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency and mAb expression level. Stably amplified CHO DG44 pools generated using GT2A had titers 357, 416 and 600 mg/L for the 3 mAbs in shake flask batch cultures. Incomplete cleavage likely resulted in incorrectly processed mAb species and aggregates, which were removed with a chromatin-directed clarification method and protein A purification. The vector and methods presented provide an easy process beneficial for both mAb development and manufacturing.

  11. Androgen Receptors in a Cichlid Fish, Astatotilapia burtoni: Structure, Localization, and Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    HARBOTT, LENE K.; BURMEISTER, SABRINA S.; WHITE, RICHARD B.; VAGELL, MIKE; FERNALD, RUSSELL D.

    2009-01-01

    Androgens are an important output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis that controls reproduction in all vertebrates. In male teleosts two androgens, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone, control sexual differentiation and development in juveniles and reproductive behavior in adults. Androgenic signals provide feedback at many levels of the HPG axis, including the hypothalamic neurons that synthesize and release gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), but the precise cellular site of androgen action in the brain is not known. Here we describe two androgen receptor subtypes, ARα and ARβ, in the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni and show that these subtypes are differentially located throughout the adult brain in nuclei known to function in the control of reproduction. ARα was expressed in the ventral part of the ventral telencephalon, the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus and the ventral hypothalamus, whereas ARβ was more widely expressed in the dorsal and ventral telencephalon, the POA, and the ventral and dorsal hypothalamus. We provide the first evidence in any vertebrate that the GnRH1-releasing neurons, which serve as the central control point of the HPG axis, express both subtypes of AR. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that A. burtoni AR subtypes have different expression levels in adult tissue, with ARα showing significantly higher expression than ARβ in the pituitary, and ARβ expressed at a higher level than ARα in the anterior and middle brain. These data provide important insight into the role of androgens in regulating the vertebrate reproductive axis. PMID:17614300

  12. Constitutively expressed DHAR and MDHAR influence fruit, but not foliar ascorbate levels in tomato.

    PubMed

    Haroldsen, Victor M; Chi-Ham, Cecilia L; Kulkarni, Shashank; Lorence, Argelia; Bennett, Alan B

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin C (L-ascorbate, AsA) is an essential nutrient required in key metabolic functions in humans and must be obtained from the diet, mainly from fruits and vegetables. Given its importance in human health and plant physiology we sought to examine the role of the ascorbate recycling enzymes monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), an economically important fruit crop. Cytosolic-targeted tomato genes Mdhar and Dhar were cloned and over-expressed under a constitutive promoter in tomato var. Micro-Tom. Lines with increased protein levels and enzymatic activity were identified and examined. Mature green and red ripe fruit from DHAR over-expressing lines had a 1.6 fold increase in AsA content in plants grown under relatively low light conditions (150 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Conversely, MDHAR over-expressers had significantly reduced AsA levels in mature green fruits by 0.7 fold. Neither over-expressing line had altered levels of AsA in foliar tissues. These results underscore a complex regulation of the AsA pool size in tomato.

  13. Experimental Hyperthyroidism Decreases Gene Expression and Serum Levels of Adipokines in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Luvizotto, Renata de Azevedo Melo; do Nascimento, André Ferreira; de Síbio, Maria Teresa; Olímpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Leopoldo, André Soares; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2012-01-01

    Aims. To analyze the influence of hyperthyroidism on the gene expression and serum concentration of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin in obese animals. Main Methods. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (C)—fed with commercial chow ad libitum—and obese (OB)—fed with a hypercaloric diet. After group characterization, the OB rats continued receiving a hypercaloric diet and were randomized into two groups: obese animals (OB) and obese with 25 μg triiodothyronine (T3)/100 BW (OT). The T3 dose was administered every day for the last 2 weeks of the study. After 30 weeks the animals were euthanized. Samples of blood and adipose tissue were collected for biochemical and hormonal analyses as well as gene expression of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin. Results. T3 treatment was effective, increasing fT3 levels and decreasing fT4 and TSH serum concentration. Administration of T3 promotes weight loss, decreases all fat deposits, and diminishes serum levels of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin by reducing their gene expression. Conclusions. Our results suggest that T3 modulate serum and gene expression levels of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin in experimental model of obesity, providing new insights regarding the relationship between T3 and adipokines in obesity. PMID:22645452

  14. The human BDNF gene: peripheral gene expression and protein levels as biomarkers for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, A; Cattane, N; Begni, V; Pariante, C M; Riva, M A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the survival and growth of neurons, and influences synaptic efficiency and plasticity. The human BDNF gene consists of 11 exons, and distinct BDNF transcripts are produced through the use of alternative promoters and splicing events. The majority of the BDNF transcripts can be detected not only in the brain but also in the blood cells, although no study has yet investigated the differential expression of BDNF transcripts at the peripheral level. This review provides a description of the human BDNF gene structure as well as a summary of clinical and preclinical evidence supporting the role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. We will discuss several mechanisms as possibly underlying BDNF modulation, including epigenetic mechanisms. We will also discuss the potential use of peripheral BDNF as a biomarker for psychiatric disorders, focusing on the factors that can influence BDNF gene expression and protein levels. Within this context, we have also characterized, for we believe the first time, the expression of BDNF transcripts in the blood, with the aim to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms and signaling that may regulate peripheral BDNF gene expression levels. PMID:27874848

  15. Physiological levels of HBB transgene expression from S/MAR element-based replicating episomal vectors.

    PubMed

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Spathas, Dionysios; Athanassiadou, Aglaia; Antoniou, Michael N

    2009-08-20

    Replicating episomal vectors (REV) are in principle able to provide long-term transgene expression in the absence of integration into the target cell genome. The scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) located 5' of the human beta-interferon gene (IFNB1) has been shown to confer a stable episomal replication and retention function within plasmid vectors when stably transfected and selected in mammalian cells. The minimal requirement for the IFNB1 S/MAR to function in DNA replication and episomal retention is transcription through this element. We used the erythroid beta-globin locus control region-beta-globin gene (betaLCR-HBB) microlocus cassette as a model to assess tissue-specific expression from within an IFNB1 S/MAR-based plasmid REV. The betaLCR-HBB plus S/MAR combination constructs provided either high or low levels of transcription through the S/MAR element. Our results show that the betaLCR-HBB microlocus is able to reproducibly and stably express at full physiological levels on an episome copy number basis. In addition, our data show that even low levels of transcription from betaLCR-HBB through the S/MAR element are sufficient to allow efficient episomal replication and retention. These data provide the principles upon which generic and flexible expression cassette-S/MAR-based REVs can be designed for a wide range of applications.

  16. Constitutively expressed DHAR and MDHAR influence fruit, but not foliar ascorbate levels in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Haroldsen, Victor M.; Chi-Ham, Cecilia L.; Kulkarni, Shashank; Lorence, Argelia; Bennett, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin C (l-ascorbate, AsA) is an essential nutrient required in key metabolic functions in humans and must be obtained from the diet, mainly from fruits and vegetables. Given its importance in human health and plant physiology we sought to examine the role of the ascorbate recycling enzymes monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), an economically important fruit crop. Cytosolic-targeted tomato genes Mdhar and Dhar were cloned and over-expressed under a constitutive promoter in tomato var. Micro-Tom. Lines with increased protein levels and enzymatic activity were identified and examined. Mature green and red ripe fruit from DHAR over-expressing lines had a 1.6 fold increase in AsA content in plants grown under relatively low light conditions (150 µmol m−2 s−1). Conversely, MDHAR over-expressers had significantly reduced AsA levels in mature green fruits by 0.7 fold. Neither over-expressing line had altered levels of AsA in foliar tissues. These results underscore a complex regulation of the AsA pool size in tomato. PMID:21875809

  17. Increased SNAIL expression and low syndecan levels are associated with high Gleason grade in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    POBLETE, CRISTIAN E.; FULLA, JUAN; GALLARDO, MARCELA; MUÑOZ, VALENTINA; CASTELLÓN, ENRIQUE A.; GALLEGOS, IVAN; CONTRERAS, HECTOR R.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a leading male oncologic malignancy wideworld. During malignant transformation, normal epithelial cells undergo genetic and morphological changes known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Several regulatory genes and specific marker proteins are involved in PC EMT. Recently, syndecans have been associated with malignancy grade and Gleason score in PC. Considering that SNAIL is mainly a gene repressor increased in PC and that syndecan promoters have putative binding sites for this repressor, we propose that SNAIL might regulate syndecan expression during PC EMT. The aim of this study was to analyze immunochemically the expression of SNAIL, syndecans 1 and 2 and other EMT markers in a tissue microarray (TMA) of PC samples and PC cell lines. The TMAs included PC samples of different Gleason grade and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) samples, as non-malignant controls. PC3 and LNCaP cell lines were used as models of PC representing different tumorigenic capacities. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed on TMAs and fluorescence immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis were conducted on cell cultures. Results show that SNAIL exhibits increased expression in high Gleason specimens compared to low histological grade and BPH samples. Accordingly, PC3 cells show higher SNAIL expression levels compared to LNCaP cells. Conversely, syndecan 1, similarly to E-cadherin (a known marker of EMT), shows a decreased expression in high Gleason grades samples and PC3 cells. Interestingly, syndecan 2 shows no changes associated to histological grade. It is concluded that increased SNAIL levels in advanced PC are associated with low expression of syndecan 1. The mechanism by which SNAIL regulates the expression of syndecan 1 remains to be investigated. PMID:24424718

  18. Clinical impact of L1CAM expression measured on the transcriptome level in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Samira Abdel; Duggan-Peer, Michaela; Sprung, Susanne; Reimer, Daniel; Fiegl, Heidi; Soleiman, Afschin; Marth, Christian; Zeimet, Alain G.

    2016-01-01

    Background High expression of L1 cell adhesion molecules (L1CAM) has been repeatedly shown to be associated with aggressive disease behavior, which translates in poor clinical outcome in various cancer entities. However, in ovarian cancer results based either on immunohistochemistry or cytosolic protein quantifications remained conflicting regarding clinical behavior. In the present work we assessed L1CAM expression on the transcriptome level with the highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to define its relevance in ovarian cancer biology. Results There was a significant difference in L1CAM high and low mRNA expressing cancers with regard to disease-free (p=0.002) and overall survival (p=0.008). L1CAM proofed to be an independent predictor for disease progression (HR 1.8, p=0.01) and overall survival (HR 1.6, p=0.04). Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between the level of L1CAM and the grade of tumor differentiation (p=0.04), the FIGO stage (p=0.025) as well as the histological subtype (p= 0.002) was found. Methods This study included fresh frozen tissue samples of 138 patients with FIGO I-IV stage ovarian cancer. L1CAM mRNA expression was determined using qRT-PCR. In the calculations special attention was put on the various histological subtypes. In survival analysis median L1CAM mRNA expression obtained in the entire cohort of ovarian cancer samples was used as a cut-off to distinguish between high and low L1CAM mRNA expression. Conclusion L1CAM mRNA expression appears to play a substantial role in the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer that is translated into poor clinical outcome. Additionally humanized L1CAM antibodies, which can serve as potential future treatment options are under testing. PMID:27174921

  19. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  20. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-08-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  1. Induction without methanol: novel regulated promoters enable high-level expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inducible high-level expression is favoured for recombinant protein production in Pichia pastoris. Therefore, novel regulated promoters are desired, ideally repressing heterologous gene expression during initial growth and enabling it in the production phase. In a typical large scale fed-batch culture repression is desired during the batch phase where cells grow on a surplus of e.g. glycerol, while heterologous gene expression should be active in the feed phase under carbon (e.g. glucose) limitation. Results DNA microarray analysis of P. pastoris wild type cells growing in glycerol-based batch and glucose-based fed batch was used for the identification of genes with both, strong repression on glycerol and high-level expression in the feed phase. Six novel glucose-limit inducible promoters were successfully applied to express the intracellular reporter eGFP. The highest expression levels together with strong repression in pre-culture were achieved with the novel promoters PG1 and PG6. Human serum albumin (HSA) was used to characterize the promoters with an industrially relevant secreted protein. A PG1 clone with two gene copies reached about 230% of the biomass specific HSA titer in glucose-based fed batch fermentation compared to a PGAP clone with identical gene copy number, while PG6 only achieved 39%. Two clones each carrying eleven gene copies, expressing HSA under control of PG1 and PG6 respectively were generated by post-transformational vector amplification. They produced about 1.0 and 0.7 g L-1 HSA respectively in equal fed batch processes. The suitability in production processes was also verified with HyHEL antibody Fab fragment for PG1 and with porcine carboxypeptidase B for PG6. Moreover, the molecular function of the gene under the control of PG1 was determined to encode a high-affinity glucose transporter and named GTH1. Conclusions A set of novel regulated promoters, enabling induction without methanol, was successfully identified by using

  2. Bimodal distribution of RNA expression levels in human skeletal muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many human diseases and phenotypes are related to RNA expression, levels of which are influenced by a wide spectrum of genetic and exposure-related factors. In a large genome-wide study of muscle tissue expression, we found that some genes exhibited a bimodal distribution of RNA expression, in contrast to what is usually assumed in studies of a single healthy tissue. As bimodality has classically been considered a hallmark of genetic control, we assessed the genome-wide prevalence, cause, and association of this phenomenon with diabetes-related phenotypes in skeletal muscle tissue from 225 healthy Pima Indians using exon array expression chips. Results Two independent batches of microarrays were used for bimodal assessment and comparison. Of the 17,881 genes analyzed, eight (GSTM1, HLA-DRB1, ERAP2, HLA-DRB5, MAOA, ACTN3, NR4A2, and THNSL2) were found to have bimodal expression replicated in the separate batch groups, while 24 other genes had evidence of bimodality in only one group. Some bimodally expressed genes had modest associations with pre-diabetic phenotypes, of note ACTN3 with insulin resistance. Most of the other bimodal genes have been reported to be involved with various other diseases and characteristics. Association of expression with cis genetic variation in a subset of 149 individuals found all but one of the confirmed bimodal genes and nearly half of all potential ones to be highly significant expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). The rare prevalence of these bimodally expressed genes found after controlling for batch effects was much lower than the prevalence reported in other studies. Additional validation in data from separate muscle expression studies confirmed the low prevalence of bimodality we observed. Conclusions We conclude that the prevalence of bimodal gene expression is quite rare in healthy muscle tissue (<0.2%), and is much lower than limited reports from other studies. The major cause of these clearly bimodal

  3. Biphasic Dependence of Glioma Survival and Cell Migration on CD44 Expression Level.

    PubMed

    Klank, Rebecca L; Decker Grunke, Stacy A; Bangasser, Benjamin L; Forster, Colleen L; Price, Matthew A; Odde, Thomas J; SantaCruz, Karen S; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Canoll, Peter; Turley, Eva A; McCarthy, James B; Ohlfest, John R; Odde, David J

    2017-01-03

    While several studies link the cell-surface marker CD44 to cancer progression, conflicting results show both positive and negative correlations with increased CD44 levels. Here, we demonstrate that the survival outcomes of genetically induced glioma-bearing mice and of high-grade human glioma patients are biphasically correlated with CD44 level, with the poorest outcomes occurring at intermediate levels. Furthermore, the high-CD44-expressing mesenchymal subtype exhibited a positive trend of survival with increased CD44 level. Mouse cell migration rates in ex vivo brain slice cultures were also biphasically associated with CD44 level, with maximal migration corresponding to minimal survival. Cell simulations suggest that cell-substrate adhesiveness is sufficient to explain this biphasic migration. More generally, these results highlight the potential importance of non-monotonic relationships between survival and biomarkers associated with cancer progression.

  4. The abundance of processed pseudogenes derived from glycolytic genes is correlated with their expression level.

    PubMed

    McDonell, Laura; Drouin, Guy

    2012-02-01

    The abundance of processed pseudogenes in different vertebrate species is known to be proportional to the length of their oogenesis. However, this hypothesis cannot explain why, in a given species, certain genes produce more processed pseudogenes than others. In particular, one would expect that all genes of the glycolytic pathway would generate roughly the same number of processed pseudogenes. However, some glycolitic genes generate more processed pseudogenes than others. Here, we show that there is a positive correlation between the abundance of processed pseudogene generated from glycolytic genes and their level of expression. The variation in expression level of different glycolytic genes likely reflects the fact that some of them, such a GAPDH, have functions other than those they play in glycolysis. Furthermore, the age distribution of GAPDH-processed pseudogenes corresponds to the age distribution of LINE1 elements, which are the source of the reverse transcriptase that generates processed pseudogenes. These results support the hypothesis that gene expression levels affect the level of processed pseudogene production.

  5. Nonlinear Dynamics in Gene Regulation Promote Robustness and Evolvability of Gene Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Steinacher, Arno; Bates, Declan G.; Akman, Ozgur E.; Soyer, Orkun S.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular phenotypes underpinned by regulatory networks need to respond to evolutionary pressures to allow adaptation, but at the same time be robust to perturbations. This creates a conflict in which mutations affecting regulatory networks must both generate variance but also be tolerated at the phenotype level. Here, we perform mathematical analyses and simulations of regulatory networks to better understand the potential trade-off between robustness and evolvability. Examining the phenotypic effects of mutations, we find an inverse correlation between robustness and evolvability that breaks only with nonlinearity in the network dynamics, through the creation of regions presenting sudden changes in phenotype with small changes in genotype. For genotypes embedding low levels of nonlinearity, robustness and evolvability correlate negatively and almost perfectly. By contrast, genotypes embedding nonlinear dynamics allow expression levels to be robust to small perturbations, while generating high diversity (evolvability) under larger perturbations. Thus, nonlinearity breaks the robustness-evolvability trade-off in gene expression levels by allowing disparate responses to different mutations. Using analytical derivations of robustness and system sensitivity, we show that these findings extend to a large class of gene regulatory network architectures and also hold for experimentally observed parameter regimes. Further, the effect of nonlinearity on the robustness-evolvability trade-off is ensured as long as key parameters of the system display specific relations irrespective of their absolute values. We find that within this parameter regime genotypes display low and noisy expression levels. Examining the phenotypic effects of mutations, we find an inverse correlation between robustness and evolvability that breaks only with nonlinearity in the network dynamics. Our results provide a possible solution to the robustness-evolvability trade-off, suggest an explanation for

  6. Neuropeptide Y mRNA expression levels following chronic olanzapine, clozapine and haloperidol administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, X-F; Deng, Chao; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2006-06-01

    Using quantitative in situ hybridization, this study examined regional changes in rat brain mRNA levels encoding neuropeptide Y (NPY) following olanzapine, clozapine and haloperidol administration (1.2, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, oral) for 36 days. The NPY mRNA expression levels and patterns were examined after the last drug administration at both time points enabling the measurement of immediate effect at 2h and the effects after 48 h of drug administration. It was found that all these drugs had an immediate effect on NPY mRNA expression, while virtually all these changes normalized 48 h after the drug treatments. A similarity in altered NPY mRNA expression patterns was seen between the olanzapine and clozapine groups; however, haloperidol was very different. Olanzapine and clozapine administration decreased NPY mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and anterior cingulate cortex (from -60% to -77%, p<0.05). Haloperidol decreased NPY mRNA expression in the amygdala and hippocampus (-69%, -64%, p<0.05). In the lateral septal nucleus, NPY mRNA levels significantly decreased in the olanzapine group (-66%, p<0.05), a trend toward a decrease was observed in the clozapine group, and no change was found in the haloperidol treated group. These results suggest that the different effects of atypical and typical antipsychotics on NPY systems may reflect the neural chemical mechanisms responsible for the differences between these drugs in their effects in treating positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The immediate decrease of NPY mRNA levels suggests an immediate reduction of NPY biosynthesis in response to these drugs.

  7. Global Gene Expression Profiling of a Population Exposed to a Range of Benzene Levels

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Vermeulen, Roel; Li, Guilan; Hubbard, Alan E.; Porter, Kristin E.; Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J.; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Benzene, an established cause of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), may also cause one or more lymphoid malignancies in humans. Previously, we identified genes and pathways associated with exposure to high (> 10 ppm) levels of benzene through transcriptomic analyses of blood cells from a small number of occupationally exposed workers. Objectives The goals of this study were to identify potential biomarkers of benzene exposure and/or early effects and to elucidate mechanisms relevant to risk of hematotoxicity, leukemia, and lymphoid malignancy in occupationally exposed individuals, many of whom were exposed to benzene levels < 1 ppm, the current U.S. occupational standard. Methods We analyzed global gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 125 workers exposed to benzene levels ranging from < 1 ppm to > 10 ppm. Study design and analysis with a mixed-effects model minimized potential confounding and experimental variability. Results We observed highly significant widespread perturbation of gene expression at all exposure levels. The AML pathway was among the pathways most significantly associated with benzene exposure. Immune response pathways were associated with most exposure levels, potentially providing biological plausibility for an association between lymphoma and benzene exposure. We identified a 16-gene expression signature associated with all levels of benzene exposure. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic benzene exposure, even at levels below the current U.S. occupational standard, perturbs many genes, biological processes, and pathways. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which benzene may induce hematotoxicity, leukemia, and lymphoma and reveal relevant potential biomarkers associated with a range of exposures. PMID:21147609

  8. Munc18-1 expression levels control synapse recovery by regulating readily releasable pool size

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Ruud F. G.; Wierda, Keimpe; Sons, Michèle S.; de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Brussaard, Arjen; Plomp, Jaap J.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Prompt recovery after intense activity is an essential feature of most mammalian synapses. Here we show that synapses with reduced expression of the presynaptic gene munc18-1 suffer from increased depression during intense stimulation at glutamatergic, GABAergic, and neuromuscular synapses. Conversely, munc18-1 overexpression makes these synapses recover faster. Concomitant changes in the readily releasable vesicle pool and its refill kinetics were found. The number of vesicles docked at the active zone and the total number of vesicles per terminal correlated with both munc18-1 expression levels and the size of the releasable vesicle pool. These data show that varying expression of a single gene controls synaptic recovery by modulating the number of docked, release-ready vesicles and thereby replenishment of the secretion capacity. PMID:17110441

  9. High-Level Transient Expression of ER-Targeted Human Interleukin 6 in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Henrik; Mikschofsky, Heike; Koslowski, Roswitha; Meyer, Udo; Broer, Inge; Huckauf, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco plants can be used to express recombinant proteins that cannot be produced in a soluble and active form using traditional platforms such as Escherichia coli. We therefore expressed the human glycoprotein interleukin 6 (IL6) in two commercial tobacco cultivars (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Virginia and cv. Geudertheimer) as well as the model host N. benthamiana to compare different transformation strategies (stable vs. transient expression) and subcellular targeting (apoplast, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and vacuole). In T0 transgenic plants, the highest expression levels were achieved by ER targeting but the overall yields of IL6 were still low in the leaves (0.005% TSP in the ER, 0.0008% in the vacuole and 0.0005% in the apoplast). The apoplast variant accumulated to similar levels in leaves and seeds, whereas the ER-targeted variant was 1.2-fold more abundant in seeds and the vacuolar variant was 6-fold more abundant in seeds. The yields improved in subsequent generations, with the best-performing T2 plants producing the ER-targeted IL6 at 0.14% TSP in both leaves and seeds. Transient expression of ER-targeted IL6 in leaves using the MagnICON system resulted in yields of up to 7% TSP in N. benthamiana, but only 1% in N. tabacum cv. Virginia and 0.5% in cv. Geudertheimer. Although the commercial tobacco cultivars produced up to threefold more biomass than N. benthamiana, this was not enough to compensate for the lower overall yields. The recombinant IL6 produced by transient and stable expression in plants was biologically active and presented as two alternative bands matching the corresponding native protein. PMID:23152824

  10. Comprehensive expression analysis of FSHD candidate genes at the mRNA and protein level.

    PubMed

    Klooster, Rinse; Straasheijm, Kirsten; Shah, Bharati; Sowden, Janet; Frants, Rune; Thornton, Charles; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère

    2009-12-01

    In facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) the majority of patients carry a D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat contraction in the subtelomere of chromosome 4q. Several disease mechanisms have been proposed to explain how repeat contraction causes muscular dystrophy. All proposed mechanisms foresee a change from a closed to a more open chromatin structure followed by loss of control over expression of genes in or proximal to D4Z4. Initially, a distance and residual repeat size-dependent upregulation of the candidate genes FRG2, FRG1 and ANT1 was observed, but most successive expression studies failed to support transcriptional upregulation of 4qter genes. Moreover, chromatin studies do not provide evidence for a cis-spreading mechanism operating at 4qter in FSHD. In part, this inconsistency may be explained by differences in the techniques used, and the use of RNA samples obtained from different muscle groups. The aim of this study is to comprehensively and uniformly study the expression of the FSHD candidate genes FRG1, FRG2, CRYM, ANT1, ALP, PITX1 and LRP2BP at the RNA and protein level in identically processed primary myoblasts, myotubes and quadriceps muscle. Expression was compared between samples obtained from FSHD patients and normal controls with samples from myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients as disease controls. No consistent changes in RNA or protein expression levels were observed between the samples. The one exception was a selective increase in FRG2 mRNA expression in FSHD myotubes. This study provides further evidence that there is no demonstrable consistent, large magnitude, overexpression of any of the FSHD candidate genes.

  11. Correlations among PPARγ, DNMT1, and DNMT3B Expression Levels and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pazienza, Valerio; Tavano, Francesca; Benegiamo, Giorgia; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Burbaci, Francesca Paola; Copetti, Massimiliano; di Mola, Fabio Francesco; Andriulli, Angelo; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) play a role in carcinogenesis. In this study we aimed to evaluate the expression of PPARγ, DNMT1, and DNMT3B and their correlation with clinical-pathological features in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC), and to define the effect of PPARγ activation on DNMTs expression in PC cell lines. qRT-PCR analysis showed that DNMT3B expression was downregulated in tumors compared to normal tissues (P = 0.03), whereas PPARγ and DNMT1 levels did not show significant alterations in PC patients. Expression levels between PPARγ and DNMT1 and between DNMT1 and DNMT3B were highly correlated (P = 0.008 and P = 0.05 resp.). DNMT3B overexpression in tumor tissue was positively correlated with both lymph nodes spreading (P = 0.046) and resection margin status (P = 0.04), and a borderline association with perineural invasion (P = 0.06) was found. Furthermore, high levels of DNMT3B expression were significantly associated with a lower mortality in the whole population (HR = 0.485; 95%CI = 0.262-0.895, P = 0.02) and in the subgroup of patients without perineural invasion (HR = 0.314; 95%CI = 0.130-0.758; P = 0.01), while such association was not observed in patients with tumor invasion into perineural structures (P = 0.70). In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo PPARγ and DNMTs appear interrelated in PC, and this interaction might influence cell phenotype and disease behavior.

  12. Low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration with up-regulation of dynamin II expression.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Miao-Sui; Chen, Ying-Hsun; Liang, Fang-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm(2)). Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore.

  13. Zinc Fortification Decreases ZIP1 Gene Expression of Some Adolescent Females with Appropriate Plasma Zinc Levels

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Rosa O.; Santiago, Alejandra; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria; Peregrino-Uriarte, Alma B.; de la Barca, Ana M. Calderón; García, Hugo S.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc homeostasis is achieved after intake variation by changes in the expression levels of zinc transporters. The aim of this study was to evaluate dietary intake (by 24-h recall), absorption, plasma zinc (by absorption spectrophotometry) and the expression levels (by quantitative PCR), of the transporters ZIP1 (zinc importer) and ZnT1 (zinc exporter) in peripheral white blood cells from 24 adolescent girls before and after drinking zinc-fortified milk for 27 day. Zinc intake increased (p < 0.001) from 10.5 ± 3.9 mg/day to 17.6 ± 4.4 mg/day, and its estimated absorption from 3.1 ± 1.2 to 5.3 ± 1.3 mg/day. Mean plasma zinc concentration remained unchanged (p > 0.05) near 150 µg/dL, but increased by 31 µg/dL (p < 0.05) for 6/24 adolescents (group A) and decreased by 25 µg/dL (p < 0.05) for other 6/24 adolescents (group B). Expression of ZIP1 in blood leukocytes was reduced 1.4-fold (p < 0.006) in group A, while for the expression of ZnT1 there was no difference after intervention (p = 0.39). An increase of dietary zinc after 27-days consumption of fortified-milk did not increase (p > 0.05) the plasma level of adolescent girls but for 6/24 participants from group A in spite of the formerly appropriation, which cellular zinc uptake decreased as assessed by reduction of the expression of ZIP1. PMID:24922175

  14. Effect of heat stress and feeding phosphorus levels on pig electron transport chain gene expression.

    PubMed

    Weller, M M D C A; Alebrante, L; Campos, P H R F; Saraiva, A; Silva, B A N; Donzele, J L; Oliveira, R F M; Silva, F F; Gasparino, E; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature and different levels of available phosphorus (aP) on the expression of nine genes encoding electron transport chain proteins in the Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of pigs. Two trials were carried out using 48 high-lean growth pigs from two different growth phases: from 15 to 30 kg (phase 1) and from 30 to 60 kg (phase 2). Pigs from growth phase 1 were fed with three different levels of dietary aP (0.107%, 0.321% or 0.535%) and submitted either to a thermoneutral (24°C and RH at 76%) or to a heat stress (34°C and RH at 70%) environment. Pigs from growth phase 2 were fed with three different levels of dietary aP (0.116%, 0.306% or 0.496%) and submitted either to a thermoneutral (22ºC and RH at 77%) or to a heat stress (32ºC and RH at 73%) environment. Heat stress decreased (P<0.001) average daily feed intake at both growth phases. At 24°C, pigs in phase 1 fed the 0.321% aP diet had greater average daily gain and feed conversion (P<0.05) than those fed the 0.107% or 0.535% while, at 34°C pigs fed the 0.535% aP had the best performance (P<0.05). Pigs from phase 2 fed the 0.306% aP had best performance in both thermal environments. Gene expression profile was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Irrespective of growing phase, the expression of six genes was lower (P<0.05) at high temperature than at thermoneutrality. The lower expression of these genes under high temperatures evidences the effects of heat stress by decreasing oxidative metabolism, through adaptive physiological mechanisms in order to reduce heat production. In pigs from phase 1, six genes were differentially expressed across aP levels (P<0.05) in the thermoneutral and one gene in the heat stress. In pigs from phase 2, two genes were differentially expressed across aP levels (P<0.05) in both thermal environments. These data revealed strong evidence that phosphorus and thermal environments are key factors to

  15. Caveolin-1 Expression Level in Cancer Associated Fibroblasts Predicts Outcome in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Fan, Lifang; Li, Zonghuan; Yang, Guifang; Chen, Honglei

    2013-01-01

    Aims Altered expression of epithelial or stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is observed in various types of human cancers. However, the clinical significance of Cav-1 expression in gastric cancer (GC) remains largely unknown. The present study aims to explore the clinicopathological significance and prognostic value of both tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) Cav-1 in GC. Methods and Results Quantum dots immunofluorescence histochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Cav-1 in 20 cases of gastritis without intestinal metaplasia (IM), 20 cases of gastritis with IM and 286 cases of GC. Positive rates of epithelial Cav-1 in gastritis without IM, gastritis with IM and GC showed a decreasing trend (P = 0.012). Low expression of Cav-1 in CAFs but not in tumor cells was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in GC patients (P = 0.034 and 0.005 respectively in disease free survival and overall survival). Cav-1 level in tumor cells and CAFs showed no significant correlation with classic clinicopathological features. Conclusions Loss of epithelial Cav-1 may promote malignant progression and low CAFs Cav-1 level herald worse outcome of GC patient, suggesting CAFs Cav-1 may be a candidate therapeutic target and a useful prognostic marker of GC. PMID:23527097

  16. Potato steroidal glycoalkaloid levels and the expression of key isoprenoid metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Krits, Pinchas; Fogelman, Edna; Ginzberg, Idit

    2007-12-01

    The potato steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) are toxic secondary metabolites, and their total content in tubers should not exceed 20 mg/100 g fresh weight. The two major SGA in cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) are alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine. SGA biosynthetic genes and the genetic factors that control their expression have not yet been determined. In the present study, potato genotypes exhibiting different levels of SGA content showed an association between high SGA levels in their leaves and tubers and high expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 (hmg1) and squalene synthase 1 (pss1), genes of the mevalonic/isoprenoid pathway. Transcripts of other key enzymes of branches of the isoprenoid pathway, vetispiradiene/sesquiterpene synthase (pvs1) and sterol C24-methyltransferase type1 (smt1), were undetectable or exhibited stable expression regardless of SGA content, respectively, suggesting facilitated precursor flow to the SGA biosynthetic branch. The transcript ratio of solanidine glucosyltransferase (sgt2) to solanidine galactosyltransferase (sgt1) was correlated to the documented chaconine-to-solanine ratio in the tested genotypes. Significantly higher expression of hmg1, pss1, smt1, sgt1 and sgt2 was monitored in the tuber phelloderm than in the parenchyma of the tuber's flesh, targeting the former as the main SGA-producing tissue in the tuber, in agreement with the known high SGA content in the layers directly under the tuber skin.

  17. High Level Expression and Purification of Recombinant Proteins from Escherichia coli with AK-TAG

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Wen, Caixia; Zhao, Rongchuan; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Xinxin; Cui, Jingjing; Liang, Joshua G.; Liang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) from Escherichia coli was used as both solubility and affinity tag for recombinant protein production. When fused to the N-terminus of a target protein, an AK fusion protein could be expressed in soluble form and purified to near homogeneity in a single step from Blue-Sepherose via affinity elution with micromolar concentration of P1, P5- di (adenosine—5’) pentaphosphate (Ap5A), a transition-state substrate analog of AK. Unlike any other affinity tags, the level of a recombinant protein expression in soluble form and its yield of recovery during each purification step could be readily assessed by AK enzyme activity in near real time. Coupled to a His-Tag installed at the N-terminus and a thrombin cleavage site at the C terminus of AK, the streamlined method, here we dubbed AK-TAG, could also allow convenient expression and retrieval of a cleaved recombinant protein in high yield and purity via dual affinity purification steps. Thus AK-TAG is a new addition to the arsenal of existing affinity tags for recombinant protein expression and purification, and is particularly useful where soluble expression and high degree of purification are at stake. PMID:27214237

  18. The hESC line Envy expresses high levels of GFP in all differentiated progeny.

    PubMed

    Costa, Magdaline; Dottori, Mirella; Ng, Elizabeth; Hawes, Susan M; Sourris, Koula; Jamshidi, Pegah; Pera, Martin F; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G

    2005-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been advanced as a potential source of cells for use in cell replacement therapies. The ability to identify hESCs and their differentiated progeny readily in transplantation experiments will facilitate the analysis of hESC potential and function in vivo. We have generated a hESC line designated 'Envy', in which robust levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) are expressed in stem cells and all differentiated progeny.

  19. Endogenous Oxytocin Levels Are Associated with the Perception of Emotion in Dynamic Body Expressions in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Gregory P.; Keller, William R.; Koenig, James I.; Sullivan, Sara K.; Gold, James M.; Buchanan, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Lower endogenous oxytocin levels have been associated with impaired social cognition in schizophrenia, particularly facial affect identification. Little is known about the relationship between oxytocin and other forms of emotion perception. In the current study, 41 individuals with schizophrenia (SZ) and 22 demographically matched healthy controls (CN) completed a forced-choice affective body expression classification task. Stimuli included dynamic videos of male and female actors portraying 4 discrete emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and neutral. Plasma oxytocin levels were determined via radioimmunoassay. Results indicated that SZ had significantly higher plasma oxytocin concentrations than CN. SZ were also less accurate at identifying expressions of happiness and sadness; however, there were no group differences for anger or neutral stimuli. A group x sex interaction was also present, such that female CN were more accurate than male CN, whereas male SZ were more accurate than female SZ. Higher endogenous oxytocin levels were associated with better total recognition in both SZ and CN; this association was specific to females in SZ. Findings indicate that sex plays an important role in identifying emotional expressions in body gestures in SZ, and that individual differences in endogenous oxytocin predict emotion perception accuracy. PMID:25620121

  20. Deimination level and peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 expression are elevated in astrocytes with increased incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Serra, Horacio M

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes respond to environmental cues, including changes in temperatures. Increased deimination, observed in many progressive neurological diseases, is thought to be contributed by astrocytes. We determined the level of deimination and expression of peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in isolated primary astrocytes in response to changes on either side (31°C and 41°C) of the optimal temperature (37°C). We investigated changes in the astrocytes by using a number of established markers and accounted for cell death with the CellTiter-Blue assay. We found increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, ALDH1L1, and J1-31, resulting from increased incubation temperature and increased expression of TSP1, S100β, and AQP4, resulting from decreased incubation temperature vs. optimal temperature, suggesting activation of different biochemical pathways in astrocytes associated with different incubation temperatures. Mass spectrometric analyses support such trends. The PAD2 level was increased only as a result of increased incubation temperature with a commensurate increased level of deimination. Actin cytoskeleton and iso[4]LGE, a lipid peroxidase modification, also showed an increase with higher incubation temperature. Altogether, these results suggest that temperature, as an environmental cue, activates astrocytes in a different manner on either side of the optimal temperature and that increase in deimination is associated only with the higher temperature side of the spectrum.

  1. Relationship between expression levels and atherogenesis in scavenger receptor Class B, Type I Transgenics

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yukihiko; Gong, Elaine; Royer, Lori; Cooper, Philip N.; Francone, Omar L; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-03-15

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies of SR-BI have implicated it as a likely participant in the metabolism of HDL cholesterol. To investigate SR-BI's effect on atherogenesis we examined two lines of SR-BI transgenic mice with high (10-fold increases) and low (2-fold increases) in SR-BI expression in an inbred mouse background hemizygous for a human apo B transgene. Unlike non-HDL cholesterol levels which minimally differed in the various groups of animals, HDL cholesterol levels were inversely related to SR-BI expression. Mice with the low expression SR-BI transgene had a 50% reduction in HDL cholesterol while the high expression SR-BI transgene was associated with two-fold decreases in HDL as well as dramatic alterations in HDL composition and size including the near absence of a-migrating particles as determined by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. The low expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had more than a two-fold decrease in the development of diet induced fatty streak lesions compared t o the apo B transgenics (4448{+-}1908 {mu}m2/aorta to 10133 {+-} 4035 {mu}m2/aorta; p<0.001), while the high expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had an atherogenic response similar to that of the apo B transgenics (14692{+-}7238 {mu}m2/aorta) but three-fold greater than the low SR-BI/apo B mice (p<0.001). The prominent anti-atherogenic effect of moderate SR-BI expression provides in vivo support for the hypothesis that HDL functions to inhibit atherogenesis through its interactions with SR-BI in facilitating reverse cholesterol transport. The failure of the high SR-BI/apo B transgenics to have similar or even greater reductions in atherogenesis suggests that the changes resulting from extremely high SR-BI expression including dramatic changes in lipoproteins may have both pro- and anti-atherogenic consequences illustrating the complexity of the relationship between SR-BI and atherogenesis.

  2. Electrotonic loading of anisotropic cardiac monolayers by unexcitable cells depends on connexin type and expression level

    PubMed Central

    McSpadden, Luke C.; Kirkton, Robert D.; Bursac, Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how electrotonic loading of cardiomyocytes by unexcitable cells alters cardiac impulse conduction may be highly relevant to fibrotic heart disease. In this study, we optically mapped electrical propagation in confluent, aligned neonatal rat cardiac monolayers electrotonically loaded with cardiac fibroblasts, control human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells, or HEK-293 cells genetically engineered to overexpress the gap junction proteins connexin-43 or connexin-45. Gap junction expression and function were assessed by immunostaining, immunoblotting, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and were correlated with the optically mapped propagation of action potentials. We found that neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts negative for the myofibroblast marker smooth muscle α-actin expressed connexin-45 rather than connexin-43 or connexin-40, weakly coupled to cardiomyocytes, and, without significant depolarization of cardiac resting potential, slowed cardiac conduction to 75% of control only at high (>60%) coverage densities, similar to loading effects found from HEK-293 cells expressing similar levels of connexin-45. In contrast, HEK-293 cells with connexin-43 expression similar to that of cardiomyocytes significantly decreased cardiac conduction velocity and maximum capture rate to as low as 22% and 25% of control values, respectively, while increasing cardiac action potential duration to 212% of control and cardiac resting potential from −71.6 ± 4.9 mV in controls to −65.0 ± 3.8 mV. For all unexcitable cell types and coverage densities, velocity anisotropy ratio remained unchanged. Despite the induced conduction slowing, none of the loading cell types increased the proportion of spontaneously active monolayers. These results signify connexin isoform and expression level as important contributors to potential electrical interactions between unexcitable cells and myocytes in cardiac tissue. PMID:19494239

  3. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  4. Effect of sodium intake on gene expression and plasma levels of ANF in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lattion, A.L.; Aubert, J.F.; Flueckiger, J.P.; Nussberger, J.; Waeber, B.; Brunner, H.R. )

    1988-08-01

    The effect of short- and long-term sodium loading and sodium restriction on the gene expression as well as on circulating plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) was evaluated in normotensive Wistar rats. These rats were fed either a low-, a regular-, or a high-sodium diet (regular diet and 1% saline as drinking fluid) and studied after 1 and 3 wk. The ANF mRNA was determined in pooled atria and ventricles of the different groups of rats, using the dot-blot technique. Plasma ANF levels were measured with a radioimmunoassay. After 1 wk on the high-sodium diet, ANF mRNA was increased in right atria and ventricles together with circulating ANF levels when compared with animals maintained for the same period on a low-sodium diet. After 3 wk on the various diets, the differences in cardiac ANF mRNA and in plasma ANF levels had disappeared. Gene expression of ANF was also looked for in different areas of the brain, lung, thyroid, adrenals, and the kidney; no hybridization was detected in any of these organs. These data suggest that in rats, the transcription of the ANF gene and peptide release is enhanced only during short-term adaptation to dietary sodium loading.

  5. Tubular B7-1 expression parallels proteinuria levels, but not clinical outcomes in adult minimal change disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Woo; Baek, Seon Ha; Paik, Jin Ho; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2017-01-01

    B7-1 is thought to play a pathogenic role in minimal-change disease (MCD). Recently, however, doubts have arisen regarding the role of B7-1 expression in MCD. Therefore, we aimed to identify the presence and clinical significance of B7-1 expression in MCD patients. The study participants included 28 adult MCD patients for whom kidney specimens were available. The intensity of B7-1 expression was assessed by two independent specialists. We analysed the association between the intensity of B7-1 expression and clinicopathological variables. No B7-1 expression in the glomeruli was observed in any of the 28 patients. Unexpectedly, however, 75.0% of the patients exhibited tubular B7-1 expression, with 35.7% demonstrating weak positive expressions and 39.3% demonstrating strong positive expressions. The level of proteinuria significantly increased as the intensity of tubular B7-1 expression increased. We also found trends of increasing blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels with increased intensity of tubular B7-1 expression. However, we could not observe definite differences in long- and short-term clinical outcomes depending on the intensity of tubular B7-1 expression. In conclusion, B7-1 was expressed in renal tubular cells but not in glomeruli in adult MCD patients. The intensity of tubular B7-1 expression paralleled proteinuria levels, but not clinical outcomes. PMID:28150736

  6. High level expression of human enteropeptidase light chain in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Pepeliaev, Stanislav; Krahulec, Ján; Černý, Zbyněk; Jílková, Jana; Tlustá, Marcela; Dostálová, Jana

    2011-10-20

    Human enterokinase (enteropeptidase, rhEP), a serine protease expressed in the proximal part of the small intestine, converts the inactive form of trypsinogen to active trypsin by endoproteolytic cleavage. The high specificity of the target site makes enterokinase an ideal tool for cleaving fusion proteins at defined cleavage sites. The mature active enzyme is comprised of two disulfide-linked polypeptide chains. The heavy chain anchors the enzyme in the intestinal brush border membrane, whereas the light chain represents the catalytic enzyme subunit. The synthetic gene encoding human enteropeptidase light chain with His-tag added at the C-terminus to facilitate protein purification was cloned into Pichia pastoris expression plasmids under the control of an inducible AOX1 or constitutive promoters GAP and AAC. Cultivation media and conditions were optimized as well as isolation and purification of the target protein. Up to 4 mg/L of rhEP was obtained in shake-flask experiments and the expression level of about 60-70 mg/L was achieved when cultivating in lab-scale fermentors. The constitutively expressing strains proved more efficient and less labor-demanding than the inducible ones. The rhEP was immobilized on AV 100 sorbent (Iontosorb) to allow repeated use of enterokinase, showing specific activity of 4U/mL of wet matrix.

  7. Tight regulation, modulation, and high-level expression by vectors containing the arabinose PBAD promoter.

    PubMed

    Guzman, L M; Belin, D; Carson, M J; Beckwith, J

    1995-07-01

    We have constructed a series of plasmid vectors (pBAD vectors) containing the PBAD promoter of the araBAD (arabinose) operon and the gene encoding the positive and negative regulator of this promoter, araC. Using the phoA gene and phoA fusions to monitor expression in these vectors, we show that the ratio of induction/repression can be 1,200-fold, compared with 50-fold for PTAC-based vectors. phoA expression can be modulated over a wide range of inducer (arabinose) concentrations and reduced to extremely low levels by the presence of glucose, which represses expression. Also, the kinetics of induction and repression are very rapid and significantly affected by the ara allele in the host strain. Thus, the use of this system which can be efficiently and rapidly turned on and off allows the study of important aspects of bacterial physiology in a very simple manner and without changes of temperature. We have exploited the tight regulation of the PBAD promoter to study the phenotypes of null mutations of essential genes and explored the use of pBAD vectors as an expression system.

