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Sample records for a3v star zeta

  1. DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A FAINT STELLAR COMPANION TO THE A3V STAR zeta VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Roberts, Lewis C.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Burruss, Rick; Shao, Michael; Vasisht, Gautam; Parry, Ian R.; King, David L.; Soummer, Remi; Simon, Michal; Perrin, Marshall D.; Lloyd, James P.; Bouchez, Antonin; Dekany, Richard; Beichman, Charles

    2010-03-20

    Through the combination of high-order adaptive optics and coronagraphy, we report the discovery of a faint stellar companion to the A3V star zeta Virginis. This companion is {approx}7 mag fainter than its host star in the H band, and infrared imaging spanning 4.75 years over five epochs indicates this companion has common proper motion with its host star. Using evolutionary models, we estimate its mass to be 0.168{sup +0.012}{sub -0.016} M{sub sun}, giving a mass ratio for this system q = 0.082{sup +0.007}{sub -0.008}. Assuming the two objects are coeval, this mass suggests an M4V-M7V spectral type for the companion, which is confirmed through {integral} field spectroscopic measurements. We see clear evidence for orbital motion from this companion and are able to constrain the semimajor axis to be {approx}>24.9 AU, the period {approx}>124 yr, and eccentricity {approx}>0.16. Multiplicity studies of higher mass stars are relatively rare, and binary companions such as this one at the extreme low end of the mass ratio distribution are useful additions to surveys incomplete at such a low mass ratio. Moreover, the frequency of binary companions can help to discriminate between binary formation scenarios that predict an abundance of low-mass companions forming from the early fragmentation of a massive circumstellar disk. A system such as this may provide insight into the anomalous X-ray emission from A stars, hypothesized to be from unseen late-type stellar companions. Indeed, we calculate that the presence of this M-dwarf companion easily accounts for the X-ray emission from this star detected by ROSAT.

  2. Zeta Pegasi: An SPB Variable Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Broadband photometric observations of the bright star Zeta Pegasi are presented that display brightness variability of 488.2 +/- 6.6 micromag (ppm) range with a period of 22.952 +/- 0.804 hr (f approx. equals 1.04566 c/d). The variation is monosinusoidal, so the star is recommended for membership in the class of small-amplitude Slowly Pulsating B-Stars (SPB) variables oscillating in a non-radial g-mode.

  3. Zeta Ophiuchi -- Runaway Star Plowing through Space Dust

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-24

    The blue star near the center of this image is Zeta Ophiuchi. Zeta Ophiuchi is actually a very massive, hot, bright blue star plowing its way through a large cloud of interstellar dust and gas in this image from NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer.

  4. The white dwarf companion of the B a 2 star zeta Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1981-01-01

    The Ba II star zeta Cap has a white dwarf companion. Its T (sub eff) is determined to be 22000 K, its mass is approximately one solar mass. The importance of this finding for the explanation of abundance peculiarities is discussed.

  5. Niobium and rubidium in the barium star Zeta Capricorni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, V. V.; Lambert, D. L.

    1984-03-01

    An abundance analysis of the elements Rb to Nb (relative to the G-giant standard ɛ Vir) has been carried out for the barium star ζ Cap using low-noise, high-resolution Digicon and Reticon spectra. Tech's (1971) low abundance of Nb in ζ Cap suggests that the s-process ceased less than about a million years ago. The authors' improved analysis finds a higher Nb abundance consistent with the complete decay of 93Zr to 93Nb; i.e., more than 3×106 years have elapsed since the principal phase of s-processing. The abundance of Rb suggests a neutron density of N(n) ≡ 107cm-3 for the s-process site at the close of s-processing.

  6. Discovery of a magnetic field in the Slowly Pulsating B star zeta Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Geers, V. C.; Henrichs, H. F.; Floquet, M.; Frémat, Y.; Hubert, A.-M.; Preuss, O.; Wiersema, K.

    2003-08-01

    zeta Cas is a B2 IV star with vsin i = 17 km s-1. Time-resolved circular spectropolarimetric observations of zeta Cas obtained in 2001 and 2002 with the Musicos échelle spectropolarimeter at the 2 m Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) show a sinusoidally varying longitudinal magnetic field with a strength between 10 G and -46 G for the averaged line-of-sight component, corresponding to B_pol=335+120-65 G. The period corresponds very accurately with the 5.37045 day period as derived from stellar wind variations observed in the ultraviolet. The epoch of the positive maximum field corresponds in phase with the maximum emission in the UV wind lines. This gives compelling evidence for a magnetic rotator model for this star, with an unambiguous rotation period of 5.37 days. We searched for periodicity in line-profile variations (lpv), radial velocity and minimum intensity curves in the ~ 400 optical spectra. We found a non-radial pulsation mode with l=2 +/- 1 at the frequency f=0.64 c d-1. From this periodicity and from stellar parameters derived from model fits, we propose to classify zeta Cas as a Slowly Pulsating B (SPB) star. This is the third detection of a magnetic field in an early B-type pulsating star and the first one in a SPB star. Based on observations obtained using the Musicos spectropolarimeter at the Observatoire du Pic du Midi, France, and on INES data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite.

  7. The Structural Evolution of Milky-Way-Like Star-Forming Galaxies zeta is approximately 1.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Shannon G.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Franx, Marun; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; VanDerWel, Arjen; Leja, Joel; Labbe, Ivo; Brammr, Gabriel; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Lundgren, Britt; Muzzin, Adam; Quadri, Ryan F.; Nelson, Erica June; Wake, David A.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    We follow the structural evolution of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) like the Milky Way by selecting progenitors to zeta is approx. 1.3 based on the stellar mass growth inferred from the evolution of the star-forming sequence. We select our sample from the 3D-HT survey, which utilizes spectroscopy from the HST-WFC3 G141 near-IR grism and enables precise redshift measurements for our sample of SFGs. Structural properties are obtained from Sersic profile fits to CANDELS WFC3 imaging. The progenitors of zeta = 0 SFGs with stellar mass M = 10(exp 10.5) solar mass are typically half as massive at zeta is approx. 1. This late-time stellar mass grow is consistent with recent studies that employ abundance matching techniques. The descendant SFGs at zeta is approx. 0 have grown in half-light radius by a factor of approx. 1.4 zeta is approx. 1. The half-light radius grows with stellar mass as r(sub e) alpha stellar mass(exp 0.29). While most of the stellar mass is clearly assembling at large radii, the mass surface density profiles reveal ongoing mass growth also in the central regions where bulges and pseudobulges are common features in present day late-type galaxies. Some portion of this growth in the central regions is due to star formation as recent observations of H(a) maps for SFGs at zeta approx. are found to be extended but centrally peaked. Connecting our lookback study with galactic archeology, we find the stellar mass surface density at R - 8 kkpc to have increased by a factor of approx. 2 since zeta is approx. 1, in good agreement with measurements derived for the solar neighborhood of the Milky Way.

  8. MULTI-EPOCH NEAR-INFRARED INTERFEROMETRY OF THE SPATIALLY RESOLVED DISK AROUND THE BE STAR {zeta} TAU

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, G. H.; Brummelaar, T. ten; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N. H.; Farrington, C. D.; Goldfinger, P. J.; Gies, D. R.; Richardson, N. D.; Touhami, Y.; McAlister, H. A.; Monnier, J. D.; Che, X.; Zhao, M.; Pedretti, E.; Thureau, N.; Ridgway, S. T. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.ed

    2010-12-15

    We present interferometric observations of the Be star {zeta} Tau obtained using the MIRC beam combiner at the CHARA Array. We resolved the disk during four epochs in 2007-2009. We fit the data with a geometric model to characterize the circumstellar disk as a skewed elliptical Gaussian and the central Be star as a uniform disk. The visibilities reveal a nearly edge-on disk with an FWHM major axis of {approx}1.8 mas in the H band. The non-zero closure phases indicate an asymmetry within the disk. Interestingly, when combining our results with previously published interferometric observations of {zeta} Tau, we find a correlation between the position angle of the disk and the spectroscopic V/R ratio, suggesting that the tilt of the disk is precessing. This work is part of a multi-year monitoring campaign to investigate the development and outward motion of asymmetric structures in the disks of Be stars.

  9. On the Star Formation-AGN Connection at zeta (is) approximately greater than 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, Andrew; Urry, C. Megan

    2013-01-01

    Using the spectra of a sample of approximately 28,000 nearby obscured active galaxies from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we probe the connection between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation over a range of radial scales in the host galaxy. We use the extinction-corrected luminosity of the [O iii] 5007A line as a proxy of intrinsic AGN power and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion rate. The star formation rates (SFRs) are taken from the MPA-JHU value-added catalog and are measured through the 3 inch SDSS aperture. We construct matched samples of galaxies covering a range in redshifts. With increasing redshift, the projected aperture size encompasses increasing amounts of the host galaxy. This allows us to trace the radial distribution of star formation as a function of AGN luminosity. We find that the star formation becomes more centrally concentrated with increasing AGN luminosity and Eddington ratio. This implies that such circumnuclear star formation is associated with AGN activity, and that it increasingly dominates over omnipresent disk star formation at higher AGN luminosities, placing critical constraints on theoretical models that link host galaxy star formation and SMBH fueling. We parameterize this relationship and find that the star formation on radial scales (is) less than 1.7 kpc, when including a constant disk component, has a sub-linear dependence on SMBH accretion rate: SFR in proportion to solar mass(sup 0.36), suggesting that angular momentum transfer through the disk limits accretion efficiency rather than the supply from stellar mass loss.

  10. Direct detection of pulsations of the Cepheid star zeta Gem and an independent calibration of the period-luminosity relation.

    PubMed

    Lane, B F; Kuchner, M J; Boden, A F; Creech-Eakman, M; Kulkarni, S R

    2000-09-28

    Cepheids are a class of variable (pulsating) stars whose absolute luminosities are related in a simple manner to their pulsational periods. By measuring the period and using the 'period-luminosity' relationship, astronomers can use the observed visual brightness to determine the distance to the star. Because these stars are very luminous, they can be observed in other galaxies, and therefore can be used to help determine the expansion rate of the Universe (the Hubble constant). Calibration of the period-luminosity relation is a necessary first step, but the small number of sufficiently nearby Cepheids has forced the use of a number of indirect means, with associated systematic uncertainties. Here we present a distance to the Cepheid zeta Geminorum, determined using a direct measurement (by an optical interferometer) of its changes in diameter as it pulsates. Within our uncertainty of 15 per cent, our distance is in agreement with previous indirect determinations. Planned improvements to the instrument will allow us to calibrate directly the period-luminosity relation to better than a few per cent.

  11. GAS DISTRIBUTION, KINEMATICS, AND EXCITATION STRUCTURE IN THE DISKS AROUND THE CLASSICAL Be STARS {beta} CANIS MINORIS AND {zeta} TAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, S.; Monnier, J. D.; Che, X.; Baron, F.; Schaefer, G.; Ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Turner, N. H.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Touhami, Y.; Gies, D. R.; Aufdenberg, J. P.; Thureau, N.

    2012-01-01

    Using CHARA and VLTI near-infrared spectro-interferometry with hectometric baseline lengths (up to 330 m) and with high spectral resolution (up to {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 12, 000), we studied the gas distribution and kinematics around two classical Be stars. The combination of high spatial and spectral resolution achieved allows us to constrain the gas velocity field on scales of a few stellar radii and to obtain, for the first time in optical interferometry, a dynamical mass estimate using the position-velocity analysis technique known from radio astronomy. For our first target star, {beta} Canis Minoris, we model the H+K-band continuum and Br{gamma}-line geometry with a near-critical rotating stellar photosphere and a geometrically thin equatorial disk. Testing different disk rotation laws, we find that the disk is in Keplerian rotation (v(r){proportional_to}r{sup -0.5{+-}0.1}) and derive the disk position angle (140 Degree-Sign {+-} 1.{sup 0}7), inclination (38.{sup 0}5 {+-} 1 Degree-Sign ), and the mass of the central star (3.5 {+-} 0.2 M{sub Sun }). As a second target star, we observed the prototypical Be star {zeta} Tauri and spatially resolved the Br{gamma} emission as well as nine transitions from the hydrogen Pfund series (Pf 14-22). Comparing the spatial origin of the different line transitions, we find that the Brackett (Br{gamma}), Pfund (Pf 14-17), and Balmer (H{alpha}) lines originate from different stellocentric radii (R{sub cont} < R{sub Pf} < R{sub Br{gamma}} {approx} R{sub H{alpha}}), which we can reproduce with an LTE line radiative transfer computation. Discussing different disk-formation scenarios, we conclude that our constraints are inconsistent with wind compression models predicting a strong outflowing velocity component, but support viscous decretion disk models, where the Keplerian-rotating disk is replenished with material from the near-critical rotating star.

  12. Evidence for Reduced Species Star Formation Rates in the Centers of Massive Galaxies at zeta = 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Intae; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Dickinson, Mark; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lu, Yu; Mobasher, Bahram; hide

    2017-01-01

    We perform the first spatially-resolved stellar population study of galaxies in the early universe z equals 3.5 -6.5, utilizing the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging dataset over the GOODS-S field. We select a sample of 418 bright and extended galaxies at z less than or approximately equal to 3.5-6.5 from a parent sample of approximately 8000 photometric-redshift selected galaxies from Finkelstein et al. We first examine galaxies at 3.5 less than or equal to z less than or approximately equal to 4.0 using additional deep K-band survey data from the HAWK-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS) which covers the 4000 Angstrom break at these redshifts. We measure the stellar mass, star formation rate, and dust extinction for galaxy inner and outer regions via spatially-resolved spectral energy distribution fitting based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. By comparing specific star formation rates (sSFRs) between inner and outer parts of the galaxies we find that the majority of galaxies with the high central mass densities show evidence for a preferentially lower sSFR in their centers than in their outer regions, indicative of reduced sSFRs in their central regions. We also study galaxies at z approximately equal to 5 and 6 (here limited to high spatial resolution in the rest-frame ultraviolet only), finding that they show sSFRs which are generally independent of radial distance from the center of the galaxies. This indicates that stars are formed uniformly at all radii in massive galaxies at z approximately equal to 5-6, contrary tomassive galaxies at z. less than approximately equal to 4.

  13. Maximum-Entropy Maps of the Be Shell Star Zeta Tauri from Optical Long-Baseline Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    position angle of the linear polarization. We tested the program using one night’s data on the bi- nary star Capella (a Aurigae); it converged to an image...binary star Capella , which did not give a "ghost image" of the secondary, shows that this is not necessar- ily the case, however. If the object is fairly...maps of the Be shell star ~ Tauri from optical long-baseline interferometry A. Quirrenbach1•2,3, D.F. Buscher1.2, D. Mozurkewich1•4, C.A. HummeJ1.2

  14. The interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio toward Zeta Ophiuchi and Zeta Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel; Wright, Edward L.

    1993-01-01

    High S/N, high-resolution observations of the interstellar Li absorption lines toward the stars Zeta Ophiuchi and Zeta Persei are reported. Li I line profiles indicate the presence of both the Li-7 and Li-6 doublets in these two sightlines. Best-fit values for the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio are 6.8 (+1.4/-1.7) towards Zeta Ophiuchi and 5.5 (+ 1.3/-1.1) toward Zeta Persei. Measurement of 6.8 (+1.4/-1.7) for the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio towards Zeta Ophiuchi does not support the lower limit of 25 determined by Ferlet and Dennefeld (1984). The current value of the interstellar Li-7/Li-6 isotope ratio is the result of various lithium production and destruction processes involving stars, cosmic rays, and the big bang.

  15. Zeta potential measurement.

    PubMed

    Clogston, Jeffrey D; Patri, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for the measurement of the electrostatic potential at the electrical double layer surrounding a nanoparticle in solution. This is referred to as the zeta potential. Nanoparticles with a zeta potential between -10 and +10 mV are considered approximately neutral, while nanoparticles with zeta potentials of greater than +30 mV or less than -30 mV are considered strongly cationic and strongly anionic, respectively. Since most cellular membranes are negatively charged, zeta potential can affect a nanoparticle's tendency to permeate membranes, with cationic particles generally displaying more toxicity associated with cell wall disruption. This technique is demonstrated for two types of nanoparticles commonly used in biological applications: colloidal gold (strongly anionic) and amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimer (strongly cationic).

  16. The Triple System Zeta Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    Zeta Aquarii is a bright and nearby (28 pc) triple star with a 26-year astrometric subsystem. Almost one-half of the outer 540-year visual orbit has been covered in 238 years of its observations. Both inner and outer orbits are revised here taking into account recent direct resolution of the inner pair Aa,Ab. The inner orbit has a high eccentricity of 0.87 and is inclined to the outer orbit by 140° ± 10°, suggesting that Kozai-Lidov cycles take place. The masses of the stars Aa, B, and Ab are 1.4, 1.4, and 0.6 solar. The age of the system is about 3 Gyr, and the two main components have just left the main sequence. Hypothetically, this system could have formed by a dynamical capture of the small star Ab in the twin binary Aa,B. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope.

  17. New observations and analysis of zeta Phe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Tex; van Antwerpen, Coen

    2017-06-01

    From new and published photometry of the eclipsing binary zeta Phe (HR 338) a period of 1.66977220(3) days was determined and a new epoch of HJD 2432500.021511 selected. Using the 60+ years of photometry, published radial velocities and new values for the period and epoch, the physical characteristics of the zetaPhe system were modeled using a software package called PHOEBE. Of note, the masses of the B6V and B9V components were determined to be 3.75 and 2.35 M⊙, somewhat less than previous determinations. The period of apsidal motion of Phe's eccentric orbit was calculated to be 53.7±0.3 years indicating that one full cycle has been completed since photoelectric measurements of this star were first undertaken in 1950.

  18. 2--14 microns Spectroscopy of Vega-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Knacke, R. F.; Hackwell, J. A.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Hanner, M. S.

    1994-12-01

    We present intermediate-resolution (lambda /Delta lambda ~ 50) infrared (2--14 microns) spectroscopy of four early-type main-sequence stars, conducted with the Aerospace Corp. Infrared Spectrograph. We observed beta UMa (A1 V), alpha Aql (A7 V), and beta Leo (A3 V) at the 1.3-m KPNO telescope in May 1993, and zeta Lep (A2 V) at the 3.0-m IRTF telescope in Nov. 1993. The Vega-type stars beta UMa and zeta Lep showed weak but definite excess flux at ~ 10 microns in previous groundbased photometric surveys (Fajardo-Acosta, Telesco & Knacke 1994, in preparation; Aumann & Probst 1991, ApJ, 368, 264). We observed alpha Aql and beta Leo to confirm that their ~ 10 microns spectra do not show any excess. The weak ~ 10 microns excess features in our spectra of beta UMa and zeta Lep are probably indicative of large grains and/or a small quantity of dust around these stars. Their weak features contrast with the prominent silicate emission feature previously seen in beta Pic and 51 Oph. The grains are hotter in zeta Lep than in beta UMa, as indicated by an excess already present at short wavelengths ( ~ 8.5 microns) in the spectrum of the former, as opposed to the 10--11 microns excess of the latter. Dust around these two stars could be an assemblage of amorphous minerals, probably of a variety of sizes, as suggested by their broad features. We compared the excess spectra of zeta Lep and beta UMa with those of comets (reviewed by Hanner, Lynch, & Russell 1994, ApJ, 425, 274) and found they resemble those of dust-poor comets such as Austin 1990 V and Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko 1989 XIX.

  19. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  20. Massive Star Makes Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    The giant star Zeta Ophiuchi, a young, large and hot star located around 370 light-years away, is having a hocking effect on the surrounding dust clouds in this infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  1. Asymmetry in zeta Auriage chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.

    1988-01-01

    Asymmetry in the ultraviolet spectra of zeta-Aur, similar to that reported in optical observations, was studied using IUE data. A plot of the integrated flux of zeta Aurigae from 1625 to 1675 A as a function of absolute phase shows no significant difference between the ingress and egress phases. A plot of the integrated flux from 1625 to 1675 A for 22 Vul as a function of absolute phase for both ingress and egress confirms that the atmospheric eclipse is asymmetric in 22 Vul. The eclipse in 22 Vul begins symmetrically but departs from symmetry at a phase greater than 0.05. The pronounced dip at ingress suggests a feature in the chromosphere.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chemical abundances of zeta Reticuly (Adibekyan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Faria, J. P.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Israelian, G.; Harutyunyan, G.; Suarez-Andres, L.; Hakobyan, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The file table1.dat lists stellar parameters, S/N, and observation dates of zeta1 Ret and zeta2 Ret derived from individual and combined spectra The file ew.dat lists the equivalent widths (EW) of all the spectral lines. The file s_lines.dat lists the lines that were used in this study. The file abund.dat lists the derived abundances of the elements for each star and spectra. (4 data files).

  3. The spectral energy distribution of Zeta Puppis and HD 50896

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectral energy distribution of the O5f star Zeta Pup and the WN5 star HD 50896 are derived from OAO-2 observations with the calibration of Bless, Code, and Fairchild (1976). An estimate of the interstellar reddening (0.12 magnitude) of the Wolf-Rayet star is determined from the size of the characteristic interstellar extinction bump at 4.6 inverse microns. After correction for extinction, both stars show a flat energy distribution in the ultraviolet. The distribution of HD 50896 from 1100 A to 2 microns is in good agreement with results of extended model atmospheres, but some uncertainty remains because of the interstellar-extinction correction. The absolute energy distribution of Zeta Pup is fitted by a 42,000-K plane-parallel model if the model's flux is adjusted for the effects of electron scattering in the stellar wind and for UV line blanketing that was determined empirically from high-resolution Copernicus satellite observations. To achieve this fit, it is necessary to push both the spectroscopically determined temperature and the ultraviolet calibration to the limits of their probable errors.

  4. Joint discrete universality of Hurwitz zeta functions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinčikas, A

    2014-11-30

    We obtain a joint discrete universality theorem for Hurwitz zeta functions. Here the parameters of zeta functions and the step of shifts of these functions approximating a given family of analytic functions are connected by some condition of linear independence. Nesterenko's theorem gives an example satisfying this condition. The universality theorem is applied to estimate the number of zeros of a linear combination of Hurwitz zeta functions. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  5. Zeta potential in ceramic industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecuit, M.

    1984-01-01

    Deflocculation, electrical conductivity and zeta potential (ZP) are studied for the addition of 0 to 10000 ppm Na2SiO3 deflocculator to slips obtained from three argillaceous materials (kaolin d'Arvor, ball clay Hyplas 64, and/or Granger Clay No. 10). The quantity of Na2SO3 required to deflocculate a slip is independent of the density but differes for each clay. The ZP is directly related to the density of the slip. The higher the ZP the more stable a slip is; the value of the ZP of a mixture does not follow a simple law but the electrical resistance of a mixture does follow a simple additive law. The ZP appears to have linear relation with the specific surface of the argillaceous material.

  6. Rocket spectroscopy of zeta Orionis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of a spectrum of zeta Ori extending from 922 to 1453 A with approximately 0.8 A resolution recorded at rocket altitudes. All lines used in existing models of stellar atmospheres appear in the recorded spectrum with the exception of those masked by telluric N2 or strong P Cygni-type profiles and by an O V line at 1371.29 A. Fifteen multiplets of subordinate lines have been reliably identified, indicating an approximate range of excitation from 0 to 50 eV. Transitions in C III (1176 A), N III (991 A), N V (1239, 1243 A), O VI (1032, 1038 A), Si IV (1394, 1403 A), S IV (1063, 1074 A), and S VI (933, 944 A) have been observed as P Cygni-type profiles presumably arising in a circumstellar envelope. The degree of ionization, transitions present, and mean radial velocities are all consistent with viewing the envelope as a hot (about 100,000 K), rarefied plasma in which collisional ionization is important. Interstellar lines in C I (1277, 1280 A), C II (1036, 1334 A), N I (1134-1135 A), N I (1200-1201 A), N II (1084-1086 A), O I (1302, 1305 A), Si II (1190, 1193 A), Si II (1260 A), and Si II (1304 A) have been definitely identified. Other transitions in Ar II, S I, C I, and Fe II are tentatively identified. The equivalent width of the L alpha line is found to be 10.4 plus or minus 1.6 A, corresponding to a columnar density of 2.0 plus or minus 0.7 x 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  7. Universality of composite functions of periodic zeta functions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurincikas, Antanas P

    2012-11-30

    In the paper, we prove the universality, in the sense of Voronin, for some classes of composite functions F({zeta}(s;a)), where the function {zeta}(s;a) is defined by a Dirichlet series with periodic multiplicative coefficients. We also study the universality of functions of the form F({zeta}(s;a{sub 1}),...,{zeta}(s;a{sub r})). For example, it follows from general theorems that every linear combination of derivatives of the function {zeta}(s;a) and every linear combination of the functions {zeta}(s;a{sub 1}),...,{zeta}(s;a{sub r}) are universal. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  8. Zeta functions in brane world cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flachi, Antonino; Knapman, Alan; Naylor, Wade; Sasaki, Misao

    2004-12-01

    We present a calculation of the zeta function and of the functional determinant for a Laplace-type differential operator, corresponding to a scalar field in a higher-dimensional deSitter brane background, which consists of a higher-dimensional anti deSitter bulk spacetime bounded by a deSitter section, representing a brane. Contrary to the existing examples, which all make use of conformal transformations, we evaluate the zeta function working directly with the higher-dimensional wave operator. We also consider a generic mass term and coupling to curvature, generalizing previous results. The massless, conformally coupled case is obtained as a limit of the general result and compared with known calculations. In the limit of large anti deSitter radius, the zeta determinant for the ball is recovered in perfect agreement with known expressions, providing an interesting check of our result and an alternative way of obtaining the ball determinant.

  9. Deitmar schemes, graphs and zeta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mérida-Angulo, Manuel; Thas, Koen

    2017-07-01

    In Thas (2014) it was explained how one can naturally associate a Deitmar scheme (which is a scheme defined over the field with one element, F1) to a so-called ;loose graph; (which is a generalization of a graph). Several properties of the Deitmar scheme can be proven easily from the combinatorics of the (loose) graph, and known realizations of objects over F1 such as combinatorial F1-projective and F1-affine spaces exactly depict the loose graph which corresponds to the associated Deitmar scheme. In this paper, we first modify the construction of loc. cit., and show that Deitmar schemes which are defined by finite trees (with possible end points) are ;defined over F1; in Kurokawa's sense; we then derive a precise formula for the Kurokawa zeta function for such schemes (and so also for the counting polynomial of all associated Fq-schemes). As a corollary, we find a zeta function for all such trees which contains information such as the number of inner points and the spectrum of degrees, and which is thus very different than Ihara's zeta function (which is trivial in this case). Using a process called ;surgery,; we show that one can determine the zeta function of a general loose graph and its associated {Deitmar, Grothendieck}-schemes in a number of steps, eventually reducing the calculation essentially to trees. We study a number of classes of examples of loose graphs, and introduce the Grothendieck ring ofF1-schemes along the way in order to perform the calculations. Finally, we include a computer program for performing more tedious calculations, and compare the new zeta function to Ihara's zeta function for graphs in a number of examples.

  10. 1979-1980 eclipse of zeta Aurigae, I. The circumstellar envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.D.

    1981-09-15

    The resonance lines of Mg/sup +/ and C/sup + + +/ have been studied in the spectrum of zeta Aurigae during 1979 and 1980. A model of the K-star wind far from the K star and its interaction with the B star in the system has been derived. The data suggest a mass loss rate from the K star of 2 x 10/sup -8/ M/sub sun/ yr/sup -1/. The rate of accretion by the B star of material from the K supergiant is such that the matter accreted in the course of about 10 years is of the order of the total mass of the photosphere of the B star.

  11. Group entropies, correlation laws, and zeta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Piergiulio

    2011-08-01

    The notion of group entropy is proposed. It enables the unification and generaliztion of many different definitions of entropy known in the literature, such as those of Boltzmann-Gibbs, Tsallis, Abe, and Kaniadakis. Other entropic functionals are introduced, related to nontrivial correlation laws characterizing universality classes of systems out of equilibrium when the dynamics is weakly chaotic. The associated thermostatistics are discussed. The mathematical structure underlying our construction is that of formal group theory, which provides the general structure of the correlations among particles and dictates the associated entropic functionals. As an example of application, the role of group entropies in information theory is illustrated and generalizations of the Kullback-Leibler divergence are proposed. A new connection between statistical mechanics and zeta functions is established. In particular, Tsallis entropy is related to the classical Riemann zeta function.

  12. Interstellar C2 molecules toward Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Campbell, B.

    1982-01-01

    Ten weak interstellar absorption lines of the (2-0) Phillips band of C2 near 8760 A are detected in the spectrum of Zeta Ophiuchi. All of the lines have equivalent widths smaller than 2 mA, and originate from the six lowest rotational levels of C2. The resulting total column density is equal to about 1.7 x 10 to the 13th/sq cm, and the excitation temperature is 130 + or - 10 K.

  13. Graph Zeta function and gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui

    2011-03-01

    Along the recently trodden path of studying certain number theoretic properties of gauge theories, especially supersymmetric theories whose vacuum manifolds are non-trivial, we investigate Ihara's Graph Zeta Function for large classes of quiver theories and periodic tilings by bi-partite graphs. In particular, we examine issues such as the spectra of the adjacency and whether the gauge theory satisfies the strong and weak versions of the graph theoretical analogue of the Riemann Hypothesis.

  14. Zeta potential orientation dependence of sapphire substrates.

    PubMed

    Kershner, Ryan J; Bullard, Joseph W; Cima, Michael J

    2004-05-11

    The zeta potential of planar sapphire substrates for three different crystallographic orientations was measured by a streaming potential technique in the presence of KCl and (CH3)4NCl electrolytes. The streaming potential was measured for large single crystalline C-plane (0001), A-plane (1120), and R-plane (1102) wafers over a full pH range at three or more ionic strengths ranging from 1 to 100 mM. The roughness of the epi-polished wafers was verified using atomic force microscopy to be on the order of atomic scale, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to ensure that the samples were free of silica and other contaminants. The results reveal a shift in the isoelectric point (iep) of the three samples by as much as two pH units, with the R-plane surface exhibiting the most acidic behavior and the C-plane samples having the highest iep. The iep at all ionic strengths was tightly centered around a single pH for each wafer. These values of iep are substantially different from the range of pH 8-10 consistently reported in the literature for alpha-Al2O3 particles. Particle zeta potential measurements were performed on a model powder using phase analysis light scattering, and the iep was confirmed to occur at pH 8. Modified Auger parameters (MAP) were calculated from XPS spectra of a monolayer of iridium metal deposited on the sapphire by electron beam deposition. A shift in MAP consistent with the observed differences in iep of the surfaces confirms the effect of surface structure on the transfer of charge between the Ir and sapphire, hence accounting for the changes in acidity as a function of crystallographic orientation.

  15. The impact of IUE on binary star studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of IUE observations in the investigation of binary stars is discussed. The results of data analysis of several classes of binary systems are briefly reviewed including zeta Aurigae and VV Cephei stars, mu Sagittarii, epsilon Aurigae, beta Lyrae and the W Serpentis stars, symbiotic stars, and the Algols.

  16. A pseudo zeta function and the distribution of primes.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, P R

    2000-07-05

    The Riemann zeta function is given by: [equation, see published text]. Zeta(s) may be analytically continued to the entire s-plane, except for a simple pole at s = 0. Of great interest are the complex zeros of zeta(s). The Riemann hypothesis states that the complex zeros all have real part 1/2. According to the prime number theorem, pn approximately n logn, where pn is the nth prime. Suppose that pn were exactly nlogn. In other words, in the Euler product above, replace the nth prime by nlogn. In this way, we define a pseudo zeta function C(s) for Re s > 1. One can show that C(s) may be analytically continued at least into the half-plane Re s > 0 except for an isolated singularity (presumably a simple pole) at s = 0. It may be shown that the pseudo zeta function C(s) has no complex zeros whatsoever. This means that the complex zeros of the zeta function are associated with the irregularity of the distribution of the primes.

  17. DISCOVERY OF THE HOST CLUSTER FOR THE FUNDAMENTAL CEPHEID CALIBRATOR ZETA GEMINORUM

    SciTech Connect

    Majaess, D.; Turner, D.; Lane, D.; Gieren, W.; Balam, D.

    2012-03-20

    New and existing CORAVEL, UBVJHK{sub s} , HST, HIP/Tycho, ARO, KPNO, and DAO observations imply that the fundamental Cepheid calibrator {zeta} Gem is a cluster member. The following parameters were inferred for {zeta} Gem from cluster membership and are tied to new spectral classifications (DAO) established for 26 nearby stars (e.g., HD53588/B7.5IV, HD54692/B9.5IV): E{sub B-V} = 0.02 {+-} 0.02, log {tau} = 7.85 {+-} 0.15, and d = 355 {+-} 15 pc. The mean distance to {zeta} Gem from cluster membership and six recent estimates (e.g., IRSB) is d=363{+-}9({sigma}{sub x}-bar ){+-}26 ({sigma}) pc. The results presented here support the color-excess and HST parallax derived for the Cepheid by Benedict et al. Forthcoming precise proper motions (DASCH) and Chandra/XMM-Newton observations of the broader field may be employed to identify cluster members, bolster the cluster's existence, and provide stronger constraints on the Cepheid's fundamental parameters.

  18. Molecular origins of the zeta potential

    SciTech Connect

    Predota, Milan; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2016-09-19

    The zeta potential (ZP) is an oft-reported measure of the macroscopic charge state of solid surfaces and colloidal particles in contact with solvents. However, the origin of this readily measurable parameter has remained divorced from the molecular-level processes governing the underlying electrokinetic phenomena, which limits its usefulness. Here, we connect the macroscopic measure to the microscopic realm through nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of electroosmotic flow between parallel slabs of the hydroxylated (110) rutile (TiO2) surface. These simulations provided streaming mobilities, which were converted to ZP via the commonly used Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. A range of rutile surface charge densities (0.1 to –0.4 C/m2), corresponding to pH values between about 2.8 and 9.4, in RbCl, NaCl, and SrCl2 aqueous solutions, were modeled and compared to experimental ZPs for TiO2 particle suspensions. Simulated ZPs qualitatively agree with experiment and show that “anomalous” ZP values and inequalities between the point of zero charge derived from electrokinetic versus pH titration measurements both arise from differing co- and counterion sorption affinities. We show that at the molecular level the ZP arises from the delicate interplay of spatially varying dynamics, structure, and electrostatics in a narrow interfacial region within about 15 Å of the surface, even in dilute salt solutions. This contrasts fundamentally with continuum descriptions of such interfaces, which predict the ZP response region to be inversely related to ionic strength. In reality the properties of this interfacial region are dominated by relatively immobile and structured water. Furthermore, viscosity values are substantially greater than in the bulk, and electrostatic potential profiles are oscillatory in nature.

  19. Molecular origins of the zeta potential

    DOE PAGES

    Predota, Milan; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2016-09-19

    The zeta potential (ZP) is an oft-reported measure of the macroscopic charge state of solid surfaces and colloidal particles in contact with solvents. However, the origin of this readily measurable parameter has remained divorced from the molecular-level processes governing the underlying electrokinetic phenomena, which limits its usefulness. Here, we connect the macroscopic measure to the microscopic realm through nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of electroosmotic flow between parallel slabs of the hydroxylated (110) rutile (TiO2) surface. These simulations provided streaming mobilities, which were converted to ZP via the commonly used Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. A range of rutile surface charge densities (0.1 tomore » –0.4 C/m2), corresponding to pH values between about 2.8 and 9.4, in RbCl, NaCl, and SrCl2 aqueous solutions, were modeled and compared to experimental ZPs for TiO2 particle suspensions. Simulated ZPs qualitatively agree with experiment and show that “anomalous” ZP values and inequalities between the point of zero charge derived from electrokinetic versus pH titration measurements both arise from differing co- and counterion sorption affinities. We show that at the molecular level the ZP arises from the delicate interplay of spatially varying dynamics, structure, and electrostatics in a narrow interfacial region within about 15 Å of the surface, even in dilute salt solutions. This contrasts fundamentally with continuum descriptions of such interfaces, which predict the ZP response region to be inversely related to ionic strength. In reality the properties of this interfacial region are dominated by relatively immobile and structured water. Furthermore, viscosity values are substantially greater than in the bulk, and electrostatic potential profiles are oscillatory in nature.« less

  20. Molecular origins of the zeta potential

    SciTech Connect

    Predota, Milan; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2016-09-19

    The zeta potential (ZP) is an oft-reported measure of the macroscopic charge state of solid surfaces and colloidal particles in contact with solvents. However, the origin of this readily measurable parameter has remained divorced from the molecular-level processes governing the underlying electrokinetic phenomena, which limits its usefulness. Here, we connect the macroscopic measure to the microscopic realm through nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of electroosmotic flow between parallel slabs of the hydroxylated (110) rutile (TiO2) surface. These simulations provided streaming mobilities, which were converted to ZP via the commonly used Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. A range of rutile surface charge densities (0.1 to –0.4 C/m2), corresponding to pH values between about 2.8 and 9.4, in RbCl, NaCl, and SrCl2 aqueous solutions, were modeled and compared to experimental ZPs for TiO2 particle suspensions. Simulated ZPs qualitatively agree with experiment and show that “anomalous” ZP values and inequalities between the point of zero charge derived from electrokinetic versus pH titration measurements both arise from differing co- and counterion sorption affinities. We show that at the molecular level the ZP arises from the delicate interplay of spatially varying dynamics, structure, and electrostatics in a narrow interfacial region within about 15 Å of the surface, even in dilute salt solutions. This contrasts fundamentally with continuum descriptions of such interfaces, which predict the ZP response region to be inversely related to ionic strength. In reality the properties of this interfacial region are dominated by relatively immobile and structured water. Furthermore, viscosity values are substantially greater than in the bulk, and electrostatic potential profiles are oscillatory in nature.

  1. The Multiple Zeta Value data mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümlein, J.; Broadhurst, D. J.; Vermaseren, J. A. M.

    2010-03-01

    We provide a data mine of proven results for Multiple Zeta Values (MZVs) of the form ζ(s,s,…,s)=∑n>n>⋯>n>0∞{1/(n1s⋯nks)} with weight w=∑i=1ks and depth k and for Euler sums of the form ∑n>n>⋯>n>0∞{(ɛ1n⋯ɛ1n)/(n1s⋯nks)} with signs ɛ=±1. Notably, we achieve explicit proven reductions of all MZVs with weights w⩽22, and all Euler sums with weights w⩽12, to bases whose dimensions, bigraded by weight and depth, have sizes in precise agreement with the Broadhurst-Kreimer and Broadhurst conjectures. Moreover, we lend further support to these conjectures by studying even greater weights ( w⩽30), using modular arithmetic. To obtain these results we derive a new type of relation for Euler sums, the Generalized Doubling Relations. We elucidate the "pushdown" mechanism, whereby the ornate enumeration of primitive MZVs, by weight and depth, is reconciled with the far simpler enumeration of primitive Euler sums. There is some evidence that this pushdown mechanism finds its origin in doubling relations. We hope that our data mine, obtained by exploiting the unique power of the computer algebra language FORM, will enable the study of many more such consequences of the double-shuffle algebra of MZVs, and their Euler cousins, which are already the subject of keen interest, to practitioners of Quantum Field Theory, and to mathematicians alike.

  2. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  3. Zeta Potential in Intact Natural Carbonates at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mahrouqi, D.; Vinogradov, J.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of zeta potential have been used to monitor subsurface flows in many natural brine systems. Numerous studies report zeta potentials in carbonates using crushed samples at low ionic strength and laboratory temperatures. However, natural brines have much higher salinity; moreover, temperatures are considerably higher in many subsurface settings. The variation of zeta potentials with temperature has not been examined in natural carbonates. We report zeta potential values interpreted from streaming potential measurements in two intact carbonate rock samples, saturated with artificial brines at elevated temperatures. We measure streaming potential using an experimental set-up that incorporates in-situ measurements of saturated rock conductivity, brine temperature, brine pH, brine electrical conductivity, pressure difference and voltage at temperatures up to 120oC. The streaming potential measurements are complemented with brine effluent studies. We find that the interpreted zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01M) and independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5M); consistent with published zeta potential in intact natural sandstones. The concentration of Ca2+ (main potential determining ion) also decreases with temperature at low ionic strength, but remains constant at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is consistent between two different natural carbonate samples and can be explained by the temperature dependence of pCa2+. We suggest that zeta potential of carbonate is independent of temperature or pH when pCa2+ remains constant. A linear variation of pH vs. pCa2+ is exhibited, at ambient and elevated temperatures, when pCa2+ is allowed to change with pH. This linear variation explains the numerous published data that shows apparent relationship between zeta potential of carbonates and pH.

  4. Pure red cell aplasia induced by epoetin zeta

    PubMed Central

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Ricchiuti, Guido; Scatena, Alessia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). We report on a 72-year-old patient who developed hypo-proliferative anaemia unresponsive to ESA following the administration of epoetin zeta subcutaneously for 7 months. On the basis of severe isolated hypoplasia of the erythroid line in the bone marrow and high-titre neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies (Ab), a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA was made. Epoetin zeta was discontinued and the patient was given steroids. This was associated with anaemia recovery. To our knowledge this is the first PRCA case related to epoetin zeta. PMID:27478604

  5. Zeta functions of the Dirac operator on quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, J. M.; Weyand, T.; Kirsten, K.

    2016-10-01

    We construct spectral zeta functions for the Dirac operator on metric graphs. We start with the case of a rose graph, a graph with a single vertex where every edge is a loop. The technique is then developed to cover any finite graph with general energy independent matching conditions at the vertices. The regularized spectral determinant of the Dirac operator is also obtained as the derivative of the zeta function at a special value. In each case the zeta function is formulated using a contour integral method, which extends results obtained for Laplace and Schrödinger operators on graphs.

  6. The IUE MEGA Campaign: The Rotationally Modulated Wind of zeta Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, Ian D.; Prinja, Raman K.; Massa, Derck

    1995-01-01

    We discuss 16 days of intensive International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of the Si iv doublet (lambda1400) in the spectrum of the O4 I(n) f star zeta Pup. The data show continuous variability throughout the greater part of the blueshifted absorption. Time series analysis of these data reveals significant power at periods of 19.2 hr and 5.2 days, which we identify with the mean recurrence time of Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) and the photospheric rotation period, respectively. These results indicate that the wind has a global longitudinal asymmetry (approaching a factor 2 in optical depth), possibly associated with large-scale magnetic structures, but suggest that the DACs are not directly associated with specific stellar longitudes in this star. There is no significant power in the lines at the 8.5 hr period identified in photospheric absorption-line variability, nor at the 16.7 hr period reported in X-ray observations.

  7. Zeta potential of artificial and natural calcite in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Al Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew D

    2017-02-01

    Despite the broad range of interest and applications, controls on calcite surface charge in aqueous solution, especially at conditions relevant to natural systems, remain poorly understood. The primary data source to understand calcite surface charge comprises measurements of zeta potential. Here we collate and review previous measurements of zeta potential on natural and artificial calcite and carbonate as a resource for future studies, compare and contrast the results of these studies to determine key controls on zeta potential and where uncertainties remain, and report new measurements of zeta potential relevant to natural subsurface systems. The results show that the potential determining ions (PDIs) for the carbonate mineral surface are the lattice ions Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and CO3(2-). The zeta potential is controlled by the concentration-dependent adsorption of these ions within the Stern layer, primarily at the Outer Helmholtz Plane (OHP). Given this, the Iso-Electric Point (IEP) at which the zeta potential is zero should be expressed as pCa (or pMg). It should not be reported as pH, similar to most metal oxides. The pH does not directly control the zeta potential. Varying the pH whilst holding pCa constant yields constant zeta potential. The pH affects the zeta potential only by moderating the equilibrium pCa for a given CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). Experimental studies that appear to yield a systematic relationship between pH and zeta potential are most likely observing the relationship between pCa and zeta potential, with pCa responding to the change in pH. New data presented here show a consistent linear relationship between equilibrium pH and equilibrium pCa or pMg irrespective of sample used or solution ionic strength. The surface charge of calcite is weakly dependent on pH, through protonation and deprotonation reactions that occur within a hydrolysis layer immediately adjacent to the mineral surface. The Point of Zero Charge (PZC) at which the surface

  8. Zeta potential in intact natural sandstones at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2015-08-01

    We report measurements of the zeta potential of natural sandstones saturated with NaCl electrolytes of varying ionic strengths at temperatures up to 150°C. The zeta potential is always negative but decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01 M) and is independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5 M). The pH also decreases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength but remains constant at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential can be explained by the temperature dependence of the pH. Our findings are consistent with published models of the zeta potential, so long as the temperature dependence of the pH at low ionic strength is accounted for and can explain the hitherto contradictory results reported in previous studies.

  9. Temperature dependence of the zeta potential in intact natural carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2016-11-01

    The zeta potential is a measure of the electrical charge on mineral surfaces and is an important control on subsurface geophysical monitoring, adsorption of polar species in aquifers, and rock wettability. We report the first measurements of zeta potential in intact, water-saturated, natural carbonate samples at temperatures up to 120°C. The zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01 M NaCl, comparable to potable water) but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl, comparable to seawater). The equilibrium calcium concentration resulting from carbonate dissolution also increases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is correlated with the temperature dependence of the equilibrium calcium concentration and shows a Nernstian linear relationship. Our findings are applicable to many subsurface carbonate rocks at elevated temperature.

  10. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  11. Observing and Analyzing the &zeta; Aurigae Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. Elizabeth; Eaton, Joel A.; Ake, Thomas B.; Schröder, Klaus-Peter

    This chapter reviews the scientific information that has been extracted from the ζ Aur binaries by various methods, surveys the kinds of spectroscopic data that have been used in those analyses, and examines each of the 10 known eclipsing systems in turn, except for VV Cep which is treated separately in Chap. 3, 10.1007/978-3-319-09198-3_3. It describes what has been achieved by modelling, and assesses what has been learned so far about the mass loss and winds from the cool giants and supergiants in those systems. It tries to keep in focus the fundamental questions posed at the end of the previous chapter (Sect. 1.8, 10.1007/978-3-319-09198-3_1#Sec8"), in particular the role of the ζ Aur binaries as templates for single stars, and suggests observing strategies for the future.

  12. Riemann {zeta} function from wave-packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, R.; Schleich, W. P.; Dahl, J. P.; Moya-Cessa, H.; Strunz, W. T.; Walser, R.

    2010-09-15

    We show that the time evolution of a thermal phase state of an anharmonic oscillator with logarithmic energy spectrum is intimately connected to the generalized Riemann {zeta} function {zeta}(s,a). Indeed, the autocorrelation function at a time t is determined by {zeta}({sigma}+i{tau},a), where {sigma} is governed by the temperature of the thermal phase state and {tau} is proportional to t. We use the JWKB method to solve the inverse spectral problem for a general logarithmic energy spectrum; that is, we determine a family of potentials giving rise to such a spectrum. For large distances, all potentials display a universal behavior; they take the shape of a logarithm. However, their form close to the origin depends on the value of the Hurwitz parameter a in {zeta}(s,a). In particular, we establish a connection between the value of the potential energy at its minimum, the Hurwitz parameter and the Maslov index of JWKB. We compare and contrast exact and approximate eigenvalues of purely logarithmic potentials. Moreover, we use a numerical method to find a potential which leads to exact logarithmic eigenvalues. We discuss possible realizations of Riemann {zeta} wave-packet dynamics using cold atoms in appropriately tailored light fields.

  13. The Influence of Surfactants on the Zeta Potential of Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Marsalek, R.

    2009-07-01

    The surface of three different kinds of coal was modified by three surfactants (cationic, anionic, and non-ionic). Changes on coal surface were examined by the zeta potential technique. The influence of the dispersion of pH, concentration of surfactants, and contact time were investigated. The most significant change in zeta potential resulting from adding surfactants was observed in activated coal (hydrophobic surface, largest BET surface area). Adding the cationic surfactant led to an increase of the zeta potential, contrary to measuring done in water. The anionic surfactant decreased the value of the zeta potential; however, this change was not too remarkable. The results proved that even a very low concentration of the cationic surfactant (0.01 mmol/L) causes a remarkable change of the zeta potential. On the other hand, a similar effect was observed until the concentration of the anionic surfactant reached about 10 mmol/L. The mechanism of binding surfactants is not simple, but preferential hydrophobic interactions were discovered.

  14. Novel Method for Finding [zeta](2[rho]) from a Product of Sines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Euler gave a simple method for showing that [zeta](2)=1/1[superscript 2] + 1/2[superscript 2] + 1/3[superscript 2] + ... = [pi][superscript 2]/6. He generalized his method so as to find [zeta](4), [zeta](6), [zeta](8),.... His computations became increasingly more complex as the arguments increased. In this note we show a different generalization…

  15. Apatite nucleation on silica surface: a zeta potential approach.

    PubMed

    Coreño, J; Martínez, A; Bolarín, A; Sánchez, F

    2001-10-01

    Zeta potential measurements on pure silica, prepared by the sol-gel method from tetraethoxysilane under acidic conditions, are reported in different suspensions. Water suspensions and suspensions containing calcium or phosphate ions with and without NaCl were tested. zeta potential measurements were carried out as a function of the pH and ion concentration. Also, calcium and phosphate adsorption on silica was determined experimentally. The results of zeta potential and adsorption measurements suggest that both calcium and phosphate ions can be adsorbed on the silica surface; however, calcium adsorption is stronger than phosphate adsorption. When calcium and sodium ions are present in the suspension, calcium adsorption decreases. It seems that certain sites on the silica surface are specific for calcium adsorption.

  16. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in interstellar space. III - The lines of sight to Zeta Puppis and Gamma Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal-Madjar, A.; Laurent, C.; Bonnet, R. M.; York, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    An extensive set of measurements of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in the interstellar medium has been undertaken. The general observing program is described along with the data reduction techniques used to separate the complex deuterium and hydrogen profiles, and the results of the measurements for two stars, Zeta Pup and Gamma Cas. For Gamma Cas, log N(D)/N(H) is found to be approximately -4.8, in agreement with previous measurements. For Zeta Pup, a complicated structure of absorbing clouds in the interstellar medium is inferred. The best value of log N(D)/N(H) is about -4.6 for each of two components. One component is probably more complex than can be demonstrated directly at the resolution employed, and log N(D)N(H) could be -4.0 or larger in this component.

