Science.gov

Sample records for a4 compton backscattering

  1. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  2. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  3. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  4. The dose from Compton backscatter screening.

    PubMed

    Rez, Peter; Metzger, Robert L; Mossman, Kenneth L

    2011-04-01

    Systems based on the detection of Compton backscattered X rays have been deployed for screening personnel for weapons and explosives. Similar principles are used for screening vehicles at border-crossing points. Based on well-established scattering cross sections and absorption coefficients in conjunction with reasonable estimates of the image contrast and resolution, the entrance skin dose and the dose at a depth of 1 cm can be calculated. The effective dose can be estimated using the same conversion coefficients as used to convert exposure measurements to the effective dose. It is shown that the effective dose is highly dependent on image resolution (i.e. pixel size).The effective doses for personnel screening systems are unlikely to be in compliance with the American National Standards Institute standard NS 43.17 unless the pixel sizes are >4 mm. Nevertheless, calculated effective doses are well below doses associated with health effects.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1988-03-11

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.; Goulding, Frederick S.

    1991-01-01

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons Compton backscattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to monimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering.

  7. Polarized γ source based on Compton backscattering in a laser cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, V.; Pogorelsky, I. V.

    2006-09-01

    We propose a novel gamma source suitable for generating a polarized positron beam for the next generation of electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). This 30-MeV polarized gamma source is based on Compton scattering inside a picosecond CO2 laser cavity generated from electron bunches produced by a 4-GeV linac. We identified and experimentally verified the optimum conditions for obtaining at least one gamma photon per electron. After multiplication at several consecutive interaction points, the circularly polarized gamma rays are stopped on a target, thereby creating copious numbers of polarized positrons. We address the practicality of having an intracavity Compton-polarized positron source as the injector for these new colliders.

  8. NRF Based Nondestructive Inspection System for SNM by Using Laser-Compton-Backscattering Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.

    2015-10-01

    A non-destructive inspection system for special nuclear materials (SNMs) hidden in a sea cargo has been developed. The system consists of a fast screening system using neutron generated by inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device and an isotope identification system using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements with laser Compton backscattering (LCS) gamma-rays has been developed. The neutron flux of 108 n/sec has been achieved by the IEC in static mode. We have developed a modified neutron reactor noise analysis method to detect fission neutron in a short time. The LCS gamma-rays has been generated by using a small racetrack microtoron accelerator and an intense sub-nano second laser colliding head-on to the electron beam. The gamma-ray flux has been achieved more than 105 photons/s. The NRF gamma-rays will be measured using LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detector array whose performance has been measured by NRF experiment of U-235 in HIGS facility. The whole inspection system has been designed to satisfy a demand from the sea port.

  9. Simulation of emittance dilution in electron storage ring from Compton backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.; Blum, E.

    1993-07-01

    A Monte-Carlo simulation of Compton backscattered {kappa}{sub L}=3.2-{mu}m photons from an IR-FEL on 75-MeV electrons in a storage ring yields an RMS electron energy spread of {Delta}{sub E}=11.9-keV for a sample of 10{sup 7} single scattering events. Electrons are sampled from a beam of natural energy spread {sigma}{sub E} = 5.6-keV and damped transverse angle spreads {sigma}{sub x}{prime}, = .041-mrad and {sigma}{sub y}{prime} = .052-mrad (100%) coupling, scaled from the 200-MeV BNL XLS compact storage ring. The Compton-scattered X-Rays are generated from an integral of the CM Klein-Nishina cross-section transformed to the lab. A tracking calculation has also been performedmore » in 6-dimensional phase space. Initial electron coordinates are selected randomly from a Gaussian distribution of RMS spreads {sigma}{sub xo}=.102-mm, {sigma}{sub x{prime}o}=.041-mrad, {sigma}{sub yo}=.018-mm, {sigma}{sub y{prime}o}=.052-mrad, {sigma}{sub {phi}o}=22-mrad and {sigma}{sub Eo}=6-keV. A sample of 10000 electrons were each following for 40000 turns around the ring through an RF cavity of f{sub rf}=211.54-MHz and peak voltage V{sub m}=300-keV. Preliminary results indicate that the resulting energy distribution is quite broad with an RMS width of {Delta}{sub E} = 124-keV. The transverse widths are only slightly increased from their original values, i.e. {Delta}{sub x} = .106-mm and {Delta}{sub x}{prime}=.043 mrad. The scaled energy spread of {Delta}{sub E} {approximately} 360-keV for {approximately} 350,000 turns desired in a 10-msec X-Ray angiography exposure is well within the RF bucket used here; even V{sub m} < 50-kV is adequate. Further, the electron energy spread adds a negligible RMS X-Ray energy spread of {Delta}{sub Ex}=.32-keV. The electron energy damping time of {tau}{sub E}=379-msec at 75-MeV in an XLS-type ring allows for damping this induced spread and top-off of the ring between heart cycles.« less

  10. Simulation of emittance dilution in electron storage ring from Compton backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumberg, L. N.; Blum, E.

    A Monte-Carlo simulation of Compton backscattered kappa(sub L) = 3.2-micron photons from an IR-FEL on 75-MeV electrons in a storage ring yields an RMS electron energy spread of delta(sub E) = 11.9-keV for a sample of 10(exp 7) single scattering events. Electrons are sampled from a beam of natural energy spread sigma(sub E) = 5.6-keV and damped transverse angle spreads sigma(sub x)(prime) = .041-mrad and sigma(sub y)(prime) = .052-mrad (100%) coupling, scaled from the 200-MeV BNL XLS compact storage ring. The Compton-scattered x-rays are generated from an integral of the CM Klein-Nishina cross-section transformed to the lab. A tracking calculation has also been performed in 6-dimensional phase space. Initial electron coordinates are selected randomly from a Gaussian distribution of RMS spreads sigma(sub xo) = .102-mm, sigma(sub x(prime)o) = .041-mrad, sigma(sub yo) = .018-mm, sigma(sub y(prime)o) = .052-mrad, sigma(sub (phi)o) = 22-mrad and sigma(sub Eo) = 6-keV. A sample of 10000 electrons were each following for 40000 turns around the ring through an RF cavity of f(sub RF) = 211.54-MHz and peak voltage V(sub m)=300-keV. Preliminary results indicate that the resulting energy distribution is quite broad with an RMS width of delta(sub E) = 124-keV. The transverse widths are only slightly increased from their original values, i.e. delta(sub x) = .106-mm and delta(sub x)(prime) = .043 mrad. The scaled energy spread of delta(sub E) approximately = 360-keV for approximately 350,000 turns desired in a 10-msec x-ray angiography exposure is well within the RF bucket used here; even V(sub m) less than 50-kV is adequate. Further, the electron energy spread adds a negligible RMS x-ray energy spread of delta(sub Ex) = .32-keV. The electron energy damping time of tau(sub E) = 379-msec at 75-MeV in an XLS-type ring allows for damping this induced spread and top-off of the ring between heart cycles.

  11. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S

    2005-05-19

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10{sup 7} photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 {micro}m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verifiedmore » the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials.« less

  12. Two-colour X-gamma ray inverse Compton back-scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebot, I.; Petrillo, V.; Serafini, L.

    2017-10-01

    We present a simple and new scheme for producing two-colour Thomson/Compton radiation with the possibility of controlling separately the polarization of the two different colours, based on the interaction of one single electron beam with two light pulses that can come from the same laser setup or from two different lasers and that collide with the electrons at different angle. One of the most interesting cases for medical applications is to provide two X-ray pulses across the iodine K-edge at 33.2 keV. The iodine is used as contrast medium in various imaging techniques and the availability of two spectral lines accross the K-edge allows one to produce subtraction images with a great increase in accuracy.

  13. An optical storage cavity-based, Compton-backscatter x-ray source using the MKV free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadmack, Michael R.

    A compact, high-brightness x-ray source is presently under development at the University of Hawai`i Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This source utilizes Compton backscattering of an infrared laser from a relativistic electron beam to produce a narrow beam of monochromatic x-rays. The scattering efficiency is greatly increased by tightly focusing the two beams at an interaction point within a near-concentric optical storage cavity, designed with high finesse to coherently stack the incident laser pulses and greatly enhance the number of photons available for scattering with the electron beam. This dissertation describes the effort and progress to integrate and characterize the most important and challenging aspects of the design of this system. A low-power, near-concentric, visible-light storage cavity has been constructed as a tool for the exploration of the performance, alignment procedures, and diagnostics required for the operation of a high power infrared storage cavity. The use of off-axis reflective focussing elements is essential to the design of the optical storage cavity, but requires exquisite alignment to minimize astigmatism and other optical aberrations. Experiments using a stabilized HeNe laser have revealed important performance characteristics, and allowed the development of critical alignment and calibration procedures, which can be directly applied to the high power infrared storage cavity. Integration of the optical and electron beams is similarly challenging. A scanning-wire beam profiler has been constructed and tested, which allows for high resolution measurement of the size and position of the laser and electron beams at the interaction point. This apparatus has demonstrated that the electron and laser beams can be co-aligned with a precision of less than 10 microm, as required to maximize the x-ray production rate. Equally important is the stabilization of the phase of the GHz repetition rate electron pulses arriving at the interaction point

  14. Arthur H. Compton and Compton Scattering

    Science.gov Websites

    of X-rays, when he discovered the effect that is named after him in 1922. ... The Compton effect photon, when it interacts with matter. This effect demonstrates that light cannot be explained purely as overall momentum of the system is conserved. ... The explanation and measurement of the Compton effect

  15. Infrared backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Nevitt, Timothy J.; Singham, Shermila Brito

    1989-01-01

    All particles in the atmosphere are not spherical. Moreover, the scattering properties of randomly oriented nonspherical particles are not equivalent to those of spherical particles no matter how the term equivalent is defined. This is especially true for scattering in the backward direction and at the infrared wavelengths at which some atmospheric particles have strong absorption bands. Thus calculations based on Mie theory of infrared backscattering by dry or insoluble atmospheric particles are suspect. To support this assertion, it was noted that peaks in laboratory-measured infrared backscattering spectra show appreciable shifts compared with those calculated using Mie theory. One example is ammonium sulfate. Some success was had in modeling backscattering spectra of ammonium sulfate particles using a simple statistical theory called the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) theory. In this theory, the scattering properties of an ensemble are calculated. Recently a modified version of this theory was applied to measured spectra of scattering by kaolin particles. The particles were platelike, so the probability distribution of ellipsoidal shapes was chosen to reflect this. As with ammonium sulfate, the wavelength of measured peak backscattering is shifted longward of that predicted by Mie theory.

  16. Compton tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Grubsky, Victor; Romanoov, Volodymyr; Shoemaker, Keith; Patton, Edward Matthew; Jannson, Tomasz

    2016-02-02

    A Compton tomography system comprises an x-ray source configured to produce a planar x-ray beam. The beam irradiates a slice of an object to be imaged, producing Compton-scattered x-rays. The Compton-scattered x-rays are imaged by an x-ray camera. Translation of the object with respect to the source and camera or vice versa allows three-dimensional object imaging.

  17. The Compton generator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siboni, S.

    2014-09-01

    The Compton generator, introduced in 1913 by the US physicist A H Compton as a relatively simple device to detect the Earth's rotation with respect to the distant stars, is analyzed and discussed in a general perspective. The paper introduces a generalized definition of the generator, emphasizing the special features of the original apparatus, and provides a suggestive interpretation of the way the device works. To this end, an intriguing electromagnetic analogy is developed, which turns out to be particularly useful in simplifying the calculations. Besides the more extensive description of the Compton generator in itself, the combined use of concepts and methods coming from different fields of physics, such as particle dynamics in moving references frames, continuum mechanics and electromagnetism, may be of interest to both teachers and graduate students.

  18. Finite element Compton tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Amouzou, Pauline; Menon, Naresh; Gertsenshteyn, Michael

    2007-09-01

    In this paper a new approach to 3D Compton imaging is presented, based on a kind of finite element (FE) analysis. A window for X-ray incoherent scattering (or Compton scattering) attenuation coefficients is identified for breast cancer diagnosis, for hard X-ray photon energy of 100-300 keV. The point-by-point power/energy budget is computed, based on a 2D array of X-ray pencil beams, scanned vertically. The acceptable medical doses are also computed. The proposed finite element tomography (FET) can be an alternative to X-ray mammography, tomography, and tomosynthesis. In experiments, 100 keV (on average) X-ray photons are applied, and a new type of pencil beam collimation, based on a Lobster-Eye Lens (LEL), is proposed.

  19. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  20. A novel Compton camera design featuring a rear-panel shield for substantial noise reduction in gamma-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Sakurai, N.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.

    2014-12-01

    After the Japanese nuclear disaster in 2011, large amounts of radioactive isotopes were released and still remain a serious problem in Japan. Consequently, various gamma cameras are being developed to help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation. The Compton camera utilizes the kinematics of Compton scattering to contract images without using a mechanical collimator, and features a wide field of view. For instance, we have developed a novel Compton camera that features a small size (13 × 14 × 15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg), but which also achieves high sensitivity thanks to Ce:GAGG scintillators optically coupled wiith MPPC arrays. By definition, in such a Compton camera, gamma rays are expected to scatter in the ``scatterer'' and then be fully absorbed in the ``absorber'' (in what is called a forward-scattered event). However, high energy gamma rays often interact with the detector in the opposite direction - initially scattered in the absorber and then absorbed in the scatterer - in what is called a ``back-scattered'' event. Any contamination of such back-scattered events is known to substantially degrade the quality of gamma-ray images, but determining the order of gamma-ray interaction based solely on energy deposits in the scatterer and absorber is quite difficult. For this reason, we propose a novel yet simple Compton camera design that includes a rear-panel shield (a few mm thick) consisting of W or Pb located just behind the scatterer. Since the energy of scattered gamma rays in back-scattered events is much lower than that in forward-scattered events, we can effectively discriminate and reduce back-scattered events to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the images. This paper presents our detailed optimization of the rear-panel shield using Geant4 simulation, and describes a demonstration test using our Compton camera.