  8. Claudin-1, -2, -4, and -5: comparison of expression levels and distribution in equine tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonn; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Dong Oh; Ahn, Changhwan

    2016-01-01

    Claudins, which are known as transmembrane proteins play an essential role in tight junctions (TJs) to form physical barriers and regulate paracellular transportation. To understand equine diseases, it is helpful to measure the tissue-specific expression of TJs in horses. Major equine diseases such as colic and West Nile cause damage to TJs. In this study, the expression level and distribution of claudin-1, -2, -4, and -5 in eight tissues were assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry methods. Claudin-1 was primarily identified in the lung, duodenum, and uterus, claudin-2 was evenly observed in equine tissues, claudin-4 was abundantly detected in the liver, kidney and uterus, and claudin-5 was strongly expressed in the lung, duodenum, ovary, and uterus, as determined by Western blotting method. The localization of equine claudins was observed by immunohistochemistry methods. These findings provide knowledge regarding the expression patterns and localization of equine claudins, as well as valuable information to understand tight junction-related diseases according to tissue specificity and function of claudins in horses. PMID:27030194

  9. Identification of a gene, FMP21, whose expression levels are involved in thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of high temperature tolerance in yeasts is important for the molecular breeding of high temperature-tolerant yeasts that can be used in bioethanol production. We identified genes whose expression is correlated with the degree of thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA microarray analysis. Gene expression profiles of three S. cerevisiae strains showing different levels of thermotolerance were compared, and we chose three of them as candidate genes. Among these genes, FMP21 was investigated as a thermotolerance-related gene in S. cerevisiae by comparing the growth at high temperature with the gene expression in eight strains. The expression ratio of FMP21 at 37°C was correlated with the doubling time ratio at a coefficient of determination of 0.787. The potential involvement of the Fmp21 in the thermotolerance of yeasts was evaluated. The FMP21 deletion variant showed a decreased respiratory growth rate and increased thermosensitivity. Furthermore, the overexpression of FMP21 improved thermotolerance in yeasts. In conclusion, the function of Fmp21 is important for thermotolerance in yeasts. PMID:25177541

  10. High-level expression of two thermophilic β-mannanases in Yarrowialipolytica.

    PubMed

    YaPing, Wang; Ben, Rao; Ling, Zhang; Lixin, Ma

    2017-02-22

    Two thermophilic β-mannanases (ManA and ManB)were successfully expressed in Yarrowialipolytica using vector pINA1296I. The sequences of manA from Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88 and manB from Bacillus subtilis BCC41051 were optimized based on codon-usage bias in Y.lipolytica and synthesized by overlapping polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We utilized the pINA1296I vector, which allows inserting and expression of multiple copies of an expression cassette, to engineer recombinant strains containing multiple copies of manA or manB. Following verification of target-gene expression by quantitative PCR, fermentation experiments indicated that recombinant protein levels and enzyme activity increased along with increasing manA/manB copy number.After production in a 10 l fermenter, we obtained maximum enzyme activity from strains YLA6 and YLB6 of3024 U/mL and 1024 U/mL, respectively. Additionally, purification and characterization results revealed that the optimum pH and temperature for manA activity were pH∼5 and ∼70 °C, and for manB activity were pH∼7 and 60 °C, respectively. These results indicated that the thermo stabilities of these two enzymes were higher than most other mannanases, making them potentially useful for industrial applications.

  11. Effects of zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation on homocysteine levels and related enzyme expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyan; Rech, Leslie; Wu, Yinghong; Goltz, Douglas; Taylor, Carla G; House, James D

    2015-04-01

    Methionine synthase (MS) and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) are both zinc (Zn)-dependent methyltransferases and involved in the methylation of homocysteine. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary Zn supply on homocysteine levels and expression of the two enzymes in growing rats. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned randomly to four dietary groups (n=8/group) for 3 weeks: Zn deficient (ZD; <1mg Zn/kg); Zn control (ZC; 30mg Zn/kg); Zn supplemented (ZS; 300mg Zn/kg); pair fed (PF; 30mg Zn/kg) to the ZD group. Serum and femur Zn concentrations were 83% and 58% lower in ZD, and 49% and 62% higher in ZS compared to ZC (P<0.001), respectively. The ZD rats had lower feed intake (37%), body weight gains (45%), liver (43%) and kidney (31%) weights than those of ZC (P<0.001), but these parameters in ZD were not significantly different from the PF controls. Serum homocysteine concentrations were 65% higher in ZD compared to PF (P<0.05), and there was no significant difference in serum folate levels between ZD and PF groups. The mRNA expression of liver and kidney MS was 57% and 38% lower in ZD than PF (P<0.001), respectively. Hepatic and renal BHMT mRNA levels were not altered in ZD compared to controls. The aforementioned measurements were not significantly different between ZS and ZC groups, except Zn levels. These results demonstrated that homocysteine homeostasis appeared to be disturbed by Zn deficiency but not Zn supplementation, and elevated serum homocysteine might be due to reduced expression of MS during Zn deficiency.

  12. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2014-02-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection.

  13. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  14. Divergent prion strain evolution driven by PrPC expression level in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Le Dur, Annick; Laï, Thanh Lan; Stinnakre, Marie-George; Laisné, Aude; Chenais, Nathalie; Rakotobe, Sabine; Passet, Bruno; Reine, Fabienne; Soulier, Solange; Herzog, Laetitia; Tilly, Gaëlle; Rézaei, Human; Béringue, Vincent; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Laude, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    Prions induce a fatal neurodegenerative disease in infected host brain based on the refolding and aggregation of the host-encoded prion protein PrPC into PrPSc. Structurally distinct PrPSc conformers can give rise to multiple prion strains. Constrained interactions between PrPC and different PrPSc strains can in turn lead to certain PrPSc (sub)populations being selected for cross-species transmission, or even produce mutation-like events. By contrast, prion strains are generally conserved when transmitted within the same species, or to transgenic mice expressing homologous PrPC. Here, we compare the strain properties of a representative sheep scrapie isolate transmitted to a panel of transgenic mouse lines expressing varying levels of homologous PrPC. While breeding true in mice expressing PrPC at near physiological levels, scrapie prions evolve consistently towards different strain components in mice beyond a certain threshold of PrPC overexpression. Our results support the view that PrPC gene dosage can influence prion evolution on homotypic transmission. PMID:28112164

  15. Diazepam affects the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor density and their expression levels in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Bolaris, Stamatis; Valcana, Theony; Margarity, Marigoula

    2005-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are involved in the occurrence of anxiety and affective disorders; however, the effects following an anxiolytic benzodiazepine treatment, such as diazepam administration, on the mechanism of action of thyroid hormones has not yet been investigated. The effect of diazepam on the in vitro nuclear T3 binding, on the relative expression of the TH receptors (TRs) and on the synaptosomal TH availability were examined in adult rat cerebral hemispheres 24 h after a single intraperitoneal dose (5 mg/kg BW) of this tranquillizer. Although, diazepam did not affect the availability of TH either in blood circulation or in the synaptosomal fraction, it decreased (33%) the nuclear T3 maximal binding density (B(max)). No differences were observed in the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)). The TRalpha2 variant (non-T3-binding) mRNA levels were increased by 33%, whereas no changes in the relative expression of the T3-binding isoforms of TRs (TRalpha1, TRbeta1) were observed. This study shows that a single intraperitoneal injection of diazepam affects within 24 h, the density of the nuclear TRs and their expression pattern. The latest effect occurs in an isoform-specific manner involving specifically the TRalpha2 mRNA levels in adult rat brain.

  16. Exposure to caregiver maltreatment alters expression levels of epigenetic regulators in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Blaze, Jennifer; Roth, Tania L

    2013-01-01

    Quality of maternal care experienced during infancy is a key factor that can confer vulnerability or resilience to psychiatric disorders later in life. Research continues to indicate that early-life experiences can affect developmental trajectories through epigenetic alterations capable of affecting gene regulation and neural plasticity. Previously, our lab has shown that experiences within an adverse caregiving environment (i.e. maltreatment) produce aberrant DNA methylation patterns at various gene loci in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of developing and adult rats. This study aimed to determine whether caregiver maltreatment likewise affects expression levels of several genes important in regulating DNA methylation patterns (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, MeCP2, Gadd45b, and Hdac1). While we observed minimal changes in gene expression within the mPFC of developing rats, we observed expression changes for all genes in adult animals. Specifically, exposure to maltreatment produced a significant decrease in mRNA levels of all epigenetic regulators in adult males and a significant decrease in Gadd45b in adult females. Our results here provide further empirical support for the long-term and sex-specific epigenetic consequences of caregiver maltreatment on the mPFC. PMID:24120634

  17. Cell Cycle and Cell Size Dependent Gene Expression Reveals Distinct Subpopulations at Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Dolatabadi, Soheila; Candia, Julián; Akrap, Nina; Vannas, Christoffer; Tesan Tomic, Tajana; Losert, Wolfgang; Landberg, Göran; Åman, Pierre; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Cell proliferation includes a series of events that is tightly regulated by several checkpoints and layers of control mechanisms. Most studies have been performed on large cell populations, but detailed understanding of cell dynamics and heterogeneity requires single-cell analysis. Here, we used quantitative real-time PCR, profiling the expression of 93 genes in single-cells from three different cell lines. Individual unsynchronized cells from three different cell lines were collected in different cell cycle phases (G0/G1 – S – G2/M) with variable cell sizes. We found that the total transcript level per cell and the expression of most individual genes correlated with progression through the cell cycle, but not with cell size. By applying the random forests algorithm, a supervised machine learning approach, we show how a multi-gene signature that classifies individual cells into their correct cell cycle phase and cell size can be generated. To identify the most predictive genes we used a variable selection strategy. Detailed analysis of cell cycle predictive genes allowed us to define subpopulations with distinct gene expression profiles and to calculate a cell cycle index that illustrates the transition of cells between cell cycle phases. In conclusion, we provide useful experimental approaches and bioinformatics to identify informative and predictive genes at the single-cell level, which opens up new means to describe and understand cell proliferation and subpopulation dynamics. PMID:28179914

  18. Mechanical Stimulation Increases Knee Meniscus Gene RNA-level Expression in Adipose-derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Elizabeth M.; Wu, Bin; Siddiqui, Aamir; Tepper, Donna G.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efforts have been made to engineer knee meniscus tissue for injury repair, yet most attempts have been unsuccessful. Creating a cell source that resembles the complex, heterogeneous phenotype of the meniscus cell remains difficult. Stem cell differentiation has been investigated, mainly using bone marrow mesenchymal cells and biochemical means for differentiation, resulting in no solution. Mechanical stimulation has been investigated to an extent with no conclusion. Here, we explore the potential for and effectiveness of mechanical stimulation to induce the meniscal phenotype in adipose-derived stromal cells. Methods: Human adipose-derived stromal cells were chosen for their fibrogenic nature and conduciveness for chondrogenesis. Biochemical and mechanical stimulation were investigated. Biochemical stimulation included fibrogenic and chondrogenic media. For mechanical stimulation, a custom-built device was used to apply constant, cyclical, uniaxial strain for up to 6 hours. Strain and frequency varied. Results: Under biochemical stimulation, both fibrogenic (collagen I, versican) and chondrogenic (collagen II, Sox9, aggrecan) genes were expressed by cells exposed to either fibrogenic or chondrogenic biochemical factors. Mechanical strain was found to preferentially promote fibrogenesis over chondrogenesis, confirming that tensile strain is an effective fibrogenic cue. Three hours at 10% strain and 1 Hz in chondrogenic media resulted in the highest expression of fibrochondrogenic genes. Although mechanical stimulation did not seem to affect protein level expression, biochemical means did affect protein level presence of collagen fibers. Conclusion: Mechanical stimulation can be a useful differentiation tool for mechanoresponsive cell types as long as biochemical factors are also integrated. PMID:27757329

  19. Endotoxemia enhances expression of the signaling receptor (GP130) on protein and molecular level.

    PubMed

    Marsik, Claudia; Halama, Thomas; Cardona, Francesco; Schlifke, Irene; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Jilma, Bernd

    2005-03-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) performs a prominent role during sepsis. To examine the molecular regulation of IL-6, IL-6 receptor, and signaling receptor gp130 during endotoxemia, nine healthy young volunteers received a bolus injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on day 1 and saline on day 2 in a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. LPS enhanced IL-6 release 300-fold. IL-6 mRNA expression was not significantly altered in blood samples at any time after LPS infusion in vivo, while incubation of whole blood with 50 pg/ml LPS up-regulated IL-6 mRNA levels 8000- to 50,000-fold in vitro. LPS infusion increased synthesis of gp130 mRNA 5.5-fold compared to baseline at 4 h (P < 0.05), while no significant change was observed in the placebo period (P = 0.001 between groups). LPS increased the percentage of gp130 positive neutrophils gp130 700% over baseline at 8 h (P < 0.01 versus baseline and placebo). IL-6 receptor levels were not significantly altered by low-grade endotoxemia. In conclusion, endotoxemia up-regulates gp130 expression in vivo and in vitro. Quantification of IL-6 mRNA expression in circulating leukocytes is unlikely a suitable marker for monitoring of endotoxemia.

  20. Recurrent selection for transgene expression levels in maize results in proxy selection for a native gene with the same promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High expression levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High expression levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurre...

  1. Ascorbic acid inhibits PMP22 expression by reducing cAMP levels.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ferdinand; Belin, Sophie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Micaleff, Joelle; Blin, Olivier; Fontés, Michel

    2007-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth [CMT] syndrome is the most common hereditary peripheral neuropathy. CMT1A, which accounts for 50% of all CMT cases, usually results from triploidy of the PMP22 gene. Preclinical trials using an animal model show that disabled mice force-fed with high doses of ascorbic acid partially recover muscular strength after a few months of treatment, and suggest that high doses of ascorbic acid repress PMP22 expression. In this study, we demonstrated that ascorbic acid represses PMP22 gene expression by acting on intracellular cAMP levels and adenylate cyclase activity. This action is dose dependent and specific to ascorbic acid, since repression is not observed after treatment with other antioxidants. The new properties of ascorbic acid are discussed, along with the implications of these findings for CMT disease treatment.

  2. Level of CYP4G19 Expression Is Associated with Pyrethroid Resistance in Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang-Zhou; Geng, Yi-Jie; Huang, Da-Na; Xue, Cai-Fang; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2010-01-01

    German cockroaches have become a large problem in the Shenzhen area because of their pesticide resistance, especially to pyrethroid. A pyrethroid called "Jia Chong Qing" to prevent pests for a long time were found to be resistant to "Jia Chong Qing" with resistance index of 3.88 measured using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that both CYP4G19 mRNA and CYP4G19 protein expression levels in the wild strain were substantially higher than that of a sensitive strain. dsRNA segments derived from the target gene CYP4G19 were prepared using in vitro transcription and were microinjected into abdomens of the wild strain. Two to eight days after injection, the result showed that CYP4G19 mRNA expressions were significantly reduced in the groups injected with dsRNAs.

  3. Production of Cloned Miniature Pigs Expressing High Levels of Human Apolipoprotein(a) in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Masayuki; Himaki, Takehiro; Ookutsu, Shoji; Mizobe, Yamato; Ogawa, Junki; Miyoshi, Kazuchika; Yabuki, Akira; Fan, Jianglin; Yoshida, Mitsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    High lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels are a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, because apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)], the unique component of Lp(a), is found only in primates and humans, the study of human Lp(a) has been hampered due to the lack of appropriate animal models. Using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) techniques, we produced transgenic miniature pigs expressing human apo(a) in the plasma. First, we placed the hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged cDNA of human apo(a) under the control of the β-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer, and then introduced this construct into kidney epithelial cells. Immunostaining of cells with anti-HA antibody allowed identification of cells stably expressing apo(a); one of the positive clones was used to provide donor cells for SCNT, yielding blastocysts that expressed apo(a). Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections and RT-PCR analysis of total RNA from organs of cloned piglet revealed that apo(a) is expressed in various tissues/organs including heart, liver, kidney, and intestine. More importantly, a transgenic line exhibited a high level (>400 mg/dL) of Lp(a) in plasma, and the transgenic apo(a) gene was transmitted to the offspring. Thus, we generated a human apo(a)–transgenic miniature pig that can be used as a model system to study advanced atherosclerosis related to human disease. The anatomical and physiological similarities between the swine and human cardiovascular systems will make this pig model a valuable source of information on the role of apo(a) in the formation of atherosclerosis, as well as the mechanisms underlying vascular health and disease. PMID:26147378

  4. Differential hormonal and gene expression dynamics in two inbred sunflower lines with contrasting dormancy level.

    PubMed

    Roselló, Paula L; Vigliocco, Ana E; Andrade, Andrea M; Riera, Natalí V; Calafat, Mario; Molas, María L; Alemano, Sergio G

    2016-05-01

    Seed germination and dormancy are tightly regulated by hormone metabolism and signaling pathway. We investigated the endogenous content of abscisic acid (ABA), its catabolites, and gibberellins (GAs), as well as the expression level of certain ABA and GAs metabolic and signaling genes in embryo of dry and imbibed cypselas of inbred sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae) lines: B123 (dormant) and B91 (non-dormant). Under our experimental conditions, the expression of RGL2 gene might be related to the ABA peak in B123 line at 3 h of imbibition. Indeed, RGL2 transcripts are absent in dry and early embedded cypselas of the non-dormant line B91. ABA increase was accompanied by a significant ABA-Glucosyl ester (ABA-GE) and phaseic acid (PA) (two ABA catabolites) decrease in B123 line (3 h) which indicates that ABA metabolism seems to be more active in this line, and that it would be involved in the imposition and maintenance of sunflower seed dormancy, as it has been reported for many species. Finally, an increase of bioactive GAs (GA1 and GA3) occurs at 12 h of imbibition in both lines after a decrease in ABA content. This study shows the first report about the RGL2 tissue-specific gene expression in sunflower inbred lines with contrasting dormancy level. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that ABA and GAs content and differential expression of metabolism and signaling genes would be interacting in seed dormancy regulation through a mechanism of action related to embryo itself.

  5. The levels of RAC3 expression are up regulated by TNF in the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Cecilia Viviana; Rubio, María Fernanda; Fernández Larrosa, Pablo Nicolas; Panelo, Laura Carolina; Azurmendi, Pablo Javier; Ruiz Grecco, Marina; Martínez-Nöel, Giselle Astrid; Costas, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    RAC3 is a coactivator of glucocorticoid receptor and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) that is usually over-expressed in tumors and which also has important functions in the immune system. We investigated the role of the inflammatory response in the control of RAC3 expression levels in vivo and in vitro. We found that inflammation regulates RAC3 levels. In mice, sub-lethal doses of lipopolysaccharide induce the increase of RAC3 in spleen and the administration of the synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid dexamethasone has a similar effect. However, the simultaneous treatment with both stimuli is mutually antagonistic. In vitro stimulation of the HEK293 cell line with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), one of the cytokines induced by lipopolysaccharide, also increases the levels of RAC3 mRNA and protein, which correlates with an enhanced transcription dependent on the RAC3 gene promoter. We found that binding of the transcription factor NF-κB to the RAC3 gene promoter could be responsible for these effects. Our results suggest that increase of RAC3 during the inflammatory response could be a molecular mechanism involved in the control of sensitivity to both pro- and anti-inflammatory stimuli in order to maintain the normal healthy course of the immune response.

  6. Expression level tuning for optimal heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Parekh, R N; Wittrup, K D

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between expression level and secretion of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) was determined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a tunable amplifiable delta integration vector. Optimal secretory productivity of 15 mg of BPTI/g cell dry weight yields 180 mg/L secreted active BPTI in test-tube cultures, an order of magnitude increase over 2 mu plasmid-directed secretion. Maximum productivity is determined by the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Unfolded protein accumulates in the ER as synthesis increases, until a physiological instability is reached and secretion decreases precipitously despite high BPTI mRNA levels. Optimal specific productivity of a standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae is double that reported for secretion of BPTI by Pichia pastoris, indicating that efficient utilization of S. cerevisiae's available secretory capacity can eliminate apparent differences among yeast species in their capacity for heterologous protein secretion. Although not generally recognized, the existence of an optimum synthesis level for secretion is apparently a general feature of eucaryotic expression systems and could be of substantial significance for maximization of protein secretion in mammalian and insect cell culture.

  7. The Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Expression Levels and Folding of Organophosphorus Hydrolase Enzyme in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Khajeh, Khosro; Farnoosh, Gholamreza; Hassanpour, Kazem; Khodi, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) is a type of organophosphate-degrading enzyme which is widely used in the bioremediation process. Objectives: In this study, the periplasmic and cytoplasmic productions and the activity of recombinant OPH in Escherichia coli were investigated and compared using two pET systems (pET21a and pET26b). Materials and Methods: The sequence encoding the opd gene was synthesized and expressed in the form of inclusion body using pET21a-opd and in the periplasmic space in pET26b-opd. Results: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed a band of about 37 kDa with a maximum expression level at 30°C from pET21a-opd.However, the obtained results of the periplasmic space extraction of OPH (pET26b-opd) showed a very weak band, while the cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd) produced a strong protein band. Conclusions: The activities studied by the production of PNP were determined by following the increase at 410 nm. The maximum PNP was produced at 30°C with an optical density of 10.62 in the presence of cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd). Consequently, our results suggest cytoplasmic expression system as an appropriate candidate with a high amount of OPH in spite of inclusion body formation, which needs an additional refolding step. PMID:26870308

  8. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN ARSENIC-TREATED MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS EXPRESSING DIFFERENT LEVELS OF HSP70

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression profiles in arsenic-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing different levels of HSP70

    Gail Nelson, Susan Hester, Ernest Winkfield, Jill Barnes, James Allen
    Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Rese...

  9. Strategies for achieving high-level expression of genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Makrides, S C

    1996-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of several biological processes promises to broaden the usefulness of Escherichia coli as a tool for gene expression. There is an expanding choice of tightly regulated prokaryotic promoters suitable for achieving high-level gene expression. New host strains facilitate the formation of disulfide bonds in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm and offer higher protein yields by minimizing proteolytic degradation. Insights into the process of protein translocation across the bacterial membranes may eventually make it possible to achieve robust secretion of specific proteins into the culture medium. Studies involving molecular chaperones have shown that in specific cases, chaperones can be very effective for improved protein folding, solubility, and membrane transport. Negative results derived from such studies are also instructive in formulating different strategies. The remarkable increase in the availability of fusion partners offers a wide range of tools for improved protein folding, solubility, protection from proteases, yield, and secretion into the culture medium, as well as for detection and purification of recombinant proteins. Codon usage is known to present a potential impediment to high-level gene expression in E. coli. Although we still do not understand all the rules governing this phenomenon, it is apparent that "rare" codons, depending on their frequency and context, can have an adverse effect on protein levels. Usually, this problem can be alleviated by modification of the relevant codons or by coexpression of the cognate tRNA genes. Finally, the elucidation of specific determinants of protein degradation, a plethora of protease-deficient host strains, and methods to stabilize proteins afford new strategies to minimize proteolytic susceptibility of recombinant proteins in E. coli. PMID:8840785

  10. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat‐shock promoter (PCYC1–HSE), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  11. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat-shock promoter (PCYC1-HSE ), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C-terminus of a temperature-sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E; McHale, Cliona M; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R; Smith, Martyn T

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings.

  13. Characterization of Changes in Gene Expression and Biochemical Pathways at Low Levels of Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24786086

  14. Gene expression profiles in testis of pigs with extreme high and low levels of androstenone

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Maren; Meuwissen, Theo; Lien, Sigbjørn; Bendixen, Christian; Wang, Xuefei; Conley, Lene Nagstrup; Berget, Ingunn; Tajet, Håvard; Grindflek, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Background: Boar taint is a major obstacle when using uncastrated male pigs for swine production. One of the main compounds causing this taint is androstenone, a pheromone produced in porcine testis. Here we use microarrays to study the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in testis of high and low androstenone boars. The study allows identification of genes and pathways associated with elevated androstenone levels, which is essential for recognising potential molecular markers for breeding purposes. Results: Testicular tissue was collected from 60 boars, 30 with extreme high and 30 with extreme low levels of androstenone, from each of the two breeds Duroc and Norwegian Landrace. The samples were hybridised to porcine arrays containing 26,877 cDNA clones, detecting 563 and 160 genes that were differentially expressed (p < 0.01) in Duroc and Norwegian Landrace, respectively. Of these significantly up- and down-regulated clones, 72 were found to be common for the two breeds, suggesting the possibility of both general and breed specific mechanisms in regulation of, or response to androstenone levels in boars. Ten genes were chosen for verification of expression patterns by quantitative real competitive PCR and real-time PCR. As expected, our results point towards steroid hormone metabolism and biosynthesis as important biological processes for the androstenone levels, but other potential pathways were identified as well. Among these were oxidoreductase activity, ferric iron binding, iron ion binding and electron transport activities. Genes belonging to the cytochrome P450 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase families were highly up-regulated, in addition to several genes encoding different families of conjugation enzymes. Furthermore, a number of genes encoding transcription factors were found both up- and down-regulated. The high number of clones belonging to ferric iron and iron ion binding suggests an importance of these genes, and the association between

  15. Regulation of Ubx expression by epigenetic enhancer silencing in response to Ubx levels and genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Crickmore, Michael A; Ranade, Vikram; Mann, Richard S

    2009-09-01

    For gene products that must be present in cells at defined concentrations, expression levels must be tightly controlled to ensure robustness against environmental, genetic, and developmental noise. By studying the regulation of the concentration-sensitive Drosophila melanogaster Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx), we found that Ubx enhancer activities respond to both increases in Ubx levels and genetic background. Large, transient increases in Ubx levels are capable of silencing all enhancer input into Ubx transcription, resulting in the complete silencing of this gene. Small increases in Ubx levels, brought about by duplications of the Ubx locus, cause sporadic silencing of subsets of Ubx enhancers. Ubx enhancer silencing can also be induced by outcrossing laboratory stocks to D. melanogaster strains established from wild flies from around the world. These results suggest that enhancer activities are not rigidly determined, but instead are sensitive to genetic background. Together, these findings suggest that enhancer silencing may be used to maintain gene product levels within the correct range in response to natural genetic variation.

  16. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Milly N.; Rodermel, Steven R.; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls. PMID:23785377

  17. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, C. S.; Giloteaux, L.; Montgomery, A. P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-03-05

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment.

  18. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene.

    PubMed

    Kanobe, Milly N; Rodermel, Steven R; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls.

  19. Stable, high-level expression of a type I antifreeze protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R G; Appels, R

    1999-06-01

    The type I antifreeze proteins are simple amphipathic helical proteins found in abundance in polar fish species, where they act to prevent freezing of internal fluids by a mechanism of noncolligative freezing point depression. Large-scale production of these proteins for research and biotechnological purposes has been hampered by their apparent instability when expressed in heterologous host systems. This has necessitated their production as fusion proteins, in polymeric form, or as proproteins for secretion, with the concomitant necessity for postpurification processing to generate the mature form of the protein. We have successfully expressed a recombinant variant of type I antifreeze protein (rAFP) in Escherichia coli using the inducible T7 polymerase transcription expression system. The rAFP contains five copies of the 11 amino acid ice-binding repeat motif found in all type I antifreeze proteins. The protein accumulates to high levels intracellularly in the form of inclusion bodies, with no apparent degradation by the cellular proteolytic machinery. We have devised a simple and rapid purification protocol for this recombinant type I antifreeze protein which does not require cellular fractionation, purification of the inclusion bodies, or chromatographic steps. This protocol may be of general use for this class of protein. The protein displays all three activities common to these proteins: recrystallization inhibition, noncolligative freezing point depression, and modification of the morphology of single ice crystals in solution.

  20. Gallium nitrate regulates rat osteoblast expression of osteocalcin protein and mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Salvatori, R; Bockman, R S

    1993-01-01

    Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, has been found to be clinically effective for the treatment of accelerated bone resorption in cancer-related hypercalcemia and Paget's disease. Here we report the effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein levels on the rat osteoblast-like cell line ROS 17/2.8. Gallium nitrate reduced both constitutive and vitamin D3-stimulated osteocalcin protein levels in culture medium by one-half and osteocalcin mRNA levels to one-third to one-tenth of control. Gallium nitrate also inhibited vitamin D3 stimulation of osteocalcin and osteopontin mRNA levels but did not affect constitutive osteopontin mRNA levels. Among several different metals examined, gallium was unique in its ability to reduce osteocalcin mRNA levels without decreasing levels of other mRNAs synthesized by ROS 17/2.8 cells. The effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein synthesis mimic those seen when ROS 17/2.8 cells are exposed to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1); however, TGF-beta 1 was not detected in gallium nitrate-treated ROS 17/2.8 cell media. Use of the RNA polymerase II inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole demonstrated that gallium nitrate did not alter the stability of osteocalcin mRNA. Transient transfection assays using the rat osteocalcin promoter linked to the bacterial reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase indicated that gallium nitrate blocked reporter gene expression stimulated by the osteocalcin promoter. This is the first reported effect of gallium nitrate on isolated osteoblast cells.

  1. The Role of Neuropeptide Y mRNA Expression Level in Distinguishing Different Types of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yingying; Jiang, Haitang; Yin, Yingying; Zhang, Yuqun; Liang, Jinfeng; Li, Shenghua; Wang, Jun; Lu, Jianxin; Geng, Deqin; Wu, Aiqin; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that the protein of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abnormal in depression patients, but the changes of NPY in different types of depression are unclear. This study was aimed to examine protein and mRNA expression levels of NPY in 159 cases with four groups including post-stroke depression (PSD) group, stroke without depression (Non-PSD) group, major depressive disorder (MDD) group and normal control (NC) group. The protein and gene expression analysis were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based methods. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square tests and nonparametric test were used to evaluate general characteristics, clinical and biological materials. In order to explore the role of NPY in different types of depression, the partial correlations, binary logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated for PSD and MDD groups. There are significant differences of NPY protein (Fdf(3) = 5.167, P = 0.002) and mRNA expression levels (χKruskal2-Wallis, df(3) = 20.541, P < 0.001) among four groups. Bonferroni multiple comparisons found that the NPY protein was significantly decreased in PSD (FBonferroni = −7.133, P = 0.002) and Non-PSD group (FBonferroni = −5.612, P = 0.018) compared with NC group. However, contrasted with MDD group, the mRNA expression was increased in PSD and Non-PSD group by nonparametric test (all P < 0.05). In binary logistic analyses, NPY mRNA expression was independent predictors of PSD (odds ratio: 1.452, 95% CI, 1.081–1.951, P = 0.013). The ROC curve showed NPY mRNA had a general prognostic accuracy (area under the curve: 0.766, 95% CI, 0.656–0.876, P < 0.001). This is the first study to explore the distinguishing function of NPY in different types of depression. It will provide help in the identification of different subtypes of depression. PMID:28082897

  2. The Role of Neuropeptide Y mRNA Expression Level in Distinguishing Different Types of Depression.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yingying; Jiang, Haitang; Yin, Yingying; Zhang, Yuqun; Liang, Jinfeng; Li, Shenghua; Wang, Jun; Lu, Jianxin; Geng, Deqin; Wu, Aiqin; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that the protein of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abnormal in depression patients, but the changes of NPY in different types of depression are unclear. This study was aimed to examine protein and mRNA expression levels of NPY in 159 cases with four groups including post-stroke depression (PSD) group, stroke without depression (Non-PSD) group, major depressive disorder (MDD) group and normal control (NC) group. The protein and gene expression analysis were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based methods. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square tests and nonparametric test were used to evaluate general characteristics, clinical and biological materials. In order to explore the role of NPY in different types of depression, the partial correlations, binary logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated for PSD and MDD groups. There are significant differences of NPY protein (Fdf(3) = 5.167, P = 0.002) and mRNA expression levels ([Formula: see text] = 20.541, P < 0.001) among four groups. Bonferroni multiple comparisons found that the NPY protein was significantly decreased in PSD (FBonferroni = -7.133, P = 0.002) and Non-PSD group (FBonferroni = -5.612, P = 0.018) compared with NC group. However, contrasted with MDD group, the mRNA expression was increased in PSD and Non-PSD group by nonparametric test (all P < 0.05). In binary logistic analyses, NPY mRNA expression was independent predictors of PSD (odds ratio: 1.452, 95% CI, 1.081-1.951, P = 0.013). The ROC curve showed NPY mRNA had a general prognostic accuracy (area under the curve: 0.766, 95% CI, 0.656-0.876, P < 0.001). This is the first study to explore the distinguishing function of NPY in different types of depression. It will provide help in the identification of different subtypes of depression.

  3. High levels of homocysteine downregulate apolipoprotein E expression via nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Trusca, Violeta G; Mihai, Adina D; Fuior, Elena V; Fenyo, Ioana M; Gafencu, Anca V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of high homocysteine (Hcy) levels on apolipoprotein E (apoE) expression and the signaling pathways involved in this gene regulation. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess apoE expression in cells treated with various concentrations (50-500 μmol/L) of Hcy. Calcium phosphate-transient transfections were performed in HEK-293 and RAW 264.7 cells to evaluate the effect of Hcy on apoE regulatory elements [promoter and distal multienhancer 2 (ME2)]. To this aim, plasmids containing the proximal apoE promoter [(-500/+73)apoE construct] alone or in the presence of ME2 [ME2/(-500/+73)apoE construct] to drive the expression of the reporter luciferase gene were used. Co-transfection experiments were carried out to investigate the downstream effectors of Hcy-mediated regulation of apoE promoter by using specific inhibitors or a dominant negative form of IKβ. In other co-transfections, the luciferase reporter was under the control of synthetic promoters containing multiple specific binding sites for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was accomplished to detect the binding of NF-κB p65 subunit to the apoE promoter in HEK-293 treated with 500 μmol/L Hcy. As control, cells were incubated with similar concentration of cysteine. NF-κB p65 proteins bound to DNA were immunoprecipitated with anti-p65 antibodies and DNA was identified by PCR using primers amplifying the region -100/+4 of the apoE gene. RESULTS: RT-PCR revealed that high levels of Hcy (250-750 μmol/L) induced a 2-3 fold decrease in apoE mRNA levels in HEK-293 cells, while apoE gene expression was not significantly affected by treatment with lower concentrations of Hcy (100 μmol/L). Immunoblotting data provided additional evidence for the negative role of Hcy in apoE expression. Hcy decreased apoE promoter

  4. Direct effect of acaricides on pathogen loads and gene expression levels in honey bees Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Boncristiani, Humberto; Underwood, Robyn; Schwarz, Ryan; Evans, Jay D; Pettis, Jeffery; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis

    2012-05-01

    The effect of using acaricides to control varroa mites has long been a concern to the beekeeping industry due to unintended negative impacts on honey bee health. Irregular ontogenesis, suppression of immune defenses, and impairment of normal behavior have been linked to pesticide use. External stressors, including parasites and the pathogens they vector, can confound studies on the effects of pesticides on the metabolism of honey bees. This is the case of Varroa destructor, a mite that negatively affects honey bee health on many levels, from direct parasitism, which diminishes honey bee productivity, to vectoring and/or activating other pathogens, including many viruses. Here we present a gene expression profile comprising genes acting on diverse metabolic levels (detoxification, immunity, and development) in a honey bee population that lacks the influence of varroa mites. We present data for hives treated with five different acaricides; Apiguard (thymol), Apistan (tau-fluvalinate), Checkmite (coumaphos), Miteaway (formic acid) and ApiVar (amitraz). The results indicate that thymol, coumaphos and formic acid are able to alter some metabolic responses. These include detoxification gene expression pathways, components of the immune system responsible for cellular response and the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and developmental genes. These could potentially interfere with the health of individual honey bees and entire colonies.

  5. Utilizing the Carba NP test as an indicator of expression level of carbapenemase genes in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takaya; Matsui, Mari; Suzuki, Masato; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Kuroda, Makoto; Shibayama, Keigo; Suzuki, Satowa

    2017-02-01

    The Carba NP test was developed to detect carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and uses imipenem as the reaction substrate. In Japan, IMP-6 metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) producers, which are usually resistant to meropenem but susceptible to imipenem, and IMP-1 MBL producers, which are usually resistant to both carbapenems are prevalent. We performed the Carba NP test with IMP-6 and IMP-1 MBL producers, and both types were detected by the Carba NP test with high sensitivity. All IMP-1 MBL producers were detected by the Carba NP test, but the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of imipenem varied from 0.25 to >32μg/mL, and the time to positivity varied from 0 to 30min. Time to positivity was significantly correlated with expression levels of blaIMP-1, but not with MICs of imipenem. These results suggested that the Carba NP test can be used as a screening assay for carbapenemase gene expression levels among producers of the same type of carbapenemase. Using this approach, it is possible to determine whether the carbapenem resistance of each carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolate is primarily due to carbapenemase production, or to another mechanism such as outer membrane impermeability.

  6. Expression of DMP-1 in the human pulp tissue using low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Teixeira Marques, Nádia Carolina; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Oliveira Rodini, Camila; Cruvinel Silva, Thiago; Moreira Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade; Marchini Oliveira, Thais

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on DMP-1 expression in pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. Twenty mandibular primary molars were randomly assigned into the following groups: Group I—Buckley’s Formocresol (FC); Group II—Calcium Hydroxide (CH); Group III—LLLT + CH and Group IV—LLLT + Zinc oxide/Eugenol. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Descriptive analysis was performed on the dentin pulp complex. Histopathological assessment showed internal resorption in group FC. Groups CH and LLLT + CH provided better pulpal repair due to the absence of inflammation and the formation of hard tissue barrier. These two groups presented odontoblastic layer expressing DMP-1. According to this study, low level laser therapy preceding the use of calcium hydroxide exhibited satisfactory bio-inductive activity on pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. However, other histological and cellular studies are needed to confirm the laser tissue action and efficacy.

  7. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene expression level has prognostic value in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hoebeeck, Jasmien; Vandesompele, Jo; Nilsson, Helén; De Preter, Katleen; Van Roy, Nadine; De Smet, Els; Yigit, Nurten; De Paepe, Anne; Laureys, Geneviève; Påhlman, Sven; Speleman, Frank

    2006-08-01

    Deletions of the short arm of chromosome 3 are often observed in a specific subset of aggressive neuroblastomas (NBs) with loss of distal 11q and without MYCN amplification. The critical deleted region encompasses the locus of the von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL, 3p25). Constitutional loss of function mutations in the VHL gene are responsible for the VHL syndrome, a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome predisposing to a variety of neoplasms, including pheochromocytoma. Pheochromocytomas are, like NB, derived from neural crest cells, but, unlike NB, consist of more mature chromaffin cells instead of immature neuroblasts. Further arguments for a putative role of VHL in NB are its function as oxygen sensitizer and the reported relation between hypoxia and dedifferentiation of NB cells, leading to a more aggressive phenotype. To test the possible involvement of VHL in NB, we did mRNA expression analysis and sought evidence for VHL gene inactivation. Although no evidence for a classic tumor suppressor role for VHL in NB could be obtained, a strong correlation was observed between reduced levels of VHL mRNA and low patient survival probability (p=0.013). Furthermore, VHL appears to have predictive power in NTRK1 (TRKA) positive tumor samples with presumed favorable prognosis, which makes it a potentially valuable marker for more accurate risk assessment in this subgroup of patients. The significance of the reduced VHL expression levels in relation to NB tumor biology remains unexplained, as functional analysis demonstrated no clear effect of the reduction in VHL mRNA expression on protein stability of its downstream target hypoxia-inducible factor alpha.

  8. Reduced ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-1 expression levels in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, Marta; Castaño, Esther; Dalfó, Esther; Maes, Tamara; Buesa, Carlos; Ferrer, Isidro

    2006-05-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal alpha-synuclein and ubiquitin in protein aggregates conforming Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-1 (UCHL-1) disassembles polyubiquitin chains to increase the availability of free monomeric ubiquitin to the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) thus favoring protein degradation. Since mutations in the UCHL-1 gene, reducing UPS activity by 50%, have been reported in autosomal dominant PD, and UCHL-1 inhibition results in the formation of alpha-synuclein aggregates in mesencephalic cultured neurons, the present study was initiated to test UCHL-1 mRNA and protein levels in post-mortem frontal cortex (area 8) of PD and DLB cases, compared with age-matched controls. TaqMan PCR assays, and Western blots demonstrated down-regulation of UCHL-1 mRNA and UCHL-1 protein in the cerebral cortex in DLB (either in pure forms, not associated with Alzheimer disease: AD, and in common forms, with accompanying AD changes), but not in PD, when compared with age-matched controls. Interestingly, UCHL-1 mRNA and protein expressions were reduced in the medulla oblongata in the same PD cases. Moreover, UCHL-1 protein was decreased in the substantia nigra in cases with Lewy body pathology. UCHL-1 down-regulation was not associated with reduced protein levels of several proteasomal subunits, including 20SX, 20SY, 19S and 11Salpha. Yet UCHL-3 expression was reduced in the cerebral cortex of PD and DLB patients. Together, these observations show reduced UCHL-1 expression as a contributory factor in the abnormal protein aggregation in DLB, and points UCHL-1 as a putative therapeutic target in the treatment of DLB.

  9. In situ detection of specific gene expression during and immediately after transcription at electron microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Sohei; Kitazawa, Riko

    2006-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a widely applied technique used for visualizing specific nucleic acid sequences at chromosomal, cytologic, and histologic levels. It sometimes fails, however, to demonstrate precise cell identity, early stages of gene expression and variants of alternative splicing because of its limited resolution. To overcome this shortcoming, we have developed an improved ISH technique at the electron microscopic (EM) level by conducting en bloc hybridization before embedding (pre-embedding) and immuno-EM detection after ultra-thin sectioning (post-embedding). We applied this technique to demonstrate both the dynamic expression of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA immediately after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, and the static expression of osteonectin mRNA in a differentiating osteoblastic cell linage. Tissue samples were diced into 1mm cubes, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and then successively hybridized en bloc with the digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled single-stranded probe measuring 200-300 bp with the aid of microwave treatment. After washing, for EM observation, the cubes were embedded in epon for ultra-thin sectioning, and a gold-colloid-labeled anti-DIG antibody was used for post-embedding immuno-EM; some of the cubes was directly incubated with anti-DIG antibody and developed en bloc for stereoscopic and light microscopic observation. IL-6 mRNA during and immediately after transcription was demonstrated in the nuclei of the alveolar macrophages and in neutrophils of mouse lung tissue as early as 15 min after LPS treatment, which was of better sensitivity than that by Northern blot or nuclear run-on techniques. Moreover, in mouse calvaria tissue, osteonectin mRNA both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm was observed in a differentiating osteoblastic cell linage in a differentiation-specific manner. This technique is useful in identifying specific cell types during and immediately after transcribing specific mRNA based on ultrastructural morphology.

  10. Endogenous galectin-3 expression levels modulate immune responses in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna D; Gude, Rajiv P; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2015-12-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding mammalian lectin, is involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, there is an unmet need to identify the underlying mechanisms of cancer metastasis mediated by endogenous host galectin-3. Galectin-3 is also known to be an important regulator of immune responses. The present study was aimed at analysing how expression of endogenous galectin-3 regulates host immunity and lung metastasis in B16F10 murine melanoma model. Transgenic Gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and Gal-3(-/-) (null) mice exhibited decreased levels of Natural Killer (NK) cells and lower NK mediated cytotoxicity against YAC-1 tumor targets, compared to Gal-3(+/+) (wild-type) mice. On stimulation, Gal-3(+/-) and Gal-3(-/-) mice splenocytes showed increased T cell proliferation than Gal-3(+/+) mice. Intracellular calcium flux was found to be lower in activated T cells of Gal-3(-/-) mice as compared to T cells from Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, serum Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine levels were found to be lowest, exhibiting dysregulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance. Marked decrease in serum IFN-γ levels and splenic IFN-γR1 (IFN-γ Receptor 1) expressing T and NK cell percentages were observed in Gal-3(-/-) mice. On recombinant IFN-γ treatment of splenocytes in vitro, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 protein expression was higher in Gal-3(-/-) mice compared to that in Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice; suggesting possible attenuation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) 1 mediated IFN-γ signaling in Gal-3(-/-) mice. The ability of B16F10 melanoma cells to form metastatic colonies in the lungs of Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(-/-) mice remained comparable, whereas it was found to be reduced in Gal-3(+/-) mice. Our data indicates that complete absence of endogenous host galectin-3 facilitates lung metastasis of B16F10 cells in mice, which may be contributed by dysregulated immune

  11. Development of ileal cytokine and immunoglobulin expression levels in response to early feeding in broilers and layers.

    PubMed

    Simon, K; de Vries Reilingh, G; Kemp, B; Lammers, A

    2014-12-01

    Provision of feed in the immediate posthatch period may influence interaction between intestinal microbiota and immune system, and consequently immunological development of the chick. This study addressed ileal immune development in response to early feeding in 2 chicken breeds selected for different production traits: broilers and layers. Chicks of both breeds either received feed and water immediately posthatch or were subjected to a 72-h feed and water delay. Ileal cytokine and immunoglobulin mRNA expression levels were determined at different time points. Effects of early feeding were limited, but breeds differed strikingly regarding cytokine and immunoglobulin expression levels. Cytokine expression levels in broilers were low compared with layers and showed a transient drop in the second to third week of life. In contrast, broilers showed considerably higher expression levels of IgA, IgM, and IgY. These findings indicate that the 2 breeds use different immune strategies, at least on the ileal level.