  17. Zeta potential changing phosphorylated nanocomplexes for pDNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Prüfert, Felix; Jelkmann, Max; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-05-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of a zeta potential changing system as gene delivery system. The phosphate ester bearing ligand 6-phosphogluconic acid (6-PGA) was attached to linear and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) via a carbodiimide-mediated reaction whereby 287 μmol and 413 μmol 6-PGA could be coupled per gram polymer. Nanocomplexes of these modified polymers with pDNA showed a zeta potential of +12 mV for nanocomplexes with the linear PEI-6PGA and +16 mV in case of the branched derivative. By the addition of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), zeta potentials of the complexes were reduced to +2.86 and +3.25, respectively. Phosphate release studies on Caco 2 cells and HEK-293 cells demonstrated the ability to cleave the phosphate ester. Compared to HEK-293 cells, enzymatic degradation of the phosphate ester in Caco 2 cells was 2.3-fold higher from nanocomplexes comprising linear PEI and 4.3-fold higher from those with branched PEI. Furthermore, incubation with alkaline phosphatase led to an increase in the zeta potential of nanocomplexes based on linear PEI-6PGA to +6.96mV and +8.26 mV in nanocomplexes comprising branched PEI-6PGA. Studying transfection efficiency in Caco 2 cells and HEK-293 cells, a higher expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) could be detected in HEK-293 cells. In presence of a phosphate inhibitor, transfection efficiencies were decreased in both cells lines, due to a lacking shift of the zeta potential of the tested pDNA complexes. According to these results, zeta potential changing systems seem to be a promising strategy for future gene delivery systems, as this concept allows the in situ generation of positive charges in close proximity to the cellular surface.

  18. Elliptic multiple zeta values and one-loop superstring amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broedel, Johannes; Mafra, Carlos R.; Matthes, Nils; Schlotterer, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    We investigate iterated integrals on an elliptic curve, which are a natural genus-one generalization of multiple polylogarithms. These iterated integrals coincide with the multiple elliptic polylogarithms introduced by Brown and Levin when constrained to the real line. At unit argument they reduce to an elliptic analogue of multiple zeta values, whose network of relations we start to explore. A simple and natural application of this framework are one-loop scattering amplitudes in open superstring theory. In particular, elliptic multiple zeta values are a suitable language to express their low energy limit. Similar to the techniques available at tree-level, our formalism allows to completely automatize the calculation.

  19. The interstellar (C-12)N/(C-13)N ratio toward Zeta Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary E.; Wright, Edward L.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise observations of interstellar CN toward Zeta Per are performed to determine the C-12/C-13 isotope ratio in this line of sight. Observations of (C-12)N/(C-13)N in several diffuse clouds are performed to assess whether CN suffers from isotope-selective effects. Values are obtained which are higher than the value toward Zeta Oph determined by Crane and Hegyi (1988) and lower than the results toward the more reddened stars HD 21483 obtained by Meyer et al. (1989) and Palazzi et al. (1990). Theory and observations indicate the existence of a spatial C-12/C-13 gradient which decreases toward the Galactic center at an approximate rate of 12 percent/kpc at the distance of the solar radius. It is argued that since a gradient of this character cannot explain the CN results, isotope-selective effects provide a more likely explanation for the large range in (C-12)N/(C-13)N ratios.

  20. Development of phosphorylated nanoparticles as zeta potential inverting systems.

    PubMed

    Perera, Glen; Zipser, Maximilian; Bonengel, Sonja; Salvenmoser, Willi; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to generate nanoparticles with a slightly negative zeta potential which switches to positive values under the influence of intestinal alkaline phosphatase in order to address two major physiological barriers (mucus and membrane barrier). Carboxymethyl cellulose and chitosan were modified with phosphotyrosine by means of a water-soluble carbodiimide and polyelectrolyte complexes were formed by mixing two polymer solutions in an appropriate ratio. Due to this modification, phosphate ions could potentially be released which would lead to a change in zeta potential. Their sizes were found to be between 200 and 300 nm while their zeta potentials ranged from -8 mV to -5 mV prior to incubation with the enzyme. It could be shown that phosphate ions are released from the modified polymers and nanoparticles by isolated phosphatase and in a Caco-2 cell model. Incubation with phosphatase led to a change in zeta potential of the nanoparticles up to +8 mV. As neither polymers nor particles display toxic properties within the resazurin assay, these nanoparticles appear to be useful tools in future drug delivery systems as they have appropriate properties regarding particle size and surface charge in order to overcome the mucus and the membrane barrier.

  1. Zeta functional equation on Jordan algebras of type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayoya, J. B.

    2005-02-01

    Using the Jordan algebras methods, specially the properties of Peirce decomposition and the Frobenius transformation, we compute the coefficients of the zeta functional equation, in the case of Jordan algebras of type II. As particular cases of our result, we can cite the case of studied by Gelbart [Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 108 (1971)] and Godement and Jacquet [Zeta functions of simple algebras, Lecture Notes in Math., vol. 260, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1972], and the case of studied by Muro [Adv. Stud. Pure Math. 15 (1989) 429]. Let us also mention, that recently, Bopp and Rubenthaler have obtained a more general result on the zeta functional equation by using methods based on the algebraic properties of regular graded algebras which are in one-to-one correspondence with simple Jordan algebras [Local Zeta Functions Attached to the Minimal Spherical Series for a Class of Symmetric Spaces, IRMA, Strasbourg, 2003]. The method used in this paper is a direct application of specific properties of Jordan algebras of type II.

  2. Interstellar gas phase abundance of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, copper, gallium, germanium, and krypton toward Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.; Ebbets, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of weak (less than 10 mA) UV interstellar absorption line data obtained for the line of sight to the O9.5 IV star Zeta Oph is presented. Measurements of weak semiforbidden lines of N I, O I, Cu II, and a new UV detection of Na I are reported along with a small upper limit for C II. Interstellar detections of Ga II, Ge II, and Kr I are also presented. Ga, Ge, and Kr represent the heaviest elements detected in the ISM. A comparison of the derived column densities to cosmic abundances shows Ga to be depleted by about -1.2 dex while Ge is overabundant by +0.2 dex. Assuming Kr to be undepleted, a logarithmic cosmic abundance of Kr/H = 2.95 is obtained on the scale where H = 12.00.

  3. Evidence for Resonance Scattering in the X-ray Spectrum of Zeta Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice

    2008-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of pairs of X-ray emission line profiles from the 0 star Zeta Pup that originate from the same He-like ion. The two profiles in each pair have different shapes and cannot both be consistently fit by models assuming the same wind parameters. We show that the differences in profile shape can be accounted for in a model including the effects of resonance scattering, which affects the resonance line in the pair but not the intercombination line. This implies that resonance scattering is also important in single resonance lines, where its effect is difficult to distinguish from a low effective continuum optical depth in the wind. Thus, resonance scattering may help reconcile X-ray line profile shapes with literature mass-loss rates.

  4. Detection of boron, cobalt, and other weak interstellar lines toward Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Sheffer, Y.; Lambert, D. L.; Gilliland, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous weak lines from interstellar atomic species toward Zeta Ophiuchi were observed with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph. Of particular note are the first interstellar detection of cobalt and the detection of boron in this sight line. These measurements provide estimates for the amount of depletion for the two elements. Boron, a volatile, and cobalt, a refractory element, display the depletion pattern found by Savage et al. (1992). The abundance of phosphorus in the H II region associated with the star was obtained from a detection of P III. Additional weak lines from S I, C I, Ni II, and Cu II were detected for the first time; these lines provide the basis for refinements in oscillator strength and column density. Analysis of the neutral sulfur data indicates that the atomic gas is more widely distributed than the molecular material in the main component.

  5. Detection of boron, cobalt, and other weak interstellar lines toward Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Sheffer, Y.; Lambert, D. L.; Gilliland, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous weak lines from interstellar atomic species toward Zeta Ophiuchi were observed with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph. Of particular note are the first interstellar detection of cobalt and the detection of boron in this sight line. These measurements provide estimates for the amount of depletion for the two elements. Boron, a volatile, and cobalt, a refractory element, display the depletion pattern found by Savage et al. (1992). The abundance of phosphorus in the H II region associated with the star was obtained from a detection of P III. Additional weak lines from S I, C I, Ni II, and Cu II were detected for the first time; these lines provide the basis for refinements in oscillator strength and column density. Analysis of the neutral sulfur data indicates that the atomic gas is more widely distributed than the molecular material in the main component.

  6. TC Trends And Terrestrial Planet Formation: The Case of Zeta Reticuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardan, Adibekyan; Delgado-Mena, Elisa; Figueira, Pedro; Sousa, Sergio; Santos, Nuno; Faria, Joao; González Hernández, Jonay; Israelian, Garik; Harutyunyan, Gohar; Suárez-Andrés, Lucia; Hakobyan, Arthur

    2016-11-01

    During the last decade astronomers have been trying to search for chemical signatures of terrestrial planet formation in the atmospheres of the hosting stars. Several studies suggested that the chemical abundance trend with the condensation temperature, Tc, is a signature of rocky planet formation. In particular, it was suggested that the Sun shows 'peculiar' chemical abundances due to the presence of the terrestrial planets in our solar-system. However, the rocky material accretion or the trap of rocky materials in terrestrial planets is not the only explanation for the chemical 'peculiarity' of the Sun, or other Sun-like stars with planets. In this talk I madea very brief review of this topic, and presented our last results for the particular case of Zeta Reticuli binary system: A very interesting and well-known system (known in science fiction and ufology as the world of Grey Aliens, or Reticulans) where one of the components hosts an exo-Kuiper belt, and the other component is a 'single', 'lonely' star.

  7. Spectral zeta function of a sub-Laplacian on product sub-Riemannian manifolds and zeta-regularized determinant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Wolfram; Furutani, Kenro

    2010-09-01

    We analyze the spectral zeta function for sub-Laplace operators on product manifolds M×N. Starting from suitable conditions on the zeta functions on each factor, the existence of a meromorphic extension to the complex plane and real analyticity in a zero neighbourhood is proved. In the special case of N=S1 and using the Poisson summation formula, we obtain expressions for the zeta-regularized determinant. Moreover, we can calculate limit cases of such determinants by inserting a parameter into our formulas. This is a generalization of results in Furutani and de Gosson (2003) [1] and in particular it applies to an intrinsic sub-Laplacian on U(2)≅S3×S1 induced by a sum of squares of canonical vector fields on S3; cf. Bauer and Furutani (2008) [2]. Finally, the spectral zeta function of a sub-Laplace operator on Heisenberg manifolds is calculated by using an explicit expression of the heat kernel for the corresponding sub-Laplace operator on the Heisenberg group; cf. Beals et al. (2000) [18] and Hulanicki (1976) [19].

  8. Can Eccentric Debris Disks Be Long-lived? A First Numerical Investigation and Application to Zeta(exp 2) Reticuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faramaz, V.; Beust, H.; Thebault, P.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bonsor, A.; delBurgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Milli, J.; Montesinos, B.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Context. Imaging of debris disks has found evidence for both eccentric and offset disks. One hypothesis is that they provide evidence for massive perturbers, for example, planets or binary companions, which sculpt the observed structures. One such disk was recently observed in the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory around Zeta2 Reticuli. In contrast with previously reported systems, the disk is significantly eccentric, and the system is several Gyr old. Aims. We aim to investigate the long-term evolution of eccentric structures in debris disks caused by a perturber on an eccentric orbit around the star. We hypothesise that the observed eccentric disk around Zeta2 Reticuli might be evidence of such a scenario. If so, we are able to constrain the mass and orbit of a potential perturber, either a giant planet or a binary companion. Methods. Analytical techniques were used to predict the effects of a perturber on a debris disk. Numerical N-body simulations were used to verify these results and further investigate the observable structures that may be produced by eccentric perturbers. The long-term evolution of the disk geometry was examined, with particular application to the Zeta2 Reticuli system. In addition, synthetic images of the disk were produced for direct comparison with Herschel observations. Results. We show that an eccentric companion can produce both the observed offsets and eccentric disks. These effects are not immediate, and we characterise the timescale required for the disk to develop to an eccentric state (and any spirals to vanish). For Zeta2 Reticuli, we derive limits on the mass and orbit of the companion required to produce the observations. Synthetic images show that the pattern observed around Zeta2 Reticuli can be produced by an eccentric disk seen close to edge-on, and allow us to bring additional constraints on the disk parameters of our model (disk flux and extent). Conclusions. We conclude that eccentric planets or stellar companions

  9. Zeta waves: a special type of slow delta waves.

    PubMed

    Magnus, O; Van der Holst, M

    1987-08-01

    A special type of delta waves with a duration of 1-3 sec which, because of their saw-tooth or zed shape in the EEG, we have named 'zeta waves' has been described. They occur particularly in cases with rather severe brain lesions, usually with an acute or subacute onset and a space occupying character. In a period of 2 years during which 2500 EEGs have been reported we have seen zeta waves in 20 patients in whom 76 EEGs have been recorded. The characteristics of these waves and the types of lesions with which they occurred are described. The importance of an adequate recording technique for proper presentation of this EEG pattern is emphasized.

  10. {zeta}-potentials of silica in water-alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmulski, M.; Matijevic, E.

    1992-04-01

    Two effects of 1-alcohols (up to 30% w/w) on electrokinetic properties of silica in the presence of different concentrations of KCl (1 x 10{sup -3}-1 x 1-{sup -1} mol dm{sup -3}) are described. The isoelectric point shifts toward more basic pH, while the negative {zeta}-potentials decrease with higher concentrations of the alcohol and the electrolyte. The change in the pH{sub iep} is explained in terms of the complexation of protonated surface hydroxyl groups by alcohol molecules. The lower negative {zeta}-potentials are due to an increase in cation activity in mixed solvents and, thus, an enhanced counterion adsorption in the Stern layer. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Continuous fermentation: improvement of cell immobilization by zeta potential measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Michaux, M.; Paquot, M.; Baijot, B.; Thonart, P.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of various agents such as inulin, proteins, and cationic polymers on the zeta potential of yeast cells has been studied. With various agents, it appears feasible to give a positive charge to the cell and a negative one to the carrier. Under these conditions, the yield of immobilization (mg cells/g support) is significantly improved. This is the case with various agents such as proteins and cationic polymers. For example, the yeild of cell immobilization (Saccharomyces) on sawdust varied from 94.2 to 145.8 mg/g of support with addition of gelatin (0.05%). The results demonstrate the influence of zeta potential on cell immobilization by adsorption. These immobilized cells are advantageously used in continuous production of ethanol. 3 figures, 8 tables.

  12. Interstellar lines in the ultraviolet spectrum of zeta Oph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    Interstellar lines arising in carbon, oxygen, silicon, and sulfur observed in the ultraviolet spectrum of zeta Oph by rocket spectrographic techniques were analyzed. Within a factor of 10, the abundances of c(+), neutral 0, and Si(+) outside the H II region surrounding zeta Oph, relative to the hydrogen abundance, are equal to solar values. The lines in neutral C and S(+) imply that the interstellar matter is distributed among several clouds as indicated by high resolution visible spectra. It is suggested that the excited C(+) ions are inside the Stromgren sphere where proton densities equal to or greater than 0.0022 cm can collisionally excite the ions at sufficient rates. Stellar absorption lines of C IV (1548.2, 1550.8A) and N V (1238.8, 1242.8A) were observed shifted to lower wavelengths, indicating stellar mass loss.

  13. Moments of zeta and correlations of divisor-sums: I.

    PubMed

    Conrey, Brian; Keating, Jonathan P

    2015-04-28

    We examine the calculation of the second and fourth moments and shifted moments of the Riemann zeta-function on the critical line using long Dirichlet polynomials and divisor correlations. Previously, this approach has proved unsuccessful in computing moments beyond the eighth, even heuristically. A careful analysis of the second and fourth moments illustrates the nature of the problem and enables us to identify the terms that are missed in the standard application of these methods.

  14. Lowest Landau level on a cone and zeta determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevtsov, Semyon

    2017-06-01

    We consider the integer QH state on Riemann surfaces with conical singularities, with the main objective of detecting the effect of the gravitational anomaly directly from the form of the wave function on a singular geometry. We suggest the formula expressing the normalisation factor of the holomorphic state in terms of the regularized zeta determinant on conical surfaces and check this relation for some model geometries. We also comment on possible extensions of this result to the fractional QH states.

  15. On the Laurent series for the Epstein zeta function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    The Epstein zeta function ζ d [ M ; s ] ≡ ∑ n ∈ Z d ‧ ( n M n T ) - s 2 , where {M} is a real symmetric and invertible d × d matrix and {n} is a d-dimensional row vector ({n}1,{n}2,\\ldots ,{n}d) with integer coordinates {n}i, is considered. (The prime on the sum indicates that the term {n}={0} should be excluded.) It is known that {\\zeta }d[{M};s] has a Laurent series expansion about the singular point s = d which can be written in the form ζ d [ M ; s ] = ∑ ν = - 1 ∞ A ν [ M ; d ] ( s - d ) ν . In this paper we shall show that the coefficient {A}ν [{M};d] can be accurately calculated using rapidly convergent series which involve the Meijer G-function. Exact formulae are also derived for {A}ν [{M};2] when M = U N ≡ 1 0 0 N , with N=1,2,\\ldots . The results for {A}0[{{U}}N;2] are then used to establish several mathematical identities involving summations of generalized Stieltjes constants. Next the Laurent series for {\\zeta }d[{{I}}d;s], where {{I}}d is the d × d unit matrix, is briefly discussed for the cases d=3,4,6 and 8. Finally, a new application of the results in lattice statistics is described.

  16. Effect of Plasma on the Zeta Potential of Cotton Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, A.; Shahidi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Dalalsharifi, S.; Wiener, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, the effect of a low-temperature plasma on the zeta potential of cotton fabric was studied. The silver particle absorption on cotton fabric when modified by a low-temperature plasma was also investigated. The modification consisted of plasma pre-functionalization followed by a one-step wet treatment with silver nitrate solution. The process was performed in a low-temperature plasma medium, using a magnetron sputtering device. Oxygen and nitrogen were used as working gases in the system, and the results were compared. After preparing the samples, the zeta potentials of the untreated and plasma-treated cotton under a constant pH value solution were estimated and compared. Also, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to examine the functional groups of the corresponding samples. The amounts of silver absorption on plasma treated and untreated cotton were examined using the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) method. The results show that the amount of zeta potential for the nitrogen plasma treated sample is less and the absorption of silver particles by cotton can be increased strongly with nitrogen plasma treatment.

  17. Zeta potential mediated reaction monitoring on nano and microparticles.

    PubMed

    Thielbeer, Frank; Donaldson, Ken; Bradley, Mark

    2011-02-16

    Nano and microparticles are widely used across the life science interface, with applications ranging from chemical probes of biological function to fluorescent particles for flow cytometry and cellular tracking. Increasingly, particles are modified with a variety of chemistries to boost their functionality and broaden their biological applicability. However, although particle modification has become standard laboratory practice, the ability to determine the extent and efficiency of chemical modification is often very limited and empirical in nature. Herein, we report the use of zeta potential analysis as a simple and rapid "direct-on-particle" approach allowing levels of bead modification and derivatization to be evaluated. As a proof-of-concept, aminomethyl-functionalized nano and microparticles were derivatized to display a variety of surface functionalities and their zeta potentials measured, allowing verification of the applicability of the approach for particle analysis. We demonstrate that zeta potential measurement is a convenient approach which allows multistep reaction sequences to be followed, and show that this method can be used to verify and validate successful particle modification.

  18. Characterization of thymus-derived lymphocytes expressing Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta- eta antigen receptor isoforms: analysis by gene transfection

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the function of the CD3 eta subunit of the T cell receptor (TCR), we have used cDNAs encoding CD3 zeta, CD3 eta, or both to reconstitute a variant of a cytochrome c-specific, I-Ek-restricted murine T cell hybridoma, termed MA5.8, which lacks CD3 zeta and CD3 eta proteins. We provide direct evidence that assembly and surface expression of TCRs can be mediated by either of these subunits separately or together. However, the level of TCR expression on zeta transfectants is up to one order of magnitude greater than that on eta transfectants, implying that CD3 eta is weakly associated with the pentameric Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon complex and/or inefficient at salvaging the incomplete TCR from lysosomal degradation. As a component of the TCR, the CD3 eta subunit preferentially forms a heterodimer with CD3 zeta, but is also able to form a CD3 eta-eta homodimer. Crosslinking of Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta- zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta, or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta-eta TCR isotypes with anti-CD3 epsilon monoclonal antibody or a cytochrome c peptide epitope on I-Ek antigen-presenting cells mediates signal transduction resulting in reversible cell-cycle arrest of transfected clones. Given the potential for diversity of signals generated by these functional TCR isotypes and the expression of the CD3 eta gene product in the thymus, CD3 eta is likely to play a role in selection and/or activation of thymocytes during development. PMID:2145389

  19. The interstellar line spectra of zeta Ophiuchi and zeta Persei and their relation to the short wavelength microwave background radiation. Ph.D. Thesis - N. Y. Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortolot, V. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thirty-one high dispersion Coude spectrograms of zeta Ophiuchi and seven of zeta Persei were numerically synthesized to produce high resolution, low noise spectra in the interval 3650 A to 4350 that yield data on atomic and molecular absorption in well-defined regions of the interstellar medium. The detection threshold is improved by as much as a factor 5 over single plates. Several interstellar lines were discovered in the zeta Oph - 15km/sec cloud and the zeta Per + 13 km/sec cloud.

  20. HST-WFC3 Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Quenched Galaxies at zeta approx 1.5 from the WISP Survey: Stellar Populations Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedregal, A. G.; Scarlata, C.; Henry, A. L.; Atek, H.; Rafelski, M.; Teplitz, H. I.; Dominguez, A.; Siana, B.; Colbert, J. W.; Malkan, M.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We combine Hubble Space Telescope (HST) G102 and G141 near-IR (NIR) grism spectroscopy with HST/WFC3- UVIS, HST/WFC3-IR, and Spitzer/IRAC [3.6 microns] photometry to assemble a sample of massive (log(Mstar/M solar mass) at approx 11.0) and quenched (specific star formation rate < 0.01 G/yr(exp -1) galaxies at zeta approx 1.5. Our sample of 41 galaxies is the largest with G102+G141 NIR spectroscopy for quenched sources at these redshifts. In contrast to the local universe, zeta approx 1.5 quenched galaxies in the high-mass range have a wide range of stellar population properties. We find that their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are well fitted with exponentially decreasing star formation histories and short star formation timescales (tau less than or equal to 100 M/yr). Quenched galaxies also show a wide distribution in ages, between 1 and 4 G/yr. In the (u - r)0-versus-mass space quenched galaxies have a large spread in rest-frame color at a given mass. Most quenched galaxies populate the zeta appro. 1.5 red sequence (RS), but an important fraction of them (32%) have substantially bluer colors. Although with a large spread, we find that the quenched galaxies on the RS have older median ages (3.1 G/yr) than the quenched galaxies off the RS (1.5 G/yr). We also show that a rejuvenated SED cannot reproduce the observed stacked spectra of (the bluer) quenched galaxies off the RS. We derive the upper limit on the fraction of massive galaxies on the RS at zeta approx 1.5 to be <43%.We speculate that the young quenched galaxies off the RS are in a transition phase between vigorous star formation at zeta > 2 and the zeta approx 1.5 RS. According to their estimated ages, the time required for quenched galaxies off the RS to join their counterparts on the z approx. 1.5 RS is of the order of approx. 1G/yr.

  1. Local zeta factors and geometries under Spec Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manin, Yu I.

    2016-08-01

    The first part of this note shows that the odd-period polynomial of each Hecke cusp eigenform for the full modular group produces via the Rodriguez-Villegas transform ([1]) a polynomial satisfying the functional equation of zeta type and having non-trivial zeros only in the middle line of its critical strip. The second part discusses the Chebyshev lambda-structure of the polynomial ring as Borger's descent data to \\mathbf{F}_1 and suggests its role in a possible relation of the Γ\\mathbf{R}-factor to 'real geometry over \\mathbf{F}_1' (cf. [2]).

  2. Renormalization In Quantum Gauge Theory Using Zeta-Function Method

    SciTech Connect

    Chiritoiu, Viorel; Zet, Gheorghe

    2009-05-22

    It is possible to consider space-time symmetries (for example Poincare or de Sitter) as purely inner symmetries. A formulation of the de Sitter symmetry as purely inner symmetry defined on a fixed Minkowski space-time is presented. We define the generators of the de Sitter group and write the equations of structure using a constant deformation parameter {lambda}. Local gauge transformations and corresponding covariant derivative depending on gauge fields are obtained. The method of generalized zeta-function is used to realize the renormalization. An effective integral of action is obtained and a comparison with other results is given.

  3. Intersystem transitions of interstellar carbon monoxide toward zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Sheffer, Yaron; Lambert, David L.; Morton, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption from seven intersystem (triplet-singlet) transitions of interstellar (12)CO were detected in ultraviolet spectra of zeta Oph. The observed equivalent widths are approximately consistent with the transitions' predicted f-values and the (12) CO column density derived from the weakest of the observed A-X bands. These unsaturated intersystem transitions provide the opportunity to measure the (12)CO column density for heavily reddened (dense) sight lines. Laboratory measurements of oscillator strengths more precise than available ones will be needed to derive accurate column densities.

  4. Symbol calculus and zeta-function regularized determinants

    SciTech Connect

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik; Turgut, O. Teoman

    2007-11-15

    In this work, we use semigroup integral to evaluate zeta-function regularized determinants. This is especially powerful for nonpositive operators such as the Dirac operator. In order to understand fully the quantum effective action, one should know not only the potential term but also the leading kinetic term. In this purpose, we use the Weyl type of symbol calculus to evaluate the determinant as a derivative expansion. The technique is applied both to a spin-0 bosonic operator and to the Dirac operator coupled to a scalar field.

  5. Binding of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) to phospholipid membranes: potential role of an unstructured cluster of basic residues.

    PubMed

    Nomikos, Michail; Mulgrew-Nesbitt, Anna; Pallavi, Payal; Mihalyne, Gyongyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony; Murray, Diana; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2007-06-01

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) is a sperm-specific enzyme that initiates the Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian eggs that activate embryo development. It shares considerable sequence homology with PLC-delta1, but lacks the PH domain that anchors PLC-delta1 to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, PIP2. Thus it is unclear how PLC-zeta interacts with membranes. The linker region between the X and Y catalytic domains of PLC-zeta, however, contains a cluster of basic residues not present in PLC-delta1. Application of electrostatic theory to a homology model of PLC-zeta suggests this basic cluster could interact with acidic lipids. We measured the binding of catalytically competent mouse PLC-zeta to phospholipid vesicles: for 2:1 phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) vesicles, the molar partition coefficient, K, is too weak to be of physiological significance. Incorporating 1% PIP2 into the 2:1 PC/PS vesicles increases K about 10-fold, to 5x10(3) M-1, a biologically relevant value. Expressed fragments corresponding to the PLC-zeta X-Y linker region also bind with higher affinity to polyvalent than monovalent phosphoinositides on nitrocellulose filters. A peptide corresponding to the basic cluster (charge=+7) within the linker region, PLC-zeta-(374-385), binds to PC/PS vesicles with higher affinity than PLC-zeta, but its binding is less sensitive to incorporating PIP2. The acidic residues flanking this basic cluster in PLC-zeta may account for both these phenomena. FRET experiments suggest the basic cluster could not only anchor the protein to the membrane, but also enhance the local concentration of PIP2 adjacent to the catalytic domain.

  6. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  7. Studying bubble-particle interactions by zeta potential distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chendi; Wang, Louxiang; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-07-01

    Over a decade ago, Xu and Masliyah pioneered an approach to characterize the interactions between particles in dynamic environments of multicomponent systems by measuring zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures. Using a Zetaphoremeter, the measured zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures were used to determine the conditions of preferential attachment in multicomponent particle suspensions. The technique has been applied to study the attachment of nano-sized silica and alumina particles to sub-micron size bubbles in solutions with and without the addition of surface active agents (SDS, DAH and DF250). The degree of attachment between gas bubbles and particles is shown to be a function of the interaction energy governed by the dispersion, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. Under certain chemical conditions, the attachment of nano-particles to sub-micron size bubbles is shown to be enhanced by in-situ gas nucleation induced by hydrodynamic cavitation for the weakly interacting systems, where mixing of the two individual components results in negligible attachment. Preferential interaction in complex tertiary particle systems demonstrated strong attachment between micron-sized alumina and gas bubbles, with little attachment between micron-sized alumina and silica, possibly due to instability of the aggregates in the shear flow environment.

  8. The distributional zeta-function in disordered field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaiter, B. F.; Svaiter, N. F.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new mathematical rigorous technique for computing the average free energy of a disordered system with quenched randomness, using the replicas. The basic tool of this technique is a distributional zeta-function, a complex function whose derivative at the origin yields the average free energy of the system as the sum of two contributions: the first one is a series in which all the integer moments of the partition function of the model contribute; the second one, which cannot be written as a series of the integer moments, can be made as small as desired. This result supports the use of integer moments of the partition function, computed via replicas, for expressing the average free energy of the system. One advantage of the proposed formalism is that it does not require the understanding of the properties of the permutation group when the number of replicas goes to zero. Moreover, the symmetry is broken using the saddle-point equations of the model. As an application for the distributional zeta-function technique, we obtain the average free energy of the disordered λφ4 model defined in a d-dimensional Euclidean space.

  9. Biomass/adsorbent electrostatic interactions in expanded bed adsorption: a zeta potential study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Qiang; Brixius, Peter J; Hubbuch, Jürgen J; Thömmes, Jörg; Kula, Maria-Regina

    2003-07-20

    Expanded bed adsorption is an integrated technology that allows the introduction of particle-containing feedstock without the risk of blocking the bed. The biomass particles contained in the feedstock have to be treated as an integral part of the process and potential interactions between suspended biomass and the adsorbent must be excluded during process design. Because the electrostatic forces dominate the interactions between the biomass and adsorbent, the zeta potential has been studied as a tool to characterize biomass/adsorbent electrostatic interactions. The zeta potentials of four types of biomass (yeast intact cells, yeast homogenate, Escherichia coli intact cells, and E. coli homogenate) and two types of ion exchanger were measured systematically at varying process conditions. Using the cell transmission index from biomass pulse-response experiments as a parameter, the relations between zeta potential and the biomass/adsorbent interaction were evaluated. Combining the influences from zeta potential of adsorbent (zeta(a)), zeta potential of biomass (zeta(b)), and biomass size (d), parameter (-zeta(a)zeta(b)d) was found to be an appropriate indicator of the biomass/adsorbent interactions in expanded beds under various liquid-phase conditions for different types of biomass. The threshold value of parameter (-zeta(a)zeta(b)d) can be defined as 120 mV(2) microm for cell transmission of >90%, which means that systems with (-zeta(a)zeta(b)d) < 120 may have a considerable probability of forming stable expanded beds in a biomass suspension under the particular experimental conditions. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 83: 149-157, 2003.

  10. Diacylglycerol kinase-zeta localization in skeletal muscle is regulated by phosphorylation and interaction with syntrophins.

    PubMed

    Abramovici, Hanan; Hogan, Angela B; Obagi, Christopher; Topham, Matthew K; Gee, Stephen H

    2003-11-01

    Syntrophins are scaffolding proteins that link signaling molecules to dystrophin and the cytoskeleton. We previously reported that syntrophins interact with diacylglycerol kinase-zeta (DGK-zeta), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid. Here, we show syntrophins and DGK-zeta form a complex in skeletal muscle whose translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane is regulated by protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of the DGK-zeta MARCKS domain. DGK-zeta mutants that do not bind syntrophins were mislocalized, and an activated mutant of this sort induced atypical changes in the actin cytoskeleton, indicating syntrophins are important for localizing DGK-zeta and regulating its activity. Consistent with a role in actin organization, DGK-zeta and syntrophins were colocalized with filamentous (F)-actin and Rac in lamellipodia and ruffles. Moreover, extracellular signal-related kinase-dependent phosphorylation of DGK-zeta regulated its association with the cytoskeleton. In adult muscle, DGK-zeta was colocalized with syntrophins on the sarcolemma and was concentrated at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), whereas in type IIB fibers it was found exclusively at NMJs. DGK-zeta was reduced at the sarcolemma of dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse myofibers but was specifically retained at NMJs, indicating that dystrophin is important for the sarcolemmal but not synaptic localization of DGK-zeta. Together, our findings suggest syntrophins localize DGK-zeta signaling complexes at specialized domains of muscle cells, which may be critical for the proper control of lipid-signaling pathways regulating actin organization. In dystrophic muscle, mislocalized DGK-zeta may cause abnormal cytoskeletal changes that contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  11. Overexpression of protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-zeta) inhibits invasive and metastatic abilities of Dunning R-3327 MAT-LyLu rat prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Powell, C T; Gschwend, J E; Fair, W R; Brittis, N J; Stec, D; Huryk, R

    1996-09-15

    Previously, we reported that protein kinase C (PKC)-zeta mRNA levels are reduced markedly in metastatic Dunning R-3327 rat prostate tumors relative to the nonmetastatic Dunning H tumor and normal rat prostate (C.T. Powell et al., Cell Growth & Differ., 5: 143-149, 1994). To examine the effect of PKC-zeta on metastatic and invasive abilities of an aggressive Dunning R-3327 cell line, we generated stably transfected clones of MAT-LyLu cells that overexpress active PKC-zeta. PKC-zeta-overexpressing MAT-LyLu cells exhibited tumorigenicity and growth rates in syngeneic rats similar to those of MAT-LyLu cells transfected with vector alone or untransfected MAT-LyLu. However, nine independent clones of PKC-zeta-expressing cells exhibited an average 2-fold lower tendency to metastasize to lungs relative to vector-transfected MAT-LyLu cell clones, with about 2-fold and 4.5-fold fewer metastases per rat in two separate protocols. In addition, the ability of four PKC-zeta overexpressing MAT-LyLu clones to invade through Matrigel in a Boyden chamber assay was reduced an average of 12-fold relative to three vector-transfected clones. These results indicate that increased PKC-zeta expression can substantially suppress invasion and metastasis by an aggressive rat prostate tumor.

  12. Zeta diversity as a concept and metric that unifies incidence-based biodiversity patterns.

    PubMed

    Hui, Cang; McGeoch, Melodie A

    2014-11-01

    Patterns in species incidence and compositional turnover are central to understanding what drives biodiversity. Here we propose zeta (ζ) diversity, the number of species shared by multiple assemblages, as a concept and metric that unifies incidence-based diversity measures, patterns, and relationships. Unlike other measures of species compositional turnover, zeta diversity partitioning quantifies the complete set of diversity components for multiple assemblages, comprehensively representing the spatial structure of multispecies distributions. To illustrate the application and ecological value of zeta diversity, we show how it scales with sample number, grain, and distance. Zeta diversity reconciles several different biodiversity patterns, including the species accumulation curve, the species-area relationship, multispecies occupancy patterns, and scaling of species endemism. Exponential and power-law forms of zeta diversity are associated with stochastic versus niche assembly processes. Zeta diversity may provide new insights on biodiversity patterns, the processes driving them, and their response to environmental change.

  13. Detection of GRB 060927 at zeta = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sterling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture groundbased telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hours after the trigger shows a continuum break at lambda approx. equals 8070 A, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at zeta = 5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 A which we interpret as Si II lambda 1260 at zeta = 5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Ly(alpha) profile with a column density with log(N(sub HI)/sq cm) = 22.50 +/- 0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: i) GRB afterglows originating from zeta greater than or approx. equal to 6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; ii) The presence of large H I column densities in some GRBs host galaxies at zeta > 5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; iii) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at zeta > 5 and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe.

  14. Ionization Properties of Phospholipids Determined by Zeta Potential Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sathappa, Murugappan; Alder, Nathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes are vital for diverse cellular functions such as maintaining cell and organelle structure, selective permeability, active transport, and signaling. The surface charge of the membrane bilayer plays a critical role in these myriad processes. For most biomembranes, the surface charge of anionic phospholipids contributes to the negative surface charge density within the interfacial region of the bilayer. To quantify surface charge, it is essential to understand the proton dissociation behavior of the titratable headgroups within such lipids. We describe a protocol that uses model membranes for electrokinetic zeta potential measurements coupled with data analysis using Gouy-Chapman-Stern formalism to determine the pKa value of the component lipids. A detailed example is provided for homogeneous bilayers composed of the monoanionic lipid phosphatidylglycerol. This approach can be adapted for the measurement of bilayers with a heterogeneous lipid combination, as well as for lipids with multiple titratable sites in the headgroup (e.g., cardiolipin). PMID:27928550

  15. Hamiltonian for the Zeros of the Riemann Zeta Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Brody, Dorje C.; Müller, Markus P.

    2017-03-01

    A Hamiltonian operator H ^ is constructed with the property that if the eigenfunctions obey a suitable boundary condition, then the associated eigenvalues correspond to the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function. The classical limit of H ^ is 2 x p , which is consistent with the Berry-Keating conjecture. While H ^ is not Hermitian in the conventional sense, i H ^ is P T symmetric with a broken P T symmetry, thus allowing for the possibility that all eigenvalues of H ^ are real. A heuristic analysis is presented for the construction of the metric operator to define an inner-product space, on which the Hamiltonian is Hermitian. If the analysis presented here can be made rigorous to show that H ^ is manifestly self-adjoint, then this implies that the Riemann hypothesis holds true.

  16. Zeta function zeros, powers of primes, and quantum chaos.

    PubMed

    Sakhr, Jamal; Bhaduri, Rajat K; van Zyl, Brandon P

    2003-08-01

    We present a numerical study of Riemann's formula for the oscillating part of the density of the primes and their integer powers. The formula consists of an infinite series of oscillatory terms, one for each zero of the zeta function on the critical line, and was derived by Riemann in his paper on primes, assuming the Riemann hypothesis. We show that high-resolution spectral lines can be generated by the truncated series at all integer powers of primes and demonstrate explicitly that the relative line intensities are correct. We then derive a Gaussian sum rule for Riemann's formula. This is used to analyze the numerical convergence of the truncated series. The connections to quantum chaos and semiclassical physics are discussed.

  17. Hamiltonian for the Zeros of the Riemann Zeta Function.

    PubMed

    Bender, Carl M; Brody, Dorje C; Müller, Markus P

    2017-03-31

    A Hamiltonian operator H[over ^] is constructed with the property that if the eigenfunctions obey a suitable boundary condition, then the associated eigenvalues correspond to the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function. The classical limit of H[over ^] is 2xp, which is consistent with the Berry-Keating conjecture. While H[over ^] is not Hermitian in the conventional sense, iH[over ^] is PT symmetric with a broken PT symmetry, thus allowing for the possibility that all eigenvalues of H[over ^] are real. A heuristic analysis is presented for the construction of the metric operator to define an inner-product space, on which the Hamiltonian is Hermitian. If the analysis presented here can be made rigorous to show that H[over ^] is manifestly self-adjoint, then this implies that the Riemann hypothesis holds true.

  18. Zeta potentials of polydimethylsiloxane surfaces modified by polybrene of different concentrations.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongxin; Li, Jun; Li, Dongqing

    2016-02-01

    Zeta potential is an important parameter for characterizing the electrokinetic properties of a solid-liquid interface. In this paper, zeta potentials of polydimethylsiloxane surfaces modified by polybrene (PB) solutions of different concentrations in Phosphate buffer solution and pure water were reported. The zeta potentials were measured by an induction current method. The measurements were validated both by a calibration curve based on the data reported in the published papers and by comparing the zeta potential determined by using the Smoluchowski equation and the measured velocity of the electrokinetic motion of particles in a microchannel.

  19. Copernicus studies of interstellar material in the Perseus II complex. III - The line of sight to Zeta Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectrophotometric data obtained with Copernicus are used to analyze the distribution, composition, density, temperature, and kinematics of the interstellar material along the line of sight to Zeta Persei. The far-UV extinction curve for the star is evaluated along with the kinematics of the interstellar gas, observations of atomic and molecular hydrogen, curves of growth for neutral and ionized species, atomic abundances and depletions, ionization equilibria, and observations of CO and OH lines. The results show that there are apparently three clouds along the line of sight to Zeta Persei: a main cloud at approximately +13 km/s which contains most of the material and forms all the neutral and molecular lines as well as most of the ionic lines, a second component at +22 km/s which must contribute to the strong UV lines of most ions, and a third component at roughly +2 km/s which gives rise to a strong Si III line at 1206 A. It is also found that the UV extinction curve has a somewhat steep far-UV rise, indicating the presence of a substantial number of small grains, and that about 30% of the hydrogen nuclei over the entire line of sight are in molecular form.

  20. The Masses and Radii of the Eclipsing Binary zeta Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Philip D.; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Hummel, Christian A.

    1996-11-01

    We present a full determination of the fundamental stellar and orbital parameters of the eclipsing binary ζ Aurigae (K4 Ib + BS V) using recent observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) and the Mark III long-baseline optical interferometer. The information obtained from spectroscopic and interferometric measurements is complementary, and the combination permits a complete determination of the stellar masses, the absolute semimajor axis of the orbit, and the distance. A complete solution requires that both components be visible spectroscopically, and this has always been difficult for the ζ Aur systems. The ζ Aur K star primary presents no difficulty, and accurate radial velocities are readily obtainable in the optical. However, the B star secondary is more problematic. Ground-based radial velocity measurements are hampered by the difficulty of working with the composite spectrum in the blue-violet region, the small number of suitable lines in the generally featureless optical spectrum of the B star, and the great width of the few available lines (the Balmer lines of hydrogen and a few weak He I lines) due to rapid rotation. We avoid the worst of these problems by using GHRS observations in the ultraviolet, where the K star flux is negligible and the intrinsic B star spectrum is more distinctive, and obtain the most accurate determination of the B star radial velocity amplitude to date. We also analyze published photometry of previous eclipses and near-eclipse phases of ζ Aur in order to obtain eclipse durations, which fix the length of the eclipse chord and therefore determine the orbit inclination. The long-baseline interferometry (LBI) yields, in conjunction with the spectroscopic solution, the distance to the system and thus the absolute stellar radius of the resolved K supergiant primary star, ζ Aur A. The secondary is not resolved by LBI, but its angular (and absolute) radius is found by fitting the model

  1. Zeta potential of microfluidic substrates: 1. Theory, experimental techniques, and effects on separations.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Brian J; Hasselbrink, Ernest F

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes theory, experimental techniques, and the reported data pertaining to the zeta potential of silica and silicon with attention to use as microfluidic substrate materials, particularly for microchip chemical separations. Dependence on cation concentration, buffer and cation type, pH, cation valency, and temperature are discussed. The Debye-Hückel limit, which is often correctly treated as a good approximation for describing the ion concentration in the double layer, can lead to serious errors if it is extended to predict the dependence of zeta potential on the counterion concentration. For indifferent univalent electrolytes (e.g., sodium and potassium), two simple scalings for the dependence of zeta potential on counterion concentration can be derived in high- and low-zeta limits of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzman equation solution in the double layer. It is shown that for most situations relevant to microchip separations, the high-zeta limit is most applicable, leading to the conclusion that the zeta potential on silica substrates is approximately proportional to the logarithm of the molar counterion concentration. The zeta vs. pH dependence measurements from several experiments are compared by normalizing the zeta based on concentration.

  2. 40 CFR 180.418 - Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances for residues. 180.418 Section 180.418 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.418 Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances...

  3. 40 CFR 180.418 - Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.418 Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances for... (±))(cis-trans 3-(2,2-dichloroethenyl)-2,2 dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate and its inactive R-isomers in...

  4. 40 CFR 180.418 - Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.418 Cypermethrin and an isomer zeta-cypermethrin; tolerances for... (±))(cis-trans 3-(2,2-dichloroethenyl)-2,2 dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate and its inactive R-isomers in...

  5. An elementary and real approach to values of the Riemann zeta function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasaryan, A. G.

    2010-02-01

    An elementary approach for computing the values at negative integers of the Riemann zeta function is presented. The approach is based on a new method for ordering the integers. We show that the values of the Riemann zeta function can be computed, without using the theory of analytic continuation and any knowledge of functions of complex variable.

  6. Nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-zeta, an egg-activating factor, during early embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Yoshie; Ito, Masahiko; Shirakawa, Hideki; Shikano, Tomohide; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi . E-mail: shunm@research.twmu.ac.jp

    2005-05-13

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC{zeta}), a strong candidate of the egg-activating sperm factor, causes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} oscillations and egg activation, and is subsequently accumulated into the pronucleus (PN), when expressed in mouse eggs by injection of RNA encoding PLC{zeta}. Changes in the localization of expressed PLC{zeta} were investigated by tagging with a fluorescent protein. PLC{zeta} began to translocate into the PN formed at 5-6 h after RNA injection and increased there. Observation in the same embryo revealed that PLC{zeta} in the PN dispersed to the cytoplasm upon nuclear envelope breakdown and translocated again into the nucleus after cleavage. The dynamics was found in the second mitosis as well. When RNA was injected into fertilization-originated 1-cell embryos or blastomere(s) of 2-8-cell embryos, the nuclear localization of expressed PLC{zeta} was recognized in every embryo up to blastocyst. Thus, PLC{zeta} exhibited alternative cytoplasm/nucleus localization during development. This supports the view that the sperm factor could control cell cycle-dependent generation of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in early embryogenesis.

  7. Optimization of zeta potential profile for low-dispersion flows in microchannel turns.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Hong, S M; Lee, J S

    2007-03-21

    A method is developed to determine the optimal profile of zeta potential around U turns such that the turn-induced spreading of a solute band is minimized. After proposing a velocity profile that eliminates the racetrack effect, a conjugate gradient method is adopted to find the zeta potential profile to induce the required velocity. The optimal profiles of zeta potential seem to be insensitive to the relevant parameters of electroosmotic flows. It is shown that a reduction of variance two orders of magnitude below that of a comparable turn with uniform zeta potential is easily attained by adopting the optimal profile of zeta potential, which can be realized using a UV excimer laser or external voltage control.

  8. Oscillatory electroosmotic flow in a parallel-plate microchannel under asymmetric zeta potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, M.; Arcos, J.; Méndez, F.; Bautista, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we conduct a theoretical analysis of the start-up of an oscillatory electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a parallel-plate microchannel under asymmetric zeta potentials. It is found that the transient evolution of the flow field is controlled by the parameters {R}ω , {R}\\zeta , and \\bar{κ }, which represent the dimensionless frequency, the ratio of the zeta potentials of the microchannel walls, and the electrokinetic parameter, which is defined as the ratio of the microchannel height to the Debye length. The analysis is performed for both low and high zeta potentials; in the former case, an analytical solution is derived, whereas in the latter, a numerical solution is obtained. These solutions provide the fundamental characteristics of the oscillatory EOFs for which, with suitable adjustment of the zeta potential and the dimensionless frequency, the velocity profiles of the fluid flow exhibit symmetric or asymmetric shapes.

  9. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing

    PubMed Central

    Hales, T. C.; Sarnak, P.; Pugh, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues (“the energy levels”) follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks. PMID:11058156

  10. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing.

    PubMed

    Hales, T C; Sarnak, P; Pugh, M C

    2000-11-21

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues ("the energy levels") follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks.

  11. Zeta potentials in the flotation of oxide and silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Fuerstenau, D W; Pradip

    2005-06-30

    Adsorption of collectors and modifying reagents in the flotation of oxide and silicate minerals is controlled by the electrical double layer at the mineral-water interface. In systems where the collector is physically adsorbed, flotation with anionic or cationic collectors depends on the mineral surface being charged oppositely. Adjusting the pH of the system can enhance or prevent the flotation of a mineral. Thus, the point of zero charge (PZC) of the mineral is the most important property of a mineral in such systems. The length of the hydrocarbon chain of the collector is important because of chain-chain association enhances the adsorption once the surfactant ions aggregate to form hemimicelles at the surface. Strongly chemisorbing collectors are able to induce flotation even when collector and the mineral surface are charged similarly, but raising the pH sufficiently above the PZC can repel chemisorbing collectors from the mineral surface. Zeta potentials can be used to delineate interfacial phenomena in these various systems.

  12. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model.

  13. Multichannel optical aperture synthesis imaging of zeta1 URSAE majoris with the Navy prototype optical interferometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, J. A.; Hutter, D. J.; Elias, N. M., II; Bowers, P. F.; Johnston, K. J.; Hajian, A. R.; Armstrong, J. T.; Mozurkewich, D.; Pauls, T. A.; Rickard, L. J.; Hummel, C. A.; White, N. M.; Black, D.; Denison, C. S.

    1997-09-01

    We have used the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) to obtain the first multi-channel optical aperture synthesis images of a star. We observed the spectroscopic binary zeta (1) Ursae Majoris at 6 to 10 milliarcseconds separation during seven nights, using three interferometric baselines and 19 spectral channels (lambda lambda520 - 850 nm) of the NPOI. After editing, a typical 90 sec scan yielded fringe visibilities at 50 spatial frequencies and closure phases at 15 wavelengths. Three to five scans were obtained each night. The separations and position angles are in good agreement with the visual orbit obtained with the Mark III interferometer (Hummel et al.markcite{hum1} 1995 [AJ, 110, 376]) but show small systematic difference that can be used to improve the orbit. The closure phase data provide a sensitive measure of the magnitude difference between the components. These results demonstrate the power of broad-band interferometric observations for fast imaging and the utility of vacuum delay lines for simultaneous observations over a wide band. These observations are the first to produce simultaneous visibilities and closure phases with a separate-aperture optical interferometer, and the second to produce closure phase images, following the results from COAST reported by Baldwin et al.markcite{bal} (1996 [A&A, 306, L13]). The angular resolution here is the highest ever achieved at visual wavelengths, exceeding by an order of magnitude the best thus far achieved by any single-aperture optical telescope. We generated complex visibilities and closure phases (the data types commonly used in radio interferometry) from the optical data and used standard radio interferometry techniques to produce these images. However, the fundamental observables of optical interferometry, the squared visibility amplitude and the closure phase, require the development of new analysis techniques.