  1. Australian aerosol backscatter survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, John L.; Jones, William D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of the atmospheric backscatter coefficient in and around Australia during May and June 1986. One set of backscatter measurements was made with a CO2 lidar operating at 10.6 microns; the other set was obtained from calculations using measured aerosol parameters. Despite the two quite different data collection techniques, there is quite good agreement between the two methods. Backscatter values range from near 1 x 10 to the -8th/m per sr near the surface to 4 - 5 x 10 to the -11th/m per sr in the free troposphere at 5-7-km altitude. The values in the free troposphere are somewhat lower than those typically measured at the same height in the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (Editor); Gehrels, Neil (Editor); Dennis, Brian (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  3. Maximum Likelihood Compton Polarimetry with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, A. W.; Boggs, S. E; Chiu, C. L.

    2017-10-20

    Astrophysical polarization measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are becoming more feasible as detectors with high position and energy resolution are deployed. Previous work has shown that the minimum detectable polarization (MDP) of an ideal Compton polarimeter can be improved by ∼21% when an unbinned, maximum likelihood method (MLM) is used instead of the standard approach of fitting a sinusoid to a histogram of azimuthal scattering angles. Here we outline a procedure for implementing this maximum likelihood approach for real, nonideal polarimeters. As an example, we use the recent observation of GRB 160530A with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager. Wemore » find that the MDP for this observation is reduced by 20% when the MLM is used instead of the standard method.« less

  4. Maximum Likelihood Compton Polarimetry with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, A. W.; Boggs, S. E.; Chiu, C. L.; Kierans, C. A.; Sleator, C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Zoglauer, A. C.; Chang, H.-K.; Tseng, C.-H.; Yang, C.-Y.; Jean, P.; von Ballmoos, P.; Lin, C.-H.; Amman, M.

    2017-10-01

    Astrophysical polarization measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are becoming more feasible as detectors with high position and energy resolution are deployed. Previous work has shown that the minimum detectable polarization (MDP) of an ideal Compton polarimeter can be improved by ˜21% when an unbinned, maximum likelihood method (MLM) is used instead of the standard approach of fitting a sinusoid to a histogram of azimuthal scattering angles. Here we outline a procedure for implementing this maximum likelihood approach for real, nonideal polarimeters. As an example, we use the recent observation of GRB 160530A with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager. We find that the MDP for this observation is reduced by 20% when the MLM is used instead of the standard method.

  5. Analysis of Compton continuum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.; Olson, I. K.

    1970-01-01

    Five computer programs: COMPSCAT, FEND, GABCO, DOSE, and COMPLOT, have been developed and used for the analysis and subsequent reduction of measured energy distributions of Compton recoil electrons to continuous gamma spectra. In addition to detailed descriptions of these computer programs, the relationship amongst these codes is stressed. The manner in which these programs function is illustrated by tracing a sample measurement through a complete cycle of the data-reduction process.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of flat natural and cultural heritage objects by a Compton scattering modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero Prado, Patricio; Nguyen, Mai K.; Dumas, Laurent; Cohen, Serge X.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization and interpretation of flat ancient material objects, such as those found in archaeology, paleoenvironments, paleontology, and cultural heritage, have remained a challenging task to perform by means of conventional x-ray tomography methods due to their anisotropic morphology and flattened geometry. To overcome the limitations of the mentioned methodologies for such samples, an imaging modality based on Compton scattering is proposed in this work. Classical x-ray tomography treats Compton scattering data as noise in the image formation process, while in Compton scattering tomography the conditions are set such that Compton data become the principal image contrasting agent. Under these conditions, we are able, first, to avoid relative rotations between the sample and the imaging setup, and second, to obtain three-dimensional data even when the object is supported by a dense material by exploiting backscattered photons. Mathematically this problem is addressed by means of a conical Radon transform and its inversion. The image formation process and object reconstruction model are presented. The feasibility of this methodology is supported by numerical simulations.

  7. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-12-09

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  8. Polarization reconstruction algorithm for a Compton polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockert, M.; Weber, G.; Spillmann, U.; Krings, T.; Stöhlker, Th

    2018-05-01

    We present the technique of Compton polarimetry using X-ray detectors based on double-sided segmented semiconductor crystals that were developed within the SPARC collaboration. In addition, we discuss the polarization reconstruction algorithm with particular emphasis on systematic deviations between the observed detector response and our model function for the Compton scattering distribution inside the detector.

  9. X-ray backscatter imaging for radiography by selective detection and snapshot: Evolution, development, and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Daniel

    Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) is a single-sided imaging technique that uses the penetrating power of radiation and unique interaction properties of radiation with matter to image subsurface features. CBI has a variety of applications that include non-destructive interrogation, medical imaging, security and military applications. Radiography by selective detection (RSD), lateral migration radiography (LMR) and shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) are different CBI techniques that are being optimized and developed. Radiography by selective detection (RSD) is a pencil beam Compton backscatter imaging technique that falls between highly collimated and uncollimated techniques. Radiography by selective detection uses a combination of single- and multiple-scatter photons from a projected area below a collimation plane to generate an image. As a result, the image has a combination of first- and multiple-scatter components. RSD techniques offer greater subsurface resolution than uncollimated techniques, at speeds at least an order of magnitude faster than highly collimated techniques. RSD scanning systems have evolved from a prototype into near market-ready scanning devices for use in a variety of single-sided imaging applications. The design has changed to incorporate state-of-the-art detectors and electronics optimized for backscatter imaging with an emphasis on versatility, efficiency and speed. The RSD system has become more stable, about 4 times faster, and 60% lighter while maintaining or improving image quality and contrast over the past 3 years. A new snapshot backscatter radiography (SBR) CBI technique, shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR), has been developed from concept and proof-of-principle to a functional laboratory prototype. SABR radiography uses digital detection media and shaded aperture configurations to generate near-surface Compton backscatter images without scanning, similar to how transmission radiographs are taken. Finally, a

  10. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

  11. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory being released from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-35 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered the Earth's atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, GRO's Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientist to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of star, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in BATSE's science program.

  12. Collective stimulated Brillouin backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel; Rose, Harvey

    2007-11-01

    We develop the statistical theory of linear collective stimulated Brillouin backscatter (CBSBS) in spatially and temporally incoherent laser beam. Instability is collective because it does not depend on the dynamics of isolated hot spots (speckles) of laser intensity, but rather depends on averaged laser beam intensity, optic f/#, and laser coherence time, Tc. CBSBS has a much larger threshold than a classical coherent beam's in long-scale-length high temperature plasma. It is a novel regime in which Tc is too large for applicability of well-known statistical theories (RPA) but Tc must be small enough to suppress single speckle processes such as self-focusing. Even if laser Tc is too large for a priori applicability of our theory, collective forward SBS^1, perhaps enhanced by high Z dopant, and its resultant self-induced Tc reduction, may regain the CBSBS regime. We identified convective and absolute CBSBS regimes. The threshold of convective instability is inside the typical parameter region of NIF designs. Well above incoherent threshold, the coherent instability growth rate is recovered. ^1 P.M. Lushnikov and H.A. Rose, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, 48, 1501 (2006).

  13. Foreign body detection in food materials using compton scattered x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Nigel James Bruce

    This thesis investigated the application of X-ray Compton scattering to the problem of foreign body detection in food. The methods used were analytical modelling, simulation and experiment. A criterion was defined for detectability, and a model was developed for predicting the minimum time required for detection. The model was used to predict the smallest detectable cubes of air, glass, plastic and steel. Simulations and experiments were performed on voids and glass in polystyrene phantoms, water, coffee and muesli. Backscatter was used to detect bones in chicken meat. The effects of geometry and multiple scatter on contrast, signal-to-noise, and detection time were simulated. Compton scatter was compared with transmission, and the effect of inhomogeneity was modelled. Spectral shape was investigated as a means of foreign body detection. A signal-to-noise ratio of 7.4 was required for foreign body detection in food. A 0.46 cm cube of glass or a 1.19 cm cube of polystyrene were detectable in a 10 cm cube of water in one second. The minimum time to scan a whole sample varied as the 7th power of the foreign body size, and the 5th power of the sample size. Compton scatter inspection produced higher contrasts than transmission, but required longer measurement times because of the low number of photon counts. Compton scatter inspection of whole samples was very slow compared to production line speeds in the food industry. There was potential for Compton scatter in applications which did not require whole-sample scanning, such as surface inspection. There was also potential in the inspection of inhomogeneous samples. The multiple scatter fraction varied from 25% to 55% for 2 to 10 cm cubes of water, but did not have a large effect on the detection time. The spectral shape gave good contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios in the detection of chicken bones.

  14. CO2 lidar backscatter experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Bowdle, David A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Cutten, Dean; Mccaul, Eugene W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Aerosol/Lidar Science Group of the Remote Sensing Branch engages in experimental and theoretical studies of atmospheric aerosol scattering and atmospheric dynamics, emphasizing Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts by in-house personnel, coordinated with similar efforts by university and government institutional researchers. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol scattering is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE was initiated by NASA in 1986 to support the engineering design, performance simulation, and science planning for the prospective NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). The most important GLOBE scientific result has been identified of a background aerosol mode with a surprisingly uniform backscatter mixing ratio (backscatter normalized by air density) throughout a deep tropospheric layer. The backscatter magnitude of the background mode evident from the MSFC CW lidar measurements is remarkably similar to that evident from ground-based backscatter profile climatologies obtained by JPL in Pasadena CA, NOAA/WPL in Boulder CO, and by the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment in the United Kingdom. Similar values for the background mode have been inferred from the conversion of in situ aerosol microphysical measurements to backscatter using Mie theory. Little seasonal or hemispheric variation is evident in the survey mission data, as opposed to large variation for clouds, aerosol plums, and the marine boundary layer. Additional features include: localized aerosol residues from dissipated clouds, occasional regions having mass concentrations of nanograms per cubic meter and very low backscatter, and aerosol plumes extending thousands of kilometers and several kilometers deep. Preliminary comparison with meteorological observations thus far indicate correlation between backscatter and water vapor under high humidity conditions. Limited

  15. Hidden baryons: The physics of Compton composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Frederick J.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of the mass-energy of the Universe appears to be composed of Compton composites. How is it then that these composites are not frequently observed in experiments? This paper addresses this question, and others, by reviewing recent publications that: 1) introduced Compton composites, 2) showed how and where they are formed and 3) explained how they interact with other systems. Though ubiquitous in many physical situations, Compton composites are almost completely hidden in experiments due to their unique interaction characteristics. Still, their presence has been indirectly observed, though not interpreted as such until recently. Looking to the future, direct-detection experiments are proposed that could verify the composites' components. It is with deep sadness that I dedicate this paper to my mentor, collaborator, and friend, Dr. John R. Reitz, who passed away within days of the publication of our paper “Compton Composites Late in the Early Universe”.

  16. Neutron Compton scattering from selectively deuterated acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Fielding, A. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    With the aim of developing the application of neutron Compton scattering (NCS) to molecular systems of biophysical interest, we are using the Compton spectrometer EVS at ISIS to characterize the momentum distribution of protons in peptide groups. In this contribution we present NCS measurements of the recoil peak (Compton profile) due to the amide proton in otherwise fully deuterated acetanilide (ACN), a widely studied model system for H-bonding and energy transfer in biomolecules. We obtain values for the average width of the potential well of the amide proton and its mean kinetic energy. Deviations from the Gaussian form of the Compton profile, analyzed on the basis of an expansion due to Sears, provide data relating to the Laplacian of the proton potential.

  17. Multibeam sonar backscatter data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimel, Alexandre C. G.; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Parnum, Iain M.; Le Bas, Tim; Schmidt, Val; Keith, Gordon; Ierodiaconou, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    Multibeam sonar systems now routinely record seafloor backscatter data, which are processed into backscatter mosaics and angular responses, both of which can assist in identifying seafloor types and morphology. Those data products are obtained from the multibeam sonar raw data files through a sequence of data processing stages that follows a basic plan, but the implementation of which varies greatly between sonar systems and software. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of this backscatter data processing chain, with a focus on the variability in the possible implementation of each processing stage. Our objective for undertaking this task is twofold: (1) to provide an overview of backscatter data processing for the consideration of the general user and (2) to provide suggestions to multibeam sonar manufacturers, software providers and the operators of these systems and software for eventually reducing the lack of control, uncertainty and variability associated with current data processing implementations and the resulting backscatter data products. One such suggestion is the adoption of a nomenclature for increasingly refined levels of processing, akin to the nomenclature adopted for satellite remote-sensing data deliverables.