  12. Neuroblastoma patient outcomes, tumor differentiation, and ERK activation are correlated with expression levels of the ubiquitin ligase UBE4B

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, Sarah E.; Guo, Rong Jun; Liu, Yin; Major, Angela M.; Hollingsworth, Emporia Faith; Indiviglio, Sandra; Whittle, Sarah B.; Mo, Qianxing; Bean, Andrew J.; Ittmann, Michael; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background UBE4B is an E3/E4 ubiquitin ligase whose gene is located in chromosome 1p36.22. We analyzed the associations of UBE4B gene and protein expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes and with tumor prognostic features and histology. Methods We evaluated the association of UBE4B gene expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes using the R2 Platform. We screened neuroblastoma tumor samples for UBE4B protein expression using immunohistochemistry. FISH for UBE4B and 1p36 deletion was performed on tumor samples. We then evaluated UBE4B expression for associations with prognostic factors and with levels of phosphorylated ERK in neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. Results Low UBE4B gene expression is associated with poor outcomes in patients with neuroblastoma and with worse outcomes in all patient subgroups. UBE4B protein expression was associated with neuroblastoma tumor differentiation, and decreased UBE4B protein levels were associated with high-risk features. UBE4B protein levels were also associated with levels of phosphorylated ERK. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between UBE4B gene expression and neuroblastoma patient outcomes and prognostic features. Reduced UBE4B protein expression in neuroblastoma tumors was associated with high-risk features, a lack of differentiation, and with ERK activation. These results suggest UBE4B may contribute to the poor prognosis of neuroblastoma tumors with 1p36 deletions and that UBE4B expression may mediate neuroblastoma differentiation. PMID:27014418

  13. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-04-21

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise.

  14. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Expression of SLE, but Not Flare Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Squance, Marline L.; Reeves, Glenn E. M.; Tran, Huy A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores links between vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D = 50 nmol/L) and serological autoimmunity (ANA > 1 : 80) and frequency of self-reported flares (SRF) in participants with clinical autoimmunity (SLE). 25(OH)D levels of 121 females were quantified and compared. The cohort consisted of 80 ACR defined SLE patients and 41 age and sex matched controls. Association analysis of log2 (25(OH)D) levels and ANA 80 positivity was undertaken via two-sample t-tests and regression models. Significant differences were found for 25(OH)D levels (mean: control 74 nmol/L (29.5 ng/ml); SLE 58 nmol/L (23.1 ng/ml), P = 0.04), 25(OH)D deficiency (P = 0.02). Regression models indicate that, for a twofold rise in 25(OH)D level, the odds ratio (OR) for ANA-positivity drops to 36% of the baseline OR. No link was found between SRF-days and 25(OH)D levels. Our results support links between vitamin D deficiency and expression of serological autoimmunity and clinical autoimmunity (SLE). However, no demonstrable association between 25(OH)D and SRF was confirmed, suggesting independent influences of other flare-inducing factors. Results indicate that SLE patients have high risk of 25(OH)D deficiency and therefore supplementation with regular monitoring should be considered as part of patient management. PMID:25506363

  15. Association of MAPT haplotypes with Alzheimer’s disease risk and MAPT brain gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction MAPT encodes for tau, the predominant component of neurofibrillary tangles that are neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Genetic association of MAPT variants with late-onset AD (LOAD) risk has been inconsistent, although insufficient power and incomplete assessment of MAPT haplotypes may account for this. Methods We examined the association of MAPT haplotypes with LOAD risk in more than 20,000 subjects (n-cases = 9,814, n-controls = 11,550) from Mayo Clinic (n-cases = 2,052, n-controls = 3,406) and the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC, n-cases = 7,762, n-controls = 8,144). We also assessed associations with brain MAPT gene expression levels measured in the cerebellum (n = 197) and temporal cortex (n = 202) of LOAD subjects. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which tag MAPT haplotypes with frequencies greater than 1% were evaluated. Results H2-haplotype tagging rs8070723-G allele associated with reduced risk of LOAD (odds ratio, OR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.85-0.95, p = 5.2E-05) with consistent results in the Mayo (OR = 0.81, p = 7.0E-04) and ADGC (OR = 0.89, p = 1.26E-04) cohorts. rs3785883-A allele was also nominally significantly associated with LOAD risk (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01-1.13, p = 0.034). Haplotype analysis revealed significant global association with LOAD risk in the combined cohort (p = 0.033), with significant association of the H2 haplotype with reduced risk of LOAD as expected (p = 1.53E-04) and suggestive association with additional haplotypes. MAPT SNPs and haplotypes also associated with brain MAPT levels in the cerebellum and temporal cortex of AD subjects with the strongest associations observed for the H2 haplotype and reduced brain MAPT levels (β = -0.16 to -0.20, p = 1.0E-03 to 3.0E-03). Conclusions These results confirm the previously reported MAPT H2 associations with LOAD risk in two large series, that this haplotype has the strongest

  16. Differential expression levels of aroma-related genes during ripening of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    PubMed

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Troncoso, Sebastián; Gudenschwager, Orianne; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Moya-León, María A; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2009-05-01

    Fruit aroma is a complex trait, particularly in terms of the number of different biosynthetic pathways involved, the complexity of the final metabolites, and their regulation. In order to understand the underlying biochemical processes involved in apricot aroma, four cDNAs (Pa-aat, EU784138; Pa-adhEU395433; Pa-pdcEU395434; and Pa-loxEU439430) encoding an alcohol acyl transferase (AAT), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and lipoxygenase (LOX), respectively, were isolated and characterized at four stages of maturity in Prunus armeniaca L. cv. Modesto. We observed a reduction in aldehyde and alcohol production between early-harvested fruit and late-harvest fruit, concomitant with an increase in ester production. qPCR analyses showed that the expression levels of the adh gene and the lox gene stayed constant at all stages. Interestingly, aat levels showed a sharp increase in the late-harvest stages concurrent with the changes observed in ester levels. The significance of these changes in relation to aroma production in apricot is discussed.

  17. RNA-Binding Protein AUF1 Promotes Myogenesis by Regulating MEF2C Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Amaresh C.; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Curtis, Jessica; Mercken, Evi M.; Chenette, Devon M.; Zhang, Yongqing; Schneider, Robert J.; Becker, Kevin G.; de Cabo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian RNA-binding protein AUF1 (AU-binding factor 1, also known as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D [hnRNP D]) binds to numerous mRNAs and influences their posttranscriptional fate. Given that many AUF1 target mRNAs encode muscle-specific factors, we investigated the function of AUF1 in skeletal muscle differentiation. In mouse C2C12 myocytes, where AUF1 levels rise at the onset of myogenesis and remain elevated throughout myocyte differentiation into myotubes, RNP immunoprecipitation (RIP) analysis indicated that AUF1 binds prominently to Mef2c (myocyte enhancer factor 2c) mRNA, which encodes the key myogenic transcription factor MEF2C. By performing mRNA half-life measurements and polysome distribution analysis, we found that AUF1 associated with the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of Mef2c mRNA and promoted MEF2C translation without affecting Mef2c mRNA stability. In addition, AUF1 promoted Mef2c gene transcription via a lesser-known role of AUF1 in transcriptional regulation. Importantly, lowering AUF1 delayed myogenesis, while ectopically restoring MEF2C expression levels partially rescued the impairment of myogenesis seen after reducing AUF1 levels. We propose that MEF2C is a key effector of the myogenesis program promoted by AUF1. PMID:24891619

  18. Criteria for acceptable levels of the Shinkansen Super Express train noise and vibration in residential areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Kobayashi, F.; Kanada, S.; Tanahashi, M.; Muramatsu, T.; Yamada, S.

    1982-10-01

    A survey of 1187 housewives living in 18 areas along the Shinkansen Super Express (bullet train) railway was conducted by means of a self-administered health questionnaire (modified Cornell Medical Index). In addition, geographically corresponding measurements of noise level and vibration intensity were taken. The relationship of noise and vibration to positive responses (health complaints) related to bodily symptoms, illness and emotional disturbances was analyzed. The factors which correlated with an increase in the average number of positive responses included noise, vibration, age and health status. Such factors as marital status, educational level, part time work, duration of inhabitancy and occupation of the head of the houshold correlated poorly with the number of positive responses. Unhealthy respondents compared to healthy respondents are more frequently affected by noise and vibration. The rate of positive responses in the visual, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive and nervous systems, sleep disturbances and emotional disturbances increased accordingly as noise and vibration increased. Combined effects of noise and vibration stimuli on the total number of positive responses (an indicator of general health) were found. This study has produced results indicating that the maximum permissible noise level should not exceed 70 dB(A) in the residential areas along the Shinkansen railway.

  19. BCL6 mRNA Expression Level in Invasive Duct Carcinoma not otherwise Specified

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Eman; Masoud, Eman; Eldien, Marwa Serag

    2016-01-01

    Introduction B-Cell Lymphoma 6 (BCL6) has an oncogenic role in tumourigenesis of various malignancies. It represses genes involved in terminal differentiation and plays complementary role with Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) in triple-negative breast cancer cellular function. Aim To evaluate the expression of BCL6 in cancer breast and determine its correlation with the clinico-pathological features including the molecular subtype of breast carcinoma. Materials and Methods This prospective case control study was carried out on 150 patients, divided into 100 cases of invasive duct carcinoma not otherwise specified and 50 benign breast lesions including fibroadenoma and fibrocystic disease. Fresh tissues were excised, which were then subjected to RNA extraction. The BCL6 mRNA level was assessed using real-time reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results There was a significant higher levels of BCL6 mRNA in malignant cases compared to benign ones (p<0.001). The level of BCL6 mRNA was higher in cases showing advanced tumor stage (p<0.04), triple negative subtype and associated in situ component (p<0.001) compared to cases with an early stage, luminal or Her 2-neu positive subtypes and those lacking in situ component. Conclusion BCL6 is up-regulated in breast cancer and is associated with poor prognostic features such as advanced stage and triple negative molecular subtype. BCL6 inhibitors might be considered as targeted therapy for breast cancer. PMID:28208987

  20. Chronic stress alters the expression levels of longevity-related genes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Ana C; Muñoz, Mario F; Herrera, Antonio J; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Stowell, Rianne; Ayala, Antonio; Machado, Alberto; Venero, José L; de Pablos, Rocío M

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of psychological stress on cellular stress during aging and neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of chronic psychological stress, and the consequent increase of circulating glucocorticoids, on several hippocampal genes involved in longevity. Sirtuin-1, p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein, and heat shock protein 70 were studied at the mRNA and protein levels in stressed and non-stressed animals. Stress treatment for 10 days decreased sirtuin-1 and heat shock protein 70 levels, but increased levels of p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. Examination of protein expression following two months of stress treatment indicated that sirtuin-1 remained depressed. In contrast, an increase was observed for thioredoxin-interacting protein, heat shock protein 70, p53 and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. The effect of stress was reversed by mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These data suggest that chronic stress could contribute to aging in the hippocampus.

  1. Expression levels of TWIST1 are associated with the clinicopathological stage of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    JIA, CUNDONG; LIANG, LIPING; YANG, LILI; ZHAO, FENG; BAI, JINGPING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression level of TWIST1 in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (BNHL) and its association with the clinicopathological characteristics of BNHL. Expression levels of TWIST1 were analyzed in patients with BNHL (n=45) and lymphadenosis (n=21) using immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of TWIST1 in the peripheral blood were detected by fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The positive rate of TWIST1 expression in the BNHL tissue was 82.2%, which was significantly higher compared with the lymphadenosis tissue (5%; P<0.05). In addition, the protein expression level of TWIST1 in the BNHL tissue was higher compared with the lymphadenosis tissue. TWIST1 expression was also higher in stage III/IV BNHL tissues than in stage I/II tissues (P<0.05). The tissues were staged following the Ann Arbor system. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of TWIST1 in the peripheral blood of the BNHL tissue (3.03±0.03) was higher compared with the lymphadenosis tissue, and the mRNA expression level of TWIST1 was higher in stage III/IV (4.41±0.12) tissues than in stage I/II BNHL (2.03±0.08) tissues. In conclusion, TWIST1 expression was higher in the tissue and peripheral blood of patients with BNHL when compared with those with lymphadenosis. Thus, TWIST1 expression was associated with the clinicopathological stage of BNHL. PMID:25289047

  2. HLA-G expression levels influence the tolerogenic activity of human DC-10

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Giada; Comi, Michela; Tomasoni, Daniela; Gianolini, Monica Emma; Rizzo, Roberta; LeMaoult, Joël; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Gregori, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical HLA class I molecule with known immune-modulatory functions. Our group identified a subset of human dendritic cells, named DC-10, that induce adaptive interleukin-10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells via the interleukin-10-dependent HLA-G/ILT4 pathway. In this study we aimed at defining the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated Tr1 cell differentiation. We analyzed phenotype, functions, and genetic variations in the 3′ untranslated region of the HLA-G locus of in vitro-differentiated DC-10 from 67 healthy donors. We showed that HLA-G expression on DC-10 is donor-dependent. Functional studies demonstrated that DC-10, independently of HLA-G expression, secrete interleukin-10 and negligible levels of interleukin-12. Interestingly, DC-10 with high HLA-G promote allo-specific anergic T cells that contain a significantly higher frequency of Tr1 cells, defined as interleukin-10-producing (P=0.0121) or CD49b+LAG-3+ (P=0.0031) T cells, compared to DC-10 with low HLA-G. We found that the HLA-G expression on DC-10 is genetically imprinted, being associated with specific variations in the 3′ untranslated region of the gene, and it may be finely tuned by microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. These data highlight the important role of HLA-G in boosting DC-10 tolerogenic activity and confirm that interleukin-10 production by DC-10 is necessary but not sufficient to promote Tr1 cells at high frequency. These new insights into the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated induction of Tr1 cells provide additional information for clinical use in Tr1- or DC-10-based cell therapy approaches. PMID:25661445

  3. Expression of catalytically active recombinant Helicobacter pylori urease at wild-type levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L T; Mobley, H L

    1993-01-01

    The genes encoding Helicobacter pylori urease, a nickel metalloenzyme, have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Enzymatic activity, however, has been very weak compared with that in clinical isolates of H. pylori. Conditions under which near wild-type urease activity was achieved were developed. E. coli. SE5000 containing recombinant H. pylori urease genes was grown in minimal medium containing no amino acids, NiCl2 was added to 0.75 microM, and structural genes ureA and ureB (pHP902) were overexpressed in trans to the complete urease gene cluster (pHP808). Under these conditions, E. coli SE5000 pHP808/pHP902) expressed a urease activity up to 87 mumol of urea per min per mg of protein (87 U/mg of protein), a level approaching that of wild-type H. pylori UMAB41 (100 U/mg of protein), from which the genes were cloned. Poor catalytic activity of recombinant clones grown in Luria broth or M9 medium containing 0.5% Casamino Acids was due to chelation of nickel ions by medium components, particularly histidine and cysteine. In cultures containing these amino acids, 63Ni2+ was prevented from being transported into cells and was not incorporated into urease protein. As a consequence, M9 minimal medium cultures containing histidine or cysteine produced only 0.05 and 0.9%, respectively, of active urease produced by control cultures containing no amino acids. We conclude that recombinant H. pylori urease is optimally expressed when Ni2+ transport is not inhibited and when sufficient synthesis of urease subunits UreA and UreB is provided. Images PMID:8500893

  4. Stress levels of glucocorticoids inhibit LHβ-subunit gene expression in gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kellie M; Thackray, Varykina G; Hsu, Tracy; Mak-McCully, Rachel A; Coss, Djurdjica; Mellon, Pamela L

    2012-10-01

    Increased glucocorticoid secretion is a common response to stress and has been implicated as a mediator of reproductive suppression upon the pituitary gland. We utilized complementary in vitro and in vivo approaches in the mouse to investigate the role of glucocorticoids as a stress-induced intermediate capable of gonadotrope suppression. Repeated daily restraint stress lengthened the ovulatory cycle of female mice and acutely reduced GnRH-induced LH secretion and synthesis of LH β-subunit (LHβ) mRNA, coincident with increased circulating glucocorticoids. Administration of a stress level of glucocorticoid, in the absence of stress, blunted LH secretion in ovariectomized female mice, demonstrating direct impairment of reproductive function by glucocorticoids. Supporting a pituitary action, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is expressed in mouse gonadotropes and treatment with glucocorticoids reduces GnRH-induced LHβ expression in immortalized mouse gonadotrope cells. Analyses revealed that glucocorticoid repression localizes to a region of the LHβ proximal promoter, which contains early growth response factor 1 (Egr1) and steroidogenic factor 1 sites critical for GnRH induction. GR is recruited to this promoter region in the presence of GnRH, but not by dexamethasone alone, confirming the necessity of the GnRH response for GR repression. In lieu of GnRH, Egr1 induction is sufficient for glucocorticoid repression of LHβ expression, which occurs via GR acting in a DNA- and dimerization-independent manner. Collectively, these results expose the gonadotrope as an important neuroendocrine site impaired during stress, by revealing a molecular mechanism involving Egr1 as a critical integrator of complex formation on the LHβ promoter during GnRH induction and GR repression.

  5. HLA-G expression levels influence the tolerogenic activity of human DC-10.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Giada; Comi, Michela; Tomasoni, Daniela; Gianolini, Monica Emma; Rizzo, Roberta; LeMaoult, Joël; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Gregori, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical HLA class I molecule with known immune-modulatory functions. Our group identified a subset of human dendritic cells, named DC-10, that induce adaptive interleukin-10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells via the interleukin-10-dependent HLA-G/ILT4 pathway. In this study we aimed at defining the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated Tr1 cell differentiation. We analyzed phenotype, functions, and genetic variations in the 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G locus of in vitro-differentiated DC-10 from 67 healthy donors. We showed that HLA-G expression on DC-10 is donor-dependent. Functional studies demonstrated that DC-10, independently of HLA-G expression, secrete interleukin-10 and negligible levels of interleukin-12. Interestingly, DC-10 with high HLA-G promote allo-specific anergic T cells that contain a significantly higher frequency of Tr1 cells, defined as interleukin-10-producing (P=0.0121) or CD49b(+)LAG-3(+) (P=0.0031) T cells, compared to DC-10 with low HLA-G. We found that the HLA-G expression on DC-10 is genetically imprinted, being associated with specific variations in the 3' untranslated region of the gene, and it may be finely tuned by microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. These data highlight the important role of HLA-G in boosting DC-10 tolerogenic activity and confirm that interleukin-10 production by DC-10 is necessary but not sufficient to promote Tr1 cells at high frequency. These new insights into the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated induction of Tr1 cells provide additional information for clinical use in Tr1- or DC-10-based cell therapy approaches.

  6. Codon Optimization Significantly Improves the Expression Level of a Keratinase Gene in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hong; Gao, Jie; He, Jun; Yu, Bing; Zheng, Ping; Huang, Zhiqing; Mao, Xiangbing; Yu, Jie; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Daiwen

    2013-01-01

    The main keratinase (kerA) gene from the Bacillus licheniformis S90 was optimized by two codon optimization strategies and expressed in Pichia pastoris in order to improve the enzyme production compared to the preparations with the native kerA gene. The results showed that the corresponding mutations (synonymous codons) according to the codon bias in Pichia pastoris were successfully introduced into keratinase gene. The highest keratinase activity produced by P. pastoris pPICZαA-kerAwt, pPICZαA-kerAopti1 and pPICZαA-kerAopti2 was 195 U/ml, 324 U/ml and 293 U/ml respectively. In addition, there was no significant difference in biomass concentration, target gene copy numbers and relative mRNA expression levels of every positive strain. The molecular weight of keratinase secreted by recombinant P. pastori was approx. 39 kDa. It was optimally active at pH 7.5 and 50°C. The recombinant keratinase could efficiently degrade both α-keratin (keratin azure) and β-keratin (chicken feather meal). These properties make the P. pastoris pPICZαA-kerAopti1 a suitable candidate for industrial production of keratinases. PMID:23472192

  7. Molecular Characterization of the NLRC4 Expression in Relation to Interleukin-18 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Tanja; Haase, Tina; Müller, Christian; Riess, Helene; Lau, Denise; Zeller, Simon; Krause, Jasmin; Baumert, Jens; Pless, Ole; Dupuis, Josée; Wild, Philipp S.; Eleftheriadis, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Zeilinger, Sonja; Ziegler, Andreas; Peters, Annette; Tiret, Laurence; Proust, Carole; Marzi, Carola; Munzel, Thomas; Strauch, Konstantin; Prokisch, Holger; Lackner, Karl J.; Herder, Christian; Thorand, Barbara; Benjamin, Emilia J.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Koenig, Wolfgang; Schnabel, Renate B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic cytokine centrally involved in the cytokine cascade with complex immunomodulatory functions in innate and acquired immunity. Circulating IL-18 concentrations are associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular events and diverse inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Methods and Results To identify causal variants affecting circulating IL-18 concentrations, we applied various omics and molecular biology approaches. By GWAS, we confirmed association of IL-18 levels with a SNP in the untranslated exon 2 of the inflammasome component NLRC4 (NLR family, CARD domain containing 4) gene on chromosome 2 (rs385076, P=2.4×10−45). Subsequent molecular analyses by gene expression analysis and reporter gene assays indicated an effect of rs385076 on NLRC4 expression and differential isoform usage by modulating binding of the transcription factor PU.1. Conclusions Our study provides evidence for the functional causality of SNP rs385076 within the NLRC4 gene in relation to IL-18 activation. PMID:26362438

  8. High-level expression of canine parvovirus VP2 using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Woo, S D; Lee, H K; Hong, H K; Je, Y H; Park, J H; Song, J Y; An, S H; Kang, S K

    2000-01-01

    For the potential use as recombinant vaccine, canine parvovirus (CPV) major capsid protein VP2 was expressed using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) vector. CPV VP2 gene was introduced into polyhedrin-based BmNPV transfer vector pBmKSK3, and recombinant virus BmK1-Parvo was prepared. When anti-CPV.VP2 monoclonal antibody was employed in immunofluorescence staining, an intense signal was observed within BmK1-Parvo-infected Bm5 cells but not within uninfected cells or cells infected with a wild-type BmNPV-K1. In hemagglutination assay, the expression level of VP2 were 3.2 x 10(3) HA units/ml from infected Bm5 cells, 2.1x 10(5) HA units/larvae from infected larval fat body, and 1.6x 10(6) HA units/ml from infected larval hemolymph. These results suggested that BmNPV vector system using B. mori larva as host could be applied to efficient mass-production of recombinant vaccines.

  9. A cloud-based workflow to quantify transcript-expression levels in public cancer compendia

    PubMed Central

    Tatlow, PJ; Piccolo, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Public compendia of sequencing data are now measured in petabytes. Accordingly, it is infeasible for researchers to transfer these data to local computers. Recently, the National Cancer Institute began exploring opportunities to work with molecular data in cloud-computing environments. With this approach, it becomes possible for scientists to take their tools to the data and thereby avoid large data transfers. It also becomes feasible to scale computing resources to the needs of a given analysis. We quantified transcript-expression levels for 12,307 RNA-Sequencing samples from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and The Cancer Genome Atlas. We used two cloud-based configurations and examined the performance and cost profiles of each configuration. Using preemptible virtual machines, we processed the samples for as little as $0.09 (USD) per sample. As the samples were processed, we collected performance metrics, which helped us track the duration of each processing step and quantified computational resources used at different stages of sample processing. Although the computational demands of reference alignment and expression quantification have decreased considerably, there remains a critical need for researchers to optimize preprocessing steps. We have stored the software, scripts, and processed data in a publicly accessible repository (https://osf.io/gqrz9). PMID:27982081

  10. The myostatin gene of Mytilus chilensis evidences a high level of polymorphism and ubiquitous transcript expression.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2014-02-15

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a protein of the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and plays a crucial role in muscular development for higher vertebrates. However, its biological function in marine invertebrates remains undiscovered. This study characterizes the full-length sequence of the Mytilus chilensis myostatin gene (Mc-MSTN). Furthermore, tissue transcription patterns and putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were also identified. The Mc-MSTN cDNA sequence showed 3528 base pairs (bp), consisting of 161 bp of 5' UTR, 2,110 bp of 3' UTR, and an open reading frame of 1,257 bp encoding for 418 amino acids and with an RXXR proteolytic site and nine cysteine-conserved residues. Gene transcription analysis revealed that the Mc-MSTN has ubiquitous expression among several tissues, with higher expression in the gonads and mantle than in the digestive gland, gills, and hemolymph. Furthermore, high levels of polymorphisms were detected (28 SNPs in 3'-UTR and 9 SNPs in the coding region). Two SNPs were non-synonymous and involved amino acid changes between Glu/Asp and Thr/Ile. Until now, the MSTN gene has been mainly related to muscle growth in marine bivalves. However, the present study suggests a putative biological function not entirely associated to muscle tissue and contributes molecular evidence to the current debate about the function of the MSTN gene in marine invertebrates.

  11. High-level expression in Corynebacterium glutamicum of nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous for acrylamide production.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi-Suk; Han, Sang-Soo; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Bu-Youn; Huh, Jong-Pil; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-01

    The nhhBAG gene of Rhodococcus rhodochrous M33 that encodes nitrile hydratase (NHase), converting acrylonitrile into acrylamide, was cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum under the control of an ilvC promoter. The specific enzyme activity in recombinant C. glutamicum cells was about 13.6 μmol/min/mg dry cell weight (DCW). To overexpress the NHase, five types of plasmid variants were constructed by introducing mutations into 80 nucleotides near the translational initiation region (TIR) of nhhB. Of them, pNBM4 with seven mutations showed the highest NHase activity, exhibiting higher expression levels of NhhB and NhhA than wild-type pNBW33, mainly owing to decreased secondary-structure stability and an introduction of a conserved Shine-Dalgarno sequence in the translational initiation region. In a fed-batch culture of recombinant Corynebacterium cells harboring pNBM4, the cell density reached 53.4 g DCW/L within 18 h, and the specific and total enzyme activities were estimated to be 37.3 μmol/min/mg DCW and 1,992 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The use of recombinant Corynebacterium cells for the production of acrylamide from acrylonitrile resulted in a conversion yield of 93 % and a final acrylamide concentration of 42.5 % within 6 h when the total amount of fed acrylonitrile was 456 g.

  12. High level expression of an acid-stable phytase from Citrobacter freundii in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xiong, Aisheng; Fu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Feng; Tian, Yongsheng; Peng, Rihe

    2010-12-01

    To obtain a high level expression of phytase with favorable characteristics, a codon-optimized phytase gene from Citrobacter freundii was synthesized and transferred into Pichia pastoris. Small-scale expression experiments and activity assays were used to screen positive colonies. After purified by Ni²+-NTA agarose affinity column, the characterizations of the recombinant phytase were determined. The recombinant phytase (r-phyC) had two distinct pH optima at 2.5 and 4.5 and an optimal temperature at 50 °C. It retained more than 80% activity after being incubated under various buffer (pH 1.5-8.0) at 37 °C for 1 h. The specific activity, Km, and Vmax values of r-phyC for sodium phytate were 2,072 ± 18 U mg⁻¹, 0.52 ± 0.04 mM, and 2,380 ± 84 U mg⁻¹ min⁻¹, respectively. The enzyme activity was significantly improved by 1 mM of K+, Ca²+, and Mg²+. These characteristics contribute to its potential application in feed industry.

  13. [Significant regression of glioblastoma with low level of Mgmt gene expression following radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Matsko, M V; Luchin, E I; Ievleva, A G; Bakholdin, D V; Abysheva, S N; Zavgorodniaia, E V; Potapova, O N; Imianitov, E N; Ulitin, A Iu; Matsko, D E

    2011-01-01

    Radiochemotherapy is leading the universal research effort in fighting lethality: it is improving relapse-free survival of patients with inoperable glioblastoma, the most pernicious brain tumor in adults. Its effectiveness was found to depend on expression of Mgmt gene of tumor DNA reparation following radiochemotherapy and adequate medication based on the molecular phenotype of tumor. Our study involved a 40-year old male with a low level of Mgmt gene expression as established by stereotactic biopsy. The patient received hypofractionated three-dimensional conformational proton therapy with the benefit of temozolomide (140 mg/24 hr). Subsequently, the dose was raised to 360 mg/24 hr, on days 1-5 of the cycle. Contrast-enhanced MRI examination established significant diminishing of the size of tumors on completion of cycles 7 and 8; patients felt better, memory and blood indices improved. As of the time this paper was written, relapse-free survival was 17.5 months, as compared with the literature data on inoperable glioblastoma--5.5 months.

  14. Low-level laser therapy promotes dendrite growth via upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; He, Zhiyong; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal survival and dendrite growth, BDNF upregulation may contribute to rescue dendrite atrophy and cell loss in AD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to regulate neuronal function both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that LLLT rescued neurons loss and dendritic atrophy via the increase of both BDNF mRNA and protein expression. In addition, dendrite growth was improved after LLLT, characterized by upregulation of PSD95 expression, and the increase in length, branching, and spine density of dendrites in hippocampal neurons. Together, these studies suggest that upregulation of BDNF with LLLT can ameliorate Aβ-induced neurons loss and dendritic atrophy, thus identifying a novel pathway by which LLLT protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Gene expression levels in small specimens from patients detected using oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Katrin; Firth, Martin J; Freitas, Joseph R; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Kees, Ursula R

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale gene expression profiling using microarray technology is often limited by the amount of tissue or cells available. A number of RNA amplification protocols have been published to overcome this problem. However, additional amplification steps can result in both a 3' bias and poor reproducibility for low abundance transcripts. We performed microarray experiments using HG-U133A GeneChip arrays to ascertain whether less than the recommended amount of RNA can be used, thus avoiding additional amplification steps. In a titration experiment, 2-10 microg of total RNA from a single cryopreserved patient specimen was used to prepare biotinylated cRNA, and the recommended standard amount of 15 microg of each preparation was used for hybridization. Statistical analysis using box plots, correlation coefficients, MvA plots, and concordance percentages revealed almost identical levels of gene expression, independent of the amount of RNA used for target preparation. Most importantly, there was no statistically significant difference when the concordance percentages for low abundance genes were compared, demonstrating that as little as 2 microg of total RNA is sufficient to perform GeneChip analysis.

  16. Accurate Estimation of Expression Levels of Homologous Genes in RNA-seq Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paşaniuc, Bogdan; Zaitlen, Noah; Halperin, Eran

    Next generation high throughput sequencing (NGS) is poised to replace array based technologies as the experiment of choice for measuring RNA expression levels. Several groups have demonstrated the power of this new approach (RNA-seq), making significant and novel contributions and simultaneously proposing methodologies for the analysis of RNA-seq data. In a typical experiment, millions of short sequences (reads) are sampled from RNA extracts and mapped back to a reference genome. The number of reads mapping to each gene is used as proxy for its corresponding RNA concentration. A significant challenge in analyzing RNA expression of homologous genes is the large fraction of the reads that map to multiple locations in the reference genome. Currently, these reads are either dropped from the analysis, or a naïve algorithm is used to estimate their underlying distribution. In this work, we present a rigorous alternative for handling the reads generated in an RNA-seq experiment within a probabilistic model for RNA-seq data; we develop maximum likelihood based methods for estimating the model parameters. In contrast to previous methods, our model takes into account the fact that the DNA of the sequenced individual is not a perfect copy of the reference sequence. We show with both simulated and real RNA-seq data that our new method improves the accuracy and power of RNA-seq experiments.

  17. Accurate estimation of expression levels of homologous genes in RNA-seq experiments.

    PubMed

    Paşaniuc, Bogdan; Zaitlen, Noah; Halperin, Eran

    2011-03-01

    Abstract Next generation high-throughput sequencing (NGS) is poised to replace array-based technologies as the experiment of choice for measuring RNA expression levels. Several groups have demonstrated the power of this new approach (RNA-seq), making significant and novel contributions and simultaneously proposing methodologies for the analysis of RNA-seq data. In a typical experiment, millions of short sequences (reads) are sampled from RNA extracts and mapped back to a reference genome. The number of reads mapping to each gene is used as proxy for its corresponding RNA concentration. A significant challenge in analyzing RNA expression of homologous genes is the large fraction of the reads that map to multiple locations in the reference genome. Currently, these reads are either dropped from the analysis, or a naive algorithm is used to estimate their underlying distribution. In this work, we present a rigorous alternative for handling the reads generated in an RNA-seq experiment within a probabilistic model for RNA-seq data; we develop maximum likelihood-based methods for estimating the model parameters. In contrast to previous methods, our model takes into account the fact that the DNA of the sequenced individual is not a perfect copy of the reference sequence. We show with both simulated and real RNA-seq data that our new method improves the accuracy and power of RNA-seq experiments.

  18. The effects of laughter on post-prandial glucose levels and gene expression in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Murakami, Kazuo

    2009-07-31

    This report mainly summarizes the results of our study in which the physiological effects of laughter--as a positive emotional expression--were analyzed with respect to gene expression changes to demonstrate the hypothesis that the mind and genes mutually influence each other. We observed that laughter suppressed 2-h postprandial blood glucose level increase in patients with type 2 diabetes and analyzed gene expression changes. Some genes showed specific changes in their expression. In addition, we revealed that laughter decreased the levels of prorenin in blood; prorenin is involved in the onset of diabetic complications. Further, laughter normalized the expression of the prorenin receptor gene on peripheral blood leukocytes, which had been reduced in diabetic patients; this demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of laughter on the onset/deterioration of diabetic complications at the gene-expression level. In a subsequent study, we demonstrated the effects of laughter by discriminating 14 genes, related to natural killer (NK) cell activity, to exhibit continuous increases in expression as a result of laughter. Our results supported NK cell-mediated improvement in glucose tolerance at the gene-expression level. In this report, we also review other previous studies on laughter.

  19. Soft mean spherical approximation for dusty plasma liquids: Level of accuracy and analytic expressions

    SciTech Connect

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; Angelis, U. de

    2015-08-15

    The soft mean spherical approximation is employed for the study of the thermodynamics of dusty plasma liquids, the latter treated as Yukawa one-component plasmas. Within this integral theory method, the only input necessary for the calculation of the reduced excess energy stems from the solution of a single non-linear algebraic equation. Consequently, thermodynamic quantities can be routinely computed without the need to determine the pair correlation function or the structure factor. The level of accuracy of the approach is quantified after an extensive comparison with numerical simulation results. The approach is solved over a million times with input spanning the whole parameter space and reliable analytic expressions are obtained for the basic thermodynamic quantities.

  20. DNA vaccines expressing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela M; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Darrieux, Michelle; Arêas, Ana Paula M; Ho, Paulo L; Leite, Luciana C C

    2006-04-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is a promising candidate for the development of cost-effective vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine vectors expressing the N-terminal region of PspA. Animals immunized with a vector expressing secreted PspA developed higher levels of antibody than mice immunized with the vector expressing the antigen in the cytosol. However, both immunogens elicited similar levels of protection against intraperitoneal challenge. Furthermore, immunization with exactly the same fragment in the form of a recombinant protein, with aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, elicited even higher antibody levels, but this increased humoral response did not correlate with enhanced protection. These results show that DNA vaccines expressing PspA are able to elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein, even though total anti-PspA IgG response is considerably lower.

  1. Constitutive high-level SOS1 expression and absence of HKT1;1 expression in the salt-accumulating halophyte Salicornia dolichostachya.

    PubMed

    Katschnig, D; Bliek, T; Rozema, J; Schat, H

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the effects of salinity on ion accumulation and expression of candidate salt tolerance genes in the highly tolerant salt accumulating halophyte Salicornia dolichostachya and the taxonomically related glycophytic Spinacia oleracea. S. dolichostachya, in comparison with S. oleracea, constitutively expressed SOS1 at a high level, but did not detectably express HKT1;1. These findings suggest that the constitutive high level of shoot salt accumulation in S. dolichostachya is accomplished through enhancement of SOS1-mediated Na(+) xylem loading, in combination with complete suppression of HKT1;1-mediated Na(+) retrieval from the xylem. Our findings demonstrate the importance of gene expression comparisons between highly tolerant halophytes and taxonomically related glycophytes to improve the understanding of mechanisms of Na(+) movement and salt tolerance in plants.

  2. The level of HER2 expression is a predictor of antibody-HER2 trafficking behavior in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ram, Sripad; Kim, Dongyoung; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is known to play a central role in mitogenic signaling, motivating the development of targeted, HER2-specific therapies. However, despite the longstanding use of antibodies to target HER2, controversies remain concerning antibody/HER2 trafficking behavior in cancer cells. Understanding this behavior has direct relevance to the mechanism of action and effective design of such antibodies. In the current study, we analyzed the intracellular dynamics of trastuzumab, a marketed HER2-targeting antibody, in a panel of breast and prostate cancer cell lines that have a wide range of HER2 expression levels. Our results reveal distinct post-endocytic trafficking behavior of antibody-HER2 complexes in cells with different HER2 expression levels. In particular, HER2-overexpressing cells exhibit efficient HER2 recycling and limited reductions in HER2 levels upon antibody treatment, and consequently display a high level of antibody persistence on their plasma membrane. By contrast, in cells with low HER2 expression, trastuzumab treatment results in rapid antibody clearance from the plasma membrane combined with substantial decreases in HER2 levels and undetectable levels of recycling. A cell line with intermediate levels of HER2 expression exhibits both antibody recycling and clearance from the cell surface. Significantly, these analyses demonstrate that HER2 expression levels, rather than cell origin (breast or prostate), is a determinant of subcellular trafficking properties. Such studies have relevance to optimizing the design of antibodies to target HER2.

  3. Analysis of the CD161-expressing cell quantities and CD161 expression levels in peripheral blood natural killer and T cells of systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Lung; Lin, Shih-Chang

    2017-02-01

    Expressed on the cell surface of most of NK cells and some T cells, CD161 has been shown to deliver inhibitory signal in human NK cells. To determine whether the CD161-expressing cell quantities and the cell surface expression levels of CD161 in NK and T cells were altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, we analyzed the CD3, CD56 and CD161 expression patterns of peripheral blood lymphocytes by flow cytometric analysis to identify different NK and T cell subpopulations. The cell surface expression levels of CD161 were estimated by the mean florescence intensities (MFIs) of CD161. It was found that SLE patients had lower frequencies of CD161+CD56+CD3- and CD161+CD56+CD3+ cells among the lymphocyte population than normal controls, whereas the frequencies of CD161-CD56+CD3- and CD161+CD56-CD3+ cells were not statistically different between two groups. In addition, SLE patients also had decreased absolute counts of all CD161-expressing NK cells and T cells and had reduced frequencies of CD161+ cells in CD56+CD3-, CD56+CD3+ and CD56-CD3+ cell populations. Moreover, SLE patients had reduced MFIs of CD161 in CD161+CD56+CD3+ and CD161+CD56-CD3+, but not CD161+CD56+CD3-, cell populations. Our results indicated that CD161-expressing cell frequency and the CD161 expression levels were reduced in some NK and T cell subpopulations of SLE patients, suggesting possible important role of CD161 and CD161-expressing immune cells in the SLE pathogenesis.

  4. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  5. FNDC5 expression and circulating irisin levels are modified by diet and hormonal conditions in hypothalamus, adipose tissue and muscle.

    PubMed

    Varela-Rodríguez, B M; Pena-Bello, L; Juiz-Valiña, P; Vidal-Bretal, B; Cordido, F; Sangiao-Alvarellos, S

    2016-07-19

    Irisin is processed from fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5). However, a controversy exists concerning irisin origin, regulation and function. To elucidate the relationship between serum irisin and FNDC5 mRNA expression levels, we evaluated plasma irisin levels and FNDC5 gene expression in the hypothalamus, gastrocnemius muscle and different depots of adipose tissue in models of altered metabolism. In normal rats, blood irisin levels diminished after 48-h fast and with leptin, insulin and alloxan treatments, and serum irisin concentrations increased in diabetic rats after insulin treatment and acute treatments of irisin increased blood insulin levels. No changes were observed during long-term experiments with different diets. We suggested that levels of circulating irisin are the result of the sum of the irisin produced by different depots of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. This study shows for the first time that there are differences in FNDC5 expression depending on white adipose tissue depots. Moreover, a considerable decrease in visceral and epididymal adipose tissue depots correlated with increased FNDC5 mRNA expression levels, probably in an attempt to compensate the decrease that occurs in their mass. Hypothalamic FNDC5 expression did not change for any of the tested diets but increased with leptin, insulin and metformin treatments suggesting that the regulation of central and peripheral FNDC5/irisin expression and functions are different.

  6. FNDC5 expression and circulating irisin levels are modified by diet and hormonal conditions in hypothalamus, adipose tissue and muscle

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Rodríguez, B. M.; Pena-Bello, L.; Juiz-Valiña, P.; Vidal-Bretal, B.; Cordido, F.; Sangiao-Alvarellos, S.

    2016-01-01

    Irisin is processed from fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5). However, a controversy exists concerning irisin origin, regulation and function. To elucidate the relationship between serum irisin and FNDC5 mRNA expression levels, we evaluated plasma irisin levels and FNDC5 gene expression in the hypothalamus, gastrocnemius muscle and different depots of adipose tissue in models of altered metabolism. In normal rats, blood irisin levels diminished after 48-h fast and with leptin, insulin and alloxan treatments, and serum irisin concentrations increased in diabetic rats after insulin treatment and acute treatments of irisin increased blood insulin levels. No changes were observed during long-term experiments with different diets. We suggested that levels of circulating irisin are the result of the sum of the irisin produced by different depots of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. This study shows for the first time that there are differences in FNDC5 expression depending on white adipose tissue depots. Moreover, a considerable decrease in visceral and epididymal adipose tissue depots correlated with increased FNDC5 mRNA expression levels, probably in an attempt to compensate the decrease that occurs in their mass. Hypothalamic FNDC5 expression did not change for any of the tested diets but increased with leptin, insulin and metformin treatments suggesting that the regulation of central and peripheral FNDC5/irisin expression and functions are different. PMID:27432282

  7. Mouse lymphomyeloid cells can function with significantly decreased expression levels of cytochrome C.

    PubMed

    Shilov, E S; Kislyakov, I V; Gorshkova, E A; Zvartsev, R V; Drutskaya, M S; Mufazalov, I A; Skulachev, V P; Nedospasov, S A

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome c is an indispensable electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and also an important mediator of the internal pathway triggering apoptosis. Mice with a complete deficiency of the Cycs gene encoding the somatic cytochrome c die during the embryogenesis. Using the technology of LoxP-cre-dependent tissue-specific recombination, we obtained some mouse strains with significantly reduced expression of cytochrome c in certain cell types ("conditional genetic knockdown"). This knockdown was achieved by abrogation of the normal splicing of the Cycs locus pre-mRNA due to an additional acceptor site inside the stop-cassette neo(r). Previously, we observed embryonic lethality in homozygous mice with the same knockdown of cytochrome c in all cells of the organism. In the present work we studied two novel mouse strains with conditional knockdown of the Cycs gene in T lymphocytes and macrophages. Somewhat surprisingly, the mice of these two strains under normal conditions were not phenotypically different from the wild-type mice, either on the whole organism level or on the level of activity of individual target cells. Thus, the amount of cytochrome c in lymphomyeloid cells does not affect their development and normal functioning.

  8. TWO-LAYER MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GENE EXPRESSION: INCORPORATING DNA-LEVEL INFORMATION AND SYSTEM DYNAMICS*

    PubMed Central

    DRESCH, JACQUELINE M.; THOMPSON, MARC A.; ARNOSTI, DAVID N.; CHIU, CHICHIA

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis have provided researchers with a quantitative basis for detailed modeling of gene expression using a wide variety of mathematical models. Two of the most commonly employed approaches used to model eukaryotic gene regulation are systems of differential equations, which describe time-dependent interactions of gene networks, and thermodynamic equilibrium approaches that can explore DNA-level transcriptional regulation. To combine the strengths of these approaches, we have constructed a new two-layer mathematical model that provides a dynamical description of gene regulatory systems, using detailed DNA-based information, as well as spatial and temporal transcription factor concentration data. We also developed a semi-implicit numerical algorithm for solving the model equations and demonstrate here the efficiency of this algorithm through stability and convergence analyses. To test the model, we used it together with the semi-implicit algorithm to simulate a Drosophila gene regulatory circuit that drives development in the dorsal-ventral axis of the blastoderm-stage embryo, involving three genes. For model validation, we have done both mathematical and statistical comparisons between the experimental data and the model’s simulated data. Where protein and cis-regulatory information is available, our two-layer model provides a method for recapitulating and predicting dynamic aspects of eukaryotic transcriptional systems that will greatly improve our understanding of gene regulation at a global level. PMID:25328249

  9. Relationship between Fluorescence Intensity of GFP and the Expression Level of Prestin in a Prestin-Expressing Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Koji; Nagaoka, Tomoyuki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kumagai, Izumi; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Wada, Hiroshi

    Outer hair cells (OHCs) in mammals can elongate and contract at frequencies up to 100kHz in response to changes in their membrane potential. The origin of this unique motility is the motor protein prestin, which is densely packed in the lateral membrane of the OHCs. In a previous work, we constructed a prestin-expressing cell line using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to obtain a stable supply of prestin. When we research prestin using constructed cells, it is necessary to estimate the expression level of prestin in the cells easily and non-invasively. As the prestin gene and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were introduced into constructed cells using the same vector, the expression level of prestin and fluorescence intensity of GFP are possibly correlated. Since this correlation is not clear, however, in this study, we therefore investigated whether the expression level of prestin evaluated by patch-clamp recording and the fluorescence intensity of GFP obtained from fluorescence images are correlated or not. As a result, it was demonstrated that they were correlated. The expression level of prestin can therefore be evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of GFP.