  14. Stereospecific Toxicokinetics of Bromochloro- and chlorofluoroacetate: Effect of GST-zeta Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R. ); Sylvester, Steven R.

    2001-09-01

    The chloro- and bromo- haloacetates are drinking water disinfection by-products and rodent carcinogens. Chloro, bromo di-haloacetates are also mechanism based inhibitors of glutathione-S- transferase zeta (GSTZ1-1). We studied the stereospecific toxicokinetics and in-vitro metabolism of two chiral di-haloacetates in male F344 rats: (-), (+)bromochloro-acetate (BCA), and racemic chlorofluoro-acetate (CFA), a non GST-zeta inhibiting di-haloacetate. These experiments were repeated in animals that had previously been treated with dichloroacetate (DCA) to deplete GST-zeta activity. Results indicated that in naive rats the elimination half-life of (-)BCA was 0.07 hrs compared to 0.40 hrs for (+)BCA. A comparable difference in elimination half-life was also observed for the CFA stereoisomers (0.79 hr vs. 0.11 hrs). In GST-zeta depleted rats, stereospecific elimination of (-), (+) BCA was absent with both stereoisomers having an elimination half-life of approximately 0.4 hrs. This finding was in contrast to results for CFA, which still maintained the same relative difference in elimination rate between its stereoisomers although overall elimination was diminished in GST-zeta depleted rats. Results of in-vitro metabolism experiments indicated (-)BCA was affected by modulating GST-zeta activity, with the intrinsic metabolic clearance decreasing from 2.81 to 0.15 ml hr-1 mg-protein-1 (naive, GST-zeta depleted) compared with values for (+)BCA (0.30 and 0.31 ml hr-1 mg-protein-1). Incubations with 350 mM DDTC (IC50 for GST-theta inhibition) or polyclonal antibodies recognizing GST-theta (hGSTT1-1) preferentially decreased (+)BCA metabolism in both GST-zeta depleted and human cytosol. These results indicate (+)BCA is a poor substrate for GST-zeta and its metabolism is controlled by an additional GST isoenzyme, possibly GST-theta.

  15. zeta-COP, a subunit of coatomer, is required for COP-coated vesicle assembly

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    cDNA encoding the 20-kD subunit of coatomer, zeta-COP, predicts a protein of 177-amino acid residues, similar in sequence to AP17 and AP19, subunits of the clathrin adaptor complexes. Polyclonal antibody directed to zeta-COP blocks the binding of coatomer to Golgi membranes and prevents the assembly of COP-coated vesicles on Golgi cisternae. Unlike other coatomer subunits (beta-, beta'-, gamma-, and epsilon- COP), zeta-COP exists in both coatomer bound and free pools. PMID:8276893

  16. Effect of epoetin zeta for correction of renal anemia in hemodialysis patients with thalassemia minor.

    PubMed

    Kumchev, E; Koytchev, R; Dimitrakov, D; Stavrev, P; Tsochev, G; Siebert-Weigel, M

    2008-12-01

    Two patients with thalassemia minor and end-stage renal failure on hemodialysis were treated with epoetin zeta (Silapo, Retacrit; STADA, Germany), a medicinal product that was developed and registered as biosimilar to epoetin alfa. Dosing was titrated individually for two patients to achieve a stable hemoglobin (Hb) concentration of 10.5-12.0 g/dL. One patient was treated intravenously with epoetin zeta; the other patient was treated subcutaneously. After 12 weeks of therapy both patients achieved Hb levels within the target range, confirming the effi cacy of epoetin zeta in patients with thalassemia minor.

  17. Heat-kernel expansion on noncompact domains and a generalized zeta-function regularization procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Cognola, Guido; Elizalde, Emilio; Zerbini, Sergio

    2006-08-15

    Heat-kernel expansion and zeta function regularization are discussed for Laplace-type operators with discrete spectrum in noncompact domains. Since a general theory is lacking, the heat-kernel expansion is investigated by means of several examples. It is pointed out that for a class of exponential (analytic) interactions, generically the noncompactness of the domain gives rise to logarithmic terms in the heat-kernel expansion. Then, a meromorphic continuation of the associated zeta function is investigated. A simple model is considered, for which the analytic continuation of the zeta function is not regular at the origin, displaying a pole of higher order. For a physically meaningful evaluation of the related functional determinant, a generalized zeta function regularization procedure is proposed.

  18. Tunnel determinants from spectral zeta functions. Instanton effects in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, A. Alonso; Guilarte, J. Mateos

    2014-07-23

    In this paper we develop an spectral zeta function regularization procedure on the determinants of instanton fluctuation operators that describe the semi-classical order of tunnel effects between degenerate vacua.

  19. Al III, Si IV, and C IV absorption toward zeta Ophiuchi: Evidence for photionized and collisionally ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1994-01-01

    We present Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph observations at 3.5 km/s resolution and signal-to-noise ratios of 30 to 60 for the Al III, Si IV, and N V absorption lines in the far-ultraviolet spectrum of the O9.5 V star zeat Ophiuchi. The measurement reveal three types of highly ionized gas along the 140 pc line of sight. (1) Narrow components of Al III (b = 4.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(helio)) = -7.8 km/s; b = 3.2 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -14.4 km/s) and Si IV (b = 5.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -15.0 km/s) trace photionized gas in the expanding H II region surrounding zeta Oph. The observed magnitude and direction of the velocity offset between the Al III and Si IV profiles can be explained by models of H II regions that incorporate expansion. Narrow C IV absorption associated with the H II region is not detected. Predictions of the expected amounts of Si IV and C IV overestimate the column densities of these ions by factors of 30 and more than 10, respectively. The discrepancy may be due to the effects of elemental depletions in the gas and/or to the interaction of the stellar wind with surrounding matter. (2) Broad (b = 15 to 18 km/s) and weak Si IV and C IV absorption components are detected near the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -26 km/s. The high-ionization species associated with these absorption components are probably produced by electron collisional ionization in a heated gas. This absorption may be physically related to the zeta Oph bow shock ot to a cloud complex situated within the local interstellar medium at d less than 60 pc. The C IV to Si IV column density ratio in this gas is 8, a factor of 6 less than conductive interface models predict, but this discrepancy may be removed by considering the effects of self-photoionization within the cooling gas in the model calculations. (3) A broad (b = 13 km/s) and weak C IV absorption feature detected at the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -61 km/s is not seen in other

  20. Physical properties of nanofluid suspension of ferromagnetic graphite with high Zeta potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, N. S.; Rodrigues, A. D.; Cardoso, C. A.; Pardo, H.; Faccio, R.; Mombru, A. W.; Galzerani, J. C.; de Lima, O. F.; Sergeenkov, S.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the magnetic properties and stability of nanofluid ferromagnetic graphite (NFMG) studied through the measurements of its magnetization hysteresis curves, Raman spectrum and the so-called Zeta potential. The obtained results suggest a robust ferromagnetic behavior of NFMG even at room temperature along with a good stability of the dispersed solution (with Zeta potential around 41.3 mV) and a good reactivity between magnetic graphite and CTAB type cationic surfactant.

  1. Remarks on the Patterson-Selberg zeta function, black hole vacua and extremal CFT partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Floyd L.

    2012-09-01

    We consider some applications (old and new) of the Patterson-Selberg zeta function to 3D gravity with a negative cosmological constant. We also consider 2D black hole vacua with a parabolic generator of their holonomy. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  2. Seiberg duality, quiver gauge theories, and Ihara’s zeta function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Da; Xiao, Yan; He, Yang-Hui

    2015-07-01

    We study Ihara’s zeta function for graphs in the context of quivers arising from gauge theories, especially under Seiberg duality transformations. The distribution of poles is studied as we proceed along the duality tree, in light of the weak and strong graph versions of the Riemann Hypothesis. As a by-product, we find a refined version of Ihara’s zeta function to be the generating function for the generic superpotential of the gauge theory.

  3. The structure of the human zeta-globin gene and a closely linked, nearly identical pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, N J; Gil, A; Maniatis, T

    1982-12-01

    DNA sequencing studies indicate that only one of two closely linked human embryonic alpha-like globin genes, zeta (zeta), encodes a functional polypeptide. The other is a pseudogene (psi zeta) that differs by only 3 bp in the protein coding sequence, one of which converts the codon for amino acid 6 into a chain termination codon. Both zeta-globin genes differ from all other alpha-like genes thus far reported in that they contain large introns consisting, in part, of simple repeat sequences. Intron 1 of each gene contains a variation of the repeat sequence ACAGTGGGGAGGGG, while intron 2 contains the repeat sequence CGGGG. Comparison of the human zeta- and alpha-globin gene sequences reveals that the embryonic and adult alpha-like genes began to diverge from each other relatively early in vertebrate evolution (400 million years ago). In contrast, the beta-like embryonic globin gene, epsilon (epsilon), is the product of a much more recent evolutionary event (200 million years ago). Thus, even though the temporal and quantitative expression of zeta- and epsilon-globin genes must be coordinately controlled during development, their evolutionary histories are clearly distinct.

  4. Optical Tweezers as a New Biomedical Tool to Measure Zeta Potential of Stored Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos A. L.; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Filho, Milton M.; Lucena, Sheyla C.; Costa, Ana Maria D. N.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; Santos, Beate S.; Fontes, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    During storage, red blood cells (RBCs) for transfusion purposes suffer progressive deterioration. Sialylated glycoproteins of the RBC membrane are responsible for a negatively charged surface which creates a repulsive electrical zeta potential. These charges help prevent the interaction between RBCs and other cells, and especially among each RBCs. Reports in the literature have stated that RBCs sialylated glycoproteins can be sensitive to enzymes released by leukocyte degranulation. Thus, the aim of this study was, by using an optical tweezers as a biomedical tool, to measure the zeta potential in standard RBCs units and in leukocyte reduced RBC units (collected in CPD-SAGM) during storage. Optical tweezers is a sensitive tool that uses light for measuring cell biophysical properties which are important for clinical and research purposes. This is the first study to analyze RBCs membrane charges during storage. In addition, we herein also measured the elasticity of RBCs also collected in CPD-SAGM. In conclusion, the zeta potential decreased 42% and cells were 134% less deformable at the end of storage. The zeta potential from leukodepleted units had a similar profile when compared to units stored without leukoreduction, indicating that leukocyte lyses were not responsible for the zeta potential decay. Flow cytometry measurements of reactive oxygen species suggested that this decay is due to membrane oxidative damages. These results show that measurements of zeta potentials provide new insights about RBCs storage lesion for transfusion purposes. PMID:22363729

  5. The correlation between zeta potential and mucoadhesion strength on pig vesical mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bogataj, Marija; Vovk, Tomaz; Kerec, Mojca; Dimnik, Ales; Grabnar, Iztok; Mrhar, Ales

    2003-05-01

    The detachment forces of various polymers are frequently measured to determine their mucoadhesion strength. As the process of mucoadhesion is a consequence of interactions between the mucus layer on mucosa and mucoadhesive polymers, it is greatly dependent on mucus and polymer structure including their charge. It is also known that the glycosaminoglycan layer, which covers the urinary bladder mucosa surface, is highly negatively charged. Therefore, by measuring the zeta potential of polymer dispersions and mucosal homogenates an insight into electrostatic interactions during mucoadhesion can be obtained. In our experiments we chose three polymers, two anionic (polycarbophil, PC; sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, CMCNa) and one cationic (chitosan hydrochloride, CH), for which we expected different zeta potential values and different mucoadhesion strengths. The correlation between the zeta potential and the detachment force was determined. In addition to that, the zeta potential of the scraped surface layer of pig urinary bladders was measured to confirm its negative value. The mucoadhesion strength decreased in the following order: CH>CMCNa=PC. The zeta potentials for all three polymers and for porcine vesical mucosal homogenates were measured in Tyrode solution and two NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths. The lower values of the detachment force correlated well with the more negative zeta potential of the polymer, which might be a consequence of the greater repulsion between negative charges of polymers and glycosaminoglycans.

  6. Determination of 9-cis beta-carotene and zeta-carotene in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Krinsky, Norman I; Russell, Robert M; Tang, Guangwen

    2008-09-01

    Concentrations of 9-cis beta-carotene (9-cis betaC) and zeta-carotene (zetaC) in biological samples may provide crucial information on the biological activities of these carotenoids. However, in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) these carotenoids are often co-eluted. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a method for 9-cis betaC and zetaC quantitation. Both 9-cis betaC and zetaC have peak absorbance at 400 and 450 nm, respectively, whereas only 9-cis betaC has peak absorbance at 475 nm. We developed a HPLC method to quantitate 9-cis betaC and zetaC by using peak absorbance ratios. The 9-cis betaC/zetaC peak area was monitored at 475, 450 and 400 nm. The 9-cis betaC was quantified by using absorbance value at 475 nm; zetaC was then calculated from the 9-cis betaC/zetaC peak at 400 nm by subtracting 9-cis betaC contribution at 400 nm using the 400-nm/475-nm peak absorbance ratio of 9-cis betaC (0.39). This method was applied to determine 9-cis betaC and zetaC concentrations in serum and breast milk samples (n=12) from American lactating women and serum and breast adipose tissue samples (n=16) from Korean women with either benign or malignant breast tumors. 9-cis betaC concentrations in serum and breast milk of American women, and serum and adipose tissue of Korean women were 7.1+/-0.8 and 1.1+/-0.2 nM, and 15.6+/-1.1 nM and 0.2+/-0.1 nmol/g, respectively. zetaC concentrations in the above samples were 54.2+/-7.2 and 8.3+/-1.8 nM, and 49.0+/-3.9 nM and 0.3+/-0.1 nmol/g, respectively.

  7. A3V2(PO4)3 (A = Na or Li) probed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivko, Maja; Arcon, Iztok; Bele, Marjan; Dominko, Robert; Gaberscek, Miran

    2012-10-01

    Two stable modifications of A3V2(PO4)3 (A = Na or Li) were synthesized by citric acid assisted modified sol-gel synthesis. The obtained samples were phase pure Li3V2(PO4)3 and Na3V2(PO4)3 materials embedded in a carbon matrix. The samples were tested as half cells against lithium or sodium metal. Both samples delivered about 90 mAh g-1 at a C/10 cycling rate. The change of vanadium oxidation state and changes in the local environment of redox center for both materials were probed by in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Oxidation state of vanadium was determined by energy shift of the absorption edge. The reversible change of valence from trivalent to tetravalent oxidation state was determined in the potential window used in our experiments. Small reversible changes in the interatomic distances due to the relaxation of the structure in the process of alkali metal extraction and insertion were observed. Local environment (vanadium-oxygen bond distances) after 1st cycle were found to be the same as in the starting material. Both structures have been found very rigid without significant changes during alkali metal extraction.

  8. Determining the Zeta Potential of Porous Membranes Using Electrolyte Conductivity inside Pores.

    PubMed

    Fievet, P.; Szymczyk, A.; Labbez, C.; Aoubiza, B.; Simon, C.; Foissy, A.; Pagetti, J.

    2001-03-15

    The zeta potential is an important and reliable indicator of the surface charge of membranes, and knowledge of it is essential for the design and operation of membrane processes. The zeta potential cannot be measured directly, but must be deduced from experiments by means of a model. The possibility of determining the zeta potential of porous membranes from measurements of the electrolyte conductivity inside pores (lambda(pore)) is investigated in the case of a ceramic microfiltration membrane. To this end, experimental measurements of the electrical resistance in pores are performed with the membrane filled with KCl solutions of various pHs and concentrations. lambda(pore) is deduced from these experiments. The farther the pH is from the isoelectric point and/or the lower the salt concentration is, the higher the ratio of the electrolyte conductivity inside pores to the bulk conductivity is, due to a more important contribution of the surface conduction. Zeta potentials are calculated from lambda(pore) values by means of a space charge model and compared to those calculated from streaming potential measurements. It is found that the isoelectric points are very close and that zeta potential values for both methods are in quite good agreement. The differences observed in zeta potentials could be due to the fact that the space charge model does not consider the surface conductivity in the inner part of the double layer. Measurements of the electrolyte conductivity within the membrane pores are proved to be a well-adapted procedure for the determination of the zeta potential in situations where the contribution of the surface conduction is significant, i.e., for small and charged pores. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  10. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  11. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  12. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry from Gemini 11 of stars in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.; Spear, G. G.; Kondo, Y.; Henize, K. G.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectrophotometry in the wavelength region 2600-3600 A is reported for the bright early-type stars beta, eta, gamma, delta, iota, epsilon, sigma, zeta, and kappa Ori. The results are in good agreement with other observations, and, with the possible exception of the supergiants, are in good agreement with recent line-blanketed model atmospheres. There is evidence that the supergiants possess a small ultraviolet deficiency shortward of 3000 A relative to main-sequence stars of similar spectral type. The most extreme example of this phenomenon is the star kappa Ori.

  13. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry from Gemini 11 of stars in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.; Spear, G. G.; Kondo, Y.; Henize, K. G.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectrophotometry in the wavelength region 2600-3600 A is reported for the bright early-type stars beta, eta, gamma, delta, iota, epsilon, sigma, zeta, and kappa Ori. The results are in good agreement with other observations, and, with the possible exception of the supergiants, are in good agreement with recent line-blanketed model atmospheres. There is evidence that the supergiants possess a small ultraviolet deficiency shortward of 3000 A relative to main-sequence stars of similar spectral type. The most extreme example of this phenomenon is the star kappa Ori.

  14. Determination of (C-12)/(C-13) in the interstellar medium toward Zeta Ophiuchi and Xi Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Isabel; Craig, Nahide; Meyer, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The Lick Observatory Reticon (LOR) data presented in Hawkins et al. (1985) are reanalyzed in order to determine the cause of the significant discrepancy in (C-12)/(C-13) isotope ratios determined on the basis of observations of this isotope in the interstellar medium toward Zeta Ophiuchi and Xi Persei. A new set of Lick Observatory observations toward Zeta Oph are obtained using a CCD detector. The KPNO coude feed echelle spectrograph and a CCD detector are used to carry out high-resolution, high SNR ratio observations toward Zeta Oph and Xi Per. The LOR results for Zeta Oph are uncertain, ranging to 40 to 60, owing to the error in continuum placement. The KPNO results toward Zeta Oph are (C-12)H/(C-13)H(+)(0, 0) = 63 +/- 8, (C-12)H(+)/(C-13)H(+)(1, 0) = 67 +/- 19, and (C-12)N/(C-13)N = 100 + 88/- 33. Toward Xi Per, the KPNO measurements yield (C-12)H(+)/(C-13)H(+) = 49 +/- 15 from the 4232-A band, and a lower limit of 45 from the 3957-A observations.

  15. Implementation of the Baldwin-Barth turbulence model into the ZETA code and its diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Scott L.

    1993-06-01

    The Baldwin-Barth turbulence model was implemented into Zeta, a time-accurate, zonal, integro-differential code for incompressible laminar and turbulent flows. The implementation procedure is patterned after the model subroutine in ARC2D. The results of ZETA with the Baldwin-Barth turbulence model were compared with experimental data, with ZETA using Baldwin-Lomax model, and with ARC2D using the Baldwin-Barth model. The Baldwin-Barth model subroutine was tested by inputting an ARC2D velocity solution of an NACA-0012 airfoil at R(sub e) = 3.9 x 10(exp 6) and alpha = 5 deg. The resultant turbulent viscosity and Reynolds stresses compared favorably with the original data. For the same grid having grid points inside the laminar sublayer, which is necessary due to the one-equation nature of the model, ZETA however predicts early separation. It was found that the current ZETA has problem with such a fine grid. Further work is in progress to solve this problem.

  16. Riemann Zeta Zeros and Prime Number Spectra in Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, G.; Svaiter, B. F.; Svaiter, N. F.

    2013-10-01

    The Riemann hypothesis states that all nontrivial zeros of the zeta function lie in the critical line Re(s) = 1/2. Hilbert and Pólya suggested that one possible way to prove the Riemann hypothesis is to interpret the nontrivial zeros in the light of spectral theory. Using the construction of the so-called super-zeta functions or secondary zeta functions built over the Riemann nontrivial zeros and the regularity property of one of this function at the origin, we show that it is possible to extend the Hilbert-Pólya conjecture to systems with countably infinite number of degrees of freedom. The sequence of the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function can be interpreted as the spectrum of a self-adjoint operator of some hypothetical system described by the functional approach to quantum field theory. However, if one considers the same situation with numerical sequences whose asymptotic distributions are not "far away" from the asymptotic distribution of prime numbers, the associated functional integral cannot be constructed. Finally, we discuss possible relations between the asymptotic behavior of a sequence and the analytic domain of the associated zeta function.

  17. Determination of (C-12)/(C-13) in the interstellar medium toward Zeta Ophiuchi and Xi Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Isabel; Craig, Nahide; Meyer, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The Lick Observatory Reticon (LOR) data presented in Hawkins et al. (1985) are reanalyzed in order to determine the cause of the significant discrepancy in (C-12)/(C-13) isotope ratios determined on the basis of observations of this isotope in the interstellar medium toward Zeta Ophiuchi and Xi Persei. A new set of Lick Observatory observations toward Zeta Oph are obtained using a CCD detector. The KPNO coude feed echelle spectrograph and a CCD detector are used to carry out high-resolution, high SNR ratio observations toward Zeta Oph and Xi Per. The LOR results for Zeta Oph are uncertain, ranging to 40 to 60, owing to the error in continuum placement. The KPNO results toward Zeta Oph are (C-12)H/(C-13)H(+)(0, 0) = 63 +/- 8, (C-12)H(+)/(C-13)H(+)(1, 0) = 67 +/- 19, and (C-12)N/(C-13)N = 100 + 88/- 33. Toward Xi Per, the KPNO measurements yield (C-12)H(+)/(C-13)H(+) = 49 +/- 15 from the 4232-A band, and a lower limit of 45 from the 3957-A observations.

  18. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the zeta isoform of the 14-3-3 protein: homologous sequences in the 3'-untranslated region of frog and human zeta isoforms.

    PubMed

    Miura, I; Nakajima, T; Ohtani, H; Kashiwagi, A; Nakamura, M

    1997-10-01

    14-3-3 proteins constitute a family of well-conserved eukaryotic proteins that possess diverse biochemical activities such as regulation of gene transcription, cell proliferation and activation of protein kinase C. At least 7 subtypes (alpha to theta) of 14-3-3 protein are known, but the zeta subtype of this protein has been cloned only in mammals. We cloned the zeta subtype of 14-3-3 protein (14-3-3 zeta) from the frog, Rana rugosa. The sequence encoded 245 amino acids that share 92% identity with rat and bovine 14-3-3 zeta s, and 92% with human phospholipase A2 (PLA2; 14-3-3 zeta). Northern blot analysis revealed a single band of about 1.8 kb in tadpoles at stage 25. The 14-3-3 zeta mRNA level was high in the brain, lung, spleen and kidney, and low in the heart and testis, as opposed to the mRNA level, which was only faintly detected in the liver, pancreas, ovary and muscle. Furthermore, high similarity in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) was observed between frog and human 14-3-3 zeta cDNA. The results suggest that 14-3-3 zeta is highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, and that the homologous sequence in the 3'-UTR of 14-3-3 zeta cDNA may be conserved in frogs and humans.

  19. Zeta potential of selected bacteria in drinking water when dead, starved, or exposed to minimal and rich culture media.

    PubMed

    Soni, Kamlesh A; Balasubramanian, Ashwin K; Beskok, Ali; Pillai, Suresh D

    2008-01-01

    The zeta potentials of E. coli, GFP (green fluorescence protein)-labeled E. coli, Salmonella Newport, and Pseudomonas sp. in different states (nutrient-starved and dead) and grown in rich and minimal media were measured. Capillary electrophoresis experiments were conducted to measure the zeta potential of the different cells suspended in a drinking water sample. Salmonella Newport strain showed a lower zeta potential compared to E. coli, GFP-labeled E. coli, and Pseudomonas sp. Starved E. coli cells had a lower zeta potential compared to E. coli cells grown under rich media conditions. Salmonella Newport cells grown in minimal media also had a lower zeta potential compared to rich, starved, and dead cells. The different bacterial cell types exhibited differences in size as well. These results suggest that when bacterial cells are present in drinking water they can exhibit significant heterogeneity in the size and zeta potential, depending on their physiological state.

  20. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  1. Zeta potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells after exposure to alumina nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Fomenko, Alla N.; Korovin, Matvey S.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, researches have paid much attention to the physical, chemical, biophysical and biochemical properties of a cell surface. It is known that most of the cells' surfaces are charged. This charge depends on the biochemical structure of the cell membranes. Therefore, measurement of a cell surface charge is a significant criterion that gives information about the cell surface. Evaluation of the cells zeta-potential is important to understand the interaction mechanisms of various drugs, antibiotics, as well as the interaction of nanoparticles with the cell surface. In this study, we use the dynamic light scattering method to detect the zeta-potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells. It has been observed that zeta-potential shifted to negative values after exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles and inducing apoptosis.

  2. Electroosmotic flow of a viscoplastic material through a slit channel with walls of arbitrary zeta potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-On; Qi, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Electroosmotic (EO) flow is known to have a nearly uniform velocity profile, but such a plug-flow velocity can be considerably diminished if the fluid is a viscoplastic material having a yield stress. This paper aims to investigate the reduction of EO velocity (also known as Smoluchowski slip velocity) due to a yield stress as a function of the material rheological parameters and the zeta potential. Three rheological models are considered: Casson, Herschel-Bulkley, and Bingham fluids. In the absence of pressure forcing and without the Debye-Hückel approximation, the problems of EO flow of these materials in a slit channel with walls uniformly charged with an arbitrary zeta potential are analytically solved. Analytical expressions are deduced for the reduced Smoluchowski velocity under the limiting conditions of very small and very large zeta potentials. It is shown that qualitatively different asymptotic behaviors will be exhibited by materials of different models.

  3. Characterization of amphoteric multilayered thin films by means of zeta potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-Hang; Zhang, Bao; Fang, Wei-Wei; Lao, Xue-Jun; Yu, Hanry

    2005-06-10

    Multilayer films of amphoteric methylated collagen were assembled on SOURCE 15S or SOURCE 15Q beads by sequential electrostatic deposition with negatively charged methylacrylic acid-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate (MAA-HEMA-MMA) terpolymer. Methylated collagen and terpolymer were deposited under conditions where they were oppositely charged to one another, thereby facilitating growth of the films through electrostatic interactions. Measurements revealed alternating positive and negative zeta-potential with the deposition of each methylated collagen and terpolymer layer, respectively. Assembly pH had a remarkable influence on zeta-potential of the assembled multilayers and the deposition of methylated collagen will be frustrated when the assembly pH is up to 9.0. In addition, ionic strength (NaCl concentration) showed an intricate effect on zeta-potential of the films of amphoteric methylated collagen.

  4. Pax-6 is essential for lens-specific expression of zeta-crystallin.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J; Cvekl, A; Wistow, G

    1995-01-01

    Pax-6 is essential for normal eye development and has been implicated as a "master gene" for lens formation in embryogenesis. Guinea pig zeta-crystallin, a taxon-specific enzyme crystallin, achieves high expression specifically in lens through use of an alternative promoter. Here we show that Pax-6 binds a site in this promoter, which is essential for lens-specific expression. Lens and lens-derived cells exhibit a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of Pax-6 transcripts and Pax-6 is expressed in adult lenses and cells that support zeta-crystallin expression. These results suggest that zeta-crystallin is a natural target gene for Pax-6 and that this Pax family member has a direct role in the continuing expression of tissue-specific genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7753863

  5. FcRgamma chain does not replace CD3zeta chain in CD3zeta-deficient T lymphocytes of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Santalla, Mercedes; Krishnan, Sandeep; Valeri, Anna P; Aguilera-Montilla, Noemi; Fisher, Carolyn U; Perez-Blas, Mercedes; Gutierrez-Calvo, Alberto; Lasa, Inmaculada; Granell-Vicent, Javier; Tsokos, George C; Martin-Villa, José M

    2007-03-01

    Defective CD3zeta chain expression has been reported in T lymphocytes of patients with inflammatory diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or osteoarthritis, and with cancer. In lupus, the absent CD3zeta chain is replaced by the FcRgamma chain, rendering the T cells hyper responsive. However, there are no data on T lymphocytes from patients with cancer. In this study, the presence of the FcRgamma chain and its associated kinase, Syk, was analysed in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and healthy subjects. Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments were carried out with total cell or lipid raft extracts from fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells or T lymphocytes, and Herpesvirus saimiri-derived T-cell lines (of blood or tissue origin). Our results revealed that the absent CD3zeta chain in cancer T lymphocytes was not replaced by FcRgamma either in fresh T cells or T-cell lines, in contrast to lupus T cells. This altered expression of signalling molecules in T lymphocytes of cancer patients, would explain their low proliferative capacity. Our T-cell lines represent tools to unveil the signalling abnormalities of cancer T lymphocytes.

  6. A search for weak ultraviolet interstellar absorption features in IUE spectra of Rho Ophiuchi and Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, D. E.; Thorburn, J. A.; Hobbs, L. M.; York, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    We have applied procedures designed to reduce substantially the nonrandom, so-called 'fixed-pattern' noise present in IUE spectra to archival long-wavelength high-dispersion spectra of Rho Ophiuchi and Zeta Ophiuchi. Substantial elimination of the fixed-pattern noise via flat fielding can yield 2sigma equivalent width limits of 5-10 mA from the sum of a small number (about less than 5) of well-exposed archival spectra, and increases confidence in the reality of any weak features found. Examination of complete long-wavelength (about 2200-3250 A) spectra of these two stars has revealed, in addition to many known strong absorption lines, several lines of Fe I and Si I which had not previously been reported, as well as a small number of possible unidentified lines. We also present substantially improved upper limits to the equivalent widths of a number of other weak lines; limits an order of magnitude smaller, now achievable with the HST GHRS, should produce detections of some of these.

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristadoro, Giampaolo

    2006-03-01

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyse low-dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand, even simple one-dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non-smooth dependence of global observables on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one-dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant, we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

  8. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. Dowker's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-07-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  9. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. DOWKER's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so-called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  10. Requirement of protein kinase C zeta for stimulation of protein synthesis by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, R; Kollmorgen, G; White, M F; Rhoads, R E

    1997-01-01

    The ability of insulin to stimulate protein synthesis and cellular growth is mediated through the insulin receptor (IR), which phosphorylates Tyr residues in the insulin receptor substrate-signaling proteins (IRS-1 and IRS-2), Gab-1, and Shc. These phosphorylated substrates directly bind and activate enzymes such as phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K) and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for p21Ras (GRB-2/SOS), which are in turn required for insulin-stimulated protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and prevention of apoptosis. We have now shown that one or more members of the atypical protein kinase C group, as exemplified by the zeta isoform (PKC zeta), are downstream of IRS-1 and P13K and mediate the effect of insulin on general protein synthesis. Ectopic expression of constitutively activated PKC zeta eliminates the requirement of IRS-1 for general protein synthesis but not for insulin-stimulated activation of 70-kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K), synthesis of growth-regulated proteins (e.g., c-Myc), or mitogenesis. The fact that PKC zeta stimulates general protein synthesis but not activation of p70S6K indicates that PKC zeta activation does not involve the proto-oncogene Akt, which is also activated by PI3K. Yet insulin is still required for the stimulation of general protein synthesis in the presence of constitutively active PKC zeta and in the absence of IRS-1, suggesting a requirement for the convergence of the IRS-1/PI3K/PKC zeta pathway with one or more additional pathways emanating from the IR, e.g., Shc/SOS/p21Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase. Thus, PI3K appears to represent a bifurcation in the insulin signaling pathway, one branch leading through PKC zeta to general protein synthesis and one, through Akt and the target of rapamycin (mTOR), to growth-regulated protein synthesis and cell cycle progression. PMID:9271396

  11. Finding zeros of the Riemann zeta function by periodic driving of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creffield, C. E.; Sierra, G.

    2015-06-01

    The Riemann hypothesis, which states that the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function all lie on a certain line in the complex plane, is one of the most important unresolved problems in mathematics. We propose here an approach to finding a physical system to study the Riemann zeros, which is based on applying a time-periodic driving field. This driving allows us to tune the quasienergies of the system (the analog of the eigenenergies for static systems), so that they are directly governed by the zeta function. We further show by numerical simulations that this allows the Riemann zeros to be measured in currently accessible cold-atom experiments.

  12. Zeta functions of Dirac and Laplace-type operators over finite cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsten, Klaus; Loya, Paul; Park, Jinsung

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, a complete description of the zeta functions and corresponding zeta determinants for Dirac and Laplace-type operators over finite cylinders using the contour integration method, for example described in [K. Kirsten, Spectral Functions in Mathematics and Physics, Chapman & Hall/CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2001] is given. Different boundary conditions, local and non-local ones, are considered. The method is shown to be very powerful in that it is easily adapted to each situation and in that answers are very elegantly obtained.

  13. A3V5O14 (A = K+, Rb+, or Tl+), new polar oxides with a tetragonal tungsten bronze related structural topology: synthesis, structure, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Jeongho; Kim, Sang-Hwan; Halasyamani, P Shiv

    2010-08-02

    Three polar noncentrosymmetric (NCS) oxide materials, A(3)V(5)O(14) (A = K(+), Rb(+), or Tl(+)), have been synthesized by hydrothermal and conventional solid state techniques. Their crystal structures and functional properties (second-harmonic generation, piezoelectricity, and polarization) have been determined. The iso-structural materials exhibit a layered structural topology that consists of corner-sharing VO(4) tetrahedra and VO(5) square pyramids. The layers stack parallel to the c-axis direction and are separated by the K(+), Rb(+), or Tl(+) cations. Powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements using 1064 nm radiation indicate the materials exhibit moderate SHG efficiencies of approximately 100 x alpha-SiO(2). Additional SHG measurements, that is, particle size versus SHG efficiency, indicate the materials are type-I phase-matchable. Converse piezoelectric measurements for K(3)V(5)O(14), Rb(3)V(5)O(14), and Tl(3)V(5)O(14) revealed d(33) values of 28, 22, and 26 pm/V, respectively. Pyroelectric measurements, that is, temperature-dependent polarization measurements, resulted in pyroelectric coefficients of -2.2, -2.9, and -2.8 microC/m(2) x K at 65 degrees C, for K(3)V(5)O(14), Rb(3)V(5)O(14), and Tl(3)V(5)O(14) respectively. Frequency-dependent polarization measurements confirmed that all of the materials are nonferroelectric, consistent with our first principle density functional theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations. Infrared, UV-vis, thermogravimetric, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were also performed. Crystal data: K(3)V(5)O(14), trigonal, space group P31m (No. 157), a = 8.6970(16) A, c = 4.9434(19) A, V = 323.81(15), and Z = 1; Rb(3)V(5)O(14), trigonal, space group P31m (No. 157), a = 8.7092(5) A, c = 5.2772(7) A, V = 346.65(5), and Z = 1; Tl(3)V(5)O(14), trigonal, space group P31m (No. 157), a = 8.7397(8) A, c = 5.0846(10) A, V = 336.34(8), and Z = 1.

  14. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  15. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  16. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  17. High-concentration zeta potential measurements using light-scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba, Michael; Corbett, Jason; Watson, Fraser Mcneil; Jones, Andrew

    2010-09-28

    Zeta potential is the key parameter that controls electrostatic interactions in particle dispersions. Laser Doppler electrophoresis is an accepted method for the measurement of particle electrophoretic mobility and hence zeta potential of dispersions of colloidal size materials. Traditionally, samples measured by this technique have to be optically transparent. Therefore, depending upon the size and optical properties of the particles, many samples will be too concentrated and will require dilution. The ability to measure samples at or close to their neat concentration would be desirable as it would minimize any changes in the zeta potential of the sample owing to dilution. However, the ability to measure turbid samples using light-scattering techniques presents a number of challenges. This paper discusses electrophoretic mobility measurements made on turbid samples at high concentration using a novel cell with reduced path length. Results are presented on two different sample types, titanium dioxide and a polyurethane dispersion, as a function of sample concentration. For both of the sample types studied, the electrophoretic mobility results show a gradual decrease as the sample concentration increases and the possible reasons for these observations are discussed. Further, a comparison of the data against theoretical models is presented and discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are made from the zeta potential values obtained at high concentrations.

  18. Zeta-potential Analyses using Micro Electrical Field Flow Fractionation with Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Moon-Hwan; Dosev, Dosi; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly growing application of nanoparticles in biotechnology requires fast and accessible tools for their manipulation and for characterization of their colloidal properties. In this work we determine the zeta-potentials for polystyrene nanoparticles using micro electrical field flow fractionation (μ–EFFF) which is an efficient method for sorting of particles by size. The data obtained by μ–EFFF were compared to zeta potentials determined by standard capillary electrophoresis. For proof of concept, we used polystyrene nanoparticles of two different sizes, impregnated with two different fluorescent dyes. Fluorescent emission spectra were used to evaluate the particle separation in both systems. Using the theory of electrophoresis, we estimated the zeta-potentials as a function of size, dielectric permittivity, viscosity and electrophoretic mobility. The results obtained by the μ–EFFF technique were confirmed by the conventional capillary electrophoresis measurements. These results demonstrate the applicability of the μ–EFFF method not only for particle size separation but also as a simple and inexpensive tool for measurements of nanoparticles zeta potentials. PMID:18542710

  19. Nuclear protein I{kappa}B-{zeta} inhibits the activity of STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Xiaoai; Yang, Juntao; Wu, Guangzhou; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Chang, Zhijie; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoming; He, Fuchu

    2009-09-18

    STAT3 (Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) is a key transcription factor of the JAK-STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway that regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. Activation of STAT3 is under tight regulation, and yet the different signaling pathways and the mechanisms that regulate its activity remain to be elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we have identified a nuclear protein I{kappa}B-{zeta} that interacts in a novel way with STAT3. This physical interaction was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assays. The interaction regions were mapped to the coiled-coil domain of STAT3 and the C-terminal of I{kappa}B-{zeta}. Overexpression of I{kappa}B-{zeta} inhibited the transcriptional activity of STAT3. It also suppressed cell growth and induced cell apoptosis in SRC-simulated cells, which is partially mediated by down-regulation of expression of a known STAT3 target gene, MCL1. Our results suggest that I{kappa}B-{zeta} is a negative regulator of STAT3, and demonstrate a novel mechanism in which a component of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway inhibits the activation of STAT3.

  20. Clinical and pharmacogenomic data mining: 3. Zeta theory as a general tactic for clinical bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Robson, Barry

    2005-01-01

    A new approach, a Zeta Theory of observations, data, and data mining, is being forged from a theory of expected information into an even more cohesive and comprehensive form by the challenge of general genomic, pharmacogenomic, and proteomic data. In this paper, the focus is not on studies using the specific tool FANO (CliniMiner) but on extensions to a new broader theoretical approach, aspects of which can easily be implemented into, or otherwise support, excellent existing methods, such as forms of multivariate analysis and IBM's product Intelligent Miner. The theory should perhaps be distinguished from an existing purely number-theoretic area sometimes also known as Zeta Theory, which focuses on the Riemann Zeta Function and the ways in which it governs the distribution of prime numbers. However, Zeta Theory as used here overlaps heavily with it and actually makes use of these same matters. The distinction is that it enters from a Bayesian information theory and data representation perspective. It could thus be considered an application of the 'mathematician's version'. The application is by no means confined to areas of modern biomedicine, and indeed its generality, even merging into quantum mechanics, is a key feature. Other areas with some similar challenges as modern biology, and which have inspired data mining methods such as IBM's Intelligent Miner, include commerce. But for several reasons discussed, modern molecular biology and medicine seem particularly challenging, and this relates to the often irreducible high dimensionality of the data. This thus remains our main target.

  1. Boundary Conditions for the Maintenance of Memory by PKM[zeta] in Neocortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shema, Reul; Hazvi, Shoshi; Sacktor, Todd C.; Dudai, Yadin

    2009-01-01

    We report here that ZIP, a selective inhibitor of the atypical protein kinase C isoform PKM[zeta], abolishes very long-term conditioned taste aversion (CTA) associations in the insular cortex of the behaving rat, at least 3 mo after encoding. The effect of ZIP is not replicated by a general serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor that is…

  2. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1a-1a)

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Christopher D.; Zhong, Guo; Smeltz, Marci; James, Margaret O. McKenna, Robert

    2014-01-21

    Crystals of glutathione transferase zeta 1 were grown and shown to diffract X-rays to 3.1 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.0, b = 49.6, c = 54.6 Å, α = 82.9, β = 69.9, γ = 73.4°.

  3. On small values of the Riemann zeta-function at Gram points

    SciTech Connect

    Korolev, M A

    2014-01-31

    In this paper, we prove the existence of a large set of Gram points t{sub n} such that the values ζ(0.5+it{sub n}) are 'anomalously' close to zero. A lower bound for the negative 'discrete' moment of the Riemann zeta-function on the critical line is also given. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  4. High-concentration zeta potential measurements using light-scattering techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kaszuba, Michael; Corbett, Jason; Watson, Fraser Mcneil; Jones, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Zeta potential is the key parameter that controls electrostatic interactions in particle dispersions. Laser Doppler electrophoresis is an accepted method for the measurement of particle electrophoretic mobility and hence zeta potential of dispersions of colloidal size materials. Traditionally, samples measured by this technique have to be optically transparent. Therefore, depending upon the size and optical properties of the particles, many samples will be too concentrated and will require dilution. The ability to measure samples at or close to their neat concentration would be desirable as it would minimize any changes in the zeta potential of the sample owing to dilution. However, the ability to measure turbid samples using light-scattering techniques presents a number of challenges. This paper discusses electrophoretic mobility measurements made on turbid samples at high concentration using a novel cell with reduced path length. Results are presented on two different sample types, titanium dioxide and a polyurethane dispersion, as a function of sample concentration. For both of the sample types studied, the electrophoretic mobility results show a gradual decrease as the sample concentration increases and the possible reasons for these observations are discussed. Further, a comparison of the data against theoretical models is presented and discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are made from the zeta potential values obtained at high concentrations. PMID:20732896

  5. Boundary Conditions for the Maintenance of Memory by PKM[zeta] in Neocortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shema, Reul; Hazvi, Shoshi; Sacktor, Todd C.; Dudai, Yadin

    2009-01-01

    We report here that ZIP, a selective inhibitor of the atypical protein kinase C isoform PKM[zeta], abolishes very long-term conditioned taste aversion (CTA) associations in the insular cortex of the behaving rat, at least 3 mo after encoding. The effect of ZIP is not replicated by a general serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor that is…

  6. Synthesis, bioactivity and zeta potential investigations of chlorine and fluorine substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Fahami, Abbas; Beall, Gary W; Betancourt, Tania

    2016-02-01

    Chlorine and fluorine substituted hydroxyapatites (HA-Cl-F) with different degrees of ion replacement were successfully prepared by the one step mechanochemical activation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectra indicated that substitution of these anions in milled powders resulted in the formation of pure hydroxyapatite phase except for the small observed change in the lattice parameters and unit cell volumes of the resultant hydroxyapatite. Microscopic observations showed that the milled product had a cluster-like structure made up of polygonal and spherical particles with an average particle size of approximately ranged from 20±5 to 70±5nm. The zeta potential of milled samples was performed at three different pH (5, 7.4, and 9). The obtained zeta potential values were negative for all three pH values. Negative zeta potential was described to favor osseointegration, apatite nucleation, and bone regeneration. The bioactivity of samples was investigated on sintered pellets soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution and apatite crystals formed on the surface of the pellets after being incubated for 14days. Zeta potential analysis and bioactivity experiment suggested that HA-Cl-F will lead to the formation of new apatite particles and therefore be a potential implant material.

  7. Electroviscous effect on fluid drag in a microchannel with large zeta potential

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Dalei

    2015-01-01

    Summary The electroviscous effect has been widely studied to investigate the effect of surface charge-induced electric double layers (EDL) on the pressure-driven flow in a micro/nano channel. EDL has been reported to reduce the velocity of fluid flow and increase the fluid drag. Nevertheless, the study on the combined effect of EDL with large zeta potential up to several hundred millivolts and surface charge depenedent-slip on the micro/nano flow is still needed. In this paper, the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann equation for electrical potential and ion distribution in non-overlapping EDL is first analytically solved. Then, the modified Navier–Stokes equation for the flow considering the effect of surface charge on the electrical conductivity of the electrolyte and slip length is analytically solved. This analysis is used to study the effect of non-overlapping EDL with large zeta potential on the pressure-driven flow in a microchannel with no-slip and charge-dependent slip conditions. The results show that the EDL leads to an increase in the fluid drag, but that slip can reduce the fluid drag. When the zeta potential is large enough, the electroviscous effect disappears for flow in the microchannel under a no-slip condition. However, the retardation of EDL on the flow and the enhancement of slip on the flow counteract each other under a slip condition. The underlying mechanisms of the effect of EDL with large zeta potential on fluid drag are the high net ionic concentration near the channel wall and the fast decay of electrical potential in the EDL when the zeta potential is large enough. PMID:26734512

  8. Electroviscous effect on fluid drag in a microchannel with large zeta potential.

    PubMed

    Jing, Dalei; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    The electroviscous effect has been widely studied to investigate the effect of surface charge-induced electric double layers (EDL) on the pressure-driven flow in a micro/nano channel. EDL has been reported to reduce the velocity of fluid flow and increase the fluid drag. Nevertheless, the study on the combined effect of EDL with large zeta potential up to several hundred millivolts and surface charge depenedent-slip on the micro/nano flow is still needed. In this paper, the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for electrical potential and ion distribution in non-overlapping EDL is first analytically solved. Then, the modified Navier-Stokes equation for the flow considering the effect of surface charge on the electrical conductivity of the electrolyte and slip length is analytically solved. This analysis is used to study the effect of non-overlapping EDL with large zeta potential on the pressure-driven flow in a microchannel with no-slip and charge-dependent slip conditions. The results show that the EDL leads to an increase in the fluid drag, but that slip can reduce the fluid drag. When the zeta potential is large enough, the electroviscous effect disappears for flow in the microchannel under a no-slip condition. However, the retardation of EDL on the flow and the enhancement of slip on the flow counteract each other under a slip condition. The underlying mechanisms of the effect of EDL with large zeta potential on fluid drag are the high net ionic concentration near the channel wall and the fast decay of electrical potential in the EDL when the zeta potential is large enough.

  9. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} regulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of PKC{zeta}

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis Fricke, Alex; Fender, Anne; McClelland, Lindy; Jacobs, Stacey

    2007-11-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid signaling intermediates released by keratinocytes in response to ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) in the skin. The main prostaglandin released following UVR is PGE{sub 2}, a ligand for 4 related G-protein-coupled receptors (EP{sub 1}, EP{sub 2}, EP{sub 3} and EP{sub 4}). Our previous work established that PGE{sub 2} stimulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors. The purpose of the present report is to define the signaling intermediates involved in EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in human melanocytes. We recently showed that activation of the atypical PKC{zeta} isoform stimulates melanocyte dendricity in response to treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine. We therefore examined the potential contribution of PKC{zeta} activation on EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in melanocytes. Stimulation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors by selective agonists activated PKC{zeta}, and inhibition of PKC{zeta} activation abrogated EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-receptor-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Because of the importance of Rho-GTP binding proteins in the regulation of melanocyte dendricity, we also examined the effect of EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptor activation on Rac and Rho activity. Neither Rac nor Rho was activated upon treatment with EP{sub 1,3}-receptor agonists. We show that melanocytes express only the EP{sub 3A1} isoform, but not the EP{sub 3B} receptor isoform, previously associated with Rho activation, consistent with a lack of Rho stimulation by EP{sub 3} agonists. Our data suggest that PKC{zeta} activation plays a predominant role in regulation of PGE{sub 2}-dependent melanocyte dendricity.

  10. Characterization of mineralogy and surface zeta potential of atmospheric dust fall in northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Fa-Qin; Chen, Wu; Dai, Qun-Wei; Deng, Yue-Quan; He, Ping; He, Xiao-Chun; Tang, Jun; Liu, Li-Zhu; He, Hua

    2015-06-01

    The mineralogy characterization of dust fall in atmosphere is important in understanding and improving air quality. In this paper, dust fall samples were collected in the suburb of four areas of northwest China during April to May 2012. The size distribution, mineral phase and composition, morphology, and surface charge of dust fall were investigated, respectively, by particle size analyzer, X-ray powder diffraction spectrometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and zeta potential analyzer. The average volume size of dust fall was from 59.17 to 62.88 μm, and the dust fall in Tuoketuo County of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region had the finest particles (59.17 μm), while the number percentage of fine particulate matter (<1.0 μm) in dusts was about 88.36 % of total particles. The main minerals of dust fall samples are composed of quartz, calcilte, muscotive, albite, clinochlore, and gypsum. And four dust fall samples had the same main mineral phase. Minerals of surface soil were identified as an important source of atmospheric dust fall. The morphological of the atmospheric dust fall presented irregular square, sphere, agglomerate elongated particles, and granular aggregates. Zeta potentials of four dust fall samples were negative in tested pH range. Moreover, their zeta potentials decreased with increasing pH of the solution. The surface charge of dust fall was strongly affected by the quantity of carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) in samples. The simulated zeta potential result of multimineral dusts indicated that the magnitude and tendencies of dust's zeta potential were dominated by the main mineral phase in dust fall.

  11. Line identifications in the ultraviolet spectra of Tau Herculis, B5 IV, and Zeta Draconis, B6 III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.; Adelman, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tables of the lines found on two tracings each of the ultraviolet spectrum of Tau Her, B5 IV, and Zeta Dra, B6 III, made by the Copernicus satellite and possible identifications are given. The ranges 1025-1451A for Tau Her and 1035 to 1425A for Zeta Dra are covered by the U2 spectrometer at a resolution of 0.2A; the ranges 2028 to 2959A for Tau Her and 2000 to 3000A for Zeta Dra are covered by the V2 spectrometer at a resolution of 0.4A. The observed density of lines in the U2 region is 1.1 lines/A for Tau Her and 1.7 lines/A for Zeta Dra. In the V2 region it is 0.8 lines/A for Tau Her and 0.9 lines/A for Zeta Dra.