  18. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma- (γ-) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A γ-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition γ-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO2 laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of γ-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO2-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO2 laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO2 laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  19. Enhanced Compton Backscattering in a Periodic Mirror System for Polarized Positron Beam Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yoshikazu

    2002-05-01

    By colliding a circularly polarized high power laser beam with a high-energy electron beam, intense circularly polarized γ-rays can be generated, which in turn can be used to produce a longitudinally polarized positron beam for a linear collider. In the present paper, an optical mirror system with periodic focal points is considered to generate intense polarized γ-rays. A CO2 laser beam propagates back and forth in a series of holed mirrors in a straight line. The diffraction loss through the holes is negligibly small, so that the laser beam can be used repeatedly for the collision. The beam size is reduced to 22 μm at a minimum and kept the same in 20 unit cells, ten of which are combined in series. A 5.8 GeV electron beam is focused to 30 μm at a minimum in a series of triplets of permanent quadrupole magnets to generate γ-rays of 60 MeV at a maximum. A γ-ray yield required for a positron beam in a linear collider can be obtained by 10 laser sources with a power of 3.1 kW each, which is considerably lower than the total power assumed in a previous proposal.

  20. 3D Backscatter Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ross (Inventor); Turner, D. Clark (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for imaging an object using backscattered radiation are described. The imaging system comprises both a radiation source for irradiating an object that is rotationally movable about the object, and a detector for detecting backscattered radiation from the object that can be disposed on substantially the same side of the object as the source and which can be rotationally movable about the object. The detector can be separated into multiple detector segments with each segment having a single line of sight projection through the object and so detects radiation along that line of sight. Thus, each detector segment can isolate the desired component of the backscattered radiation. By moving independently of each other about the object, the source and detector can collect multiple images of the object at different angles of rotation and generate a three dimensional reconstruction of the object. Other embodiments are described.

  1. A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer conceptual design is discussed for performing gamma spectral measurements in monodirectional gamma fields from 100 R per hour to 1,000,000 R per hour. Selectable Compton targets are used to scatter gamma photons onto an otherwise heavily shielded detector with changeable scattering efficiencies such that the count rate is maintained between 500 and 10,000 per second. Use of two sum-Compton coincident detectors, one for energies up to 1.5 MeV and the other for 600 keV to 10 MeV, will allow good peak to tail pulse height ratios to be obtained over the entire spectrum and reduces the neutron recoil background rate.

  2. Compton scattering collision module for OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, Fabrizio; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luís

    2017-10-01

    Compton scattering plays a fundamental role in a variety of different astrophysical environments, such as at the gaps of pulsars and the stagnation surface of black holes. In these scenarios, Compton scattering is coupled with self-consistent mechanisms such as pair cascades. We present the implementation of a novel module, embedded in the self-consistent framework of the PIC code OSIRIS 4.0, capable of simulating Compton scattering from first principles and that is fully integrated with the self-consistent plasma dynamics. The algorithm accounts for the stochastic nature of Compton scattering reproducing without approximations the exchange of energy between photons and unbound charged species. We present benchmarks of the code against the analytical results of Blumenthal et al. and the numerical solution of the linear Kompaneets equation and good agreement is found between the simulations and the theoretical models. This work is supported by the European Research Council Grant (ERC- 2015-AdG 695088) and the Fundao para a Céncia e Tecnologia (Bolsa de Investigao PD/BD/114323/2016).

  3. Investigating the Compton Effect with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinderman, Jesusa Valdez

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation of the Compton effect designed to lead students to discover (1) the relationship of the electron's final kinetic energy to its angle of scattering and (2) the relationship between the scattering angles of the outgoing electron and photon. (MDH)

  4. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  5. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  6. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  7. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  8. Signature of inverse Compton emission from blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Haritma; Mohan, Prashanth; Wierzcholska, Alicja; Gu, Minfeng

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are classified into high-, intermediate- and low-energy-peaked sources based on the location of their synchrotron peak. This lies in infra-red/optical to ultra-violet bands for low- and intermediate-peaked blazars. The transition from synchrotron to inverse Compton emission falls in the X-ray bands for such sources. We present the spectral and timing analysis of 14 low- and intermediate-energy-peaked blazars observed with XMM-Newton spanning 31 epochs. Parametric fits to X-ray spectra help constrain the possible location of transition from the high-energy end of the synchrotron to the low-energy end of the inverse Compton emission. In seven sources in our sample, we infer such a transition and constrain the break energy in the range 0.6-10 keV. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram is used to estimate the power spectral density (PSD) shape. It is well described by a power law in a majority of light curves, the index being flatter compared to general expectation from active galactic nuclei, ranging here between 0.01 and 1.12, possibly due to short observation durations resulting in an absence of long-term trends. A toy model involving synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton (EC; disc, broad line region, torus) mechanisms are used to estimate magnetic field strength ≤0.03-0.88 G in sources displaying the energy break and infer a prominent EC contribution. The time-scale for variability being shorter than synchrotron cooling implies steeper PSD slopes which are inferred in these sources.

  9. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Oldaker, Mark E [Pleasanton, CA

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  10. Nonlinear Brightness Optimization in Compton Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Hartemann, Fred V.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.

    2013-07-26

    In Compton scattering light sources, a laser pulse is scattered by a relativistic electron beam to generate tunable x and gamma rays. Because of the inhomogeneous nature of the incident radiation, the relativistic Lorentz boost of the electrons is modulated by the ponderomotive force during the interaction, leading to intrinsic spectral broadening and brightness limitations. We discuss these effects, along with an optimization strategy to properly balance the laser bandwidth, diffraction, and nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  11. Coherent backscattering of singular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Chaim; Dogariu, Aristide

    2006-02-01

    The phenomenon of coherent backscattering depends on both the statistical characteristics of a random scattering medium and the correlation features of the incident field. Imposing a wavefront singularity on the incident field offers a unique and very attractive way to modify the field correlations in a deterministic manner. The field correlations are found to act as a path-length filter which modifies the distribution of different contributions to the enhancement cone. This effect is thoroughly discussed and demonstrated experimentally for the case of single scale scattering systems.

  12. Detection and Localization of Money Bills Concealed Behind Wooden Walls Using Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wart, Jason A. van; Hussein, Esam M.A.; Waller, Edward J

    2005-05-15

    This work presents a portable device for detecting visually obscured contraband money bills that may be hidden within conventional household walls for the purpose of avoiding confiscation. The device utilizes the Compton backscattering of photons emitted from a collimated {sup 241}Am source. The scattered photons are detected with a thin NaI(Tl) detector, either over a wide field of view for surface scanning of the wall or within a confined view field for depth scanning. The design of the device was optimized for best density contrast and highest count rate for a given source activity. It was shown that the minimummore » detectable amount of contraband, with >95% confidence level, is 86 paper bills. The contraband was detectable when hidden in household walls made of gyprock or wooden paneling, even when masked by higher density materials such as metallic piping. The device's capability exceeded those of commercially available density-based portable contraband detectors.« less

  13. Photon Beaming in External Compton models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Anne; Spanier, Felix

    In attempt to model blazar emission spectra, External Compton models have been employed to fit the observed data. In these models photons from the accretion disk or the CMB are upscat-tered via the Compton effect by the electrons and contribute to the emission. In previous works the resulting scattered photon angular distribution has been calculated for ultrarelativistic elec-trons. This work aims to extend the result to the case of mildly relativistic electrons. Hence, the beaming pattern produced by a relativistic moving blob consisting of isotropic distributed electrons, which scatter photons of an isotropic external radiation is calculated numerically. The isotropic photon density distribution in the blob frame is Lorentz-transformed into the rest frame of the electron and results in an anisotropic distribution with a preferred direction where it is upscattered by the electrons. The photon density distribution is determined and transformed back into the blob frame. As the photons in the rest frame of the electrons are dis-tributed anisotropically the scattering does not reproduce this anisotropic distribution. When transforming back into the blob frame the resulting photon distribution won't be isotropic. Approximations have shown that the resulting photon distribution is boosted more strongly than a distribution assumed to be isotropic in the rest frame of the electrons. Hence, in order to obtain the beaming caused by external Compton it is of particular interest to derive a more exact approximation of the resulting photon angular distribution.

  14. Laser pulsing in linear Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Krafft, G. A.; Johnson, E.; Deitrick, K.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Previous work on calculating energy spectra from Compton scattering events has either neglected considering the pulsed structure of the incident laser beam, or has calculated these effects in an approximate way subject to criticism. In this paper, this problem has been reconsidered within a linear plane wave model for the incident laser beam. By performing the proper Lorentz transformation of the Klein-Nishina scattering cross section, a spectrum calculation can be created which allows the electron beam energy spread and emittance effects on the spectrum to be accurately calculated, essentially by summing over the emission of each individual electron. Such anmore » approach has the obvious advantage that it is easily integrated with a particle distribution generated by particle tracking, allowing precise calculations of spectra for realistic particle distributions in collision. The method is used to predict the energy spectrum of radiation passing through an aperture for the proposed Old Dominion University inverse Compton source. In addition, as discussed in the body of the paper, many of the results allow easy scaling estimates to be made of the expected spectrum. A misconception in the literature on Compton scattering of circularly polarized beams is corrected and recorded.« less

  15. Prototype Compton imager for special nuclear material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Eric A.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Fitzgerald, Carrie

    2006-05-01

    Compton imagers offer a method for passive detection of nuclear material over background radiation. A prototype Compton imager has been constructed using 8 layers of silicon detectors. Each layer consists of a 2×2 array of 2 mm thick cross-strip double-sided silicon detectors with active areas of 5.7 × 5.7 cm2 and 64 strips per side. The detectors are daisy-chained together in the array so that only 256 channels of electronics are needed to read-out each layer of the instrument. This imager is a prototype for a large, high-efficiency Compton imager that will meet operational requirements of Homeland Security for detection of shielded uranium. The instrument can differentiate between different radioisotopes using the reconstructed gamma-ray energy and can also show the location of the emissions with respect to the detector location. Results from the current instrument as well as simulations of the next generation instrument are presented.

  16. Backscatter from metal surfaces in diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kodera, Y.; Schmidt, R.A.; Chan, H.P.

    Backscatter from four commonly used metals (aluminum, lead, copper, and iron) was measured under diagnostic imaging conditions, using screen-film systems as detectors. The results indicate that for an 80-kV filtered beam and Par Speed/XRP system, backscatter increases as aluminum (Al) thickness increases until it reaches a plateau of approximately 12% at 50 mm Al. The amount of backscatter depends strongly on the screen used, possibly due to their attenuation and energy response. Backscatter from aluminum was significantly greater than that from the other metals tested.

  17. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  18. Advanced Source Deconvolution Methods for Compton Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoglauer, Andreas

    The next generation of space telescopes utilizing Compton scattering for astrophysical observations is destined to one day unravel the mysteries behind Galactic nucleosynthesis, to determine the origin of the positron annihilation excess near the Galactic center, and to uncover the hidden emission mechanisms behind gamma-ray bursts. Besides astrophysics, Compton telescopes are establishing themselves in heliophysics, planetary sciences, medical imaging, accelerator physics, and environmental monitoring. Since the COMPTEL days, great advances in the achievable energy and position resolution were possible, creating an extremely vast, but also extremely sparsely sampled data space. Unfortunately, the optimum way to analyze the data from the next generation of Compton telescopes has not yet been found, which can retrieve all source parameters (location, spectrum, polarization, flux) and achieves the best possible resolution and sensitivity at the same time. This is especially important for all sciences objectives looking at the inner Galaxy: the large amount of expected sources, the high background (internal and Galactic diffuse emission), and the limited angular resolution, make it the most taxing case for data analysis. In general, two key challenges exist: First, what are the best data space representations to answer the specific science questions? Second, what is the best way to deconvolve the data to fully retrieve the source parameters? For modern Compton telescopes, the existing data space representations can either correctly reconstruct the absolute flux (binned mode) or achieve the best possible resolution (list-mode), both together were not possible up to now. Here we propose to develop a two-stage hybrid reconstruction method which combines the best aspects of both. Using a proof-of-concept implementation we can for the first time show that it is possible to alternate during each deconvolution step between a binned-mode approach to get the flux right and a

  19. Nondestructive Inspection System for Special Nuclear Material Using Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Neutrons and Laser Compton Scattering Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Misawa, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.; Fujimoto, S.

    2017-07-01

    A Neutron/Gamma-ray combined inspection system for hidden special nuclear materials (SNMs) in cargo containers has been developed under a program of Japan Science and Technology Agency in Japan. This inspection system consists of an active neutron-detection system for fast screening and a laser Compton backscattering gamma-ray source in coupling with nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) method for precise inspection. The inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device has been adopted as a neutron source and two neutron-detection methods, delayed neutron noise analysis method and high-energy neutron-detection method, have been developed to realize the fast screening system. The prototype system has been constructed and tested in the Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University. For the generation of the laser Compton backscattering gamma-ray beam, a race track microtron accelerator has been used to reduce the size of the system. For the NRF measurement, an array of LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detectors has been adopted to realize a low-cost detection system. The prototype of the gamma-ray system has been demonstrated in the Kansai Photon Science Institute, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. By using numerical simulations based on the data taken from these prototype systems and the inspection-flow, the system designed by this program can detect 1 kg of highly enriched 235U (HEU) hidden in an empty 20-ft container within several minutes.