  10. Steroid hormone receptor gene expression in human breast cancer cells: inverse relationship between oestrogen and glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, R E; Lee, C S; Alexander, I E; Shine, J; Clarke, C L; Sutherland, R L

    1990-12-15

    The relative expression in human breast cancer cells of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) encoding different steroid hormone receptors is unknown. Accordingly, mRNA levels in total RNA extracted from 13 human breast cancer cell lines were measured by Northern analysis employing complementary DNA probes for the human oestrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), androgen (AR), vitamin D3 (VDR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR). The 7 ER+ lines expressed a single 6.4 kilobases (kb) ER mRNA. Interestingly, low concentrations of ER mRNA were detected in the ER- cell lines, MDA-MB-330 and BT 20. PR mRNA, predominantly a 13.5 kb species, was expressed in the 6 lines known to be ER+, PR+ by radioligand binding; however, one ER+ cell line, MDA-MB-134, failed to express PR mRNA. A 10.5 kb AR mRNA was expressed at significantly higher levels in ER+ than ER- cell lines. All cell lines expressed a single 4.6 kb mRNA for VDR and a single 7.4 kb mRNA for GR. ER and PR mRNA levels were positively correlated (p = 0.011) and each was positively correlated with androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels (p less than or equal to 0.009). ER, PR and AR mRNAs were negatively associated with GR levels (p less than or equal to 0.012), while ER and AR mRNA levels were negatively correlated with mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor. In contrast, levels of VDR mRNA were unrelated to the concentration of any other steroid receptor mRNA. Our data demonstrate the coordinate expression of ER, PR and AR genes, and an inverse relationship between sex steroid hormone receptor and GR gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

  11. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh) mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects. PMID:27652270

  12. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Verburg, Melissa; Renes, Ingrid B; Van Nispen, Danielle J P M; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jorritsma, Marieke; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C; Dekker, Jan

    2002-11-01

    The rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were localized on tissue sections and quantified at mRNA and protein levels relative to control levels. We analyzed correlations in temporal expression patterns between markers. mRNA expression of enterocyte and goblet cell markers decreased significantly during damage for a specific period. Of these, sucrase-isomaltase (-62%) and CPS (-82%) were correlated. Correlations were also found between lactase (-76%) and SGLT1 (-77%) and between I-FABP (-52%) and L-FABP (-45%). Decreases in GLUT5 (-53%), MUC2 (-43%), and TFF3 (-54%) mRNAs occurred independently of any of the other markers. In contrast, lysozyme mRNA present in Paneth cells increased (+76%). At the protein level, qualitative and quantitative changes were in agreement with mRNA expression, except for Muc2 (+115%) and TFF3 (+81%), which increased significantly during damage, following independent patterns. During regeneration, expression of each marker returned to control levels. The enhanced expression of cytoprotective molecules (Muc2, TFF3, lysozyme) during damage represents maintenance of goblet cell and Paneth cell functions, most likely to protect the epithelium. Decreased expression of enterocyte-specific markers represents decreased enterocyte function, of which fatty acid transporters were least affected.

  13. Epigallocatechin gallate induces a hepatospecific decrease in the CYP3A expression level by altering intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Ogawa, Sosuke; Hirobe, Ryuta; Kon, Risako; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Yamashita, Marin; Mizukami, Nanaho; Kaneko, Miho; Wakui, Nobuyuki; Machida, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2017-03-30

    In previous studies, we showed that a high-dose intake of green tea polyphenol (GP) induced a hepatospecific decrease in the expression and activity of the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). In this study, we examined whether this decrease in CYP3A expression is induced by epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is the main component of GP. After a diet containing 1.5% EGCG was given to mice, the hepatic CYP3A expression was measured. The level of intestinal bacteria of Clostridium spp., the concentration of lithocholic acid (LCA) in the feces, and the level of the translocation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) to the nucleus in the liver were examined. A decrease in the CYP3A expression level was observed beginning on the second day of the treatment with EGCG. The level of translocation of PXR to the nucleus was significantly lower in the EGCG group. The fecal level of LCA was clearly decreased by the EGCG treatment. The level of intestinal bacteria of Clostridium spp. was also decreased by the EGCG treatment. It is clear that the hepatospecific decrease in the CYP3A expression level observed after a high-dose intake of GP was caused by EGCG. Because EGCG, which is not absorbed from the intestine, causes a decrease in the level of LCA-producing bacteria in the colon, the level of LCA in the liver decreases, resulting in a decrease in the nuclear translocation of PXR, which in turn leads to the observed decrease in the expression level of CYP3A.

  14. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  15. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles.

  16. Protection against UVA-induced photooxidative damage in mammalian cell lines expressing increased levels of metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, E.J. Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL . Dept. of Biology); Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J. ); Roth, R.M. . Dept. of Biology)

    1990-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is an endogenous low molecular weight protein that is inducible in a variety of eukaryotic cells and has the ability to selectivity bind heavy metal ions such as zinc and the cadmium. Although the exact physiological role of MT is still not understood, there is strong evidence that MT is involved in providing cellular resistance against the damaging effects of heavy metals and in the regulation of intracellular zinc and copper. Recently, it has been demonstrated that MT can scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen intermediates in vitro, specifically hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, and because of these observations it has been suggested that MT may provide protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in vivo. Cell lines expressing increased levels of MT have demonstrated resistance to ionizing radiation, to ultraviolet radiation, and also to various DNA damaging agents including melphalan and cis-diaminedichloroplatinum. It is therefore important to gain some insight into the relationship between cellular MT content and cellular resistance to radiation and other DNA damaging agents. In this study we investigated the role of MT in providing protection against monochromatic 365-nm UVA radiation, which is known to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species that are involved in both DNA damage and cell killing. For this purpose, we used zinc acetate, a potent inducer of MT, to elevate MT levels in V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts prior to UVA exposure and determined cell survival for uninduced and induced cultures. In order to eliminate any zinc effects other than MT induction, we also isolated and characterized cadmium chloride-resistant clones of V79 cells that have increased steady-state levels of both MT mRNA and protein, and we examined their survival characteristics against 365-nm radiation in the absence of zinc acetate. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Correlation between BOLD-MRI and HIF expression level in renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Wang, Xingming; Wang, Shuai; Cheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Occupying about 2%~3% of all malignant tumors, renal carcinoma is the most common primary cancer in kidney. The oxidative level of tumor cells is of vital role for optimizing treatment plan, evaluating efficacy and predicting prognosis. This study thus investigated the R2(*) value in mouse renal carcinoma model and the correlation between tumor hypoxia and expression level of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). A total of 20 BALB/C nude mice (4~6 weeks old) were inoculated with human ACHN renal carcinoma cells to generate renal cancer model. After the tumor diameter reached 0.5 cm, all animals were examined by BOLD-MRI, both under normal inhalation (R2a(*)) and carbogen treatment (R2b(*)). The alternation of R2(*) values (ΔR2(*)=R2a(*) - R2b(*)) was calculated. Mice were then sacrificed for Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining targeting HIF-1α and HIF-2α. The positive score of HIF was then analyzed for its correlation with R2(*) value. In 18 mice finished both experiments, Pearson correlation analysis revealed significant negative correlation between R2a(*) and ΔR2(*) (r=-0.48, P<0.05) and positive relationship between ΔR2(*) and HIF-2α (r=0.38, P<0.05). HIF-1α level, however, did not correlated with tumor R(*) values. The positive correlation between ΔR2(*) and HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α, suggested potential role of combined BOLD-MRI technique and HIF-1α staining in clinical diagnosis of renal carcinoma. HIF-2α may work as biological marker for renal cancer.

  18. MicroRNA 203 expression in keratinocytes is dependent on regulation of p53 levels by E6.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Declan J; McDade, Simon S; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J

    2010-10-01

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miRNA 203 (miR-203), which has previously been shown to play an important role in epithelial cell biology by regulating p63 levels. We investigated how expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) oncoproteins E6 and E7 affected miR-203 expression during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We demonstrated that miR-203 expression is reduced in HFKs where p53 function is compromised, either by the viral oncoprotein E6 or by knockout of p53 using short hairpin RNAs (p53i). We show that the induction of miR-203 observed during calcium-induced differentiation of HFKs is significantly reduced in HFKs expressing E6 and in p53i HFKs. Induction of miR-203 in response to DNA damage is also reduced in the absence of p53. We report that proliferation of HFKs is dependent on the level of miR-203 expression and that overexpression of miR-203 can reduce overproliferation in E6/E7-expressing and p53i HFKs. In summary, these results indicate that expression of miR-203 is dependent on p53, which may explain how expression of HPV16 E6 can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation, as well as the response to DNA damage, in keratinocytes.

  19. Is There a Link Between Expression Levels of Histone Deacetylase/Acetyltransferase in Mouse Sperm and Subsequent Blastocyst Development?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayeon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Jee, Byung-Chul; Suh, Chang-Suk; Kim, Seok-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    Histone acetylation has been known to be significant in spermatogenesis. Histone acetylation is regulated by the act of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs). We investigated the link between expression levels of HDACs and HATs in mouse sperm and subsequent blastocyst formation rate. In the univariate analysis, expression levels of HDAC1 and HAT were generally not associated with the blastocyst formation rate. When divided by the mature oocyte number category, a significant positive association was observed between the expression levels of HDAC1 and the blastocyst-forming rate in the highest (> 75th) percentile group (a group with ≥34 mature oocytes). In conclusion, expression of sperm HDAC1 could be considered as a possible predictor of embryo development in mice with high ovarian response.

  20. Increased ceramide synthase 2 and 6 mRNA levels in breast cancer tissues and correlation with sphingosine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Erez-Roman, Racheli; Pienik, Reut; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Intervention in the ceramide metabolic pathway is emerging as a novel means to regulate cancer and to modify the activity of chemotherapeutic drugs. We now study mRNA expression levels of the six ceramide synthase (CerS) genes in breast cancer tissue. CerS2 and CerS6 mRNA was significantly elevated in breast cancer tissue compared to paired normal tissue, with approximately half of the individuals showing elevated CerS2 and CerS6 mRNA. A significant correlation was found between CerS2 and CerS6 expression, and between CerS4 and CerS2/CerS6 expression. Moreover, patients that expressed higher CerS2 or 4 mRNA levels tended to show no changes in sphingosine kinase 1 levels, and likewise patients that expressed no change in CerS2 or CerS4 mRNA levels tended to express higher levels of sphingosine kinase 1. Together these results suggest an important role for the CerS genes in breast cancer etiology or diagnosis.

  1. Role of serum TRAIL level and TRAIL apoptosis gene expression in multiple sclerosis and relation to brain atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tawdy, Mohamed H; Abd El Nasser, Maged M; Abd El Shafy, Sanaa S; Nada, Mona A F; El Sirafy, Mohamed Nasr I; Magd, Amany Hussien Abol

    2014-09-01

    One of the presumed pathological mechanisms of multiple sclerosis (MS) is the failure of apoptosis of autoreactive T lymphocytes. This study aimed to determine the relationship of the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA gene expression ratio and serum TRAIL levels with MS and brain atrophy. This study was conducted on 53 relapsing-remitting Egyptian MS patients and 25 matched healthy volunteers. The expression of TRAIL in peripheral blood lymphocytes was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, serum levels of soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and brain MRI measured "black holes" and the bicaudate ratio as a measure of brain atrophy in all patients. The serum TRAIL level was lower in MS patients compared to controls but no difference was seen in the TRAIL mRNA gene expression ratio. No significant correlation was detected between the serum TRAIL level and the TRAIL mRNA expression ratio in either group. No statistically significant correlation was found between serum TRAIL levels or the TRAIL mRNA expression ratio with the number of black holes or the bicaudate ratio on MRI. Apoptosis of T lymphocytes is decreased in MS patients, which could be useful when designing treatments. There was no difference in the TRAIL mRNA gene expression ratio between MS patients and controls.

  2. Use of heat stress responsive gene expression levels for early selection of heat tolerant cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ji; Jung, Won Yong; Lee, Sang Sook; Song, Jun Ho; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Hyeran; Kim, Chulwook; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2013-06-04

    Cabbage is a relatively robust vegetable at low temperatures. However, at high temperatures, cabbage has disadvantages, such as reduced disease tolerance and lower yields. Thus, selection of heat-tolerant cabbage is an important goal in cabbage breeding. Easier or faster selection of superior varieties of cabbage, which are tolerant to heat and disease and have improved taste and quality, can be achieved with molecular and biological methods. We compared heat-responsive gene expression between a heat-tolerant cabbage line (HTCL), "HO", and a heat-sensitive cabbage line (HSCL), "JK", by Genechip assay. Expression levels of specific heat stress-related genes were increased in response to high-temperature stress, according to Genechip assays. We performed quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to compare expression levels of these heat stress-related genes in four HTCLs and four HSCLs. Transcript levels for heat shock protein BoHsp70 and transcription factor BoGRAS (SCL13) were more strongly expressed only in all HTCLs compared to all HSCLs, showing much lower level expressions at the young plant stage under heat stress (HS). Thus, we suggest that expression levels of these genes may be early selection markers for HTCLs in cabbage breeding. In addition, several genes that are involved in the secondary metabolite pathway were differentially regulated in HTCL and HSCL exposed to heat stress.

  3. Dinitrophenol modulates gene expression levels of angiogenic, cell survival and cardiomyogenic factors in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Anwar; Akhter, Muhammad Aleem; Haneef, Kanwal; Khan, Irfan; Naeem, Nadia; Habib, Rakhshinda; Kabir, Nurul; Salim, Asmat

    2015-01-25

    Various preconditioning strategies influence regeneration properties of stem cells. Preconditioned stem cells generally show better cell survival, increased differentiation, enhanced paracrine effects, and improved homing to the injury site by regulating the expression of tissue-protective cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we analyzed gene expression pattern of growth factors through RT-PCR after treatment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with a metabolic inhibitor, 2,4 dinitrophenol (DNP) and subsequent re-oxygenation for periods of 2, 6, 12 and 24h. These growth factors play important roles in cardiomyogenesis, angiogenesis and cell survival. Mixed pattern of gene expression was observed depending on the period of re-oxygenation. Of the 13 genes analyzed, ankyrin repeat domain 1 (Ankrd1) and GATA6 were downregulated after DNP treatment and subsequent re-oxygenations. Ankrd1 expression was, however, increased after 24h of re-oxygenation. Placental growth factor (Pgf), endoglin (Eng), neuropilin (Nrp1) and jagged 1 (Jag1) were up-regulated after DNP treatment. Gradual increase was observed as re-oxygenation advances and by the end of the re-oxygenation period the expression started to decrease and ultimately regained normal values. Epiregulin (Ereg) was not expressed in normal MSCs but its expression increased gradually from 2 to 24h after re-oxygenation. No change was observed in the expression level of connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf) at any time period after re-oxygenation. Kindlin3, kinase insert domain receptor (Kdr), myogenin (Myog), Tbx20 and endothelial tyrosine kinase (Tek) were not expressed either in normal cells or cells treated with DNP. It can be concluded from the present study that MSCs adjust their gene expression levels under the influence of DNP induced metabolic stress. Their levels of expression vary with varying re-oxygenation periods. Preconditioning of MSCs with DNP can be used for enhancing the potential of these cells for

  4. Expression levels of JNK associated with polymorphic lactotransferrin haplotypes in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gengqiu; Zhou, Yanhong; Yi, Wei; Yi, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family, serves a role in the innate immune response and is involved in anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activity. Alterations in the LTF gene are associated with an increased incidence of cancer. The LTF gene is polymorphic, and several common alleles may be observed in the general population. Our previous study identified a lower rate of occurrence of the 'A-G-G-T' haplotype (constructed with rs1126477, rs1126478, rs2073495 and rs9110) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients compared with controls. In the present study, in order to elucidate a possible mechanism of LTF-mediated anti-tumor activity in NPC, the protein profiles of NPC and non-tumorous nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues with/without the 'A-G-G-T' haplotype were constructed using LTQ Orbitrap technology. The results revealed that c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) was highly expressed in NPC tissues and non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues without the 'A-G-G-T' haplotype. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, microRNA (miRNA) microarray analysis was conducted to investigate the differential miRNA profiles of NPC and non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues with/without the 'A-G-G-T' haplotype. It was observed that hsa-miR-1256 and hsa-miR-659, which are potentially targeted to the JNK2 gene, were downregulated in NPC tissues without the 'A-G-G-T' haplotype. Hsa-miR-298, another miRNA potentially targeted to the JNK2 gene, was downregulated in non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues without the 'A-G-G-T' haplotype. In summary, these results suggested that the expression levels of JNK2 may be associated with polymorphic LTF haplotypes in human NPC.

  5. The Expression of Pre- and Postcopulatory Sexually Selected Traits Reflects Levels of Dietary Stress in Guppies

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Moshiur; Turchini, Giovanni M.; Gasparini, Clelia; Norambuena, Fernando; Evans, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental and ecological conditions can shape the evolution of life history traits in many animals. Among such factors, food or nutrition availability can play an important evolutionary role in moderating an animal's life history traits, particularly sexually selected traits. Here, we test whether diet quantity and/or composition in the form of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (here termed ‘n3LC’) influence the expression of pre- and postcopulatory traits in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing poeciliid fish. We assigned males haphazardly to one of two experimental diets supplemented with n3LC, and each of these diet treatments was further divided into two diet ‘quantity’ treatments. Our experimental design therefore explored the main and interacting effects of two factors (n3LC content and diet quantity) on the expression of precopulatory (sexual behaviour and sexual ornamentation, including the size, number and spectral properties of colour spots) and postcopulatory (the velocity, viability, number and length of sperm) sexually selected traits. Our study revealed that diet quantity had significant effects on most of the pre- and postcopulatory traits, while n3LC manipulation had a significant effect on sperm traits and in particular on sperm viability. Our analyses also revealed interacting effects of diet quantity and n3LC levels on courtship displays, and the area of orange and iridescent colour spots in the males’ colour patterns. We also confirmed that our dietary manipulations of n3LC resulted in the differential uptake of n3LC in body and testes tissues in the different n3LC groups. This study reveals the effects of diet quantity and n3LC on behavioural, ornamental and ejaculate traits in P. reticulata and underscores the likely role that diet plays in maintaining the high variability in these condition-dependent sexual traits. PMID:25170940

  6. Expression levels of JNK associated with polymorphic lactotransferrin haplotypes in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gengqiu; Zhou, Yanhong; Yi, Wei; Yi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family, serves a role in the innate immune response and is involved in anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activity. Alterations in the LTF gene are associated with an increased incidence of cancer. The LTF gene is polymorphic, and several common alleles may be observed in the general population. Our previous study identified a lower rate of occurrence of the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype (constructed with rs1126477, rs1126478, rs2073495 and rs9110) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients compared with controls. In the present study, in order to elucidate a possible mechanism of LTF-mediated anti-tumor activity in NPC, the protein profiles of NPC and non-tumorous nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues with/without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype were constructed using LTQ Orbitrap technology. The results revealed that c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) was highly expressed in NPC tissues and non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, microRNA (miRNA) microarray analysis was conducted to investigate the differential miRNA profiles of NPC and non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues with/without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. It was observed that hsa-miR-1256 and hsa-miR-659, which are potentially targeted to the JNK2 gene, were downregulated in NPC tissues without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. Hsa-miR-298, another miRNA potentially targeted to the JNK2 gene, was downregulated in non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. In summary, these results suggested that the expression levels of JNK2 may be associated with polymorphic LTF haplotypes in human NPC. PMID:27446399

  7. The expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexually selected traits reflects levels of dietary stress in guppies.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Turchini, Giovanni M; Gasparini, Clelia; Norambuena, Fernando; Evans, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Environmental and ecological conditions can shape the evolution of life history traits in many animals. Among such factors, food or nutrition availability can play an important evolutionary role in moderating an animal's life history traits, particularly sexually selected traits. Here, we test whether diet quantity and/or composition in the form of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (here termed 'n3LC') influence the expression of pre- and postcopulatory traits in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing poeciliid fish. We assigned males haphazardly to one of two experimental diets supplemented with n3LC, and each of these diet treatments was further divided into two diet 'quantity' treatments. Our experimental design therefore explored the main and interacting effects of two factors (n3LC content and diet quantity) on the expression of precopulatory (sexual behaviour and sexual ornamentation, including the size, number and spectral properties of colour spots) and postcopulatory (the velocity, viability, number and length of sperm) sexually selected traits. Our study revealed that diet quantity had significant effects on most of the pre- and postcopulatory traits, while n3LC manipulation had a significant effect on sperm traits and in particular on sperm viability. Our analyses also revealed interacting effects of diet quantity and n3LC levels on courtship displays, and the area of orange and iridescent colour spots in the males' colour patterns. We also confirmed that our dietary manipulations of n3LC resulted in the differential uptake of n3LC in body and testes tissues in the different n3LC groups. This study reveals the effects of diet quantity and n3LC on behavioural, ornamental and ejaculate traits in P. reticulata and underscores the likely role that diet plays in maintaining the high variability in these condition-dependent sexual traits.

  8. High Levels of Expression of P-glycoprotein/Multidrug Resistance Protein Result in Resistance to Vintafolide.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Amy D; O'Neil, Jennifer; Stoeck, Alexander; Reddy, Joseph A; Cristescu, Razvan; Haines, Brian B; Hinton, Marlene C; Dorton, Ryan; Bloomfield, Alicia; Nelson, Melissa; Vetzel, Marilynn; Lejnine, Serguei; Nebozhyn, Michael; Zhang, Theresa; Loboda, Andrey; Picard, Kristen L; Schmidt, Emmett V; Dussault, Isabelle; Leamon, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Targeting surface receptors overexpressed on cancer cells is one way to specifically treat cancer versus normal cells. Vintafolide (EC145), which consists of folate linked to a cytotoxic small molecule, desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH), takes advantage of the overexpression of folate receptor (FR) on cancer cells. Once bound to FR, vintafolide enters the cell by endocytosis, and the reducing environment of the endosome cleaves the linker, releasing DAVLBH to destabilize microtubules. Vintafolide has shown efficacy and improved tolerability compared with DAVLBH in FR-positive preclinical models. As the first FR-targeting drug to reach the clinic, vintafolide has achieved favorable responses in phase II clinical trials in FR-positive ovarian and lung cancer. However, some FR-positive patients in these clinical trials do not respond to vintafolide. We sought to identify potential biomarkers of resistance to aid in the future development of this and other FR-targeting drugs. Here, we confirm that high P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression was the strongest predictor of resistance to DAVLBH in a panel of 359 cancer cell lines. Furthermore, targeted delivery of DAVLBH via the FR, as in vintafolide, fails to overcome P-gp-mediated efflux of DAVLBH in both in vitro and in vivo preclinical models. Therefore, we suggest that patients whose tumors express high levels of P-gp be excluded from future clinical trials for vintafolide as well as other FR-targeted therapeutics bearing a P-gp substrate. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1998-2008. ©2016 AACR.

  9. High-level expression and phosphorylation of phytochrome B modulates flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hajdu, Anita; Ádám, Éva; Sheerin, David J; Dobos, Orsolya; Bernula, Péter; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Kozma-Bognár, László; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Optimal timing of flowering in higher plants is crucial for successful reproduction and is coordinated by external and internal factors, including light and the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, light-dependent stabilization of the rhythmically expressed CONSTANS (CO) is required for the activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), resulting in the initiation of flowering. Phytochrome A and cryptochrome photoreceptors stabilize CO in the evening by attenuating the activity of the CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1-SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 1 (COP1-SPA1) ubiquitin ligase complex, which promotes turnover of CO. In contrast, phytochrome B (phyB) facilitates degradation of CO in the morning and delays flowering. Accordingly, flowering is accelerated in phyB mutants. Paradoxically, plants overexpressing phyB also show early flowering, which may arise from an early phase of rhythmic CO expression. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of phyB induces FT transcription at dusk and in the night without affecting the phase or level of CO transcription. This response depends on the light-activated Pfr form of phyB that inhibits the function of the COP1-SPA1 complex by direct interactions. Our data suggest that attenuation of COP1 activity results in the accumulation of CO protein and subsequent induction of FT. We show that phosphorylation of Ser-86 inhibits this function of phyB by accelerating dark reversion and thus depletion of Pfr forms in the night. Our results explain the early flowering phenotype of phyB overexpression and reveal additional features of the molecular machinery by which photoreceptors mediate photoperiodism.

  10. Poly r(C) binding protein (PCBP) 1 expression is regulated at the post-translation level in thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Peng; Zhang, Wei-San; Tan, Jin; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Lian, Lin-Juan; Cai, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Poly r(C) binding protein (PCBP) 1 or heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) E1 is a RNA binding protein that plays a vital role in a wide variety of biological processes. PCBP1 has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating translation of pro-metastatic proteins in different cancers. Loss of PCBP1 expression or its Akt2-mediated phosphorylation at serine 43 residue has both been indicated to de-repress its regulation of EMT inducer proteins. Our previous work has established that PCBP1 functions as a tumor suppressor in thyroid cancer, where its translation is inhibited by microRNA-490-3p. Here we show that thyroid cancer patients can be divided into 2 cohorts based on miR-490-3p expression and PCBP1 mRNA expression-one cohort with high PCBP1 mRNA expression and basal miR-490-3p expression and a second cohort with low PCBP1 mRNA expression and high miR-490-3p expression. However, PCBP1 protein expression is also downregulated in the cohort with high PCBP1 mRNA expression, with expression levels similar to what is observed in patients with the low PCBP1 mRNA expression. Our analysis shows that PCBP1 mRNA is actively translated in patients with high PCBP1 mRNA expression, but that the protein is post translationally degraded by the proteasome machinery. Our results thus elucidate a novel mechanism responsible for down regulation of PCBP1 expression in thyroid cancer. It will be important in future to identify the mechanism that causes degradation of PCBP1 protein and to identify if similar mechanisms are active in other tumors characterized by low PCBP1 protein expression.

  11. Sustaining Written Expression Quality through Leveled Procedural Facilitators in Secondary Students with and without Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    Students with and without learning disabilities (LD) struggle with the written expression process, from planning and organization (e.g., prewriting) to actually writing an essay. For students with LD, challenges in written expression are more intensive than their typical peers. Without effective written expression supports and instruction, such as…

  12. Expression of FOXO6 is Associated With Oxidative Stress Level and Predicts the Prognosis in Hepatocellular Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-Yong; Chen, Yao-Min; Wu, Jian; Yang, Fu-Chun; Lv, Zhen; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the association of Forkhead box O6 (FOXO6) expression with oxidative stress level and prognosis of hepatocellular cancer (HCC). The case group included tissues of HCC from 128 patients who were hospitalized in Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery of First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University. The control group included normal liver tissues from 74 patients. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to test expressions of FOXO6, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). Dihydroethidium (DHE) was dyed to observe reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Immunohistochemistry was used to test FOXO6 expression. FOXO6 was silenced in HepG2 cells to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expressions of ROS, HO-1, GPx, SOD, CAT, p27, and cyclin D1 were also detected to further explore the possible mechanism. The expressions of FOXO6, HO-1, GPx, SOD, and CAT in HCC tissue was significantly higher than those in normal and adjacent HCC tissues (P <0.05). The tumor size, TNM stage, Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level, the presence or absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg), and differentiation degree were related to FOXO6 expression level (all P <0.05). COX analysis showed that high FOXO6 expression, male, positive HBsAg, advanced TNM staging, high expression of AFP, and low degree of differentiation were all risk factors for prognosis in HCC (P <0.05). Compared with the blank group (C group, without transfection) and the negative control (NC) group, the mRNA expressions of ROS, FOXO6, HO-1, SOD, GPx, and CAT were decreased (P <0.05). si-RNA group had significantly decreased proliferation speed during 24 to 72 hours (P <0.05), whereas si-FOXO6 group had remarkably increased G0/G1 staged cells and decreased S-staged cells (P <0.05). The si-FOXO6 group showed notably increased apoptosis rate (P <0.05) and p

  13. Clinical response to persistent, low-level beta-glucuronidase expression in the murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII.

    PubMed

    Donsante, A; Levy, B; Vogler, C; Sands, M S

    2007-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) deficiency. This disease exhibits a broad spectrum of clinical signs including skeletal dysplasia, retinal degeneration, cognitive deficits and hearing impairment. Sustained, high-level expression of GUSB significantly improves the clinical course of the disease in the murine model of MPS VII. Low levels of enzyme expression (1-5% of normal) can significantly reduce the biochemical and histopathological manifestations of MPS VII. However, it has not been clear from previous studies whether persistent, low levels of circulating GUSB lead to significant improvements in the clinical presentation of this disease. We generated a rAAV2 vector that mediates persistent, low-level GUSB expression in the liver. Liver and serum levels of GUSB were maintained at approximately 5% and approximately 2.5% of normal, respectively, while other tissue ranged from background levels to 0.9%. This level of activity significantly reduced the secondary elevations of alpha-galactosidase and the levels of glycosaminoglycans in multiple tissues. Interestingly, this level of GUSB was also sufficient to reduce lysosomal storage in neurons in the brain. Although there were small but statistically significant improvements in retinal function, auditory function, skeletal dysplasia, and reproduction in rAAV-treated MPS VII mice, the clinical deficits were still profound and there was no improvement in lifespan. These data suggest that circulating levels of GUSB greater than 2.5% will be required to achieve substantial clinical improvements in MPS VII.

  14. High Levels of BCOX1 Expression Are Associated with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinomas of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Xian-Yu; He, Xiao-Hui; Geng, Jing-Shu; Liu, Yang; Kong, De-Jia; Shi, Qing-Yu; Liu, Feng; Wei, Wei; Pang, Da

    2014-01-01

    This study was to examine the breast cancer-overexpressed gene 1 (BCOX1) expression in invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC) of the breast and its value in the prognosis of the disease. The levels of BCOX1 expression in 491 paired IDC and surrounding non-tumor breast tissues as well as 40 paired fresh specimens were evaluated by tissue microarray, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. The potential associations of high BCOX1 expression with clinicopathological variables and the overall survival of these patients were analyzed. The relative levels of BCOX1 mRNA transcripts in the IDC breast tissues were significantly higher than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues (P = 0.005). The anti-BCOX1 was predominantly stained in the cytoplasm of breast tissue cells and the levels of BCOX1 expression in the majority of breast cancer tissues were obviously higher than that in the corresponding non-tumor breast tissues. High levels of BCOX1 expression were found in 59.5% (292/491) of breast cancer tissues. The high BCOX1 expression was significantly associated with high histological grade (P = 0.037), positive expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, P = 0.031) and triple negative breast cancer (P = 0.027). The high BCOX1 expression in breast cancers was significantly associated with a shorter overall survival of these patients (P = 0.023), particularly in patients with triple negative breast cancer (P = 0.005). Therefore, the high BCOX1 expression may serve as a novel marker of poor prognosis and a potential therapeutic target for patients with IDC of the breast. PMID:24489812

  15. Correlation of AR, EGFR, and HER2 Expression Levels in Prostate Cancer: Immunohistochemical Analysis and Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Min Eui; Jung, Yoon Yang; Lee, Chung Hun; Park, Eon Sub; Kim, Mi Kyung; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Soo Whan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in prostate cancer. Evidence from several groups indicates that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) may enhance AR activity in prostate cancer cell lines. This study was designed to investigate the protein expression of AR, EGFR, and HER2 and to determine whether the EGFR and HER2 genes are amplified in prostate cancer tissues. Materials and Methods The protein expression levels of AR, EGFR, and HER2 in a tissue microarray block of 66 prostate cancer samples were investigated by immunohistochemical analysis and chromogenic in situ hybridization was used to determine whether the EGFR and HER2 genes were amplified in these tissues. Results The AR and EGFR proteins were expressed in 59.1% and 40.9% of prostate cancers, respectively, but their expression levels were not significantly associated with clinicopathologic factors. Of the cases in which tissues were negative for EGFR protein expression, 69.2% were positive for AR protein expression; however, AR protein expression was significantly reduced (44.4%) in tissues in which EGFR protein was expressed. HER2 expression was detected in only 1 case (1.5%). No amplification of the EGFR or HER2 genes was found in prostate cancer specimens. Conclusion This study was limited by small number of subjects, but it can still be inferred that the expression levels of the AR and EGFR proteins are inversely correlated in prostate cancer patients. The potential utility of EGFR and HER2 as prognostic factors or therapeutic targets warrants further study. PMID:22500161

  16. TP53 and ATM mRNA expression in skin and skeletal muscle after low-level laser exposure.

    PubMed

    Guedes de Almeida, Luciana; Silva Sergio, Luiz Philippe da; de Paoli, Flavia; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza

    2017-02-16

    Low-level lasers are widespread in regenerative medicine, but the molecular mechanisms involved in their biological effects are not fully understood, particularly those on DNA stability. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate mRNA expression of genes related to DNA genomic stability in skin and skeletal muscle tissue from Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers. For this, TP53 (Tumor Protein 53) and ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated gene) mRNA expressions were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) technique 24 hours after low-level red and infrared laser exposure. Our data showed that relative TP53 mRNA expression was not significantly altered in both tissues exposed to lasers. For ATM, relative mRNA expression in skin tissue was not significantly altered, but in muscle tissue, laser exposure increased relative ATM mRNA expression. Low-level red and infrared laser radiations alter ATM mRNA expression related to DNA stability in skeletal muscle tissue.

  17. Increase in expression level of alpha- and beta-tubulin genes in Arabidopsis seedlings under hypergravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Hoson, T.

    Hypergravity, a gravitational force of more than 1 g, suppresses elongation growth of shoots of various plants. The analysis of the changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method showed that a gene encoding alpha-tubulin, which is a component of microtubules, was up-regulated by hypergravity [Yoshioka et al. (2003) Adv. Space Res. 31: 2187-2193]. However, the detailed relation between hypergravity treatment and the changes in alpha-tubulin gene levels has not been determined yet. Microtubules are formed by the spontaneous polymerization of dimers consisting of one alpha- and one beta-tubulin protein molecule. Thus, the expression levels of beta-tubulin genes may also be affected by hypergravity. In the present study, we examined the dose-response and the time course relations of change in the expression of both alpha- and beta-tubulin genes in Arabidopsis hypocotyls grown under hypergravity conditions. Elongation growth of Arabidopsis hypocotyls was suppressed by increasing gravity. The expression levels of both alpha- and beta-tubulin genes were increased depending on the magnitude of gravity. At 300 g, expression levels of alpha- and beta-tubulin genes were about 400% and 350% of the 1 g control, respectively. The increases in expression of both tubulin genes were detected within a few hours, when the seedlings grown at 1 g were transferred to hypergravity conditions. The increase in alpha- and beta-tubulin genes preceded or occurred at the same time as growth suppression. These results suggest that Arabidopsis hypocotyls regulate the expression level of alpha- and beta-tubulin genes promptly in response to gravity stimuli. The increase in the amount of microtubules due to the activation of tubulin gene expression may be involved in the regulation by gravity signal of shoot growth.

  18. Swimming training down-regulates plasma leptin levels, but not adipose tissue ob mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Benatti, F B; Polacow, V O; Ribeiro, S M L; Gualano, B; Coelho, D F; Rogeri, P S; Costa, A S; Lancha Junior, A H

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of endurance training on leptin levels and adipose tissue gene expression and their association with insulin, body composition and energy intake. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: trained (N = 18) and sedentary controls (N = 20). The trained group underwent swimming training for 9 weeks. Leptin and insulin levels, adiposity and leptin gene expression in epididymal and inguinal adipose tissue were determined after training. There were no differences in energy intake between groups. Trained rats had a decreased final body weight (-10%), relative and total body fat (-36 and -55%, respectively) and insulin levels (-55%) compared with controls (P < 0.05). Although trained animals showed 56% lower leptin levels (2.58 +/- 1.05 vs 5.89 +/- 2.89 ng/mL in control; P < 0.05), no difference in leptin gene expression in either fat depot was demonstrable between groups. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that lower leptin levels in trained rats were due primarily to their lower body fat mass. After adjustment for total body fat, leptin levels were still 20% (P < 0.05) lower in exercised rats. In conclusion, nine weeks of swimming training did not affect leptin gene expression, but did lead to a decrease in leptin levels that was independent of changes in body fat.

  19. [Expression levels of Slc7a11 in the skin of Kazakh sheep with different coat colors].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Tao; He, Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Zhao, Song-Hua; Zhang, Wen-Xiang; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Zong-Sheng; Jia, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Slc7a11 belongs to solute transporter gene family, encoding cystine/glutamate transporter xCT. It regulates switching between eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis. In the present study, Real-time PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of Slc7a11 in the skin of Kazakh lambs with different coat colors (black, brown and white), and then the prokaryotic expression plasmid PET-32a-sxCT was constructed to induce the expression of fusion protein. The target pro-tein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatographic separation, and then was used to immunize rabbit in order to produce rabbit anti-sxCT polyclonal antibody. Finally, the expression levels of sxCT were detected in the skin of Kazakh lambs with different hair colors by Western blotting analysis. Results showed that the mRNA expression levels of Slc7a11 differed significantly in the skin of Kazakh lambs with different coat colors, with the highest level in brown coat color, followed by the black, and then the white. The sxCT protein was also detected in the skin of different coat colors by polyclonal antibody, with the highest level in brown coat color, followed by the black, and then the white. It is, therefore, concluded that slc7a11 gene might be associated with the phenotype of coat color in Kazakh sheep.

  20. Detection of sugar accumulation and expression levels of correlative key enzymes in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Yu, Jing; Cang, Jing; Liu, Lijie; Mu, Yongchao; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Da

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate accumulation is common in frost-resistant plants, and many enzymes participate in this process. The sugar content and expression levels of metabolic enzymes related to sugar biosynthesis in response to drops in temperature were measured in two cultivars of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) with different cold tolerances. The results indicate that the two cultivars examined, Dongnongdongmai 1 and Jimai 22, accumulated high levels of carbohydrate before November 4 (above 0°C), and that accumulation decreased as temperatures fell. However, this decrease was more modest in Dongnongdongmai 1, which had a higher sugar content. Sucrose and fructose were the main soluble sugars, indicating an important role in freezing tolerance. Gene expression studies revealed that expression of the genes encoding chloroplastic enzymes was significantly upregulated in the tillering nodes. Expression upregulation of TaSS and TaTPT may be helpful for sugar accumulation before November 4.

  1. Decreased expression levels of Nurr1 are associated with chronic inflammation in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Huang, Qi; Zhang, Wenfang; Wang, Yaping; Zeng, Qingling; He, Chunyan; Xue, Junli; Chen, Jin; Hu, Xuemei; Xu, Yancheng

    2015-10-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with insulin resistance, a characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Nuclear receptor‑related protein 1 (Nurr1) can regulate inflammation, dependent on the nature of individual diseases. However, whether Nurr1 regulates chronic inflammation during the pathogenic process of T2D in humans remains to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the potential association between the expression of Nurr1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and inflammation in patients with T2D. The levels of plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and interleukin (IL)‑6, the relative expression levels of Nurr1, and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)‑3β phosphorylation in PBMCs from 40 patients with T2D and 40 healthy controls (HC group) were examined, and their potential association with clinical measures were analyzed. The expression levels of Nurr1, induced by high glucose and palmitic acid, were assessed in the PBMCs from the HC group. Compared with the HC group, significantly higher levels of plasma TNFα and IL‑6 were correlated positively with the degree of insulin resistance in the T2D patients. However, significantly lower expression levels of Nurr1 and GSK‑3β phosphorylation in the PBMCs were correlated negatively with the levels of TNFα, IL‑6, fasting insulin and insulin resistance in the T2D patients. Treatment of the PBMCs with high glucose or palmitic acid inhibited the expression of Nurr1 in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Therefore, decreased expression levels of Nurr1 were associated with chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with T2D.

  2. A modest glucokinase overexpression in the liver promotes fed expression levels of glycolytic and lipogenic enzyme genes in the fasted state without altering SREBP-1c expression.

    PubMed

    Scott, D K; Collier, J J; Doan, T T T; Bunnell, A S; Daniels, M C; Eckert, D T; O'Doherty, R M

    2003-12-01

    Hepatic genes crucial for carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis are regulated by insulin and glucose metabolism. However, the relative contributions of insulin and glucose to the regulation of metabolic gene expression are poorly defined in vivo. To address this issue, adenovirus-mediated hepatic overexpression of glucokinase was used to determine the effects of increased hepatic glucose metabolism on gene expression in fasted or ad libitum fed rats. In the fasted state, a 3 fold glucokinase overexpression was sufficient to mimic feeding-induced increases in pyruvate kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA levels, demonstrating a primary role for glucose metabolism in the regulation of these genes in vivo. Conversely, glucokinase overexpression was unable to mimic feeding-induced alterations of fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase I or PEPCK mRNAs, indicating insulin as the primary regulator of these genes. Interestingly, glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA was increased by glucokinase overexpression in both the fasted and fed states, providing evidence, under these conditions, for the dominance of glucose over insulin signaling for this gene in vivo. Importantly, glucokinase overexpression did not alter sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-c mRNA levels in vivo and glucose signaling did not alter the expression of this gene in primary hepatocytes. We conclude that a modest hepatic overexpression of glucokinase is sufficient to alter expression of metabolic genes without changing the expression of SREBP-1c.

  3. Lipocalin-2 expression and serum levels as early predictors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese women.

    PubMed

    Rashad, Nearmeen M; El-Shal, Amal S; Etewa, Rasha L; Wadea, Fady M

    2017-02-01

    Obesity and diabetes are increasing in epidemic proportions globally. Lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) is an inflammatory adipocytokine and obesity-related marker of low-grade inflammation. We aimed to investigate, for first time, the possible role of LCN-2 expression and serum levels in prediction of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among obese Egyptian women. This study included 188 obese women and 180 controls. Obese women were subdivided into three subgroups according to their fasting blood glucose, normal glucose tolerance (NGT), IGT and T2DM. Circulating LCN-2 expression levels were determined by real time polymerase chain reaction. Serum LCN-2 concentrations were assessed by ELISA. Our findings revealed that LCN-2 expression and serum levels were higher in obese women compared to lean controls. They were higher in IGT and T2DM obese cases than in NGT obese women. Receiver operating characteristic analyses revealed that LCN-2 expression level was a useful biomarker discriminating IGT from NGT and T2DM from IGT obese women (AUC were 0.735 and 0.740, respectively). It was an independent predictor of IGT and T2DM among obese women. Serum LCN-2 level was a useful biomarker discriminating IGT from NGT and T2DM from IGT obese women (AUC were 0.705 and 0.728, respectively). It was independent predictor of T2DM without predicting IGT among obese women. The power of combined LCN-2 serum levels and expression in discriminating between IGT from NGT and T2DM from IGT obese women was high (AUC = 0.717 and 0.741, respectively). In conclusion, LCN-2 expression and serum levels could discriminate IGT from NGT and T2DM from IGT obese women and early predicting T2DM among obese women. While, LCN-2 expression level was the independent predictor of IGT in obese women. Combination of both LCN-2 expression and serum levels improved their diagnostic value in early detection of IGT and T2DM among obese women. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(2):88-97, 2017.

  4. Feline leukemia virus T entry is dependent on both expression levels and specific interactions between cofactor and receptor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Heather H; Anderson, Maria M; Overbaugh, Julie

    2007-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroup T uses both a multiple membrane-spanning receptor, FePit1, and a soluble cofactor, FeLIX, to enter feline cells. FeLIX is expressed from endogenous FeLV-related sequence and resembles the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the viral envelope protein. It remains unclear whether FeLV-T receptor activity requires specific residues within FePit1 and FeLIX and/or a threshold level of receptor/cofactor expression. To address this, we examined FeLV-T infection of cells expressing variable levels of FePit1 and other gammaretroviral receptors in the presence of variable amounts of soluble cofactor, either RBD or the envelope surface subunit (SU). Cofactor-receptor pairs fall into three groups with regard to mediating FeLV-T infection: those that are efficient at all concentrations tested, such as FePit1 and FeLIX; those requiring high expression of both cofactor and receptor; and those that are non-functional as receptors even at high expression. This suggests that both expression levels and specific interactions with receptor and cofactor are critical for mediating entry of FeLV-T.

  5. Successful pod infections by Moniliophthora roreri result in differential Theobroma cacao gene expression depending on the clone's level of tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shahin S; Melnick, Rachel L; Crozier, Jayne; Phillips-Mora, Wilberth; Strem, Mary D; Shao, Jonathan; Zhang, Dapeng; Sicher, Richard; Meinhardt, Lyndel; Bailey, Bryan A

    2014-09-01

    An understanding of the tolerance mechanisms of Theobroma cacao used against Moniliophthora roreri, the causal agent of frosty pod rot, is important for the generation of stable disease-tolerant clones. A comparative view was obtained of transcript populations of infected pods from two susceptible and two tolerant clones using RNA sequence (RNA-Seq) analysis. A total of 3009 transcripts showed differential expression among clones. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes indicated shifts in 152 different metabolic pathways between the tolerant and susceptible clones. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR) analyses of 36 genes verified the differential expression. Regression analysis validated a uniform progression in gene expression in association with infection levels and fungal loads in the susceptible clones. Expression patterns observed in the susceptible clones diverged in tolerant clones, with many genes showing higher expression at a low level of infection and fungal load. Principal coordinate analyses of real-time qRT-PCR data separated the gene expression patterns between susceptible and tolerant clones for pods showing malformation. Although some genes were constitutively differentially expressed between clones, most results suggested that defence responses were induced at low fungal load in the tolerant clones. Several elicitor-responsive genes were highly expressed in tolerant clones, suggesting rapid recognition of the pathogen and induction of defence genes. Expression patterns suggested that the jasmonic acid-ethylene- and/or salicylic acid-mediated defence pathways were activated in the tolerant clones, being enhanced by reduced brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis and catabolic inactivation of both BR and abscisic acids. Finally, several genes associated with hypersensitive response-like cell death were also induced in tolerant clones.