  12. Ice/Water Interface: Zeta Potential, Point of Zero Charge, and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Drzymala; Sadowski; Holysz; Chibowski

    1999-12-15

    The ice/water interface is a common and important part of many biological, environmental, and technological systems. In contrast to its importance, the system has not been extensively studied and is not well understood. Therefore, in this paper the properties of the H(2)O ice/water and D(2)O ice/water interfaces were investigated. Although the zeta potential vs pH data points were significantly scattered, it was determined that the isoelectric point (iep) of D(2)O ice particles in water at 3.5 degrees C containing 10(-3) M NaCl occurs at about pH 3.0. The negative values of the zeta potential, calculated from the electrophoretic mobility, seem to decrease with decreasing content of NaCl, while the iep shifts to a higher pH. The point of zero charge (pzc) of D(2)O ice and H(2)O ice, determined by changes in pH of 10(-4) M NaCl aqueous solution at 0.5 degrees C after the ice particle addition, was found to be very different from the iep and equal to pH 7.0 +/- 0.5. The shift of the iep with NaCl concentration and the difference in the positions of the iep and pzc on the pH scale point to complex specific adsorption of ions at the interface. Interestingly, similar values of iep and pzc were found for very different systems, such as hydrophilic ice and highly hydrophobic hexadecane droplets in water. A comparison of the zeta potential vs pH curves for hydrophilic ice and hydrophobic materials that do not possess dissociative functional groups at the interface (diamond, air bubbles, bacteria, and hexadecane) indicated that all of them have an iep near pH 3.5. These results indicate that the zeta potential and surface charge data alone cannot be used to delineate the electrochemical properties of a given water/moiety interface because similar electrical properties do not necessary mean a similar structure of the interfacial region. A good example is the aliphatic hydrocarbon/water interface in comparison to the ice/water interface. Although the experiments were carried

  13. Stimulation and inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis by organosolv lignins as determined by zeta potential and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Sun, Shaolong; Huang, Chen; Yong, Qiang; Elder, Thomas; Tu, Maobing

    2017-01-01

    Lignin typically inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass, but certain organosolv lignins or lignosulfonates enhance enzymatic hydrolysis. The hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between lignin and cellulases play critical roles in the enzymatic hydrolysis process. However, how to incorporate these two interactions into the consideration of lignin effects has not been investigated. We examined the physicochemical properties and the structures of ethanol organosolv lignins (EOL) from hardwood and softwood and ascertained the association between lignin properties and their inhibitory and stimulatory effects on enzymatic hydrolysis. The zeta potential and hydrophobicity of EOL lignin samples, isolated from organosolv pretreatment of cottonwood (CW), black willow (BW), aspen (AS), eucalyptus (EH), and loblolly pine (LP), were determined and correlated with their effects on enzymatic hydrolysis of Avicel. EOLs from CW, BW, and AS improved the 72 h hydrolysis yield by 8-12%, while EOLs from EH and LP decreased the 72 h hydrolysis yield by 6 and 16%, respectively. The results showed a strong correlation between the 72 h hydrolysis yield with hydrophobicity and zeta potential. The correlation indicated that the hydrophobicity of EOL had a negative effect and the negative zeta potential of EOL had a positive effect. HSQC NMR spectra showed that β-O-4 linkages in lignin react with ethanol to form an α-ethoxylated β-O-4' substructure (A') during organosolv pretreatment. Considerable amounts of C2,6-H2,6 correlation in p-hydroxybenzoate (PB) units were observed for EOL-CW, EOL-BW, and EOL-AS, but not for EOL-EH and EOL-LP. This study revealed that the effect of lignin on enzymatic hydrolysis is a function of both hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic repulsions. The lignin inhibition is controlled by lignin hydrophobicity and the lignin stimulation is governed by the negative zeta potential. The net effect of lignin depends on the combined

  14. Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars were discovered almost 40 years ago, and yet many of their most fundamental properties remain mysteries. There have been many attempts to measure the mass and radius of a neutron star and thereby constrain the equation of state of the dense nuclear matter at their cores. These have been complicated by unknown parameters such as the source distance and burning fractions. A clean, straightforward way to access the neutron star parameters is with high-resolution spectroscopy. I will present the results of searches for gravitationally red-shifted absorption lines from the neutron star atmosphere using XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  15. Do all barium stars have a white dwarf companion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, J. F.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer short-wavelength, low-dispersion spectra were analyzed for four barium, two mild barium, and one R-type carbon star in order to test the hypothesis that the barium and related giants are produced by mass transfer from a companion now present as a white dwarf. An earlier tentative identification of a white dwarf companion to the mild barium star Zeta Cyg is confirmed. For the other stars, no ultraviolet excess attributable to a white dwarf is seen. Limits are set on the bolometric magnitude and age of a possible white dwarf companion. Since the barium stars do not have obvious progenitors among main-sequence and subgiant stars, mass transfer must be presumed to occur when the mass-gaining star is already on the giant branch. This restriction, and the white dwarf's minimum age, which is greater than 8 x 10 to the 8th yr, determined for several stars, effectively eliminates the hypothesis that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star creates a barium star. Speculations are presented on alternative methods of producing a barium star in a binary system.

  16. Averages of ratios of the Riemann zeta-function and correlations of divisor sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrey, Brian; Keating, Jonathan P.

    2017-10-01

    Nonlinearity has published articles containing a significant number-theoretic component since the journal was first established. We examine one thread, concerning the statistics of the zeros of the Riemann zeta function. We extend this by establishing a connection between the ratios conjecture for the Riemann zeta-function and a conjecture concerning correlations of convolutions of Möbius and divisor functions. Specifically, we prove that the ratios conjecture and an arithmetic correlations conjecture imply the same result. This provides new support for the ratios conjecture, which previously had been motivated by analogy with formulae in random matrix theory and by a heuristic recipe. Our main theorem generalises a recent calculation pertaining to the special case of two-over-two ratios.

  17. Phase diagrams of colloidal spheres with a constant zeta-potential.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Boon, Niels; Kater, Maarten; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2011-02-21

    We study suspensions of colloidal spheres with a constant zeta-potential within Poisson-Boltzmann theory, quantifying the discharging of the spheres with increasing colloid density and decreasing salt concentration. We use the calculated renormalized charge of the colloids to determine their pairwise effective screened-Coulomb repulsions. Bulk phase diagrams in the colloid concentration-salt concentration representation follow, for various zeta-potentials, by a mapping onto published fits of phase boundaries of point-Yukawa systems. Although the resulting phase diagrams do feature face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic phases, they are dominated by the (re-entrant) fluid phase due to the colloidal discharging with increasing colloid concentration and decreasing salt concentration.

  18. Effect of additive on Zeta potential and particle size of nickel nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikash; Tarachand, Chotia, Chandrabhan; Okram, G. S.

    2017-05-01

    Nickel nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by thermal decomposition method using Oleylamine (OLY) as a solvent and Trioctylphosphine (TOP) as a surfactant. We have investigated the effect of pH and addition of Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the stability and particle size of Ni NPs using zeta potential and particle size analyser. Coating of the surfactants on the surface of Ni NPs was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Autotitration study of zeta potential of these NPs in ethanol by dynamic light scattering (DLS) at different pH values confirmed an isoelectric point (IEP) at pH = 3.64 in ethanol and pH = 3.04 after addition of EDTA in ethanol. It was observed that addition of EDTA in nanosuspension enhances stability of Ni-NPs significantly.

  19. Glycosaminoglycan-mediated selective changes in the aggregation states, zeta potentials, and intrinsic stability of liposomes.

    PubMed

    Nyren-Erickson, Erin K; Haldar, Manas K; Totzauer, Jessica R; Ceglowski, Riley; Patel, Dilipkumar S; Friesner, Daniel L; Srivastava, D K; Mallik, Sanku

    2012-11-20

    Though the aggregation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the presence of liposomes and divalent cations has been previously reported, the effects of different GAG species and minor changes in GAG composition on the aggregates that are formed are yet unknown. If minor changes in GAG composition produce observable changes in the liposome aggregate diameter or zeta potential, such a phenomenon may be used to detect potentially dangerous oversulfated contaminants in heparin. We studied the mechanism of the interactions between heparin and its oversulfated glycosaminoglycan contaminants with liposomes. Herein, we demonstrate that Mg(2+) acts to shield the incoming glycosaminoglycans from the negatively charged phosphate groups of the phospholipids and that changes in the aggregate diameter and zeta potential are a function of the glycosaminoglycan species and concentration as well as the liposome bilayer composition. These observations are supported by TEM studies. We have shown that the organizational states of the liposome bilayers are influenced by the presence of GAG and excess Mg(2+), resulting in a stabilizing effect that increases the T(m) value of DSPC liposomes; the magnitude of this effect is also dependent on the GAG species and concentration present. There is an inverse relationship between the percent change in aggregate diameter and the percent change in aggregate zeta potential as a function of GAG concentration in solution. Finally, we demonstrate that the diameter and zeta potential changes in POPC liposome aggregates in the presence of different oversulfated heparin contaminants at low concentrations allow for an accurate detection of oversulfated chondroitin sulfate at concentrations of as low as 1 mol %.

  20. Red blood cell membrane viscoelasticity, agglutination and zeta potential measurements with double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycolproteins embedded in, or attached, to a fluid lipid bilayer and are negatively charged, which creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. There are techniques, however, to decrease the zeta potential to allow cell agglutination which are the basis of most of the tests of antigen-antibody interactions in blood banks. This report shows the use of a double optical tweezers to measure RBC membrane viscosity, agglutination and zeta potential. In our technique one of the optical tweezers trap a silica bead that binds strongly to a RBC at the end of a RBCs rouleaux and, at the same time, acts as a pico-Newton force transducer, after calibration through its displacement from the equilibrium position. The other optical tweezers trap the RBC at the other end. To measure the membrane viscosity the optical force is measured as a function of the velocity between the RBCs. To measure the adhesion the tweezers are slowly displaced apart until the RBCs disagglutination happens. The RBC zeta potential is measured in two complimentary ways, by the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied electric field, and the conventional way, by the measurement of terminal velocity of the RBC after released from the optical trap. These two measurements provide information about the RBC charges and, also, electrolytic solution properties. We believe this can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  1. miR-451 protects against erythroid oxidant stress by repressing 14-3-3zeta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Duonan; dos Santos, Camila O; Zhao, Guowei; Jiang, Jing; Amigo, Julio D; Khandros, Eugene; Dore, Louis C; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Zhang, Zhe; Ghaffari, Saghi; Choi, John; Friend, Sherree; Tong, Wei; Orange, Jordan S; Paw, Barry H; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2010-08-01

    The bicistronic microRNA (miRNA) locus miR-144/451 is highly expressed during erythrocyte development, although its physiological roles are poorly understood. We show that miR-144/451 ablation in mice causes mild erythrocyte instability and increased susceptibility to damage after exposure to oxidant drugs. This phenotype is deeply conserved, as miR-451 depletion synergizes with oxidant stress to cause profound anemia in zebrafish embryos. At least some protective activities of miR-451 stem from its ability to directly suppress production of 14-3-3zeta, a phospho-serine/threonine-binding protein that inhibits nuclear accumulation of transcription factor FoxO3, a positive regulator of erythroid anti-oxidant genes. Thus, in miR-144/451(-/-) erythroblasts, 14-3-3zeta accumulates, causing partial relocalization of FoxO3 from nucleus to cytoplasm with dampening of its transcriptional program, including anti-oxidant-encoding genes Cat and Gpx1. Supporting this mechanism, overexpression of 14-3-3zeta in erythroid cells and fibroblasts inhibits nuclear localization and activity of FoxO3. Moreover, shRNA suppression of 14-3-3zeta protects miR-144/451(-/-) erythrocytes against peroxide-induced destruction, and restores catalase activity. Our findings define a novel miRNA-regulated pathway that protects erythrocytes against oxidant stress, and, more generally, illustrate how a miRNA can influence gene expression by altering the activity of a key transcription factor.

  2. CD3 zeta dependence of the CD2 pathway of activation in T lymphocytes and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, P; Lucich, J L; McConkey, D J; Letourneur, F; Malissen, B; Kochan, J; Chang, H C; Rodewald, H R; Reinherz, E L

    1992-02-15

    In T lymphocytes, signal transduction through the CD2 adhesion molecule requires surface expression of the CD3-Ti T-cell receptor (TCR) complex. In contrast, in natural killer (NK) cells, CD2 functions in the absence of a TCR. Because the TCR on T lymphocytes and the CD16 low-affinity IgG Fc receptor (Fc gamma receptor type III) complex on NK cells share a common CD3 zeta subunit, we reasoned that CD3 zeta may be critical for CD2 signaling in T lymphocytes and NK cells. Here we show that transfection of a cDNA encoding a transmembrane form of CD16 into TCR- variants of the Jurkat T-cell line results in CD16 expression in association with endogenous CD3 zeta homodimers and restores CD2 signaling function. To test directly the role of CD3 zeta in CD2 triggering, we then transfected human CD2 into each of two murine T-T hybridomas that express TCRs containing either a full-length CD3 zeta subunit or a truncated CD3 zeta subunit incapable of transducing signals. Despite expression of equivalent surface levels of TCR, CD2-mediated signaling is seen only in the T cells containing wild-type CD3 zeta. These findings show that (i) CD16 on NK cells is functionally equivalent to the TCR on T lymphocytes for coupling CD2 to signaling pathways and (ii) CD2 signal transduction depends upon the CD3 zeta subunit of the TCR complex and, by inference, the CD3 zeta subunit of the CD16 complex.

  3. The effect of brine pH, concentration and temperature on zeta potential measured in natural sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M.; Vinogradov, J.

    2015-12-01

    The zeta potential is a measure of the electrical potential of the mineral surfaces in water-saturated rocks. In many subsurface settings the rocks are at elevated temperature, yet the temperature dependence of the zeta potential remains poorly understood. There are few previous experimental studies and these report inconsistent and contradictory behaviour; some studies have found that the zeta potential increases in magnitude with increasing temperature while others have found that it decreases in magnitude. Moreover, few studies have investigated salt concentrations relevant to natural systems; most used de-ionised water or NaCl/KCl electrolytes at low ionic strength (10-3M). Natural groundwater is typically more saline than this. We report measurements of the zeta potential of natural sandstones saturated with NaCl brines of varying ionic strength at temperatures up to 150°C. We find that the zeta potential is always negative, but decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at in 0.01M NaCl brine (comparable to potable water) and is independent of temperature in 0.5M brine (comparable to seawater). In unbuffered experiments, the pH also decreases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength, but remains constant at higher ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential can be explained by the temperature dependence of the pH. Our findings are consistent with published models of the zeta potential, so long as the temperature dependence of the pH at low ionic strength is accounted for. Moreover, they explain the hitherto contradictory results reported in previous studies that used low ionic strength electrolytes. In unbuffered experiments, the pH decreases with increasing temperature and the zeta potential decreases in magnitude. In experiments with fixed pH, the zeta potential increases in magnitude with increasing temperature. The results have broad application to deep sandstone reservoirs and hydrothermal fields.

  4. Nucleolin is a protein kinase C-zeta substrate. Connection between cell surface signaling and nucleus in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G; Seibenhener, M L; Wooten, M W

    1997-12-05

    We have previously shown that protein kinase C (PKC)-zeta is activated and required for nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells (Wooten, M. W., Zhou, G., Seibenhener, M. L., and Coleman, E. S. (1994) Cell Growth & Diff. 5, 395-403; Coleman, E. S., and Wooten, M. W. (1994) J. Mol. Neurosci. 5, 39-57). Here we report the characterization and identification of a 106-kDa nuclear protein as a specific substrate of PKC-zeta. NGF treatment of PC12 cells resulted in translocation of PKC-zeta and coincident phosphorylation of a protein that was localized within the nucleoplasm of nuclei isolated from PC12 cells. Addition of PKC-zeta pseudosubstrate peptide in vitro or myristoylated peptide in vivo diminished phosphorylation of pp106 in a dose-dependent fashion. Likewise, addition of purified PKC-zeta, but neither PKC-alpha nor delta, to nuclear extracts resulted in an incremental increase in the phosphorylation of pp106. Expression of dominant-negative PKC-zeta inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of pp106, by comparison overexpression of PKC-zeta enhanced basal phosphorylation without a noticeable effect upon NGF-induced effects. Amino acid sequence analysis of four peptides derived from purified pp106 revealed that this protein was homologous to nucleolin. Using an in vitro reconstitution system, purified nucleolin was likewise shown to be phosphorylated by purified PKC-zeta. The staining intensity of both enzyme and substrate in the nucleus increased upon treatment with NGF. In vivo labeling with 32Pi and stimulation of PC12 cells with NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-nucleolin antibody corroborated the in vitro approach documenting enhanced phosphorylation of nucleolin by NGF treatment. Taken together, the findings presented herein document that nucleolin is a target of PKC-zeta that serves to relay NGF signals from cell surface to nucleus in PC12 cells.

  5. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  6. Radio stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjellming, Robert M.

    The state of knowledge on continuum radio emission from the stars is considered. Fundamental radio emission process and stellar radiative transfer are reviewed, and solar radio emission is examined. Flare stars and active binaries are addressed, and stellar winds and cataclysmic variables are considered. Radio-emitting X-ray binaries are discussed.

  7. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  8. Zeta potential of microbubbles in aqueous solutions: electrical properties of the gas-water interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayoshi

    2005-11-24

    Microbubbles are very fine bubbles and appropriate for the investigation of the gas-water interface electrical charge, because of their long stagnation, due to slow buoyancy, in the electrophoresis cell observation area. This study investigated the zeta potential of microbubbles in aqueous solutions and revealed that the bubbles were negatively charged under a wide range of pH conditions. The potential was positive under strong acidic conditions, and the inorganic electrolytes decrease the potential by increasing the amount of counterions within the slipping plane. OH(-) and H(+) are crucial factors for the charging mechanism of the gas-water interface, while other anions and cations have secondary effects on the zeta potential, because counterions are attracted by the interface charge. The addition of a small amount of propanol and butanol provided significant information for considering the mechanism of the gas-water interface charge. Even though these alcohols did not have any electrical charge, they had a strong effect on the gas-water interface charge and dispersed the zeta potential of the microbubbles in the aqueous solution. These alcohols tended to adsorb to the interface and affect the hydrogen-bonding network at the interface, so that it was concluded that the gas-water interface electrical charge must be related to the difference of the construction of the hydrogen-bonding network between the bulk water and the gas-water interface.

  9. Electrokinetic mixing at high zeta potentials: ionic size effects on cross stream diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian Yazdi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Arman; Saidi, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-03-15

    The electrokinetic phenomena at high zeta potentials may show several unique features which are not normally observed. One of these features is the ionic size (steric) effect associated with the solutions of high ionic concentration. In the present work, attention is given to the influences of finite ionic size on the cross stream diffusion process in an electrokinetically actuated Y-shaped micromixer. The method consists of a finite difference based numerical approach for non-uniform grid which is applied to the dimensionless form of the governing equations, including the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The results reveal that, neglecting the ionic size at high zeta potentials gives rise to the overestimation of the mixing length, because the steric effects retard liquid flow, thereby enhancing the mixing efficiency. The importance of steric effects is found to be more intense for channels of smaller width to height ratio. It is also observed that, in sharp contrast to the conditions that the ions are treated as point charges, increasing the zeta potential improves the cross stream diffusion when incorporating the ionic size. Moreover, increasing the EDL thickness decreases the mixing length, whereas the opposite is true for the channel aspect ratio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of haemoglobin H inclusion bodies with embryonic zeta globin in screening for alpha thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Chan, L C; So, J C; Chui, D H

    1995-09-01

    To compare the haemoglobin (Hb) H inclusion test with immunocytochemical detection of embryonic zeta chains in screening for alpha thalassaemia. Blood samples from 115 patients with relevant clinical history and hypochromic microcytic indexes were screened using the HbH inclusion test and the Variant Hemoglobin Testing System (BioRad, Hercules, CA, USA). The HbH inclusion test was positive in 61 of 115 cases, three of whom had HbH disease confirmed by electrophoresis. The remaining 58 had alpha thalassaemia 1. All three HbH cases and 56 of 58 cases of alpha thalassaemia 1 expressed embryonic zeta chains, giving a specificity of 96.7%. Fifty four of 115 cases had a negative HbH inclusion test, of whom 50 had beta thalassaemia trait and three had iron deficiency. No diagnosis was reached for the remaining patient. The immunocytochemical test is as sensitive as the HbH inclusion test in screening for alpha thalassaemia. The presence of zeta chains is highly specific for alpha thalassaemia 1 incorporating the (--/SEA) deletion. The specificity and simplicity of the immunocytochemical test make it the test of choice in screening for alpha thalassaemia.

  11. Comparison of haemoglobin H inclusion bodies with embryonic zeta globin in screening for alpha thalassaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, L C; So, J C; Chui, D H

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the haemoglobin (Hb) H inclusion test with immunocytochemical detection of embryonic zeta chains in screening for alpha thalassaemia. METHODS--Blood samples from 115 patients with relevant clinical history and hypochromic microcytic indexes were screened using the HbH inclusion test and the Variant Hemoglobin Testing System (BioRad, Hercules, CA, USA). RESULTS--The HbH inclusion test was positive in 61 of 115 cases, three of whom had HbH disease confirmed by electrophoresis. The remaining 58 had alpha thalassaemia 1. All three HbH cases and 56 of 58 cases of alpha thalassaemia 1 expressed embryonic zeta chains, giving a specificity of 96.7%. Fifty four of 115 cases had a negative HbH inclusion test, of whom 50 had beta thalassaemia trait and three had iron deficiency. No diagnosis was reached for the remaining patient. CONCLUSION--The immunocytochemical test is as sensitive as the HbH inclusion test in screening for alpha thalassaemia. The presence of zeta chains is highly specific for alpha thalassaemia 1 incorporating the (--/SEA) deletion. The specificity and simplicity of the immunocytochemical test make it the test of choice in screening for alpha thalassaemia. Images PMID:7490322

  12. Coagulation-flocculation mechanisms in wastewater treatment plants through zeta potential measurements.

    PubMed

    López-Maldonado, E A; Oropeza-Guzman, M T; Jurado-Baizaval, J L; Ochoa-Terán, A

    2014-08-30

    Based on the polyelectrolyte-contaminant physical and chemical interactions at the molecular level, this article analyzed and discussed the coagulation-flocculation and chemical precipitation processes in order to improve their efficiency. Bench experiments indicate that water pH, polyelectrolyte (PE) dosing strategy and cationic polyelectrolyte addition are key parameters for the stability of metal-PE complexes. The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed based on zeta potential (ζ) measurement as the criteria to define the electrostatic interaction between pollutants and coagulant-flocculant agents. Polyelectrolyte and wastewater dispersions are exposed to an electrophoretic effect to determine ζ. Finally, zeta potential values are compared at pH 9, suggesting the optimum coagulant dose at 162mg/L polydadmac and 67mg/L of flocculant, since a complete removal of TSS and turbidity is achieved. Based on the concentration of heavy metals (0.931mg/L Sn, 0.7mg/L Fe and 0.63mg/L Pb), treated water met the Mexican maximum permissible limits. In addition, the treated water has 45mg O2/L chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 45mg C/L total organic carbon (TOC). The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed taking into account both: zeta potential (ζ)-pH measurement and chemical affinity, as the criteria to define the electrostatic and chemical interaction between pollutants and polyelectrolytes.

  13. Entrapment of ovalbumin into liposomes--factors affecting entrapment efficiency, liposome size, and zeta potential.

    PubMed

    Brgles, Marija; Jurasin, Darija; Sikirić, Maja Dutour; Frkanec, Ruza; Tomasić, Jelka

    2008-01-01

    Various amounts of Ovalbumin (OVA) were encapsulated into positively and negatively charged multilamellar liposomes, with the aim to investigate the entrapment efficiency in different buffers and to study their effects on the liposome size and zeta potential. Results showed that the entrapment efficiency of OVA in anionic liposomes was the same in 10 mM Phosphate Buffer (PB) as in Phosphate-Buffered Saline (PBS; PB + 0.15 M NaCl). Also, liposome size was approximately 1200 nm for all anionic liposomes incorporating OVA. The entrapment efficiency of OVA in cationic liposomes was highly dependent on ionic strength. The size of cationic liposomes was approximately 1200 nm in PBS, regardless of protein content, but increased with the amount of the incorporated protein in PB. Aggregation of cationic liposomes in PB was observed when the mass of the protein was 2.5 mg or greater. The zeta potential of anionic liposomes was negative and of cationic liposomes positive in the whole range of protein mass tested. These results show how different compositions of lipid and aqueous phases can be used to vary the entrapment efficiency, liposome size, and zeta potential--the factors that are of great importance for the use of liposomes as drug carriers.

  14. Zeta-crystallin, a novel lens protein from the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q L; Russell, P; Stone, S H; Zigler, J S

    1987-05-01

    Lens proteins from the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) were found to be similar to those of other mammals with the exception of the presence of a previously undescribed constituent comprising about 10% of the total soluble lens proteins. This oligomeric protein is composed of polypeptides with apparent molecular weight of 38,000 and elutes from gel exclusion chromatography columns in the beta H-crystallin fraction. Following purification by ion exchange chromatography an antibody was raised against the protein. Using that antibody and antibodies specific for other crystallins we could detect no cross-reactivity between the guinea pig protein and any other reported lens crystallin. This protein, which we have named zeta (zeta)-crystallin, is the first reported mammalian lens crystallin which is not part of the alpha- or beta-gamma families of crystallins. Unlike all other known mammalian crystallins, which have little or no alpha-helical structure, zeta-crystallin is estimated to be approximately 30-40% alpha-helix.

  15. Spectral zeta function and non-perturbative effects in ABJM Fermi-gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki

    2015-11-01

    The exact partition function in ABJM theory on three-sphere can be regarded as a canonical partition function of a non-interacting Fermi-gas with an unconventional Hamiltonian. All the information on the partition function is encoded in the discrete spectrum of this Hamiltonian. We explain how (quantum mechanical) non-perturbative corrections in the Fermi-gas system appear from a spectral consideration. Basic tools in our analysis are a Mellin-Barnes type integral representation and a spectral zeta function. From a consistency with known results, we conjecture that the spectral zeta function in the ABJM Fermi-gas has an infinite number of "non-perturbative" poles, which are invisible in the semi-classical expansion of the Planck constant. We observe that these poles indeed appear after summing up perturbative corrections. As a consequence, the perturbative resummation of the spectral zeta function causes non-perturbative corrections to the grand canonical partition function. We also present another example associated with a spectral problem in topological string theory. A conjectured non-perturbative free energy on the resolved conifold is successfully reproduced in this framework.

  16. Hydrophobicity, surface tension, and zeta potential measurements of glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M A; Monteiro, F J; Santos, J D; Serro, A P; Saramago, B

    1999-06-15

    Wettability and zeta potential studies were performed to characterize the hydrophobicity, surface tension, and surface charge of P2O5-glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites. Quantitative phase analysis was performed by the Rietveld method using GSAS software applied to X-ray diffractograms. Surface charge was assessed by zeta potential measurements. Protein adsorption studies were performed using vitronectin. Contact angles and surface tensions variation with time were determined by the sessile and pendent drop techniques, respectively, using ADSA-P software. The highest (-18.1 mV) and lowest (-28.7 mV) values of zeta potential were found for hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), respectively, with composite materials presenting values in between. All studied bioceramic materials showed similar solid surface tension. For HA and beta-TCP, solid surface tensions of 46.7 and 45.3 mJ/m2, respectively, were obtained, while composites presented intermediate surface tension values. The dispersive component of surface tension was the predominant one for all materials studied. Adhesion work values between the vitronectin solution and HA and beta-TCP were found to be 79.8 and 88.0 mJ/m2, respectively, while the 4.0 wt % glass composites showed slightly lower values than the 2.5 wt % ones. The presence of beta-TCP influenced surface charge, hydrophobicity, and protein adsorption of the glass-reinforced HA composites, and therefore indirectly affected cell-biomaterial interactions.

  17. Biosimilar epoetin zeta: extrapolation of indications and real world utilization experience.

    PubMed

    Dingermann, Theodor; Scotte, Florian

    2016-07-01

    There is an essential need for clinicians to understand the development and approval process of biosimilars. Extrapolation of efficacy and safety data from one indication to another may be considered by a comprehensive comparability program including safety, efficacy and immunogenicity, which detect potentially clinically relevant differences. This article specifically discusses the approval of epoetin zeta (Retacrit™, Hospira, a Pfizer company) and the EMA reasoning for extrapolation of indications. Additionally, the results of the ongoing utilization surveillance program that was approved in 2007 and has analyzed over 120 million patient days of epoetin zeta treatment are presented. At the time of approval, uncertainty of safety and efficacy is much less for biosimilars than for new innovative products. Approval of indications based on extrapolation of data is based on sound and objective scientific criteria and a logical consequence of the biosimilar concept that has been successfully implemented in the European Union. Biosimilar epoetin has been used extensively in patients in Europe for nine years. Following a review of the known risks and ADR information received in almost 120 million patient-days' worth of experience, the risks associated with treatment with epoetin zeta remain similar to those of the reference product.

  18. Three proposed B-associations in the vicinity of zeta puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, E. K. L.

    1971-01-01

    There appear to be three loose B associations in the general vicinity of zeta Puppis, all at distances of approximately 300 to 400 parsecs from the sun. Their diameters, perpendicular to the line of sight, are 20 to 50 parsecs, and their separations are of similar size. All three are situated in bright areas of the Gum nebula. The proposed associations A and C lie in the two brightest parts of the nebula. The three associations are not all of the same age. Association C is about 50 million years old, whereas A and B are decidedly younger. The ages of A and B cannot be determined from the present data, as their color-magnitude diagrams show no clear turnoff from the main sequence. Association A may be young enough to qualify as the birthplace of zeta Puppis. There is no other identifiable association in which zeta Puppis can have originated, unless its age is substantially greater than the 3 million years assumed.

  19. A perturbative approach to the spectral zeta functions of strings, drums, and quantum billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo

    2012-12-15

    We show that the spectral zeta functions of inhomogeneous strings and drums can be calculated using Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory. The inhomogeneities that can be treated with this method are small but otherwise arbitrary and include the previously studied case of a piecewise constant density. In two dimensions the method can be used to derive the spectral zeta function of a domain obtained from the small deformation of a square. We also obtain exact sum rules that are valid for arbitrary densities and that correspond to the values taken by the spectral zeta function at integer positive values; we have tested numerically these sum rules in specific examples. We show that the Dirichlet or Neumann Casimir energies of an inhomogeneous string, evaluated to first order in perturbation theory, contain in some cases an irremovable divergence, but that the combination of the two is always free of divergences. Finally, our calculation of the Casimir energies of a string with piecewise constant density and of two perfectly conducting concentric cylinders, of similar radius, reproduce the results previously published.

  20. Water wettability and zeta-potential of polystyrene surface modified by Ne or Na implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Aiko; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Iwaki, Masaya

    1998-01-15

    A study has been made of the modification of the wettability and the surface potential of polystyrene by ion bombardment and implantation. Substrates used were polystyrene (PS) dishes. Ne bombardment and Na ion implantation were performed at energies of 50 and 150 keV with fluences between 1 {times} 10{sup 14} to 1 {times} 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface potential was examined by measurements of {zeta}-potential and the wettability was examined by the contact angle of water. The contact angle of water and the {zeta}-potential are found to change, depending on ion species and fluences. Two kinds of relationships between the contact angle of water and the {zeta}-potential are found, classified by region A and region B. From XPS results, region A means that PS surfaces modified by radiation effects of Ne-bombardment or Na-implantation have new functional groups and amorphous carbon. In region B, Na implanted PS surfaces with a high fluence show not only new functional groups and amorphous carbon but also Na atoms with chemical bonding states.

  1. Relation between primes and nontrivial zeros in the Riemann hypothesis; Legendre polynomials, modified zeta function and Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seongsoo; Chung, J. W.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2012-12-01

    We study the dependence between prime numbers and the real and imaginary parts of the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function. The Legendre polynomials and the partial derivatives of the Riemann zeta function are used to investigate the above dependence along with the Riemann hypothesis with physical interpretations. A modified zeta function with finite terms is defined as a new implement for the study of the zeta function and its zeros.

  2. NuSTAR Observations of WISE J1036+0449, A Galaxy at zeta approx 1 Obscured by Hot Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, C.; Assef, R. J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Nikutta, R.; Alexander, D. M.; Asmus, D.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Blain, A.W.; Zhang, William W.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (hot DOGs), selected from Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer's all-sky infrared survey, host some of the most powerful active galactic nuclei known and may represent an important stage in the evolution of galaxies. Most known hot DOGs are located at z > 1.5, due in part to a strong bias against identifying them at lower redshift related to the selection criteria. We present a new selection method that identifies 153 hot DOG candidates at z approx. 1, where they are significantly brighter and easier to study. We validate this approach by measuring a redshift z = 1.009 and finding a spectral energy distribution similar to that of higher-redshift hot DOGs for one of these objects, WISE J1036+0449 (L(sub BOL) approx. = 8 x 10(exp 46) erg/s). We find evidence of a broadened component in Mg II, which would imply a black hole mass of M(BH) approx. = 2 x 10(exp 8) Stellar Mass and an Eddington ratio of lambda(sub Edd) approx. = 2.7. WISE J1036+0449 is the first hot DOG detected by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, and observations show that the source is heavily obscured, with a column density of N(sub H) approx. = (2-15) x 10(exp 23)/sq cm. The source has an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of approx. 6 x 10(exp 44) erg/s, a value significantly lower than that expected from the mid-infrared X-ray correlation. We also find that other hot DOGs observed by X-ray facilities show a similar deficiency of X-ray flux. We discuss the origin of the X-ray weakness and the absorption properties of hot DOGs. Hot DOGs at z < or approx. 1 could be excellent laboratories to probe the characteristics of the accretion flow and of the X-ray emitting plasma at extreme values of the Eddington ratio.

  3. CD3zeta down-modulation may explain Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocyte anergy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Tempestilli, Massimo; Turchi, Federica; Agrati, Chiara; Casetti, Rita; Cimini, Eleonora; Gioia, Cristiana; Martini, Federico

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to explain the observed anergy of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. CD3zeta expression and interferon (IFN)-gamma production by Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects were analyzed. We demonstrated that Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from HIV-infected patients expressed a lower level of CD3zeta than did Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from healthy donors. A direct correlation was found between CD3zeta expression and IFN-gamma production capability by Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells. However, activation of protein kinase C by phorbol myristate acetate is able to restore CD3zeta expression and IFN-gamma production. Our findings may contribute to clarification of the molecular mechanisms of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell anergy found in HIV-positive patients.

  4. First ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of Be stars from the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, K. S.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Code, A. D.; Anderson, C. M.; Babler, B. L.; Clayton, G. C.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Meade, M. R.; Nook, M. A.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The first UV spectropolarimetric observations of Be stars are presented. They were obtained with the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) aboard the Astro-1 mission. WUPPE data on the Be stars Zeta Tau and Pi Aqr, along with near-simultaneous optical data obtained at the Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO). Combined WUPPE and PBO data give polarization as a function of wavelength across a very broad spectral region, from 1400 to 7600 A. Existing Be star models predicted increasing polarization toward shorter wavelengths in the UV, but this is not supported by the WUPPE observations. Instead, the observations show a constant or slightly declining continuum polarization shortward of the Balmer jump, and broad UV polarization dips around 1700 and 1900 A, which may be a result of Fe-line-attenuation effects on the polarized flux. Supporting evidence for this conclusion comes from the optical data, in which decreases in polarization across Fe II lines in Zeta Tau were discovered.

  5. First ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of Be stars from the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, K. S.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Code, A. D.; Anderson, C. M.; Babler, B. L.; Clayton, G. C.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Meade, M. R.; Nook, M. A.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The first UV spectropolarimetric observations of Be stars are presented. They were obtained with the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) aboard the Astro-1 mission. WUPPE data on the Be stars Zeta Tau and Pi Aqr, along with near-simultaneous optical data obtained at the Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO). Combined WUPPE and PBO data give polarization as a function of wavelength across a very broad spectral region, from 1400 to 7600 A. Existing Be star models predicted increasing polarization toward shorter wavelengths in the UV, but this is not supported by the WUPPE observations. Instead, the observations show a constant or slightly declining continuum polarization shortward of the Balmer jump, and broad UV polarization dips around 1700 and 1900 A, which may be a result of Fe-line-attenuation effects on the polarized flux. Supporting evidence for this conclusion comes from the optical data, in which decreases in polarization across Fe II lines in Zeta Tau were discovered.

  6. Gene-specific requirement of a nuclear protein, IkappaB-zeta, for promoter association of inflammatory transcription regulators.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Soh; Matsuo, Susumu; Muta, Tatsushi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akira, Shizuo; Takeshige, Koichiro

    2008-11-21

    Expression of many inflammatory genes is induced through activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. In contrast to the advanced understanding of cytoplasmic control of NF-kappaB activation, its regulation in the nucleus has not been fully understood despite its importance in selective gene expression. We previously identified an inducible nuclear protein, IkappaB-zeta, and demonstrated that this molecule is indispensable for the expression of a group of NF-kappaB-regulated genes. In this study, we established a unique gene induction system, in which IkappaB-zeta is expressed independently of inflammatory stimuli, to specifically investigate the molecular basis underlying IkappaB-zeta-mediated gene activation. We show that in the presence of IkappaB-zeta other primary response genes are dispensable for the expression of the target secondary response genes. ChIP analyses revealed that IkappaB-zeta is required for stimulus-induced recruitment of NF-kappaB onto the target promoter in a gene-specific manner. Surprisingly, IkappaB-zeta is also necessary for the gene-selective promoter recruitment of another inflammatory transcription factor, C/EBPbeta, and the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1. We propose a new gene regulatory mechanism underlying the selective expression of inflammatory genes.

  7. Multichannel Optical Aperture Synthesis Imaging of zeta1 URSAE Majoris with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    Optical Interferometer (NPOI) to obtain the first multichannel optical aperture synthesis images of a star . We observed the spectroscopic binary ~1...interferom- etry had the potential of measuring the exceedingly small angular diameters of stars (Michelson & Pease 1921). Mich- elson also realized that...could be used to image stellar surfaces. The use of interfer- ometry to measure orbits of binary stars also began early in this century (Anderson

  8. Targeted disruption within the CD3 zeta/eta/phi/Oct-1 locus in mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Koyasu, S; Hussey, R E; Clayton, L K; Lerner, A; Pedersen, R; Delany-Heiken, P; Chau, F; Reinherz, E L

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the role of the CD3 eta subunit of the T cell receptor (TCR) in thymic development, a CD3 eta -/- mouse was generated by gene targeting. Insertion of a neomycin resistance gene into exon 9 of the CD3 zeta/eta/phi locus disrupted expression of CD3 eta and CD3 phi without affecting the expression of CD3 zeta. Little difference was observed between wild type and CD3 eta -/- mice with regard to cellularity or subset composition in thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs. Furthermore, neither alloproliferative responses nor cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation and effector function was affected by the mutation. The effect of the CD3 eta -/- mutation on thymic selection was examined by crossing the CD3 eta knockout animals with anti-HY TCR transgenic animals: the absence of the CD3 eta subunit altered neither positive nor negative selection. Thus, CD3 eta is not required for thymic selection. Of note, the birth rate of the CD3 eta -/- animals was significantly lower than that of wild type or heterozygous animals (P = 0.041-0.002). This unexpected result is probably the consequence of an alteration in mRNA expression of the Oct-1 nuclear transcription factor in CD3 eta -/- animals. The CD3 zeta/eta/phi locus partially overlaps the gene encoding Oct-1 whose transcription is dysregulated by the CD3 eta -/- mutation. Our results clearly underscore the value of characterizing all products of a genetic locus disrupted by gene targeting. Images PMID:8112294

  9. Silver ion impregnated composite biomaterial optimally prepared using zeta potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, N; Socrates, R; Shanthini, G M; Rajaram, A; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2015-02-01

    Biodegradable, antimicrobial composite of various silver ion concentrations was synthesized using zeta potential and isoelectric point measurements, for a controlled release of silver ions, and in addition to assess the effect of protein adsorption with the increase of the silver ion concentration. The interaction between hydroxyapatite (HAp) and silver incorporated hydroxyapatite (AgHAp) with gelatin was increased by optimally adjusting the zeta potential and isoelectric point of the ceramic (HAp and AgHAp), and bio-polymer individually. The electrostatic interactions between the ceramic and biopolymer were confirmed, through shifts in N-H stretching, decrease in the swelling ratio, and increase in the degradation temperature observed by the derivative thermo-gravimetric analysis (DTG). These results substantiate that, the zeta potential is a novel tool to increase the ceramic-biopolymer interaction. Increasing electrostatic interaction between the biopolymer and ceramic, decreases the release of silver ions in the simulated body fluid, due to the controlled degradation of the biopolymer. The isoelectric point decreases with the increase of the silver ion concentration, which evidenced the change in the net surface charge. With the increase of the silver ion concentration, the protein adsorption decreases due to an increase in hydrophilic character of the composite. This study examines the minimum concentration of silver ion essential for maximum protein adsorption, antimicrobial and hemocompatibility. This study provides a novel route to control the release of silver ions by enhancing the ceramic-polymer interaction and estimate the silver ion concentration suitable for protein adsorption. The prepared composite is nontoxic, degradable, and antimicrobial, with the controlled release of silver ions in the simulated body fluid.

  10. Zeta-determinants of Sturm-Liouville operators with quadratic potentials at infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Luiz; Lesch, Matthias; Vertman, Boris

    2017-03-01

    We consider Sturm-Liouville operators on a half line [ a , ∞) , a > 0, with potentials that are growing at most quadratically at infinity. Such operators arise naturally in the analysis of hyperbolic manifolds, or more generally manifolds with cusps. We establish existence and a formula for the associated zeta-determinant in terms of the Wronski-determinant of a fundamental system of solutions adapted to the boundary conditions. Despite being the natural objects in the context of hyperbolic geometry, spectral geometry of such operators has only recently been studied in the context of analytic torsion.

  11. Hearing the music of the primes: auditory complementarity and the siren song of zeta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.

    2012-09-01

    A counting function for the primes can be rendered as a sound signal whose harmonies, spanning the gamut of musical notes, are the Riemann zeros. But the individual primes cannot be discriminated as singularities in this ‘music’, because the intervals between them are too short. Conversely, if the prime singularities are detected as a series of clicks, the Riemann zeros correspond to frequencies too low to be heard. The sound generated by the Riemann zeta function itself is very different: a rising siren howl, which can be understood in detail from the Riemann-Siegel formula.

  12. Relations between elliptic multiple zeta values and a special derivation algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broedel, Johannes; Matthes, Nils; Schlotterer, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    We investigate relations between elliptic multiple zeta values (eMZVs) and describe a method to derive the number of indecomposable elements of given weight and length. Our method is based on representing eMZVs as iterated integrals over Eisenstein series and exploiting the connection with a special derivation algebra. Its commutator relations give rise to constraints on the iterated integrals over Eisenstein series relevant for eMZVs and thereby allow to count the indecomposable representatives. Conversely, the above connection suggests apparently new relations in the derivation algebra. Under https://tools.aei.mpg.de/emzv we provide relations for eMZVs over a wide range of weights and lengths.

  13. PLCzeta(zeta): a sperm protein that triggers Ca2+ oscillations and egg activation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Swann, K; Saunders, C M; Rogers, N T; Lai, F A

    2006-04-01

    At fertilization in mammals, the sperm activates development by causing a prolonged series of intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations that are generated by increased production of inositol trisphosphate (InsP(3)). It appears that the sperm initiates InsP(3) generation via the introduction of a sperm factor into the egg after gamete membrane fusion. We recently identified a sperm-specific form of phospholipase C (PLC), referred to as PLCzeta(zeta). We review the evidence that PLCzeta represents the sperm factor that activates development of the egg and discuss the characteristics of PLCzeta that distinguish it from the somatic forms of PLC.

  14. Quantum Graphs Whose Spectra Mimic the Zeros of the Riemann Zeta Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuipers, Jack; Hummel, Quirin; Richter, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    One of the most famous problems in mathematics is the Riemann hypothesis: that the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function lie on a line in the complex plane. One way to prove the hypothesis would be to identify the zeros as eigenvalues of a Hermitian operator, many of whose properties can be derived through the analogy to quantum chaos. Using this, we construct a set of quantum graphs that have the same oscillating part of the density of states as the Riemann zeros, offering an explanation of the overall minus sign. The smooth part is completely different, and hence also the spectrum, but the graphs pick out the low-lying zeros.

  15. Normalization of off-shell boundary state, g-function and zeta function regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoyama, H.; Oota, T.

    2002-11-01

    We consider the model in two dimensions with boundary quadratic deformation (BQD), which has been discussed in tachyon condensation. The partition function of this model (BQD) on a cylinder is determined using the method of zeta function regularization. We show that, for closed channel partition function, a subtraction procedure must be introduced in order to reproduce the correct results at conformal points. The boundary entropy (g-function) is determined from the partition function and the off-shell boundary state. We propose and consider a supersymmetric generalization of the BQD model, which includes a boundary fermion mass term, and check the validity of the subtraction procedure.

  16. Thickness determination of biological samples with a zeta-calibrated scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z H; Hartmann, T; Baumeister, W; Guckenberger, R

    1990-01-01

    A single-tube scanning tunneling microscope has been zeta-calibrated by using atomic steps of crystalline gold and was used for measuring the thickness of two biological samples, metal-coated as well as uncoated. The hexagonal surface layer of the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with an open network-type structure shows thickness values that are strongly influenced by the substrate and the preparation method. In contrast, the thickness of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium with its densely packed less-corrugated structure exhibits very little variation in thickness in coated preparations and the values obtained are in good agreement with x-ray data. Images PMID:2251276

  17. Quantum graphs whose spectra mimic the zeros of the Riemann zeta function.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jack; Hummel, Quirin; Richter, Klaus

    2014-02-21

    One of the most famous problems in mathematics is the Riemann hypothesis: that the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function lie on a line in the complex plane. One way to prove the hypothesis would be to identify the zeros as eigenvalues of a Hermitian operator, many of whose properties can be derived through the analogy to quantum chaos. Using this, we construct a set of quantum graphs that have the same oscillating part of the density of states as the Riemann zeros, offering an explanation of the overall minus sign. The smooth part is completely different, and hence also the spectrum, but the graphs pick out the low-lying zeros.

  18. Symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  19. Differential interaction and aggregation of 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau isoforms with 14-3-3{zeta} protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sadik, Golam; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kato, Kiyoko; Yanagi, Kentaro; Kudo, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-05-22

    Tau isoforms, 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat tau (4R), are differentially involved in neuronal development and in several tauopathies. 14-3-3 protein binds to tau and 14-3-3/tau association has been found both in the development and in tauopathies. To understand the role of 14-3-3 in the differential regulation of tau isoforms, we have performed studies on the interaction and aggregation of 3R-tau and 4R-tau, either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated, with 14-3-3{zeta}. We show by surface plasmon resonance studies that the interaction between unphosphorylated 3R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta} is {approx}3-folds higher than that between unphosphorylated 4R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta}. Phosphorylation of tau by protein kinase A (PKA) increases the affinity of both 3R- and 4R-tau for 14-3-3{zeta} to a similar level. An in vitro aggregation assay employing both transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the aggregation of unphosphorylated 4R-tau to be significantly higher than that of unphosphorylated 3R-tau following the induction of 14-3-3{zeta}. The filaments formed from 3R- and 4R-tau were almost similar in morphology. In contrast, the aggregation of both 3R- and 4R-tau was reduced to a similar low level after phosphorylation with PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3{zeta} exhibits a similar role for tau isoforms after PKA-phosphorylation, but a differential role for unphosphorylated tau. The significant aggregation of 4R-tau by 14-3-3{zeta} suggests that 14-3-3 may act as an inducer in the generation of 4R-tau-predominant neurofibrillary tangles in tauopathies.

  20. Comparison of the therapeutic effects of epoetin zeta and epoetin alpha in the correction of renal anaemia.

    PubMed

    Krivoshiev, Stefan; Todorov, Vasil V; Manitius, Jacek; Czekalski, Stanislaw; Scigalla, Paul; Koytchev, Rossen

    2008-05-01

    To assess the therapeutic equivalence of epoetin zeta and epoetin alpha for correction of haemoglobin (Hb) concentration in patients with anaemia and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 maintained on haemodialysis. In total, 609 patients with CKD and anaemia (Hb < 9 g/dL) were randomly assigned to receive either epoetin zeta or epoetin alpha intravenously, one to three times per week for 24 weeks. Dosing was titrated individually to achieve a stable, target Hb concentration of 11-12 g/dL. Primary endpoints were the mean weekly dose of epoetin per kilogram of body weight and mean Hb concentration during the last 4 weeks of treatment. Safety endpoints were the occurrence of anti-erythropoietin antibodies, ratings of tolerability and adverse events (AEs). Mean (+/- standard deviation [SD]) Hb concentration over the last 4 weeks of treatment was 11.61 +/- 1.27 g/dL for patients receiving epoetin zeta, compared with 11.63 +/- 1.37 g/dL for patients receiving epoetin alpha (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.25 to 0.20 g/dL). Mean (+/- SD) epoetin zeta weekly dose over the last 4 weeks of treatment was 182.20 +/- 118.11 IU/kg/wk, compared with 166.14 +/- 109.85 IU/kg/wk for epoetin alpha (95% CI: -3.21 to 35.34 IU/kg/wk). The most commonly reported AEs (> 5% of patients) were infections and infestations (12.5% and 12.8% of patients treated with epoetin zeta and epoetin alpha, respectively) and vascular disorders (8.5% and 8.9%, respectively). No patients developed neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies. Epoetin zeta, administered intravenously, is therapeutically equivalent to epoetin alpha in the correction of low Hb concentration in patients with CKD undergoing haemodialysis. No unexpected AEs were seen and both epoetin zeta and epoetin alpha were well tolerated.