  20. Compton suppression in BEGe detectors by digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yu-Hao; Ma, Hao; Zeng, Zhi; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Li, Jun-Li; Zhang, Hui

    2017-03-01

    A new method of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for BEGe detectors is developed to suppress Compton-continuum by digital pulse shape analysis (PSA), which helps reduce the Compton background level in gamma ray spectrometry. A decision parameter related to the rise time of a pulse shape was presented. The method was verified by experiments using 60 Co and 137 Cs sources. The result indicated that the 60 Co Peak to Compton ratio and the Cs-Peak to Co-Compton ratio could be improved by more than two and three times, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Theoretical Compton profile anisotropies in molecules and solids. VI. Compton profile anisotropies and chemical binding

    SciTech Connect

    Matcha, R.L.; Pettitt, B.M.

    1979-03-15

    An interesting empirical relationship between zero point Compton profile anisotropies ..delta..J (0) and nuclear charges is noted. It is shown that, for alkali halide molecules AB, to a good approximation ..delta..J (0) =N ln(Z/sub b//Z/sub a/).

  2. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  3. Preparations for the Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) balloon flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, T.; Bloser, P. F.; Legere, J. S.; Bancroft, C. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Wright, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    We describe our ongoing work to develop a new medium-energy gamma-ray Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts and fly it on a scientific balloon. There is a need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from approximately 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. We believe that directly building on the legacy of COMPTEL, using relatively robust, low-cost, off-the-shelf technologies, is the most promising path for such a mission. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Cerium Bromide (CeBr3) and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. We are now constructing an Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) with SiPM readout, with the goal of imaging the Crab Nebula at MeV energies from a high-altitude balloon flight. We expect a 4-sigma detection at 1 MeV in a single transit. We present calibration results of the detector modules, and updated simulations of the balloon instrument sensitivity. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the energy, timing, and position resolution of this technology are sufficient to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the medium-energy gamma-ray band, were it to be applied to a 1 cubic meter instrument on a long-duration balloon or Explorer platform.

  4. Backscatter from metal surfaces in diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kodera, Y.; Schmidt, R.A.; Chan, H.P.

    Backscatter from four commonly used metals (aluminum, lead, copper, and iron) was measured under diagnostic imaging conditions, using screen-film systems as detectors. The results indicate that for an 80-kV filtered beam and Par Speed/XRP system, backscatter increases as aluminum (Al) thickness increases until it reaches a plateau of approximately 12% at 50 mm Al. The amount of backscatter from any of these four metals increases as the tube voltage is raised from 60 to 115 kV. Measured backscatter depends strongly on the screens used, possibly due to their attenuation and energy response. Backscatter from aluminum was significantly greater than thatmore » from the other metals tested.« less

  5. Backscatter from metal surfaces in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Kodera, Y; Schmidt, R A; Chan, H P; Doi, K

    1984-01-01

    Backscatter from four commonly used metals (aluminum, lead, copper, and iron) was measured under diagnostic imaging conditions, using screen-film systems as detectors. The results indicate that for an 80-kV filtered beam and Par Speed/XRP system, backscatter increases as aluminum (Al) thickness increases until it reaches a plateau of approximately 12% at 50 mm Al. The amount of backscatter from any of these four metals increases as the tube voltage is raised from 60 to 115 kV. Measured backscatter depends strongly on the screens used, possibly due to their attenuation and energy response. Backscatter from aluminum was significantly greater than that from the other metals tested.

  6. Diamond Scattering Detectors for Compton Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter

    The objective of the proposed work is to demonstrate the suitability of artificial singlecrystal diamond detectors (SCDDs) for use as the scattering medium in Compton telescopes for medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy. SCDDs offer the possibility of position and energy resolution comparable to those of silicon solid-state detectors (SSDs), combined with efficiency and timing resolution so-far only achievable using fast scintillators. When integrated with a calorimeter composed of fast inorganic scintillator, such as CeBr3, read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), SCDDs will enable a compact and efficient Compton telescope using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination to achieve low background and high sensitivity. This detector development project will be a collaboration between the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The proposed work represents an innovative combination of detector technologies originally conceived separately for high-energy astronomy (fast scintillators read out by SiPMs; UNH) and space plasma/particle physics (SCDDs; SwRI). Recently SwRI has demonstrated that SCDDs fabricated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) show good energy resolution ( 7 keV FWHM), comparable to silicon SSDs, with much faster time response ( ns rise time) due to higher electron/hole mobilities. They are also temperature- and lightinsensitive, and radiation hard. In addition, diamond is low-Z, composed entirely of carbon, but relatively high-density (3.5 g cm-3) compared to silicon or organic scintillator. SCDDs are therefore an intriguing possibility for a new Compton scattering element: if patterned with mm-sized readout electrodes and combined with a fast inorganic scintillator calorimeter, SCDDs could enable a compact but efficient Compton telescope with superior angular and energy resolution, while maintaining ToF background rejection. Such an instrument offers the exciting potential for unprecedented sensitivity, especially at

  7. Compton thick AGN: the hunt continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Stefano

    2017-09-01

    The X-ray spectral analysis of Compton thick (CT-) active galactic nuclei (AGN) represents a fundamental step to understand the physics of the obscuring material surrounding the accreting supermassive black hole. However, at the present day CT-AGN remain extremely hard to detect. After a first, successful pilot program, we propose to target with a 10 ks Chandra observation 4 low redshift candidate CT-AGN from the Swift-BAT 100-month catalog. This analysis will refine our knowledge of the selection function of CT-AGN, therefore helping us in determine the true intrinsic fraction of CT-AGN and their contribution to the CXB.

  8. Biophysical applications of neutron Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Albergamo, F.; Hayward, R. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    Neutron Compton scattering (NCS) can be applied to measuring nuclear momentum distributions and potential parameters in molecules of biophysical interest. We discuss the analysis of NCS spectra from peptide models, focusing on the characterisation of the amide proton dynamics in terms of the width of the H-bond potential well, its Laplacian, and the mean kinetic energy of the proton. The Sears expansion is used to quantify deviations from the high-Q limit (impulse approximation), and line-shape asymmetry parameters are evaluated in terms of Hermite polynomials. Results on NCS from selectively deuterated acetanilide are used to illustrate this approach.

  9. Recent results from the Compton Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Michelson, P.F.; Hansen, W.W.

    1994-12-01

    The Compton Observatory is an orbiting astronomical observatory for gamma-ray astronomy that covers the energy range from about 30 keV to 30 GeV. The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET), one of four instruments on-board, is capable of detecting and imaging gamma radiation from cosmic sources in the energy range from approximately 20 MeV to 30 GeV. After about one month of tests and calibration following the April 1991 launch, a 15-month all sky survey was begun. This survey is now complete and the Compton Observatory is well into Phase II of its observing program which includes guest investigator observations.more » Among the highlights from the all-sky survey discussed in this presentation are the following: detection of five pulsars with emission above 100 MeV; detection of more than 24 active galaxies, the most distant at redshift greater than two; detection of many high latitude, unidentified gamma-ray sources, some showing significant time variability; detection of at least two high energy gamma-ray bursts, with emission in one case extending to at least 1 GeV. EGRET has also detected gamma-ray emission from solar flares up to energies of at least 2 GeV and has observed gamma-rays from the Large Magellanic Cloud.« less

  10. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Glenzer, S. H.; Neumayer, P.; Doppner, T.; ...

    2008-06-12

    Here, Compton scattering techniques have been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, whilemore » in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.« less

  11. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

  12. Compton thick AGN in Chandra sureys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Nandra, Kirpal

    2014-07-01

    We present the results from the X-ray spectral analysis of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the Chandra Deep Field-South, AEGIS-XD and Chandra-COSMOS surveys, focussing on the identification and characterisation of the most heavily obscured, Compton thick (CT, N H > 104 cm-2) sources. Our sample is comprised of 3088 X-ray selected sources, which has a high rate of redshift completeness (97%). The aim is to produce the largest and cleanest uniform sample of these sources from the data as possible. We identify these sources through X-ray spectral fitting, utilising torus spectral models designed for heavily obscured AGN which self consistently include the spectral signatures of heavy absorption, being Compton scattering, photoelectric absorption and iron Kα fluorescence. We identify a total of 163 CT AGN covering an intrinsic 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity range of 102 -3 × 105 erg s-1 and from z = 0.1-7.

  13. Extraction of Generalized Parton Distributions from combined Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Timelike Compton scattering fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, Marie

    2017-09-01

    Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) contain the correlation between the parton's longitudinal momentum and their transverse distribution. They are accessed through hard exclusive processes, such as Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS). DVCS has already been measured in several experiments and several models allow for extracting GPDs from these measurements. Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS) is, at leading order, the time-reversal equivalent process to DVCS and accesses GPDs at the same kinematics. Comparing GPDs extracted from DVCS and TCS is a unique way for proving GPD universality. Combining fits from the two processes will also allow for better constraining the GPDs. We will present our method for extracting GPDs from DVCS and TCS pseudo-data. We will compare fit results from the two processes in similar conditions and present what can be expected in term of contraints on GPDs from combined fits.

  14. A Backscatter-Lidar Forward-Operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisinger, Armin; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Vogel, Bernhard; Mattis, Ina; Flentje, Harald; Förstner, Jochen; Potthast, Roland

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a forward-operator which is capable of calculating virtual lidar profiles from atmospheric state simulations. The operator allows us to compare lidar measurements and model simulations based on the same measurement parameter: the lidar backscatter profile. This method simplifies qualitative comparisons and also makes quantitative comparisons possible, including statistical error quantification. Implemented into an aerosol-capable model system, the operator will act as a component to assimilate backscatter-lidar measurements. As many weather services maintain already networks of backscatter-lidars, such data are acquired already in an operational manner. To estimate and quantify errors due to missing or uncertain aerosol information, we started sensitivity studies about several scattering parameters such as the aerosol size and both the real and imaginary part of the complex index of refraction. Furthermore, quantitative and statistical comparisons between measurements and virtual measurements are shown in this study, i.e. applying the backscatter-lidar forward-operator on model output.

  15. C-band backscattering from corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency-modulatad continuous-wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck, and backscatter coefficients of corn (Zea mays L.) were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green-leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis, when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level for view angles of 30 deg or greater. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor tillage operations at small view zenith angles and vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  16. Bulk Comptonization by Turbulence in Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jason

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs may have turbulent velocities that exceed the electron thermal velocities. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. We discuss how to self-consistently resolve and interpret this effect in calculations of spectra of radiation MHD simulations. In particular, we show that this effect is dominated by radiation viscous dissipation and can be treated as thermal Comptonization with an equivalent temperature. We investigate whether bulk Comptonization may provide a physical basis for warm Comptonization models of the soft X-ray excess in AGN. We characterize our results with temperatures and optical depths to make contact with other models of this component. We show that bulk Comptonization shifts the Wien tail to higher energy and lowers the gas temperature, broadening the spectrum. More generally, we model the dependence of this effect on a wide range of fundamental accretion disc parameters, such as mass, luminosity, radius, spin, inner boundary condition, and the alpha parameter. Because our model connects bulk Comptonization to one dimensional vertical structure temperature profiles in a physically intuitive way, it will be useful for understanding this effect in future simulations run in new regimes. We also develop a global Monte Carlo code to study this effect in global radiation MHD simulations. This code can be used more broadly to compare global simulations with observed systems, and in particular to investigate whether magnetically dominated discs can explain why observed high Eddington accretion discs appear to be thermally stable.

  17. Lidar backscattering measurements of background stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Northam, G. B.; Butler, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative lidar-dustsonde experiment was conducted in San Angelo, Texas, in May 1974 in order to estimate the uncertainties in stratospheric-aerosol backscatter for the NASA Langley 48-inch lidar system. The lidar calibration and data-analysis procedures are discussed. Results from the Texas experiment indicate random and systematic uncertainties of 35 and 63 percent, respectively, in backscatter from a background stratospheric-aerosol layer at 20 km.

  18. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  19. An energy-dependent electron backscattering coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, W., Jr.; Antolak, A. J.; Meredith, R. J.

    1987-05-01

    An energy-dependent electron backscattering coefficient is derived based on the continuous slowing down approximation and the Bethe stopping power. Backscattering coefficients are given for 10-50-keV electrons incident on bulk and thin-film aluminum, silver, and gold targets. The results are compared with the Everhart theory and empirical fits to experimental data. The energy-dependent theory agrees better with experimental work.

  20. The GSFC Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.; Trombka, J.; Stacy, G.

    1983-01-01

    A new telescope is being developed at GSFC for the study of point sources of gamma rays in the energy range 1-30 MeV. Using the detection principle of a Compton scatter in a 2.5 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector followed by absorption in a 15 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector, the telescope uses a rocking collimator for field-of-view reduction and background subtraction. Background reduction techniques include lead-plastic scintillator shielding, pulse shape discrimination and Anger camera operation to both NaI detectors, as well as a time-of-flight measurement between them. The instrument configuration and status is described.

  1. Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, M. I.; L'vov, A. I.

    2000-07-01

    Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic diagrammatic approach with the Bonn OBE potential. A complete gauge-invariant set of diagrams is taken into account which includes resonance diagrams without and with NN-rescattering and diagrams with one- and two-body seagulls. The seagull operators are analyzed in detail, and their relations with free- and bound-nucleon polarizabilities are discussed. It is found that both dipole and higher-order polarizabilities of the nucleon are required for a quantitative description of recent experimental data. An estimate of the isospin-averaged dipole electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon and the polarizabilities of the neutron is obtained from the data.

  2. HF coherent backscatter in the ionosphere: In situ measurements of SuperDARN backscatter with e-POP RRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, G. W.; James, H. G.; Hussey, G. C.; Howarth, A. D.; Yau, A. W.