  6. [Effect of ribosome binding site sequence on the expression level of HBcAg in E. coli].

    PubMed

    Li, M; Ma, X

    1992-01-01

    The recombinant (pKL series) Plasmids showing different levels of HBcAg antigenicity in ELISA were constructed by inserting the HBcAg gene which was randomly deleted at the non-coding region by Bal-31 exonuclease into plasmid vector pKK223-3 containing tac promoter and SD sequence. SDS-PAGE and Western blot experiments indicated that molecular weight of the HBcAg protein generated by these positive clones was 21000D. Three plasmids with high, moderate and low HBcAg expression level were sequenced and the distance between SD sequence and HBcAg gene ATG codon was 12, 13 and 19bp respectively. Computer analysis of secondary structure of the ribosome binding sites on RNA transcripts also revealed energy and structure differences between the low and high level expression plasmids, suggesting the importance of this distance and the mRNA structure to gene expression.

  7. Heavy Water Reduces GFP Expression in Prokaryotic Cell-Free Assays at the Translation Level While Stimulating Its Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hohlefelder, Luisa S.; Opitz, Madeleine; Bayerl, Thomas M.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro proliferation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is remarkably hampered in the presence of heavy water (D2O). Impairment of gene expression at the transcription or translation level can be the base for this effect. However, insights into the underlying mechanisms are lacking. Here, we employ a cell-free expression system for the quantitative analysis of the effect of increasing percentages of D2O on the kinetics of in-vitro GFP expression. Experiments are designed to discriminate the rates of transcription, translation, and protein folding using pDNA and mRNA vectors, respectively. We find that D2O significantly stimulates GFP expression at the transcription level but acts as a suppressor at translation and maturation (folding) in a linear dose-dependent manner. At a D2O concentration of 60%, the GFP expression rate was reduced to 40% of an undisturbed sample. We observed a similar inhibition of GFP expression by D2O in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain, although the inhibitory effect is less pronounced. These results demonstrate the suitability of cell-free systems for quantifying the impact of heavy water on gene expression and establish a platform to further assess the potential therapeutic use of heavy water as antiproliferative agent. PMID:24455706

  8. High expression levels of COX-2 and P300 are associated with unfavorable survival in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Feng; Luo, Rong-Zhen; Li, Yong; Cui, Bo-Kang; Song, Ming; Yang, An-Kui; Chen, Wen-Kuan

    2013-03-01

    In order to provide a basis for clinical treatment decisions, we explored whether there was a correlation between the expression of COX-2 and P300 and clinical factors in a group of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). A retrospective analysis of clinicopathological data was conducted in 80 patients with LSCC who presented between January 1997 and December 1998. An immunohistochemistry tissue microarray was conducted of 80 surgically resected LSCC and 20 adjacent normal tissue specimens. Survival analysis and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the effects of clinicopathological factors on survival. The Cox model was applied for multivariate analysis. The expression level of COX-2/P300 in LSCC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were 47.5/50.0 versus 0.0/15.0 %. The expression of COX-2 and P300 was correlated with higher T category, N category, clinical staging, histological grade and recurrence (P < 0.05). P300 expression was correlated with COX-2 expression (P < 0.05). Univariate survival analysis showed that P300, COX-2, N category, clinical staging and recurrence factors were closely correlated with unfavorable survival (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that COX-2 expression, histological grade and recurrence were independent prognostic factors for LSCC. High expression levels of COX-2 and P300 indicated poor survival outcomes for patients with LSCC.

  9. [MYP gene expressions at transcription level in different stages of gonad of sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius and hybrids].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zun-Chun; Bao, Zhen-Min; Dong, Ying; Wang, Li-Mei; He, Chong-Bo; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2008-11-01

    MYP (Major yolk protein) gene expression at transcription level in different stages of gonad of sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius and hybrids (S. intermediusfemale symbolxS. nudusmale symbol) was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Based on normalization with 18S rRNA levels, the comparative quantities of MYP expression were determined. The expression of MYP gene in gonad showed little difference between female and male. MYP gene expression was decreased rapidly in the gonad of S. intermedius at different stages, and slowly in hybrids. The comparative quantities of MYP expression in the gonads of S. intermedius were decreased from 44.55% to 9.59% in female and from 41.17% to 1.83% in male at different stages. The comparative quantities of MYP expression in the gonads of the hybrids were decreased from 37.66% to 19.22% in female and from 36.66% to 12.55% in male at different stages. The results indicated that the difference of MYP expression was correlated with the variation caused by hybridization.

  10. New adipokines vaspin and omentin. Circulating levels and gene expression in adipose tissue from morbidly obese women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaspin and omentin are recently described molecules that belong to the adipokine family and seem to be related to metabolic risk factors. The objectives of this study were twofold: to evaluate vaspin and omentin circulating levels and mRNA expression in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues in non-diabetic morbidly obese women; and to assess the relationship of vaspin and omentin with anthropometric and metabolic parameters, and other adipo/cytokines. Design We analysed vaspin and omentin circulating levels in 71 women of European descent (40 morbidly obese [BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2] and 31 lean [BMI ≤ 25]). We assessed vaspin and omentin gene expression in paired samples of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue from 46 women: 40 morbidly obese and 6 lean. We determined serum vaspin and plasma omentin levels with an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and adipose tissue mRNA expression by real time RT-PCR. Results Serum vaspin levels in the morbidly obese were not significantly different from those in controls. They correlated inversely with levels of lipocalin 2 and interleukin 6. Vaspin mRNA expression was significantly higher in the morbidly obese, in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. Plasma omentin levels were significantly lower in the morbidly obese and they correlated inversely with glucidic metabolism parameters. Omentin circulating levels, then, correlated inversely with the metabolic syndrome (MS). Omentin expression in visceral adipose tissue was significantly lower in morbidly obese women than in controls. Conclusions The present study indicates that vaspin may have a compensatory role in the underlying inflammation of obesity. Decreased omentin circulating levels have a close association with MS in morbidly obese women. PMID:21526992

  11. The Expression of the Endogenous mTORC1 Inhibitor Sestrin 2 Is Induced by UVB and Balanced with the Expression Level of Sestrin 1

    PubMed Central

    Mlitz, Veronika; Gendronneau, Gaelle; Berlin, Irina; Buchberger, Maria; Eckhart, Leopold; Tschachler, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin 2 (SESN2) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) which controls central cellular processes such as protein translation and autophagy. Previous studies have suggested that SESN2 itself is subjected to regulation at multiple levels. Here, we investigated the expression of SESN2 in the skin and in isolated skin cells. SESN2 was detected by immunofluorescence analysis in fibroblasts and keratinocytes of human skin. Differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes was not associated with altered SESN2 expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of SESN2 did not impair stratum corneum formation in vitro. However, SESN2 was increased in both cell types when the expression of its paralog SESN1 was blocked by siRNA-mediated knock down, indicating a compensatory mechanism for the control of expression. Irradiation with UVB but not with UVA significantly increased SESN2 expression in both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Upregulation of SESN2 expression could be completely blocked by suppression of p53. These results suggest that SESN2 is dispensable for normal epidermal keratinization but involved in the UVB stress response of skin cells. PMID:27861561

  12. The Expression of the Endogenous mTORC1 Inhibitor Sestrin 2 Is Induced by UVB and Balanced with the Expression Level of Sestrin 1.

    PubMed

    Mlitz, Veronika; Gendronneau, Gaelle; Berlin, Irina; Buchberger, Maria; Eckhart, Leopold; Tschachler, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin 2 (SESN2) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) which controls central cellular processes such as protein translation and autophagy. Previous studies have suggested that SESN2 itself is subjected to regulation at multiple levels. Here, we investigated the expression of SESN2 in the skin and in isolated skin cells. SESN2 was detected by immunofluorescence analysis in fibroblasts and keratinocytes of human skin. Differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes was not associated with altered SESN2 expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of SESN2 did not impair stratum corneum formation in vitro. However, SESN2 was increased in both cell types when the expression of its paralog SESN1 was blocked by siRNA-mediated knock down, indicating a compensatory mechanism for the control of expression. Irradiation with UVB but not with UVA significantly increased SESN2 expression in both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Upregulation of SESN2 expression could be completely blocked by suppression of p53. These results suggest that SESN2 is dispensable for normal epidermal keratinization but involved in the UVB stress response of skin cells.

  13. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

  14. New Levels of Transcriptome Complexity at Upper Thermal Limits in Wild Drosophila Revealed by Exon Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Telonis-Scott, Marina; van Heerwaarden, Belinda; Johnson, Travis K.; Hoffmann, Ary. A.; Sgrò, Carla. M.

    2013-01-01

    While the cellular heat-shock response has been a paradigm for studying the impact of thermal stress on RNA metabolism and gene expression, the genome-wide response to thermal stress and its connection to physiological stress resistance remain largely unexplored. Here, we address this issue using an array-based exon expression analysis to interrogate the transcriptome in recently established Drosophila melanogaster stocks during severe thermal stress and recovery. We first demonstrated the efficacy of exon-level analyses to reveal a level of thermally induced transcriptome complexity extending well beyond gene-level analyses. Next, we showed that the upper range of both the cellular and physiological thermal stress response profoundly affected message expression and processing in D. melanogaster, limiting expression to a small subset of transcripts, many that share features of known rapidly responding stress genes. As predicted from cellular heat-shock research, constitutive splicing was blocked in a set of novel genes; we did not detect changes to alternative splicing during heat stress, but rather induction of intronless isoforms of known heat-responsive genes. We observed transcriptome plasticity in the form of differential isoform expression during recovery from heat shock, mediated by multiple mechanisms including alternative transcription and alternative splicing. This affected genes involved in DNA regulation, immune response, and thermotolerance. These patterns highlight the complex nature of innate transcriptome responses under stress and potential for adaptive shifts through plasticity and evolved genetic responses at different hierarchical levels. PMID:24002645

  15. Inverse Relationship of the CMKLR1 Relative Expression and Chemerin Serum Levels in Obesity with Dysmetabolic Phenotype and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Meraz, Fernanda-Isadora; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena; Ruíz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Madrigal-Ruíz, Perla-Monserrat; Castro-Albarrán, Jorge; Chavarría-Ávila, Efraín; Guzmán-Ornelas, Milton-Omar; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Petri, Marcelo-Herón; Ramírez-Cedano, Joel-Isidro; Aguilar-Aldrete, María-Elena; Ríos-Ibarra, Clara; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Background. In obesity there is a subclinical chronic low-grade inflammatory response where insulin resistance (IR) may develop. Chemerin is secreted in white adipose tissue and promotes low-grade inflammatory process, where it expressed CMKLR1 receptor. The role of chemerin and CMKLR1 in inflammatory process secondary to obesity is not defined yet. Methods. Cross-sectional study with 134 individuals classified as with and without obesity by body mass index (BMI) and IR. Body fat storage measurements and metabolic and inflammatory markers were measured by routine methods. Soluble chemerin and basal levels of insulin by ELISA and relative expression of CMKLR1 were evaluated with qPCR and 2−ΔΔCT method. Results. Differences (P < 0.05) were observed between obesity and lean individuals in body fat storage measurements and metabolic-inflammatory markers. Both CMKLR1 expression and chemerin levels were increased in obesity without IR. Soluble chemerin levels correlate with adiposity and metabolic markers (r = 8.8% to 38.5%), P < 0.05. Conclusion. The increment of CMKLR1 expression was associated with insulin production. Increased serum levels of chemerin in obesity were observed, favoring a dysmetabolic response. The results observed in this study suggest that both chemerin and CMKLR1 have opposite expression in the context of low-grade inflammatory response manifested in the development of IR. PMID:27239101

  16. Morphology, sex steroid level and gene expression analysis in gonadal sex reversal of triploid female (XXX) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Xu, Gefeng; Huang, Tianqing; Jin, Xian; Cui, Cunhe; Li, Depeng; Sun, Cong; Han, Ying; Mu, Zhenbo

    2016-02-01

    In non-mammalian vertebrates, estrogens and expressions of cyp19a1 and foxl2 play critical roles in maintaining ovary differentiation and development, while dmrt1 and sox9 are male-specific genes in testicular differentiation and are highly conserved. In order to deeply understand the morphological change, sex steroids level and molecular mechanism of triploid female gonadal reversal in rainbow trout, we studied the ovary morphology, tendency of estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T) levels and the relative expressions of dmrt1, cyp19a1, sox9 and foxl2 in juvenile and adult fish. Our results demonstrated that the development of triploid female gonads in rainbow trout went through arrested development, oocytes dedifferentiation, ovary reconstruction and sex reversal finally. During early gonadal development (154-334 days post-fertilization), the expressions of foxl2 and cyp19a1 increased linearly, while expressions of dmrt1 and sox9 were extremely suppressed, and E2 level was higher, while T level was lower. During the mid-to-late period of triploid female gonadal development (574-964 days post-fertilization), the expressions of dmrt1 and sox9 remained high and were very close to the quantity of diploid male genes, and T levels were even reaching diploid male plasma concentrations, while expressions of cyp19a1 and foxl2 were decreased, leading to decrease in E2 level. We realized that the development model of rainbow trout triploid female gonads was extremely rare, and the regulatory mechanism was very special. Genes involved in gonadal development and endogenous estrogens are pivotal factors in fish natural sex reversal.

  17. Low BRAF and NRAS expression levels are associated with clinical benefit from DTIC therapy and prognosis in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Einar; Busch, Christian; Berge, Elisabet Ognedal; Geisler, Jürgen; Jönsson, Göran; Lillehaug, Johan Richard; Knappskog, Stian; Lønning, Per Eystein

    2013-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is characterized by a poor response to chemotherapy. Furthermore, there is a lack of established predictive and prognostic markers. In this single institution study, we correlated mutation status and expression levels of BRAF and NRAS to dacarbazine (DTIC) treatment response as well as progression-free and overall survival in a cohort of 85 patients diagnosed with advanced melanoma. Neither BRAF nor NRAS mutation status correlated to treatment response. However, patients with tumors harboring NRAS mutations had a shorter overall survival (p < 0.001) compared to patients with tumors wild-type for NRAS. Patients having a clinical benefit (objective response or stable disease at 3 months) on DTIC therapy had lower BRAF and NRAS expression levels compared to patients progressing on therapy (p = 0.037 and 0.003, respectively). For BRAF expression, this association was stronger among patients with tumors wild-type for BRAF (p = 0.005). Further, low BRAF as well as NRAS expression levels were associated with a longer progression-free survival in the total population (p = 0.004 and <0.001, respectively). Contrasting low NRAS expression levels, which were associated with improved overall survival in the total population (p = 0.01), low BRAF levels were associated with improved overall survival only among patients with tumors wild-type for BRAF (p = 0.013). These findings indicate that BRAF and NRAS expression levels may influence responses to DTIC as well as prognosis in patients with advanced melanoma.

  18. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs.

  19. Cimetidine inhibits the adhesion of gastric cancer cells expressing high levels of sialyl Lewis x in human vascular endothelial cells by blocking E-selectin expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Rong; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Li, Yan-Shu; Li, Jia-Bin; Li, Feng

    2011-04-01

    Cimetidine has been shown to have anti-metastatic activity and improves the survival of patients with colorectal cancer. One hypothesis is its modulation of the expression of the cell adhesion molecule by target organ endothelial cells. Because of the inconclusive results in clinical trials of gastric cancer, we investigated the effects of cimetidine on the adhesion of gastric cancer cells to activated endothelial cells and on the expression of some cell adhesion molecules. Human endothelial cells were pre-incubated with cimetidine for 6 h, incubated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor for 4 h, and the endothelial surface expression of E-selectin was evaluated by flow cytometry, immunostaining and ELISA. Further, we investigated E-selectin mRNA expression by RT-PCR. Three gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901, MGC-803, BGC-823) and a normal gastric epithelial cell line, GES-1, were studied for the surface expression of sialyl Lewis x by flow cytometry and immunostaining. Adherence of CFSE-labeled gastric cancer cells and GES-1 cells to endothelial cell monolayers was determined. Cimetidine significantly reduced E-selectin expression of activated endothelial cells, but did not influence E-selectin expression at the mRNA level. Three gastric cancer cell lines expressed high levels of sialyl Lewis x, whereas GES-1 did not. Cimetidine also significantly decreased gastric cancer cell adherence to stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibition of E-selectin expression corresponded to the reduction of tumor cell adherence. The effects of cimetidine on tumor adhesion were almost nullified by pre-incubation with E-selectin and sialyl Lewis x antibody. Furthermore, there was no significant change of GES-1 adherence to endothelial cells by TNF-α, cimetidine, E-selectin and sialyl Lewis x antibody. The inhibiton of gastric cancer cell adherence to cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells treated with cimetidine appears to result from blocking endothelial E-selectin expression

  20. Characterization of the complete porcine MSTN gene and expression levels in pig breeds differing in muscularity.

    PubMed

    Stinckens, A; Luyten, T; Bijttebier, J; Van den Maagdenberg, K; Dieltiens, D; Janssens, S; De Smet, S; Georges, M; Buys, N

    2008-12-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a transforming growth factor beta superfamily member, is an essential factor for the growth and development of muscle mass. The protein functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth and is related to the so-called double-muscling phenotype in cattle, where a series of mutations renders the gene inactive. One particular breed of pigs, the Belgian Piétrain, also shows a heavily muscled phenotype. The similarity of muscular phenotypes between the double-muscled cattle and Piétrain pigs indicated that MSTN may be a candidate gene for muscular hypertrophy in pigs. In this study, we sequenced and analysed the complete MSTN gene from 45 pigs of five different breeds, including the heavily muscled Piétrain breed at one extreme and the Meishan and Wild boar breeds at the other extreme. In total, 7626 bp of the porcine MSTN gene were sequenced, including the 5' and 3' UTR. Fifteen polymorphic loci were found, three of which were located in the promoter region, five in intron 1 and seven in intron 2. Most mutations were found when comparing the obtained MSTN sequence with porcine MSTN sequences already published. However, one polymorphism located at position 447 of the porcine MSTN promoter had a very high allele frequency in the Piétrain pig breed and disrupted a putative myocyte enhancer factor 3 binding site. Real-time PCR using Sybr Green showed that this mutation was associated with expression levels of the MSTN gene in m. longissimus dorsi at an age of 4 weeks.

  1. Baseline Chromatin Modification Levels May Predict Interindividual Variability in Ozone-Induced Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Shaun D.; Bowers, Emma C.; On, Doan M.; Morgan, David S.; Dailey, Lisa A.; Hines, Ronald N.; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David

    2016-01-01

    Traditional toxicological paradigms have relied on factors such as age, genotype, and disease status to explain variability in responsiveness to toxicant exposure; however, these are neither sufficient to faithfully identify differentially responsive individuals nor are they modifiable factors that can be leveraged to mitigate the exposure effects. Unlike these factors, the epigenome is dynamic and shaped by an individual’s environment. We sought to determine whether baseline levels of specific chromatin modifications correlated with the interindividual variability in their ozone (O3)-mediated induction in an air–liquid interface model using primary human bronchial epithelial cells from a panel of 11 donors. We characterized the relationship between the baseline abundance of 6 epigenetic markers with established roles as key regulators of gene expression—histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac), pan-acetyl H4 (H4ac), histone H3K27 di/trimethylation (H3K27me2/3), unmodified H3, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC)—and the variability in the O3-induced expression of IL-8, IL-6, COX2, and HMOX1. Baseline levels of H3K4me3, H3K27me2/3, and 5-hmC, but not H3K27ac, H4ac, and total H3, correlated with the interindividual variability in O3-mediated induction of HMOX1 and COX2. In contrast, none of the chromatin modifications that we examined correlated with the induction of IL-8 and IL-6. From these findings, we propose an “epigenetic seed and soil” model in which chromatin modification states between individuals differ in the relative abundance of specific modifications (the “soil”) that govern how receptive the gene is to toxicant-mediated cellular signals (the “seed”) and thus regulate the magnitude of exposure-related gene induction. PMID:26719369

  2. SOURCES OF VARIATION IN BASELINE GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS FROM TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY CONTROL ANIMALS ACROSS MULTIPLE LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in study design are typical for toxicogenomic studies, but their impact on gene expression in control animals has not been well characterized. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Scienc...

  3. High-Level Expression of Recombinant Bovine Lactoferrin in Pichia pastoris with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Figueroa, Blanca; Valdiviezo-Godina, Norberto; Siqueiros-Cendón, Tania; Sinagawa-García, Sugey; Arévalo-Gallegos, Sigifredo; Rascón-Cruz, Quintín

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bovine lactoferrin (bLf), an iron-binding glycoprotein considered an important nutraceutical protein because of its several properties, was expressed in Pichia pastoris KM71-H under AOX1 promoter control, using pJ902 as the recombinant plasmid. Dot blotting analysis revealed the expression of recombinant bovine lactoferrin (rbLf) in Pichia pastoris. After Bach fermentation and purification by molecular exclusion, we obtained an expression yield of 3.5 g/L of rbLf. rbLf and predominantly pepsin-digested rbLf (rbLfcin) demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21DE3, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) FRI137, and, in a smaller percentage, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. Aeruginosa) ATCC 27833. The successful expression and characterization of functional rbLf expressed in Pichia pastoris opens a prospect for the development of natural antimicrobial agents produced recombinantly. PMID:27294912

  4. High-level expression of Bacillus naganoensis pullulanase from recombinant Escherichia coli with auto-induction: effect of lac operator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yao; Yan, Wei; Xu, Yan; Chen, Wen Bo; Mu, Xiao Qing; Wang, Xinye; Xiao, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Pullulanase plays an important role in specific hydrolysis of branch points in amylopectin and is generally employed as an important enzyme in starch-processing industry. So far, however, the production level of pullulanase is still somewhat low from wide-type strains and even heterologous expression systems. Here the gene encoding Bacillus naganoensis pullulanase was amplified and cloned. For expression of the protein, two recombinant systems, Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET-20b(+)-pul and E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul, were constructed, both bearing T7 promoter and signal peptide sequence, but different in the existance of lac operator and lacI gene encoding lac repressor. Recombinant pullulanase was initially expressed with the activity of up to 14 U/mL by E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-20b(+)-pul with IPTG induction in LB medium, but its expression level reduced continually with the extension of cryopreservation time and basal expression was observed. However, E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul , involving lac operator downstream of T7 promoter to regulate foreign gene transcription, exhibited pullulanase activity consistently without detected basal expression. By investigating the effect of lac operator, basal expression of foreign protein was found to cause expression instability and negative effect on production of target protein. Thus double-repression strategy was proposed that lac operators in both chromosome and plasmid were bound with lac repressor to repress T7 RNA polymerase synthesis and target protein expression before induction. Consequently, the total activity of pullulanase was remarkably increased to 580 U/mL with auto-induction by lac operator-involved E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+)-pul. When adding 0.6% glycine in culture, the extracellular production of pullulanase was significantly improved with the extracellular activity of 502 U/mL, which is a relatively higher level achieved to date for extracellular production of pullulanase. The successful

  5. Differential viral levels and immune gene expression in three stocks of Apis mellifera induced by different numbers of Varroa destructor.

    PubMed

    Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; de Guzman, Lilia I; Tarver, Matthew R; Rinderer, Thomas E; Chen, Yanping; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2015-01-01

    The viral levels and immune responses of Italian honey bees (IHB), Russian honey bees (RHB) and an outcross of Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees (POL) deliberately infested with one or two foundress Varroa were compared. We found that the Deformed wing virus (DWV) level in IHB inoculated with one or two foundress Varroa increased to about 10(3) or 10(5) fold the levels of their uninfested brood. In contrast, POL (10(2) or 10(4) fold) and RHB (10(2) or l0(4) fold) supported a lower increase in DWV levels. The feeding of different stages of Varroa nymphs did not increase DWV levels of their pupal hosts. Analyses of their corresponding Varroa mites showed the same trends: two foundress Varroa yielded higher DWV levels than one foundress, and the addition of nymphs did not increase viral levels. Using the same pupae examined for the presence of viruses, 16 out of 24 genes evaluated showed significant differential mRNA expression levels among the three honey bee stocks. However, only four genes (Defensin, Dscam, PPOact and spaetzle), which were expressed at similar levels in uninfested pupae, were altered by the number of feeding foundress Varroa and levels of DWV regardless of stocks. This research provides the first evidence that immune response profiles of different honey bee stocks are induced by Varroa parasitism.

  6. Human α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) epithelial prostate stem cells express low levels of active androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Stuart C; Hepburn, Anastasia C; Wilson, Laura; Coffey, Kelly; Ryan-Munden, Claudia A; Pal, Deepali; Leung, Hing Y; Robson, Craig N; Heer, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to be the cell of origin in malignant transformation in many tissues, but their role in human prostate carcinogenesis continues to be debated. One of the conflicts with this model is that cancer stem cells have been described to lack androgen receptor (AR) expression, which is of established importance in prostate cancer initiation and progression. We re-examined the expression patterns of AR within adult prostate epithelial differentiation using an optimised sensitive and specific approach examining transcript, protein and AR regulated gene expression. Highly enriched populations were isolated consisting of stem (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE)), transiently amplifying (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE)) and terminally differentiated (α(2)β(1)(LOW) CD133(-VE)) cells. AR transcript and protein expression was confirmed in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) and CD133(-VE) progenitor cells. Flow cytometry confirmed that median (±SD) fraction of cells expressing AR were 77% (±6%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells and 68% (±12%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE) transiently amplifying cells. However, 3-fold lower levels of total AR protein expression (peak and median immunofluorescence) were present in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells compared with differentiated cells. This finding was confirmed with dual immunostaining of prostate sections for AR and CD133, which again demonstrated low levels of AR within basal CD133(+VE) cells. Activity of the AR was confirmed in prostate progenitor cells by the expression of low levels of the AR regulated genes PSA, KLK2 and TMPRSS2. The confirmation of AR expression in prostate progenitor cells allows integration of the cancer stem cell theory with the established models of prostate cancer initiation based on a functional AR. Further study of specific AR functions in prostate stem and differentiated cells may highlight novel mechanisms of prostate homeostasis and insights into tumourigenesis.

  7. MGMT expression levels predict disease stabilisation, progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanomas treated with DTIC.

    PubMed

    Busch, Christian; Geisler, Jürgen; Lillehaug, Johan R; Lønning, Per Eystein

    2010-07-01

    Metastatic melanoma responds poorly to systemic treatment. We report the results of a prospective single institution study evaluating O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status as a potential predictive and/or prognostic marker among patients treated with dacarbazine (DTIC) 800-1000 mg/m(2) monotherapy administered as a 3-weekly schedule for advanced malignant melanomas. The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Committee. Surgical biopsies from metastatic or loco-regional deposits obtained prior to DTIC treatment were snap-frozen immediately upon removal and stored in liquid nitrogen up to processing. Median time from enrolment to end of follow-up was 67 months. MGMT expression levels evaluated by qRT-PCR correlated significantly to DTIC benefit (CR/PR/SD; p=0.005), time to progression (TTP) (p=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (p=0.003). MGMT expression also correlated to Breslow thickness in the primary tumour (p=0.014). While MGMT promoter hypermethylation correlated to MGMT expression, MGMT promoter hypermethylation did not correlate to treatment benefit, TTP or OS, suggesting that other factors may be critical in determining MGMT expression levels in melanomas. In a Cox proportional regression analysis, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, p<0.001), MGMT expression (p=0.022) and p16(INK4a) expression (p=0.037) independently predicted OS, while TTP correlated to DTIC benefit after 6 weeks only (p=0.001). Our data reveal MGMT expression levels to be associated with disease stabilisation and prognosis in patients receiving DTIC monotherapy for advanced melanoma. The role of MGMT expression as a predictor to DTIC sensitivity versus a general prognostic factor in advanced melanomas warrants further evaluation.

  8. Expression levels of insulin receptor substrate-1 modulate the osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Contaldo, Clara; Myers, Timothy J; Zucchini, Cinzia; Manara, Maria Cristina; Chiodoni, Claudia; Colombo, Mario P; Nicoletti, Giordano; Lollini, Pier Luigi; Li, Tieshi; Longobardi, Lara; Scotlandi, Katia; Spagnoli, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 system, including its critical mediator insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), is involved in regulating osteosarcoma (OS) cell proliferation or differentiation. The aim of this study is to define the role of IRS-1 in OS cells by assessing the contribution of IRS-1 in the differentiation of human and murine OS cell lines and mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and found that the basal level of IRS-1 is important for the initiation of differentiation. Both down-regulation and over-expression of IRS-1 inhibited osteoblastic differentiation. In vivo studies showed that OS cells over-expressing IRS-1 have increased metastatic potential and tumor growth. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 led to an increase in IRS-1 protein level that inhibited osteoblastic differentiation, suggesting a role for proteasomal regulation in maintaining the appropriate expression level of IRS-1. Thus, precise regulation of IRS-1 expression level is critical for determining the differentiating capacity of MSCs and OS cells, and that derangement of IRS-1 levels can be a critical step in OS transformation.

  9. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  10. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network.

  11. Integration of mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels in breast cancer to improve grade definition.

    PubMed

    Cava, Claudia; Bertoli, Gloria; Ripamonti, Marilena; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zoppis, Italo; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Defining the aggressiveness and growth rate of a malignant cell population is a key step in the clinical approach to treating tumor disease. The correct grading of breast cancer (BC) is a fundamental part in determining the appropriate treatment. Biological variables can make it difficult to elucidate the mechanisms underlying BC development. To identify potential markers that can be used for BC classification, we analyzed mRNAs expression profiles, gene copy numbers, microRNAs expression and their association with tumor grade in BC microarray-derived datasets. From mRNA expression results, we found that grade 2 BC is most likely a mixture of grade 1 and grade 3 that have been misclassified, being described by the gene signature of either grade 1 or grade 3. We assessed the potential of the new approach of integrating mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels to select a limited number of genomic BC biomarkers. The combination of mRNA profile analysis and copy number data with microRNA expression levels led to the identification of two gene signatures of 42 and 4 altered genes (FOXM1, KPNA4, H2AFV and DDX19A) respectively, the latter obtained through a meta-analytical procedure. The 42-based gene signature identifies 4 classes of up- or down-regulated microRNAs (17 microRNAs) and of their 17 target mRNA, and the 4-based genes signature identified 4 microRNAs (Hsa-miR-320d, Hsa-miR-139-5p, Hsa-miR-567 and Hsa-let-7c). These results are discussed from a biological point of view with respect to pathological features of BC. Our identified mRNAs and microRNAs were validated as prognostic factors of BC disease progression, and could potentially facilitate the implementation of assays for laboratory validation, due to their reduced number.

  12. Population Level Purifying Selection and Gene Expression Shape Subgenome Evolution in Maize.

    PubMed

    Pophaly, Saurabh D; Tellier, Aurélien

    2015-12-01

    The maize ancestor experienced a recent whole-genome duplication (WGD) followed by gene erosion which generated two subgenomes, the dominant subgenome (maize1) experiencing fewer deletions than maize2. We take advantage of available extensive polymorphism and gene expression data in maize to study purifying selection and gene expression divergence between WGD retained paralog pairs. We first report a strong correlation in nucleotide diversity between duplicate pairs, except for upstream regions. We then show that maize1 genes are under stronger purifying selection than maize2. WGD retained genes have higher gene dosage and biased Gene Ontologies consistent with previous studies. The relative gene expression of paralogs across tissues demonstrates that 98% of duplicate pairs have either subfunctionalized in a tissuewise manner or have diverged consistently in their expression thereby preventing functional complementation. Tissuewise subfunctionalization seems to be a hallmark of transcription factors, whereas consistent repression occurs for macromolecular complexes. We show that dominant gene expression is a strong determinant of the strength of purifying selection, explaining the inferred stronger negative selection on maize1 genes. We propose a novel expression-based classification of duplicates which is more robust to explain observed polymorphism patterns than the subgenome location. Finally, upstream regions of repressed genes exhibit an enrichment in transposable elements which indicates a possible mechanism for expression divergence.

  13. Leveling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    Geodetic leveling by the U.S. Geological Survey provides a framework of accurate elevations for topographic mapping. Elevations are referred to the Sea Level Datum of 1929. Lines of leveling may be run either with automatic or with precise spirit levels, by either the center-wire or the three-wire method. For future use, the surveys are monumented with bench marks, using standard metal tablets or other marking devices. The elevations are adjusted by least squares or other suitable method and are published in lists of control.

  14. Circulating promyelocytes and low levels of CD16 expression on polymorphonuclear leukocytes accompany early-onset periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, E; Nakamura, M; Shoji, S; Horiuchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Early-onset periodontitis (EOP) is characterized by rapidly progressive alveolar bone loss, chemotactic defects of neutrophils, and significant familial aggregation. We found immature myeloid lineage cells, defined as promyelocytes, in the peripheral blood in patients with EOP. A hematological examination of peripheral blood cells showed normal reference values regarding cell proportions. Flow cytometry revealed significantly lower expression of CD16, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, on peripheral neutrophils in patients compared with those in age- and sex-matched healthy controls, whereas the levels of CD11a and CD11b expression were similar. The chemotactic response of neutrophils was lower toward not only formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine but also complement fragment C5a than that of healthy controls. The expression of another GPI-anchored protein, CD14, was equally expressed by controls and patients. Therefore, the low level of CD16 expression was not due to the incomplete synthesis of the GPI anchor. GPI anchors of CD16 on neutrophils from controls and patients were both partially resistant to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. The presence of promyelocytes in peripheral blood, low expression of CD16, and low chemotactic response of neutrophils suggest that patients with EOP have an abnormal maturation system in myeloid lineage cells in the bone marrow, which may be associated with the onset and course of EOP. PMID:9284170

  15. Activity levels and expression of antioxidant enzymes in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in artificially aged rice seed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangkun; Xin, Xia; Song, Chao; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; Wu, Shuhua; Li, Ruifang; Liu, Xu; Lu, Xinxiong

    2014-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species are the main contributors to seed deterioration. In order to study scavenging systems for reactive oxygen species in aged seed, we performed analyses using western blotting, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, high-performance liquid chromatography, and antioxidant enzyme activity analyses in artificially aged rice seeds (Oryza sativa L. cv. wanhua no.11). Aging seeds by storing them at 50 °C for 1, 9, or 17 months increased the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide levels and reduced the germination percentage from 99% to 92%, 55%, and 2%, respectively. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) did not change in aged seeds. In contrast, the activity levels of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) were significantly decreased in aged seeds, as were the expression of catalase and cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase protein. Transcript accumulation analysis showed that specific expression patterns were complex for each of the antioxidant enzyme types in the rice embryos. Overall, the expression of most genes was down-regulated, along with their protein expression. In addition, the reduction in the amount of ascorbate and glutathione was associated with the reduction in scavenging enzymes activity in aged rice embryos. Our data suggest that the depression of the antioxidant system, especially the reduction in the expression of CAT1, APX1 and MDHAR1, may be responsible for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in artificially aged seed embryos, leading to a loss of seed vigor.

  16. Role of endogenous cortistatin in the regulation of ghrelin system expression at pancreatic level under normal and obese conditions.

    PubMed

    Chanclón, Belén; Luque, Raúl M; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; Castaño, Justo P; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin-system components [native ghrelin, In1-ghrelin, Ghrelin-O-acyltransferase enzyme (GOAT) and receptors (GHS-Rs)] are expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the pancreas, where they exert different biological actions including regulation of neuroendocrine secretions, food intake and pancreatic function. The expression of ghrelin system is regulated by metabolic conditions (fasting/obesity) and is associated with the progression of obesity and insulin resistance. Cortistatin (CORT), a neuropeptide able to activate GHS-R, has emerged as an additional link in gut-brain interplay. Indeed, we recently reported that male CORT deficient mice (cort-/-) are insulin-resistant and present a clear dysregulation in the stomach ghrelin-system. The present work was focused at analyzing the expression pattern of ghrelin-system components at pancreas level in cort-/- mice and their control littermates (cort +/+) under low- or high-fat diet. Our data reveal that all the ghrelin-system components are expressed at the mouse pancreatic level, where, interestingly, In1-ghrelin was expressed at higher levels than native-ghrelin. Thus, GOAT mRNA levels were significantly lower in cort-/- mice compared with controls while native ghrelin, In1-ghrelin and GHS-R transcript levels remained unaltered under normal metabolic conditions. Moreover, under obese condition, a significant increase in pancreatic expression of native-ghrelin, In1-ghrelin and GHS-R was observed in obese cort+/+ but not in cort-/- mice. Interestingly, insulin expression and release was elevated in obese cort+/+, while these changes were not observed in obese cort-/- mice. Altogether, our results indicate that the ghrelin-system expression is clearly regulated in the pancreas of cort+/+ and cort -/- under normal and/or obesity conditions suggesting that this system may play relevant roles in the endocrine pancreas. Most importantly, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that endogenous CORT is essential

  17. Loss of Pnn expression attenuates expression levels of SR family splicing factors and modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Yali; Ouyang Pin . E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2006-03-10

    SR and SR-related proteins have been implicated as trans-acting factors that play an important role in splice selection and are involved at specific stages of spliceosome formation. A well-established property of SR protein splicing factors is their ability to influence selection of alternative splice sites in a concentration-dependent manner. Identification of molecules that regulate SR family protein expression is therefore of vital importance in RNA biology. Here we report that depletion of Pnn expression, a SR-related protein with functions involved in pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export, induces reduced expression of a subset of cellular proteins, especially that of SR family proteins, including SC35, SRm300, SRp55, and SRp40, but not that of other nuclear proteins, such as p53, Mdm2, and ki67. Knocking down Pnn expression was achieved in vitro by siRNA transfection. Expression levels of SR and SR-related proteins in Pnn-depleted cells as compared to those in control cells were evaluated by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot with specific antibodies. In addition, we also demonstrate that loss of Pnn expression could modulate splice site selection of model reporter gene in vivo. Our finding is significant in terms of regulation of SR protein cellular concentration because it reveals that Pnn may play a general role in the control of the cellular amount of family SR proteins through down-regulation of its own expression, thereby providing us with a better understanding of the cellular mechanism by which Pnn fulfills its biological function.

  18. A glucose-insensitive T7 expression system for fully-induced expression of proteins at a subsaturating level of L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zei Wen; Lai, Cheng-Bon; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2011-06-22

    The L-arabinose (Ara)-controlled T7 expression system was previously constructed by creation of an Escherichia coli BL21(BAD) strain. The production of recombinant proteins in this strain was stringently regulated and reached a high level upon induction with Ara. Nevertheless, this system is still associated with inherent problems of interference with glucose and of the all-or-nothing induction profile at a subsaturating level of Ara. In this study, these problems were circumvented by modifying the physiological traits of BL21(BAD) strain. This was followed by deletion of ptsG gene and the araFGH and araBAD operon. The former encodes the glucose transporter while the latter two gene operons produce proteins responsible for Ara uptake and catabolism. In addition, the expression of genomic araE (encodes the Ara transporter) was constitutively enhanced. The resulting strain was designated BAD-5. By expression of the faster degrader GFP(LAA) at a subsaturating level of Ara, 80% of BAD-5 strain was found visually bright in the presence or absence of glucose. A further analysis by flow cytometry showed a uniform distribution of GFP expression for BAD-5 strain. In marked contrast, BL21(BAD) strain exhibiting visual brightness was less than 10% of the cell population and remained dark in the presence of glucose. Moreover, a saturated level of luciferase from Renilla reniformis (Rluc) could be readily obtained in BAD-5 strain at 20 μM Ara regardless of glucose. Rluc in BL21(BAD) strain was produced in an Ara dose-dependent manner, and the protein production became arrested when glucose was present. Overall, it illustrates the usefulness of the improved system for overproduction of recombinant proteins in an efficient, homogeneous, and glucose-insensitive way.

  19. Lenalidomide affect expression level of cereblon protein in multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226.

    PubMed

    Yang, D Y; Ren, J H; Guo, X N; Guo, X L; Cai, X Y; Guo, X F; Zhang, J N

    2015-10-29

    We investigated the mechanisms of action of immuno-modulatory drug (lenalidomide) on the protein expression of cereblon (CRBN) and their therapeutic targets in the multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226. The multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226 was cultured and treated with different concentrations of lenalidomide and bortezomib to determine the proliferation inhibition rate, apoptosis rate, and protein expression of CRBN. The results revealed that both lenalidomide and bortezomib inhibited the proliferation of RPMI8226 and promoted cell apoptosis. However, the protein expression of CRBN decreased signifi-cantly after treatment with lenalidomide, while bortezomib had no effect on the expression of CRBN. We confirmed that CRBN may be a target of lenalidomide.

  20. Variation of expression levels of seven housekeeping genes at different life-history stages in Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojie; Huang, Aiyou; Xu, Meiling; Wang, Chao; Jia, Zhaojun; Wang, Guangce; Niu, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the optimal internal control for relative real-time PCR when studying target gene expression in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we quantified the expression of seven housekeeping genes (18S ribosomal RNA, 30S ribosomal protein S8, Polyubiquitin-2, Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, Elongation factor 1-alpha, Beta-tubulin and Actin 3) at different life-history stages. Absolute quantification was done by normalization to total RNA quantity and by normalization to genomic DNA quantity. We used these two normalization approaches, comparing the differences of expression levels of all candidate housekeeping genes between any two generations and across three life-history stages (filamentous sporophytes, leafy gametophytes and conchospores). We found GAPDH had the best stability in all cases and we recommend that GAPDH be considered as a potential internal control for gene expression studies at different life-history stages in P. yezoensis.

  1. An internal ribosome entry site (IRES) mutant library for tuning expression level of multiple genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Esther Y C; Ho, Steven C L; Mariati; Song, Zhiwei; Bi, Xuezhi; Bardor, Muriel; Yang, Yuansheng

    2013-01-01

    A set of mutated Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements with varying strengths is generated by mutating the translation initiation codons of 10(th), 11(th), and 12(th) AUG to non-AUG triplets. They are able to control the relative expression of multiple genes over a wide range in mammalian cells in both transient and stable transfections. The relative strength of each IRES mutant remains similar in different mammalian cell lines and is not gene specific. The expressed proteins have correct molecular weights. Optimization of light chain over heavy chain expression by these IRES mutants enhances monoclonal antibody expression level and quality in stable transfections. Uses of this set of IRES mutants can be extended to other applications such as synthetic biology, investigating interactions between proteins and its complexes, cell engineering, multi-subunit protein production, gene therapy, and reprogramming of somatic cells into stem cells.

  2. Alternating expression levels of WWOX tumor suppressor and cancer-related genes in patients with bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    PŁUCIENNIK, ELŻBIETA; NOWAKOWSKA, MAGDALENA; STĘPIEN, ANNA; WOŁKOWICZ, MATEUSZ; STAWIŃSKI, ADAM; RÓŻAŃSKI, WALDEMAR; LIPIŃSKI, MAREK; BEDNAREK, ANDRZEJ K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the roles of the WWOX tumor suppressor and cancer-related genes in bladder tumor carcinogenesis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the status of WWOX promoter methylation (using MethylScreen™ technology) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in papillary urothelial cancer tissues. The associations between the expression levels of the following tumorigenesis-related genes were also assessed: The WWOX tumor suppressor gene, the MKI67 proliferation gene, the BAX, BCL2 and BIRC5 apoptotic genes, the EGFR signal transduction gene, the VEGF vascular endothelial growth factor gene, and the CCND1 and CCNE1 cell cycle genes. The results reveal a high frequency of LOH in intron 1 in the WWOX gene, as well as an association between reduced WWOX expression levels and increased promoter methylation. In addition, the present study demonstrates that in bladder tumors, apoptosis is inhibited by increased expression levels of the BCL2 gene. A correlation between the proliferation indices of the MKI67 and the BIRC5 genes was also revealed. Furthermore, the expression levels of VEGF were identified to be positively associated with those of the EGFR gene. PMID:25295115

  3. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Petra A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Anderson, Christine B.; Seifried, Harold E.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Howard, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake. PMID:26258789

  4. Development of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the precise quantification of transgene expression levels in rice plants.

    PubMed

    James, Victoria A.; Worland, Barbara; Snape, John W.; Vain, Philippe

    2004-04-01

    Variation in transgene expression levels can result from uncontrolled differences in experimental protocols. It is important to quantify and eliminate this unwanted variation as much as possible in order to attain precision in transgenic studies. Large-scale transgenic studies could, by their design, generate additional variation. The influence of different plant growth, sampling and analysis strategies in generating spurious variation in transgene expression level quantification in rice plant populations was assessed. The use of multiple independent plant phenotypic analyses (enzymatic assays in this study) was identified as the major source of spurious variation (doubling or tripling the variation). The quantification of transgene expression levels was also found to be significantly influenced by plant age, the choice of leaf sampled and leaf size. All of these factors reduced the precision of molecular genetic studies and generated artefactual results in transgenic studies. Identification of the sources of extraneous variation allowed the development of a new standard operating procedure (SOP) for rice, designed to control spurious variation. SOP allowed the influence of differences in growth period and independent phenotypic analyses to be minimized. The coefficient of variation in transgene expression levels, between and within genetically identical rice plants, was reduced to approximately 10 to 15% using SOP. Adoption of quality assurance (QA) criteria such as SOP is key to improving the reproducibility of transgenic studies.