  1. Mutations in the maize zeta-carotene desaturase gene lead to viviparous kernel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Li, Jiankun; Fan, Kaijian; Du, Yicong; Ren, Zhenjing; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yunjun; Fu, Junjie; Ren, Dongtao

    2017-01-01

    Preharvest sprouting reduces the maize quality and causes a significant yield loss in maize production. vp-wl2 is a Mutator (Mu)-induced viviparous mutant in maize, causing white or pale yellow kernels, dramatically reduced carotenoid and ABA content, and a high level of zeta-carotene accumulation. Here, we reported the cloning of the vp-wl2 gene using a modified digestion-ligation-amplification method (DLA). The results showed that an insertion of Mu9 in the first intron of the zeta-carotene desaturase (ZDS) gene results in the vp-wl2 mutation. Previous studies have suggested that ZDS is likely the structural gene of the viviparous9 (vp9) locus. Therefore, we performed an allelic test using vp-wl2 and three vp9 mutants. The results showed that vp-wl2 is a novel allele of the vp9 locus. In addition, the sequences of ZDS gene were identified in these three vp9 alleles. The vp-wl2 mutant gene was subsequently introgressed into four maize inbred lines, and a viviparous phenotype was observed with yield losses from 7.69% to 13.33%. PMID:28339488

  2. Remarks on non-Gaussian fluctuations of the inflaton and constancy of {zeta} outside the horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Namit; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    2011-02-15

    We point out that the non-Gaussianity arising from cubic self-interactions of the inflaton field is proportional to {xi}N{sub e} where {xi}{approx}V{sup '''} and N{sub e} is the number of e-foldings from horizon exit till the end of inflation. For scales of interest N{sub e}=60, and for models of inflation such as new inflation, natural inflation, and running mass inflation {xi} is large compared to the slow-roll parameter {epsilon}{approx}V{sup '2}. Therefore, the contribution from self-interactions should not be outrightly ignored while retaining other terms in the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL}. However, the N{sub e}-dependent term seems to imply the growth of non-Gaussianities outside the horizon. Therefore, we briefly discuss the issue of the constancy of correlations of the curvature perturbation {zeta} outside the horizon. We then calculate the 3-point function of the inflaton fluctuations using the canonical formalism and further obtain the 3-point function of {zeta}{sub k}. We find that the N{sub e}-dependent contribution to f{sub NL} from self-interactions of the inflaton field is canceled by contributions from other terms associated with nonlinearities in cosmological perturbation theory.

  3. p62 modulates Akt activity via association with PKC{zeta} in neuronal survival and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, Insil . E-mail: ijoung@hanseo.ac.kr; Kim, Hak Jae; Kwon, Yunhee Kim . E-mail: kimyh@khu.ac.kr

    2005-08-26

    p62 is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoprotein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules and a major component of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. It has been implicated in important cellular functions such as cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways. In this study, we have addressed the potential role of p62 during neuronal differentiation and survival using HiB5, a rat neuronal progenitor cell. We generated a recombinant adenovirus encoding T7-epitope tagged p62 to reliably transfer p62 cDNA into the neuronal cells. The results show that an overexpression of p62 led not only to neuronal differentiation, but also to decreased cell death induced by serum withdrawal in HiB5 cells. In this process p62-dependent Akt phosphorylation occurred via the release of Akt from PKC{zeta} by association of p62 and PKC{zeta}, which is known as a negative regulator of Akt activation. These findings indicate that p62 facilitates cell survival through novel signaling cascades that result in Akt activation. Furthermore, we found that p62 expression was induced during neuronal differentiation. Taken together, the data suggest p62 is a regulator of neuronal cell survival and differentiation.

  4. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  5. Organization of the human [zeta]-crystallin/quinone reductase gene (CRYZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.; Rao, P.V.; Zigler, J.S. Jr. )

    1994-05-15

    [zeta]-Crystallin is a protein highly expressed in the lens of guinea pigs and camels, where it comprises about 10% of the total soluble protein. It has recently been characterized as a novel quinone oxidoreductase present in a variety of mammalian tissues. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of the human [zeta]-crystallin gene (CRYZ) and its processed pseudogene. The functional gene is composed of nine exons and spans about 20 kb. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene is rich in G and C (58%) and lacks TATA and CAAT boxes. Previous analysis of the guinea pig gene revealed the presence of two different promoters, one responsible for the high lens-specific expression and the other for expression at the enzymatic level in numerous tissues. Comparative analysis with the guinea pig gene shows that a region of [approximately]2.5 kb that includes the promoter responsible for the high expression in the lens in guinea pig is not present in the human gene. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Effective flocculation of Chlorella vulgaris using chitosan with zeta potential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Y. J.; Lau, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae are considered as one promising source of third-generation biofuels due to their fast growth rates, potentially higher yield rates and wide ranges of growth conditions. However, the extremely low biomass concentration in microalgae cultures presents a great challenge to the harvesting of microalgae because a large volume of water needs to be removed to obtain dry microalgal cells for the subsequent oil extraction process. In this study, the fresh water microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) was effectively harvested using both low molecular weight (MW) and high MW chitosan flocculants. The flocculation efficiency was evaluated by physical appearance, supernatant absorbance, zeta potential and solids content after centrifugal dewatering. High flocculation efficiency of 98.0-99.0% was achieved at the optimal dosage of 30-40 mg/g with formation of large microalgae flocs. This study suggests that the polymer bridging mechanism was governing the flocculation behaviour of C. vulgaris using high MW chitosan. Besides, charge patch neutralisation mechanism prevailed at low MW chitosan where lower dosage was sufficient to reach near-zero zeta potential compared with the high MW chitosan. The amount of chitosan polymer present in the culture may also affect the mechanism of flocculation.

  7. The search for a Hamiltonian whose energy spectrum coincides with the Riemann zeta zeroes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschheim, Raymond; Perelman, Carlos Castro; Irwin, Klee

    Inspired by the Hilbert-Polya proposal to prove the Riemann Hypothesis we have studied the Schroedinger QM equation involving a highly nontrivial potential, and whose self-adjoint Hamiltonian operator has for its energy spectrum one which approaches the imaginary parts of the zeta zeroes only in the asymptotic (very large N) region. The ordinates λn are the positive imaginary parts of the nontrivial zeta zeroes in the critical line :sn = 1 2 + iλn. The latter results are consistent with the validity of the Bohr-Sommerfeld semi-classical quantization condition. It is shown how one may modify the parameters which define the potential, and fine tune its values, such that the energy spectrum of the (modified) Hamiltonian matches not only the first two zeroes but the other consecutive zeroes. The highly nontrivial functional form of the potential is found via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization formula using the full-fledged Riemann-von Mangoldt counting formula (without any truncations) for the number N(E) of zeroes in the critical strip with imaginary part greater than 0 and less than or equal to E.

  8. HILBERT-PÓLYA Conjecture, Zeta Functions and Bosonic Quantum Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Julio C.

    2013-07-01

    The original Hilbert and Pólya conjecture is the assertion that the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function can be the spectrum of a self-adjoint operator. So far no such operator was found. However, the suggestion of Hilbert and Pólya, in the context of spectral theory, can be extended to approach other problems and so it is natural to ask if there is a quantum mechanical system related to other sequences of numbers which are originated and motivated by Number Theory. In this paper, we show that the functional integrals associated with a hypothetical class of physical systems described by self-adjoint operators associated with bosonic fields whose spectra is given by three different sequence of numbers cannot be constructed. The common feature of the sequence of numbers considered here, which causes the impossibility of zeta regularizations, is that the various Dirichlet series attached to such sequences — such as those which are sums over "primes" of (norm P)-s have a natural boundary, i.e. they cannot be continued beyond the line Re(s) = 0. The main argument is that once the regularized determinant of a Laplacian is meromorphic in s, it follows that the series considered above cannot be a regularized determinant. In other words, we show that the generating functional of connected Schwinger functions of the associated quantum field theories cannot be constructed.

  9. Multiple site-specific infrared dichroism of CD3-zeta, a transmembrane helix bundle.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaume; Briggs, John A G; Arkin, Isaiah T

    2002-02-15

    The structure of the transmembrane domain of CD3-zeta a component of the T-cell receptor involved in signal transduction, has been studied in its native state (a lipid bilayer) by multiple site-specific infrared dichroism. For the first time, the transmembrane domain has been labelled at multiple positions along the sequence, representing a total of 11 samples, each labelled at a different residue with an isotopically modified carbonyl group, (13)C [double bond] (18)O. A strategy is outlined that, based on the above data, can yield the rotational orientation and the local helix tilt for each labelled residue, giving a detailed description of helix geometry. The results obtained indicate that the transmembrane segment is in an alpha-helical conformation throughout, with an average helix tilt of 12 degrees. The N-terminal side of the helix is more tilted than the C-terminal. In an accompanying paper we describe the implementation of the infrared data in a model-building study of the CD3-zeta transmembrane complex. The model obtained is entirely consistent with results based on evolutionary conservation data. Taken together, this study represents the first step towards elucidation of the backbone structure of a transmembrane alpha-helical bundle by infrared spectroscopy.

  10. Surface electrochemical properties of red mud (bauxite residue): zeta potential and surface charge density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravendra; Ming, Hui

    2013-03-15

    The surface electrochemical properties of red mud (bauxite residue) from different alumina refineries in Australia and China were studied by electrophoresis and measuring surface charge density obtained from acid/base potentiometric titrations. The electrophoretic properties were measured from zeta potentials obtained in the presence of 0.01 and 0.001 M KNO(3) over a wide pH range (3.5-10) by titration. The isoelectric point (IEP) values were found to vary from 6.35 to 8.70 for the red mud samples. Further investigation into the surface charge density of one sample (RRM) by acid/base potentiometric titration showed similar results for pH(PZC) with pH(IEP) obtained from electrokinetic measurements. The pH(IEP) determined from zeta potential measurements can be used as a characteristic property of red mud. The minerals contained in red mud contributed to the different values of pH(IEP) of samples obtained from different refineries. Different relationships of pH(IEP) with Al/Fe and Al/Si ratios (molar basis) were also found for different red mud samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal aluminum/zirconium: Protein interactions for predicting antiperspirant efficacy using zeta potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaotang; Vaughn, John; Pappas, Iraklis; Fitzgerald, Michael; Masters, James G; Pan, Long

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between commercial antiperspirant (AP) salts [aluminum chlorohydrate (ACH), activated ACH, aluminum sesquichlorohydrate (ASCH), zirconium aluminum glycine (ZAG), activated ZAG), pure aluminum polyoxocations (Al13-mer, Al30-mer), and the zirconium(IV)-glycine complex Zr6 (O)4 (OH)4 (H2O)8 (Gly)8]12+(-) (CP-2 or ZG) with Bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied using zeta potential and turbidity measurements. The maximal turbidity, which revealed the optimal interactions between protein and metal salts, for all protein-metal salt samples was observed at the isoelectric point (IEP), where the zeta potential of the solution was zero. Efficacy of AP salts was determined via three parameters: the amount of salt required to flocculate BSA to reach IEP, the turbidity of solution at the IEP, and the pH range over which the turbidity of the solution remains sufficiently high. By comparing active salt performance from this work to traditional prescreening methods, this methodology was able to provide a consistent efficacy assessment for metal actives in APs or in water treatment.

  12. An interstellar cloud density from Copernicus observations of CO in the spectrum of Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. M.; Stecher, T. P.; Krishna Swamy, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Interstellar CO absorption bands in Copernicus spectra of Zeta Oph have been studied. Absorption profiles, computed under the assumption that excitation is due to collisions with H2 molecules and interaction with the 3-K background radiation field, were fitted to the reduced data of nine bands. When a gas kinetic temperature of 56 K is assumed, the best-fit condition implies a hydrogen-nucleus density of 120 per cu cm, a CO column density of 1.2 by 10 to the 15th power per sq cm, and a radial-velocity dispersion of 0.9 km/s. The relevance of these results to existing ideas concerning the Zeta Oph interstellar clouds is discussed. It is suggested that the strongest interstellar component is not circumstellar in origin but is instead part of a supernova remnant. Simple calculations are made to establish the plausibility of the supernova-remnant identification. This suggestion is also supported by Heiles's (1976) 21-cm pictures.

  13. The Zeta Potential of Surface-Functionalized Metallic Nanorod Particles in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, G M; Rose, K A; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Chuang, F S; Sha, M Y; Chakarova, G; Penn, S G

    2007-05-07

    Metallic nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions, and functionalized with chemical and biological surface coatings, are important elements in basic and applied nanoscience research. Many applications require an understanding of the electrokinetic or colloidal properties of such particles. In this paper we describe the results of experiments to measure the zeta potential of metallic nanorod particles in aqueous saline solutions, including the effects of pH, ionic strength, metallic composition, and surface functionalization state. Particle substrates tested include gold, silver, and palladium monometallic particles as well as gold/silver bimetallic particles. Surface functionalization conditions included 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA), mercaptoethanol (ME), and mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (MESA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), as well as MUA layers subsequently derivatized with proteins. Zeta potential data for typical charge-stabilized polystyrene particles are also presented for comparison. Experimental data are compared with theory. The results of these studies are useful in predicting and controlling the aggregation, adhesion, and transport of functionalized metallic nanoparticles within microfluidic devices and other systems.

  14. Casimir force in brane worlds: Coinciding results from Green's and zeta function approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2010-06-15

    Casimir force encodes the structure of the field modes as vacuum fluctuations and so it is sensitive to the extra dimensions of brane worlds. Now, in flat spacetimes of arbitrary dimension the two standard approaches to the Casimir force, Green's function, and zeta function yield the same result, but for brane world models this was only assumed. In this work we show that both approaches yield the same Casimir force in the case of universal extra dimensions and Randall-Sundrum scenarios with one and two branes added by p compact dimensions. Essentially, the details of the mode eigenfunctions that enter the Casimir force in the Green's function approach get removed due to their orthogonality relations with a measure involving the right hypervolume of the plates, and this leaves just the contribution coming from the zeta function approach. The present analysis corrects previous results showing a difference between the two approaches for the single brane Randall-Sundrum; this was due to an erroneous hypervolume of the plates introduced by the authors when using the Green's function. For all the models we discuss here, the resulting Casimir force can be neatly expressed in terms of two four-dimensional Casimir force contributions: one for the massless mode and the other for a tower of massive modes associated with the extra dimensions.

  15. Stability of fenbendazole suspensions for veterinary use. Correlation between zeta potential and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Arias, José L; López-Viota, Margarita; Clares, Beatriz; Ruiz, Ma Adolfina

    2008-08-07

    In this paper we have carried out a detailed investigation of the stability and redispersibility characteristics of fenbendazole aqueous suspensions, through a thermodynamic and electrokinetic characterization, considering the effect of both pH and ionic strength. The hydrophobic character of the drug, and the surface charge and electrical double-layer thickness play an essential role in the stability of the system, hence the need for a full characterization of fenbendazole. It was found that the drug suspensions displays "delayed" or "hindered" sedimentation, determined by their hydrophobic character and their low zeta potential (indicating a small electrokinetic charge on the particles). The electrostatic repulsion between the particles is responsible for the low sedimentation volume and poor redispersibility of the drug. However, only low concentrations of AlCl(3) induced a significant effect on both the zeta potential and stability of the drug, leading to a "free-layered" sedimentation and a very easy redispersion which could be of great interest in the design of an oral pharmaceutical dosage form for veterinary.

  16. Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis for Determination of Hydrodynamic Diameter, Concentration, and Zeta-Potential of Polyplex Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David R; Green, Jordan J

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is a recently developed nanoparticle characterization technique that offers certain advantages over dynamic light scattering for characterizing polyplex nanoparticles in particular. Dynamic light scattering results in intensity-weighted average measurements of nanoparticle characteristics. In contrast, NTA directly tracks individual particles, enabling concentration measurements as well as the direct determination of number-weighted particle size and zeta-potential. A direct number-weighted assessment of nanoparticle characteristics is particularly useful for polydisperse samples of particles, including many varieties of gene delivery particles that can be prone to aggregation. Here, we describe the synthesis of poly(beta-amino ester)/deoxyribonucleic acid (PBAE/DNA) polyplex nanoparticles and their characterization using NTA to determine hydrodynamic diameter, zeta-potential, and concentration. Additionally, we detail methods of labeling nucleic acids with fluorophores to assess only those polyplex nanoparticles containing plasmids via NTA. Polymeric gene delivery of exogenous plasmid DNA has great potential for treating a wide variety of diseases by inducing cells to express a gene of interest.

  17. Design and its application of the f(n)-zeta chart capable of direct readout of the highest frequency indicating the limit of obtaining distortion-free waveforms.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Haruo; Kinefuchi, Yoshio; Saitoh, Satoru; Kanazawa, Masahiro; Shimada, Masato; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2004-09-01

    We have already reported that the highest frequency (f(h)) could serve as an index for evaluating the fidelity of pressure waveform derived via a catheter manometer system and be read off by the f(n)-zeta chart. Fh is determined by the natural frequency (f(n)) and damping coefficient ( zeta ) in the frequency characteristics of the system. Inversely, f(h) determines two pairs of f(n) and zeta in the f(n)-zeta chart, one in the case of zeta < 0.7 and the another zeta > 0.7. Then, each pair of f(n) and zeta determines respectively the resonant frequency (f(r)) and its amplitude (Ar) ( zeta < 0.7), or the corner frequency (f(c)) and its amplitude (Ac) ( zeta > 0.7) in the frequency characteristics. Thus, the point (f(r), Ar) or (f(c), Ac) represents the position of f(h) projected in the frequency characteristics. Repeating the same operation for other f(n) and zeta corresponding to the same f(h), yields the curve of f(h) in the frequency characteristics. Calculations for other f(h)'s provide a group of curves. Frequency characteristics of pulmonary artery catheters were measured and overwritten thereupon, resulting in f(h)'s to be from 1.2 to 3.2 Hz. These results were in agreement with that calculated by the conventional method.

  18. Line profile asymmetries in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Granados, Arno F.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    A powerful, new probe of chromospheric activity, cross-correlation, has been developed and applied to a variety of stars. In this particular application, an entire CCD spectrum of an active star is correlated with the spectrum of a narrow-line, inactive star of similar spectral type and luminosity class. Using a number of strong lines in this manner enables the detection of absorption profile asymmetries at moderate resolution (lambda/Delta lambda about 40,000) and S/N 150:1. This technique has been applied to 14 systems mostly RS CVn's, with 10 not greater than nu sin i not greater than 50 km/s and P not less than 7 d. Distortions were detected for the first time in five systems: Sigma Gem, IM Peg, GX Lib, UV Crb, and Zeta And. Detailed modeling, incorporating both spectral line profiles and broad-band photometry, is applied to Sigma Gem. Profile asymmetries for this star are fitted by two high-latitude spots covering 5 percent of the stellar surface. The derived spot temperature of 3400 K is lower than found in previous studies. In addition, two well-known systems have been studied: HD 199178 and V711 Tau. Polar spots are found on both.

  19. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  20. Rainbow's stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garattini, Remo; Mandanici, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest in the equilibrium of compact astrophysical objects like white dwarf and neutron stars has been manifested. In particular, various modifications due to Planck-scale energy effects have been considered. In this paper we analyze the modification induced by gravity's rainbow on the equilibrium configurations described by the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equation. Our purpose is to explore the possibility that the rainbow Planck-scale deformation of space-time could support the existence of different compact stars.

  1. Implementation of the Baldwin-Barth turbulence model into the ZETA code and its diagnosis. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Scott L.

    1993-01-01

    The Baldwin-Barth turbulence model was implemented into Zeta, a time-accurate, zonal, integro-differential code for incompressible laminar and turbulent flows. The implementation procedure is patterned after the model subroutine in ARC2D. The results of ZETA with the Baldwin-Barth turbulence model were compared with experimental data, with ZETA using Baldwin-Lomax model, and with ARC2D using the Baldwin-Barth model. The Baldwin-Barth model subroutine was tested by inputting an ARC2D velocity solution of an NACA-0012 airfoil at R(sub e) = 3.9 x 10(exp 6) and alpha = 5 deg. The resultant turbulent viscosity and Reynolds stresses compared favorably with the original data. For the same grid having grid points inside the laminar sublayer, which is necessary due to the one-equation nature of the model, ZETA however predicts early separation. It was found that the current ZETA has problem with such a fine grid. Further work is in progress to solve this problem.

  2. Interpretation of Self-potential on a Tranquil Volcano in Consideration of Zeta Potential Variation of the Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, H.; Ishido, T.; Kanda, W.; Mori, S.

    2009-12-01

    Kaimondake volcano is located at the southern tip of the Satsuma peninsula in Kyushu, Japan. We conducted self-potential (SP) surveys on the volcano along the traverse to the summit from the northwestern coast and obtained a characteristic SP profile. Several local SP anomalies were observed around the boundary between the central cone and the 885 lava flow. In order to clarify the origin of the SP profile, we implemented VLF-MT measurements and zeta potential experiment of the sampled volcanic rocks. Although apparent resistivities of the volcano showed a small variation of 100 to 600 Ωm along the SP survey line, zeta potentials of the rock samples were measured to be -1.3 to -20.4 mV, which can be categorized into three groups corresponding to the geological units. We conducted numerical simulations of groundwater flow and SP of the electrokinetic origin within the volcano based on the results of VLF-MT survey and zeta potential experiment. The simulation results indicated (a) topographic effect (-3mV/m) on the stratovolcano area below 400m ASL and (b) unclear topographic effect on the central cone above 400m ASL. Additional simulation of the SP caused by an anomalous zeta potential distribution qualitatively explained (c) local anomalies around the boundary between the central cone and the 885 lava. These results suggest that the SP profile on Kaimondake volcano is mainly controlled by the zeta potential distribution reflecting the distribution of three geological units of the volcano.

  3. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  4. Morning Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-04

    Dawn on Saturn is greeted across the vastness of interplanetary space by the morning star, Venus, in this image from NASA Cassini spacecraft. Venus appears just off the edge of the planet directly above the white streak of Saturn G ring.

  5. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  6. Pulsations of B stars: A review of observations and theories

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The observational and theoretical status are discussed for several classes of variable B stars. The older classes now seem to be better understood in terms of those stars that probably have at least one radial mode and those that have only nonradial modes. The former are the ..beta.. Cephei variables, and the latter are the slowly rotating 53 Persei and the rapidly rotating zeta Ophiuchi variables. It seems that in this last class there are also some Be stars that show nonradial pulsations from the variations of the line shapes and their light. Among the nonradial pulsators, we must also include the supergiants which show pulsations with very short lifetimes. A review of the present observational and theoretical problems is given. The most persistent problem of the cause for the pulsations is briefly discussed, and many proposed mechanisms plus some new thoughts are presented. 57 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Mechanisms of fibrinogen adsorption on latex particles determined by zeta potential and AFM measurements.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Dąbrowska, Paulina; Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata

    2012-01-10

    The adsorption of fibrinogen on polystyrene latex particles was studied using the concentration depletion method combined with the AFM detection of residual protein after adsorption. Measurements were carried out for a pH range of 3.5-11 and an ionic strength range of 10(-3)-0.15 M NaCl. First, the bulk physicochemical properties of fibrinogen and the latex particle suspension were characterized for this range of pH and ionic strength. The zeta potential and the number of uncompensated (electrokinetic) charges on the protein were determined from microelectrophoretic measurements. It was revealed that fibrinogen molecules exhibited amphoteric characteristics, being on average positively charged for pH <5.8 (isolectric point) and negative otherwise. However, the latex particles did not show any isoelectric point, remaining strongly negative for this pH range. Afterward, systematic measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of fibrinogen-covered latex were carried out as a function of the amount of adsorbed protein, expressed as the surface concentration. A monotonic increase in the electrophoretic mobility (zeta potential) of the latex was observed in all cases, indicating a significant adsorption of fibrinogen on latex for pH below 11. It was also proven that fibrinogen adsorption was irreversible, with the maximum surface concentration varying between 2.5 and 5 × 10(3) μm(-2) (weight concentration of a bare molecule was 1.4 to 2.8 mg m(-2)). These measurements revealed two main adsorption mechanisms of fibrinogen: (i) the unoriented (random) mechanism prevailing for lower ionic strength, where adsorbing molecules significantly penetrate the fuzzy polymeric layer on the latex core and (ii) the side-on adsorption mechanism prevailing for pH > 5.8 and a higher ionic strength of 0.15 M. It was also shown that in the latter case, variations in the zeta potential with the protein coverage could be adequately described in terms of the electrokinetic model, previously

  8. Epoetin zeta in the management of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, differential pharmacology and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Wu, Jun; Downton, Katherine; Ludeman, Emilie; Noxon, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Epoetin zeta was granted marketing authorization in October 2007 by the European Medicines Agency as a recombinant human erythropoietin erythropoiesis-stimulating agent to treat symptomatic anemia of renal origin in adult and pediatric patients on hemodialysis and adults on peritoneal dialysis, as well as for symptomatic renal anemia in adult patients with renal insufficiency not yet on dialysis. Currently, epoetin zeta can be administered either subcutaneously or intravenously to correct for hemoglobin concentrations ≤10 g/dL (6.2 mmol/L) or with dose adjustment to maintain hemoglobin levels at desired levels not in excess of 12 g/dL (7.5 mmol/L). This review article focuses on epoetin zeta indications in chronic kidney disease, its use in managing anemia of renal origin, and discusses its pharmacology and clinical utility. PMID:24790409

  9. Development and in vitro evaluation of zeta potential changing self-emulsifying drug delivery systems for enhanced mucus permeation.

    PubMed

    Suchaoin, Wongsakorn; Pereira de Sousa, Irene; Netsomboon, Kesinee; Lam, Hung Thanh; Laffleur, Flavia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-08-20

    The aim of this study was the development of zeta potential changing self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS). Various cationic surfactants were incorporated into a formulation consisting of 30% Cremophor EL, 30% Capmul MCM, 30% Captex 355 and 10% propylene glycol (w/w). A substrate of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid sodium (PA), was thereafter incorporated into SEDDS. Size, zeta potential and polydispersity index were determined. Phosphate release studies were performed using three different models, namely, isolated IAP, Caco-2 cell monolayer and rat intestinal mucosa and the amount of released phosphate was quantified by malachite green assay. Interaction of SEDDS and mucus was investigated regarding surface charges and mucus diffusion studies were performed using rotating tube technique. SEDDS were diluted 1:100 in 100mM HEPES buffer and a negative zeta potential was obtained. By addition of isolated IAP, 15% to 20% phosphate was liberated from SEDDS within 3h and a shift of zeta potential from negative to positive was observed. On Caco-2 cell monolayer and rat intestinal mucosa, 12% and 23% phosphate were released, respectively, from SEDDS diluted 1:1000 in glucose-HEPES buffer. Positively charged droplets were bound to negatively charged mucus resulting in a decrease of zeta potential, whereas negatively charged SEDDS showed no interaction. Furthermore, negatively charged SEDDS diffused faster through mucus layer as higher extent of incorporated Lumogen was present in deeper mucus segments in comparison to positively charged ones. Accordingly, zeta potential changing SEDDS provide an effective mucus permeation combined with higher cellular uptake when droplets reach absorptive epithelium membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High mobility group box-1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta and secreted in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hanna; Park, Minhee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Gamin; Kim, Yun Gi; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Kim, Hoguen

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific enzyme for HMGB1 phosphorylation and its secretion is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of PKC-{zeta} leads to significant reduction of the secreted HMGB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation of specific site of HMGB1 redirects its secretion in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of PKC-{zeta} in cancers explains the enhanced HMGB1 secretion. -- Abstract: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is overexpressed and secreted in cancer cells. Phosphorylation on two different nuclear localization signal regions are known to be important for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transport and secretion of HMGB1. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism of HMGB1 modifications and its subsequent secretion from cancer cells. To identify the specific enzyme and important sites for HMGB1 phosphorylation, we screened the protein kinase C (PKC) family in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116) for HMGB1 binding by pull-down experiments using a 3XFLAG-HMGB1 construct. Strong interactions between atypical PKCs (PKC-{zeta}, {lambda}, and {iota}) and cytoplasmic HMGB1 were observed in HCT116 cells. We further identified the most critical PKC isotype that regulates HMGB1 secretion is PKC-{zeta} by using PKC inhibitors and siRNA experiments. The serine residues at S39, S53 and S181 of HMGB1 were related to enhancing HMGB1 secretion. We also demonstrated overexpression and activation of PKC-{zeta} in colon cancer tissues. Our findings suggest that PKC-{zeta} is involved in the phosphorylation of HMGB1, and the phosphorylation of specific serine residues in the nuclear localization signal regions is related to enhanced HMGB1 secretion in colon cancer cells.

  11. Moments of zeta functions associated to hyperelliptic curves over finite fields

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Michael O.; Wu, Kaiyu

    2015-01-01

    Let q be an odd prime power, and denote the set of square-free monic polynomials D(x)∈Fq[x] of degree d. Katz and Sarnak showed that the moments, over , of the zeta functions associated to the curves y2=D(x), evaluated at the central point, tend, as , to the moments of characteristic polynomials, evaluated at the central point, of matrices in USp(2⌊(d−1)/2⌋). Using techniques that were originally developed for studying moments of L-functions over number fields, Andrade and Keating conjectured an asymptotic formula for the moments for q fixed and . We provide theoretical and numerical evidence in favour of their conjecture. In some cases, we are able to work out exact formulae for the moments and use these to precisely determine the size of the remainder term in the predicted moments. PMID:25802418

  12. Simultaneous visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of stellar wind variability in Zeta Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, G. A.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Spectra of He II 4686 A and H-alpha in Zeta Pup were obtained simultaneously with Copernicus ultraviolet scans of several P Cygni profiles in this O4 If supergiant with strong mass loss. The visible-wavelength data show significant variations in the profiles of both lines, consisting of doubling of the emission over times of less than a day. Recent theoretical calculations show that the observed profile variations in 4686 A can be produced by significant fluctuations in the wind density. The Copernicus data show less variability, although in one scan of the 1400-A Si IV doublet there appears to be a significant enhancement of the emission which may be correlated with one of the doublings observed in 4686 A and H-alpha, as though a density enhancement formed at low levels and then moved outward in the wind.

  13. Measuring microchannel electroosmotic mobility and zeta potential by the current monitoring method.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chenren; Devoe, Don L

    2013-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) is an electrokinetic flow control technique widely used in microfluidic systems for applications including direct electrokinetic pumping, hydrodynamic pressure generation, and counterflow for microfluidic separations. During EOF, an electric field is applied along the length of a microchannel containing an electrolyte, with mobile ions near the charged microchannel walls experiencing a Coulomb force due to electrostatic interactions with the applied electric field that leads to bulk solution movement. The goal of this laboratory is to experimentally determine the fixed channel surface charge (zeta potential) and electroosmotic mobility associated with a given microchannel substrate material and buffer solution, using a simple current monitoring method to measure the average flow velocity within the microchannel. It is a straightforward experiment designed to help students understand EOF physics while gaining hands-on experience with basic world-to-chip interfacing. It is well suited to a 90-min laboratory session for up to 12 students with minimal infrastructure requirements.

  14. Zeta potential determination by streaming current modelization and measurement in electrophoretic microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Louis; Kleimann, Pascal; Morin, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Electrophoresis in capillary and microfluidic systems, used in analytical chemistry to separate charged species, are quite sensitive to surface phenomena in terms of separation performances. In order to improve theses performances, new surface functionalization techniques are required. There is a need for methods to provide fast and accurate quantification about surface charges at liquid/solid interfaces. We present a fast, simple, and low-cost technique for the measurement of the zeta-potential, via the modelization and the measurement of streaming currents. Due to the small channel cross section in microfluidic devices, the streaming current modelization is easier than the streaming potential measurement. The modelization combines microfluidic simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equation and charge repartition simulations based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This method has been validated with square and circular cross section shape fused-silica capillaries and can be easily transposed to any lab-on-chip microsystems.

  15. Newton flow of the Riemann zeta function: separatrices control the appearance of zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, J. W.; Feiler, C.; Maier, H.; Schleich, W. P.

    2014-10-01

    A great many phenomena in physics can be traced back to the zeros of a function or a functional. Eigenvalue or variational problems prevalent in classical as well as quantum mechanics are examples illustrating this statement. Continuous descent methods taken with respect to the proper metric are efficient ways to attack such problems. In particular, the continuous Newton method brings out the lines of constant phase of a complex-valued function. Although the patterns created by the Newton flow are reminiscent of the field lines of electrostatics and magnetostatics they cannot be realized in this way since in general they are not curl-free. We apply the continuous Newton method to the Riemann zeta function and discuss the emerging patterns emphasizing especially the structuring of the non-trivial zeros by the separatrices. This approach might open a new road toward the Riemann hypothesis.

  16. Zeta-potential and particle size studies of silver sulphide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vikash Tarachand,; Ganesan, V.; Okram, Gunadhor S.

    2016-05-23

    Silver sulfide (Ag{sub 2}S) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared successfully for the first time using diethylene glycol (DEG) as a surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data revealed single phase nature of the compound and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) confirmed its nominal composition. Their sizes were 43 nm from XRD, 50 nm from atomic force microscopy (AFM) and 19 nm & 213 nm from dynamic light scattering (DLS); their differences have been discussed. Autotitration study of zeta potential of these NPs in deionized water by DLS at different pH values confirmed an isoelectric point at pH = 5.14 and their very unstable nature in deionized water.

  17. Simultaneous visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of stellar wind variability in Zeta Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, G. A.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Spectra of He II 4686 A and H-alpha in Zeta Pup were obtained simultaneously with Copernicus ultraviolet scans of several P Cygni profiles in this O4 If supergiant with strong mass loss. The visible-wavelength data show significant variations in the profiles of both lines, consisting of doubling of the emission over times of less than a day. Recent theoretical calculations show that the observed profile variations in 4686 A can be produced by significant fluctuations in the wind density. The Copernicus data show less variability, although in one scan of the 1400-A Si IV doublet there appears to be a significant enhancement of the emission which may be correlated with one of the doublings observed in 4686 A and H-alpha, as though a density enhancement formed at low levels and then moved outward in the wind.

  18. A new biphasic osteoinductive calcium composite material with a negative Zeta potential for bone augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Kolk, Andreas; Gerressen, Marcus; Driemel, Oliver; Maciejewski, Oliver; Hermanns-Sachweh, Benita; Riediger, Dieter; Stein, Jamal M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the osteogenic potential of a biphasic calcium composite material (BCC) with a negative surface charge for maxillary sinus floor augmentation. In a 61 year old patient, the BCC material was used in a bilateral sinus floor augmentation procedure. Six months postoperative, a bone sample was taken from the augmented regions before two titanium implants were inserted at each side. We analyzed bone neoformation by histology, bone density by computed tomography, and measured the activity of voltage-activated calcium currents of osteoblasts and surface charge effects. Control orthopantomograms were carried out five months after implant insertion. The BCC was biocompatible and replaced by new mineralized bone after being resorbed completely. The material demonstrated a negative surface charge (negative Zeta potential) which was found to be favorable for bone regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:19523239

  19. Modeling the zeta potential of silica capillaries in relation to the background electrolyte composition.

    PubMed

    Berli, Claudio L A; Piaggio, María V; Deiber, Julio A

    2003-05-01

    A theoretical relation between the zeta potential of silica capillaries and the composition of the background electrolyte (BGE) is presented in order to be used in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). This relation is derived on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and considering the equilibrium dissociation of silanol groups at the capillary wall as the mechanism of charge generation. The resulting model involves the relevant physicochemical parameters of the BGE-capillary interface. Special attention is paid to the characterization of the BGE, which can be either salt or/and buffer solutions. The model is successfully applied to electroosmotic flow (EOF) experimental data of different aqueous solutions, covering a wide range of pH and ionic strength. Numerical predictions are also presented showing the capability of the model to quantify the EOF, the control of which is relevant to improve analyte separation performance in CZE.

  20. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide as a Novel Therapy to Control Chronic Visceral Hypersensitivity in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Lixia; Dai, Hengfen; Huang, Yang; Chen, Qianqian; Lin, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of multiple chronic visceral pain syndromes, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is not well known, and as a result current therapies are ineffective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of spinal protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ) on visceral pain sensitivity in rats with IBS to better understand the pathogenesis and investigate the effect of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) as a therapy for chronic visceral pain. Methods Visceral hypersensitivity rats were produced by neonatal maternal separation (NMS). Visceral pain sensitivity was assessed by electromyographic (EMG) responses of abdominal muscles to colorectal distention (CRD). Spinal PKMζ and phosphorylated PKMζ (p-PKMζ) were detected by western blot. Varying doses of ZIP were intrathecally administered to investigate the role of spinal PKMζ in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. The open field test was used to determine if ZIP therapy causes spontaneous motor activity side effects. Results Graded CRD pressure significantly increased EMG responses in NMS rats compared to control rats (p < 0.05). p-PKMζ expression increased in the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral spinal cord in the IBS-like rats with notable concomitant chronic visceral pain compared to control rats (p < 0.05). EMG data revealed that intrathecal ZIP injection (1, 5, and 10 μg) dose-dependently attenuated visceral pain hypersensitivity in IBS-like rats. Conclusions Phosphorylated PKMζ may be involved in the spinal central sensitization of chronic visceral hypersensitivity in IBS, and administration of ZIP could effectively treat chronic visceral pain with good outcomes in rat models. PMID:27776136

  1. A method to determine zeta potential and Navier slip coefficient of microchannels.

    PubMed

    Park, H M

    2010-07-01

    The no-slip boundary condition for liquid flows in microchannel has been applied successfully although it has no theoretical foundation. Liquid molecules, however, can slip at the liquid-solid interfaces if the liquid has a lower wettability. The velocity slip at the solid wall, called the Navier slip, is proportional to the velocity gradient at the wall for given wall physicochemical properties. Since the electroosmotic flow has a sharp velocity variation at the wall, the Navier slip of electroosmotic flow can be appreciable in a microchannel where there may be negligible Navier slip for a purely pressure-driven flow which has a smoother velocity variation at the wall. The Navier slip affects the volumetric flow rate and streaming potential significantly in electrokinetic flows and, therefore, one must be cautious about the possible occurrence of Navier slip in the design and operation of various microfluidic devices. In the present work, we have devised a simple method of estimating both Navier slip coefficient and zeta potential by measuring both the volumetric flow rate under a given pressure gradient after eliminating streaming potential and streaming potential under a given pressure gradient. Instead of streaming potential, one may adopt volumetric flow rate under a given external electric field. The method relies on a semi-analytic formula derived in the present work, which allows evaluation of streaming potential and volumetric flow rate without the necessity of numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. The present method is found to estimate both slip coefficient and zeta potential reasonably accurately even using contaminated experimental data. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surfactants, not size or zeta-potential influence blood-brain barrier passage of polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Nadine; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Kockentiedt, Sarah; Hintz, Werner; Tomas, Jürgen; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) can deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but little is known which of the factors surfactant, size and zeta-potential are essential for allowing BBB passage. To this end we designed purpose-built fluorescent polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA) NP and imaged the NP's passage over the blood-retina barrier - which is a model of the BBB - in live animals. Rats received intravenous injections of fluorescent PBCA-NP fabricated by mini-emulsion polymerisation to obtain various NP's compositions that varied in surfactants (non-ionic, anionic, cationic), size (67-464nm) and zeta-potential. Real-time imaging of retinal blood vessels and retinal tissue was carried out with in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) before, during and after NP's injection. Successful BBB passage with subsequent cellular labelling was achieved if NP were fabricated with non-ionic surfactants or cationic stabilizers but not when anionic compounds were added. NP's size and charge had no influence on BBB passage and cell labelling. This transport was not caused by an unspecific opening of the BBB because control experiments with injections of unlabelled NP and fluorescent dye (to test a "door-opener" effect) did not lead to parenchymal labelling. Thus, neither NP's size nor chemo-electric charge, but particle surface is the key factor determining BBB passage. This result has important implications for NP engineering in medicine: depending on the surfactant, NP can serve one of two opposite functions: while non-ionic tensides enhance brain up-take, addition of anionic tensides prevents it. NP can now be designed to specifically enhance drug delivery to the brain or, alternatively, to prevent brain penetration so to reduce unwanted psychoactive effects of drugs or prevent environmental nanoparticles from entering tissue of the central nervous system.

  3. Investigation of the influence of the zeta-potential on the filtration rate in the presence of collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provirnina, E. V.; Barbin, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    The value of the zeta-potential does not have an explicit effect, which is expressed by a simple math correlation, on filtration rate when a solution of the tested collector is filtered through a cake prepared under standard conditions from the examined particulate material. The zeta-potential measurements and filtration tests were carried out on silica and galena with solutions contg. a cationic container ANP and Et xanthane, resp. at PH = 6.5, varying concentration of the agent (0-2500 g/ton), and under a vacuum of 100 to 600 mm Hg.

  4. Uncoupling of T cell receptor zeta chain function during the induction of anergy by the superantigen, staphylococcal enterotoxin A.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, William D; Rogers, Thomas J

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins have immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we show that Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) induces a strong proliferative response in a murine T cell clone independent of MHC class II bearing cells. SEA stimulation also induces a state of hypo-responsiveness (anergy). We characterized the components of the T cell receptor (TCR) during induction of anergy by SEA. Most interestingly, TCR zeta chain phosphorylation was absent under SEA anergizing conditions, which suggests an uncoupling of zeta chain function. We characterize here a model system for studying anergy in the absence of confounding costimulatory signals.

  5. On an analytic estimate in the theory of the Riemann zeta function and a theorem of Báez-Duarte.

    PubMed

    Burnol, Jean-François

    2003-01-01

    On the Riemann hypothesis we establish a uniform upper estimate for zeta(s)/zeta (s + A), 0 < or = A, on the critical line. We use this to give a purely complex-analytic variant of Báez-Duarte's proof of a strengthened Nyman-Beurling criterion for the validity of the Riemann Hypothesis. We investigate function-theoretically some of the functions defined by Báez-Duarte in his study and we show that their square-integrability is, in itself, an equivalent formulation of the Riemann Hypothesis. We conclude with a third equivalent formulation which resembles a "causality" statement.

  6. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  7. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  8. Christmas star.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biała, J.

    There are continuous attempts to identify the legendary Christmas Star with a real astronomical event accompanying the birth of Jesus from Nazareth. Unfortunately, the date of birth is difficult to establish on the basis of historical records with better accuracy than a few years. During that period a number of peculiar astronomical events were observed and it seem to be impossible to identify the right one unambiguously.

  9. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  10. Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Ed

    Radio pulsars are unique laboratories for a wide range of physics and astrophysics. Understanding how they are created, how they evolve and where we find them in the Galaxy, with or without binary companions, is highly constraining of theories of stellar and binary evolution. Pulsars' relationship with a recently discovered variety of apparently different classes of neutron stars is an interesting modern astrophysical puzzle which we consider in Part I of this review. Radio pulsars are also famous for allowing us to probe the laws of nature at a fundamental level. They act as precise cosmic clocks and, when in a binary system with a companion star, provide indispensable venues for precision tests of gravity. The different applications of radio pulsars for fundamental physics will be discussed in Part II. We finish by making mention of the newly discovered class of astrophysical objects, the Fast Radio Bursts, which may or may not be related to radio pulsars or neutron stars, but which were discovered in observations of the latter.

  11. Amateur Spectroscopy of Hot Stars. Long term tracking of circumstellar emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, E.

    2005-12-01

    The spectroscopic monitoring programs carried out by the Spectroscopy Group of the German ``Vereinigung der Sternfreunde'' are reviewed in light of current research. Potential benefits for the professional community in collaborating and obtain long-term monitoring data otherwise unaccessible due to telescope time restrictions are summarized. The contribution highlights results on specific objects of wide interest, such as the well investigated Be stars zeta Tauri or the S Doradus type variable P Cygni.

  12. HEC-cysteamine particles: influence of particle size, zeta potential, morphology and sulfhydryl groups on permeation enhancing properties.

    PubMed

    Rahmat, Deni; Müller, Christiane; Shahnaz, Gul; Leithner, Katharina; Laffleur, Flavia; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Martien, Ronny; Bernkop Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Within this study, the influence of particle size and zeta potential of hydroxyethyl cellulose-cysteamine particles on permeation enhancing properties was investigated. Particles were prepared by four different methods namely ionic gelation, spray drying, air jet milling and grinding. Particles prepared by grinding were additionally air jet milled. All particles were characterized in terms of particle size and zeta potential. The transport of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4 (FD4) across Caco-2 cell monolayers in the presence of these particles and the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was evaluated. The cytotoxic effect of the particles was investigated using resazurin assay. Nanoparticles displaying a zeta potential of 3.3 ± 1.3 mV showed the highest enhancement of FD4 transport among all particles with a 5.83-fold improvement compared to buffer only. Due to the larger particle size, particles generated by grinding exhibited a lower capability in opening of tight junctions compared to smaller particles generated by air jet milling. In addition, the results of the transport studies were supported by the decrease in the TEER. All particle formulations tested were comparatively non-cytotoxic. Accordingly, the zeta potential and particle size showed a significant impact on the opening of tight junctions and hence could play an important role in the design of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC)-cysteamine-based nano- and micro-particles as drug delivery systems.

  13. Development of a novel in silico model of zeta potential for metal oxide nanoparticles: a nano-QSPR approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowska, Ewelina; Mikolajczyk, Alicja; Sikorska, Celina; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    Once released into the aquatic environment, nanoparticles (NPs) are expected to interact (e.g. dissolve, agglomerate/aggregate, settle), with important consequences for NP fate and toxicity. A clear understanding of how internal and environmental factors influence the NP toxicity and fate in the environment is still in its infancy. In this study, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach was employed to systematically explore factors that affect surface charge (zeta potential) under environmentally realistic conditions. The nano-QSPR model developed with multiple linear regression (MLR) was characterized by high robustness ({{{Q}}{{2}}}{{CV}}=0.90) and external predictivity ({{{Q}}{{2}}}{{EXT}}=0.93). The results clearly showed that zeta potential values varied markedly as functions of the ionic radius of the metal atom in the metal oxides, confirming that agglomeration and the extent of release of free MexOy largely depend on their intrinsic properties. A developed nano-QSPR model was successfully applied to predict zeta potential in an ionized solution of NPs for which experimentally determined values of response have been unavailable. Hence, the application of our model is possible when the values of zeta potential in the ionized solution for metal oxide nanoparticles are undetermined, without the necessity of performing more time consuming and expensive experiments. We believe that our studies will be helpful in predicting the conditions under which MexOy is likely to become problematic for the environment and human health.

  14. Nonlinear Smoluchowski velocity for electroosmosis of Power-law fluids over a surface with arbitrary zeta potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2010-03-01

    Electroosmotic flow of Power-law fluids over a surface with arbitrary zeta potentials is analyzed. The governing equations including the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation and the continuity equation are solved to seek exact solutions for the electroosmotic velocity, shear stress, and dynamic viscosity distributions inside the electric double layer. Specifically, an expression for the general Smoluchowski velocity is obtained for electroosmosis of Power-law fluids in a fashion similar to the classic Smoluchowski velocity for Newtonian fluids. The existing Smoluchowski slip velocities under two special cases, (i) for Newtonian fluids with arbitrary zeta potentials and (ii) for Power-law fluids with small zeta potentials, can be recovered from our derived formula. It is interesting to note that the general Smoluchowski velocity for non-Newtonian Power-law fluids is a nonlinear function of the electric field strength and surface zeta potentials; this is due to the coupling electrostatics and non-Newtonian fluid behavior, which is different from its counterpart for Newtonian fluids. This general Smoluchowski velocity is of practical significance in determining the flow rates in microfluidic devices involving non-Newtonian Power-law fluids.

  15. Runaway stars in the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Got, J. R., III; Ostriker, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    It is proposed that the two pulsars PSR 0833-45 (the Vela pulsar) and MP 0835 are runaways from a common binary system originally located in the B association around gamma Velorum. Arguments are presented for a simple model of the Gum nebula in which two distinct ionized regions are present. The first consists of the Stromgren spheres of gamma Velorum and zeta Puppis, while the second is a larger, more filamentary region ionized by the supernova explosion associated with PSR 0833-45. Using this model and the available dispersion measures, the distances to the two pulsars were estimated and found to be compatible with a runaway origin. The position angle of the rotation axis of PSR 0833-45 is also compatible with this origin. The masses of the parent stars of the two pulsars can be deduced from the runaway star dynamics and an assumed age for MP 0835. It is concluded that the masses were in excess of 10 solar masses. The dynamically-determined parent star masses are in agreement with the values expected for evolved members of the B association around gamma Velorum.

  16. Astrobiologically interesting stars within 10 parsecs of the sun.

    PubMed

    Porto de Mello, Gustavo; Fernandez Del Peloso, Eduardo; Ghezzi, Luan

    2006-04-01

    The existence of life based on carbon chemistry and water oceans relies upon planetary properties, chiefly climate stability, and stellar properties, such as mass, age, metallicity, and galactic orbits. The latter can be well constrained with present knowledge. We present a detailed, up-to-date compilation of the atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, multiplicity, and degree of chromospheric activity for the astrobiologically interesting solar-type stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun. We determined their state of evolution, masses, ages, and space velocities, and produced an optimized list of candidates that merit serious scientific consideration by the future space-based interferometry probes aimed at directly detecting Earthsized extrasolar planets and seeking spectroscopic infrared biomarkers as evidence of photosynthetic life. The initially selected stars number 33 solar-type within the total population (excluding some incompleteness for late M-dwarfs) of 182 stars closer than 10 parsecs. A comprehensive and detailed data compilation for these objects is still lacking; a considerable amount of recent data has so far gone unexplored in this context. We present 13 objects as the nearest "biostars," after eliminating multiple stars, young, chromospherically active, hard x-ray- emitting stars, and low metallicity objects. Three of these "biostars"-- Zeta Tucanae, Beta Canum Venaticorum, and 61 Virginis -- closely reproduce most of the solar properties and are considered as premier targets. We show that approximately 7% of the nearby stars are optimally interesting targets for exobiology.