    2017-12-01

    We report in situ polarimetry measurements of HF scattering obtained by the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) during a coherent backscatter scattering event detected by the Saskatoon Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). On April 1, 2015, e-POP conducted a 4 minute coordinated experiment with SuperDARN Saskatoon, starting at 3:38:44 UT (21:38:44 LT). Throughout the experiment, SuperDARN was transmitting at 17.5 MHz and e-POP's ground track moved in a northeastward direction, along SuperDARN's field-of-view, increasing in altitude from 331 to 352 km. RRI was tuned to 17.505 MHz, and recorded nearly 12,000 SuperDARN radar pulses during the experiment. In the first half of the experiment, radar pulses recorded by RRI were "well behaved": they retained their transmitted amplitude envelope, and their pulse-to-pulse polarization characteristics were coherent - Faraday rotation was easily measured. During the second half of the experiment the pulses showed clear signs of scattering: their amplitude envelopes became degraded and dispersed, and their pulse-to-pulse polarization characteristics became incoherent - Faraday rotation was difficult to quantify. While these pulses were being received by RRI, SuperDARN Saskatoon detected a latitudinal band of coherent backscatter at e-POP's location, indicating that the scattered pulses measured by RRI may be a signature of HF backscatter. In this presentation, we will outline the polarimetric details of the scattered pulses, and provide an analytic interpretation of RRI's measurements to give new insight into the nature of HF coherent backscatter mechanism taking place in the terrestrial ionosphere.

  3. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.

    2015-02-15

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a{sub 0} ∼ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jetmore » exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic “denting” of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75–200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (∼6 × 10{sup −12}) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.« less

  4. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction,more » it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.« less

  5. Electron backscattering simulation in Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondero, Paolo; Mantero, Alfonso; Ivanchencko, Vladimir; Lotti, Simone; Mineo, Teresa; Fioretti, Valentina

    2018-06-01

    The backscattering of electrons is a key phenomenon in several physics applications which range from medical therapy to space including AREMBES, the new ESA simulation framework for radiation background effects. The importance of properly reproducing this complex interaction has grown considerably in the last years and the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit, recently upgraded to the version 10.3, is able to comply with the AREMBES requirements in a wide energy range. In this study a validation of the electron Geant4 backscattering models is performed with respect to several experimental data. In addition a selection of the most recent validation results on the electron scattering processes is also presented. Results of our analysis show a good agreement between simulations and data from several experiments, confirming the Geant4 electron backscattering models to be robust and reliable up to a few tens of electronvolts.

  6. Backscatter correction factor for megavoltage photon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yida; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: For routine clinical dosimetry of photon beams, it is often necessary to know the minimum thickness of backscatter phantom material to ensure that full backscatter condition exists. Methods: In case of insufficient backscatter thickness, one can determine the backscatter correction factor, BCF(s,d,t), defined as the ratio of absorbed dose measured on the central-axis of a phantom with backscatter thickness of t to that with full backscatter for square field size s and forward depth d. Measurements were performed in SAD geometry for 6 and 15 MV photon beams using a 0.125 cc thimble chamber for field sizes between 10more » x 10 and 30 x 30 cm at depths between d{sub max} (1.5 cm for 6 MV and 3 cm for 15 MV) and 20 cm. Results: A convolution method was used to calculate BCF using Monte-Carlo simulated point-spread kernels generated for clinical photon beams for energies between Co-60 and 24 MV. The convolution calculation agrees with the experimental measurements to within 0.8% with the same physical trend. The value of BCF deviates more from 1 for lower energies and larger field sizes. According to our convolution calculation, the minimum BCF occurs at forward depth d{sub max} and 40 x 40 cm field size, 0.970 for 6 MV and 0.983 for 15 MV. Conclusions: The authors concluded that backscatter thickness is 6.0 cm for 6 MV and 4.0 cm for 15 MV for field size up to 10 x 10 cm when BCF = 0.998. If 4 cm backscatter thickness is used, BCF is 0.997 and 0.983 for field size of 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 6 MV, and is 0.998 and 0.990 for 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 15 MV, respectively.« less

  7. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  8. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartwell, Stephen R.; Finlayson, David P.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    Between July 30 and August 9, 2012, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from Estero Bay, San Luis Obispo, California, under PCMSC Field Activity ID S-05-12-SC. The survey was done using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with a multibeam sonar for swath mapping and highly accurate position and orientation equipment for georeferencing. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  9. A microwave backscattering model for precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Seda

    A geophysical microwave backscattering model for space borne and ground-based remote sensing of precipitation is developed and used to analyze backscattering measurements from rain and snow type precipitation. Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equations for a multilayered inhomogeneous medium are applied to the precipitation region for calculation of backscattered intensity. Numerical solution of the VRT equation for multiple layers is provided by the matrix doubling method to take into account close range interactions between particles. In previous studies, the VRT model was used to calculate backscattering from a rain column on a sea surface. In the model, Mie scattering theory for closely spaced scatterers was used to determine the phase matrix for each sublayer characterized by a set of parameters. The scatterers i.e. rain drops within the sublayers were modelled as spheres with complex permittivities. The rain layer was bounded by rough boundaries; the interface between the cloud and the rain column as well as the interface between the sea surface and the rain were all analyzed by using the integral equation model (IEM). Therefore, the phase matrix for the entire rain column was generated by the combination of surface and volume scattering. Besides Mie scattering, in this study, we use T-matrix approach to examine the effect of the shape to the backscattered intensities since larger raindrops are most likely oblique in shape. Analyses show that the effect of obliquity of raindrops to the backscattered wave is related with size of the scatterers and operated frequency. For the ground-based measurement system, the VRT model is applied to simulate the precipitation column on horizontal direction. Therefore, the backscattered reflectivities for each unit range of volume are calculated from the backscattering radar cross sections by considering radar range and effective illuminated area of the radar beam. The volume scattering phase matrices for each range interval

  10. Determination of the Ce142(γ,n) cross section using quasi-monoenergetic Compton backscattered γ rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, A.; Sonnabend, K.; Fritzsche, M.; Glorius, J.; Kwan, E.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Knowing the energy dependence of the (γ,n) cross section is mandatory to predict the abundances of heavy elements using astrophysical models. The data can be applied directly or used to constrain the cross section of the inverse (n,γ) reaction. Purpose: The measurement of the reaction Ce142(γ,n)141Ce just above the reaction threshold amends the existing experimental database in that mass region for p-process nucleosynthesis and helps to understand the s-process branching at the isotope Ce141. Method: The quasi-monoenergetic photon beam of the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS), TUNL, USA, is used to irradiate naturally composed Ce targets. The reaction yield is determined afterwards with high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Results: The experimental data are in agreement with previous measurements at higher energies. Since the cross-section prediction of the Ce142(γ,n) reaction is exclusively sensitive to the γ-ray strength function, the resulting cross-section values were compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations using different γ-ray strength functions. A microscopic description within the framework of the Hartree-Fock-BCS model describes the experimental values well within the measured energy range. Conclusions: The measured data show that the predicted (γ,n) reaction rate is correct within a factor of 2 even though the closed neutron shell N =82 is approached. This agreement allows us to constrain the (n,γ) cross section and to improve the understanding of the s-process branching at Ce141.

  11. Rapid Compton-thick/Compton-thin Transitions in the Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risaliti, G.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Baldi, A.; Zezas, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365, which shows the most dramatic X-ray spectral changes observed so far in an active galactic nucleus: the source switched from reflection-dominated to transmission-dominated and back in just 6 weeks. During this time the soft thermal component, arising from a approx. 1 kpc region around the center, remained constant. The reflection component is constant at all timescales, and its high flux relative to the primary component implies the presence of thick gas covering a large fraction of the solid angle. The presence of this gas, and the fast variability timescale, suggest that the Compton-thick to Compton-thin change is due to variation in the line-of-sight absorber rather than to extreme intrinsic emission variability. We discuss a structure of the circumuclear absorber/reflector that can explain the observed X-ray spectral and temporal properties.

  12. Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Data Acquisition and Processing: Guidelines and Recommendations from the GEOHAB Backscatter Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, E.; Lurton, X.; Lamarche, G.; Brown, C.; Lucieer, V.; Rice, G.; Schimel, A.; Weber, T.

    2015-12-01

    Backscatter data acquired with multibeam sonars are now commonly used for the remote geological interpretation of the seabed. The systems hardware, software, and processing methods and tools have grown in numbers and improved over the years, yet many issues linger: there are no standard procedures for acquisition, poor or absent calibration, limited understanding and documentation of processing methods, etc. A workshop organized at the GeoHab (a community of geoscientists and biologists around the topic of marine habitat mapping) annual meeting in 2013 was dedicated to seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars and concluded that there was an overwhelming need for better coherence and agreement on the topics of acquisition, processing and interpretation of data. The GeoHab Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) was subsequently created with the purpose of documenting and synthetizing the state-of-the-art in sensors and techniques available today and proposing methods for best practice in the acquisition and processing of backscatter data. Two years later, the resulting document "Backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars: Guidelines and Recommendations" was completed1. The document provides: An introduction to backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars; A background on the physical principles of sonar backscatter; A discussion on users' needs from a wide spectrum of community end-users; A review on backscatter measurement; An analysis of best practices in data acquisition; A review of data processing principles with details on present software implementation; and finally A synthesis and key recommendations. This presentation reviews the BSWG mandate, structure, and development of this document. It details the various chapter contents, its recommendations to sonar manufacturers, operators, data processing software developers and end-users and its implication for the marine geology community. 1: Downloadable at https://www.niwa.co.nz/coasts-and-oceans/research-projects/backscatter-measurement-guidelines

  13. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL-matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  14. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Duisterwinkel, H A; van Abbema, J K; van Goethem, M J; Kawachimaru, R; Paganini, L; van der Graaf, E R; Brandenburg, S

    2015-04-01

    Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  15. Compton Thick AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Cosmos Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    I will present the results we published in a couple of recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, arXiv 1505.01153) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^24 cm^-2) AGN, in the COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems.We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^25 cm^-2), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line.The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.We will also present estimates on the detectability of such extreme sources up to redshift ~6-7 with Athena. Combining the most up to date models for the Luminosity Function of CT AGN at high z, aggressive data analysis techniques on faint sources, and the current Athena survey design, we demonstrate that we will detect, and recognize as such, a small (few to ten) but incredibly valuable sample of CT AGN at such high redshift.

  16. Inverse Compton Scattering in Mildly Relativistic Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of inverse Compton scattering in mildly relativistic static and moving plasmas with low optical depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculated the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the cosmic background radiation. Our semi-analytic method is based on a separation of photon diffusion in frequency and real space. We use Monte Carlo simulation to derive the intensity and frequency of the scattered photons for a monochromatic incoming radiation. The outgoing spectrum is determined by integrating over the spectrum of the incoming radiation using the intensity to determine the correct weight. This method makes it possible to study the emerging radiation as a function of frequency and direction. As a first application we have studied the effects of finite optical depth and gas infall on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (not possible with the extended Kompaneets equation) and discuss the parameter range in which the Boltzmann equation and its expansions can be used. For high temperature clusters (k(sub B)T(sub e) greater than or approximately equal to 15 keV) relativistic corrections based on a fifth order expansion of the extended Kompaneets equation seriously underestimate the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at high frequencies. The contribution from plasma infall is less important for reasonable velocities. We give a convenient analytical expression for the dependence of the cross-over frequency on temperature, optical depth, and gas infall speed. Optical depth effects are often more important than relativistic corrections, and should be taken into account for high-precision work, but are smaller than the typical kinematic effect from cluster radial velocities.

  17. Computer simulation of backscattering spectra from paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Silva, T. F.

    2017-09-01

    To study the role of lateral non-homogeneity on backscattering analysis of paintings, a simplified model of paint consisting of randomly distributed spherical pigment particles embedded in oil/binder has been developed. Backscattering spectra for lead white pigment particles in linseed oil have been calculated for 3 MeV H+ at a scattering angle of 165° for pigment volume concentrations ranging from 30 vol.% to 70 vol.% using the program STRUCTNRA. For identical pigment volume concentrations the heights and shapes of the backscattering spectra depend on the diameter of the pigment particles: This is a structural ambiguity for identical mean atomic concentrations but different lateral arrangement of materials. Only for very small pigment particles the resulting spectra are close to spectra calculated supposing atomic mixing and assuming identical concentrations of all elements. Generally, a good fit can be achieved when evaluating spectra from structured materials assuming atomic mixing of all elements and laterally homogeneous depth distributions. However, the derived depth profiles are inaccurate by a factor of up to 3. The depth range affected by this structural ambiguity ranges from the surface to a depth of roughly 0.5-1 pigment particle diameters. Accurate quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra from paintings therefore requires taking the correct microstructure of the paint layer into account.