  5. IDP-ASE: haplotyping and quantifying allele-specific expression at the gene and gene isoform level by hybrid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deonovic, Benjamin; Wang, Yunhao; Weirather, Jason; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Au, Kin Fai

    2016-11-28

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) is a fundamental problem in studying gene regulation and diploid transcriptome profiles, with two key challenges: (i) haplotyping and (ii) estimation of ASE at the gene isoform level. Existing ASE analysis methods are limited by a dependence on haplotyping from laborious experiments or extra genome/family trio data. In addition, there is a lack of methods for gene isoform level ASE analysis. We developed a tool, IDP-ASE, for full ASE analysis. By innovative integration of Third Generation Sequencing (TGS) long reads with Second Generation Sequencing (SGS) short reads, the accuracy of haplotyping and ASE quantification at the gene and gene isoform level was greatly improved as demonstrated by the gold standard data GM12878 data and semi-simulation data. In addition to methodology development, applications of IDP-ASE to human embryonic stem cells and breast cancer cells indicate that the imbalance of ASE and non-uniformity of gene isoform ASE is widespread, including tumorigenesis relevant genes and pluripotency markers. These results show that gene isoform expression and allele-specific expression cooperate to provide high diversity and complexity of gene regulation and expression, highlighting the importance of studying ASE at the gene isoform level. Our study provides a robust bioinformatics solution to understand ASE using RNA sequencing data only.

  6. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Anderson, Christine B; Seifried, Harold E; Hatfield, Dolph L; Howard, Michael T

    2015-08-06

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake.

  7. Expression level of P2X7 receptor is a determinant of ATP-induced death of mouse cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, A; Keno, Y; Marumiya, A; Sudo, Y; Uda, Y; Matsuda, K; Morita, Y; Furuta, T; Nishida, K; Nagasawa, K

    2016-04-05

    Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a purinergic receptor, expressed by neurons is well-known to induce their death, but whether or not their sensitivity to ATP depends on its expression levels remains unclear. Here, we examined the effect of the expression level of P2X7Rs on cell viability using pure neuron cultures, co-cultures with astrocytes derived from SJL- and ddY-strain mice, and mouse P2X7R-expressing HEK293T cell systems. Treatment of pure neuron cultures with 5mM ATP for 2h, followed by 3-h incubation in fresh medium, resulted in death of both types of neurons, and their death was prevented by administration of P2X7R-specific antagonists. In both SJL- and ddY-neurons, ATP-induced neuronal death was inhibited by a mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor cyclosporine A, mitochondrial dysfunction being involved in their death. The ATP-induced neuronal death was greater for SJL-neurons than for ddY-ones, this being correlated with the expression level of P2X7R in them, and the same results were obtained for the HEK293T cell systems. Co-culture of neurons with astrocytes increased the ATP-induced neuronal death compared to the case of pure neuron cultures. Overall, we reveal that neuronal vulnerability to ATP depends on the expression level of P2X7R, and co-existence of astrocytes exacerbates ATP-induced neuronal death.

  8. Effect of cadmium on the expression levels of interleukin-1α and interleukin-10 cytokines in human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    ODEWUMI, CAROLINE; LATINWO, LEKAN M.; SINCLAIR, ANDRE; BADISA, VEERA L.D.; ABDULLAH, AHKINYALA; BADISA, RAMESH B.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmentally hazardous metal, which causes toxicity in humans. Inhalation of cigarette smoke and industrial fumes containing cadmium are sources of cadmium exposure. It is responsible for the malfunction of various organs, leading to disease particularly in the lungs, liver and kidneys. In the present study, the effect of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) on cell viability, and the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-10 cytokines at various concentrations and incubation durations were assessed in MRC-9 human normal lung and A549 human lung cancer cells to elucidate the mechanism of cadmium toxicity. Cell viability was measured using a crystal violet dye binding assay. The expression levels of the cytokines were measured by cytokine specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The viability assay results revealed higher sensitivity of the A549 lung cancer cells to CdCl2 compared with the normal MRC-9 lung cells. In the normal MRC-9 lung cells, higher expression levels of the cytokines were observed at the lowest CdCl2 concentration at a shorter exposure time compared with the lung cancer cells. Higher levels of the cytokines were observed in the A549 lung cancer cells at all other times and concentrations compared with the MRC-9 cells, indicating higher levels of inflammation. The cytokine levels were reduced at higher CdCl2 concentrations and longer exposure durations, demonstrating the toxic effect of cadmium. The results indicated that CdCl2 affected the expression levels of the cytokines and led to cytotoxicity in human lung cells, and suggested that compounds which reduce inflammation may prevent cadmium toxicity. PMID:26397147

  9. AEG-1 expression correlates with CD133 and PPP6c levels in human glioma tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Chen, Xin; Xi, Ruxing; Chang, Yuwei; Zhang, Xuanwei; Zhang, Xiaozhi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is associated with tumor genesis and progression in a variety of human cancers. This study aimed to explore the significance of AEG-1 in glioma and investigate whether it correlated with radioresistance of glioma cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the intensity of AEG-1, CD133 and PPP6c protein expression in glioma tissues increased significantly, mainly in the cytoplasm. The expression rate of AEG-1, CD133 and PPP6c were 85.9% (67/78), 60.3% (47/78) and 65.8% (51/78), respectively. AEG-1 expression was correlated with age (r = 0.227, P = 0.045), clinical stage (r = 0.491, P<0.001) and clinical grade (r = 0.450, P<0.001). No correlation was found between AEG-1 expression and other clinicopathologic parameters (P>0.05). The expression of AEG-1 was positively correlated with the expression of CD133 (r = 0.240, P  =  0.035) and PPP6c (r =  0.250, P  =  0.027). In addition, retrieved data on TCGA implied co-occurrence of genomic alterations of AEG-1 and PPP6c in glioblastoma. Our findings indicate that AEG-1 is positively correlated with CD133 and AEG-1 expression. It may play an important role in the progression of glioma and may serve as potential novel marker of chemoresistance and radioresistance. PMID:25332711

  10. Abnormal expression levels of sMICA and NKG2D are correlated with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiong; Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Soluble major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A molecules (sMICA) and natural-killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) not only correlate with tumorigenesis and progression, but also with tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the correlation and prognostic significance of the differential expression of sMICA and NKG2D in pancreatic carcinoma and paracarcinoma tissues from 70 patients with pancreatic carcinomas. The results showed that sMICA expression was significantly (P<0.05) higher in tumor tissues (67.1%) than that in adjacent nontumor tissues (31.4%), whereas NKG2D expression was significantly (P<0.001) lower in tumor tissues (32.9%) than that in adjacent nontumor tissues (60.0%). Spearman’s rank correlation test showed a negative correlation between the expression of sMICA and that of NKG2D (r=−0.676, P<0.001). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that a high sMICA expression was significantly correlated with decreased disease-free survival (DFS) (P<0.001) and overall survival (OS) (P<0.001), while a high NKG2D expression was significantly associated with increased DFS (P=0.001) and OS (P=0.001) of the patients. Multivariate analysis showed that a high sMICA expression was an independent predictive factor for poor DFS (P<0.001) and OS (P=0.012); but low NKG2D expression was not an independent prognostic factor for poor DFS (P=0.238) and OS (P=0.574). In conclusion, our findings suggest that the expression levels of sMICA and NKG2D are abnormal and negatively correlated with one another in pancreatic carcinoma tissues; they may be considered as valuable biomarkers for the prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:26730197

  11. Antiproliferative effects of kisspeptin‑10 depend on artificial GPR54 (KISS1R) expression levels.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Elke; Olbrich, Teresa; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Kisspeptins are peptides derived from the metastasis suppressor gene KISS1 interacting with GPR54 as their corresponding receptor. The KISS1/GPR54 system is one regulator of cellular motility mechanisms leading to decreased migration and invasion. Its role in cell proliferation processes is not clearly understood. In this study, breast cancer cell lines, T47D, ZR75-1, MDA‑MB‑231, MDA‑MB‑435s, MDA‑MB‑453, HCC 70, HCC 1806, HCC 1937 and MCF‑7, were investigated for their endogenous GPR54 expression by immunocytochemistry, RT‑PCR and western blot analysis. The effect of kisspeptin‑10 on proliferation was measured in MDA‑MB‑231, MDA‑MB‑435s, HCC 1806 and MCF‑7 cells. Further experiments on proliferation were carried out with cells transfected with GPR54. All of the tested breast cancer cell lines expressed GPR54 in different amounts. No effects on proliferation were detected in the breast cancer cells expressing the receptor endogenously. In transfected neuronal cells overexpressing GPR54, proliferation was significantly inhibited by kisspeptin‑10. The results indicate that the antiproliferative action of kisspeptin depends on the nature of GPR54 expression. The effect was detected in an artificial system of cells transfected with GPR54 and not in cells expressing the receptor endogenously. Thus, the antiproliferative action of kisspeptin seems not to be important for pathophysiological processes.

  12. Global features of gene expression on the proteome and transcriptome levels in S. coelicolor during germination.

    PubMed

    Strakova, Eva; Bobek, Jan; Zikova, Alice; Vohradsky, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes have been studied mostly as producers of secondary metabolites, while the transition from dormant spores to an exponentially growing culture has largely been ignored. Here, we focus on a comparative analysis of fluorescently and radioactively labeled proteome and microarray acquired transcriptome expressed during the germination of Streptomyces coelicolor. The time-dynamics is considered, starting from dormant spores through 5.5 hours of growth with 13 time points. Time series of the gene expressions were analyzed using correlation, principal components analysis and an analysis of coding genes utilization. Principal component analysis was used to identify principal kinetic trends in gene expression and the corresponding genes driving S. coelicolor germination. In contrast with the correlation analysis, global trends in the gene/protein expression reflected by the first principal components showed that the prominent patterns in both the protein and the mRNA domains are surprisingly well correlated. Analysis of the number of expressed genes identified functional groups activated during different time intervals of the germination.

  13. Enhanced expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 correlates with malondialdehyde levels during the formation of liver cirrhosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUN; ZHANG, HUIYING; ZHAO, ZHONGFU; LV, MINLI; JIA, JIANTAO; ZHANG, LILI; TIAN, XIAOXIA; CHEN, YUNXIA; LI, BAOHONG; LIU, MINGSHE; HAN, DEWU; JI, CHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the role of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) in the development of liver cirrhosis promoted by intestinal endotoxemia in rats. Fifty-one male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the liver cirrhosis 4-week, 6-week and 8-week groups and the normal control group at each time point. Liver cirrhosis was induced by employing multiple pathogenic factors in the rats. Blood and liver tissues were collected. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), homocysteine, endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the plasma, and TNF-α, malondialdehyde (MDA) and procollagen type III peptide (PIIIP) in the liver tissues were determined. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GRP78 in the liver were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Morphological changes were observed through hematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson staining of the liver. Liver cirrhosis caused marked histopathological changes to the livers of the rats. Following significant increases in the levels of ALT, homocysteine, endotoxin and TNF-α in the plasma, and TNF-α, MDA and PIIIP in the liver tissues of all experimental groups with the progression of liver cirrhosis, the mRNA and protein expression levels of GRP78 also gradually increased. In addition, correlation analysis indicated that the enhanced expression of GRP78 correlated with the MDA levels of the rats during the formation of liver cirrhosis. PMID:26668603

  14. Synchronous vitellogenin expression and sexual maturation during migration are negatively correlated with juvenile hormone levels in Mythimna separata

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Kong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Annual migration of pests between different seasonal habitats can lead to serious crop damage. Reproductive immaturity is generally associated with the migratory process (oogenesis-flight syndrome), but the mechanism of reproductive development during migration varies unpredictably. Here, the vitellogenin gene (MsVg) and three key regulatory enzyme genes (MsJhamt, MsJheh and MsJhe) related to juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis and degradation were identified and characterized in Mythimna separata. The relative expression of MsVg varied significantly in response to seasonal changes and was significantly correlated with stages of ovarian development. The relatively low levels of JH titer did not differ significantly in male moths but slightly increased in female adults during the migratory season, which was consistent with changes in mRNA levels for MsJhamt, MsJheh and MsJhe. JH titer was negatively associated with relative seasonal levels of vitellogenin mRNA transcripts and with ovarian development in migrating M. separata. The synchrony of MsVg expression with sexual maturation highlighted the potential of MsVg transcript levels to serve as an index to monitor the adult reproductive status. In addition, the level of JH and sexual maturity were correlated with the extent of JH in regulating the MsVg expression and reproduction during seasonal northern and southern migration. PMID:27629246

  15. [Effect of dietary restriction during development on the level of expression of longevity-associated genes in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Vaĭserman, A M; Koliada, A K; Zabuga, O G

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that dietary restriction (DR) may substantially affect the life span (LS) of various model organisms including Drosophila melanogaster. In our recent studies, it has been revealed that the reduction of the content of main nutrients in larval medium may lead to an increase of flies' LS. Analysis of these data suggested that the most likely candidate for such long-term adaptive changes is insects' epigenome (i.e., persistent changes in the activity of genes that are not related to changes in the DNA structure). To examine whether the observed effects may be associated with long-term changes in the epigenetic regulation of genes associated with aging and longevity, in the present study we determined the level of expression of InR and Sir2 genes that are related to the effects of DR. In the larvae developed in DR conditions, the significant increase in the level of transcription of both these genes compared to the controls has been detected. The adult males have shown a significant increase in the level of expression of InR gene while no such changes were observed in females. The Sir2 gene expression level was not different from the control level in adults of both sexes. It has been suggested that larval nutritional stress may lead to the induction of adaptive epigenetic rearrangements and, therefore, it can extend the flies' longevity.

  16. Regulation of DEK expression by AP-2α and methylation level of DEK promoter in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Ming-Xu; Li, Chun; Zhang, Ai-Qun; Hou, Ling-Ling; Yang, Juan; Hu, Hong-Gang

    2016-10-01

    DEK is overexpressed in multiple invasive tumors. However, the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of DEK remains unclear. In the present study, progressive-type truncation assay indicated that CpG2-2 (-167 bp/+35 bp) was the DEK core promoter, whose methylation inhibited DEK expression. Bisulfite genomic sequencing analysis indicated that the methylation levels of the DEK promoter in normal hepatic cells and tissues were higher than those in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. TFSEARCH result revealed transcription factor binding sites in CpG2-2. Among the sites, the AP-2α binding site showed the most significant methylation difference; hence, AP-2α is a key transcription factor that regulates DEK expression. Point or deletion mutation of the AP-2α binding site significantly reduced the promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the binding of AP-2α to the core promoter. Furthermore, knock down of endogenous AP-2α downregulated DEK expression, whereas overexpression of AP-2α upregulated DEK expression. Thus, AP-2α is an important transcription factor of DEK expression, which is correlated with the methylation level of the DEK core promoter in HCC.

  17. A genome-wide study of DNA methylation patterns and gene expression levels in multiple human and chimpanzee tissues.

    PubMed

    Pai, Athma A; Bell, Jordana T; Marioni, John C; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Gilad, Yoav

    2011-02-01

    The modification of DNA by methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that affects the spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression. Methylation patterns have been described in many contexts within and across a range of species. However, the extent to which changes in methylation might underlie inter-species differences in gene regulation, in particular between humans and other primates, has not yet been studied. To this end, we studied DNA methylation patterns in livers, hearts, and kidneys from multiple humans and chimpanzees, using tissue samples for which genome-wide gene expression data were also available. Using the multi-species gene expression and methylation data for 7,723 genes, we were able to study the role of promoter DNA methylation in the evolution of gene regulation across tissues and species. We found that inter-tissue methylation patterns are often conserved between humans and chimpanzees. However, we also found a large number of gene expression differences between species that might be explained, at least in part, by corresponding differences in methylation levels. In particular, we estimate that, in the tissues we studied, inter-species differences in promoter methylation might underlie as much as 12%-18% of differences in gene expression levels between humans and chimpanzees.

  18. Boric acid increases the expression levels of human anion exchanger genes SLC4A2 and SLC4A3.

    PubMed

    Akbas, F; Aydin, Z

    2012-04-03

    Boron is an important micronutrient in plants and animals. The role of boron in living systems includes coordinated regulation of gene expression, growth and proliferation of higher plants and animals. There are several well-defined genes associated with boron transportation and tolerance in plants and these genes show close homology with human anion exchanger genes. Mutation of these genes also characterizes some genetic disorders. We investigated the toxic effects of boric acid on HEK293 cells and mRNA expression of anion exchanger (SLC4A1, SLC4A2 and SLC4A3) genes. Cytotoxicity of boric acid at different concentrations was tested by using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Gene expression profiles were examined using quantitative real-time PCR. In the HEK293 cells, the nontoxic upper concentration of boric acid was 250 μM; more than 500 μM caused cytotoxicity. The 250 μM boric acid concentration increased gene expression level of SLC4A2 up to 8.6-fold and SLC4A3 up to 2.6-fold, after 36-h incubation. There was no significant effect of boric acid on SLC4A1 mRNA expression levels.

  19. [Bioinformatics analysis and expressed level of histone methyltransferase genes in Lonicera japonica].

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin-jie; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-qi; Long, Ping; Zha, Liang-ping; Wang, Yao-long

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three histone methyltransferase genes were obtained from transcriptome dataset of Lonicera japonica. The nucleotide and proteins characteristics, subcellular localization, senior structural domains and conservative forecasting were analyzed. The result of phylogenetic tree showed that 23 histone methyltransferases were mainly divided into two groups: lysine methyltransferase and arginine methyltransferases. The result of gene expression showed that 23 histone methyltransferases showed preference in terms of interspecies and organs. They were more expressed in buds of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis and lower in leaves of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis. Eight genes were specific expressed in flower. These results provided basis for further understanding the function of histone methyltransferase and epigenetic regulation of active ingredients of L. japonica.

  20. Plasma Ang2 and ADAM17 levels are elevated during clinical malaria; Ang2 level correlates with severity and expression of EPCR-binding PfEMP1.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jens E V; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Vaaben, Anna V; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Lyimo, Eric; Kavishe, Reginald A; Mwakalinga, Steven B; Mosha, Jacklin; Minja, Daniel T R; Lusingu, John P A; Theander, Thor G; Lavstsen, Thomas; Wang, Christian W

    2016-10-27

    The pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria involves a complex interplay between parasite adhesion and inflammatory response that includes release of cytokines and activation of the endothelium with accompanying release of Angiopoitin 2 (Ang2) to the plasma. A-disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) is a protein responsible for releasing cytokines, including Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα), and shedding of adhesion proteins. In this study, we show that plasma levels of ADAM17 are increased in Tanzanian children hospitalized with a malaria infection compared with asymptomatic children but similar to children hospitalized with other infectious diseases. The plasma levels of ADAM17 decreased during recovery after an acute malaria episode. Plasma levels of Ang2 were associated with markers of malaria severity and levels of var transcripts encoding P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) containing Cysteine Rich Inter Domain Region α1 (CIDRα1) domains predicted to bind Endothelial Protein C receptor (EPCR). ADAM17 levels were not associated with expression of var genes encoding different PfEMP1 types when controlling for age. These data are the first to report ADAM17 plasma levels in malaria-exposed individuals, and support the notion that parasite sequestration mediated by EPCR-binding PfEMP1 is associated with endothelial activation and pathology in severe paediatric malaria.

  1. Plasma Ang2 and ADAM17 levels are elevated during clinical malaria; Ang2 level correlates with severity and expression of EPCR-binding PfEMP1

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Jens E. V.; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I.; Vaaben, Anna V.; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Lyimo, Eric; Kavishe, Reginald A.; Mwakalinga, Steven B.; Mosha, Jacklin; Minja, Daniel T. R.; Lusingu, John P. A.; Theander, Thor G.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Wang, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria involves a complex interplay between parasite adhesion and inflammatory response that includes release of cytokines and activation of the endothelium with accompanying release of Angiopoitin 2 (Ang2) to the plasma. A-disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) is a protein responsible for releasing cytokines, including Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα), and shedding of adhesion proteins. In this study, we show that plasma levels of ADAM17 are increased in Tanzanian children hospitalized with a malaria infection compared with asymptomatic children but similar to children hospitalized with other infectious diseases. The plasma levels of ADAM17 decreased during recovery after an acute malaria episode. Plasma levels of Ang2 were associated with markers of malaria severity and levels of var transcripts encoding P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) containing Cysteine Rich Inter Domain Region α1 (CIDRα1) domains predicted to bind Endothelial Protein C receptor (EPCR). ADAM17 levels were not associated with expression of var genes encoding different PfEMP1 types when controlling for age. These data are the first to report ADAM17 plasma levels in malaria-exposed individuals, and support the notion that parasite sequestration mediated by EPCR-binding PfEMP1 is associated with endothelial activation and pathology in severe paediatric malaria. PMID:27784899

  2. MRE11 and ATM Expression Levels Predict Rectal Cancer Survival and Their Association with Radiotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Revoltar, Maxine; Lim, Stephanie H.; Tut, Thein-Ga; Abubakar, Askar; Henderson, Chris J.; Chua, Wei; Ng, Weng; Lee, Mark; De Souza, Paul; Morgan, Matthew; Lee, C. Soon; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of DNA repair proteins is associated with poor survival in cancer patients. We investigated the combined expression of MRE11 and ATM as a predictive marker of response to radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods MRE11 and ATM expression were examined in tumor samples from 262 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer, including a sub-cohort of 54 patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy. The relationship between expression of the two-protein panel and tumor regression grade (TRG) was assessed by Mann–Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristics area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis. The association between expression of the two-protein panel and clinicopathologic variables and survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. Results A high score for two-protein combined expression in the tumor center (TC) was significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.035) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.003) in the whole cohort, and with DFS (P = 0.028) and OS (P = 0.024) in the neoadjuvant subgroup (n = 54). In multivariate analysis, the two-protein combination panel (HR = 2.178, 95% CI 1.115–4.256, P = 0.023) and perineural invasion (HR = 2.183, 95% CI 1.222–3.899, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with DFS. Using ROC-AUC analysis of good versus poor histological tumor response among patients treated preoperatively with radiotherapy, the average ROC-AUC was 0.745 for the combined panel, 0.618 for ATM alone, and 0.711 for MRE11 alone. Conclusions The MRE11/ATM two-protein panel developed in this study may have clinical value as a predictive marker of tumor response to neoadjuvant radiotherapy, and a prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival. PMID:27930716

  3. Olfactory discrimination varies in mice with different levels of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, Jennifer L.; Arevalo, Nicole L.; Blatner, Megan J.; Dang, An K.; Clevenger, Amy C.; Adams, Catherine E.; Restrepo, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that schizophrenics have decreased expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine (α7) receptors in the hippocampus and other brain regions, paranoid delusions, disorganized speech, deficits in auditory gating (i.e., inability to inhibit neuronal responses to repetitive auditory stimuli), and difficulties in odor discrimination and detection. Here we use mice with decreased α7 expression that also show a deficit in auditory gating to determine if these mice have similar deficits in olfaction. In the adult mouse olfactory bulb (OB), α7 expression localizes in the glomerular layer; however, the functional role of α7 is unknown. We show that inbred mouse strains (i.e., C3H and C57) with varying α7 expression (e.g., α7 wild-type [α7+/+], α7 heterozygous knock-out [α7+/−] and α7 homozygous knockout mice [α7−/−]) significantly differ in odor discrimination and detection of chemically related odorant pairs. Using [125I] α-bungarotoxin (α-BGT) autoradiography, α7 expression was measured in the OB. As previously demonstrated, α-BGT binding was localized to the glomerular layer. Significantly more expression of α7 was observed in C57 α7+/+ mice compared to C3H α7+/+ mice. Furthermore, C57 α7+/+ mice were able to detect a significantly lower concentration of an odor in a mixture compared to C3H α7+/+ mice. Both C57 and C3H α7+/+ mice discriminated between chemically related odorants sooner than α7+/− or α7−/− mice. These data suggest that α7-nicotinic-receptors contribute strongly to olfactory discrimination and detection in mice and may be one of the mechanisms producing olfactory dysfunction in schizophrenics. PMID:20713028

  4. Serum and Muscle Interleukin-15 Levels Decrease in Aging Mice; Correlation with Declines in Soluble Interleukin-15 Receptor Alpha Expression

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, LeBris S.; Anderson, Barbara G.; Strait-Bodey, Lena; Wolden-Hanson, Tami

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a skeletal muscle-derived cytokine with favorable effects on muscle mass and body composition. Modulation of IL-15 levels has been suggested as a treatment for sarcopenia and age-associated increases in adiposity. However, it is unclear whether IL-15 levels change during aging, as measurement of IL-15 at physiological concentrations in mice has been technically difficult, and translational regulation of IL-15 is complex. Moreover, the IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Rα) can comprise part of a membrane-associated receptor complex, or appear as a soluble form which stabilizes IL-15 and facilitates IL-15 secretion. Here, we report measurement of physiological levels of murine IL-15, and determine that muscle and serum IL-15 levels decline progressively with age. However, expression of IL-15 mRNA and membrane-associated subunits of the IL-15 receptor did not change with age in muscle. Expression of soluble IL-15Rα (sIL-15Rα) mRNA declined 5-fold with age, and serum IL-15 levels correlated highly with muscle sIL-15 mRNA expression, suggesting declines in sIL-15Rα expression lead to decreased circulating IL-15 levels during aging. These findings complement studies which described several single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human IL-15Rα gene which impact muscularity and adiposity, and provide a technical basis for further investigation of IL-15 and the sIL-15Rα in determining body composition in aging mice, as a model for humans. PMID:19854259

  5. Chitinase Expression Due to Reduction in Fusaric Acid Level in an Antagonistic Trichoderma harzianum S17TH.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Bhandari, Pamita; Singh, Bikram; Bhatacharya, Amita; Shanmugam, Veerubommu

    2013-06-01

    To study the effect of reduction in phytotoxin level on fungal chitinases, antagonistic Trichoderma spp. were screened for their ability to reduce the level of fusaric acid (FA), the phytotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. A T. harzianum isolate S17TH was able to tolerate high levels of FA (up to 500 ppm) but was unable to reduce the toxin to a significant level (non-toxic) added to minimal synthetic broth (MSB). However, the isolate was able to reduce 400 ppm FA in the liquid medium after 7 days to a non-toxic level and displayed similar level of antagonism over the control (without FA). In studies of the effect of the reduction in FA (400 ppm) level on chitinase gene expression in PCR assays, nag1 was significantly repressed but ech42 expression was only slightly repressed. Chitinase activity was either reduced or absent in the extracellular proteins of MSB supplemented with 400 ppm FA, which could be attributed to the effect of residual FA or its breakdown products through unknown mechanisms. Selection of S17TH as a toxin insensitive isolate that could commensurate the negative effect on chitinase activity makes it a potential antagonist against Fusarium spp.

  6. High expression levels of egfl7 correlate with low endothelial cell activation in peritumoral vessels of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pannier, Diane; Philippin-Lauridant, Géraldine; Baranzelli, Marie-Christine; Bertin, Delphine; Bogart, Emilie; Delprat, Victor; Villain, Gaëlle; Mattot, Virginie; Bonneterre, Jacques; Soncin, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels participate in the immune response against cancer cells and we previously used pre-clinical models to demonstrate that egfl7 (VE-statin) promotes tumor cell evasion from the immune system by repressing endothelial cell activation, preventing immune cells from entering the tumor mass. In the present study, the expression levels of egfl7 and that of ICAM-1 as a marker of endothelium activation, were evaluated in peritumoral vessels of human breast cancer samples. Breast cancer samples (174 invasive and 30 in situ) from 204 patients treated in 2005 were immunostained for CD31, ICAM-1 and stained for egfl7 using in situ hybridization. The expression levels of ICAM-1 and egfl7 were assessed in peritumoral areas using semi-quantitative scales. There was a strong and significant inverse correlation between the expression of ICAM-1 and that of egfl7 in CD31+ blood vessels. When the ICAM-1 score increased, the egfl7 score reduced significantly (P=0.004), and vice-versa (Cuzick's test for trend across ordered groups). In order to determine which gene influenced the other gene between egfl7 and ICAM-1, the expression levels of either gene were modulated in endothelial cells. Egfl7 regulated ICAM-1 expression while ICAM-1 had no effects on egfl7 expression in the same conditions. Altogether, these results provide further results that egfl7 serves a regulatory role in endothelial cell activation in relation to immune infiltration and that it is a potential therapeutic target to consider for improving anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:27446447

  7. A Global View of the Oncogenic Landscape in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: An Integrated Analysis at the Genetic and Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunfang; Wei, Wenbin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Woodman, Ciaran B.; Yao, Yunhong; Nicholls, John M.; Joab, Irène; Sihota, Sim K.; Shao, Jian-Yong; Derkaoui, K. Dalia; Amari, Aicha; Maloney, Stephanie L.; Bell, Andrew I.; Murray, Paul G.; Dawson, Christopher W.; Young, Lawrence S.; Arrand, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that the tumour cells of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) exhibit recurrent chromosome abnormalities. These genetic changes are broadly assumed to lead to changes in gene expression which are important for the pathogenesis of this tumour. However, this assumption has yet to be formally tested at a global level. Therefore a genome wide analysis of chromosome copy number and gene expression was performed in tumour cells micro-dissected from the same NPC biopsies. Cellular tumour suppressor and tumour-promoting genes (TSG, TPG) and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-encoded oncogenes were examined. The EBV-encoded genome maintenance protein EBNA1, along with the putative oncogenes LMP1, LMP2 and BARF1 were expressed in the majority of NPCs that were analysed. Significant downregulation of expression in an average of 76 cellular TSGs per tumour was found, whilst a per-tumour average of 88 significantly upregulated, TPGs occurred. The expression of around 60% of putative TPGs and TSGs was both up-and down-regulated in different types of cancer, suggesting that the simplistic classification of genes as TSGs or TPGs may not be entirely appropriate and that the concept of context-dependent onco-suppressors may be more extensive than previously recognised. No significant enrichment of TPGs within regions of frequent genomic gain was seen but TSGs were significantly enriched within regions of frequent genomic loss. It is suggested that loss of the FHIT gene may be a driver of NPC tumourigenesis. Notwithstanding the association of TSGs with regions of genomic loss, on a gene by gene basis and excepting homozygous deletions and high-level amplification, there is very little correlation between chromosomal copy number aberrations and expression levels of TSGs and TPGs in NPC. PMID:22815911

  8. Comparison of MMP2 and MMP9 expression levels between primary and metastatic regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Kensuke; Motozawa, Keiko; Omagari, Daisuke; Gojoubori, Takahiro; Ikeda, Takayuki; Asano, Masatake; Gionhaku, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play important roles in tumor growth. The present study investigated the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 in relation to the distribution of TAMs in the primary and metastatic regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-nine cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with regional lymph node metastasis were selected from available documents in the archives of the Department of Pathology, Nihon University School of Dentistry. Four-micrometer-thick sections were prepared from the primary and metastatic regions. Each section was subjected to immunohistochemical staining using anti-MMP2, anti-MMP9, and anti-CD68 antibodies. The distribution and localization of MMPs and TAMs were compared between primary and metastatic regions. The expression levels of both MMPs were higher in the metastatic regions of lingual and gingival cancers. Statistically significant differences were observed in both T1 and T2 cases. In contrast to the higher expression of MMPs in metastatic regions, a higher number of TAMs were distributed in the primary regions. From these results, MMP expression levels and the numbers of TAMs were expected to have an inverse relationship between the primary and metastatic regions of OSCC. (J Oral Sci 58, 59-65, 2016).

  9. Exposure to arsenic at levels found inU.S. drinking water modifies expression in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Angeline S; Bernardo, Viviane; Warnke, Linda A; Davey, Jennifer C; Hampton, Thomas; Mason, Rebecca A; Thorpe, Jessica E; Ihnat, Michael A; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2007-11-01

    The mechanisms of action of drinking water arsenic in the lung and the threshold for biologic effects remain controversial. Our study utilizes Affymetrix 22,690 transcript oligonucleotide microarrays to assess the long-term effects of increasing doses of drinking water arsenic on expression levels in the mouse lung. Mice were exposed at levels commonly found in contaminated drinking water wells in the United States (0, 0.1, 1 ppb), as well as the 50 ppb former maximum contaminant level, for 5 weeks. The expression profiles revealed modification of a number of important signaling pathways, many with corroborating evidence of arsenic responsiveness. We observed statistically significant expression changes for transcripts involved in angiogenesis, lipid metabolism, oxygen transport, apoptosis, cell cycle, and immune response. Validation by reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblot assays confirmed expression changes for a subset of transcripts. These data identify arsenic-modified signaling pathways that will help guide investigations into mechanisms of arsenic's health effects and clarify the threshold for biologic effects and potential disease risk.

  10. The formation of occlusion-derived virus is affected by the expression level of ODV-E25.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Rui; Hu, Xiaolong; Xiang, Xingwei; Yu, Shaofang; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2013-05-01

    Odv-e25 is a core gene of baculoviruses and encodes a 25.5 kDa protein located on both budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). Our previous study demonstrated that ODV-E25 was required for the formation of intranuclear microvesicles and ODV, and an odv-e25 deletion mutant could be rescued by re-expression of odv-e25 under its native promoter. To investigate the functions of ODV-E25 expression level on ODV formation, the promoter of ie-1 (pIE1), the odv-e25 native promoter, and the polyhedrin promoter (pPH) were used to direct odv-e25 expression. Our results showed that the production of ODV-E25 under its native promoter was higher than that under pIE1 but lower than that under pPH. Viral DNA replication and budded viruses (BVs) production showed that expression of odv-e25 under pIE1 and pPH could not completely repair the defects caused by the deletion of ODV-E25, while expression under its native promoter did. Electron microscopy showed that intranuclear microvesicles were found in all the constructs transfected cells except the odv-e25-null virus. However, mature ODVs only were detected in cells transfected with virus in which odv-e25 was expressed under its native or polyhedrin promoter. These results indicated that the formation occlusion-derived virus was affected by the expression level of ODV-E25.

  11. Plasma concentration, genetic variation, and gene expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in Iranian patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Khalil; Kamali, Koorosh; Karami, Elham; Soltanpour, Mohammad Soleiman

    2017-01-01

    Background: Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) -1562C>T (rs3918242) polymorphism has been proposed as a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) with conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of -1562C>T genetic polymorphism, gene expression and circulating levels of MMP9 with CAD risk in an Iranian subpopulation in in Zanjan City. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective case–control study we investigated retrospectively 100 patients with angiographically verified CAD and 100 matched controls. Genotyping of -1562C>T polymorphism was done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Gene expression levels and circulating levels of MMP9 was determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme immunoassay method, respectively. Statistical analysis was done using Student's t-test or Chi-square test by SPSS 16 software. Results: The mean circulating levels of MMP9 were significantly higher in CAD Group than control group (P = 0.002). Mean plasma levels of MMP9 were also significantly higher in triple vessel stenosis patients than double vessel or single vessel stenosis patients (P < 0.001). Moreover, mean plasma levels and gene expression levels of MMP9 were significantly higher in T allele carrier than C allele carrier of MMP9 -1562C>T polymorphism (P = 0.002, P = 0.01, respectively). However, genotype and allele frequencies of MMP9 -1562C>T polymorphism were similar between CAD patients and controls (P > 0.05). Additionally, the -1562C>T polymorphism of MMP9 gene didn't increase the risk of CAD in dominant (P = 0.537) or recessive (P = 0.249) genetic models. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that circulating levels of MMP9 but not -1562C>T polymorphism of MMP9 gene may be a risk factor for development and severity of CAD in an Iranian subpopulation in Zanjan.

  12. Central expression and anorectic effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor are regulated by circulating estradiol levels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zheng; Liu, Xian; Senthil Kumar, Shiva Priya Dharshan; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Haifei

    2013-03-01

    Estrogens potently suppress food intake. Compelling evidence suggests that estradiol, the primary form of estrogens, reduces food intake by facilitating other anorectic signals. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), like estradiol, appears to suppress food intake by affecting meal size. We hypothesized that estradiol modulates Bdnf expression and the anorectic effect of BDNF. The first goal was to determine whether Bdnf expression was regulated by endogenous estradiol of cycling rats and by cyclic estradiol treatment using ovariectomized rats. Bdnf expression within the ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus (VMH) was temporally elevated at estrus following the estradiol peak, which coincided with the decline in feeding at this phase of the ovarian cycle. Additionally, food intake and body weight were increased following ovariectomy with a parallel decrease in Bdnf expression in the VMH. All of these alterations were reversed by cyclic estradiol treatment, suggesting that Bdnf expression within the VMH was regulated in an estradiol-dependent manner. The second goal was to determine whether estradiol modulates the anorectic effect of BDNF. Sham-operated estrous rats and ovariectomized rats cyclically treated with estradiol responded to a lower dose of central administration of BDNF to decrease food intake than male rats and oil-treated ovariectomized rats, implying that endogenous estradiol or cyclic estradiol replacement increased the sensitivity to anorectic effect of BDNF. These data indicate that Bdnf expression within the VMH and the anorectic effect of BDNF varied depending on plasma estradiol levels, suggesting that estradiol may regulate BDNF signaling to regulate feeding.

  13. Use of adenylate kinase as a solubility tag for high level expression of T4 DNA ligase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Huang, Anliang; Luo, Dan; Liu, Haipeng; Han, Huzi; Xu, Yang; Liang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of T4 DNA ligase in 1960s was pivotal in the spread of molecular biotechnology. The enzyme has become ubiquitous for recombinant DNA routinely practiced in biomedical research around the globe. Great efforts have been made to express and purify T4 DNA ligase to meet the world demand, yet over-expression of soluble T4 DNA ligase in E. coli has been difficult. Here we explore the use of adenylate kinase to enhance T4 DNA ligase expression and its downstream purification. E.coli adenylate kinase, which can be expressed in active form at high level, was fused to the N-terminus of T4 DNA ligase. The resulting His-tagged AK-T4 DNA ligase fusion protein was greatly over-expressed in E. coli, and readily purified to near homogeneity via two purification steps consisting of Blue Sepharose and Ni-NTA chromatography. The purified AK-T4 DNA ligase not only is fully active for DNA ligation, but also can use ADP in addition to ATP as energy source since adenylate kinase converts ADP to ATP and AMP. Thus adenylate kinase may be used as a solubility tag to facilitate recombinant protein expression as well as their downstream purification.

  14. Human papilloma virus transformed CaSki cells constitutively express high levels of functional SerpinB2.

    PubMed

    Major, Lee; Schroder, Wayne A; Gardner, Joy; Fish, Richard J; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Many malignant tissues, including human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated cancers, express SerpinB2, also known as plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2). Whether SerpinB2 is expressed by the HPV-transformed cancer cells, and if so, whether SerpinB2 is mutated or behaves aberrantly remains unclear. Here we show that HPV-transformed CaSki cells express high levels of constitutive wild-type SerpinB2, with cellular distribution, glycosylation, secretion, cleavage, induction and urokinase binding similar to that reported for primary cells. Neutralization of secreted SerpinB2 failed to affect CaSki cell migration or growth. Lentivirus-based over-expression of SerpinB2 also had no effect on growth, and we were unable to confirm a role for SerpinB2 in binding or regulating expression of the retinoblastoma protein. CaSki cells thus emerge as a useful tool for studying SerpinB2, with the physiological function of SerpinB2 expression by tumor cells remaining controversial. Using CaSki cells as a source of endogenous SerpinB2, we confirmed that SerpinB2 efficiently binds the proteasomal subunit member β1.

  15. Synergistic and Antagonistic Interplay between Myostatin Gene Expression and Physical Activity Levels on Gene Expression Patterns in Triceps Brachii Muscles of C57/BL6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Mishra, Sanjibita; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of myostatin expression and physical activity have both been associated with transcriptome dysregulation and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The transcriptome of triceps brachii muscles from male C57/BL6 mice corresponding to two genotypes (wild-type and myostatin-reduced) under two conditions (high and low physical activity) was characterized using RNA-Seq. Synergistic and antagonistic interaction and ortholog modes of action of myostatin genotype and activity level on genes and gene pathways in this skeletal muscle were uncovered; 1,836, 238, and 399 genes exhibited significant (FDR-adjusted P-value < 0.005) activity-by-genotype interaction, genotype and activity effects, respectively. The most common differentially expressed profiles were (i) inactive myostatin-reduced relative to active and inactive wild-type, (ii) inactive myostatin-reduced and active wild-type, and (iii) inactive myostatin-reduced and inactive wild-type. Several remarkable genes and gene pathways were identified. The expression profile of nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit (Naca) supports a synergistic interaction between activity level and myostatin genotype, while Gremlin 2 (Grem2) displayed an antagonistic interaction. Comparison between activity levels revealed expression changes in genes encoding for structural proteins important for muscle function (including troponin, tropomyosin and myoglobin) and for fatty acid metabolism (some linked to diabetes and obesity, DNA-repair, stem cell renewal, and various forms of cancer). Conversely, comparison between genotype groups revealed changes in genes associated with G1-to-S-phase transition of the cell cycle of myoblasts and the expression of Grem2 proteins that modulate the cleavage of the myostatin propeptide. A number of myostatin-feedback regulated gene products that are primarily regulatory were uncovered, including microRNA impacting central functions and Piezo proteins that make cationic current

  16. Identification of condition-specific regulatory modules through multi-level motif and mRNA expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wang, Yue; Hoffman, Eric P.; Riggins, Rebecca B.; Clarke, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Many computational methods for identification of transcription regulatory modules often result in many false positives in practice due to noise sources of binding information and gene expression profiling data. In this paper, we propose a multi-level strategy for condition-specific gene regulatory module identification by integrating motif binding information and gene expression data through support vector regression and significant analysis. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method on a yeast cell cycle data set. The study on a breast cancer microarray data set shows that it can successfully identify the significant and reliable regulatory modules associated with breast cancer. PMID:20054984

  17. Sources of variation in baseline gene expression levels from toxicogenomics study control animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of gene expression profiling in both clinical and laboratory settings would be enhanced by better characterization ofvariance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis ofmicroarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the con...

  18. Characteristics of High-Risk College Student Drinkers Expressing High and Low Levels of Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graceffo, James M.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Chun-Kennedy, Caitlin; Locke, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify variables that reliably differentiated between 2 groups of students who reported binge drinking at the same rate (6 to more than 10 times within the previous 2 weeks) but who exhibited different distress associated with their behavior. Results indicated that students who received an external expression of…

  19. Expression of a foreign Rubisco small subunit in tobacco with reduced levels of the native protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cDNA, ArRbcS3, for the small subunit of Rubisco from Amaranthus retroflexus (pigweed) was expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under the control of a strong leaf-specific Lhcb promoter. The coding region of the ArRbcS3 was fused to the plastid targeting sequence of the native tobacco rbcS to...

  20. Protein expression levels in the medullary visceral zone of rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, L H; Xing, L F; Zhang, G H; Pan, S Y

    2015-08-03

    We investigated protein expression in the medullary visceral zone (MVZ) of rats with multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to discuss the possible regulatory mechanism of the MVZ in the course of SAH-induced MODS. A SAH-induced MODS model was established in rats by injecting arterial blood into the Willis' circle. Protein expression in the MVZ was analyzed by immunohistochemistry assay. Protein expression in the MVZ peaked 24-36 h after SAH, and was significantly higher than in the control and sham operation groups. Organs at each time point exhibited inflammatory injuries to varying degrees after SAH, which reached a maximum at 24-36 h. Incidences of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and MODS were 100 and 71.67%, respectively, after SAH. There is a consistency between MVZ protein expression and inflammatory changes in each organ after SAH. This prompts the suggestion that the MVZ may be one of the direct regulative centers in SAH-induced MODS, and may be involved in the functional regulation of the surrounding organs after SAH.

  1. Changes in microRNA expression levels correlate with clinicopathological features and prognoses in endometrial serous adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hiroki, Eri; Akahira, Jun-Ichi; Suzuki, Fumihiko; Nagase, Satoru; Ito, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the expression profiles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in endometrial serous adenocarcinoma and to examine the association between miRNA expression and clinical outcomes. Twenty-one patients diagnosed with endometrial serous adenocarcinoma between January 2001 and December 2006 were enrolled. miRNA expression profiles were examined using miRNA microarray and qRT-PCR. miRNA expression levels were correlated with clinicopathological variables and survival rates. A total of 120 miRNAs were differentially expressed in endometrial serous adenocarcinoma compared to normal endometria. Of these, 54 miRNAs were down-regulated (>2-fold), including miR-101, miR-10b*, miR-152, and miR-29b, and the remainder were up-regulated (>2-fold), including miR-200a, miR-200b, and miR-205. Decreased expression of miR-10b*, miR-29b, and miR-455-5p was correlated with vascular invasion (P = 0.048, P = 0.013, and P = 0.032, respectively). Univariate analysis revealed that lower expression of miR-101, miR-10b*, miR-139-5p, miR-152, miR-29b, and miR-455-5p was significantly correlated with poor overall survival (P < 0.05), and reduced expression of miR-152, miR-29b, and miR-455-5p was significantly correlated with poor disease-free survival (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that decreased expression of miR-152 (P = 0.021) was a statistically independent risk factor for overall survival, and decreased expression levels of miR-101 (P = 0.016) and miR-152 (P = 0.010) were statistically independent risk factors for disease-free survival. In addition, transfection of miR-101 or miR-152 precursors into an endometrial serous carcinoma cell line inhibited cell growth (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.01, respectively). Moreover, strong positive immunoreactivity of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was significantly correlated with down-regulation of miR-101 (P = 0.035). These findings suggest that the dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with the poor prognosis in endometrial serous

  2. Expression of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 mRNAs in hippocampal interneurons: morphological characterization, levels of expression, and colocalization of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3.