  17. How do wettability, zeta potential and hydroxylation degree affect the biological response of biomaterials?

    PubMed

    Spriano, S; Sarath Chandra, V; Cochis, A; Uberti, F; Rimondini, L; Bertone, E; Vitale, A; Scolaro, C; Ferrari, M; Cirisano, F; Gautier di Confiengo, G; Ferraris, S

    2017-05-01

    It is well known that composition, electric charge, wettability and roughness of implant surfaces have great influence on their interaction with the biological fluids and tissues, but systematic studies of different materials in the same experimental conditions are still lacking in the scientific literature. The aim of this research is to investigate the correlations between some surface characteristics (wettability, zeta potential and hydroxylation degree) and the biological response (protein adsorption, blood wettability, cell and bacterial adhesion) to some model biomaterials. The resulting knowledge can be applied for the development of future innovative surfaces for implantable biomaterials. Roughness was not considered as a variable because it is a widely explored feature: smooth surfaces prepared by a controlled protocol were compared in order to have no roughness effects. Three oxides (ZrO2, Al2O3, SiO2), three metals (316LSS steel, Ti, Nb) and two polymers (corona treated polystyrene for cell culture and untreated polystyrene for bacteria culture), widely used for biomedical applications, were considered. The surfaces were characterized by contact profilometry, SEM-EDS, XPS, FTIR, zeta potential and wettability with different fluids. Protein adsorption, blood wettability, bacterial and cell adhesion were evaluated in order to investigate the correlations between the surface physiochemical properties and biological responses. From a methodological standpoint, XPS and electrokinetic measurements emerged as the more suitable techniques respectively for the evaluation of hydroxylation degree and surface charge/isoelectric point. Moreover, determination of wettability by blood appeared a specific and crucial test, the results of which are not easily predictable by using other type of tests. Hydroxylation degree resulted correlated to the wettability by water, but not directly to surface charge. Wetting tests with different media showed the possibility to

  18. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  19. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PHASE PROPERTIES ON CLAY PARTICLE ZETA POTENTIAL AND ELECTRO-OSMOTIC PERMEABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRO-KINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aqueous phase properties (pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration) on clay particle zeta potential and packed-bed electro-osmotic permeability was quantified. Although pH strongly altered the zeta potential of a Georgia kaolinite, it did not signi...

  20. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PHASE PROPERTIES ON CLAY PARTICLE ZETA POTENTIAL AND ELECTRO-OSMOTIC PERMEABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRO-KINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aqueous phase properties (pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration) on clay particle zeta potential and packed-bed electro-osmotic permeability was quantified. Although pH strongly altered the zeta potential of a Georgia kaolinite, it did not signi...

  1. The UV/Optical Energy Distributions of the A Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Massa, D.

    1999-09-01

    We apply a technique developed for fitting the observed energy distributions of main sequence B stars with stellar atmosphere models to a sample of lightly reddened early A-type stars. The technique utilizes an expanded grid of R.L. Kurucz's ATLAS 9 models and involves simultaneously determining all the parameters of the best fitting model (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and microturulence velocity) AND the properties of interstellar extinction (E(B-V) and, sometimes, the shape of the UV extinction curve). For the B stars it has been shown that the models reproduce the observed energy distributions to a level consistent with the expected observational uncertainties (for IUE satellite UV spectrophotometry and optical photometry). For the A stars, excellent agreement between models and observations is seen in the wavelength range longward of 1500 A. At shorter wavelengths the models tend to slightly overestimate the emergent flux. We discuss the possible reasons for this phenomenon and illustrate the quality of the fits for a number of A0 V to A3 V stars. The UV opacity in the A stars is dominated by absorption due to many thousands of Fe lines which produce a very distinct opacity signature, visible even in relatively low resolution data. We demonstrate the ability of the fitting procedure to exploit this spectral structure and provide precise and robust estimates of [Fe/H] from low-resolution UV spectrophotometry. Several examples, spanning a factor of nearly 20 in Fe abundances, are shown.

  2. Dynamical Mass of the O-Type Supergiant in Zeta Orionis A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    nonradial pulsation. Abundance pat- terns are unlikely, since the distortion has a similar shape in all lines, regardless of species. To produce such a...shape, nonradial pulsation has to be a high-order p-mode type, meaning ζ Ori B is a βCephei star without a radial mode, where the photometric

  3. Zeta potential, contact angles, and AFM imaging of protein conformation adsorbed on hybrid nanocomposite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ana C; Piedade, Ana P

    2013-08-28

    The sputtering deposition of gold (Au) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) was used to prepare a nanocomposite hybrid thin film suitable for protein adsorption while maintaining the native conformation of the biological material. The monolithic PTFE and the nanocomposite PTFE/Au thin films, with Au content up to 1 at %, were co-deposited by r.f. magnetron sputtering using argon as a discharge gas and deposited onto 316L stainless steel substrates, the most commonly used steel in biomaterials. The deposited thin films, before and after bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, were thoroughly characterized with special emphasis on the surface properties/characteristics by atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential, and static and dynamic contact angle measurements, in order to assess the relationship between structure and conformational changes. The influence of a pre-adsorbed peptide (RGD) was also evaluated. The nanotopographic and chemical changes induced by the presence of gold in the nanocomposite thin films enable RGD bonding, which is critical for the maintenance of the BSA native conformation after adsorption.

  4. Antiholomorphic perturbations of Weierstrass Zeta functions and Green’s function on tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Konstantin; Mamayusupov, Khudoyor; Mukherjee, Sabyasachi; Schleicher, Dierk

    2017-08-01

    In Bergweiler and Eremenko (2016 Proc. Am. Math. Soc. 144 2911-22), Bergweiler and Eremenko computed the number of critical points of the Green’s function on a torus by investigating the dynamics of a certain family of antiholomorphic meromorphic functions on tori. They also observed that hyperbolic maps are dense in this family of meromorphic functions in a rather trivial way. In this paper, we study the parameter space of this family of meromorphic functions, which can be written as antiholomorphic perturbations of Weierstrass Zeta functions. On the one hand, we give a complete topological description of the hyperbolic components and their boundaries, and on the other hand, we show that these sets admit natural parametrizations by associated dynamical invariants. This settles a conjecture, made in Lin and Wang (2010 Ann. Math. 172 911-54), on the topology of the regions in the upper half plane {H} where the number of critical points of the Green’s function remains constant.

  5. Effect of zeta potential on the performance of a ring-type electroosmotic mixer.

    PubMed

    Kim, T A; Koo, K H; Kim, Y J

    2009-12-01

    In order to achieve faster mixing, a new type of electrokinetic mixer with a T-type channel is introduced. The proposed mixer takes two fluids from different inlets and combines them into a single channel. The fluids then enter a mixing chamber with different inner and outer radii. Four microelectrodes are positioned on the outer wall of the mixing chamber. The electric potentials on the four microelectrodes are sinusoidal with respect to time and have various maximum voltages, zeta potentials and frequency values. The working fluid is water and each inlet has a different initial concentration values. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved in the channel, with a slip boundary condition on the inner and outer walls of the mixing chamber. The convection-diffusion equation is used to describe the concentration of the dissolved substances in the fluid. The pressure, concentration and flow fields in the channel are calculated and the results are graphically depicted for various flow and electric conditions.

  6. Studies on the aggregation behaviour of pegylated human red blood cells with the Zeta sedimentation technique.

    PubMed

    Jovtchev, S; Stoeff, S; Arnold, K; Zschörnig, O

    2008-01-01

    Covalent binding of poly(ethylene glycol), abbreviated as PEG, to red blood cells (RBC) surface leads to masking of the RBC blood group determinants and the PEG layer on the cell surface sterically hinders RBC-RBC and RBC-plasma protein interactions. We cross-linked linear mPEG-SPA of various molecular mass (2000, 5000, 20000) to washed human RBC under varying incubation ratios polymer to RBC. The electrophoretic mobility (EM) of the modified RBC decreases with increasing of chain length and concentration of PEG up to 50%. It may reflect the alteration in the surface layer thickness and friction. The aggregation behaviour of the pegylated RBC was studied with the Zeta sedimentation technique modifying the cell-cell interactions pressing them toward each other under centrifugal forces of various magnitudes. As a rule at low centrifugation forces the increase in chain length and concentration of PEG linked to RBC surface reduces the dextran-induced aggregation probably via elevation of the steric repulsion, which counteracts the depletion force generated by the free polymer. This effect was reversed to some extent by elevation of free dextran concentration and centrifugation forces. If cell-cell polymer bridging starts playing a role under these conditions requires further experimental and theoretical investigations.

  7. Moments of zeta functions associated to hyperelliptic curves over finite fields.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Michael O; Wu, Kaiyu

    2015-04-28

    Let q be an odd prime power, and Hq,d denote the set of square-free monic polynomials D(x)∈Fq[x] of degree d. Katz and Sarnak showed that the moments, over Hq,d, of the zeta functions associated to the curves y(2)=D(x), evaluated at the central point, tend, as q→∞, to the moments of characteristic polynomials, evaluated at the central point, of matrices in USp(2⌊(d-1)/2⌋). Using techniques that were originally developed for studying moments of L-functions over number fields, Andrade and Keating conjectured an asymptotic formula for the moments for q fixed and q→∞. We provide theoretical and numerical evidence in favour of their conjecture. In some cases, we are able to work out exact formulae for the moments and use these to precisely determine the size of the remainder term in the predicted moments. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. The cytoplasmic domain of the T-cell receptor zeta subunit does not form disordered dimers

    PubMed Central

    Nourse, Amanda; Mittag, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play active roles in recognition, signaling and molecular sorting. They often undergo coupled folding and binding giving rise to largely ordered interfaces with their binding partners. The cytoplasmic region of the T-cell receptor zeta subunit (ζcyt) has previously been proposed to specifically dimerize in the absence of a disorder-to-order transition, suggesting an intriguing dimerization mechanism that may involve multiple transient interfaces. We show here using analytical ultracentrifugation, NMR, size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering that neither ζcyt nor the cytoplasmic region of CD3ε significantly populate a dimeric state, but that they are mostly monomers in solution up to millimolar concentrations. They experience a salt- and concentration-dependent shift of their elution volume in size exclusion chromatography previously interpreted as dimerization. Our data shows that ζcyt does not form a highly disordered protein complex and leaves open the question as to whether completely disordered dimers (or other oligomers) exist in nature. PMID:24120941

  9. The cytoplasmic domain of the T-cell receptor zeta subunit does not form disordered dimers.

    PubMed

    Nourse, Amanda; Mittag, Tanja

    2014-01-09

    Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play active roles in recognition, signaling and molecular sorting. They often undergo coupled folding and binding giving rise to largely ordered interfaces with their binding partners. The cytoplasmic region of the T-cell receptor zeta subunit (ζcyt) has been previously proposed to specifically dimerize in the absence of a disorder-to-order transition, suggesting an intriguing dimerization mechanism that may involve multiple transient interfaces. We show here using analytical ultracentrifugation, NMR, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and multi-angle light scattering that neither ζcyt nor the cytoplasmic region of CD3ε significantly populates a dimeric state but that they are mostly monomers in solution up to millimolar concentrations. They experience a salt- and concentration-dependent shift of their elution volume in SEC previously interpreted as dimerization. Our data show that ζcyt does not form a highly disordered protein complex and leaves open the question as to whether completely disordered dimers (or other oligomers) exist in nature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta as regulators of angiogenesis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Pantazaka, Evangelia; Castana, Penelope; Tsalios, Thomas; Polyzos, Alexandros; Beis, Dimitris

    2016-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted heparin-binding growth factor that through its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ) has a significant regulatory effect on angiogenesis and cancer. PTN and RPTPβ/ζ are over-expressed in several types of human cancers and regulate important cancer cell functions in vitro and cancer growth in vivo. This review begins with a brief introduction of PTN and the regulation of its expression. PTN receptors are described with special emphasis on RPTPβ/ζ, which also interacts with and/or affects the function of other important targets for cancer therapy, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A, ανβ3 and cell surface nucleolin. PTN biological activities related to angiogenesis and cancer are extensively discussed. Finally, up to date approaches of targeting PTN or RPTPβ/ζ for cancer treatment are presented. Insights into the regulatory role of PTN/RPTPβ/ζ on angiogenesis will be extremely beneficial for future development of alternative anti-angiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Polymorphisms in the Glutathione Transferase Zeta 1/Maleylacetoacetate Isomerase Gene Influence the Toxicokinetics of Dichloroacetate

    PubMed Central

    Shroads, Albert L.; Langaee, Taimour; Coats, Bonnie S.; Kurtz, Tracie L.; Bullock, John R.; Weithorn, David; Gong, Yan; Wagner, David A.; Ostrov, David A.; Johnson, Julie A.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), a chemical relevant to environmental science and allopathic medicine, is dehalogenated by the bifunctional enzyme glutathione transferase zeta (GSTz1) maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI), the penultimate enzyme in the phenylalanine/tyrosine catabolic pathway. The authors postulated that polymorphisms in GSTz1/MAAI modify the toxicokinetics of DCA. GSTz1/MAAI haplotype significantly affected the kinetics and biotransformation of 1,2-13C-DCA when it was administered at either environmentally (μg/kg/d) or clinically (mg/kg/d) relevant doses. GSTz1/MAAI haplotype also influenced the urinary accumulation of potentially toxic tyrosine metabolites. Atomic modeling revealed that GSTz1/MAAI variants associated with the slowest rates of DCA metabolism induced structural changes in the enzyme homodimer, predicting protein instability or abnormal protein-protein interactions. Knowledge of the GSTz1/MAAI haplotype can be used prospectively to identify individuals at potential risk of DCA’s adverse side effects from environmental or clinical exposure or who may exhibit aberrant amino acid metabolism in response to dietary protein. PMID:21642471

  12. ζ-potential determination using a ZetaMeter-Dynamic Speckle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Peña, Rolando J.; Sánchez-Muñoz, Orlando L.; Martínez-Celorio, René A.; Cibrián, Rosa M.; Salvador-Palmer, Rosario; Salgado, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Electrophoretic mobility and ζ-potential are important physical parameters for the characterization of micro- and nanosystems. In this communication we describe a new method for determining the ζ-potential through the assembly of two well known techniques: free electrophoresis and Dynamic Speckle. When coherent light passes through a fluid having scattering centres, the far field interference originates a speckled image. If the scattering centres are contained within the cylindrical electrophoresis cell of a ZetaMeter and are forced to move in an orderly way under the action of an external electric field, the time variation of the light intensity in the far field speckle images follows a temporal autocorrelation function g(τ). The corresponding correlation time can then be obtained and related with the velocity, from which the electrophoretic mobility and the ζ-potential of the scattering centres can be determined. We have applied this method to microparticles, like natural air-floated silica and two classes of bioceramics, hydroxyapatite and biphasic calcium phosphate. For comparison, we analysed the same samples in parallel using a commercial Zetasizer Nano from Malvern Instruments. The values of ζ-potential determined using the two techniques were the same within ~3% error. These results validate our new method as a useful and efficient alternative for ζ-potential determination of particles, at least within the micrometer scale.

  13. Characterization of PF4-Heparin Complexes by Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and Zeta Potential.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Sabrina; Fareed, Jawed; Madaschi, Laura; Risi, Giulia; Torri, Giangiacomo; Naggi, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is associated with antibodies to complexes between heparin and platelet factor 4 (PF4), a basic protein usually found in platelet alpha granules. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia antibodies preferentially recognize macromolecular complexes formed between positively charged PF4 and polyanionic heparins over a narrow range of molar ratios. The aim of this work was to study the complexes that human PF4 forms with heparins from various species, such as porcine, bovine, and ovine; heparins from various organs, such as mucosa and lung; and different low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) at several stoichiometric ratios to evaluate their sizes and charges by photo correlation spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements. The resulting data of the PF4 complexes with unfractionated heparins (UFHs), LMWHs and their fractions, and oligosaccharide components suggest that the size of aggregates is not only a simple function of average molecular weight but also of the molecular weight distribution of the sample. Moreover, it was found that lower concentrations of the tested ovine-derived mucosal heparin are required to form the large PF4/heparin complexes as compared to mucosal porcine and bovine heparin.

  14. Zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) erases long-term memories in a cockroach.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhouheng; Lubinski, Alexander J; Page, Terry L

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to identify the molecules that are involved in the maintenance of long-term memories in mammals have focused attention on atypical isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). Inhibition of these kinases by either the general PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine, or the more specific inhibitor, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), can abolish both long-term potentiation in the hippocampus and as well as spatial, fear, appetitive, and sensorimotor memories. These inhibitors can also abolish long-term facilitation and long-term sensitization in the mollusk Aplysia californica. We have extended these results to an insect, the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. We show that systemic injections of either chelerythrine or ZIP erase long-term olfactory memories in the cockroach, but have no effect on memory acquisition during conditioning. We also show that inhibition of either protein kinase A (PKA) or protein synthesis can block memory acquisition but neither has an effect on the memory once it is formed. The results suggest that sustaining memories in insects requires the persistent activity of one or more isoforms of PKC and point to a strong evolutionary conservation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the persistence of long-term memories in the central nervous system.

  15. Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Jena B.; Ocampo, Amber C.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Clark, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial memory in rodents can be erased following the infusion of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) into the dorsal hippocampus via indwelling guide cannulas. It is believed that ZIP impairs spatial memory by reversing established late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it is unclear whether other forms of hippocampus-dependent memory, such as recognition memory, are also supported by hippocampal LTP. In the current study, we tested recognition memory in rats following hippocampal ZIP infusion. In order to combat the limited targeting of infusions via cannula, we implemented a stereotaxic approach for infusing ZIP throughout the dorsal, intermediate, and ventral hippocampus. Rats infused with ZIP 3–7 days after training on the novel object recognition task exhibited impaired object recognition memory compared to control rats (those infused with aCSF). In contrast, rats infused with ZIP 1 month after training performed similar to control rats. The ability to form new memories after ZIP infusions remained intact. We suggest that enhanced recognition memory for recent events is supported by hippocampal LTP, which can be reversed by hippocampal ZIP infusion. PMID:26380123

  16. Interrelationship between the zeta potential and viscoelastic properties in coacervates complexes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Andrews, Hugo; Enríquez-Ramírez, Karina Esmeralda; García-Márquez, Eristeo; Ramírez-Santiago, Cesar; Lobato-Calleros, Consuelo; Vernon-Carter, Jaime

    2013-06-05

    The formation of the complex coacervate (CC) phases between gum Arabic (GA) and low molecular weight chitosan (Ch) and the interrelationship between the zeta-potential and viscoelastic properties of the coacervate phase were investigated. The maximum charge difference of biopolymers stock dispersion was displayed in a range of pH between 4.0 and 5.5. Titration experiment between the oppositely charged biopolymers showed that the isoelectric point was found at a biopolymers mass ratio (R[GA:Ch]) of R[5.5:1]. Turbidity, size and ζ-potential of the soluble complexes (SC) showed an interrelation with the complex coacervate yield (CCY). Higher CCY values (82.2-88.1%) were obtained in the range from R[3:1] to R[5.5:1]. Change the R[GA:Ch] in dispersion, make possible to produce CC's phases exhibiting cationic (R[1:1] and R[3:1]), neutral (R[5.5:1]) or anionic (R[9:1] and R[7:1]) charged. All CC's exhibited liquid-viscoelastic behavior at lower frequencies and a crossover between G″ and G' at higher frequencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of zeta potential as a tool to study phase transitions in binary phosphatidylcholines mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sierra, M B; Pedroni, V I; Buffo, F E; Disalvo, E A; Morini, M A

    2016-06-01

    Temperature dependence of the zeta potential (ZP) is proposed as a tool to analyze the thermotropic behavior of unilamellar liposomes prepared from binary mixtures of phosphatidylcholines in the absence or presence of ions in aqueous suspensions. Since the lipid phase transition influences the surface potential of the liposome reflecting a sharp change in the ZP during the transition, it is proposed as a screening method for transition temperatures in complex systems, given its high sensitivity and small amount of sample required, that is, 70% less than that required in the use of conventional calorimeters. The sensitivity is also reflected in the pre-transition detection in the presence of ions. Plots of phase boundaries for these mixed-lipid vesicles were constructed by plotting the delimiting temperatures of both main phase transition and pre-transition vs. the lipid composition of the vesicle. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies, although subject to uncertainties in interpretation due to broad bands in lipid mixtures, allowed the validation of the temperature dependence of the ZP method for determining the phase transition and pre-transition temperatures. The system chosen was dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC/DPPC), the most common combination in biological membranes. This work may be considered as a starting point for further research into more complex lipid mixtures with functional biological importance.

  18. Eclipse Mapping of the Chromopsheric and Transition Region Structure of the Hybrid Chromosphere Star HR2554 (G6 Ii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander

    1994-01-01

    We propose to observe an eclipse of the Zeta Aurigae-type binary HR2554 using the GHRS. Every 195 days the A1 dwarf secondary passes behind the outer atmosphere of the G6 II primary and can be used as light source to observe absorption lines from plasma in the G star atmopshere. The G star has a hybrid-chromosphere structure with hot transition region plasma and a cool stellar wind. THESE OBSERVATIONS WOULD BE THE FIRST ECLIPSE OBSRRVATIONS OF THIS TYPE OF ATMOSPHERE WITH GHRS AND COMPARED WITH OUR RESULTS FOR THE K4 SUPERGIANT Zeta Aur, which shows only the typical red supergiant wind. We shall model the observed line profiles and determine the temperature structure, density stratification, wind acceleration/turbulence/ionization as a function of distance above the G star photosphere. The hot and cool plasma are intermixed in this outer atmosphere and we will quantify this "thermal bifurcation". Both the static and outflowing components of the atmopshere will be modelled. The mass loss rate and the wind velocity and density laws as a function of radius will be determined. The vast majority of the needed modelling code will have been developed already for our Zeta Aur analysis. This project represents an opportunity to significantly advance knowledge about the spatial structuring of cool star outer atmospheres and the physical process operating within them.

  19. Ice Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Ice Stars - August 4th, 2002 Description: Like distant galaxies amid clouds of interstellar dust, chunks of sea ice drift through graceful swirls of grease ice in the frigid waters of Foxe Basin near Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Sea ice often begins as grease ice, a soupy slick of tiny ice crystals on the ocean's surface. As the temperature drops, grease ice thickens and coalesces into slabs of more solid ice. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  20. X-ray emission from the winds of hot stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, L. B.; White, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A phenomenological theory is proposed for the structure of the unstable line-driven winds of early-type stars. These winds are conjectured to break up into a population of blobs that are being radiatively driven through, and confined by ram pressure of an ambient gas that is not itself being radiatively driven. Radiation from the bow shocks preceding the blobs can account for the X-ray luminosity of zeta Puppis. The theory breaks down when used to model the much lower density wind of tau Scorpii, for then the blobs are destroyed by heat conduction from shocked gas. This effect explains why the profiles of this star's UV resonance lines depart from classical P Cygni form.

  1. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  2. Flotation of algae for water reuse and biomass production: role of zeta potential and surfactant to separate algal particles.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong-Heui; Kim, Mi-Sug

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemical coagulation and biological auto-flocculation relative to zeta potential was examined to compare flotation and sedimentation separation processes for algae harvesting. Experiments revealed that microalgae separation is related to auto-flocculation of Anabaena spp. and requires chemical coagulation for the whole period of microalgae cultivation. In addition, microalgae separation characteristics which are associated with surfactants demonstrated optimal microalgae cultivation time and separation efficiency of dissolved CO2 flotation (DCF) as an alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). Microalgae were significantly separated in response to anionic surfactant rather than cationic surfactant as a function of bubble size and zeta potential. DAF and DCF both showed slightly efficient flotation; however, application of anionic surfactant was required when using DCF.

  3. Visualizing the transient electroosmotic flow and measuring the zeta potential of microchannels with a micro-PIV technique.

    PubMed

    Yan, Deguang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Yang, Chun; Huang, Xiaoyang

    2006-01-14

    We have demonstrated a transient micro particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique to measure the temporal development of electroosmotic flow in microchannels. Synchronization of different trigger signals for the laser, the CCD camera, and the high-voltage switch makes this measurement possible with a conventional micro-PIV setup. Using the transient micro-PIV technique, we have further proposed a method on the basis of inertial decoupling between the particle electrophoretic motion and the fluid electroosmotic flow to determine the electrophoretic component in the particle velocity and the zeta potential of the channel wall. It is shown that using the measured zeta potentials, the theoretical predictions agree well with the transient response of the electroosmotic velocities measured in this work.

  4. Influence of temperature, anions and size distribution on the zeta potential of DMPC, DPPC and DMPE lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Morini, M A; Sierra, M B; Pedroni, V I; Alarcon, L M; Appignanesi, G A; Disalvo, E A

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the work is to compare the influence of the multilamellarity, phase state, lipid head groups and ionic media on the origin of the surface potential of lipid membranes. With this aim, we present a new analysis of the zeta potential of multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles composed by phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) dispersed in water and ionic solutions of polarizable anions, at temperatures below and above the phase transition. In general, the adsorption of anions seems to explain the origin of the zeta potential in vesicles only above the transition temperature (Tc). In this case, the sign of the surface potential is ascribed to a partial orientation of head group moiety toward the aqueous phase. This is noticeable in PC head groups but not in PEs, due to the strong lateral interaction between PO and NH group in PE.

  5. Asymptotic expansions for double Shintani zeta-functions of several variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsurada, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    This is a summarized version of the forthcoming paper [19]. Let m and n be any positive integers. We write e(x) = e2π√-1 , and use the vectorial notation x = (x1,…,xm) for any complex x and xi(i = 1,…,m). The main object of this paper is the Shintani zeta-function φ˜n(s,a,λ;z) defined by (1.4) below, where sj(j = 1,…,n) are complex variables, ai and λi(i = 1,2) real parameters with ai>0, and zj complex parameters with |argzj|<π(j = 1,…,n). We shall first present a complete asymptotic expansion of φ˜n(s,a,λ;z) in the ascending order of zn as zn→0 (Theorem 1), and that in the descending order of zn as zn→∞ (Theorem 2), both through the sectorial region |argzn-θ0|<π/2 for any angle θ0 with |θ0|<π/2, while other zj's move within the same sector upon satisfying the conditions zj≈zn (j = 1,…,n-1). It is significant that the Lauricella hypergeometric functions (defined by (2.1) below) appear in each term of the asymptotic series on the right sides of (2.7) and (2.10). Our main formulae (2.6) (with (2.7) and (2.8)) and (2.9) (with (2.10) and (2.11)) further yield several functional properties of φ˜n(s,a,λ;z) (Corollaries 1-3).

  6. Ec sub. gamma. receptor type III (CD16) is included in the. zeta. NK receptor complex expressed by human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.; Caligiuri, M.; O'Brien, C.; Manley, T.; Ritz, J.; Schlossman, S.F. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors recently reported that CD3{sup {minus}} natural killer (NK) cells express the {zeta} chain of the T-cell receptor complex ({zeta} NK) in association with higher molecular weight structures whose expression differs between individual NK cell clones. Because NK cell cytolytic activity is known to be triggered by perturbation of the type III Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor (CD16), they sought to determine whether this activating molecule is included in the {zeta}NK molecular complex. Biochemical evidence for a physical association between CD16 and {zeta}NK was obtained by comparing immunoprecipitates formed using monoclonal antibodies reactive with each of these molecules by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and peptide mapping. In both clonal and polyclonal populations of CD3{sup {minus}}NK cells, CD16 and {zeta}NK specifically associated with one another. Functional evidence for a specific association between CD16 and {zeta}NK in intact cells was obtained by demonstrating a coordinate down-modulation of both of these molecules induced by either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or monoclonal antibodies reactive with CD16. The results suggest that Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor type III (CD16) is included in the {zeta}NK complex and that this complex is likely to play an important role in NK cell activation.

  7. Fc gamma receptor type III (CD16) is included in the zeta NK receptor complex expressed by human natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P; Caligiuri, M; O'Brien, C; Manley, T; Ritz, J; Schlossman, S F

    1990-01-01

    We recently reported that CD3- natural killer (NK) cells express the zeta chain of the T-cell receptor complex (zeta NK) in association with higher molecular weight structures whose expression differs between individual NK cell clones. Because NK cell cytolytic activity is known to be triggered by perturbation of the type III Fc gamma receptor (CD16), we sought to determine whether this activating molecule is included in the zeta NK molecular complex. Biochemical evidence for a physical association between CD16 and zeta NK was obtained by comparing immunoprecipitates formed using monoclonal antibodies reactive with each of these molecules by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and peptide mapping. In both clonal and polyclonal populations of CD3- NK cells, CD16 and zeta NK specifically associated with one another. Functional evidence for a specific association between CD16 and zeta NK in intact cells was obtained by demonstrating a coordinate down-modulation of both of these molecules induced by either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or monoclonal antibodies reactive with CD16. Our results suggest that Fc gamma receptor type III (CD16) is included in the zeta NK complex and that this complex is likely to play an important role in NK cell activation. Images PMID:2138330

  8. Correlations between the zeta potentials of silica hydride-based stationary phases, analyte retention behaviour and their ionic interaction descriptors.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Munera, Caesar; Tse, Colby; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-03-19

    In this study, the zeta potentials of type-B silica, bare silica hydride, the so-called Diamond Hydride™ and phenyl substituted silica hydride stationary phases have been measured in aqueous-organic media and correction procedures developed to account for the more negative zeta potential values in media containing different acetonitrile contents. Retention studies of 16 basic, acidic and neutral compounds were also performed with these four stationary phases with mobile phases containing 0.1% (v/v) formic acid and various acetonitrile-water compositions ranging from 0-90% (v/v) acetonitrile. The retention properties of these analytes were correlated to the corrected stationary phase zeta potentials measured under these different mobile phase conditions with R(2) values ranging from 0.01 to 1.00, depending on the stationary phase and analyte type. Using linear solvation energy relationships, stationary phase descriptors for each stationary phase have been developed for the different mobile phase conditions. Very high correlations of the zeta potentials with the ionic interaction descriptors were obtained for the type-B silica and the Diamond Hydride™ phases and good correlation with bare silica hydride material whilst there was no correlation observed for the phenyl substituted silica hydride phase. The nature of the retention mechanisms which gives rise to these different observations is discussed. The described methods represent a useful new approach to characterize and assess the retention properties of silica-hydride based chromatographic stationary phases of varying bonded-phase coverage and chemistries, as would be broadly applicable to other types of stationary phase used in the separation sciences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interlaboratory comparison for the measurement of particle size and zeta potential of silica nanoparticles in an aqueous suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberty, Andrée; Franks, Katrin; Braun, Adelina; Kestens, Vikram; Roebben, Gert; Linsinger, Thomas P. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements has organised an interlaboratory comparison (ILC) to allow the participating laboratories to demonstrate their proficiency in particle size and zeta potential measurements on monomodal aqueous suspensions of silica nanoparticles in the 10-100 nm size range. The main goal of this ILC was to identify competent collaborators for the production of certified nanoparticle reference materials. 38 laboratories from four different continents participated in the ILC with different methods for particle sizing and determination of zeta potential. Most of the laboratories submitted particle size results obtained with centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) or electron microscopy (EM), or zeta potential values obtained via electrophoretic light scattering (ELS). The results of the laboratories were evaluated using method-specific z scores, calculated on the basis of consensus values from the ILC. For CLS (13 results) and EM (13 results), all reported values were within the ±2 | z| interval. For DLS, 25 of the 27 results reported were within the ±2 | z| interval, the two other results were within the ±3 | z| interval. The standard deviations of the corresponding laboratory mean values varied between 3.7 and 6.5%, which demonstrates satisfactory interlaboratory comparability of CLS, DLS and EM particle size values. From the received test reports, a large discrepancy was observed in terms of the laboratory's quality assurance systems, which are equally important for the selection of collaborators in reference material certification projects. Only a minority of the participating laboratories is aware of all the items that are mandatory in test reports compliant to ISO/IEC 17025 (ISO General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. International Organisation for Standardization, Geneva, 2005b). The absence of measurement uncertainty values in the reports, for

  10. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  11. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  12. 14-3-3 sigma and 14-3-3 zeta plays an opposite role in cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Young; Jeon, Woo-Kwang; Bae, Eun-Jin; Kim, Shin-Tae; Lee, Ho-Jae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2010-03-01

    The expression of 14-3-3 proteins is dysregulated in various types of cancer. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of 14-3-3 zeta and 14-3-3 sigma on cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Mouse mammary epithelial cells (Eph4) that are transformed with oncogenic c-H-Ras (EpRas) and no longer sensitive to TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition displayed increased expression of 14-3-3 zeta and decreased expression of 14-3-3 sigma compared with parental Eph4 cells. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta, we showed that 14-3-3 sigma is required for TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition whereas 14-3-3 zeta negatively modulates this growth inhibitory response. Notably, overexpression of 14-3-3 zeta increased the level of Smad3 protein that is phosphorylated at linker regions and cannot mediate the TGF-beta1 growth inhibitory response. Consistent with this finding, mutation of the 14-3-3 zeta phosphorylation sites in Smad3 markedly reduced the 14-3-3 zeta-mediated inhibition of TGF-beta1-induced p15 promoter-reporter activity and cell cycle arrest, suggesting that these residues are critical targets of 14-3-3 zeta in the suppression of TGF-beta1-mediated growth. Taken together, our findings indicate that dysregulation of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta contributes to TGF-beta1 resistance in cancer cells.

  13. 'Syncing' Up with the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz Constant: Hurwitz-ZetaFunctions in Non-Linear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Durgin, Natalie J.; Garcia, Sofia M.; Flournoy, Tamara; Bailey,David H.

    2007-12-01

    This work extends the analytical and computationalinvestigation of the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz (QRS) constants from non-linearphysics. The QRS constants (c1, c2, ..., cN) are found in a Winfreeoscillator mean-field system used to examine the transition of coupledoscillators as they lose synchronization. The constants are part of anasymptotic expansion of a function related to the oscillatorsynchronization. Previous work used high-precision software packages toevaluate c1 to 42 decimal-digits, which made it possible to recognize andprove that c1 was the root of a certain Hurwitz-zeta function. Thisallowed a value of c2 to beconjectured in terms of c1. Therefore thereis interest in determining the exact values of these constants to highprecision in the hope that general relationships can be establishedbetween the constants and the zeta functions. Here, we compute the valuesof the higher order constants (c3, c4) to more than 42-digit precision byextending an algorithm developed by D.H. Bailey, J.M. Borwein and R.E.Crandall. Several methods for speeding up the computation are exploredand an alternate proof that c1 is the root of a Hurwitz-zeta function isattempted.

  14. Determination of Zeta Potential via Nanoparticle Translocation Velocities through a Tunable Nanopore: Using DNA-modified Particles as an Example.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Emma L C J; Vogel, Robert; Platt, Mark

    2016-10-26

    Nanopore technologies, known collectively as Resistive Pulse Sensors (RPS), are being used to detect, quantify and characterize proteins, molecules and nanoparticles. Tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS) is a relatively recent adaptation to RPS that incorporates a tunable pore that can be altered in real time. Here, we use TRPS to monitor the translocation times of DNA-modified nanoparticles as they traverse the tunable pore membrane as a function of DNA concentration and structure (i.e., single-stranded to double-stranded DNA). TRPS is based on two Ag/AgCl electrodes, separated by an elastomeric pore membrane that establishes a stable ionic current upon an applied electric field. Unlike various optical-based particle characterization technologies, TRPS can characterize individual particles amongst a sample population, allowing for multimodal samples to be analyzed with ease. Here, we demonstrate zeta potential measurements via particle translocation velocities of known standards and apply these to sample analyte translocation times, thus resulting in measuring the zeta potential of those analytes. As well as acquiring mean zeta potential values, the samples are all measured using a particle-by-particle perspective exhibiting more information on a given sample through sample population distributions, for example. Of such, this method demonstrates potential within sensing applications for both medical and environmental fields.

  15. Human hemoglobin adsorption onto colloidal cerium oxide nanoparticles: a new model based on zeta potential and spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Mobasherat Jajroud, Sheida Yousefi; Falahati, Mojtaba; Attar, Farnoosh; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali

    2017-09-18

    The nanoparticle (NP)-induced conformational changes of protein and NP agglomeration have gained a remarkable interest in medical and biotechnological fields. Herein, the effect of human hemoglobin (Hb) on the colloidal stability of cerium oxide NP (CNP) was investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, and TEM analysis. In addition, the effect of CNP on the heme degradation and structural changes of Hb was studied using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic methods. DLS and TEM analysis showed that the presence of Hb can increase the mean diameter of CNP. Zeta potential measurements revealed that CNP demonstrated a higher charge distribution relative to CNP/Hb complex. Besides, fluorescence studies indicated that two fluorescent heme degradation products are revealed during the interaction of CNP with Hb. Near UV-CD spectroscopy also showed that the microenvironmental changes of heme groups occur after interaction of Hb with CNP. The result of thermal behavior of Hb confirmed the structural changes of protein, which referred to decrease in the Hb stability in the presence of CNP. Indeed, the finding related to structural and functional changes of Hb induced by CNP may be crucial to obtain information regarding the side effects of NPs. Finally, this data reveal much insight into the effects of the interaction on protein structural changes and NP agglomeration, and can correlate the zeta potential of NP-protein complexes with the nature of the principle NP-protein interaction.

  16. A study of ultraviolet spectra of Zeta Aurigae/VV Cephei systems. VII - Chromospheric density distribution and wind acceleration region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, K.-P.

    1985-06-01

    Chromospheric eclipse spectra have been obtained for three Zeta Aurigae binary systems using the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spacecraft. In order to fit average density models to the chromospheres, 3 samples of column densities (for 31 Cygni, 32 Cygni, and Zeta Aurigae K giants) were used. Wind velocities were derived assuming a continuous outflow of matter and a known M-dot value. It is shown that wind acceleration region of Zeta Aurigae underwent a temporary energy deficiency and mass loss at the time of the 1979 eclipse. The density gradients and wind acceleration regions of 31 Cygni and 32 Cygni, were found to be very similar in the corresponding eclipses of 1981 and 1982. The density and velocity structure of 31 and 32 Cygni are represented by power laws which correspond to the Alfven wave driven wind models of Hartmann and McGregor (1980). The location of the main power input per unit mass is also discussed. A sketch of the eclipse geometry of 31 Cygni is provided.

  17. Zeta potential in oil-water-carbonate systems and its impact on oil recovery during controlled salinity water-flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Matthew D.; Al-Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments and field trials have shown that oil recovery from carbonate reservoirs can be increased by modifying the brine composition injected during recovery in a process termed controlled salinity water-flooding (CSW). However, CSW remains poorly understood and there is no method to predict the optimum CSW composition. This work demonstrates for the first time that improved oil recovery (IOR) during CSW is strongly correlated to changes in zeta potential at both the mineral-water and oil-water interfaces. We report experiments in which IOR during CSW occurs only when the change in brine composition induces a repulsive electrostatic force between the oil-brine and mineral-brine interfaces. The polarity of the zeta potential at both interfaces must be determined when designing the optimum CSW composition. A new experimental method is presented that allows this. Results also show for the first time that the zeta potential at the oil-water interface may be positive at conditions relevant to carbonate reservoirs. A key challenge for any model of CSW is to explain why IOR is not always observed. Here we suggest that failures using the conventional (dilution) approach to CSW may have been caused by a positively charged oil-water interface that had not been identified.

  18. Zeta potential in oil-water-carbonate systems and its impact on oil recovery during controlled salinity water-flooding.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew D; Al-Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan

    2016-11-23

    Laboratory experiments and field trials have shown that oil recovery from carbonate reservoirs can be increased by modifying the brine composition injected during recovery in a process termed controlled salinity water-flooding (CSW). However, CSW remains poorly understood and there is no method to predict the optimum CSW composition. This work demonstrates for the first time that improved oil recovery (IOR) during CSW is strongly correlated to changes in zeta potential at both the mineral-water and oil-water interfaces. We report experiments in which IOR during CSW occurs only when the change in brine composition induces a repulsive electrostatic force between the oil-brine and mineral-brine interfaces. The polarity of the zeta potential at both interfaces must be determined when designing the optimum CSW composition. A new experimental method is presented that allows this. Results also show for the first time that the zeta potential at the oil-water interface may be positive at conditions relevant to carbonate reservoirs. A key challenge for any model of CSW is to explain why IOR is not always observed. Here we suggest that failures using the conventional (dilution) approach to CSW may have been caused by a positively charged oil-water interface that had not been identified.

  19. Zeta potential in oil-water-carbonate systems and its impact on oil recovery during controlled salinity water-flooding

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Matthew D.; Al-Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and field trials have shown that oil recovery from carbonate reservoirs can be increased by modifying the brine composition injected during recovery in a process termed controlled salinity water-flooding (CSW). However, CSW remains poorly understood and there is no method to predict the optimum CSW composition. This work demonstrates for the first time that improved oil recovery (IOR) during CSW is strongly correlated to changes in zeta potential at both the mineral-water and oil-water interfaces. We report experiments in which IOR during CSW occurs only when the change in brine composition induces a repulsive electrostatic force between the oil-brine and mineral-brine interfaces. The polarity of the zeta potential at both interfaces must be determined when designing the optimum CSW composition. A new experimental method is presented that allows this. Results also show for the first time that the zeta potential at the oil-water interface may be positive at conditions relevant to carbonate reservoirs. A key challenge for any model of CSW is to explain why IOR is not always observed. Here we suggest that failures using the conventional (dilution) approach to CSW may have been caused by a positively charged oil-water interface that had not been identified. PMID:27876833

  20. Magnetic Fields in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstreet, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Magnetism—the force that deflects the needle of a compass—and magnetic fields have been found in some hundreds of stars during the past 50 yr. Magnetic fields have been detected in T Tauri stars and other pre-main-sequence stars, several types of main sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars. We now know a number of methods by which such magnetic fields may be detected, we are in the proces...

  1. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  2. Dynamic Light Scattering and Zeta Potential of Colloidal Mixtures of Amelogenin and Hydroxyapatite in Calcium and Phosphate Rich Ionic Milieus

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk; Odsinada, Roselyn; Djordjevic, Sonia; Habelitz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The concept of zeta-potential has been used for more than a century as a basic parameter in controlling the stability of colloidal suspensions, irrespective of the nature of their particulate ingredients – organic or inorganic. There are prospects that self-assembly of peptide species and the protein-mineral interactions related to biomineralization may be controlled using this fundamental physicochemical parameter. In this study, we have analyzed the particle size and zeta-potential of the full-length recombinant human amelogenin (rH174), the main protein of the developing enamel matrix, in the presence of calcium and phosphate ions and hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles. As calcium and phosphate salts are introduced to rH174 sols in increments, zeta-potential of the rH174 nanospheres is more affected by negatively charged ions, suggesting their tendency to locate within the double charge layer. Phosphate ions have a more pronounced effect on both the zeta-potential and aggregation propensity of rH174 nanospheres compared to calcium ions. The isoelectric point of amelogenin was independent on the ionic strength of the solution and the concentration of calcium and/or phosphate ions. Whereas rH174 shows a higher affinity for phosphate than for calcium, HAP attracts both of these ions to the shear plane of the double layer. The parallel size and zeta-potential analysis of HAP and rH174 colloidal mixtures indicated that at pH 7.4, despite both HAP and rH174 particles being negatively charged, rH174 adsorbs well onto HAP particles. The process is slower at pH 7.4 than at pH 4.5 when the HAP surface is negatively charged and the rH174 nanosphere carries an overall positive charge. The results presented hereby demonstrate that electrostatic interactions can affect the kinetics of the adsorption of rH174 onto HAP. PMID:21146151

  3. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, D.; Conti, P. S.; Divan, L.; Garmany, C. D.; Henrichs, H. F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Pauldrach, A.; Prévot-Burnichon, M.-L.; Puls, J.; Underhill, A. B.; Thomas, R. N.

    Contents: Perspective (R. N. Thomas).Part I. Introduction (L. Divan, M.-L. Prévot-Burnichon).1. Introducing the O and Wolf-Rayet stars.Part II. One perspective on O, Of, and Wolf-Rayet stars emphasizing winds and mass loss, with remarks on environment and evolution:2. Overview of O, Of, and Wolf-Rayet populations (P. S. Conti). 3. Intrinsic stellar parameters (P. S. Conti, D. Baade). 4. Stellar winds: (a) Introduction (P. S. Conti). (b) Mass loss from O stars (C. D. Garmany). (c) Mass loss in Wolf-Rayetstars (P. S. Conti). (d) Radiation-driven winds of hot luminous stars (R. P. Kudritzki, A. Pauldrach, J. Puls). (e) Intrinsic variability in ultraviolet spectra of early-type stars: the discrete absorption lines (H. Henrichs). 5. Environments and evolution (P. S. Conti).Part III. Another perspective on O, Of, and Wolf-Rayet stars, emphasizing model atmospheres and possibilities for atmospheric heating (A. B. Underhill): 6. Understanding the O and Wolf-Rayet stars. 7. Model Atmospheres and the theoryof spectra for O and Wolf-Rayet stars. 8. The physics of the mantles of hot stars. 9. Summary of processes influencing the spectra of O andWolf-Rayet stars.

  4. On the ionization of the intercloud medium by runaway O-B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, T. X.

    1975-01-01

    H II regions around seven high-velocity stars of type O5 to B1 (lambda Cep, xi Per, 68 Cyg, alpha Cam, AE Aur, zeta Oph, mu Col) are investigated assuming 'on-the-spot' reabsorption of the diffuse UV and time-dependent cooling and recombination behind the stars. Ratios of column densities integrated through the H II regions are obtained for stationary and moving stars, and the ionization structure is calculated for an H II region around a runaway star moving perpendicular to the galactic plane. The total volume ionized is found to be practically independent of the star's velocity. Global properties of the intercloud medium are examined; it is found that the presence of clouds may reduce the volume ionized by as much as a factor of 7 and that as much as 30% of the total ionizing radiation from early-type stars may leak out of the galaxy. Copernicus satellite observations are shown to be consistent with lines of sight crossing only the H II regions around the observed stars and a neutral intercloud medium as well as with the existence of a 'hole' in the distribution of O-B5 stars in the vicinity of the sun.

  5. CCD star trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The application of CCDs to star trackers and star mappers is considered. Advantages and disadvantages of silicon CCD star trackers are compared with those of image dissector star trackers. It is concluded that the CCD has adequate sensitivity for most single star tracking tasks and is distinctly superior in multiple star tracking or mapping applications. The signal and noise figures of several current CCD configurations are discussed. The basic structure of the required signal processing is described, and it is shown that resolution in excess of the number of CCD elements may be had by interpolation.

  6. The Millennium Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, R. W.

    1997-08-01

    Derived from Hipparcos and Tycho observations, the Millennium Star Atlas is a set of 1548 charts covering the entire sky to about magnitude 11. It stands apart from all previous printed atlases in completeness to magnitude 10 and in uniformity around the sky. The generous chart scale has made possible a number of innovations never before seen in a star atlas: arrows on high-proper-motion stars, double-star ticks conveying separation and position angle for a specific modern epoch, distance labels for nearby stars, and variable stars coded by amplitude, period, and type. Among the nonstellar objects plotted, more than 8000 galaxies are shown with aspect ratio and orientation.

  7. Multi-reference Hartree-Fock configuration interaction calculations of LiH and Be using a new double-zeta atomic base.

    PubMed

    de Cerqueira Sobrinho, Antonio Moreira; de Andrade, Micael Dias; Nascimento, Marco Antônio Chaer; Malbouisson, Luiz Augusto Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we propose new double-zeta atomic bases for the Li and Be atoms. These were obtained by applying the Hartree-Fock-Gauss generalized simulated annealing (GSA) method-a modified form of the GSA algorithm. The new bases were generated through optimization of the atomic electronic energy functional with regards to the linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) coefficients, and exponent and contraction coefficients of the primitive Gaussian functions, simultaneously. These new bases were tested by performing calculations of the ground state energy of the Be atom, and the ground state energy and permanent electrical dipole moment of the LiH molecule, using the multi-reference Hartree-Fock (HF) configuration interaction method-a multi-reference method based on multiple HF solutions. In addition, multi-reference HF configuration interaction calculations were performed for the Be atom using the standard double-zeta, triple-zeta and polarized double-zeta bases. With the new double-zeta bases and with reduced multi-reference HF bases, it was possible to obtain lower energies than those obtained with the full configuration interaction calculations using the standard double-zeta bases and dipole moment values in close agreement with experimental values.

  8. Interactions of stars and interstellar matter in Scorpio Centaurus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Geus, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of the stars in the Scorpio-Centaurus OB association with the ambient interstellar medium is investigated. Large H I loops in the fourth galactic quadrant are parts of expanding shells surrounding the subgroups of the association. The energy output of the original stellar population of the subgroups is calculated. Comparison with the kinetic energy of the shells shows that the energy output of the stars in the subgroups is sufficient to form the shells. The masses of the shells are consistent with those of giant molecular clouds GMCs, suggesting that the shells consist of swept-up, original GMC material. The influence of the expanding shell around the young Upper-Scorpius subgroup on the morphology of the Ophiuchus molecular clouds is investigated. The interaction of the shell with the Ophiuchus clouds accounts for the presence of a slow shock and for the shape of the elongated dark clouds connected to the Rho Oph dense cloud. The close passage of the trajectory of the runaway star Zeta Oph by the center of the Upper-Scorpius shell, combined with the time scale of formation of the shell, strongly suggests that the star has originated in the Upper-Scorpius subgroup.

  9. The chemical composition of the mild barium star HD 202109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, A. V.; Gopka, V. F.; Kim, C.; Liang, Y. C.; Musaev, F. A.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We present chemical abundances of the mild barium star HD 202109 (\\zeta Cyg) determined from the analysis of a spectrum obtained by using the 2-m telescope at the Peak Terskol Observatory and a high-resolution spectrometer with R=80 000, signal to noise ratio >100. We also present the atmospheric parameters of the star determined using various methods including iron-line abundance analysis. For line identifications, we use whole-range synthetic spectra computed from Kurucz's database and the latest lists of spectral lines. Among the determined abundances of 51 elements, those of P, S, K, Cu, Zn, Ge, Rb, Sr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, In, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Hf, Os, Ir, Pt, Tl, and Pb were not investigated previously. Assuming that the overabundance pattern of Ba stars is due to binary accretion, the observed abundance pattern of the neutron-capture process elements in HD 202109 can be explained by combining the AGB star nucleosynthesis and the wind accretion scenario. Based on observations obtained at the 2-m telescope of Peak Terskol observatory near Mt. Elbrus, Northern Caucasus, Russia - International Center for Astronomical, Medical and Ecological Research (ICAMER), Ukraine & Russia.