  18. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  19. Laissez-Faire : Fully Asymmetric Backscatter Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan; Zhang, Pengyu; Ganesan, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Backscatter provides dual-benefits of energy harvesting and low-power communication, making it attractive to a broad class of wireless sensors. But the design of a protocol that enables extremely power-efficient radios for harvesting-based sensors as well as high-rate data transfer for data-rich sensors presents a conundrum. In this paper, we present a new fully asymmetric backscatter communication protocol where nodes blindly transmit data as and when they sense. This model enables fully flexible node designs, from extraordinarily power-efficient backscatter radios that consume barely a few micro-watts to high-throughput radios that can stream at hundreds of Kbps while consuming a paltry tens of micro-watts. The challenge, however, lies in decoding concurrent streams at the reader, which we achieve using a novel combination of time-domain separation of interleaved signal edges, and phase-domain separation of colliding transmissions. We provide an implementation of our protocol, LF-Backscatter, and show that it can achieve an order of magnitude or more improvement in throughput, latency and power over state-of-art alternatives. PMID:28286885

  20. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  1. Snowcover influence on backscattering from terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Abdelrazik, M.; Stiles, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of snowcover on the microwave backscattering from terrain in the 8-35 GHz region are examined through the analysis of experimental data and by application of a semiempirical model. The model accounts for surface backscattering contributions by the snow-air and snow-soil interfaces, and for volume backscattering contributions by the snow layer. Through comparisons of backscattering data for different terrain surfaces measured both with and without snowcover, the masking effects of snow are evaluated as a function of snow water equivalent and liquid water content. The results indicate that with dry snowcover it is not possible to discriminate between different types of ground surface (concrete, asphalt, grass, and bare ground) if the snow water equivalent is greater than about 20 cm (or a depth greater than 60 cm for a snow density of 0.3 g/cu cm). For the same density, however, if the snow is wet, a depth of 10 cm is sufficient to mask the underlying surface.

  2. Backscattering of electrons from solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    1990-11-01

    A simple equation is derived which describes the electron backscattering coefficient as a function of the target atomic number in the primary energy range 2-45 KeV. Such an equation, very useful for practical purposes, is in better agreement with the experimental data of Palluel and of Cosslett and Thomas than both the treatments of Everhart and of Archard.

  3. Backscatter nephelometer to calibrate scanning lidar

    Treesearch

    Cyle E. Wold; Vladmir A. Kovalev; Wei Min Hao

    2008-01-01

    The general concept of an open-path backscatter nephelometer, its design, principles of calibration and the operational use are discussed. The research-grade instrument, which operates at the wavelength 355 nm, will be co-located with a scanning-lidar at measurement sites near wildfires, and used for the lidar calibration. Such a near-end calibration has significant...

  4. Importance of Doppler broadening in Compton scatter imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Seltzer, S. M.; Hubbell, John H.; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Akatsuka, Takao; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2001-12-01

    Compton scattering is a potential tool for the determination of bone mineral content or tissue density for dose planning purposes, and requires knowledge of the energy distribution of the X-rays through biological materials of medical interest in the X-ray and (gamma) -ray region. The energy distribution is utilized in a number of ways in diagnostic radiology, for example, in determining primary photon spectra, electron densities in separate volumes, and in tomography and imaging. The choice of the X-ray energy is more related to X-ray absorption, where as that of the scattering angle is more related to geometry. The evaluation of all the contributions are mandatory in Compton profile measurements and is important in X-ray imaging systems in order to achieve good results. In view of this, Compton profile cross-sections for few biological materials are estimated at nineteen K(alpha) X-ray energies and 60 keV (Am-241) photons. Energy broadening, geometrical broadening from 1 to 180 degree(s), FWHM of J(Pz) and FWHM of Compton energy broadening has been evaluated at various incident photon energies. These values are estimated around the centroid of the Compton profile with an energy interval of 0.1 keV and 1.0 keV for 60 keV photons. The interaction cross sections for the above materials are estimated using fractions-by-weight of the constituent elements. Input data for these tables are purely theoretical.

  5. Analysis of the backscatter spectrum in an ionospheric modification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.; Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    Predictions of the backscatter spectrum, including effects of ionospheric inhomogeneity, are compared with experimental observations of incoherent backscatter from an artificially heated region. Our calculations show that the strongest backscatter echo received is not from the reflection level, but from a region some distance below. Certain asymmetrical features are explained of the up-shifted and down-shifted plasma lines in the backscatter spectrum, and the several satellite peaks accompanying them.

  6. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  7. Coded-aperture Compton camera for gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Aaron M.

    This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.

  8. Compton-thick AGN at high and low redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Corral, A.; Ranalli, P.; Lanzuisi, G.

    2017-10-01

    The most obscured sources detected in X-ray surveys, the Compton-thick AGN present great interest both because they represent the hidden side of accretion but also because they may signal the AGN birth. We analyse the NUSTAR observations from the serendipitous observations in order to study the Compton-thick AGN at the deepest possible ultra-hard band (>10 keV). We compare our results with our SWIFT/BAT findings in the local Universe, as well as with our results in the CDFS and COSMOS fields. We discuss the comparison with X-ray background synthesis models finding that a low fraction of Compton-thick sources (about 15 per cent of the obscured population) is compatible with both the 2-10keV band results and those at harder energies.

  9. G. E. M. Jauncey and the Compton Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, John

    In late 1922 Arthur Holly Compton (1892-1962) discovered that an X-ray quantum of radiation undergoes a discrete change in wavelength when it experiences a billiard-ball collision with a single atomic electron, a phenomenon that became known as the Compton effect and for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1927. But for more than five years before he made his discovery, Compton had analyzed X-ray scattering in terms of classical electrodynamics. I suggest that his colleague at Washington University in St. Louis, G. E. M. Jauncey (1888-1947), helped materially to persuade him to embrace the quantum interpretation of his X-ray scattering experiments.

  10. The hydrogen anomaly problem in neutron Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Erik B.

    2018-03-01

    Neutron Compton scattering (also called ‘deep inelastic scattering of neutrons’, DINS) is a method used to study momentum distributions of light atoms in solids and liquids. It has been employed extensively since the start-up of intense pulsed neutron sources about 25 years ago. The information lies primarily in the width and shape of the Compton profile and not in the absolute intensity of the Compton peaks. It was therefore not immediately recognized that the relative intensities of Compton peaks arising from scattering on different isotopes did not always agree with values expected from standard neutron cross-section tables. The discrepancies were particularly large for scattering on protons, a phenomenon that became known as ‘the hydrogen anomaly problem’. The present paper is a review of the discovery, experimental tests to prove or disprove the existence of the hydrogen anomaly and discussions concerning its origin. It covers a twenty-year-long history of experimentation, theoretical treatments and discussions. The problem is of fundamental interest, since it involves quantum phenomena on the subfemtosecond time scale, which are not visible in conventional thermal neutron scattering but are important in Compton scattering where neutrons have two orders of magnitude times higher energy. Different H-containing systems show different cross-section deficiencies and when the scattering processes are followed on the femtosecond time scale the cross-section losses disappear on different characteristic time scales for each H-environment. The last section of this review reproduces results from published papers based on quantum interference in scattering on identical particles (proton or deuteron pairs or clusters), which have given a quantitative theoretical explanation both regarding the H-cross-section reduction and its time dependence. Some new explanations are added and the concluding chapter summarizes the conditions for observing the specific quantum

  11. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factorsmore » $$H_{Im}$$ and $$\\tilde{H}_{Im}$$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.« less

  12. Intershell correlations in Compton photon scattering by an atom

    SciTech Connect

    Hopersky, Alexey N.; Nadolinsky, Alexey M.; Novikov, Sergey A.

    The role of the intershell correlation effect is theoretically investigated using the example of the Ne atom in nonresonance Compton high-energy x-ray photon scattering by a free atom. The calculation results qualitatively reproduce the same results in the formalism of the generalized oscillator strength and the random phase approximation with exchange for the Compton photon and electron scattering by an atom; when the incident photon energy is 11 keV and the scattering angle is 90 deg., they correspond well with the results of the synchrotron experiment presented in the work by Jung et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1596 (1998)].

  13. Reconstructed Image Spatial Resolution of Multiple Coincidences Compton Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2010-02-01

    We study the multiple coincidences Compton imager (MCCI) which is based on a simultaneous acquisition of several photons emitted in cascade from a single nuclear decay. Theoretically, this technique should provide a major improvement in localization of a single radioactive source as compared to a standard Compton camera. In this work, we investigated the performance and limitations of MCCI using Monte Carlo computer simulations. Spatial resolutions of the reconstructed point source have been studied as a function of the MCCI parameters, including geometrical dimensions and detector characteristics such as materials, energy and spatial resolutions.

  14. Aerosol backscatter lidar calibration and data interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment of the various factors involved in lidar data acquisition and analysis is presented. This treatment highlights sources of fundamental, systematic, modeling, and calibration errors that may affect the accurate interpretation and calibration of lidar aerosol backscatter data. The discussion primarily pertains to ground based, pulsed CO2 lidars that probe the troposphere and are calibrated using large, hard calibration targets. However, a large part of the analysis is relevant to other types of lidar systems such as lidars operating at other wavelengths; continuous wave (CW) lidars; lidars operating in other regions of the atmosphere; lidars measuring nonaerosol elastic or inelastic backscatter; airborne or Earth-orbiting lidar platforms; and lidars employing combinations of the above characteristics.

  15. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  16. Modelling of backscatter from vegetation layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, J. J.; Engheta, N.; Papas, C. H.; Elachi, C.; Zebker, H.

    1985-01-01

    A simple way to build up a library of models which may be used to distinguish between the different types of vegetation and ground surfaces by means of their backscatter properties is presented. The curve of constant power received by the antenna (Gamma sphere) is calculated for the given Stokes Scattering Operator, and model parameters are adopted of the most similar library model Gamma sphere. Results calculated for a single scattering model resembling coniferous trees are compared with the Gamma spheres of a model resembling tropical region trees. The polarization which would minimize the effect of either the ground surface or the vegetation layer can be calculated and used to analyze the backscatter from the ground surface/vegetation layer combination, and enhance the power received from the desired part of the combination.

  17. Microwave backscattering from an anisotropic soybean canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.; Saatchi, S.; Levine, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic backscattering from a soybean canopy is modeled in the L band region of the spectrum. Mature soybean plants are taken as an ensemble of leaves and stems which are represented by lossy dielectric disks and rods respectively. Field data indicated that leaves and stems are not distributed uniformly in the azimuth coordinate. The plant has a tendency to grow out into the area between the rows. The effects on backscattered radar waves was computed by the distorted Born approximation. Results for look directions along the rows and perpendicular to the rows show that only a modest difference occurs in the L band frequency range. The use of another nonuniform distribution, different from those observed experimentally, results in a significant effect due to vegetation asymmetry.

  18. Backscattering Measurement From a Single Microdroplet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Chang, Jin Ho; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Changyang; Teh, Shia-Yen; Lee, Abraham; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Backscattering measurements for acoustically trapped lipid droplets were undertaken by employing a P[VDF-TrFE] broadband transducer of f-number = 1, with a bandwidth of 112%. The wide bandwidth allowed the transmission of the 45 MHz trapping signal and the 15 MHz sensing signal using the same transducer. Tone bursts at 45 MHz were first transmitted by the transducer to hold a single droplet at the focus (or the center of the trap) and separate it from its neighboring droplets by translating the transducer perpendicularly to the beam axis. Subsequently, 15 MHz probing pulses were sent to the trapped droplet and the backscattered RF echo signal received by the same transducer. The measured beam width at 15 MHz was measured to be 120 μm. The integrated backscatter (IB) coefficient of an individual droplet was determined within the 6-dB bandwidth of the transmit pulse by normalizing the power spectrum of the RF signal to the reference spectrum obtained from a flat reflector. The mean IB coefficient for droplets with a 64 μm average diameter (denoted as cluster A) was −107 dB, whereas it was −93 dB for 90-μm droplets (cluster B). The standard deviation was 0.9 dB for each cluster. The experimental values were then compared with those computed with the T-matrix method and a good agreement was found: the difference was as small as 1 dB for both clusters. These results suggest that this approach might be useful as a means for measuring ultrasonic backscattering from a single microparticle, and illustrate the potential of acoustic sensing for cell sorting. PMID:21507767

  19. A novel biometric X-ray backscatter inspection of dangerous materials based on a lobster-eye objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Xin; Mu, Baozhong; Zhan, Qi; Xie, Qing; Li, Yaran; Chen, Yifan; He, Yanan

    2016-10-01

    In order to counter drug-related crimes effectively, and to safeguard homeland security as well as public safety, it is important to inspect drugs, explosives and other contraband quickly and accurately from the express mail system, luggage, vehicles and other objects. In this paper, we discuss X-ray backscatter inspection system based on a novel lobster-eye X-ray objective, which is an effective inspection technology for drugs, explosives and other contraband inspection. Low atomic number materials, such as drugs and explosives, leads to strong Compton scattering after irradiated by X-ray, which is much stronger than high atomic number material, such as common metals, etc. By detecting the intensity of scattering signals, it is possible to distinguish between organics and inorganics. The lobster-eye X-ray optical system imitates the reflective eyes of lobsters, which field of view can be made as large as desired and it is practical to achieve spatial resolution of several millimeters for finite distance detection. A novel lobster-eye X-ray objective is designed based on modifying Schmidt geometry by using multi-lens structure, so as to reduce the difference of resolution between the horizontal and vertical directions. The demonstration experiments of X-ray backscattering imaging were carried out. A suitcase, a wooden box and a tire with several typical samples hidden in them were imaged by the X-ray backscattering inspection system based on a lobster-eye X-ray objective. The results show that this X-ray backscattering inspection system can get a resolution of less than five millimeters under the FOV of more than two hundred millimeters with 0.5 meter object distance, which can still be improved.

  20. Backscatter Correction Algorithm for TBI Treatment Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Nieto, B.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Arrans, R.