    PubMed

    Pascual, M; Rocamora, N; Acsády, L; Freund, T F; Soriano, E

    1998-05-25

    We have investigated the distribution and morphology of hippocampal interneurons that express the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in the rat. For this study, we combined in situ hybridization for the detection of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs and immunocytochemistry against the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PARV), calretinin (CALR), and calbindin (CALB). Whereas the majority of PARV+ interneurons expressed NGF mRNA, only subsets of CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons (23% and 24%, respectively) displayed NGF hybridization. Most CALB/NGF+ cells were located in the stratum oriens/alveus of the CA3-CA1 regions, suggesting that they may include the population of CALB+, hippocamposeptal, nonpyramidal neurons. Most of the nonspiny CALR/NGF+ neurons were located within or in the vicinity of the pyramidal layer and had faint CALR immunostaining and stellate, thin dendrites. Regarding the spiny CALR-immunoreactive cells, we found that most of these neurons in the hilus were NGF+, whereas only 59% of displayed NGF hybridization in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region. A small subset of PARV- and CALR-immunoreactive cells expressed NT-3 mRNA (16% and 13%, respectively). NT-3 message was not found in the large basket cells of the dentate gyrus, whereas the distribution and morphology of CALR/NT-3+ cells were similar to those of nonspiny CALR/NGF+ cells. In fact, double in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that most NT-3+ neurons also expressed NGF mRNA, indicating coexpression of both neurotrophins in subpopulations of PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. Moreover, the level of NGF mRNA expression was higher in PARV+ neurons than in CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons, whereas NT-3 message was expressed similarly in PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. The present findings show a differential expression of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs in subsets of hippocampal interneurons and suggest that the expression of these transcripts depends on factors intrinsic to

  3. The expression level of HJURP has an independent prognostic impact and predicts the sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhi; Huang, Ge; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Gu, Shenda; Lenburg, Marc E; Pai, Melody; Bayani, Nora; Blakely, Eleanor A; Gray, Joe W; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2010-06-25

    Introduction: HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) is a newly discovered gene reported to function at centromeres and to interact with CENPA. However its role in tumor development remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of HJURP in breast cancer and its correlation with radiotherapeutic outcome. Methods: We measured HJURP expression level in human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers by Western blot and/or by Affymetrix Microarray; and determined its associations with clinical variables using standard statistical methods. Validation was performed with the use of published microarray data. We assessed cell growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells after radiation using high-content image analysis. Results: HJURP was expressed at higher level in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. HJURP mRNA levels were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade, age and Ki67 proliferation indices, but not with pathologic stage, ERBB2, tumor size, or lymph node status. Higher HJURP mRNA levels significantly decreased disease-free and overall survival. HJURP mRNA levels predicted the prognosis better than Ki67 proliferation indices. In a multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression, including clinical variables as covariates, HJURP mRNA levels remained an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. In addition HJURP mRNA levels were an independent prognostic factor over molecular subtypes (normal like, luminal, Erbb2 and basal). Poor clinical outcomes among patients with high HJURP expression werevalidated in five additional breast cancer cohorts. Furthermore, the patients with high HJURP levels were much more sensitive to radiotherapy. In vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines showed that cells with high HJURP levels were more sensitive to radiation treatment and had a higher rate of apoptosis

  4. Expression of denitrification enzymes in response to the dissolved oxygen level and respiratory substrate in continuous culture of Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed Central

    Körner, H; Zumft, W G

    1989-01-01

    The onset and cessation of the synthesis of denitrification enzymes of Pseudomonas stutzeri were investigated by using continuous culture and defined dissolved oxygen levels covering the full range of transition from air saturation to complete anaerobiosis. Expression of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase (cytochrome cd1), and N2O reductase was controlled by discrete oxygen levels and by the nature of the nitrogenous oxide available for respiration. N2O reductase was synthesized constitutively at a low level; for enhanced expression, oxygen concentrations were required to decrease below 5 mg of O2 per liter. The threshold values for synthesis of nitrate reductase and cytochrome cd1 in the presence of nitrate were ca. 5 and ca. 2.5 mg of O2 per liter, respectively. With nitrous oxide as the respiratory substrate, nitrite reductase was again the most sensitive to oxygen concentration; however, thresholds for all denitrification enzymes shifted to lower oxygen levels. Whereas the presence of nitrate resulted in maximum expression and nearly uniform induction of all reductases, nitrite and nitrous oxide stimulated preferably the respective enzyme catalyzing reduction. In the absence of a nitrogenous oxide, anaerobiosis did not induce enzyme synthesis to any significant degree. The accumulation of nitrite seen during both the aerobic-anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic transition phases was caused by the differences in onset or cessation of synthesis of nitrate and nitrite reductases and an inhibitory effect of nitrate on nitrite reduction. Images PMID:2764573

  5. Cold induced changes of adenosine levels in common eelpout (Zoarces viviparus): a role in modulating cytochrome c oxidase expression.

    PubMed

    Eckerle, L G; Lucassen, M; Hirse, T; Pörtner, H O

    2008-04-01

    Exposure of ectothermic organisms to variations in temperatures causes a transient mismatch between energy supply and demand, which needs to be compensated for during acclimation. Adenosine accumulation from ATP breakdown indicates such an imbalance and its reversal reflects a restoration of energy status. We monitored adenosine levels in blood serum and liver of common eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) during cold exposure in vivo. Furthermore, we tested its effect on the pattern of thermal acclimation in hepatocytes isolated from cold- (4 degrees C) versus warm- (11 degrees C) exposed fish. Adenosine levels increased during cold exposure in vivo and reached a transient maximum after 24 h in serum, but remained permanently elevated in liver. Whole animal cold acclimation induced a rise of liver citrate synthase activity by 44+/-15%, but left cytochrome c oxidase activity (COX) and RNA expression of the respective genes unchanged. Cold incubation of hepatocytes from warm-acclimated fish failed to cause an increase of mitochondrial enzyme activities despite increased COX4 mRNA levels. Conversely, warm acclimation of hepatocytes from cold-acclimated fish reduced both enzyme activities and COX2 and COX4 mRNA levels by 26-37%. Adenosine treatment of both warm- and cold-acclimated hepatocytes suppressed COX activities but activated COX mRNA expression. These effects were not receptor mediated. The present findings indicate that adenosine has the potential to regulate mitochondrial functioning in vivo, albeit the pathways resulting in the contrasting effects on expression and activity need to be identified.

  6. Plasma Triglyceride Levels May Be Modulated by Gene Expression of IQCJ, NXPH1, PHF17 and MYB in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vallée Marcotte, Bastien; Guénard, Frédéric; Cormier, Hubert; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Rudkowska, Iwona; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2017-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) by our group identified loci associated with the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to ω-3 fatty acid (FA) supplementation in IQCJ, NXPH1, PHF17 and MYB. Our aim is to investigate potential mechanisms underlying the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the four genes and TG levels following ω-3 FA supplementation. 208 subjects received 3 g/day of ω-3 FA (1.9–2.2 g of EPA and 1.1 g of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) for six weeks. Plasma TG were measured before and after the intervention. 67 SNPs were selected to increase the density of markers near GWAS hits. Genome-wide expression and methylation analyses were conducted on respectively 30 and 35 participants’ blood sample together with in silico analyses. Two SNPs of IQCJ showed different affinities to splice sites depending on alleles. Expression levels were influenced by genotype for one SNP in NXPH1 and one in MYB. Associations between 12 tagged SNPs of IQCJ, 26 of NXPH1, seven of PHF17 and four of MYB and gene-specific CpG site methylation levels were found. The response of plasma TG to ω-3 FA supplementation may be modulated by the effect of DNA methylation on expression levels of genes revealed by GWAS. PMID:28134766

  7. TDP-43 aggregation mirrors TDP-43 knockdown, affecting the expression levels of a common set of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Prpar Mihevc, S.; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele; Rogelj, Boris

    2016-01-01

    TDP-43 protein plays an important role in regulating transcriptional repression, RNA metabolism, and splicing. Typically it shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm to perform its functions, while abnormal cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). For the purpose of this study we selected a set of proteins that were misregulated following silencing of TDP-43 and analysed their expression in a TDP-43-aggregation model cell line HEK293 Flp-in Flag-TDP-43-12x-Q/N F4L. Following TDP-43 sequestration in insoluble aggregates, we observed higher nuclear levels of EIF4A3, and POLDIP3β, whereas nuclear levels of DNMT3A, HNRNPA3, PABPC1 and POLDIP3α dropped, and cytoplasmic levels of RANBP1 dropped. In addition, immunofluorescence signal intensity quantifications showed increased nuclear expression of HNRNPL and YARS, and downregulation of cytoplasmic DPCD. Furthermore, cytoplasmic levels of predominantly nuclear protein ALYREF increased. In conclusion, by identifying a common set of proteins that are differentially expressed in a similar manner in these two different conditions, we show that TDP-43 aggregation has a comparable effect to TDP-43 knockdown. PMID:27665936

  8. Inconformity of CXCL3 Plasma Level and Placenta Expression in Preeclampsia and Its Effect on Trophoblast Viability and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jin; Gong, Yunhui; Gao, Linbo; Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Rong

    2014-01-01

    As a member of the chemokine family, CXCL3 was previously known to participate in many pathophysiological events. However, whether CXCL3 stimulates trophoblast invasion as a key process of preeclampsia pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate this hypothesis and determine the effect of CXCL3 on the first trimester trophoblast. Seventy gravidas were included in this study. ELISA was used to detect CXCL3 plasma levels on preeclampsia and normal pregnant groups. CXCL3 protein and mRNA levels were detected via Western blot and real-time quantitative PCR analysis after immunolocalized in human placenta. Moreover, the CXCL3 function in HTR-8/Svneo was analyzed via WST-1 assay, flow cytometry and invasion test. The plasma CXCL3 level in preeclampsia was significantly higher than that in normal pregnancy. CXCL3 expression was observed in the cytoplasm of placental trophoblasts and vascular endothelium in all groups without significant difference between maternal and fetal sides. In addition, placenta CXCL3 expression in severe preeclampsia was significantly lower than those in normal and mild PE groups. Moreover, exogenous CXCL3 can promote the proliferation and invasion of HTR-8/Svneo; however, its effect on apoptosis remains unclear. In summary, a significant abnormality of plasma CXCL3 level and placental CXCL3 expression was discovered in severe preeclampsia; CXCL3 had a function in trophoblast invasion, which indicated its participation in shallow implantation. Therefore CXCL3 might be involved in severe preeclampsia pathogenesis. PMID:25485631

  9. Tumor endothelial marker 8 expression levels in dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines are related to clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Venanzi, Franco Maria; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Bolli, Elisabetta; Granato, Anna Maria; Ridolfi, Laura; Gabrielli, Federica; Barucca, Alessandra; Concetti, Antonio; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Riccobon, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that tumor endothelial markers (TEMs 1-9) are up modulated in immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic dendritic cells (DCs) found in tumor microenvironments. We recently reported that monocyte-derived DCs used for vaccination trials may accumulate high levels of TEM8 gene transcripts. Here, we investigate whether TEM8 expression in DC preparations represents a specific tumor-associated change of potential clinical relevance. TEM8 expression at the mRNA and protein level was evaluated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and cytofluorimetric analysis in human clinical grade DCs utilized for the therapeutic vaccination of 17 advanced cancer patients (13 melanoma and 4 renal cell carcinoma). The analyses revealed that DCs from patients markedly differ in their ability to up-modulate TEM8. Indeed, mDCs from eight non-progressing patients [median overall survival (OS) = 32 months, all positive to the delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH)], had similar TEM8 mRNA expression levels [mDCs vs. immature iDCs; mean fold increase (mfi) = 1.97] to those found in healthy donors (mfi = 2.7). Conversely, mDCs from nine progressing patients (OS < 5 months, all but one with negative DTH) showed an increase in TEM8 mRNA levels (mfi = 12.88, p = 0.0018). The present observations suggest that TEM8 expression levels in DC-based therapeutic vaccines would allow the selection of a subgroup of patients who are most likely to benefit from therapeutic vaccination.

  10. High-level expression of a cloned HLA heavy chain gene introduced into mouse cells on a bovine papillomavirus vector.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, D; Corbin, V; Sibley, E; Maniatis, T

    1984-02-01

    A gene encoding the heavy chain of an HLA human histocompatibility antigen was isolated from a library of human DNA by recombination and selection in vivo. After insertion into a bovine papillomavirus (BPV) DNA expression vector, the gene was introduced into cultured mouse cells. Cells transformed with the HLA-BPV plasmids did not appear to contain extrachromosomal viral DNA, whereas BPV recombinants usually replicated as plasmids in transformed cell lines. Large amounts of HLA RNA were produced by the transformed cells, and the rate of synthesis of human heavy chain was several-fold higher than in the JY cell line, a well-characterized human lymphoblastoid cell line which expresses high levels of surface HLA antigen. Substantial amounts of human heavy chain accumulated in the transformed cells, and HLA antigen was present at the cell surface. These observations establish the feasibility of using BPV vectors to study the structure and function of HLA antigens and the expression of cloned HLA genes.

  11. Expression of heat shock protein 70 is altered by age and diet at the level of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, A R; Wu, B; Takahashi, R; Strong, R; Richardson, A

    1993-01-01

    Because heat shock proteins have been shown to play a critical role in protecting cells from hyperthermia and other types of physiological stresses, it was of interest to determine what effect age and caloric restriction have on the ability of cells to regulate the expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), the most prominent and most evolutionarily conserved of the heat shock proteins. Caloric restriction is the only experimental manipulation known to retard aging and increase survival of mammals. The ability of hepatocytes isolated from young/adult (4- to 7-month-old) and old (22- to 28-month-old) male Fischer F344 rats fed ad libitum or a caloric restriction diet (60% of the content of the ad libitum diet) to express hsp70 was determined after a mild heat shock (42.5 degrees C for 30 min). We found that the induction of hsp70 synthesis and mRNA levels by heat shock was 40 to 50% lower in hepatocytes isolated from old rats than in hepatocytes isolated from young rats. Using in situ hybridization, we found that essentially all hepatocytes from the young/adult and old rats expressed hsp70 in response to heat shock; therefore, the age-related decrease in the induction of hsp70 expression was not due to an age-related accumulation of cells that do not respond to heat shock. Measurements of hsp70 mRNA stability and hsp70 transcription demonstrated that the age-related decline in hsp70 expression arose from a decline in hsp70 transcription. Interestingly, the age-related decline in the induction of hsp70 expression was reversed by caloric restriction; e.g., the induction of hsp70 synthesis, mRNA levels, and nuclear transcription were significantly higher in hepatocytes isolated from old rats fed the caloric restricted diet than in hepatocytes isolated from old rats fed ad libitum. The levels of the heat shock transcription factor in nuclear extracts isolated from heat-shocked hepatocytes were measured in a gel shift assay. Binding of the heat shock transcription

  12. Exercise-induced increase in IL-6 level enhances GLUT4 expression and insulin sensitivity in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Kakehi, Saori; Sanada, Hiromi; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2016-05-13

    A single bout of exercise is known to increase the insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle; however, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Because a single bout of exercise induces a transient increase in blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) level, we hypothesized that the enhancement of insulin sensitivity after a single bout of exercise in skeletal muscle is mediated at least in part through IL-6-dependent mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, C57BL6J mice were intravenously injected with normal IgG or an IL-6 neutralizing antibody before exercise. Twenty-four hours after a single bout of exercise, the plantaris muscle was harvested to measure insulin sensitivity and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 expression levels by ex-vivo insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake and Western blotting, respectively. Compared with sedentary mice, mice that performed exercise showed enhanced IL-6 concentration, insulin-stimulated 2-DG uptake, and GLUT-4 expression in the plantaris muscle. The enhanced insulin sensitivity and GLUT4 expression were canceled by injection of the IL-6 neutralizing antibody before exercise. In addition, IL-6 injection increased GLUT4 expression, both in the plantaris muscle and the soleus muscle in C57BL6J mice. Furthermore, a short period of incubation with IL-6 increased GLUT4 expression in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. In summary, these results suggested that IL-6 increased GLUT4 expression in muscle and that this phenomenon may play a role in the post-exercise enhancement of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

  13. Evaluation of discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) expression level in normal, benign, and malignant human prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Azemikhah, Mitra; Ashtiani, Hamidreza Ahmadi; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) is a new member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. There are two isoforms of discoidin domain receptor (DDR), DDR1 and DDR2. These receptors play a major role in the adhesion, motility and cell proliferation. Due to the important role of DDR2 in the development of tumor extension, this receptor is pivotal in the field of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of DDR2, in the malignant, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissues of patients with prostate cancer. In this study the gene and protein expression of DDR2 in adjacent normal (n=40), BPH (n=40), and malignant (n=40) prostate tissue were measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the correlation of DDR2 gene and protein expression with prognostic factors such as age, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymph node involvement, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration were evaluated. The relative mRNA and protein expression level of DDR2 in malignant and benign prostate tissue was significantly higher than those of adjacent normal tissues (P<0.01). This expression was found to increase approximately 3.5 and 2.1 fold for mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Spearman test indicated a significant correlation between DDR2 mRNA and protein expression with prognostic factors such as tumor grade, stage, lymph node involvement, and serum PSA concentration. However, significant correlation with age was not observed. These findings suggest that DDR2 is a cancer-related gene associated with the aggressive progression of prostate cancer patients.

  14. Lead (Pb) exposure reduces global DNA methylation level by non-competitive inhibition and alteration of dnmt expression.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Oscar F; Lee, Jinyoung; Yu King Hing, Nathaphon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Freeman, Jennifer L; Yuan, Chongli

    2017-02-22

    Low-dose exposure to lead (Pb) is connected to developmental neurological alterations by inducing molecular changes, such as aberrant gene expression patterns. The attributing molecular mechanism, however, is not well-elucidated. In this study, we revealed epigenetic features and mechanisms that can alter gene expression patterns by identifying changes in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity, expression pattern and DNA methylation level using moelcular studies and a zebrafish animal model. We characterized the effects of Pb on the activities of various DNMTs in vitro and determined the molecular role of Pb in modulating DNMT activity via kinetic experiments. An exposure of 100 or 500 ppb of Pb was found to significantly lower the activity of maintenance DNMTs. The inhibition mechanism can be described using non-competitive Michaelis-Menten kinetics. A zebrafish animal model was then used to assess the biological significance of our findings. An embryonic exposure to 100 or 500 ppb Pb resulted in a significant change in global methylation levels consistent with previous studies using human and rodent model. Our study also suggests that Pb exposure in zebrafish alters the expression patterns of dnmt3 and dnmt4 which are human DNMT3b orthologs. The knowledge from this study suggests that Pb exposure can affect the activity of maintenance DNMTs via non-competitive inhibition, which has not been reported previously. Meanwhile, the expression pattern of de novo methyltransferases can also be altered. Collectively, they result in a reduction in global DNA methylation level in Pb-exposed zebrafish model, which can be compared to findings in human and rodent studies.

  15. Ecdysteroids Regulate the Levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) Expression in the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J. Sook

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml) and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w) ratio). Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle. PMID:25849453

  16. Ecdysteroids regulate the levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) expression in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J Sook

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml) and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w) ratio). Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle.

  17. Regulation of Connexins Expression Levels by MicroRNAs, an Update

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Juan F.; Retamal, Mauricio A.

    2016-01-01

    Control of cell-cell coordination and communication is regulated by several factors, including paracrine and autocrine release of biomolecules, and direct exchange of soluble factors between cells through gap junction channels. Additionally, hemichannels also participate in cell-cell coordination through the release of signaling molecules, such as ATP and glutamate. A family of transmembrane proteins named connexins forms both gap junction channels and hemichannels. Because of their importance in cell and tissue coordination, connexins are controlled both by post-translational and post-transcriptional modifications. In recent years, non-coding RNAs have garnered research interest due to their ability to exert post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. One of the most recent, well-documented control mechanisms of protein synthesis is found through the action of small, single-stranded RNA, called micro RNAs (miRNAs or miRs). Put simply, miRNAs are negative regulators of the expression of a myriad proteins involved in many physiological and pathological processes. This mini review will briefly summarize what is currently known about the action of miRNAs over Cxs expression/function in different organs under some relevant physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27932990

  18. Influence of Different Levels of Lipoic Acid Synthase Gene Expression on Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Longquan; Hiller, Sylvia; Simington, Stephen; Nickeleit, Volker; Maeda, Nobuyo; James, Leighton R.; Yi, Xianwen

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) but outcomes of many clinical trials are controversial. To define the role of antioxidants in kidney protection during the development of diabetic nephropathy, we have generated a novel genetic antioxidant mouse model with over- or under-expression of lipoic acid synthase gene (Lias). These models have been mated with Ins2Akita/+ mice, a type I diabetic mouse model. We compare the major pathologic changes and oxidative stress status in two new strains of the mice with controls. Our results show that Ins2Akita/+ mice with under-expressed Lias gene, exhibit higher oxidative stress and more severe DN features (albuminuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening and mesangial matrix expansion). In contrast, Ins2Akita/+ mice with highly-expressed Lias gene display lower oxidative stress and less DN pathologic changes. Our study demonstrates that strengthening endogenous antioxidant capacity could be an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of DN. PMID:27706190

  19. Regulation of Connexins Expression Levels by MicroRNAs, an Update.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Juan F; Retamal, Mauricio A

    2016-01-01

    Control of cell-cell coordination and communication is regulated by several factors, including paracrine and autocrine release of biomolecules, and direct exchange of soluble factors between cells through gap junction channels. Additionally, hemichannels also participate in cell-cell coordination through the release of signaling molecules, such as ATP and glutamate. A family of transmembrane proteins named connexins forms both gap junction channels and hemichannels. Because of their importance in cell and tissue coordination, connexins are controlled both by post-translational and post-transcriptional modifications. In recent years, non-coding RNAs have garnered research interest due to their ability to exert post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. One of the most recent, well-documented control mechanisms of protein synthesis is found through the action of small, single-stranded RNA, called micro RNAs (miRNAs or miRs). Put simply, miRNAs are negative regulators of the expression of a myriad proteins involved in many physiological and pathological processes. This mini review will briefly summarize what is currently known about the action of miRNAs over Cxs expression/function in different organs under some relevant physiological and pathological conditions.

  20. High-level expression of biologically active human alpha 1-antitrypsin in the milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, A L; McClenaghan, M; Hornsey, V; Simons, J P; Clark, A J

    1990-01-01

    Reduced circulating levels of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1 AT) are associated with certain alpha 1 AT genotypes and increased susceptibility to emphysema. Unfortunately, the amounts of alpha 1 AT that would be required for replacement therapy are beyond the capacity of plasma fractionation and mammalian cell culture systems. Thus, we have examined the potential of transgenic animals as an alternative means of producing human alpha 1 AT. A hybrid gene constructed by using sequences from the ovine milk protein gene beta-lactoglobulin fused to an alpha 1 AT "minigene" was used to generate transgenic mice. Of 13 independent transgenic mice and mouse lines, 5 expressed the hybrid gene in the mammary gland, 5 in the salivary glands, and 2 in both these tissues. Human alpha 1 AT was secreted into the milk of each of the 7 mice and mouse lines that expressed the hybrid gene in the mammary gland. Four of these mammary-expressing transgenic mice and mouse lines produced concentrations of at least 0.5 mg of alpha 1 AT per ml in their milk; one line (AATB 35) produced 7 mg of this protein per ml. alpha 1 AT from transgenic mouse milk was similar in size to human plasma-derived alpha 1 AT and showed a similar capacity to inhibit trypsin. Expression at equivalent levels in transgenic sheep or cattle would yield sufficient alpha 1 AT for therapeutic purposes. Images PMID:1695012

  1. Codon Optimization Significantly Improves the Expression Level of α -Amylase Gene from Bacillus licheniformis in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Li, Yang-Yuan; Liu, Dan-Ni; Liu, Jing-Shan; Li, Peng; Chen, Li-Zhi; Xu, Shu-De

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase as an important industrial enzyme has been widely used in starch processing, detergent, and paper industries. To improve expression efficiency of recombinant α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis), the α-amylase gene from B. licheniformis was optimized according to the codon usage of Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) and expressed in P. pastoris. Totally, the codons encoding 305 amino acids were optimized in which a total of 328 nucleotides were changed and the G+C content was increased from 47.6 to 49.2%. The recombinants were cultured in 96-deep-well microplates and screened by a new plate assay method. Compared with the wild-type gene, the optimized gene is expressed at a significantly higher level in P. pastoris after methanol induction for 168 h in 5- and 50-L bioreactor with the maximum activity of 8100 and 11000 U/mL, which was 2.31- and 2.62-fold higher than that by wild-type gene. The improved expression level makes the enzyme a good candidate for α-amylase production in industrial use.

  2. Expression of metallothoinein isoform 3 is restricted at the post-transcriptional level in human bladder epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Scott H; Park, Seongmi; Sens, Mary Ann; Somji, Seema; Singh, Rajendra K; Namburi, Venugopal B R K; Sens, Donald A

    2005-09-01

    This study was designed to define the effect that overexpression of MT-3 would have on a cell culture model of bladder urothelium. Stable and inducible transfection was used to achieve overexpression of the MT-3 gene in the UROtsa cell line. When the UROtsa cells were stably transfected with the MT-3 coding sequence, there was highly elevated expression of MT-3 mRNA, but no MT-3 protein. An inducible vector showed that low basal levels of MT-3 mRNA and protein could be produced, but that induction only increased MT-3 mRNA and not protein. The clones expressing low basal levels of MT-3 protein also had reduced growth rates compared to control cells. Site directed mutagenesis was used to produce an MT-3 coding sequence where the prolines in positions 7 and 9 were converted to threonines. When this altered MT-3 was stably transfected into the UROtsa cells, the cells were able to accumulate the mutated form of the MT-3 protein. These studies show that MT-3 protein expression is inhibited by post-transcriptional control in the urothelial cell. Modifying the MT-3 protein to resemble the MT-1 isoform removes this component of post-transcriptional control and allows accumulation of the mutated MT-3 protein. The altered sequence involved in post-transcriptional control of MT-3 protein expression is the same sequence implicated in the neuronal growth inhibitory activity associated specifically with the MT-3 isoform of the MT gene family.

  3. Expression Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and NLRP3 Inflammasome in an Experimental Model of Oxazolone-induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Zherebiatiev, Aleksandr; Kamyshnyi, Aleksandr

    2016-02-01

    IL-1β and IL-17A are two cytokines with strong proinflammatory activities and are now known to be involved in a number of chronic inflammatory disorders. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein regulating the expression of these proinflammatory cytokines. The NLRP3 inflammasome promotes the maturation of the IL-1β and its activation has been shown as a critical mechanism in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, underlying mechanisms to modulate their production in IBD are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression levels of mRNA for the NLRP3 inflammasome, HMGB1 and proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-17A in the inflamed colon of rats with experimental oxazolone-induced colitis. Experiments were carried out on male wistar rats. IL-1β, IL-17A, HMGB1 and NLRP3 inflammasome mRNA expression were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that the expression levels of IL-1β, IL-17A, NLRP3 and HMGB1 were elevated in the inflamed colon of rats with oxazolone-induced colitis.

  4. High-level expression, purification and production of the fungal immunomodulatory protein-gts in baculovirus-infected insect larva.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Chen, Hsin-An; Li, Feng-Yin; Lin, Ching-Ting; Wu, Chi-Ming; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Tzen, Jason Tze-Cheng; Hsieh, Sheng-Kuo; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong

    2013-02-01

    Fip-gts, a fungal immunomodulatory protein (Fip) isolated from Ganoderma tsugae (gts), has been reported to possess therapeutic effects in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune disease. To cost-effectively produce Fip-gts and bypass the bottleneck involved in its time-consuming purification from G. tsugae, in this study, we incorporated the SP(bbx) secretion signal into recombinant baculovirus for expressing glycosylated and bioactive rFip-gts in baculovirus-infected insect cells and Trichoplusia ni larva. This is the first study to employ the aerosol infecting T. ni larva with recombinant baculovirus for economical and high-level production of foreign proteins. In this study, one purification could yield 10 mg of rFip-gts protein merely from ∼100 infected T. ni larvae by aerosol inoculation, corresponding to 5 L (5 × 10⁹ cells) of the infected Sf21 culture. In addition, the rFip-gts purified from T. ni larvae could induce the expression of interleukin-2 in murine splenocytes with an immunoresponsive level similar to that induced by LZ-8 (a known potent immunomodulatory protein purified from Ling zhi, Ganoderma lucidum). Thus, our results demonstrated that the larva-based baculovirus expression system can successfully express rFip-gts with the assembling capability required for maintaining immunomodulatory and anticancer activity. Our approach will open a new avenue for the production of rFip-gts and facilitate the immunoregulatory activity of rFip-gts available in the future.

  5. High-level expression and characterization of a thermostable xylanase mutant from Trichoderma reesei in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-yuan; Zhong, Kai-xin; Hu, Ai-hong; Liu, Dan-ni; Chen, Li-zhi; Xu, Shu-de

    2015-04-01

    A gene encoding xylanase 2 mutant from Trichoderma reesei (T2C/T28C, named mxyn2) was cloned into the Pichia pastoris X33 strain using the vector pPICZαA. Recombinant Mxyn2p was functionally expressed in P. pastoris X33 and secreted into the supernatant. Real time qPCR demonstrated that an increase in gene copy number correlated with higher levels of expression. Supernatant from methanol induced cells was concentrated by ultrafiltration with a 10kDa cut off membrane, and purified with ion exchange chromatography using SP Sepharose Fast Flow chromatography. Recombinant Mxyn2p protein had the highest activity at 75°C, while recombinant protein encoded by the "wild type" xylanase gene xyn2, also expressed in Pichia, was 20°C lower. The Mxyn2p enzyme retained more than 70% of its activity after incubation at 80°C for 10min. The effects of the optimal pH and temperature for higher expression levels in P. pastoris were also determined, 6.0 and 22°C, respectively. The maximum xylanase activity of Mxyn2p was 13,000nkat/mg (9.88g/l) in fed-batch cultivation after 168h induction with methanol in a 50l bioreactor.

  6. High-level expression of alternative oxidase protein sequences enhances the spread of viral vectors in resistant and susceptible plants.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alex M; Gilliland, Androulla; York, Caroline J; Hyman, Belinda; Carr, John P

    2004-12-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-resistant alternative respiratory pathway in plants and has been implicated in resistance to viruses. When tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vectors were used to drive very high levels of expression of either AOX or AOX mutated in its active site (AOX-E), virus spread was enhanced. This was visualized as the induction of larger hypersensitive-response lesions after inoculation onto NN-genotype tobacco than those produced by vectors bearing sequences of comparable length [the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene sequence or antisense aox] or the 'empty' viral vector. Also, in the highly susceptible host Nicotiana benthamiana, systemic movement of TMV vectors expressing AOX or AOX-E was faster than that of TMV constructs bearing gfp or antisense aox sequences. Notably, in N. benthamiana, TMV.AOX and TMV.AOX-E induced symptoms that were severe and ultimately included cell death, whereas the empty vector, TMV.GFP and the TMV vector expressing antisense aox sequences never induced necrosis. The results show that, if expressed at sufficiently high levels, active and inactive AOX proteins can affect virus spread and symptomology in plants.

  7. β2-agonist clenbuterol suppresses bacterial phagocytosis of splenic macrophages expressing high levels of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Ken; Sato, Shogo; Sato, Madoka; Hashizume, Yoko; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Splenic marginal zone macrophages expressing macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) contribute to the clearance of blood-borne pathogens. We determined a splenic adherent cell fraction abundantly containing cells expressing a higher level of MARCO by flow cytometry, and examined the effects of daily administration of an anabolic dose of β2-agonist clenbuterol on the phagocytic capacity of the cells in mice. After 6 weeks of clenbuterol (1.0 mg/kg body weight/d) or vehicle administration to the mice, splenic adherent cells were isolated. These cells were separated into three cell-size subpopulations. Among them, the small-cell subpopulation contained abundantly the cells with markedly higher levels of MARCO and exhibited more intense phagocytic capacity against Escherichia coli, as compared with the other subpopulations. The phagocytic capacity of the small cells was significantly reduced after clenbuterol administration. These results suggest that the utilization of clenbuterol as doping drug impairs bacterial clearance in the spleen.

  8. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2013-09-27

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al., 2008, 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knock-out mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 h), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 h) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 h estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 h after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription.

  9. Assessment of Interleukin 16 Serum Levels and Skin Expression in Psoriasis Patients in Correlation with Clinical Severity of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Purzycka-Bohdan, Dorota; Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Zablotna, Monika; Wierzbicka, Justyna; Piotrowska, Anna; Zmijewski, Michal A.; Nedoszytko, Boguslaw; Nowicki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 16 (IL-16) has been described as a significant cytokine involved in the recruitment of CD4+ cells during inflammation; however, its potential role in psoriasis has not been defined. Our aim was to investigate the IL-16 serum levels and IL-16 mRNA skin expression in psoriasis patients in correlation with disease severity and mRNA skin expression for CD4. Moreover, the IL-16 skin localization was assessed and the -295 T/C IL-16 polymorphism was analyzed. For this exploratory, observational, and cross-sectional study, 97 unrelated patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis and 104 healthy controls were enrolled. IL-16 serum levels were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (P = 0.000022) and positively correlated with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (r = 0.34, P = 0.0007), Body Surface Area (r = 0.34, P = 0.01) and were significantly higher in individuals with moderate to severe psoriasis (P = 0.0029). There was no significant correlation between IL-16 serum levels and Dermatology Quality of Life Index and no differences in genotype and allele frequencies for -295 T/C IL-16 polymorphism. The expression of IL-16 (mRNA and protein) was elevated in the margin of psoriatic skin while statistically significant increase in IL-16 immunoreactivity, but not in mRNA level, was observed within plaques. Furthermore, the IL-16 mRNA levels within psoriatic lesions positively correlated with the levels of CD4 mRNA, but not with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index. In conclusion, our data revealed an association between circulating IL-16 and severity of psoriasis which indicates that this cytokine could serve as a potential marker of disease activity. However, further investigations are required. PMID:27788245

  10. Endoglin expression level discriminates long-term hematopoietic from short-term clonogenic progenitor cells in the aorta

    PubMed Central

    Roques, Marion; Durand, Charles; Gautier, Rodolphe; Canto, Pierre-Yves; Petit-Cocault, Laurence; Yvernogeau, Laurent; Dunon, Dominique; Souyri, Michèle; Jaffredo, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    CD105 is an auxiliary receptor for the transforming growth factor beta superfamily, highly expressed on proliferating endothelial cells and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Because CD105 mRNA expression was reported in the developing aortic region, we further characterized its expression profile in the aorta and examined the hematopoietic potential of CD105+ cells. Aortic endothelial cells, intra-aortic hematopoietic cell clusters and the purified cell fraction enriched in progenitor/hematopoietic stem cell activity expressed CD105. Aortic hematopoietic short-term clonogenic progenitors were highly enriched in the CD105intermediate population whereas more immature long-term progenitors/hematopoietic stem cells are contained within the CD105high population. This places CD105 on the short list of molecules discriminating short-term versus long-term progenitors in the aorta. Furthermore, decreasing transforming growth factor beta signaling increases the number of clonogenic progenitors. This suggests that CD105 expression level defines a hierarchy among aortic hematopoietic cells allowing purification of clonogenic versus more immature hematopoietic progenitors, and that the transforming growth factor beta pathway plays a critical role in this process. PMID:22271899

  11. Low levels of the reverse transactivator fail to induce target transgene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viceconte, Nikenza; McKenna, Tomás; Eriksson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time.

  12. Low Levels of the Reverse Transactivator Fail to Induce Target Transgene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viceconte, Nikenza; McKenna, Tomás; Eriksson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time. PMID:25090270

  13. Expression-level optimization of a multi-enzyme pathway in the absence of a high-throughput assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael E.; Aswani, Anil; Han, Audrey S.; Tomlin, Claire J.; Dueber, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered metabolic pathways often suffer from flux imbalances that can overburden the cell and accumulate intermediate metabolites, resulting in reduced product titers. One way to alleviate such imbalances is to adjust the expression levels of the constituent enzymes using a combinatorial expression library. Typically, this approach requires high-throughput assays, which are unfortunately unavailable for the vast majority of desirable target compounds. To address this, we applied regression modeling to enable expression optimization using only a small number of measurements. We characterized a set of constitutive promoters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that spanned a wide range of expression and maintained their relative strengths irrespective of the coding sequence. We used a standardized assembly strategy to construct a combinatorial library and express for the first time in yeast the five-enzyme violacein biosynthetic pathway. We trained a regression model on a random sample comprising 3% of the total library, and then used that model to predict genotypes that would preferentially produce each of the products in this highly branched pathway. This generalizable method should prove useful in engineering new pathways for the sustainable production of small molecules. PMID:24038353

  14. Inheritance of gene expression level and selective constraints on trans- and cis-regulatory changes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Emerson, J J; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Hsieh, Li-Ching; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2013-09-01

    Gene expression evolution can be caused by changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. As cis and trans regulation operate through different molecular mechanisms, cis and trans mutations may show different inheritance patterns and may be subjected to different selective constraints. To investigate these issues, we obtained and analyzed gene expression data from two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and their hybrid, using high-throughput sequencing. Our data indicate that compared with other types of genes, those with antagonistic cis-trans interactions are more likely to exhibit over- or underdominant inheritance of expression level. Moreover, in accordance with previous studies, genes with trans variants tend to have a dominant inheritance pattern, whereas cis variants are enriched for additive inheritance. In addition, cis regulatory differences contribute more to expression differences between species than within species, whereas trans regulatory differences show a stronger association between divergence and polymorphism. Our data indicate that in the trans component of gene expression differences genes subjected to weaker selective constraints tend to have an excess of polymorphism over divergence compared with those subjected to stronger selective constraints. In contrast, in the cis component, this difference between genes under stronger and weaker selective constraint is mostly absent. To explain these observations, we propose that purifying selection more strongly shapes trans changes than cis changes and that positive selection may have significantly contributed to cis regulatory divergence.

  15. Improvement of the reverse tetracycline transactivator by single amino acid substitutions that reduce leaky target gene expression to undetectable levels.

    PubMed

    Roney, Ian J; Rudner, Adam D; Couture, Jean-François; Kærn, Mads

    2016-06-21

    Conditional gene expression systems that enable inducible and reversible transcriptional control are essential research tools and have broad applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. The reverse tetracycline transcriptional activator is a canonical system for engineered gene expression control that enables graded and gratuitous modulation of target gene transcription in eukaryotes from yeast to human cell lines and transgenic animals. However, the system has a tendency to activate transcription even in the absence of tetracycline and this leaky target gene expression impedes its use. Here, we identify single amino-acid substitutions that greatly enhance the dynamic range of the system in yeast by reducing leaky transcription to undetectable levels while retaining high expression capacity in the presence of inducer. While the mutations increase the inducer concentration required for full induction, additional sensitivity-enhancing mutations can compensate for this effect and confer a high degree of robustness to the system. The novel transactivator variants will be useful in applications where tight and tunable regulation of gene expression is paramount.

  16. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  17. Exercise combined with low-level GABAA receptor inhibition up-regulates the expression of neurotrophins in the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuma; Maejima, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Gaku; Mani, Hiroki; Asaka, Tadayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrophins play a crucial role in neuroplasticity, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection in the central nervous system. Aerobic exercise is known to increase the expression of BDNF in the cerebral cortex. Several animal studies have evaluated the tonic inhibition of GABAergic synapses to enhance hippocampal plasticity as well as learning and memory, whereas the effects of GABAergic inhibition on plasticity in the cerebral cortex related to motor learning are not well characterized. The objective of the present study was to examine the interactive effect of low-level GABAA receptor inhibition and exercise on the expression of neurotrophins including BDNF in the murine motor cortex. ICR mice were randomly distributed among 4 groups based on two factors of GABAA receptor inhibition and exercise, i.e. control group, an exercise group, a bicuculline group, and an exercise plus bicuculline group. We administered GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline intraperitoneally to the mice (bicuculline and exercise plus bicuculline group) at a non-epileptic dose of 0.25mg/kg, whereas the mice (exercise and exercise plus bicuculline group) were exercised on a treadmill for 1h every day. After two week intervention, the expression of mRNA and protein abundance of neurotrophins in the motor cortex was assayed using Real time PCR and ELISA. BDNF gene expression was significantly increased by approximately 3-fold in the bicuculline group relative to the control, exercise, and bicuculline plus exercise groups. Protein abundance of BDNF expression was significantly increased by approximately 3-fold in the bicuculline plus exercise group relative to other groups. Therefore, the present study revealed that combined GABAA receptor inhibition and moderate aerobic exercise up-regulated BDNF protein expression in the motor cortex without producing side effects on motor or cognitive functions. Alterations in BDNF expression could positively contribute to plasticity by regulating the balance

  18. Quantification of phase I / II metabolizing enzyme gene expression and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels in human prostate

    PubMed Central

    John, Kaarthik; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pratt, M. Margaret; Singh, Paras B.; Al-Buheissi, Salah; Matanhelia, Shyam S.; Phillips, David H.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Martin, Francis L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies of migrant populations suggest that dietary and/or environmental factors play a crucial role in the aetiology of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP). The human prostate consists of the peripheral zone (PZ), transition zone (TZ) and central zone (CZ); CaP occurs most often in the PZ. METHODS To investigate the notion that an underlying differential expression of phase I/II genes, and/or the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts might explain the elevated PZ susceptibility, we examined prostate tissues (matched tissue sets consisting of PZ and TZ) from men undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy for CaP (n=26) or cystoprostatectomy (n=1). Quantitative gene expression analysis was employed for cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2, as well as N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). RESULTS CYP1B1, NAT1 and COMT were expressed in all tissue sets; levels of CYP1B1 and NAT1 were consistently higher in the PZ compared to TZ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CYP1B1 (nuclear-associated and primarily in basal epithelial cells) and NAT1. Tissue sections from 23 of these aforementioned 27 matched tissue sets were analyzed for PAH-DNA adduct levels using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). PAH-DNA adduct levels were highest in glandular epithelial cells, but a comparison of PZ and TZ showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION Although expression of activating and/or detoxifying enzymes may be higher in the PZ, PAH-DNA adduct levels appear to be similar in both zones. Therefore, factors other than PAH-DNA adducts may be responsible for promotion of tumour formation in the human prostate. PMID:19143007

  19. Interaction-Based Feature Selection for Uncovering Cancer Driver Genes Through Copy Number-Driven Expression Level.

    PubMed

    Park, Heewon; Niida, Atsushi; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2017-02-01

    Driver gene selection is crucial to understand the heterogeneous system of cancer. To identity cancer driver genes, various statistical strategies have been proposed, especially the L1-type regularization methods have drawn a large amount of attention. However, the statistical approaches have been developed purely from algorithmic and statistical point, and the existing studies have applied the statistical approaches to genomic data analysis without consideration of biological knowledge. We consider a statistical strategy incorporating biological knowledge to identify cancer driver gene. The alterations of copy number have been considered to driver cancer pathogenesis processes, and the region of strong interaction of copy number alterations and expression levels was known as a tumor-related symptom. We incorporate the influence of copy number alterations on expression levels to cancer driver gene-selection processes. To quantify the dependence of copy number alterations on expression levels, we consider [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] effects of copy number alterations on expression levels of genes, and incorporate the symptom of tumor pathogenesis to gene-selection procedures. We then proposed an interaction-based feature-selection strategy based on the adaptive L1-type regularization and random lasso procedures. The proposed method imposes a large amount of penalty on genes corresponding to a low dependency of the two features, thus the coefficients of the genes are estimated to be small or exactly 0. It implies that the proposed method can provide biologically relevant results in cancer driver gene selection. Monte Carlo simulations and analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data show that the proposed strategy is effective for high-dimensional genomic data analysis. Furthermore, the proposed method provides reliable and biologically relevant results for cancer driver gene selection in TCGA data analysis.

  20. Magnesium modulates the expression levels of calcification-associated factors to inhibit calcification in a time-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinsheng; Bai, Yaling; Jin, Jingjing; Zhang, Junxia; Zhang, Shenglei; Cui, Liwen; Zhang, Huiran

    2015-03-01

    Vascular calcification, a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease, involves a variety of mechanisms associated with the regulation of calcification-associated factors. Previous clinical studies have indicated that magnesium is involved in the reduction of vascular calcification; however, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of magnesium on β-glycerophosphate (β-GP)-induced calcification and the underlying mechanisms. Primary rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were exposed to 10 mM β-GP in medium with or without the addition of 3 mM magnesium or 2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate (2-APB; an inhibitor of magnesium transport), for a 14-day period. Calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were measured by Alizarin red staining, quantification of calcium and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression levels of core-binding factor α-1 (Cbfα1), matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteopontin (OPN) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction or western blot analysis, following incubation for 0, 3, 6, 10 and 14 days with the different media. VSMC calcification and ALP activity was reduced significantly in the high-magnesium medium compared with the calcification medium, during the 14-day incubation. The magnesium-induced changes in the VSMCs included a β-GP-induced downregulation of Cbfα1 by day 3 of incubation, an effect that was gradually enhanced over the 14-day period. By contrast, magnesium produced notable increases in MGP and OPN expression levels, with an opposite pattern to that observed in the Cbfα1 expression levels. However, the addition of 2-APB appeared to inhibit the protective effect of magnesium on the VSMCs. Therefore, magnesium was able to effectively reduce β-GP-induced calcification in rat VSMCs by regulating the expression levels of calcification-associated factors in a time-dependent manner.