  10. Protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin films: role of electrostatic interactions inferred from zeta-potential measurements versus chemisorption.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Frisch, Benoît; Ringwald, Christian; Ball, Vincent

    2010-04-01

    We recently showed the possibility to build dopamine-melanin films of controlled thickness by successive immersions of a substrate in alkaline solutions of dopamine [F. Bernsmann, A. Ponche, C. Ringwald, J. Hemmerlé, J. Raya, B. Bechinger, J.-C. Voegel, P. Schaaf, V. Ball, J. Phys. Chem. C 113 (2009) 8234-8242]. In this work the structure and properties of such films are further explored. The zeta-potential of dopamine-melanin films is measured as a function of the total immersion time to build the film. It appears that the film bears a constant zeta-potential of (-39+/-3) mV after 12 immersion steps. These data are used to calculate the surface density of charged groups of the dopamine-melanin films at pH 8.5 that are mostly catechol or quinone imine chemical groups. Furthermore the zeta-potential is used to explain the adsorption of three model proteins (lysozyme, myoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin), which is monitored by quartz crystal microbalance. We come to the conclusion that protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin is not only determined by possible covalent binding between amino groups of the proteins and catechol groups of dopamine-melanin but that electrostatic interactions contribute to protein binding. Part of the adsorbed proteins can be desorbed by sodium dodecylsulfate solutions at the critical micellar concentration. The fraction of weakly bound proteins decreases with their isoelectric point. Additionally the number of available sites for covalent binding of amino groups on melanin grains is quantified.

  11. Sloshing Star Goes Supernova

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-19

    NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

  12. Assembly Line of Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-06

    This image from NASA Herschel, in the constellation of Vulpecula, shows an entire assembly line of newborn stars. The diffuse glow reveals the widespread cold reservoir of raw material that our Milky Way galaxy has in stock for building stars.

  13. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  14. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  15. Astrophysics: Stars fight back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies contain fewer stars than predicted. The discovery of a massive galactic outflow of molecular gas in a compact galaxy, which forms stars 100 times faster than the Milky Way, may help to explain why. See Letter p.68

  16. AgSTAR Accomplishments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Showcases AgSTAR's accomplishments reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the agriculture sector. Through outreach, education, training, and other tools, AgSTAR continues to help evaluate, construct, and maintain anaerobic digesters on livestock farms.

  17. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  18. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  19. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

  20. Another Death Star?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    Although Mimas holds the unofficial designation of Death Star moon, Tethys is seen here also vaguely resembling the space station from Star Wars. Apparently, Tethys doesnt want Mimas to have all the fun!

  1. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  2. Quasi-SMILES and nano-QFPR: The predictive model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, Andrey A.; Achary, P. Ganga Raju; Toropova, Alla P.

    2016-09-01

    Building up of the predictive quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) for nanomaterials usually are impossible owing to the complexity of the molecular architecture of the nanomaterials. Simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) is a tool to represent the molecular architecture of ;traditional; molecules for "traditional" QSPR/QSAR. The quasi-SMILES is a tool to represent features (conditions and circumstances), which accompany the behavior of nanomaterials. Having, the training set and validation set, so-called quantitative feature-property relationships (QFPRs), based on the quasi-SMILES, one can build up model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles for situations characterized by different features.

  3. Segmented all-electron Gaussian basis sets of double and triple zeta qualities for Fr, Ra, and Ac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, C. T.; de Oliveira, A. Z.; Ferreira, I. B.; Jorge, F. E.; Martins, L. S. C.

    2017-05-01

    Segmented all-electron basis sets of valence double and triple zeta qualities plus polarization functions for the elements Fr, Ra, and Ac are generated using non-relativistic and Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) Hamiltonians. The sets are augmented with diffuse functions with the purpose to describe appropriately the electrons far from the nuclei. At the DKH-B3LYP level, first atomic ionization energies and bond lengths, dissociation energies, and polarizabilities of a sample of diatomics are calculated. Comparison with theoretical and experimental data available in the literature is carried out. It is verified that despite the small sizes of the basis sets, they are yet reliable.

  4. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  5. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  6. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  7. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  8. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-08

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it.

  9. Prediction of the zeta potentials and ionic descriptors of a silica hydride stationary phase with mobile phases of different pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the zeta potentials of a silica hydride stationary phase (Diamond Hydride™) in the presence of different water-acetonitrile mixtures (from 0-80% (v/v) acetonitrile) of different ionic strengths (from 0-40mM) and pH values (from pH 3.0-7.0) have been investigated. Debye-Hückel theory was applied to explain the effect of changes in the pH and ionic strength of these aqueous media on the negative zeta potential of this stationary phase. The experimental zeta potentials of the Diamond Hydride™ particles as a function of acetonitrile content up to 50% (v/v) correlated (R(2)=0.998) with the predicted zeta potential values based on this established theory, when the values of the dissociation constant of all related species, as well as viscosity, dielectric constant and refractive index of the aqueous medium were taken into consideration. Further, the retention behavior of basic, acidic and neutral analytes was investigated under mobile phase conditions of higher pH and lower ionic strength. Under these conditions, the Diamond Hydride™ stationary phase surface became more negative, as assessed from the increasingly more negative zeta potentials, resulting in the ion exchange characteristics becoming more dominant and the basic analytes showing increasing retention. Ionic descriptors were derived from these chromatographic experiments based on the assumption that linear solvation energy relationships prevail. The results were compared with predicted ionic descriptors based on the different calculated zeta potential values resulting in an overall correlation of R(2)=0.888. These studies provide fundamental insights into the impact on the separation performance of changes in the zeta potential of the Diamond Hydride™ surface with the results relevant to other silica hydride and, potentially, to other types of stationary phase materials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The influence of zeta potential and yield stress on the filtration characteristics of a magnesium hydroxide simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, Simon; Nabi, Rafiq; Poole, Colin

    2007-07-01

    In the UK, irradiated fuels from Magnox reactors are often stored in water-filled ponds under alkaline conditions, so as to minimise corrosion of fuel cladding. This is important to prevent or reduce leakage of soluble fission products and actinides to the pond water. A variety of intermediate level wastes derived from Magnox materials are stored at power stations. Under these alkaline conditions, various species of magnesium are formed, of which magnesium hydroxide is the dominant material. The particle-fluid interactions are significant for the design and operation of facilities for hydraulic retrieval, filtration, dewatering and ion exchange treatment of fuel storage pond water and stored wet Magnox wastes. Here we describe a study of particulate properties and filtration characteristics of oxide particle simulants under laboratory conditions. Cake and medium resistance data were correlated across a range of pH conditions with electro-acoustic zeta potential and shear yield stress measurements, as a function of particle volume fractions. The influence of zeta potential on filtration properties arises directly from the interaction of particles within the sediment cake. (authors)

  11. Joule heating effects on electromagnetohydrodynamic flow through a peristaltically induced micro-channel with different zeta potential and wall slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, N. K.; Shit, G. C.

    2017-09-01

    This paper aims to develop a mathematical model for magnetohydrodynamic flow of biofluids through a hydrophobic micro-channel with periodically contracting and expanding walls under the influence of an axially applied electric field. The velocity slip effects have been taken into account at the channel walls by employing different slip lengths due to hydrophobic gating. Different temperature jump factors have also been used to investigate the thermomechanical interactions at the fluid-solid interface. The electromagnetohydrodynamic flow in a microchannel is simplified under the framework of Debye-Hückel linearization approximation. We have derived the closed-form solutions for the linearized dimensionless boundary value problem under the assumptions of long wave length and low Reynolds number. The axial velocity, temperature, pressure distribution, stream function, wall shear stress and the Nusselt number have been appraised for diverse values of the parameters approaching into the problem. Our main focus is to determine the effects of different zeta potential on the axial velocity and temperature distribution under electromagnetic environment. This study puts forward an important observation that the different zeta potential plays an important role in controlling fluid velocity. The study further reveals that the temperature increases significantly with the Joule heating parameter and the Brinkman number (arises due to the dissipation of energy).

  12. Characterization of an effective cleaning procedure for aluminum alloys: surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and zeta potential analysis.

    PubMed

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Shen, Tien H; Esposito, Anthony P; Tillotson, Thomas M

    2005-02-01

    We have developed a cleaning procedure for aluminum alloys for effective minimization of surface-adsorbed sub-micrometer particles and nonvolatile residue. The procedure consists of a phosphoric acid etch followed by an alkaline detergent wash. To better understand the mechanism whereby this procedure reduces surface contaminants, we characterized the aluminum surface as a function of cleaning step using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS indicates that phosphoric acid etching re-establishes a surface oxide of different characteristics, including deposition of phosphate and increased hydration, while the subsequent alkaline detergent wash appears to remove the phosphate and modify the new surface oxide, possibly leading to a more compact surface oxide. We also studied the zeta potential of <5 microm pure aluminum and aluminum alloy 6061-T6 particles to determine how surface electrostatics may be affected during the cleaning process. The particles show a decrease in the magnitude of their zeta potential in the presence of detergent, and this effect is most pronounced for particles that have been etched with phosphoric acid.

  13. Characterization of an Effective Cleaning Procedure for Aluminum Alloys: Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Zeta Potential Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Shen, T H; Esposito, A P; Tillotson, T M

    2004-06-02

    We have developed a cleaning procedure for aluminum alloys for effective minimization of surface-adsorbed sub-micron particles and non-volatile residue. The procedure consists of a phosphoric acid etch followed by an alkaline detergent wash. To better understand the mechanism whereby this procedure reduces surface contaminants, we characterized the aluminum surface as a function of cleaning step using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). SERS indicates that phosphoric acid etching re-establishes a surface oxide of different characteristics, including deposition of phosphate and increased hydration, while the subsequent alkaline detergent wash appears to remove the phosphate and modify the new surface oxide, possibly leading to a more compact surface oxide. We also studied the zeta potential of <5 micron pure aluminum and aluminum alloy 6061-T6 particles to determine how surface electrostatics may be affected during the cleaning process. The particles show a decrease in the magnitude of their zeta potential in the presence of detergent, and this effect is most pronounced for particles that have been etched with phosphoric acid. This reduction in magnitude of the surface attractive potential is in agreement with our observation that the phosphoric acid etch followed by detergent wash results in a decrease in surface-adsorbed sub-micron particulates.

  14. Zeta potential measurement on the surface of blue-green algae particles for micro-bubble process.

    PubMed

    Taki, Kazuo; Seki, Tatsuhiro; Mononobe, Sakiyori; Kato, Kohichi

    2008-01-01

    Any kind of blue-green alga produces metabolites of musty substances and toxins. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the blue-green algae, and processing also including nutrient removal is desired for the water quality improvement of eutrophic lakes. The purpose of this study has been to investigate the possibility of a flotation system using a hybrid technique (chemical compounds and electrostatic bridge) applied to raw water containing phytoplankton with high pH of water, and to examine the zeta potential value of phytoplankton surface and the removal efficiency for phytoplankton, ammonia, nitrogen, and phosphoric acid. The results were as follows: firstly, zeta potential of M. aeruginosa particles was observed to achieve charge neutralization on their surface by adhesion of magnesium hydroxide precipitation with increasing pH. Secondly, maximum removal efficiency concerning chlorophyll-a was observed as 84%, and this efficiency was obtained in the condition of pH > 10, and magnesium hydroxide precipitation was observed. Thirdly, in the pH condition that the maximum removal efficiency of chlorophyll-a was obtained, the removal efficiency and the amount of decrease of NH(4)-N and PO(4)-P before and after the change of pH values were observed as 6.7% (0.04 mg-P/L) and 63.6% (0.07 mg-N/L), respectively.

  15. REV1 restrains DNA polymerase zeta to ensure frame fidelity during translesion synthesis of UV photoproducts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Szüts, Dávid; Marcus, Adam P; Himoto, Masayuki; Iwai, Shigenori; Sale, Julian E

    2008-12-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet light induces a number of forms of damage in DNA, of which (6-4) photoproducts present the most formidable challenge to DNA replication. No single DNA polymerase has been shown to bypass these lesions efficiently in vitro suggesting that the coordinate use of a number of different enzymes is required in vivo. To further understand the mechanisms and control of lesion bypass in vivo, we have devised a plasmid-based system to study the replication of site-specific T-T(6-4) photoproducts in chicken DT40 cells. We show that DNA polymerase zeta is absolutely required for translesion synthesis (TLS) of this lesion, while loss of DNA polymerase eta has no detectable effect. We also show that either the polymerase-binding domain of REV1 or ubiquitinated PCNA is required for the recruitment of Polzeta as the catalytic TLS polymerase. Finally, we demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for REV1 in ensuring bypass synthesis remains in frame with the template. Our data therefore suggest that REV1 not only helps to coordinate the delivery of DNA polymerase zeta to a stalled primer terminus but also restrains its activity to ensure that nucleotides are incorporated in register with the template strand.

  16. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  17. Effect of mutations mimicking phosphorylation on the structure and properties of human 14-3-3zeta.

    PubMed

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Chernik, Ivan S; Seit-Nebi, Alim S; Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Levitsky, Dmitrii I; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2008-09-15

    Effect of mutations mimicking phosphorylation on the structure of human 14-3-3zeta protein was analyzed by different methods. Mutation S58E increased intrinsic Trp fluorescence and binding of bis-ANS to 14-3-3. At low protein concentration mutation S58E increased the probability of dissociation of dimeric 14-3-3 and its susceptibility to proteolysis. Mutation S184E slightly increased Stokes radius and thermal stability of 14-3-3. Mutation T232E induced only small increase of Stokes radius and sedimentation coefficient that probably reflect the changes in the size or shape of 14-3-3. At low protein concentration the triple mutant S58E/S184E/T232E tended to dissociate, whereas at high concentration its properties were comparable with those of the wild type protein. The triple mutant was highly susceptible to proteolysis. Thus, mutation mimicking phosphorylation of Ser58 destabilized, whereas mutation of Ser184 induced stabilization of 14-3-3zeta structure.

  18. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  19. A Star Close Encounter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-03

    The potential planet-forming disk (or "protoplanetary disk") of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. At up to 100 times the mass of sun-like stars, O stars are the most massive and energetic stars in the universe. The O star can be seen to the right of the image, as the large orange spot with the white center. To the left, the comet-like structure is actually a neighboring solar system that is being destroyed by the O star's powerful winds and intense ultraviolet light. In a process called "photoevaporation," immense output from the O star heats up the nearby protoplanetary disk so much that gas and dust boil off, and the disk can no longer hold together. Photon (or light) blasts from the O star then strip the potential planet-forming disk off its neighbor star by blowing away evaporated material. This effect is illustrated in the smaller system's comet-like structure. The system is located about 2,450 light-years away in the star-forming cloud IC 1396. The image was taken with Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer instrument at 24 microns. The picture is a pseudo-color stretch representing intensity. Yellow and white represent hot areas, whereas purple and blue represent relatively cooler, fainter regions.

  20. Star field simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A Star Field Simulator has been developed to serve as a source of radiation for the ASTRO Star Tracker. The star tracker and simulator are components of a motion compensation test facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Preflight tests and simulations using various levels of guide stars are performed in the test facility to establish performance of the motion compensation system before being used in a flight environment. The ASTRO Star Tracker operates over a wide dynamic range of irradiance corresponding to visual stellar magnitudes of -0.8 to 8. A minimum of three simulated guide stars with variable magnitudes are needed to fully test the Star Tracker performance under simulated mission conditions.

  1. Spectrophotometry of Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David

    2017-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are fascinating objects - complex binary systems comprising a cool red giant star and a small hot object, often a white dwarf, both embedded in a nebula formed by a wind from the giant star. UV radiation from the hot star ionises the nebula producing a range of emission lines. These objects have composite spectra with contributions from both stars plus the nebula and these spectra can change on many timescales. Being moderately bright, they lend themselves well to amateur spectroscopy. This paper describes the symbiotic star phenomenon, shows how spectrophotometry can be used to extract astrophysically useful information about the nature of these systems, and gives results for three symbiotic stars based on the author's observations.

  2. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  3. Molecular cloning of the CD3 eta subunit identifies a CD3 zeta-related product in thymus-derived cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Y J; Clayton, L K; Howard, F D; Koyasu, S; Sieh, M; Steinbrich, R; Tarr, G E; Reinherz, E L

    1990-01-01

    The CD3 eta subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor forms a heterodimeric structure with the CD3 zeta subunit in thymus-derived lymphoid cells and is apparently involved in signal transduction through the receptor. Here we report the primary structure of murine CD3 eta as deduced from protein microsequencing and cDNA cloning. The mature protein is divided into three domains: a 9-amino acid extracellular segment, a 21-amino acid transmembrane segment including a negatively charged residue characteristic of CD3 subunits, and a 155-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. The NH2-terminal sequences of CD3 eta and CD3 zeta are identical through amino acid 122 of each mature protein but then diverge in the remainder of their respective COOH-terminal regions, consistent with alternatively spliced products of a common gene. The cytoplasmic domain of CD3 eta is 42 amino acids larger than that of CD3 zeta but lacks one of six potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites as well as a putative nucleotide binding site previously identified in CD3 zeta. These structural features presumably account for the difference between CD3 eta and CD3 zeta function and are consistent with the notion that CD3 eta may be an important component of a T-cell receptor isoform(s) during thymic development. Images PMID:2139725

  4. Fuzzy-PI-based centralised control of semi-isolated FP-SEPIC/ZETA BDC in a PV/battery hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendran, Venmathi; Ramabadran, Ramaprabha

    2016-11-01

    Multiport converters with centralised controller have been most commonly used in stand-alone photovoltaic (PV)/battery hybrid system to supply the load smoothly without any disturbances. This study presents the performance analysis of four-port SEPIC/ZETA bidirectional converter (FP-SEPIC/ZETA BDC) using various types of centralised control schemes like Fuzzy tuned proportional integral controller (Fuzzy-PI), fuzzy logic controller (FLC) and conventional proportional integral (PI) controller. The proposed FP-SEPIC/ZETA BDC with various control strategy is derived for simultaneous power management of a PV source using distributed maximum power point tracking (DMPPT) algorithm, a rechargeable battery, and a load by means of centralised controller. The steady state and the dynamic response of the FP-SEPIC/ZETA BDC are analysed using three different types of controllers under line and load regulation. The Fuzzy-PI-based control scheme improves the dynamic response of the system when compared with the FLC and the conventional PI controller. The power balance between the ports is achieved by pseudorandom carrier modulation scheme. The response of the FP-SEPIC/ZETA BDC is also validated experimentally using hardware prototype model of 500 W system. The effectiveness of the control strategy is validated using simulation and experimental results.

  5. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  6. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  7. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  8. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  9. STAR in CTO PCI: When is STAR not a star?

    PubMed

    Hira, Ravi S; Dean, Larry S

    2016-04-01

    Subintimal tracking and reentry (STAR) has been used as a bailout strategy and involves an uncontrolled dissection and recanalization into the distal lumen to reestablish vessel patency. In the current study, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow < 3 was the only variable which they found to be significantly associated with restenosis and reocclusion after stent placement. It may be reasonable to consider second generation drug eluting stent placement in patients receiving STAR that have TIMI 3 flow, however, this should only be done if there is no compromise of major side branches. If unsure, we recommend to perform balloon angioplasty without stenting. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    The standard cosmological model predicts that the first cosmological objects are formed when the age of the universe is a few hundred million years. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations consistently suggest that the first objects are very massive primordial stars. We introduce the key physics and explain why the first stars are thought to be massive, rather than to be low-mass stars. The state-of-the-art simulations include all the relevant atomic and molecular physics to follow the thermal evolution of a prestellar gas cloud to very high ``stellar'' densities. Evolutionary calculations of the primordial stars suggest the formation of massive blackholes in the early universe. Finally, we show the results from high-resolution simulations of star formation in a low-metallicity gas. Vigorous fragmentation is triggered in a star-forming gas cloud at a metallicity of as low as Z = 10-5Zsolar.

  11. Equilibrium Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2006-04-01

    We argue that rich star clusters take at least several local dynamical times to form and so are quasi-equilibrium structures during their assembly. Observations supporting this conclusion include morphologies of star-forming clumps, momentum flux of protostellar outflows from forming clusters, age spreads of stars in the Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) and other clusters, and the age of a dynamical ejection event from the ONC. We show that these long formation timescales are consistent with the expected star formation rate in turbulent gas, as recently evaluated by Krumholz & McKee. Finally, we discuss the implications of these timescales for star formation efficiencies, the disruption of gas by stellar feedback, mass segregation of stars, and the longevity of turbulence in molecular clumps.

  12. Age-Defying Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    An age-defying star called IRAS 19312+1950 exhibits features characteristic of a very young star and a very old star. The object stands out as extremely bright inside a large, chemically rich cloud of material, as shown in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. IRAS 19312+1950 is the bright red star in the center of this image. A NASA-led team of scientists thinks the star -- which is about 10 times as massive as our sun and emits about 20,000 times as much energy -- is a newly forming protostar. That was a big surprise, because the region had not been known as a stellar nursery before. But the presence of a nearby interstellar bubble, which indicates the presence of a recently formed massive star, also supports this idea. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20914

  13. A human transmembrane protein-tyrosine-phosphatase, PTP zeta, is expressed in brain and has an N-terminal receptor domain homologous to carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, N X; Saito, H

    1992-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (PTPases, EC 3.1.3.48) play a crucial role in the regulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Recently, it was found that the PTPase gene family exhibits a large variety of different functional domains associated with the PTPase catalytic domains. In this paper, we report the complete cDNA sequence of a human transmembrane PTPase, PTP zeta, isolated from fetal brain cDNA libraries. The deduced amino acid sequence of human PTP zeta is composed of a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids, a very large extracellular domain of 1616 amino acids, a transmembrane peptide of 26 amino acids, and a cytoplasmic domain of 653 amino acids. The extracellular portion of human PTP zeta contains two striking structural features: the N-terminal 280-amino acid sequence that is homologous to carbonic anhydrases (carbonate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.1), and a sequence of 1048 amino acids without a cysteine residue. While it is unlikely that the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTP zeta has any carbonic anhydrase activity, its three-dimensional structure may be quite similar to that of carbonic anhydrases, a structure that appears ideal for binding a small soluble ligand. The cytoplasmic portion of human PTP zeta contains two repeated PTPase-like domains, which, when expressed in Escherichia coli, had PTPase activity in vitro. Mutational analyses indicate that only the membrane-proximal PTPase domain is catalytically active. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses indicate that human PTP zeta is highly expressed in a glioblastoma cell line. Images PMID:1323835

  14. Proteomic identification of 14-3-3zeta as a mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 substrate: role in dimer formation and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Powell, David W; Rane, Madhavi J; Joughin, Brian A; Kalmukova, Ralitsa; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Tidor, Bruce; Dean, William L; Pierce, William M; Klein, Jon B; Yaffe, Michael B; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2003-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) mediates multiple p38 MAPK-dependent inflammatory responses. To define the signal transduction pathways activated by MAPKAPK2, we identified potential MAPKAPK2 substrates by using a functional proteomic approach consisting of in vitro phosphorylation of neutrophil lysate by active recombinant MAPKAPK2, protein separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and phosphoprotein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and protein database analysis. One of the eight candidate MAPKAPK2 substrates identified was the adaptor protein, 14-3-3zeta. We confirmed that MAPKAPK2 interacted with and phosphorylated 14-3-3zeta in vitro and in HEK293 cells. The chemoattractant formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) stimulated p38-MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of 14-3-3 proteins in human neutrophils. Mutation analysis showed that MAPKAPK2 phosphorylated 14-3-3zeta at Ser-58. Computational modeling and calculation of theoretical binding energies predicted that both phosphorylation at Ser-58 and mutation of Ser-58 to Asp (S58D) compromised the ability of 14-3-3zeta to dimerize. Experimentally, S58D mutation significantly impaired both 14-3-3zeta dimerization and binding to Raf-1. These data suggest that MAPKAPK2-mediated phosphorylation regulates 14-3-3zeta functions, and this MAPKAPK2 activity may represent a novel pathway mediating p38 MAPK-dependent inflammation.

  15. Zeta potential of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and Ca adsorption at the cell surface: possible implications for cell protection from CaCO3 precipitation in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Bundeleva, Irina A; Shirokova, Liudmila S; Bénézeth, Pascale; Pokrovsky, Oleg S; Kompantseva, Elena I; Balor, Stephanie

    2011-08-01

    Electrophoretic mobility measurements and surface adsorption of Ca on living, inactivated, and heat-killed haloalkaliphilic Rhodovulum steppense, A-20s, and halophilic Rhodovulum sp., S-17-65 anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (APB) cell surfaces were performed to determine the degree to which these bacteria metabolically control their surface potential equilibria. Zeta potential of both species was measured as a function of pH and ionic strength, calcium and bicarbonate concentrations. For both live APB in 0.1M NaCl, the zeta potential is close to zero at pH from 2.5 to 3 and decreases to -30 to -40 mV at pH of 5-8. In alkaline solutions, there is an unusual increase of zeta potential with a maximum value of -10 to -20 mV at a pH of 9-10.5. This increase of zeta potential in alkaline solutions is reduced by the presence of NaHCO(3) (up to 10 mM) and only slightly affected by the addition of equivalent amount of Ca. At the same time, for inactivated (exposure to NaN(3), a metabolic inhibitor) and heat-killed bacteria cells, the zeta potential was found to be stable (-30 to -60 mV, depending upon the ionic strength) between pH 5 and 11 without any increase in alkaline solutions. Adsorption of Ca ions on A-20s cells surface was more significant than that on S-17-65 cells and started at more acidic pHs, consistent with zeta potential measurements in the presence of 0.001-0.01 mol/L CaCl(2). Overall, these results indicate that APB can metabolically control their surface potential to electrostatically attract nutrients at alkaline pH, while rejecting/avoiding Ca ions to prevent CaCO(3) precipitation in the vicinity of cell surface and thus, cell incrustation.

  16. Numerical analysis of the zeta potential regarding the characteristics of a ring-type electro-osmotic mixer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyeon-Seok; Kim, Tae-An; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2011-07-01

    The micromixer that is applied for the electro-osmotic effect in this study, which is a passive type, takes two fluids from different inlets and combines them into a single channel. The fluids then enter the mixing chamber with different inner and outer radii. Four microelectrodes are positioned on the outer wall of the mixing chamber. The electric potentials on the four microelectrodes are sinusoidal for certain values of the time, voltage, zeta potential, and frequency. In order to check the validity of the two-dimensional numerical analysis that already has been performed, we performed a three-dimensional numerical analysis using a commercial code, COMSOL. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved in this model, with a slip boundary condition on the inner and outer walls of the mixing chamber. The results of two- and three-dimensional models are graphically depicted and compared from the viewpoint of streamlines and concentration.

  17. A novel conductivity mechanism of highly disordered carbon systems based on an investigation of graph zeta function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Shigeki; Sato, Iwao

    2017-09-01

    In the previous report (Matsutani and Suzuki, 2000 [21]), by proposing the mechanism under which electric conductivity is caused by the activational hopping conduction with the Wigner surmise of the level statistics, the temperature-dependent of electronic conductivity of a highly disordered carbon system was evaluated including apparent metal-insulator transition. Since the system consists of small pieces of graphite, it was assumed that the reason why the level statistics appears is due to the behavior of the quantum chaos in each granular graphite. In this article, we revise the assumption and show another origin of the Wigner surmise, which is more natural for the carbon system based on a recent investigation of graph zeta function in graph theory. Our method can be applied to the statistical treatment of the electronic properties of the randomized molecular system in general.

  18. SIRTF and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Four problems in the field of star formation that can be attacked to advantage with SIRTF are discussed: (1) the patterns of star formation in spiral galaxies, (2) the physical mechanism for bimodal star formation, (3) the nature of bipolar outflows from young stellar objects, and (4) the birth of brown dwarfs. In each case, SIRTF can provide the crucial combination of high angular resolution with great sensitivity over a broad range of wavelengths that is needed to address the relevant issues.

  19. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-06

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  20. The Theatre of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavedon, M.; Peri, F.

    Planetariums are special instruments in education and didactics of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Since 1930 the Planetarium of Milan, the most important planetarium in Italy, has played a fundamental role in outreach to the public. Italian tradition always preferred didactics in ``live'' lessons. Now technology expands the potential of the star projector and the theatre of stars is a real window on the universe, where you can travel among the stars and galaxies, to reach the boundaries of space and time.

  1. Nagyszombat and the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsoldos, E.

    Péter Pázmány, founder of the University of Nagyszombat, considered stars in terms inherited from medieval times. The theses, connected to the university graduation, soon left this definition, and imagined stars as made from sublunar elements. The 1753 decree of the Empress Maria Theresia ordered university professors to publish textbooks. These textbooks, together with the theses showed a definite improvement, defining stars according to contemporary knowledge.

  2. The IUE Mega Campaign: Wind Variability and Rotation in Early-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.; Nichols, J. S.; Owocki, S. P.; Prinja, R. K.; St-Louis, N.; Willis, A. J.; Altner, B.; Bolton, C. T.; Cassinelli, J. P.; hide

    1995-01-01

    Wind variability in OB stars may be ubiquitous and a connection between projected stellar rotation velocity and wind activity is well established. However, the origin of this connection is unknown. To probe the nature of the rotation connection, several of the attendees at the workshop on Instability and Variability of Hot-Star Winds drafted an IUE observing proposal. The goal of this program was to follow three stars for several rotations to determine whether the rotation connection is correlative or causal. The stars selected for monitoring all have rotation periods less than or equal to 5 days. They were HD 50896 (WN5), HD 64760 (BO.5 Ib), and HD 66811 (zeta Pup; 04 If(n)). During 16 days of nearly continuous observations in 1995 January (dubbed the 'MEGA' campaign), 444 high-dispersion IUE spectra of these stars were obtained. This Letter presents an overview of the results of the MEGA campaign and provides an introduction to the three following Letters, which discuss the results for each star.

  3. Detection of Colistin-Resistant MCR-1-Positive Escherichia coli Using Inhibition by EDTA and Zeta Potential Assays.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fernanda; Fernandes, Miriam R; Lopes, Ralf; Muñoz, Maria; Sabino, Caetano P; Cunha, Marcos P; Silva, Ketrin C; Cayô, Rodrigo; Martins, Willames M; Moreno, Andrea M; Knöbl, Terezinha; Gales, Ana C; Lincopan, Nilton

    2017-10-04

    The emergence and rapid dissemination of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli carrying the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene has created an urgent need to develop specific screening methods. In this study, we evaluate four assays based on the inhibition of the MCR-1 activity by EDTA: i) a combined disk test (CDT) comparing the inhibition zones of colistin (10 μg) and colistin-plus-EDTA (10 μg-plus-100 mM); ii) reduction of colistin MIC (CMR) in the presence of EDTA (80 μg/mL); iii) a modified rapid polymyxin Nordmann/Poirel test (MPNP) and; iv) alteration of Zeta potential (RZP= ZP+EDTA/ZP-EDTA). We obtained encouraging results for detection of MCR-1 in E. coli isolates recovered from human, food, and animal samples, using the following assay parameters: ≥3 mm difference in the inhibition zones between colistin disks without and with EDTA; ≥4-fold colistin MIC decrease in the presence of EDTA; RZP ≥2.5; and absence of metabolic activity and proliferation, indicated by unchanged color of phenol red, in the presence of colistin/EDTA, in the MPNP test. In this regard, the CDT, CMR, RZP and MPNP assays exhibited sensitivities of 96.7, 96.7, 95.1 and 96.7%, and specificities of 89.6, 83.3, 100 and 100%, respectively, for detecting MCR-1-positive E. coli Our results demonstrate that inhibition by EDTA and Zeta potential assays may provide simple and inexpensive methods for the presumptive detection of MCR-1-producing E. coli in human and veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Variability in Bioreactivity Linked to Changes in Size and Zeta Potential of Diesel Exhaust Particles in Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Srijata; Zhang, Lin; Subramaniam, Prasad; Lee, Ki-Bum; Garfunkel, Eric; Strickland, Pamela A. Ohman.; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lioy, Paul J.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Ryan, Mary; Porter, Alex; Schwander, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Acting as fuel combustion catalysts to increase fuel economy, cerium dioxide (ceria, CeO2) nanoparticles have been used in Europe as diesel fuel additives (Envirox™). We attempted to examine the effects of particles emitted from a diesel engine burning either diesel (diesel exhaust particles, DEP) or diesel doped with various concentrations of CeO2 (DEP-Env) on innate immune responses in THP-1 and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Batches of DEP and DEP-Env were obtained on three separate occasions using identical collection and extraction protocols with the aim of determining the reproducibility of particles generated at different times. However, we observed significant differences in size and surface charge (zeta potential) of the DEP and DEP-Env across the three batches. We also observed that exposure of THP-1 cells and PBMC to identical concentrations of DEP and DEP-Env from the three batches resulted in statistically significant differences in bioreactivity as determined by IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-12p40 mRNA (by qRT-PCR) and protein expression (by ELISPOT assays). Importantly, bioreactivity was noted in very tight ranges of DEP size (60 to 120 nm) and zeta potential (−37 to −41 mV). Thus, these physical properties of DEP and DEP-Env were found to be the primary determinants of the bioreactivity measured in this study. Our findings also point to the potential risk of over- or under- estimation of expected bioreactivity effects (and by inference of public health risks) from bulk DEP use without taking into account potential batch-to-batch variations in physical (and possibly chemical) properties. PMID:24825358

  5. An exact trace formula and zeta functions for an infinite quantum graph with a non-standard Weyl asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Sebastian Egger né; Steiner, Frank

    2011-05-01

    We study a quantum Hamiltonian that is given by the (negative) Laplacian and an infinite chain of δ-like potentials with strength κ > 0 on the half line { R}_{\\ge 0} and which is equivalent to a one-parameter family of Laplacians on an infinite metric graph. This graph consists of an infinite chain of edges with the metric structure defined by assigning an interval In = [0, ln], n\\in { N}, to each edge with length l_n=\\frac{\\pi }{n}. We show that the one-parameter family of quantum graphs possesses a purely discrete and strictly positive spectrum for each κ > 0 and prove that the Dirichlet Laplacian is the limit of the one-parameter family in the strong resolvent sense. The spectrum of the resulting Dirichlet quantum graph is also purely discrete. The eigenvalues are given by λn = n2, n\\in { N}, with multiplicities d(n), where d(n) denotes the divisor function. We can thus relate the spectral problem of this infinite quantum graph to Dirichlet's famous divisor problem and infer the non-standard Weyl asymptotics {N}(\\lambda )=\\frac{\\sqrt{\\lambda }}{2}\\ln \\lambda +\\mathord {{O}}(\\sqrt{\\lambda }) for the eigenvalue counting function. Based on an exact trace formula, the Voronoï summation formula, we derive explicit formulae for the trace of the wave group, the heat kernel, the resolvent and for various spectral zeta functions. These results enable us to establish a well-defined (renormalized) secular equation and a Selberg-like zeta function defined in terms of the classical periodic orbits of the graph for which we derive an exact functional equation and prove that the analogue of the Riemann hypothesis is true.

  6. Variability in bioreactivity linked to changes in size and zeta potential of diesel exhaust particles in human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Srijata; Zhang, Lin; Subramaniam, Prasad; Lee, Ki-Bum; Garfunkel, Eric; Strickland, Pamela A Ohman; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lioy, Paul J; Tetley, Teresa D; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Ryan, Mary; Porter, Alex; Schwander, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Acting as fuel combustion catalysts to increase fuel economy, cerium dioxide (ceria, CeO2) nanoparticles have been used in Europe as diesel fuel additives (Envirox™). We attempted to examine the effects of particles emitted from a diesel engine burning either diesel (diesel exhaust particles, DEP) or diesel doped with various concentrations of CeO2 (DEP-Env) on innate immune responses in THP-1 and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Batches of DEP and DEP-Env were obtained on three separate occasions using identical collection and extraction protocols with the aim of determining the reproducibility of particles generated at different times. However, we observed significant differences in size and surface charge (zeta potential) of the DEP and DEP-Env across the three batches. We also observed that exposure of THP-1 cells and PBMC to identical concentrations of DEP and DEP-Env from the three batches resulted in statistically significant differences in bioreactivity as determined by IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-12p40 mRNA (by qRT-PCR) and protein expression (by ELISPOT assays). Importantly, bioreactivity was noted in very tight ranges of DEP size (60 to 120 nm) and zeta potential (-37 to -41 mV). Thus, these physical properties of DEP and DEP-Env were found to be the primary determinants of the bioreactivity measured in this study. Our findings also point to the potential risk of over- or under- estimation of expected bioreactivity effects (and by inference of public health risks) from bulk DEP use without taking into account potential batch-to-batch variations in physical (and possibly chemical) properties.

  7. Insulin receptor substrate-2 phosphorylation is necessary for protein kinase C zeta activation by insulin in L6hIR cells.

    PubMed

    Oriente, F; Formisano, P; Miele, C; Fiory, F; Maitan, M A; Vigliotta, G; Trencia, A; Santopietro, S; Caruso, M; Van Obberghen, E; Beguinot, F

    2001-10-05

    We have investigated glycogen synthase (GS) activation in L6hIR cells expressing a peptide corresponding to the kinase regulatory loop binding domain of insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) (KRLB). In several clones of these cells (B2, F4), insulin-dependent binding of the KRLB to insulin receptors was accompanied by a block of IRS-2, but not IRS-1, phosphorylation, and insulin receptor binding. GS activation by insulin was also inhibited by >70% in these cells (p < 0.001). The impairment of GS activation was paralleled by a similarly sized inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha (GSK3 alpha) and GSK3 beta inactivation by insulin with no change in protein phosphatase 1 activity. PDK1 (a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate-dependent kinase) and Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) activation by insulin showed no difference in B2, F4, and in control L6hIR cells. At variance, insulin did not activate PKC zeta in B2 and F4 cells. In L6hIR, inhibition of PKC zeta activity by either a PKC zeta antisense or a dominant negative mutant also reduced by 75% insulin inactivation of GSK3 alpha and -beta (p < 0.001) and insulin stimulation of GS (p < 0.002), similar to Akt/PKB inhibition. In L6hIR, insulin induced protein kinase C zeta (PKC zeta) co-precipitation with GSK3 alpha and beta. PKC zeta also phosphorylated GSK3 alpha and -beta. Alone, these events did not significantly affect GSK3 alpha and -beta activities. Inhibition of PKC zeta activity, however, reduced Akt/PKB phosphorylation of the key serine sites on GSK3 alpha and -beta by >80% (p < 0.001) and prevented full GSK3 inactivation by insulin. Thus, IRS-2, not IRS-1, signals insulin activation of GS in the L6hIR skeletal muscle cells. In these cells, insulin inhibition of GSK3 alpha and -beta requires dual phosphorylation by both Akt/PKB and PKC zeta.

  8. Strangeon and Strangeon Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Lai; Renxin, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The nature of pulsar-like compact stars is essentially a central question of the fundamental strong interaction (explained in quantum chromo-dynamics) at low energy scale, the solution of which still remains a challenge though tremendous efforts have been tried. This kind of compact objects could actually be strange quark stars if strange quark matter in bulk may constitute the true ground state of the strong-interaction matter rather than 56Fe (the so-called Witten’s conjecture). From astrophysical points of view, however, it is proposed that strange cluster matter could be absolutely stable and thus those compact stars could be strange cluster stars in fact. This proposal could be regarded as a general Witten’s conjecture: strange matter in bulk could be absolutely stable, in which quarks are either free (for strange quark matter) or localized (for strange cluster matter). Strange cluster with three-light-flavor symmetry is renamed strangeon, being coined by combining “strange nucleon” for the sake of simplicity. A strangeon star can then be thought as a 3-flavored gigantic nucleus, and strangeons are its constituent as an analogy of nucleons which are the constituent of a normal (micro) nucleus. The observational consequences of strangeon stars show that different manifestations of pulsarlike compact stars could be understood in the regime of strangeon stars, and we are expecting more evidence for strangeon star by advanced facilities (e.g., FAST, SKA, and eXTP).

  9. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  10. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  11. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  12. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  13. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  14. Ecospheres around binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, B.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific investigations concerning ecospheres of other stars are very important for understanding the posibilities of existence and evolution of extraterrestrial life. In several last years astronomers discovered hundreds of extrasolar planets. Identification of stars with ecospheres is the first step in selecting those planets which could be inhabited. Usually an ecosphere of a single star is considered but it may also exist in planetary systems with two suns. This possibility is very promising in search for life on other planets as more that 60 % of stars reside in binary or multiple systems.

  15. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  16. Charged Proca stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landea, Ignacio Salazar; García, Federico

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study gauged solutions associated with a massive vector field representing a spin-1 condensate, namely, the Proca field. We focus on regular spherically symmetric solutions which we construct either using a self-interaction potential or general relativity in order to glue the solutions together. We start generating nongravitating solutions—so-called Proca Q -balls and charged Proca Q -balls. Then we turn on backreaction on the metric, allowing gravity to hold together the Proca condensate, to study the so-called Proca stars, charged Proca stars, Proca Q -stars, and charged Proca Q -stars.

  17. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  18. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  19. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  20. The Gaseous Content of the Universe at Zeta less than 1.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Together with graduate student Hsiao-Wen Chen, I have measured and analyzed structural and morphological parameters of 38 galaxies in eight fields for which sensitive measurements of corresponding Ly(alpha) absorption toward background QSOs are available. These measurements are based on Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and provide a first look at how the incidence and extent of tenuous gas around galaxies depends on galaxy luminosity, size, and morphological type and on geometry of the impact. The primary result of the analysis is that the amount of gas encountered along the line of sight depends on the galaxy impact parameter and B-band luminosity but does not depend strongly on the galaxy average surface brightness, disk-to-bulge ratio, or redshift. This result confirms and improves upon an anti-correlation between Ly(alpha) absorption equivalent width and galaxy impact parameter found previously. More importantly, this result provides the first quantitative means of relating statistics of faint galaxies to statistics of Ly(alpha) absorption systems. which we plan to exploit to constrain the luminosity function of galaxies beyond the realm of current surveys. Results have been submitted for publication and will greatly improve our statistical conclusions . Together with graduate student Noriaki Yahata. I have measured and classified spectral properties of over 1000 faint galaxies and stars obtained in our low-resolution spectroscopic survey. The goal of this project is two-fold: (1) to exhaustively characterize the spectral properties of all faint galaxies that comprise our current survey, and (2) to gain experience with our measurement and classification code. which ultimately will be used on a data base of 20,000 galaxies to be obtained with the Two-Degree Field (2df) spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The results will ultimately be used for many goals, but so far we have

  1. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  2. Stars Brewing in Cygnus X

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-10

    A bubbling cauldron of star birth is highlighted in this image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. Massive stars have blown bubbles, or cavities, in the dust and gas -- a violent process that triggers both the death and birth of stars.

  3. Cooking up the First Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-10

    Scientists are simulating how the very first stars in our universe were born. The stars we see today formed out of collapsing clouds of gas and dust. In the very early universe, however, the stars had fewer ingredients available.

  4. Observations of FK Comae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations on the FK Comae stars are described. FK Com, UZ Lib and HD 199178 are compared and related as a group of stars. The crucial observational tests of the proposed evolutionary status of these stars are noted.

  5. Neutron Star Compared to Manhattan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A pulsar is a neutron star, the crushed core of a star that has exploded. Neutron stars crush half a million times more mass than Earth into a sphere no larger than Manhattan, as animated in this s...

  6. Star Trek in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes specific educational programs for using the Star Trek TV program from kindergarten through college. For each grade level lesson plans, ideas for incorporating Star Trek into future classes, and reports of specific programs utilizing Star Trek are provided. (SL)

  7. Hybrid stars that masquerade as neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Paris; Mark Alford; Matt Braby; Sanjay Reddy

    2004-11-01

    We show that a hybrid (nuclear + quark matter) star can have a mass-radius relationship very similar to that predicted for a star made of purely nucleonic matter. We show this for a generic parameterization of the quark matter equation of state, and also for an MIT bag model, each including a phenomenological correction based on gluonic corrections to the equation of state. We obtain hybrid stars as heavy as 2 M{sub solar} for reasonable values of the bag model parameters. For nuclear matter, we use the equation of state calculated by Akmal, Pandharipande, and Ravenhall using many-body techniques. Both mixed and homogeneous phases of nuclear and quark matter are considered.

  8. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  9. Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-03-01

    The centers of galaxies host two distinct, compact components: massive black holes and nuclear star clusters. Nuclear star clusters are the densest stellar systems in the universe, with masses of ~ 107M⊙ and sizes of ~ 5pc. They are almost ubiquitous at the centres of nearby galaxies with masses similar to, or lower than the Milky Way. Their occurrence both in spirals and dwarf elliptical galaxies appears to be a strong function of total galaxy light or mass. Nucleation fractions are up to 100% for total galaxy magnitudes of M B = -19mag or total galaxy luminosities of about L B = 1010 L ⊙ and falling nucleation fractions for both smaller and higher galaxy masses. Although nuclear star clusters are so common, their formation mechanisms are still under debate. The two main formation scenarios proposed are the infall and subsequent merging of star clusters and the in-situ formation of stars at the center of a galaxy. Here, I review the state-of-the-art of nuclear star cluster observations concerning their structure, stellar populations and kinematics. These observations are used to constrain the proposed formation scenarios for nuclear star clusters. Constraints from observations show, that likely both cluster infall and in-situ star formation are at work. The relative importance of these two mechanisms is still subject of investigation.

  10. Dusty Dead Star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-29

    A composite image from NASA Chandra and Spitzer space telescopes shows the dusty remains of a collapsed star, a supernova remnant called G54.1+0.3. The white source at the center is a dead star called a pulsar.

  11. Magnetized Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Martínez, Aurora; González Felipe, Ricardo; Manreza Paret, Daryel

    2015-01-01

    The magnetized color flavor locked matter phase can be more stable than the unpaired phase, thus becoming the ground state inside neutron stars. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, there exist an anisotropy in the pressures. We estimate the mass-radius relation of magnetized compact stars taking into account the parallel and perpendicular (to the magnetic field) pressure components.

  12. Star System Bonanza Illustration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-27

    This illustration shows the unusual orbit of planet Kepler-413b around a close pair of orange and red dwarf stars. The planet 66-day orbit is tilted 2.5 degrees with respect to the plane of the binary stars orbit.

  13. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  14. Hyperons in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1986-04-01

    Generalized beta equilibrium involving nucleons, hyperons, and isobars is examined for neutron star matter. The hyperons produce a considerable softening of the equation of state. It is shown that the observed masses of neutron stars can be used to settle a recent controversy concerning the nuclear compressibility. Compressibilities less than 200 MeV are incompatible with observed masses. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  15. ENERGY STAR Certified Televisions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Televisions that are effective as of October 30, 2015. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at https://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=tv_vcr.pr_crit_tv_vcr.

  16. How do stars form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscharnuter, W. M.

    1980-02-01

    Modes and model concept of star formation are reviewed, beginning with the theory of Kant (1755), via Newton's exact mathematical formulation of the laws of motion, his recognition of the universal validity of general gravitation, to modern concepts and hypotheses. Axisymmetric and spherically symmetric collapse models are discussed, and the origin of double and multiple star systems is examined.

  17. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  18. Science through ARts (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Marycay; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Miller, Allan; Petersen, Ruth; Terrell, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is a free, international, cross-curricular program thematically aligned with "The Vision for Space Exploration," a framework of goals and objectives published by NASA in February 2004. Through the STAR program, students in grades 5 through 12 are encouraged to apply their knowledge in creative ways as they approach a…

  19. Nebraska STARS: Achieving Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschewski, Pat; Isernhagen, Jody; Dappen, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the state of Nebraska passed legislation requiring the assessment of student performance on content standards, but its requirements were very different from those of any other state. Nebraska created what has come to be known as STARS (School-based Teacher-led Assessment and Reporting System). Under STARS, each of Nebraska's nearly 500…

  20. Nebraska STARS: Achieving Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschewski, Pat; Isernhagen, Jody; Dappen, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the state of Nebraska passed legislation requiring the assessment of student performance on content standards, but its requirements were very different from those of any other state. Nebraska created what has come to be known as STARS (School-based Teacher-led Assessment and Reporting System). Under STARS, each of Nebraska's nearly 500…

  1. Science through ARts (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Marycay; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Miller, Allan; Petersen, Ruth; Terrell, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is a free, international, cross-curricular program thematically aligned with "The Vision for Space Exploration," a framework of goals and objectives published by NASA in February 2004. Through the STAR program, students in grades 5 through 12 are encouraged to apply their knowledge in creative ways as they approach a…

  2. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  3. Star spot location estimation using Kalman filter for star tracker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jian-kun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Tan, Ji-chun; Li, Xiu-jian

    2011-04-20

    Star pattern recognition and attitude determination accuracy is highly dependent on star spot location accuracy for the star tracker. A star spot location estimation approach with the Kalman filter for a star tracker has been proposed, which consists of three steps. In the proposed approach, the approximate locations of the star spots in successive frames are predicted first; then the measurement star spot locations are achieved by defining a series of small windows around each predictive star spot location. Finally, the star spot locations are updated by the designed Kalman filter. To confirm the proposed star spot location estimation approach, the simulations based on the orbit data of the CHAMP satellite and the real guide star catalog are performed. The simulation results indicate that the proposed approach can filter out noises from the measurements remarkably if the sampling frequency is sufficient.