    2015-01-15

    The accuracy requirements in target dose delivery is, according to ICRU, ±5%. This is so not only in standard radiotherapy but also in total body irradiation (TBI). Physical dosimetry plays an important role in achieving this recommended level. The semi-infinite phantoms, customarily used for dosimetry purposes, give scatter conditions different to those of the finite thickness of the patient. So dose calculated in patient’s points close to beam exit surface may be overestimated. It is then necessary to quantify the backscatter factor in order to decrease the uncertainty in this dose calculation. The backward scatter has been well studied atmore » standard distances. The present work intends to evaluate the backscatter phenomenon under our particular TBI treatment conditions. As a consequence of this study, a semi-empirical expression has been derived to calculate (within 0.3% uncertainty) the backscatter factor. This factor depends lineally on the depth and exponentially on the underlying tissue. Differences found in the qualitative behavior with respect to standard distances are due to scatter in the bunker wall close to the measurement point.« less

  1. Mode-converted diffuse ultrasonic backscatter.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Kube, Christopher M; Koester, Lucas W; Turner, Joseph A

    2013-08-01

    Diffuse ultrasonic backscatter describes the scattering of elastic waves from interfaces within heterogeneous materials. Previously, theoretical models have been developed for the diffuse backscatter of longitudinal-to-longitudinal (L-L) wave scattering within polycrystalline materials. Following a similar formalism, a mode-conversion scattering model is presented here to quantify the component of an incident longitudinal wave that scatters and is converted to a transverse (shear) wave within a polycrystalline sample. The model is then used to fit experimental measurements associated with a pitch-catch transducer configuration performed using a sample of 1040 steel. From these measurements, an average material correlation length is determined. This value is found to be in agreement with results from L-L scattering measurements and is on the order of the grain size as determined from optical micrographs. Mode-converted ultrasonic backscatter is influenced much less by the front-wall reflection than an L-L measurement and it provides additional microstructural information that is not accessible in any other manner.

  2. Exploring the Dynamics of a Quantum-Mechanical Compton Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandes, Martin; Carretero, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    In 1913, when American physicist Arthur Compton was an undergraduate, he invented a simple way to measure the rotation rate of the Earth with a tabletop-sized experiment. The experiment consisted of a large diameter circular ring of thin glass tubing filled with water and oil droplets. After placing the ring in a plane perpendicular to the surface of the Earth and allowing the fluid mixture of oil and water to come to rest, he then abruptly rotated the ring, flipping it 180 degrees about an axis passing through its own plane. The result of the experiment was that the water acquired a measurable drift velocity due to the Coriolis effect arising from the daily rotation of the Earth about its own axis. Compton measured this induced drift velocity by observing the motion of the oil droplets in the water with a microscope. This device, which is now named after him, is known as a Compton generator. The fundamental research objective of this project is to explore the dynamics of a quantum-mechanical analogue to the classical Compton generator experiment through the use of numerical simulations. We present our preliminary results on this system and the future direction of the project. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number ACI-1053575.

  3. On the Compton scattering redistribution function in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Różańska, A.; Majczyna, A.; Należyty, M.

    2017-08-01

    Compton scattering is the dominant opacity source in hot neutron stars, accretion discs around black holes and hot coronae. We collected here a set of numerical expressions of the Compton scattering redistribution functions (RFs) for unpolarized radiation, which are more exact than the widely used Kompaneets equation. The principal aim of this paper is the presentation of the RF by Guilbert, which is corrected for the computational errors in the original paper. This corrected RF was used in the series of papers on model atmosphere computations of hot neutron stars. We have also organized four existing algorithms for the RF computations into a unified form ready to use in radiative transfer and model atmosphere codes. The exact method by Nagirner & Poutanen was numerically compared to all other algorithms in a very wide spectral range from hard X-rays to radio waves. Sample computations of the Compton scattering RFs in thermal plasma were done for temperatures corresponding to the atmospheres of bursting neutron stars and hot intergalactic medium. Our formulae are also useful to study the Compton scattering of unpolarized microwave background radiation in hot intracluster gas and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We conclude that the formulae by Guilbert and the exact quantum mechanical formulae yield practically the same RFs for gas temperatures relevant to the atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars, T ≤ 108 K.

  4. Comprehensive study of observables in Compton scattering on the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2018-03-01

    We present an analysis of 13 observables in Compton scattering on the proton. Cross sections, asymmetries with polarised beam and/or targets, and polarisation-transfer observables are investigated for energies up to the Δ(1232) resonance to determine their sensitivity to the proton's dipole scalar and spin polarisabilities. The Chiral Effective Field Theory Compton amplitude we use is complete at N4LO, O(e2δ4), for photon energies ω˜ m_{π}, and so has an accuracy of a few per cent there. At photon energies in the resonance region, it is complete at NLO, O(e2δ0), and so its accuracy there is about 20%. We find that for energies from pion-production threshold to about 250 MeV, multiple asymmetries have significant sensitivity to presently ill-determined combinations of proton spin polarisabilities. We also argue that the broad outcomes of this analysis will be replicated in complementary theoretical approaches, e.g., dispersion relations. Finally, we show that below the pion-production threshold, 6 observables suffice to reconstruct the Compton amplitude, and above it 11 are required. Although not necessary for polarisability extractions, this opens the possibility to perform "complete" Compton-scattering experiments. An interactive Mathematica notebook, including results for the neutron, is available from judith.mcgovern@manchester.ac.uk.

  5. A Non-Relativistic Look at the Compton Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Steve; Giri, Sandeep; Zakrasek, Nicholas; Affatigato, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In a usual modern physics class the Compton effect is used as the pedagogical model for introducing relativity into quantum effects. The shift in photon wavelengths is usually introduced and derived using special relativity. Indeed, this works well for explaining the effect. However, in the senior author's class one of the student coauthors…

  6. Compton echoes from nearby gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Giannios, Dimitrios; Younes, George; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2018-06-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from GW170817, associated with a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) at a distance of 40 Mpc, has demonstrated that short GRBs can occur locally and at a reasonable rate. Furthermore, gravitational waves enable us to detect close-by GRBs, even when we are observing at latitudes far from the jet's axis. We consider here Compton echoes, the scattered light from the prompt and afterglow emission. Compton echoes, an as yet undetected counterpart of GRBs, peak in X-rays and maintain a roughly constant flux for hundreds to thousands of years after the burst. Though too faint to be detected in typical cosmological GRBs, a fraction of close-by bursts with a sufficiently large energy output in X-rays, and for which the surrounding medium is sufficiently dense, may indeed be observed in this way. The detection of a Compton echo could provide unique insight into the burst properties and the environment's density structure. In particular, it could potentially determine whether or not there was a successful jet that broke through the compact binary merger ejecta. We discuss here the properties and expectations from Compton echoes and suggest methods for detectability.

  7. A test of local Lorentz invariance with Compton scattering asymmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Narayan, Amrendra; Dutta, Dipangkar

    2016-12-14

    Here, we report on a measurement of the constancy and anisotropy of the speed of light relative to the electrons in photon-electron scattering. We also used the Compton scattering asymmetry measured by the new Compton polarimeter in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab to test for deviations from unity of the vacuum refractive index (more » $n$). For photon energies in the range of 9 - 46 MeV, we obtain a new limit of $$1-n < 1.4 \\times 10^{-8}$$. In addition, the absence of sidereal variation over the six month period of the measurement constrains any anisotropies in the speed of light. These constitute the first study of Lorentz invariance using Compton asymmetry. Within the minimal standard model extension framework, our result yield limits on the photon and electron coefficients $$\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{YZ}, c_{TX}, \\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{ZX}$$, and $$c_{TY}$$. Though, these limits are several orders of magnitude larger than the current best limits, they demonstrate the feasibility of using Compton asymmetry for tests of Lorentz invariance. For future parity violating electron scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab we will use higher energy electrons enabling better constraints.« less

  8. A New Comptonization Model for Weakly Magnetized Accreting NS LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paizis, A.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.; Frontera, F.; Cocchi, M.; Ferrigno, C.

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a new Comptonization model to propose, for the first time, a self consistent physical interpretation of the complex spectral evolution seen in NS LMXBs. The model and its application to LMXBs are presented and compared to the Simbol-X expected capabilities.

  9. Variance-reduction normalization technique for a compton camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. M.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, J. H.; Seo, H.; Kim, C. H.; Lee, C. S.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, M. C.; Lee, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    For an artifact-free dataset, pre-processing (known as normalization) is needed to correct inherent non-uniformity of detection property in the Compton camera which consists of scattering and absorbing detectors. The detection efficiency depends on the non-uniform detection efficiency of the scattering and absorbing detectors, different incidence angles onto the detector surfaces, and the geometry of the two detectors. The correction factor for each detected position pair which is referred to as the normalization coefficient, is expressed as a product of factors representing the various variations. The variance-reduction technique (VRT) for a Compton camera (a normalization method) was studied. For the VRT, the Compton list-mode data of a planar uniform source of 140 keV was generated from a GATE simulation tool. The projection data of a cylindrical software phantom were normalized with normalization coefficients determined from the non-uniformity map, and then reconstructed by an ordered subset expectation maximization algorithm. The coefficient of variations and percent errors of the 3-D reconstructed images showed that the VRT applied to the Compton camera provides an enhanced image quality and the increased recovery rate of uniformity in the reconstructed image.

  10. Bilingual Program Application for Continuation Proposal: Compton Unified School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton City Schools, CA.

    This document contains the continuation proposal for the fourth grade Compton bilingual education program. A review of the third year is included with details on process evaluation, project personnel and duties, new vocabulary developed by the project for lexical references, and inservice training of teachers. Information concerning the proposed…

  11. Backscatter and attenuation characterization of ventricular myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Allyson Ann

    2009-12-01

    This Dissertation presents quantitative ultrasonic measurements of the myocardium in fetal hearts and adult human hearts with the goal of studying the physics of sound waves incident upon anisotropic and inhomogeneous materials. Ultrasound has been used as a clinical tool to assess heart structure and function for several decades. The clinical usefulness of this noninvasive approach has grown with our understanding of the physical mechanisms underlying the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the myocardium. In this Dissertation, integrated backscatter and attenuation analyses were performed on midgestational fetal hearts to assess potential differences in the left and right ventricular myocardium. The hearts were interrogated using a 50 MHz transducer that enabled finer spatial resolution than could be achieved at more typical clinical frequencies. Ultrasonic data analyses demonstrated different patterns and relative levels of backscatter and attenuation from the myocardium of the left ventricle and the right ventricle. Ultrasonic data of adult human hearts were acquired with a clinical imaging system and quantified by their magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter. The results were analyzing using Bayes Classification and ROC analysis to quantify potential advantages of using a combination of two features of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter over using only one or the other feature to distinguish between groups of subjects. When the subjects were classified based on hemoglobin A1c, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and the ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, differences in the magnitude and normalized time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter were observed. The cyclic variation results also suggested a trend toward a larger area under the ROC curve when information from magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation is combined using Bayes classification than when

  12. Assessing backscatter change due to backscatter gradient over the Greenland ice sheet using Envisat and SARAL altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaoli; Luo, Zhicai; Zhou, Zebing

    2018-06-01

    Knowledge of backscatter change is important to accurately retrieve elevation change time series from satellite radar altimetry over continental ice sheets. Previously, backscatter coefficients generated in two cases, namely with and without accounting for backscatter gradient (BG), are used. However, the difference between backscatter time series obtained separately in these two cases and its impact on retrieving elevation change are not well known. Here we first compare the mean profiles of the Ku and Ka band backscatter over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS), with results illustrating that the Ku-band backscatter is 3 ∼ 5 dB larger than that of the Ka band. We then conduct statistic analysis about time series of backscatter formed separately in the above two cases for both Ku and Ka bands over two regions in the GrIS. It is found that the standard deviation of backscatter time series becomes slightly smaller after removing the BG effect, which suggests that the method for the BG correction is effective. Furthermore, the impact on elevation change from backscatter change due to the BG effect is separately assessed for both Ku and Ka bands over the GrIS. We conclude that Ka band altimetry would benefit from a BG induced backscatter analysis (∼10% over region 2). This study may provide a reference to form backscatter time series towards refining elevation change time series from satellite radar altimetry over ice sheets using repeat-track analysis.