  1. Association between adipose tissue expression and serum levels of leptin and adiponectin in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lecke, S B; Morsch, D M; Spritzer, P M

    2013-02-28

    We reviewed emerging evidence linking serum levels and adipose tissue expression of leptin and adiponectin in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Previous data obtained by our group from a sample of overweight/obese PCOS women and a control sample of normal weight controls, both stratified by BMI, were reanalyzed. Circulating levels of leptin and adiponectin were determined by commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Adipose tissue total RNA was reserve-transcripted into complementary DNA samples, which were used as templates for quantitative real-time PCR amplification. Positive correlations were found between serum and mRNA levels for both leptin (r = 0.321; P = 0.005) and adiponectin (r = 0.266; P = 0.024). Determination of leptin and adiponectin serum levels could serve as an indirect method to assess adipocyte production, since leptin and adiponectin are predominantly produced by subcutaneous adipocytes in women.

  2. Comprehensive expression analysis of miRNA in breast cancer at the miRNA and isomiR levels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianjin; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Shaoke; Zhong, Jixin; Yang, Lawei; Xu, Junfa

    2015-02-25

    Breast cancer (BC) is the main factor that leads cause of cancer death in women worldwide. A class of small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), has been widely studied in human cancers as crucial regulatory molecule. Recent studies indicate that a series of isomiRs can be yielded from a miRNA locus, and these physiological miRNA isoforms have versatile roles in miRNA biogenesis. Herein, we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNAs at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC using next-generation sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Abnormally expressed miRNA (miR-21, miR-221, miR-155, miR-30e and miR-25) and isomiR profiles could be obtained at the miRNA and isomiR levels, and similar biological roles could be detected. IsomiR expression profiles should be further concerned, and especially isomiRs are actual regulatory molecules in the miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks. The study provides a comprehensive expression analysis at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC, which indicates biological roles of isomiRs.

  3. CD26 Expression on T Helper Populations and sCD26 Serum Levels in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Oscar J.; Varela-Calviño, Rubén; López-González, Tania; Calviño-Sampedro, Cristina; Viñuela, Juan E.; Mouriño, Coral; Hernández-Rodríguez, Íñigo; Rodríguez-López, Marina; Aspe de la Iglesia, Bruno; Pego, José María

    2015-01-01

    We studied dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV, CD26) expression in different T helper cells and serum soluble DPP-IV/sCD26 levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, correlated these with disease activity score (DAS), and examined how they were affected by different therapies, conventional or biological (anti-TNF, anti-CD20 and anti-IL6R or Ig-CTLA4). The percentage of CD4+CD45R0+CD26- cells was greatly reduced in patients (up to 50%) when compared with healthy subjects. Three other subsets of CD4 cells, including a CD26high Th1-associated population, changed variably with therapies. Data from these subsets (frequency and staining density) significantly correlated with DAS28 or DAS28 components but different in each group of patients undergoing the different therapies. Th17 and Th22 subsets were implicated in RA as independent CCR4+ and CCR4- populations each, with distinct CD26 expression, and were targeted with varying efficiency by each therapy. Serum DPP-IV activity rather than sCD26 levels was lower in RA patients compared to healthy donors. DPP-IV and sCD26 serum levels were found related to specific T cell subsets but not to disease activity. We conclude that, according to their CD26 expression, different cell subsets could serve to monitor RA course, and an uncharacterized T helper CD26- subset, not targeted by therapies, should be monitored for early diagnosis. PMID:26177310

  4. Dynamic changes in catechin levels and catechin biosynthesis-related gene expression in albino tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ligui; Li, Juan; Li, Yinhua; Yuan, Ling; Liu, Shuoqian; Huang, Jian'an; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-10-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) leaves are a major source of flavonoids that mainly belong to the flavan-3-ols or catechins and are implicated in a wide range of health benefits. Although the catechins in tea leaves were identified long ago, the regulatory mechanisms governing catechin biosynthesis remain unclear. In the present work, the dynamic changes of catechin levels and the expression profiles of catechin-related genes in albino tea plants were intensively examined. The amounts of most catechins decreased to their lowest levels in the albino phase, when epigallocatechingallate was the highest of the catechins compared to all catechins, and catechin the lowest. Enzyme assays indicated that phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity was positively correlated with the concentration of catechins (r = 0.673). Gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that the transcript abundance of flavonoid biosynthetic genes followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and was affected by albinism. These genes (PAL, C4H, 4CL, CHS, CHI, F3H, FLS, F3'H, F3'5'H, DFR, LAR, ANS and ANR) encode enzymes in flavonoid biosynthesis. The expression levels of PAL, F3H and FLS were correlated with the concentration of catechins and the correlation coefficients were -0.683, 0.687 and -0.602, respectively. Therefore, these results indicate that PAL might be a core regulator in the control of catechin biosynthesis in albino tea plants.

  5. Earth Mover’s Distance (EMD): A True Metric for Comparing Biomarker Expression Levels in Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Darya Y.; Zimmerman, Noah; Meehan, Stephen; Meehan, Connor; Waters, Jeffrey; Ghosn, Eliver E. B.; Filatenkov, Alexander; Kolyagin, Gleb A.; Gernez, Yael; Tsuda, Shanel; Moore, Wayne; Moss, Richard B.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Walther, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the frequencies of cell subsets that (co)express characteristic biomarkers, or levels of the biomarkers on the subsets, are widely used as indices of drug response, disease prognosis, stem cell reconstitution, etc. However, although the currently available computational “gating” tools accurately reveal subset frequencies and marker expression levels, they fail to enable statistically reliable judgements as to whether these frequencies and expression levels differ significantly between/among subject groups. Here we introduce flow cytometry data analysis pipeline which includes the Earth Mover’s Distance (EMD) metric as solution to this problem. Well known as an informative quantitative measure of differences between distributions, we present three exemplary studies showing that EMD 1) reveals clinically-relevant shifts in two markers on blood basophils responding to an offending allergen; 2) shows that ablative tumor radiation induces significant changes in the murine colon cancer tumor microenvironment; and, 3) ranks immunological differences in mouse peritoneal cavity cells harvested from three genetically distinct mouse strains. PMID:27008164

  6. Perception of Emotional Facial Expressions in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) at Behavioural and Brain Metabolic Level

    PubMed Central

    Aho-Özhan, Helena E. A.; Keller, Jürgen; Heimrath, Johanna; Uttner, Ingo; Kassubek, Jan; Birbaumer, Niels; Ludolph, Albert C.; Lulé, Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) primarily impairs motor abilities but also affects cognition and emotional processing. We hypothesise that subjective ratings of emotional stimuli depicting social interactions and facial expressions is changed in ALS. It was found that recognition of negative emotions and ability to mentalize other’s intentions is reduced. Methods Processing of emotions in faces was investigated. A behavioural test of Ekman faces expressing six basic emotions was presented to 30 ALS patients and 29 age-, gender and education matched healthy controls. Additionally, a subgroup of 15 ALS patients that were able to lie supine in the scanner and 14 matched healthy controls viewed the Ekman faces during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Affective state and a number of daily social contacts were measured. Results ALS patients recognized disgust and fear less accurately than healthy controls. In fMRI, reduced brain activity was seen in areas involved in processing of negative emotions replicating our previous results. During processing of sad faces, increased brain activity was seen in areas associated with social emotions in right inferior frontal gyrus and reduced activity in hippocampus bilaterally. No differences in brain activity were seen for any of the other emotional expressions. Inferior frontal gyrus activity for sad faces was associated with increased amount of social contacts of ALS patients. Conclusion ALS patients showed decreased brain and behavioural responses in processing of disgust and fear and an altered brain response pattern for sadness. The negative consequences of neurodegenerative processes in the course of ALS might be counteracted by positive emotional activity and positive social interactions. PMID:27741285

  7. High-level expression of Rhodotorula gracilis D-amino acid oxidase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sandra; Nahalka, Jozef; Winkler, Margit; Bergler, Gabriele; Speight, Robert; Glieder, Anton; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    By combining gene design and heterologous over-expression of Rhodotorula gracilis D-amino acid oxidase (RgDAO) in Pichia pastoris, enzyme production was enhanced by one order of magnitude compared to literature benchmarks, giving 350 kUnits/l of fed-batch bioreactor culture with a productivity of 3.1 kUnits/l h. P. pastoris cells permeabilized by freeze-drying and incubation in 2-propanol (10% v/v) produce a highly active (1.6 kUnits/g dry matter) and stable oxidase preparation. Critical bottlenecks in the development of an RgDAO catalyst for industrial applications have been eliminated.

  8. Enhanced expression levels of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-4 in A549 cells exposed to silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaohui; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Wei; Liu, Shupeng; Peng, Zihe; Sun, Yue; Zhao, Jinyuan; Jiang, Qiujie; Liu, Heliang

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins in the cell membranes of mammals, have been reported to be important in maintaining the water balance of the respiratory system. However, little is known regarding the role of AQP in occupational pulmonary diseases such as silicosis. The present study investigated the expression of AQP1 and AQP4 in the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated by silica (SiO2). A549 cells were cultured and divided into four groups: Control, SiO2‑stimulated, AQP1 inhibitor and AQP4 inhibitor. The cells of the SiO2‑stimulated group were stimulated with SiO2 dispersed suspension (50 mg/ml). The cells of the inhibitor group were pretreated with mercury (II) chloride (HgCl2; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP1) and 2‑(nicotinamide)‑1,3,4‑thiadiazole (TGN‑020; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP4) and stimulated with SiO2. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Compared with the control group, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA and protein in SiO2‑stimulated groups increased and subsequently decreased (AQP1 peaked at 2 h and AQP4 at 1h; both P<0.001 compared with control group). In the inhibitor group, expression levels were increased compared with controls; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the SiO2‑stimulated group at 2 h (AQP1; P<0.001) and 1 h (AQP4; P<0.001). The expression of AQP1 and AQP4 increased when exposed to SiO2, and this was inhibited by HgCl2 and TGN‑020, suggesting that AQP1 and AQP4 may contribute to A549 cell damage induced by SiO2. AQP1 and AQP4 may thus be involved in the initiation and development of silicosis.

  9. Lentiviral-Transduced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Persistently Express Therapeutic Levels of Enzyme in a Xenotransplantation Model of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meyerrose, Todd E.; Roberts, Marie; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Vogler, Carole A.; Wirthlin, Louisa; Nolta, Jan A.; Sands, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising platform for cell- and gene-based treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. We recently showed that human MSCs distribute widely in a murine xenotransplantation model. In the current study, we have determined the distribution, persistence, and ability of lentivirally transduced human MSCs to express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease (nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII [NOD-SCID MPSVII]). Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (MSCs-GUSB). Lentiviral transduction did not affect any in vitro parameters of MSC function or potency. One million cells from each population were transplanted intraperitoneally into separate groups of neonatal NOD-SCID MPSVII mice. Transduced MSCs persisted in the animals that underwent transplantation, and comparable numbers of donor MSCs were detected at 2 and 4 months after transplantation in multiple organs. MSCs-GUSB expressed therapeutic levels of protein in the recipients, raising circulating serum levels of GUSB to nearly 40% of normal. This level of circulating enzyme was sufficient to normalize the secondary elevation of other lysosomal enzymes and reduce lysosomal distention in several tissues. In addition, at least one physiologic marker of disease, retinal function, was normalized following transplantation of MSCs-GUSB. These data provide evidence that transduced human MSCs retain their normal trafficking ability in vivo and persist for at least 4 months, delivering therapeutic levels of protein in an authentic xenotransplantation model of human disease. PMID:18436861

  10. dParFit: A computer program for fitting diatomic molecule spectral data to parameterized level energy expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes FORTRAN program dParFit, which performs least-squares fits of diatomic molecule spectroscopic data involving one or more electronic states and one or more isotopologues, to parameterized expressions for the level energies. The data may consist of any combination of microwave, infrared or electronic vibrotational bands, fluorescence series or binding energies (from photo-association spectroscopy). The level energies for each electronic state may be described by one of: (i) band constants {Gv ,Bv ,Dv , … } for each vibrational level, (ii) generalized Dunham expansions, (iii) pure near-dissociation expansions (NDEs), (iv) mixed Dunham/NDE expressions, or (v) individual term values for each distinct level of each isotopologue. Different representations may be used for different electronic states and/or for different types of constants in a given fit (e.g., Gv and Bv may be represented one way and centrifugal distortion constants another). The effect of Λ-doubling or 2Σ splittings may be represented either by band constants (qvB or γvB, qvD or γvD, etc.) for each vibrational level of each isotopologue, or by using power series expansions in (v + 1/2) to represent those constants. Fits to Dunham or NDE expressions automatically incorporate normal first-order semiclassical mass scaling to allow combined analyses of multi-isotopologue data. In addition, dParFit may fit to determine atomic-mass-dependent terms required to account for breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer and first-order semiclassical approximations. In any of these types of fits, one or more subsets of these parameters for one or more of the electronic states may be held fixed, while a limited parameter set is varied. The program can also use a set of read-in constants to make predictions and calculate deviations [ycalc -yobs ] for any chosen input data set, or to generate predictions of arbitrary data sets.

  11. Effect of HPV on tumor expression levels of the most commonly used markers in HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Polanska, Hana; Heger, Zbynek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Svobodova, Marketa; Balvan, Jan; Fojtu, Michaela; Binkova, Hana; Horakova, Zuzana; Kostrica, Rom; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene; Masarik, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 90 % of head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), and the overall 5-year survival rate is not higher than 50 %. There is much evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may influence the expression of commonly studied HNSCC markers. Our study was focused on the possible HPV-specificity of molecular markers that could be key players in important steps of cancerogenesis (MKI67, EGF, EGFR, BCL-2, BAX, FOS, JUN, TP53, MT1A, MT2A, VEGFA, FLT1, MMP2, MMP9, and POU5F). qRT-PCR analysis of these selected genes was performed on 74 biopsy samples of tumors from patients with histologically verified HNSCC (22 HPV-, 52 HPV+). Kaplan-Meier analysis was done to determine the relevance of these selected markers for HNSCC prognosis. In conclusion, our study confirms the impact of HPV infection on commonly studied HNSCC markers MT2A, MMP9, FLT1, VEGFA, and POU5F that were more highly expressed in HPV-negative HNSCC patients and also shows the relevance of studied markers in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC patients.

  12. Up-regulation of neurotrophin-related gene expression in mouse hippocampus following low-level toluene exposure.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Tsukahara, Shinji; Yamamoto, Shoji; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kunugita, Naoki; Arashidani, Keiichi; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the role of strain differences in sensitivity to low-level toluene exposure on neurotrophins and their receptor levels in the mouse hippocampus, 8-week-old male C3H/HeN, BALB/c and C57BL/10 mice were exposed to 0, 5, 50, or 500 ppm toluene for 6h per day, 5 days per week for 6 weeks in an inhalation chamber. We examined the expressions of neurotrophin-related genes and receptors in the mouse hippocampus using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase (Trk) A, and TrkB mRNAs in the C3H/HeN mice hippocampus was significantly higher in the mice exposed to 500 ppm toluene. Among the three strains of mice, the C3H/HeN mice seemed to be sensitive to toluene exposure. To examine the combined effect of toluene exposure and allergic challenge, the C3H/HeN mice stimulated with ovalbumin were exposed to toluene. The allergy group of C3H/HeN mice showed significantly elevated level of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus following exposure to 50 ppm toluene. Then, we also examined the expression of transcription factor, dopamine markers and oxidative stress marker in the hippocampus of sensitive strain C3H/HeN mice and found that the expression of CREB1 mRNA was significantly increased at 50 ppm toluene. In immunohistochemical analysis, the density of the NGF-immunoreactive signal was significantly stronger in the hippocampal CA3 region of the C3H/HeN mice exposed to 500 ppm toluene in non-allergy group and 50 ppm in allergy group. Our results indicate that low-level toluene exposure may induce up-regulation of neurotrophin-related gene expression in the mouse hippocampus depending on the mouse strain and an allergic stimulation in sensitive strain may decrease the threshold for sensitivity at lower exposure level.

  13. Both cell substratum regulation and hormonal regulation of milk protein gene expression are exerted primarily at the posttranscriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, R.S.; Rosen, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism by which individual peptide and steroid hormones and cell-substratum interactions regulate milk protein gene expression has been studied in the COMMA-D mammary epithelial cell line. In the presence of insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, growth of COMMA-D cells on floating collagen gels in comparison with that on a plastic substratum resulted in a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in the relative rate of ..beta..-casein gene transcription but a 37-fold increase in ..beta..-casein mRNA accumulation. In contrast, whey acidic protein gene transcription was constitutive in COMMA-D cells grown on either substratum, but its mRNA was unstable and little intact mature mRNA was detected. Culturing COMMA-D cells on collagen also promoted increased expression of other genes expressed in differentiated mammary epithelial cells, including those encoding ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-casein, transferrin, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase but decreased the expression of actin and histone genes. Using COMMA-D cells, the authors defined further the role of individual hormones in influencing ..beta..-casein gene transcription. With insulin alone, a basal level of ..beta..-casein gene transcription was detected in COMMA-D cells grown on floating collagen gels. Addition of prolactin but not hydrocortisone resulted in a 2.5- to 3.0-fold increase in ..beta..-casein gene transcription, but both hormones were required to elicit the maximal 73-fold induction in mRNA accumulation. The posttranscriptional effect of hormones on casein mRNA accummulation preceded any detectable changes in the relative rate of transcription. Thus, regulation by both hormones and cell substratum of casein gene expression is exerted primarily at the post transcriptional level.

  14. Short-term sleep deprivation impairs spatial working memory and modulates expression levels of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meilan; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Yang, Li; Tan, Gang; Li, Chao; Hu, Zhian; Wang, Jiali

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning memory is sensitive to sleep deprivation (SD). Although the ionotropic glutamate receptors play a vital role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, however, whether the expression of these receptor subunits is modulated by sleep loss remains unclear. In the present study, western blotting was performed by probing with specific antibodies against the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and against the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B. In hippocampus, down regulation of surface GluA1 and GluN2A surface expression were observed in both SD groups. However, surface expression level of GluA2, GluA3, GluN1 and GluN2B was significantly up-regulated in 8h-SD rats when compared to the 4h-SD rats. In parallel with the complex changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit expressions, we found the 8h-SD impaired rat spatial working memory in 30-s-delay T-maze task, whereas no impairment of spatial learning was observed in 4h-SD rats. These results indicate that sleep loss alters the relative expression levels of the AMPA and NMDA receptors, thus affects the synaptic strength and capacity for plasticity and partially contributes to spatial memory impairment.

  15. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  16. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  17. High-level transgene expression in plant cells: effects of a strong scaffold attachment region from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, G C; Hall, G; Michalowski, S; Newman, W; Spiker, S; Weissinger, A K; Thompson, W F

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that yeast scaffold attachment regions (SARs) flanking a chimeric beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene increased per-copy expression levels by 24-fold in tobacco suspension cell lines stably transformed by microprojectile bombardment. In this study, we examined the effect of a DNA fragment originally identified in a tobacco genomic clone by its activity in an in vitro binding assay. The tobacco SAR has much greater scaffold binding affinity than does the yeast SAR, and tobacco cell lines stably transformed with constructs containing the tobacco SAR accumulated greater than fivefold more GUS enzyme activity than did lines transformed with the yeast SAR construct. Relative to the control construct, flanking the GUS gene with plant SARs increased overall expression per transgene copy by almost 140-fold. In transient expression assays, the same construct increased expression only approximately threefold relative to a control without SARs, indicating that the full SAR effect requires integration into chromosomal DNA. GUS activity in individual stable transformants was not simply proportional to transgene copy number, and the SAR effect was maximal in cell lines with fewer than approximately 10 transgene copies per tobacco genome. Lines with significantly higher copy numbers showed greatly greatly reduced expression relative to the low-copy-number lines. Our results indicate that strong SARs flanking a transgene greatly increases expression without eliminating variation between transformants. We propose that SARs dramatically reduce the severity or likelihood of homology-dependent gene silencing in cells with small numbers of transgenes but do not prevent silencing of transgenes present in many copies. PMID:8672887

  18. Inbreeding Affects Gene Expression Differently in Two Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis lyrata Populations with Similar Levels of Inbreeding Depression.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Mandy; Sletvold, Nina; Ågren, Jon; Hansson, Bengt

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of which genes and pathways are affected by inbreeding may help understanding the genetic basis of inbreeding depression, the potential for purging (selection against deleterious recessive alleles), and the transition from outcrossing to selfing. Arabidopsis lyrata is a predominantly self-incompatible perennial plant, closely related to the selfing model species A. thaliana. To examine how inbreeding affects gene expression, we compared the transcriptome of experimentally selfed and outcrossed A. lyrata originating from two Scandinavian populations that express similar inbreeding depression for fitness (∂ ≈ 0.80). The number of genes significantly differentially expressed between selfed and outcrossed individuals were 2.5 times higher in the Norwegian population (≈ 500 genes) than in the Swedish population (≈ 200 genes). In both populations, a majority of genes were upregulated on selfing (≈ 80%). Functional annotation analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed that selfed offspring were characterized by 1) upregulation of stress-related genes in both populations and 2) upregulation of photosynthesis-related genes in Sweden but downregulation in Norway. Moreover, we found that reproduction- and pollination-related genes were affected by inbreeding only in Norway. We conclude that inbreeding causes both general and population-specific effects. The observed common effects suggest that inbreeding generally upregulates rather than downregulates gene expression and affects genes associated with stress response and general metabolic activity. Population differences in the number of affected genes and in effects on the expression of photosynthesis-related genes show that the genetic basis of inbreeding depression can differ between populations with very similar levels of inbreeding depression.

  19. Effect of Ipr1 on expression levels of immune genes related to macrophage anti-infection of mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Lianwen; Liu, Jingbo; Yuan, Xiao; Meng, Wei; Dong, Yan; Li, Boqing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) has been found in macrophages and plays a pivotal role in fighting against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. This study is designed to evaluate the effect of Iprl on the expression of macrophage genes related to the anti-infection of Mtb. Design or methods: In the experimental and control groups, the macrophages were infected with Mycobacterium H37Ra, and then the related immune genes between two groups were detected using microarray assay. Real-time quantitative PCR was applied to detect the differences in the expression of three up-regulated genes detected by microarray assay and to verify the reliability of microarray assay. Results: The expression of Iprl up-regulated 11 genes related to macrophage anti-immunity involved TLRs signaling pathway including TLR2 and TLR4, Irak1, Traf7, Ifngr1 and Tnfrsfla. No significant difference was found in terms of the molecular expression involved in regulation of the adaptive immune response, such as IL-1 and IL-12. The results of real-time PCR were consistent with the findings of microarray assay. Conclusions: The expression of Iprl gene probably promotes macrophage activity and enhances the ability of macrophages to fight against Mtb infection. The underlying mechanism may be achieved by up-regulating the expression levels of innate immunity genes, especially TLR2/TLR4 and signal transduction molecules, which is determined using microarray assay. All these findings offer the basis for subsequent study of the mechanisms of Ipr1 gene in host innate immunity against Mtb infection. PMID:26064231

  20. Differential Expression of Non-Shelterin Genes Associated with High Telomerase Levels and Telomere Shortening in Plasma Cell Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Panero, Julieta; Stella, Flavia; Schutz, Natalia; Fantl, Dorotea Beatriz; Slavutsky, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase, shelterin proteins and various interacting factors, named non-shelterin proteins, are involved in the regulation of telomere length (TL). Altered expression of any of these telomere-associated genes can lead to telomere dysfunction, causing genomic instability and disease development. In this study, we investigated the expression profile of a set of non-shelterin genes involved in essential processes such as replication (RPA1), DNA damage repair pathways (MRE11-RAD50-NBS1) and stabilization of telomerase complex (DKC1), in 35 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 40 cases with multiple myeloma (MM). Results were correlated with hTERT expression, TL and clinical parameters. Overall, a significant increase in DKC1, RAD50, MRE11, NBS1 and RPA1 expression along with an upregulation of hTERT in MM compared with MGUS was observed (p≤0.032). Interestingly, in both entities high mRNA levels of non-shelterin genes were associated with short TLs and increased hTERT expression. Significant differences were observed for DKC1 in MM (p ≤0.026), suggesting an important role for this gene in the maintenance of short telomeres by telomerase in myeloma plasma cells. With regard to clinical associations, we observed a significant increase in DKC1, RAD50, MRE11 and RPA1 expression in MM cases with high bone marrow infiltration (p≤0.03) and a tendency towards cases with advanced ISS stage, providing the first evidence of non-shelterin genes associated to risk factors in MM. Taken together, our findings bring new insights into the intricate mechanisms by which telomere-associated proteins collaborate in the maintenance of plasma cells immortalization and suggest a role for the upregulation of these genes in the progression of the disease. PMID:26366868

  1. Superoxide dismutase activity and gene expression levels in Saudi women with recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    GHNEIM, HAZEM K.; AL-SHEIKH, YAZEED A.; ALSHEBLY, MASHAEL M.; ABOUL-SOUD, MOURAD A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant activities of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and SOD2, as well as the levels of the oxidant superoxide anion (SOA) and the micronutrients zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn), were assayed in plasma, whole blood and placental tissue of non-pregnant (NP), healthy pregnant (HP) women and recurrent miscarriage (RM) patients. The results showed that SOD1 and SOD2 activities and the levels of Zn, Cu and Mn in plasma and whole blood of HP women were slightly, but significantly lower, and even more significantly decreased in RM patients compared to those observed in NP women (P<0.05 and P<0.0001, respectively). Additionally, whereas plasma SOD1 and SOD2 activities and Zn, Cu and Mn levels were significantly lower in RM patients, those of whole blood and placental tissue were significantly lower when compared to HP women (P<0.001 and P<0.0001, respectively). Concurrently, there were consistent increases of equal magnitude and statistical significance in SOA levels in all the assayed samples as identified by a comparison between the subjects. The findings thus supported oxidative metabolism and excessive reactive oxygen species generation. The resultant oxidative stress, identified in whole blood and placental tissues of RM patients, may have been a primary cause of RM. Dietary supplementation of Zn, Cu and Mn may be beneficial to these patients pre- and post-conception. PMID:26821085

  2. EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF VITELLOGENIN EXPRESSION IN DIFFERENT AQUATIC MESOCOSM TROPIC LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic mesocosms were dosed with an environmentally relevant concentration of 17-a-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) to study the significance of trophic status (N, P levels) on the attenuation and bioavailability of synthetic estrogens in aquatic ecosystems. Estrogenic activity was asse...

  3. Expression of the IRT1 metal transporter is controlled by metals at the levels of transcript and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Erin L; Fett, Janette P; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-06-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient, is not readily available to plants because of its low solubility. In addition, iron is toxic in excess, catalyzing the formation of hydroxyl radicals that can damage cellular constituents. Consequently, plants must carefully regulate iron uptake so that iron homeostasis is maintained. The Arabidopsis IRT1 gene is the major transporter responsible for high-affinity iron uptake from the soil. Here, we show that the steady state level of IRT1 mRNA was induced within 24 h after transfer of plants to iron-deficient conditions, with protein levels peaking 72 h after transfer. IRT1 mRNA and protein were undetectable 12 h after plants were shifted back to iron-sufficient conditions. Overexpression of IRT1 did not confer dominant gain-of-function enhancement of metal uptake. Analysis of 35S-IRT1 transgenic plants revealed that although IRT1 mRNA was expressed constitutively in these plants, IRT1 protein was present only in the roots when iron is limiting. Under these conditions, plants that overexpressed IRT1 accumulated higher levels of cadmium and zinc than wild-type plants, indicating that IRT1 is responsible for the uptake of these metals and that IRT1 protein levels are indeed increased in these plants. Our results suggest that the expression of IRT1 is controlled by two distinct mechanisms that provide an effective means of regulating metal transport in response to changing environmental conditions.

  4. Engineering the expression level of cytosolic nucleoside diphosphate kinase in transgenic Solanum tuberosum roots alters growth, respiration and carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dorion, Sonia; Clendenning, Audrey; Rivoal, Jean

    2017-03-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate from a donor nucleoside triphosphate to an acceptor nucleoside diphosphate. In this study we used a targeted metabolomic approach and measurement of physiological parameters to report the effects of the genetic manipulation of cytosolic NDPK (NDPK1) expression on physiology and carbon metabolism in potato (Solanum tuberosum) roots. Sense and antisense NDPK1 constructs were introduced in potato using Agrobacterium rhizogenes to generate a population of root clones displaying a 40-fold difference in NDPK activity. Root growth, O2 uptake, flux of carbon between sucrose and CO2 , levels of reactive oxygen species and some tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were positively correlated with levels of NDPK1 expression. In addition, NDPK1 levels positively affected UDP-glucose and cellulose contents. The activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, a key enzyme in starch synthesis, was higher in antisense roots than in roots overexpressing NDPK1. Further analyses demonstrated that ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was more oxidized, and therefore less active, in sense clones than antisense clones. Consequently, antisense NDPK1 roots accumulated more starch and the starch to cellulose ratio was negatively affected by the level of NDPK1. These data support the idea that modulation of NDPK1 affects the distribution of carbon between starch and cellulose biosynthetic pathways.

  5. High levels of CC-chemokine expression and downregulated levels of CCR5 during HIV-1/HTLV-1 and HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfections.

    PubMed

    Oo, Z; Barrios, C S; Castillo, L; Beilke, M A

    2015-05-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 are common copathogens among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals. HTLV-2 may confer a survival benefit among patients with HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfections, along with lower plasma HIV-1 levels and delayed rates of CD4(+) T-cell decline. These effects have been attributed to the ability of the HTLV-2 viral transactivating Tax2 protein to induce the production of high levels of antiviral CC-chemokines and to downregulate expression of the CCR5 receptor, resulting in impaired entry of HIV-1 into CD4(+) T-cells. This study investigated the innate immunity of coinfected HIV/HTLV individuals by testing the ability of patient PBMCs to produce CC-chemokines in association CCR5 receptor modulation. The cellular proliferative responses of HIV/HTLV coinfected versus HIV monoinfected individuals were also evaluated. Higher levels of MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and RANTES (P < 0.05) were found in HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfected group compared to HIV-1 monoinfected population. Upregulated levels of RANTES were shown in HIV-1/HTLV-1 after 1 and 3 days of culture (P < 0.05). Lymphocytes from HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfected individuals showed significant CCR5 downregulation after 1 and 3 days of culture compared to lymphocytes from HIV-1 and uninfected groups (P < 0.05). Lower percentages of CCR5-positive cells were found in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfected after 3 days of incubation (P < 0.05). Levels of proliferation were significantly higher in the HIV-1/HTLV-1 group compared to HIV-1 alone (P < 0.05). HTLV-2 and HTLV-1 infections may induce the involvement of innate immunity against HIV-1 via stimulation of CC-chemokines and receptors, potentially modifying CCR5/HIV-1 binding and HIV-1 progression in coinfected individuals.

  6. Cisplatin-resistant cells express increased levels of a factor that recognizes damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, G.; Chang, E. )

    1990-05-01

    Cancer treatment with the drug cisplatin is often thwarted by the emergence of drug-resistant cells. To study this phenomenon, the authors identified two independent cellular factors that recognize cisplatin-damaged DNA. One of the two factors, designated XPE binding factor, is deficient in complementation group E of xeroderma pigmentosum, an inherited disease characterized by defective repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation, cisplatin, and other agents. Human tumor cell lines selected for resistance to cisplatin showed more efficient DNA repair and increased expression of XPE binding factor. These results suggest that XPE binding factor may be responsible, at least in part, for the development of cisplatin resistance in human tumors and that the mechanism may be increased DNA repair.

  7. Differential Gene Expression to Investigate the Effects of Low-level Electrochemical Currents on Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With the emergence and spread of multidrug resistant bacteria, effective methods to eliminate both planktonic bacteria and those embedded in surface-attached biofilms are needed. Electric currents at μA-mA/cm2 range are known to reduce the viability of bacteria. However, the mechanism of such effects is still not well understood. In this study, Bacillus subtilis was used as the model Gram-positive species to systematically investigate the effects of electrochemical currents on bacteria including the morphology, viability, and gene expression of planktonic cells, and viability of biofilm cells. The data suggest that weak electrochemical currents can effectively eliminate B. subtilis both as planktonic cells and in biofilms. DNA microarray results indicate that the genes associated with oxidative stress response, nutrient starvation, and membrane functions were induced by electrochemical currents. These findings suggest that ions and oxidative species generated by electrochemical reactions might be important for the killing effects of these currents. PMID:22078549

  8. Increasing CACNA1C expression in placenta containing high Cd level: an implication of Cd toxicity.

    PubMed

    Phuapittayalert, Laorrat; Saenganantakarn, Phisid; Supanpaiboon, Wisa; Cheunchoojit, Supaporn; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi; Sakulsak, Natthiya

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has known to produce many adverse effects on organs including placenta. Many essential transporters are involved in Cd transport pathways such as DMT-1, ZIP as well as L-VDCC. Fourteen pregnant women participated and were divided into two groups: high and low Cd-exposed (H-Cd, L-Cd) groups on the basis of their residential areas, Cd concentrations in the blood (B-Cd), urine (U-Cd), and placenta (P-Cd). The results showed that the B-Cd and U-Cd were significantly increased in H-Cd group (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the P-Cd in H-Cd group was elevated (p < 0.05) and positively related to their B-Cd and U-Cd values (p < 0.05). However, the mean cord blood Cd (C-Cd) concentration in H-Cd group was not significantly increased about 2.5-fold when comparing to L-Cd group. To determine the Cd accumulation in placental tissues, metallothionein-1A (MT-1A) and metallothionein-2A (MT-2A) expressions were used as biomarkers. The results revealed that mean MT-1A and MT-2A mRNAs and MT-1/2 proteins were up-regulated in H-Cd group (p < 0.05). In addition, the Ca channel alpha 1C (CACNA1C) mRNA and protein expressions were noticeably elevated in H-Cd group (p < 0.05). From these findings, we suggested that CACNA1C might be implicated in Cd transport in human placenta.

  9. High levels of functional endopeptidase 24.11 (CD10) activity on human thymocytes: preferential expression on immature subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Mari, B; Breittmayer, J P; Guerin, S; Belhacene, N; Peyron, J F; Deckert, M; Rossi, B; Auberger, P

    1994-01-01

    Although it is now well established that cells of the immune system express most of the exopeptidases described so far, little information is available concerning the identification and the characterization of the peptidases associated with the surface of human thymocytes. In the present study we have focused on CD10 expression on thymocytes using both FACS and enzymatic analysis. Unfractionated intact human thymocytes were shown to express significant levels of CD10-specific enzymatic activity, as assessed by the hydrolysis of the neutral endopeptidase (NEP) substrate Suc-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA and of D-Ala2-Leu-enkephalin, a typical NEP substrate. CD10 activity was abolished by specific NEP inhibitors, including thiorphan, retrothiorphan and phosphoramidon. Moreover, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that intact thymocytes and purified NEP hydrolysed thymopentin, a thymic factor known to induce the maturation of prothymocytes into thymocytes. Finally, CD 10/NEP was preferentially associated with CD3- CD3low and immature CD4- CD8- thymocytes. The data demonstrate for the first time that human thymocytes express functional NEP and suggest a role for this enzyme in the maturation of human thymocytes. PMID:7959879

  10. High-level Expression and Purification of Active Human FGF-2 in Escherichia coli by Codon and Culture Condition Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Soleyman, Mohammad Reza; Khalili, Mostafa; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Baazm, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a member of a highly conserved superfamily of proteins that are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Objectives: The objective of this study was to overexpress and purify the high-level active human bFGF in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted in the Islamic Republic of Iran. After codon optimization and gene synthesis, the optimized FGF-2 gene was subcloned into plasmid pET-32a. pET32-FGF-2 was transformed into E. coli BL21 for expression. The cultivation parameters were optimized to produce a high yield of FGF-2. Results: The optimal conditions were determined as follows: cultivation at 37°C in TB medium, with 1 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), followed by post-induction expression for 6 h. Under the abovementioned conditions, the expression volumetric productivity of FGF-2 reached 1.48 g/L. Conclusions: A fusion tag from the pET32 expression plasmid permits the recovery of the recombinant fusion FGF-2 from E. coli, without affecting its biological activity. PMID:27175305

  11. Expression levels of antimicrobial peptide tachyplesin I in transgenic Ornithogalum lines affect the resistance to Pectobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Alexander; Joshi, Janak Raj; Carmi, Nir; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-11-20

    The genus Ornithogalum includes several ornamental species that suffer substantial losses from bacterial soft rot caused by Pectobacteria. The absence of effective control measures for use against soft rot bacteria led to the initiation of a project in which a small antimicrobial peptide from an Asian horseshoe crab, tachyplesin (tpnI), was introduced into two commercial cultivars: O. dubium and O. thyrsoides. Disease severity and bacterial colonization were examined in transgenic lines expressing this peptide. Disease resistance was evaluated in six lines of each species by measuring bacterial proliferation in the plant tissue. Three transgenic lines of each species were subjected to further analysis in which the expression level of the transgene was evaluated using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. The development of disease symptoms and bacterial colonization of the plant tissue were also examined using GFP-expressing strain of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense Pcb3. Confocal-microscopy imaging revealed significantly reduced quantities of bacterial cells in the transgenic plant lines that had been challenged with the bacterium. The results clearly demonstrate that tpnI expression reduces bacterial proliferation, colonization and disease symptom (reduced by 95-100%) in the transgenic plant tissues. The quantity of tpnI transcripts, as measured by qRT-PCR, was negatively correlated with the protection afforded to the plants, as measured by the reduced severity of disease symptoms in the tissue.

  12. Vitamin E levels in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) expressing a p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate gene from oat (Avena sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kramer, Catherine M; Launis, Karen L; Traber, Maret G; Ward, Dennis P

    2014-04-16

    The enzyme p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is ubiquitous in plants and functions in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, resulting in the formation of homogentisate. Homogentisate is the aromatic precursor of all plastoquinones and tocochromanols, including tocopherols and tocotrienols. Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) has been genetically modified to express the gene avhppd-03 that encodes the protein AvHPPD-03 derived from oat (Avena sativa L.). The AvHPPD-03 isozyme has an inherent reduced binding affinity for mesotrione, a herbicide that inhibits the wild-type soybean HPPD enzyme. Expression of avhppd-03 in soybean plants confers a mesotrione-tolerant phenotype. Seeds from three different avhppd-03-expressing soybean events were quantitatively assessed for content of eight vitamin E isoforms. Although increased levels of two tocopherol isoforms were identified for each of the three soybean events, they were within, or not substantially different from, the ranges of these isoforms found in nontransgenic soybean varieties. The increases of these tocopherols in the avhppd-03-expressing soybean events may have a slight benefit with regard to vitamin E nutrition but, given the commercial processing of soybeans, are unlikely to have a material impact on human nutrition with regard to vitamin E concentrations in soybean oil.

  13. Expression levels of seven candidate genes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and their association with preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Veloz, I.; Carrillo-Sanchez, K.; Martinez-Gaytan, V.; Cortes-Flores, R.; Ochoa-Torres, M. A.; Guerrero, G. G.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, I. P.; Cancela-Murrieta, C. O.; Zamudio-Osuna, M.; Badillo-Almaraz, J. I.; Castruita-De la Rosa, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) expression levels of hemeoxygenase 1 (HMOX-1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-15 and AdipoQ genes to study their association with preeclampsia (PE). Methods A total of 177 pregnant women were recruited: 108 cases and 69 controls. Quantification of gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using TaqMan probes. Results Underexpression of VEGF-A and TGF-β1 was a constant in most of the cases (80.91% and 76.36%, respectively) and their expression was associated with onset and/or severity of disease (p values < 0.05). IL-6, IL-15 and AdipoQ, showed low or no expression in PBMC samples evaluated. Conclusion PBMC underexpression of VEGF-A and TGF-β1 is a hallmark of PE in the study population. PMID:24295154

  14. The Prognostic Role of NEDD9 and P38 Protein Expression Levels in Urinary Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Maged M.; El Shorbagy, Shereen; Abdelbary, Abeer M.; Abdelaziz, Lobna A.; Salim, Reham A.; Abdel Wahab, Khaled M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. The most common malignant tumor of the urinary bladder is transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated protein 9 (NEDD9) is found to be a cell adhesion mediator. P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase is a serine/threonine kinases member which can mediate carcinogenesis through intracellular signaling. Methods. To assess their prognostic role; NEDD9 and p38 protein were evaluated in sections from 50 paraffin blocks of TCC. Results. The high expressions of NEDD9 and p38 protein were significantly associated with grade, stage, distant metastasis (p < 0.001), number of tumors, lymph node metastasis, and tumor size (p < 0.001, 0.002; 0.018, <0.001; and 0.004, 0.007, respectively). High NEDD9 and p38 detection had a worse 3-year OS (p = 0.041 and <0.001, respectively). By multivariate analysis the NEDD9 and p38 protein expression levels and various clinicopathological criteria including gender, grade, stage of the tumor, and regional lymph node involvement were independent prognostic parameters of TCC of the urinary bladder patients' outcome. Conclusion. NEDD9 and p38 protein expressions were poor prognostic markers of TCC. PMID:28194179

  15. Inflammatory modulating effects of low level laser therapy on iNOS expression by means of bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Yumi; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Blackmore, Kristina; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-09-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in modulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression as molecular marker of the inflammation signaling pathway. LLLT was mediated by different therapeutic wavelengths using transgenic animals with the luciferase gene under control of the iNOS gene expression. Inflammation in 30 transgenic mice (iNOS-luc mice, from FVB strain) was induced by intra-articular injection of Zymosan-A in both knee joints. Four experimental groups were treated with one of four different wavelengths (λ=635, 785, 808 and 905nm) and one not laser-irradiated control group. Laser treatment (25 mW cm-2, 5 J cm-2) was applied to the knees 15 minutes after inflammation induction. Measurements of iNOS expression were performed at multiple times (0, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 24h) post-LLLT by measuring the bioluminescence signal using a highly sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The responsivity of BLI was sufficient to demonstrate a significant increase in bioluminescence signals after laser irradiation of 635nm when compared to non-irradiated animals and the other LLLT treated groups, showing the wavelength-dependence of LLLT on iNOS expression during the acute inflammatory process.

  16. Changes in neurotransmitter levels and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expressions in the mice olfactory bulb following nanoparticle exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tin-Tin-Win-Shwe Mitsushima, Dai; Yamamoto, Shoji; Fukushima, Atsushi; Funabashi, Toshiya; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2008-01-15

    Recently, there have been increasing reports that nano-sized component of particulate matter can reach the brain and may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Previously, our laboratory has studied the effect of intranasal instillation of nano-sized carbon black (CB) (14 nm and 95 nm) on brain cytokine and chemokine mRNA expressions and found that 14-nm CB increased IL-1{beta}, TNF-{alpha}, CCL2 and CCL3 mRNA expressions in the olfactory bulb, not in the hippocampus of mice. To investigate the effect of a single administration of nanoparticles on neurotransmitters and proinflammatory cytokines in a mouse olfactory bulb, we performed in vivo microdialysis and real-time PCR methods. Ten-week-old male BALB/c mice were implanted with guide cannula in the right olfactory bulb and, 1 week later, were instilled vehicle or CB (14 nm, 250 {mu}g) intranasally. Six hours after the nanoparticle instillation, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline or 50 {mu}g of bacteria cell wall component lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which may potentiate CB-induced neurologic effect. Extracellular glutamate and glycine levels were significantly increased in the olfactory bulb of CB-instilled mice when compared with vehicle-instilled control mice. Moreover, we found that LTA further increased glutamate and glycine levels. However, no alteration of taurine and GABA levels was observed in the olfactory bulb of the same mice. We also detected immunological changes in the olfactory bulb 11 h after vehicle or CB instillation and found that IL-1{beta} mRNA expression was significantly increased in CB- and LTA-treated mice when compared with control group. However, TNF-{alpha} mRNA expression was increased significantly in CB- and saline-treated mice when compared with control group. These findings suggest that nanoparticle CB may modulate the extracellular amino acid neurotransmitter levels and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 {beta} mRNA expressions synergistically with LTA

  17. Impact of probiotic-supplemented diet on the expression level of lactate dehydrogenase in the leukocytes of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Magdy A E; Moselhy, Said S

    2014-04-01

    Probiotics are known as living, nonpathogenic microorganisms that colonize the intestine and provide benefit to the host. The present study aims to measure one important energy metabolism-related enzyme activity in blood of rabbits fed on probiotics of recommended concentration. In addition, it also aims for the evaluation of the expression level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Two groups of rabbits are used: control group receiving normal standardized diet and the other probiotic-supplemented group receiving the same diet containing probiotic, namely, Mega acidophilus (200 million cfu/kg body weight/day) for 4 weeks. The obtained results revealed that the rabbits supplemented with probiotics showed a significant decrease in the levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) when compared with control group. Risk factors detected by measuring TC/HDL-c and LDL-c/HDL-c ratios showed statistically significant decrease in probiotic-supplemented rabbits when compared with control group. In addition, blood glucose and total LDH activity were elevated in probiotic-supplemented rabbits when compared with control group. RT-PCR products of LDH-M gene produced two specific amplicons. One amplicon has the expected size of 243 bp from all samples of rabbits as revealed by GelPro software. The level of LDH-M expression was found to be increased in the probiotic-supplemented group. However, unexpected amplicons are produced at 586 bp in all the samples, which may be a d