  4. Young Star HD 141569

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-30

    This image shows the dusty disk of planetary material surrounding the young star HD 141569, located 380 light-years away from Earth. It was taken using the vortex coronagraph on the W.M. Keck Observatory. The vortex suppressed light from the star in the center, revealing light from the innermost ring of planetary material around the star (blue). The disk around the star, made of olivine particles, extends from 23 to 70 astronomical units from the star. By comparison, Uranus is over 19 astronomical units from our sun, and Neptune about 30 astronomical units. One astronomical unit is the distance between Earth and our sun. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21090

  5. The Carbon Star Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Robert F.

    2000-06-01

    The atmospheres of many stars have chemical compositions that are significantly different from that of the interstellar medium from which they are formed. This symposium considered all kinds of late-type stars showing altered compositions, the carbon stars being simply the best-known of these. All stages of stellar evolution from the main sequence to the ejection of a planetary nebula were considered, with emphasis on the changes that occur on the asymptotic giant branch. The spectroscopic properties of the photospheres and circumstellar envelopes of chemically-peculiar red giant stars, their origins via single-star evolution or mass transfer in binary systems, and the methods currently used to study them were all discussed in detail. This volume includes the full texts of papers given orally at the symposium and abstracts of the posters. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/book.htm/0-7923-6347-7

  6. Producing Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    How are the hypervelocity stars weve observed in our galaxy produced? A recent study suggests that these escapees could be accelerated by a massive black hole in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud.A Black Hole SlingshotSince their discovery in 2005, weve observed dozens of candidate hypervelocity stars stars whose velocity in the rest frame of our galaxy exceeds the local escape velocity of the Milky Way. These stars present a huge puzzle: how did they attain these enormous velocities?One potential explanation is known as the Hills mechanism. In this process, a stellar binary is disrupted by a close encounter with a massive black hole (like those thought to reside at the center of every galaxy). One member of the binary is flung out of the system as a result of the close encounter, potentially reaching very large velocities.A star-forming region known as LHA 120-N 11, located within the LMC. Some binary star systems within the LMC might experience close encounters with a possible massive black hole at the LMCs center. [ESA/NASA/Hubble]Blame the LMC?Usually, discussions of the Hills mechanism assume that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is the object guilty of accelerating the hypervelocity stars weve observed. But what if the culprit isnt Sgr A*, but a massive black hole at the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the Milky Ways satellite galaxies?Though we dont yet have evidence of a massive black hole at the center of the LMC, the dwarf galaxy is large enough to potentially host one as large as 100,000 solar masses. Assuming that it does, two scientists at the University of Cambridge, Douglas Boubert and Wyn Evans, have now modeled how this black hole might tear apart binary star systems and fling hypervelocity stars around the Milky Way.Models for AccelerationBoubert and Evans determined that the LMCs hypothetical black hole could easily eject stars at ~100 km/s, which is the escape velocity of the

  7. TYCHO star recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J. L.; Hog, E.; Bastian, U.; Schwekendiek, P.; Schwekendiek, P.

    1992-05-01

    The observations of the first year of mission of the Tycho program will be used for revising the Tycho Input Catalogue (TIC). The Tycho Input Catalogue Revision essentially defines the list of objects in the final Tycho output catalogs. This paper describes the mathematical and practical details of this revision process. The stars will be recognized with three different processes, according to their distances from the positions in the TIC. The main process concerns the stars closer than 6 arcsec to the T/C positions; stars with separations between 6 and 20 arcsec are recognized too, but the threshold in detection is slightly brighter than in the main process. Stars absent from the input catalog could also be recognized, but with an even higher threshold in detection. An assessment based on about 85 hours of actual Hipparcos observations is presented. It points to a Tycho Input Catalogue Revision containing about 1 million stars.

  8. Neutron stars - General review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  9. How Stars Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.

    2017-01-01

    Stars are the atoms of the universe. The process by which stars form is at the nexus of astrophysics since they are believed to be responsible for the re-ionization of the universe, they created the heavy elements, they play a central role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, and their formation naturally leads to the formation of planets. Whereas early work on star formation was based on the assumption that it is a quiescent process, it is now believed that turbulence plays a dominant role. In this overview, I shall discuss the evolution of our understanding of how stars form and current ideas about the stellar initial mass function and the rate of star formation.

  10. Activity Cycles in Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Starspots and stellar activity can be detected in other stars using high precision photometric and spectrometric measurements. These observations have provided some surprises (starspots at the poles - sunspots are rarely seen poleward of 40 degrees) but more importantly they reveal behaviors that constrain our models of solar-stellar magnetic dynamos. The observations reveal variations in cycle characteristics that depend upon the stellar structure, convection zone dynamics, and rotation rate. In general, the more rapidly rotating stars are more active. However, for stars like the Sun, some are found to be inactive while nearly identical stars are found to be very active indicating that periods like the Sun's Maunder Minimum (an inactive period from 1645 to 1715) are characteristic of Sun-like stars.

  11. Gaia and Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, D. M.; Skowron, J.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a comparison of the Gaia DR1 samples of pulsating variable stars - Cepheids and RR Lyr type - with the OGLE Collection of Variable Stars aiming at the characterization of the Gaia mission performance in the stellar variability domain. Out of 575 Cepheids and 2322 RR Lyr candidates from the Gaia DR1 samples located in the OGLE footprint in the sky, 559 Cepheids and 2302 RR Lyr stars are genuine pulsators of these types. The number of misclassified stars is low indicating reliable performance of the Gaia data pipeline. The completeness of the Gaia DR1 samples of Cepheids and RR Lyr stars is at the level of 60-75% as compared to the OGLE Collection dataset. This level of completeness is moderate and may limit the applicability of the Gaia data in many projects.

  12. Identification of cofilin and LIM-domain-containing protein kinase 1 as novel interaction partners of 14-3-3 zeta.

    PubMed Central

    Birkenfeld, Jörg; Betz, Heinrich; Roth, Dagmar

    2003-01-01

    Proteins of the 14-3-3 family have been implicated in various physiological processes, and are thought to function as adaptors in various signal transduction pathways. In addition, 14-3-3 proteins may contribute to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton by interacting with as yet unidentified actin-binding proteins. Here we show that the 14-3-3 zeta isoform interacts with both the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin and its regulatory kinase, LIM (Lin-11/Isl-1/Mec-3)-domain-containing protein kinase 1 (LIMK1). In both yeast two-hybrid assays and glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, these proteins bound efficiently to 14-3-3 zeta. Deletion analysis revealed consensus 14-3-3 binding sites on both cofilin and LIMK1. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of 14-3-3 zeta inhibited the binding of cofilin to actin in co-sedimentation experiments. Upon co-transfection into COS-7 cells, 14-3-3 zeta-specific immunoreactivity was redistributed into characteristic LIMK1-induced actin aggregations. Our data are consistent with 14-3-3-protein-induced changes to the actin cytoskeleton resulting from interactions with cofilin and/or LIMK1. PMID:12323073

  13. Expression of the growth factor pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta in the serum, cartilage and subchondral bone of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaspiris, Angelos; Mikelis, Constantinos; Heroult, Melanie; Khaldi, Lubna; Grivas, Theodoros B; Kouvaras, Ioannis; Dangas, Spyridon; Vasiliadis, Elias; Lioté, Frédéric; Courty, José; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2013-07-01

    Pleiotrophin is a heparin-binding growth factor expressed in embryonic but not mature cartilage, suggesting a role in cartilage development. Elucidation of the molecular changes observed during the remodelling process in osteoarthritis is of paramount importance. This study aimed to investigate serum pleiotrophin levels and expression of pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta in the cartilage and subchondral bone of osteoarthritis patients. Serum samples derived from 16 osteoarthritis patients and 18 healthy donors. Pleiotrophin and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta in the cartilage and subchondral bone were studied in 29 patients who had undergone total knee or hip replacement for primary osteoarthritis and in 10 control patients without macroscopic osteoarthritis changes. Serum pleiotrophin levels and expression of pleiotrophin in chondrocytes and subchondral bone osteocytes significantly increased in osteoarthritis patients graded Ahlback II to III. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta was mainly detected in the subchondral bone osteocytes of patients with moderate osteoarthritis and as disease severity increased, in the osteocytes and bone lining cells of the distant trabeculae. These data render pleiotrophin and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta promising candidates for further studies towards developing targeted therapeutic schemes for osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2012 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. IkappaB-zeta, a new anti-inflammatory nuclear protein induced by lipopolysaccharide, is a negative regulator for nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Muta, Tatsushi; Yamazaki, Soh; Eto, Akiko; Motoyama, Masaiwa; Takeshige, Koichiro

    2003-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), a prominent cellular response to bacterial endotoxin or other microbial products, must be strictly regulated because excessive activation leads to overproduction of cytotoxic cytokines that culminates in septic shock. During screening for genes up-regulated upon inflammation, we identified a new member of the IkappaB family proteins with the ankyrin-repeats. This protein, designated IkappaB-zeta, is hardly detectable in resting cells, but is strongly induced upon stimulation by lipopolysaccharide, which stimulates cells through the Toll-like receptor 4. Interleukin-1beta stimulation also results in the strong induction of IkappaB-zeta, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha does not. In contrast to IkappaB-alpha or IkappaB-beta, IkappaB-zeta localizes in the nucleus, where it inhibits NF-kappaB activity. NF-kappaB activity is essential for the induction of IkappaB-zeta, but is not sufficient. Thus, this protein is a new anti-inflammatory protein, which is specifically induced upon inflammation to regulate NF-kappaB activity.

  15. A zeta potential value determines the aggregate's size of penta-substituted [60]fullerene derivatives in aqueous suspension whereas positive charge is required for toxicity against bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, Dmitry G; Efremova, Ludmila V; Vasilchenko, Alexey S; Saidakova, Evgeniya V; Sizova, Elena A; Troshin, Pavel A; Zhilenkov, Alexander V; Khakina, Ekaterina A; Khakina, Ekaterina E

    2015-08-08

    The cause-effect relationships between physicochemical properties of amphiphilic [60]fullerene derivatives and their toxicity against bacterial cells have not yet been clarified. In this study, we report how the differences in the chemical structure of organic addends in 10 originally synthesized penta-substituted [60]fullerene derivatives modulate their zeta potential and aggregate's size in salt-free and salt-added aqueous suspensions as well as how these physicochemical characteristics affect the bioenergetics of freshwater Escherichia coli and marine Photobacterium phosphoreum bacteria. Dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler micro-electrophoresis, agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, and bioluminescence inhibition assay were used to characterize the fullerene aggregation behavior in aqueous solution and their interaction with the bacterial cell surface, following zeta potential changes and toxic effects. Dynamic light scattering results indicated the formation of self-assembled [60]fullerene aggregates in aqueous suspensions. The measurement of the zeta potential of the particles revealed that they have different surface charges. The relationship between these physicochemical characteristics was presented as an exponential regression that correctly described the dependence of the aggregate's size of penta-substituted [60]fullerene derivatives in salt-free aqueous suspension from zeta potential value. The prevalence of DLVO-related effects was shown in salt-added aqueous suspension that decreased zeta potential values and affected the aggregation of [60]fullerene derivatives expressed differently for individual compounds. A bioluminescence inhibition assay demonstrated that the toxic effect of [60]fullerene derivatives against E. coli cells was strictly determined by their positive zeta potential charge value being weakened against P. phosphoreum cells in an aquatic system of high salinity. Atomic force microscopy data suggested that the

  16. Biosimilar Retacrit® (epoetin zeta) in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced symptomatic anemia in hematology and oncology in Germany (ORHEO) – non-interventional study

    PubMed Central

    Losem, Christoph; Koenigsmann, Michael; Rudolph, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Background Symptomatic anemia is a frequent and severe complication of chemotherapy that is commonly treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The primary objective of this study was to assess the change in hemoglobin levels in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA) following treatment with biosimilar Retacrit® (epoetin zeta). Secondary objectives included changes in hematologic parameters and tolerability. Methods This was a non-interventional, multicenter, long-term observational study that is part of an ongoing surveillance program for epoetin zeta. Adult patients (N=291) with solid tumors, malignant lymphomas or multiple myeloma, and chemotherapy-induced symptomatic anemia, who were eligible for treatment with biosimilar epoetin zeta, were enrolled. Patients were evaluated at enrollment, 3 months, and 6 months. Results Evaluable patients had lymphoma or myeloma (n=30) or solid tumors (n=260). At 3 months, patients with lymphoma and myeloma showed the greatest increase in mean (SD) hemoglobin from 9.2 (0.9) to 11.0 (1.8) g/dL, whereas patients with breast cancer showed the smallest increase from 10.0 (1.0) to 11.1 (1.2) g/dL. At 6 months, the greatest mean increase occurred in patients with lymphoma or myeloma from 11.0 (1.8) to 11.7 (2.3) g/dL, and the smallest in patients with other solid tumors from 10.9 (1.4) to 11.1 (1.5) g/dL. Patient evaluation of epoetin zeta therapy was positive, as most patients expressed satisfaction with epoetin zeta treatment during the study, compliance with treatment was high, and most indicated their willingness to be retreated if necessary. Epoetin zeta was also well tolerated; overall, in 25 patients (8.6%), there were 31 adverse events. Conclusion Despite variability among different disease groups, epoetin zeta was effective and well tolerated in patients with different types of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. PMID:28280364

  17. Catch a Star!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus

  18. H{sub 2} EXCITATION STRUCTURE ON THE SIGHTLINES TO {delta} SCORPII AND {zeta} OPHIUCI: FIRST RESULTS FROM THE SUB-ORBITAL LOCAL INTERSTELLAR CLOUD EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    France, Kevin; Nell, Nicholas; Kane, Robert; Green, James C.; Burgh, Eric B.

    2013-07-20

    We present the first science results from the Sub-orbital Local Interstellar Cloud Experiment (SLICE): moderate resolution 1020-1070 A spectroscopy of four sightlines through the local interstellar medium. High signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of {eta} Uma, {alpha} Vir, {delta} Sco, and {zeta} Oph were obtained during a 2013 April 21 rocket flight. The SLICE observations constrain the density, molecular photoexcitation rates, and physical conditions present in the interstellar material toward {delta} Sco and {zeta} Oph. Our spectra indicate a factor of two lower total N(H{sub 2}) than previously reported for {delta} Sco, which we attribute to higher S/N and better scattered light control in the new SLICE observations. We find N(H{sub 2}) = 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} on the {delta} Sco sightline, with kinetic and excitation temperatures of 67 and 529 K, respectively, and a cloud density of n{sub H} = 56 cm{sup -3}. Our observations of the bulk of the molecular sightline toward {zeta} Oph are consistent with previous measurements (N(H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} at T{sub 01}(H{sub 2}) = 66 K and T{sub exc} = 350 K). However, we detect significantly more rotationally excited H{sub 2} toward {zeta} Oph than previously observed. We infer a cloud density in the rotationally excited component of n{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7600 cm{sup -3} and suggest that the increased column densities of excited H{sub 2} are a result of the ongoing interaction between {zeta} Oph and its environment; also manifest as the prominent mid-IR bowshock observed by WISE and the presence of vibrationally excited H{sub 2} molecules observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  19. Nonviral Plasmid DNA Carriers Based on N,N'-Dimethylaminoethyl Methacrylate and Di(ethylene glycol) Methyl Ether Methacrylate Star Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Mendrek, Barbara; Sieroń, Łukasz; Żymełka-Miara, Iwona; Binkiewicz, Paulina; Libera, Marcin; Smet, Mario; Trzebicka, Barbara; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Kowalczuk, Agnieszka; Dworak, Andrzej

    2015-10-12

    Star polymers with random and block copolymer arms made of cationic N,N'-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and nonionic di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA) were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in gene therapy. All stars were able to form polyplexes with plasmid DNA. The structure and size of the polyplexes were precisely determined using light scattering and cryo-TEM microscopy. The hydrodynamic radius of a complex of DNA with star was dependent on the architecture of the star arms, the DEGMA content and the number of amino groups in the star compared to the number of phosphate groups of the nucleic acid (N/P ratio). The smallest polyplexes (Rh90°∼50 nm) with positive zeta potentials (∼15 mV) were formed of stars with N/P=6. The introduction of DEGMA into the star structure caused a decrease of polyplex cytotoxicity in comparison to DMAEMA homopolymer stars. The overall transfection efficiency using HT-1080 cells showed that the studied systems are prospective gene delivery agents. The most promising results were obtained for stars with random copolymer arms of high DEGMA content.

  20. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing.

  1. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  2. Dense Axion Stars.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  3. Heartbeat Stars Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-21

    This artist's concept depicts "heartbeat stars," which have been detected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope and others. The illustration shows two heartbeat stars swerving close to one another in their closest approach along their highly elongated orbits around one another. The mutual gravitation of the two stars would cause the stars themselves to become slightly ellipsoidal in shape. A third, more distant star in the system is shown in the upper left. Astronomers speculate that such unseen companions may exist in some of these heartbeat star systems, and could be responsible for maintaining these oddly stretched-out orbits. The overlaid curve depicts the inferred cyclic change in velocities in one such system, called KIC 9965691, looking something like the graph of an electrocardiogram (hence the name "heartbeat stars"). The solid points represent measurements made by the HIRES instrument at the W.M. Keck Observatory, and the curve is the best fit model for the motions of this system. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21075

  4. From stars to nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, G.

    2008-04-01

    We recall the basic physical principles governing the evolution of stars with some emphasis on the role played by the nuclear reactions. We argue that in general it is not possible from observations of stars to deduce constraints on the nuclear reaction rates. This is the reason why precise measurements of nuclear reaction rates are a necessity in order to make progresses in stellar physics, nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution of galaxies. There are however some stars which provides useful constraints on nuclear processes. The Wolf-Rayet stars of the WN type present at their surface CNO equilibrium patterns. There is also the particular case of the abundance of 22Ne at the surface of WC stars. The abundance of this element is a measure of the initial CNO content. Very interestingly, recent determinations of its abundance at the surface of WC stars tend to confirm that massive stars in the solar neighborhood have initial metallicities in agreement with the Asplund et al. [1] solar abundances.

  5. Neutron star evolutionary sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. B.; Van Horn, H. M.; Ratcliff, K. F.; Malone, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed numerical calculations which are solutions of the full set of general relativistic equations describing the evolution of a spherical star are presented, for the case of the evolution of neutron stars that are cooling over the central temperatures range of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 7th K. The effects of nucleon superfluidity in the inner crust and core are included, and models are constructed with and without a pion condensate at high densities. It is found that the localized neutrino cooling which dominates the early evolution of neutron stars is so rapid that heat transport within the star cannot keep pace, and temperature distribution is not isothermal. The residual contraction of the neutron star during the early cooling phase contributes little to the heat budget of the star, and most of the gravitational energy released raises the Fermi energy of the degenerate nucleons. It is concluded that since calculations with and without pion condensate are consistent with the upper limits of current observations, these are not sufficient in distinguishing between the various models of neutron star cooling.

  6. Starspots on A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.

    2017-05-01

    Rotation modulation of Kepler light curves in mid-A to late-B stars is shown to be present. This is demonstrated by the high correlation of projected rotational velocities with photometric frequencies in 30 stars. The time-frequency diagrams show stochastic variations in all respects similar to those in spotted cool stars. This disposes of any explanation in terms of binary proximity effects. More than half of the sample of stars with effective temperatures in the range of 8300-12 000 K show rotational modulation, indicating that starspots are the rule rather than the exception among A stars. The periodograms of a subset of these stars show a characteristic pattern in which a broad peak is flanked by a sharp peak at a slightly higher frequency. It is demonstrated that the sharp peak has the same width as the spectral window, indicating a stable period over the duration of the 4-yr Kepler observations. It is speculated that this might be a signature of a reflection effect in a non-transiting planet. These observations suggest that the presence of localized magnetic fields in A and B stars and that current views of radiative stellar envelopes need to be revised.

  7. Pseudosynchronization of Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Mara; Thompson, Susan E.; Hambleton, Kelly; Fuller, Jim; Shporer, Avi; Isaacson, Howard T.; Howard, Andrew; Kurtz, Donald

    2016-01-01

    A type of eccentric binary star that undergoes extreme dynamic tidal forces, known as Heartbeat stars, were discovered by the Kepler Mission. As the two stars pass through periastron, the tidal distortion causes unique brightness variations. Short period, eccentric binary stars, like these, are theorized to pseudosynchronize, or reach a rotational frequency that matches the weighted average orbital angular velocity of the system. This pseudosynchronous rate, as predicted by Hut (1981), depends on the binary's orbital period and eccentricity. We tested whether sixteen heartbeat stars have pseudosynchronized. We measure the rotation rate from obvious spot signatures in the light curve. We measure the eccentricity by fitting the light curve using PHOEBE and are actively carrying out a radial velocity monitoring program with Keck/HIRES in order to improve these orbital parameters. Our initial results show that while most heartbeat stars appear to have pseudosynchronized we find stars with rotation frequencies both longer and shorter than this rate. We thank the SETI Institute REU program, the NSF, and the Kepler Guest Observer Program for making this work possible.

  8. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10-14M⊙ if the axion mass is 10-4 eV . We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10-20M⊙ to about M⊙ . If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  9. Highly-evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The ways in which the IUE has proved useful in studying highly evolved stars are reviewed. The importance of high dispersion spectra for abundance analyses of the sd0 stars and for studies of the wind from the central star of NGC 6543 and the wind from the 0 type component of Vela X-1 is shown. Low dispersion spectra are used for absolute spectrophotometry of the dwarf nova, Ex Hya. Angular resolution is important for detecting and locating UV sources in globular clusters.

  10. Superradiance in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Brito, Richard; Rosa, João L.

    2015-06-01

    It has long been known that dissipation is a crucial ingredient in the superradiant amplification of wave packets off rotating objects. We show that, once appropriate dissipation mechanisms are included, stars are also prone to superradiance and superradiant instabilities. In particular, ultralight dark matter with small interaction cross section with the star material or self-annihilation can trigger a superradiant instability. On long time scales, the instability strips the star of most of its angular momentum. Whether or not new stationary configurations surrounded by scalar condensates exist remains to be seen.

  11. STARs in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Ingrid; Fort, Philippe; Elliott, David J

    2016-08-15

    STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) proteins regulate splicing of target genes that have roles in neural connectivity, survival and myelination in the vertebrate nervous system. These regulated splicing targets include mRNAs such as the Neurexins (Nrxn), SMN2 (survival of motor neuron) and MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein). Recent work has made it possible to identify and validate STAR protein splicing targets in vivo by using genetically modified mouse models. In this review, we will discuss the importance of STAR protein splicing targets in the CNS (central nervous system). © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  13. C III] Emission in Star-Forming Galaxies Near and Far

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, J, R.; Bayliss, M. B.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Wuyts, E.; Dahle, H.; Johnson, T.; Pena-Guerrero, M.

    2015-01-01

    We measure C III Lambda Lambda 1907, 1909 Angstrom emission lines in eleven gravitationally-lensed star-forming galaxies at zeta at approximately 1.6-3, finding much lower equivalent widths than previously reported for fainter lensed galaxies (Stark et al. 2014). While it is not yet clear what causes some galaxies to be strong C III] emitters, C III] emission is not a universal property of distant star-forming galaxies. We also examine C III] emission in 46 star-forming galaxies in the local universe, using archival spectra from GHRS, FOS, and STIS on HST, and IUE. Twenty percent of these local galaxies show strong C III] emission, with equivalent widths less than -5 Angstrom. Three nearby galaxies show C III] emission equivalent widths as large as the most extreme emitters yet observed in the distant universe; all three are Wolf-Rayet galaxies. At all redshifts, strong C III] emission may pick out low-metallicity galaxies experiencing intense bursts of star formation. Such local C III] emitters may shed light on the conditions of star formation in certain extreme high-redshift galaxies.

  14. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  15. pH Effects on solubility, zeta potential, and correlation between antibacterial activity and molecular weight of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shun-Hsien; Lin, Hong-Ting Victor; Wu, Guan-James; Tsai, Guo Jane

    2015-12-10

    Six chitosans with molecular weights (MWs) of 300, 156, 72.1, 29.2, 7.1, and 3.3 kDa were prepared by cellulase degradation of chitosan (300 kDa) and ultrafiltration techniques. We examined the correlation between activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and chitosan MW, and provided the underlying explanation. In acidic pH conditions, the chitosan activity increased with increasing MW, irrespective of the temperature and bacteria tested. However, at neutral pH, chitosan activity increased as the MW decreased, and little activity was observed for chitosans with MW >29.2 kDa. At pH 5.0 and 6.0, chitosans exhibited good water solubility and zeta potential (ZP) decreased with the MW, whereas the solubility and ZP of the chitosans decreased with increasing MW at pH 7.0. Particularly, low solubility and negative ZP values were determined for chitosans with MW >29.2 kDa, which may explain the loss of their antibacterial activity at pH 7.0.

  16. Protein kinase C-zeta and protein kinase B regulate distinct steps of insulin endocytosis and intracellular sorting.

    PubMed

    Fiory, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Miele, Claudia; Romano, Chiara; Trencia, Alessandra; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Esposito, Iolanda; Valentino, Rossella; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2004-03-19

    We have investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating insulin internalization and intracellular sorting. Insulin internalization was decreased by 50% upon incubation of the cells with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. PI3K inhibition also reduced insulin degradation and intact insulin release by 50 and 75%, respectively. Insulin internalization was reduced by antisense inhibition of protein kinase C-zeta (PKCzeta) expression and by overexpression of a dominant negative PKCzeta mutant (DN-PKCzeta). Conversely, overexpression of PKCzeta increased insulin internalization as a function of the PKCzeta levels achieved in the cells. Expression of wild-type protein kinase B (PKB)-alpha or of a constitutively active form (myr-PKB) did not significantly alter insulin internalization and degradation but produced a 100% increase of intact insulin release. Inhibition of PKB by a dominant negative mutant (DN-PKB) or by the pharmacological inhibitor ML-9 reduced intact insulin release by 75% with no effect on internalization and degradation. In addition, overexpression of Rab5 completely rescued the effect of PKCzeta inhibition on insulin internalization but not that of PKB inhibition on intact insulin recycling. Indeed, PKCzeta bound to and activated Rab5. Thus, PI3K controls different steps within the insulin endocytic itinerary. PKCzeta appears to mediate the PI3K effect on insulin internalization in a Rab5-dependent manner, whereas PKB directs intracellular sorting toward intact insulin release.

  17. Perfluorinated poly(dimethylsiloxane) via the covalent attachment of perfluoroalkylsilanes on the oxidized surface: Effects on zeta-potential values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peiling; Horton, J. Hugh

    2013-04-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is a widely-used polymer in microfluidic devices due to its range of physical and chemical properties suitable for molding micron-sized features. However, its hydrophobicity also leads to some limitations: it poorly supports electro-osmotic flow, and can be incompatible with biomolecules and with many organic solvents. Surface modification is commonly used to vary PDMS surface properties to make it more suitable for specific microfluidic applications. Here, we report on the surface modification of PDMS using perfluoroalkane-triethoxysilanes, via the covalent attachment of triethoxysilane groups on plasma-oxidized PDMS. A device constructed from such fluorinated materials could be used for separating fluorous-tagged proteins or peptides. Modified PDMS were characterized using a range of surface analytical methods. In particular, zeta- (ζ-) potential values at the interfaces of both modified and unmodified PDMS and under varying pH conditions were measured, as ζ-potential is an essential parameter to support electroosmotic flow (EOF), a common pumping method in microfluidic devices. The results showed the length of fluorinated alkane chain has significant effect on the density of surface modifying species and topography following modification. In addition, the perfluorinated modification increases the magnitude of the ζ-potential at the PDMS interface when compared to that of native PDMS, increasing the electro-osmotic flow rate, over a wide pH range. The modified surface is resistant to the diffusion of PDMS oligomers that affects other PDMS surface modification processes.

  18. Transgenic Overexpression of 14-3-3 Zeta Protects Hippocampus against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Status Epilepticus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Gary P.; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M.; McKiernan, Ross C.; Engel, Tobias; Tzivion, Guri; Henshall, David C.

    2013-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that are abundantly expressed in the brain where they regulate cell functions including metabolism, the cell cycle and apoptosis. Brain levels of several 14-3-3 isoforms are altered in diseases of the nervous system, including epilepsy. The 14-3-3 zeta (ζ) isoform has been linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function in neurons, with reduced levels provoking ER stress and increasing vulnerability to excitotoxic injury. Here we report that transgenic overexpression of 14-3-3ζ in mice results in selective changes to the unfolded protein response pathway in the hippocampus, including down-regulation of glucose-regulated proteins 78 and 94, activating transcription factors 4 and 6, and Xbp1 splicing. No differences were found between wild-type mice and transgenic mice for levels of other 14-3-3 isoforms or various other 14-3-3 binding proteins. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were potently protected against cell death caused by intracerebroventricular injection of the ER stressor tunicamycin. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were also potently protected against neuronal death caused by prolonged seizures. These studies demonstrate that increased 14-3-3ζ levels protect against ER stress and seizure-damage despite down-regulation of the unfolded protein response. Delivery of 14-3-3ζ may protect against pathologic changes resulting from prolonged or repeated seizures or where injuries provoke ER stress. PMID:23359526

  19. Does advancing male age influence the expression levels and localisation patterns of phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) in human sperm?

    PubMed Central

    Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Yelumalai, Suseela; Mounce, Ginny; da Silva, Sarah J. Martins; Child, Tim; Coward, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Socio-economic factors have led to an increasing trend for couples to delay parenthood. However, advancing age exerts detrimental effects upon gametes which can have serious consequences upon embryo viability. While such effects are well documented for the oocyte, relatively little is known with regard to the sperm. One fundamental role of sperm is to activate the oocyte at fertilisation, a process initiated by phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein. While PLCζ deficiency can lead to oocyte activation deficiency and infertility, it is currently unknown whether the expression or function of PLCζ is compromised by advancing male age. Here, we evaluate sperm motility and the proportion of sperm expressing PLCζ in 71 males (22–54 years; 44 fertile controls and 27 infertile patients), along with total levels and localisation patterns of PLCζ within the sperm head. Three different statistical approaches were deployed with male age considered both as a categorical and a continuous factor. While progressive motility was negatively correlated with male age, all three statistical models concurred that no PLCζ–related parameter was associated with male age, suggesting that advancing male age is unlikely to cause problems in terms of the sperm’s fundamental ability to activate an oocyte. PMID:27270687

  20. Characterization of selenium-containing glutathione transferase zeta1-1 with high GPX activity prepared in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Song, Jian; Board, Philip G; Yu, Yang; Han, Xiao; Wei, Jingyan

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that glutathione peroxidase (GPX, EC.1.11.1.9), one of the most important antioxidant selenoenzymes, plays an essential role in protecting cells and tissues against oxidative damage by catalyzing the reduction of hydrogen peroxide by glutathione. Unfortunately, because of the limited availability and poor stability of GPX, it has not been used clinically to protect against oxidative stress. To overcome these problems, it is necessary to generate mimics of GPX. In this study, we have used directed mutagenesis and the inclusion of a selenocysteine (Sec) insertion sequence to engineer the expression in eukaryotic cells of human glutathione transferase zeta1-1 (hGSTZ1-1) with Sec in the active site (seleno-hGSTZ1-1). This modification converted hGSTZ1-1 into an active GPX and is the first time this has been achieved in eukaryotic cells. The GPX activity of seleno-hGSTZ1-1 is higher than that of GPX from bovine liver, indicating Sec at the active site plays an important role in the determination of catalytic specificity and performance. Kinetic studies revealed that the ping-pong catalytic mechanism of Se-hGSTZ1-1 is similar to that of the natural GPX. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The effect of the electrical double layer on hydrodynamic lubrication: a non-monotonic trend with increasing zeta potential

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Dalei

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a modified Reynolds equation including the electrical double layer (EDL)-induced electroviscous effect of lubricant is established to investigate the effect of the EDL on the hydrodynamic lubrication of a 1D slider bearing. The theoretical model is based on the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann equation without the use of the Debye–Hückel approximation. Furthermore, the variation in the bulk electrical conductivity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL is also considered during the theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic lubrication. The results show that the EDL can increase the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant in a 1D slider bearing. More importantly, the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL shows a non-monotonic trend, changing from enhancement to attenuation with a gradual increase in the absolute value of the zeta potential. This non-monotonic hydrodynamic lubrication is dependent on the non-monotonic electroviscous effect of the lubricant generated by the EDL, which is dominated by the non-monotonic electrical field strength and non-monotonic electrical body force on the lubricant. The subject of the paper is the theoretical modeling and the corresponding analysis. PMID:28884056

  2. The effect of the electrical double layer on hydrodynamic lubrication: a non-monotonic trend with increasing zeta potential.

    PubMed

    Jing, Dalei; Pan, Yunlu; Wang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a modified Reynolds equation including the electrical double layer (EDL)-induced electroviscous effect of lubricant is established to investigate the effect of the EDL on the hydrodynamic lubrication of a 1D slider bearing. The theoretical model is based on the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation without the use of the Debye-Hückel approximation. Furthermore, the variation in the bulk electrical conductivity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL is also considered during the theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic lubrication. The results show that the EDL can increase the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant in a 1D slider bearing. More importantly, the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL shows a non-monotonic trend, changing from enhancement to attenuation with a gradual increase in the absolute value of the zeta potential. This non-monotonic hydrodynamic lubrication is dependent on the non-monotonic electroviscous effect of the lubricant generated by the EDL, which is dominated by the non-monotonic electrical field strength and non-monotonic electrical body force on the lubricant. The subject of the paper is the theoretical modeling and the corresponding analysis.

  3. Temperature effect on the zeta potential and fluoride adsorption at the alpha-Al2O3/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    López Valdivieso, A; Reyes Bahena, J L; Song, S; Herrera Urbina, R

    2006-06-01

    The effect of temperature and pH on the zeta potential of alpha-Al2O3 and adsorption of fluoride ions at the alpha-Al2O3/aqueous solution interface has been investigated through electrophoretic mobility measurements and adsorption studies, to delineate mechanisms involved in the removal of fluoride ions from water using alumina as adsorbent. When the temperature increases from 10 to 40 degrees C, the pH of the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) shifts to smaller values, indicating proton desorption from the alumina surface. The pH(pzc) increases linearly with 1/T, which allowed estimation of the standard enthalpy change for the surface-deprotonation process. Fluoride ion adsorption follows a Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm and is affected by the electric charge at the alpha-Al2O3/aqueous solution interface and the surface density of hydroxyl groups. Such adsorption occurs through an exchange between fluoride ions and surface-hydroxyl groups and it depends on temperature, pH, and initial fluoride ion concentration. At 25 and 40 degrees C, maximum fluoride adsorption density takes place between pH 5 and 6. Increasing the temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C lowers the adsorption density of fluoride.

  4. R Coronae Borealis stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuljan, Ljiljana; Cottrell, Peter L.

    2004-05-01

    In the last ten years a significant step forward has been made toward a better understanding of the evolutionary status and unusual nature of the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, a rare class of hydrogen-poor and carbon-rich variable stars. More detailed abundance analyses of the majority of RCB stars, and objects related to them, have become available in the last couple of years. In addition to this, recent theoretical studies of the most popular evolutionary models (`Double Degenerate' and `Final Flash')provide a new insight into the origin of these stars. Regarding the nature of the RCB declines, more observations from the light maxima and the decline phase are now available, including more data from space. However, the characteristics of the various emission lines appearing during the RCB declines, and the nature of their emitting regions, are still not entirely understood.

  5. Tabby's Star (Illustration)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-04

    This illustration depicts a hypothetical uneven ring of dust orbiting KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian's Star or Tabby's Star. Astronomers have found the dimming of the star over long periods appears to be weaker at longer infrared wavelengths of light and stronger at shorter ultraviolet wavelengths. Such reddening is characteristic of dust particles and inconsistent with more fanciful "alien megastructure" concepts, which would evenly dim all wavelengths of light. By studying observations from NASA's Spitzer and Swift telescopes, as well as the Belgian AstroLAB IRIS observatory, the researchers have been able to better constrain the size of the dust particles. This places them within the range found in dust disks orbiting stars, and larger than the particles typically found in interstellar dust. The system is portrayed with a couple of comets, consistent with previous studies that have found evidence for cometary activity within the system. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22081

  6. Winds from cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral observations of cool stars enable study of the presence and character of winds and the mass loss process in objects with effective temperatures, gravities, and atmospheric compositions which differ from that of the Sun. A wealth of recent spectroscopic measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer complement high resolution ground-based measures in the optical and infrared spectral regions. Such observations when combined with realistic semi-empirical atmospheric modeling allow us to estimate the physical conditions in the atmospheres and winds of many classes of cool stars. Line profiles support turbulent heating and mass motions. In low gravity stars, evidence is found for relatively fast (approximately 200 km s(exp -1)), warm winds with rapid acceleration occurring in the chromosphere. In some cases outflows commensurate with stellar escape velocities are present. Our current understanding of cool star winds will be reviewed including the implications of stellar observations for identification of atmospheric heating and acceleration processes.

  7. Cosmology with hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-04-01

    In the standard cosmological model, the merger remnant of the Milky Way and Andromeda (Milkomeda) will be the only galaxy remaining within our event horizon once the Universe has aged by another factor of ten, ∼ 10{sup 11} years after the Big Bang. After that time, the only extragalactic sources of light in the observable cosmic volume will be hypervelocity stars being ejected continuously from Milkomeda. Spectroscopic detection of the velocity-distance relation or the evolution in the Doppler shifts of these stars will allow a precise measurement of the vacuum mass density as well as the local matter distribution. Already in the near future, the next generation of large telescopes will allow photometric detection of individual stars out to the edge of the Local Group, and may target the ∼ 10{sup 5±1} hypervelocity stars that originated in it as cosmological tracers.

  8. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-11-15

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. This image is from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  9. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  10. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  11. Guide star probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soneira, R. M.; Bahcall, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Probabilities are calculated for acquiring suitable guide stars (GS) with the fine guidance system (FGS) of the space telescope. A number of the considerations and techniques described are also relevant for other space astronomy missions. The constraints of the FGS are reviewed. The available data on bright star densities are summarized and a previous error in the literature is corrected. Separate analytic and Monte Carlo calculations of the probabilities are described. A simulation of space telescope pointing is carried out using the Weistrop north galactic pole catalog of bright stars. Sufficient information is presented so that the probabilities of acquisition can be estimated as a function of position in the sky. The probability of acquiring suitable guide stars is greatly increased if the FGS can allow an appreciable difference between the (bright) primary GS limiting magnitude and the (fainter) secondary GS limiting magnitude.

  12. Magnetospheres of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küker, M.

    We study the interaction of line-driven winds from massive stars with the magnetic field rooted in these stars by carrying out numerical simulations using the Nirvana MHD code in 2D in spherical polar coordinates. The code's adaptive mesh refinement feature allows high spatial resolution across the whole simulation box. We study both O and Wolf-Rayet stars for a range of magnetic field strengths from weak to strong as measured by the confinement parameter. For weak fields our simulations show that the initially dipolar field opens up far away from the star and a thin disk-like structure forms in the equatorial plane of the magnetic field. For stronger fields the disk is disrupted close to the stellar surface and closed field lines persist at low latitudes. For very strong fields a pronounced magnetosphere forms where the gas is forced to move along the field lines and eventually falls back to the stellar surface.

  13. Discovery of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurochkin, N. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented methods of discovering variable stars are reviewed, specifically the blink comparator, color contrast method, positive-negative method, and television method. Among the empirical methods discussed, the Van Gent method is the most important.

  14. Planets Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Anderson, Stuart B.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to continue investigations of neutron star planetary systems in an effort to describe and understand their origin, orbital dynamics, basic physical properties and their relationship to planets around normal stars. This research represents an important element of the process of constraining the physics of planet formation around various types of stars. The research goals of this project included long-term timing measurements of the planets pulsar, PSR B1257+12, to search for more planets around it and to study the dynamics of the whole system, and sensitive searches for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of old, rapidly spinning neutron stars with planetary systems. The instrumentation used in our project included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the 100-m Green Bank Telescope with the Berkeley- Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM), and the 100-m Effelsberg and 64-m Parkes telescopes equipped with the observatory supplied backend hardware.

  15. Conformally symmetric relativistic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain; Chakraborty, Koushik

    2017-03-01

    We investigate whether compact stars having Tolman-like interior geometry admit conformal symmetry. Taking anisotropic pressure along the two principal directions within the compact object, we obtain physically relevant quantities such as transverse and radial pressure, density and redshift function. We study the equation of state (EOS) for the matter distribution inside the star. From the relation between pressure and density function of the constituent matter, we explore the nature and properties of the interior matter. The redshift function and compactness parameter are found to be physically reasonable. The matter inside the star satisfies the null, weak and strong energy conditions. Finally, we compare the masses and radii predicted from the model with corresponding values in some observed stars.

  16. Dark Wombs of Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-02

    This image from the Herschel Observatory, a European Space Agency mission, reveals some of the coldest and darkest material in our galaxy. The yellow filaments show the coldest dust dotted with the youngest embryonic stars.

  17. Catch a Star 2008!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners

  18. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  19. Astro STARS Camp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-28

    Tom Nicolaides, an aerospace technologist in the Engineering & Test Directorate at Stennis Space Center, looks on as 2011 Astro STARS participants take turns gazing at the sun through a special telescope. The sun-gazing activity was part of the Astro STARS (Spaceflight, Technology, Astronomy & Robotics at Stennis) camp for 13-to-15-year-olds June 27 - July 1. The weeklong science and technology camp is held each year onsite at the rocket engine test facility.

  20. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

    The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

    The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

    In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  1. Star of Bethlehem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D.; Murdin, P.

    2001-07-01

    The biblical Star of Bethlehem, which heralded the birth of Jesus Christ, is only mentioned in the Gospel of St Matthew 2. The astrologically significant 7 bc triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces is the most likely candidate, although a comet/nova in 5 bc and a comet in 4 bc cannot be ruled out. There is also the possibility that the star was simply fictitious....

  2. A messy star factory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-15

    This sprinkle of cosmic glitter is a blue compact dwarf galaxy known as Markarian 209. Galaxies of this type are blue-hued, compact in size, gas-rich, and low in heavy elements. They are often used by astronomers to study star formation, as their conditions are similar to those thought to exist in the early Universe. Markarian 209 in particular has been studied extensively. It is filled with diffuse gas and peppered with star-forming regions towards its core. This image captures it undergoing a particularly dramatic burst of star formation, visible as the lighter blue cloudy region towards the top right of the galaxy. This clump is filled with very young and hot newborn stars. This galaxy was initially thought to be a young galaxy undergoing its very first episode of star formation, but later research showed that Markarian 209 is actually very old, with an almost continuous history of forming new stars. It is thought to have never had a dormant period — a period during which no stars were formed — lasting longer than 100 million years. The dominant population of stars in Markarian 209 is still quite young, in stellar terms, with ages of under 3 million years. For comparison, the Sun is some 4.6 billion years old, and is roughly halfway through its expected lifespan. The observations used to make this image were taken using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, and span the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared parts of the spectrum. A scattering of other bright galaxies can be seen across the frame, including the bright golden oval that could, due to a trick of perspective, be mistaken as part of Markarian 209 but is in fact a background galaxy. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble's Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Nick Rose. Links: Nick Rose’s Hidden Treasures entry on Flickr

  3. Matter accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the fundamental neutron star parameters, such as the mass and the magnetic field strength, were experimentally determined in accreting neutron star systems. Some of the relevant data and the models used to derive useful information from them, are reviewed concentrating mainly on X-ray pulsars. The latest advances in our understanding of the radiation mechanisms and the transfer in the strongly magnetized polar cap regions are discussed.

  4. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  5. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

    The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

    The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

    In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  6. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  7. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  8. ENERGY STAR Certified Products - Lighting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data set contains a simplified list of all currently certified ENERGY STAR Lighting models with basic model information collected across all product categories including ENERGY STAR Unique IDs, ENERGY STAR partners, model names and numbers, and brand names. Learn more about ENERGY STAR products at www.energystar.gov/products. A full list of ENERGY STAR specifications can be found at www.energystar.gov/specifications.

  9. Radio emission from binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the radio emission from binary star systems - the emission processes that occur, the characteristics of the binary systems inferred from the radio observations, and the reasons for the activity. Several classes of binary stars are described including those with two main sequence stars, those with one normal star and a white dwarf, and those containing a neutron star or a black hole.

  10. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars.

    Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy.

    The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation.

    The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  11. Young Stars with SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Adric R.; Alam, Munazza K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Henry, Todd J.

    2017-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All of these dwarfs are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph on the South African Large Telescope, we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, lithium 6708 Å, and potassium 7699 Å equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all of our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 pc of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, 9 members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find 14 young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  12. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars.

    Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy.

    The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation.

    The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  13. Star formation around isolated T Tauri stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, W.; Pfau, W.; Henning, T.

    1996-02-01

    The authors want to present their search for young stellar objects around the two isolated T Tau stars TW Hya (Rucinski and Krautter 1983) and CoD -29°8887 (de la Reza et al. 1989). From the known spectroscopic features of these objects, TW Hya is to be classified as a classical T Tau star (CTTS), but it is not associated with a dark cloud region like all other known CTTSs. The same situation turns out for the weak-line T Tau star (WTTS) CoD -29°8887. One possible explanation for their isolated position is that they have formed from small dark clouds or globules, which were later destroyed. The authors carried out two ROSAT PSPC observations pointing at TW Hya and CoD -29°8887 and used a source detection procedure considering all the standard ROSAT energy bands to test this hypothesis. Spectroscopic follow-up observations were made for 24 possible T Tauri candidates, but there are no further low-mass young stellar objects in the vicinity of the two targets. The study shows that the objects are definitely not formed in a cluster at the positions of the objects.

  14. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  15. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  16. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Sander, Andreas; Todt, Helge

    Nearly 150 years ago, the French astronomers Charles Wolf and Georges Rayet described stars with very conspicuous spectra that are dominated by bright and broad emission lines. Meanwhile termed Wolf-Rayet Stars after their discoverers, those objects turned out to represent important stages in the life of massive stars. As the first conference in a long time that was specifically dedicated to Wolf-Rayet stars, an international workshop was held in Potsdam, Germany, from 1.-5. June 2015. About 100 participants, comprising most of the leading experts in the field as well as as many young scientists, gathered for one week of extensive scientific exchange and discussions. Considerable progress has been reported throughout, e.g. on finding such stars, modeling and analyzing their spectra, understanding their evolutionary context, and studying their circumstellar nebulae. While some major questions regarding Wolf-Rayet stars still remain open 150 years after their discovery, it is clear today that these objects are not just interesting stars as such, but also keystones in the evolution of galaxies. These proceedings summarize the talks and posters presented at the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet workshop. Moreover, they also include the questions, comments, and discussions emerging after each talk, thereby giving a rare overview not only about the research, but also about the current debates and unknowns in the field. The Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) included Alceste Bonanos (Athens), Paul Crowther (Sheffield), John Eldridge (Auckland), Wolf-Rainer Hamann (Potsdam, Chair), John Hillier (Pittsburgh), Claus Leitherer (Baltimore), Philip Massey (Flagstaff), George Meynet (Geneva), Tony Moffat (Montreal), Nicole St-Louis (Montreal), and Dany Vanbeveren (Brussels).

  17. Models of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedjung, Michael

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important features of symbiotic stars is the coexistence of a cool spectral component that is apparently very similar to the spectrum of a cool giant, with at least one hot continuum, and emission lines from very different stages of ionization. The cool component dominates the infrared spectrum of S-type symbiotics; it tends to be veiled in this wavelength range by what appears to be excess emission in D-type symbiotics, this excess usually being attributed to circumstellar dust. The hot continuum (or continua) dominates the ultraviolet. X-rays have sometimes also been observed. Another important feature of symbiotic stars that needs to be explained is the variability. Different forms occur, some variability being periodic. This type of variability can, in a few cases, strongly suggest the presence of eclipses of a binary system. One of the most characteristic forms of variability is that characterizing the active phases. This basic form of variation is traditionally associated in the optical with the veiling of the cool spectrum and the disappearance of high-ionization emission lines, the latter progressively appearing (in classical cases, reappearing) later. Such spectral changes recall those of novae, but spectroscopic signatures of the high-ejection velocities observed for novae are not usually detected in symbiotic stars. However, the light curves of the 'symbiotic nova' subclass recall those of novae. We may also mention in this connection that radio observations (or, in a few cases, optical observations) of nebulae indicate ejection from symbiotic stars, with deviations from spherical symmetry. We shall give a historical overview of the proposed models for symbiotic stars and make a critical analysis in the light of the observations of symbiotic stars. We describe the empirical approach to models and use the observational data to diagnose the physical conditions in the symbiotics stars. Finally, we compare the results of this empirical

  18. Compact Star Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, J. H.

    1996-12-01

    A major goal of RXTE is to investigate the fastest timing signals from compact stars, especially neutron stars and black holes. Signals have now been found from many (at least nine) low mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars in the frequency range (100-1200 Hz) expected for the rotation period of the neutron star after being spun up by accretion over a long period. The kilohertz frequency domain for these sources is simpler than the domain of oscillations below about 50 Hz in that a few isolated features can dominate over white noise. However there are three main features to consider (not all present at the same time) and at least two are quasiperiodic with varying widths and frequencies. Several models are pitting their predictions against the behavior of these features, but the bursters, especially, appear to be revealing the neutron stars's spin. It is consistent with our beliefs that no black hole candidate has shown the same complex of signals, although at least one QPO frequency of a few hundred Hz could be expected in black hole candidates by analogy to the 67 Hz observed from GRS 1915+105. The observations also provide critical tests of the interpretions of the lower frequency (5-50 Hz) QPO and the variable noise seen in both low magnetic field neutron stars and black hole candidates. The kilohertz features have not been seen from the accreting pulsars with relatively high magnetic fields, but high luminosity pulsars (such as last year's transient, GRO J1744-28) reveal signatures of the dynamic interaction between the accretion flow, the magnetic field, and perhaps the neutron star surface in addition to their coherent pulsations.

  19. Life Cycle of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper left of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). This true-color picture was taken on March 5, 1999 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  20. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of zeta Puppis with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, S. M.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Cottam, J.; Rauw, G.; Vreux, J.-M.; denBoggende, A. J. F.; Mewe, R.; Guedel, M.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray spectrum of the bright O4Ief supergiant star Puppis, obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on- board XMM-Newton. The spectrum exhibits bright emission lines of hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and silicon, as well as neon-like ions of iron. The lines are all significantly resolved, with characteristic velocity widths of order 1000 - 1500 km/ s. The nitrogen lines are especially strong, and indicate that the shocked gas in the wind is mixed with CNO-burned material, as has been previously inferred for the atmosphere of this star from ultraviolet spectra. We find that the forbidden to intercombination line ratios within the helium-like triplets are anomalously low for N VI, O VII, and Ne IX. While this is sometimes indicative of high electron density, we show that in this case, it is instead caused by the intense ultraviolet radiation field of the star. We use this interpretation to derive constraints on the location of the X-ray emitting shocks within the wind that agree remarkably well with current theoretical models for this system.