  13. Advanced Compton scattering light source R&D at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G

    2010-02-16

    We report the design and current status of a monoenergetic laser-based Compton scattering 0.5-2.5 MeV {gamma}-ray source. Previous nuclear resonance fluorescence results and future linac and laser developments for the source are presented. At MeV photon energies relevant for nuclear processes, Compton scattering light sources are attractive because of their relative compactness and improved brightness above 100 keV, compared to typical 4th generation synchrotrons. Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a highmore » intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A new precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. Based on the success of the previous Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays (T-REX) Compton scattering source at LLNL, the source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. After a brief presentation of successful nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments done with T-REX, the new source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.« less

  14. Ultralow-dose, feedback imaging with laser-Compton X-ray and laser-Compton gamma ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    Ultralow-dose, x-ray or gamma-ray imaging is based on fast, electronic control of the output of a laser-Compton x-ray or gamma-ray source (LCXS or LCGS). X-ray or gamma-ray shadowgraphs are constructed one (or a few) pixel(s) at a time by monitoring the LCXS or LCGS beam energy required at each pixel of the object to achieve a threshold level of detectability at the detector. An example provides that once the threshold for detection is reached, an electronic or optical signal is sent to the LCXS/LCGS that enables a fast optical switch that diverts, either in space or time the laser pulsesmore » used to create Compton photons. In this way, one prevents the object from being exposed to any further Compton x-rays or gamma-rays until either the laser-Compton beam or the object are moved so that a new pixel location may be illumination.« less

  15. Spatial variability in acoustic backscatter as an indicator of tissue homogenate production in pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jessica E; Cain, Charles A; Fowlkes, J Brian

    2007-03-01

    Spatial variability in acoustic backscatter is investigated as a potential feedback metric for assessment of lesion morphology during cavitation-mediated mechanical tissue disruption ("histotripsy"). A 750-kHz annular array was aligned confocally with a 4.5 MHz passive backscatter receiver during ex vivo insonation of porcine myocardium. Various exposure conditions were used to elicit a range of damage morphologies and backscatter characteristics [pulse duration = 14 micros, pulse repetition frequency (PRF) = 0.07-3.1 kHz, average I(SPPA) = 22-44 kW/cm2]. Variability in backscatter spatial localization was quantified by tracking the lag required to achieve peak correlation between sequential RF A-lines received. Mean spatial variability was observed to be significantly higher when damage morphology consisted of mechanically disrupted tissue homogenate versus mechanically intact coagulation necrosis (2.35 +/- 1.59 mm versus 0.067 +/- 0.054 mm, p < 0.025). Statistics from these variability distributions were used as the basis for selecting a threshold variability level to identify the onset of homogenate formation via an abrupt, sustained increase in spatially dynamic backscatter activity. Specific indices indicative of the state of the homogenization process were quantified as a function of acoustic input conditions. The prevalence of backscatter spatial variability was observed to scale with the amount of homogenate produced for various PRFs and acoustic intensities.

  16. Atmospheric Backscatter Model Development for CO Sub 2 Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Kent, G.; Yue, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    The results of investigations into the problems of modeling atmospheric backscatter from aerosols, in the lowest 20 km of the atmosphere, at CO2 wavelengths are presented, along with a summary of the relevant aerosol characteristics and their variability, and a discussion of the measurement techniques and errors involved. The different methods of calculating the aerosol backscattering function, both from measured aerosol characteristics and from optical measurements made at other wavelengths, are discussed in detail, and limits are placed on the accuracy of these methods. The effects of changing atmospheric humidity and temperature on the backscatter are analyzed and related to the actual atmosphere. Finally, the results of modeling CO2 backscatter in the atmosphere are presented and the variation with height and geographic location discussed, and limits placed on the magnitude of the backscattering function. Conclusions regarding modeling techniques and modeled atmospheric backscatter values are presented in tabular form.

  17. Analysis of the backscatter spectrum in an ionospheric modification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.; Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare predictions of the backscatter spectrum, including effects of ionospheric inhomogeneity, with experimental observations of incoherent backscatter from an artificially heated region. Our calculations show that the strongest backscatter echo received is not from the reflection level but from a region some distance below (about 900-1100 m for an experiment carried out at Arecibo). By taking the standing wave pattern of the pump properly into account the present theory explains certain asymmetrical features of the upshifted and downshifted plasma lines in the backscatter spectrum.

  18. The angular distribution of diffusely backscattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, M. U.; Durian, D. J.

    1997-03-01

    The diffusion approximation predicts the angular distribution of light diffusely transmitted through an opaque slab to depend only on boundary reflectivity, independent of scattering anisotropy, and this has been verified by experiment(M.U. Vera and D.J. Durian, Phys. Rev. E 53) 3215 (1996). Here, by contrast, we demonstrate that the angular distribution of diffusely backscattered light depends on scattering anisotropy as well as boundary reflectivity. To model this observation scattering anisotropy is added to the diffusion approximation by a discontinuity in the photon concentration at the source point that is proportional to the average cosine of the scattering angle. We compare the resulting predictions with random walk simulations and with measurements of diffusely backscattered intensity versus angle for glass frits and aqueous suspensions of polystyrene spheres held in air or immersed in a water bath. Increasing anisotropy and boundary reflectivity each tend to flatten the predicted distributions, and for different combinations of anisotropy and reflectivity the agreement between data and predictions ranges from qualitatively to quantitatively good.

  19. Backscattering from a randomly rough dielectric surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Adrian K.; Li, Zongqian; Chen, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    A backscattering model for scattering from a randomly rough dielectric surface is developed based on an approximate solution of a pair of integral equations for the tangential surface fields. Both like and cross-polarized scattering coefficients are obtained. It is found that the like polarized scattering coefficients contain two types of terms: single scattering terms and multiple scattering terms. The single scattering terms in like polarized scattering are shown to reduce the first-order solutions derived from the small perturbation method when the roughness parameters satisfy the slightly rough conditions. When surface roughnesses are large but the surface slope is small, only a single scattering term corresponding to the standard Kirchhoff model is significant. If the surface slope is large, the multiple scattering term will also be significant. The cross-polarized backscattering coefficients satisfy reciprocity and contain only multiple scattering terms. The difference between vertical and horizontal scattering coefficients is found to increase with the dielectric constant and is generally smaller than that predicted by the first-order small perturbation model. Good agreements are obtained between this model and measurements from statistically known surfaces.

  20. Radar backscatter properties of milo and soybeans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.; Metzler, T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter from fields of milo and soybeans was measured with a ground based radar as a function of frequency (8-18 GHz), polarization (HH and VV) and angle of incidence (0 deg-70 deg) during the summer of 1974. Supporting ground truth was gathered contemporaneously with the backscatter data. At nadir sigma deg of milo correlated highly, r = 0.96, with soil moisture in the milo field at 8.6 GHz but decreased to a value of r = 0.78 at a frequency of 17.0 GHz. Correlation studies of the variations of sigma deg with soil moisture in the soybean fields were not possible due to a lack of a meaningful soil moisture dynamic range. At the larger angles of incidence, however, sigma deg of soybeans did appear to be dependent on precipitation. It is suggested this phenomenon was caused by the rain altering plant geometry. In general sigma deg of both milo and soybeans had a relatively small dynamic range at the higher angles of incidence and showed no significant dependence on the measured crop parameters.

  1. A simple framework for modelling the dependence of bulk Comptonization by turbulence on accretion disc parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.; Hirose, S.

    2018-06-01

    Warm Comptonization models for the soft X-ray excess in active galactic nuclei (AGN) do not self-consistently explain the relationship between the Comptonizing medium and the underlying accretion disc. Because of this, they cannot directly connect the fitted Comptonization temperatures and optical depths to accretion disc parameters. Since bulk velocities exceed thermal velocities in highly radiation pressure dominated discs, in these systems bulk Comptonization by turbulence may provide a physical basis in the disc itself for warm Comptonization models. We model the dependence of bulk Comptonization on fundamental accretion disc parameters, such as mass, luminosity, radius, spin, inner boundary condition, and α. In addition to constraining warm Comptonization models, our model can help distinguish contributions from bulk Comptonization to the soft X-ray excess from those due to other physical mechanisms, such as absorption and reflection. By linking the time variability of bulk Comptonization to fluctuations in the disc vertical structure due to magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence, our results show that observations of the soft X-ray excess can be used to study disc turbulence in the radiation pressure dominated regime. Because our model connects bulk Comptonization to 1D vertical structure temperature profiles in a physically intuitive way, it will be useful for understanding this effect in future simulations run in new regimes.

  2. The Compton-thick Growth of Supermassive Black Holes constrained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes; Georgakakis, Antonis; Nandra, Kirpal; Brightman, Murray; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Liu, Zhu; Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Rangel, Cyprian; Aird, James

    2017-08-01

    A heavily obscured growth phase of supermassive black holes (SMBH) is thought to be important in the co-evolution with galaxies. X-rays provide a clean and efficient selection of unobscured and obscured AGN. Recent work with deeper observations and improved analysis methodology allowed us to extend constraints to Compton-thick number densities. We present the first luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN at z=0.5-4 and constrain the overall mass density locked into black holes over cosmic time, a fundamental constraint for cosmological simulations. Recent studies including ours find that the obscuration is redshift and luminosity-dependent in a complex way, which rules out entire sets of obscurer models. A new paradigm, the radiation-lifted torus model, is proposed, in which the obscurer is Eddington-rate dependent and accretion creates and displaces torus clouds. We place observational limits on the behaviour of this mechanism.

  3. The Compton-thick Growth of Supermassive Black Holes constrained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, J.; Georgakakis, A.; Nandra, K.

    2017-10-01

    A heavily obscured growth phase of supermassive black holes (SMBH) is thought to be important in the co-evolution with galaxies. X-rays provide a clean and efficient selection of unobscured and obscured AGN. Recent work with deeper observations and improved analysis methodology allowed us to extend constraints to Compton-thick number densities. We present the first luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN at z=0.5-4 and constrain the overall mass density locked into black holes over cosmic time, a fundamental constraint for cosmological simulations. Recent studies including ours find that the obscuration is redshift and luminosity-dependent in a complex way, which rules out entire sets of obscurer models. A new paradigm, the radiation-lifted torus model, is proposed, in which the obscurer is Eddington-rate dependent and accretion creates and displaces torus clouds. We place observational limits on the behaviour of this mechanism.

  4. Compton imaging tomography technique for NDE of large nonuniform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubsky, Victor; Romanov, Volodymyr; Patton, Ned; Jannson, Tomasz

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we describe a new nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique called Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) for reconstructing the complete three-dimensional internal structure of an object, based on the registration of multiple two-dimensional Compton-scattered x-ray images of the object. CIT provides high resolution and sensitivity with virtually any material, including lightweight structures and organics, which normally pose problems in conventional x-ray computed tomography because of low contrast. The CIT technique requires only one-sided access to the object, has no limitation on the object's size, and can be applied to high-resolution real-time in situ NDE of large aircraft/spacecraft structures and components. Theoretical and experimental results will be presented.

  5. Use of capillary optics as a beam intensifier for a Compton x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, P A; Abreu, C C; Carroll, F E; Xiao, Q F; MacDonald, C A

    1994-11-01

    The use of Kumakhov capillary optics will significantly enhance the performance of near-monochromatic, Compton backscattered x-ray programs. The Vanderbilt University Medical Free-Electron Laser Center is developing the capability to create these tunable x rays for medical imaging. The present transport has only reflection optics, and the beam is quite large in diameter at the laboratory. Low loss collimation of this beam would allow higher x-ray intensities after transport. This article describes experimental and computer simulation results which predict the expected performance for a multifiber Kumakhov collimator for use in the x-ray beam transport. Estimates from our research are that a multifiber optic formed of individual polycapillary fibers could be used to capture the full 7 mrad of the Vanderbilt x-ray beam and collimate it to a 1-2 mrad divergence with approximately 40%-50% transmission efficiency. This optic should increase the x-ray intensity at the laboratory level by a factor of > or = 5 by decreasing the beam divergence and subsequent spot size. Additionally, analysis of monolithic optics of fused multicapillary fibers predicts an increase in the intensity of the x rays at the laboratory by a factor of 55. These optics can have tapered channels that greatly decrease their exit divergence. This will greatly enhance the capabilities of this unique x-ray source. This article reports the initial results from a collaboration between Vanderbilt, The Center for X-Ray Optics at University at Albany, SUNY, and X-Ray Optical Systems in Albany, NY.

  6. Directional Unfolded Source Term (DUST) for Compton Cameras.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Horne, Steven M.; O'Brien, Sean

    2018-03-01

    A Directional Unfolded Source Term (DUST) algorithm was developed to enable improved spectral analysis capabilities using data collected by Compton cameras. Achieving this objective required modification of the detector response function in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Experimental data that were collected in support of this work include measurements of calibration sources at a range of separation distances and cylindrical depleted uranium castings.

  7. The Construction of Compton Tensors in Scalar QED

    DOE PAGES

    Bakker, Bernard L. G.; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2016-12-09

    Current conservation is a vital condition in electrodynamics. For this paper, we review the literature concerning the ways to ensure that the formalism used in calculating amplitudes for the scattering of charged particles is in compliance with current conservation. For the case of electron scattering off a scalar and a spin-1/2 target as well as Compton scattering on a scalar target, we present some novelties besides reviewing the literature.

  8. Resonant Inverse Compton Scattering Spectra from Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Baring, Matthew G.; Gonthier, Peter L.; Harding, Alice K.

    2018-02-01

    Hard, nonthermal, persistent pulsed X-ray emission extending between 10 and ∼150 keV has been observed in nearly 10 magnetars. For inner-magnetospheric models of such emission, resonant inverse Compton scattering of soft thermal photons by ultrarelativistic charges is the most efficient production mechanism. We present angle-dependent upscattering spectra and pulsed intensity maps for uncooled, relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of magnetar magnetospheres, calculated using collisional integrals over field loops. Our computations employ a new formulation of the QED Compton scattering cross section in strong magnetic fields that is physically correct for treating important spin-dependent effects in the cyclotron resonance, thereby producing correct photon spectra. The spectral cutoff energies are sensitive to the choices of observer viewing geometry, electron Lorentz factor, and scattering kinematics. We find that electrons with energies ≲15 MeV will emit most of their radiation below 250 keV, consistent with inferred turnovers for magnetar hard X-ray tails. More energetic electrons still emit mostly below 1 MeV, except for viewing perspectives sampling field-line tangents. Pulse profiles may be singly or doubly peaked dependent on viewing geometry, emission locale, and observed energy band. Magnetic pair production and photon splitting will attenuate spectra to hard X-ray energies, suppressing signals in the Fermi-LAT band. The resonant Compton spectra are strongly polarized, suggesting that hard X-ray polarimetry instruments such as X-Calibur, or a future Compton telescope, can prove central to constraining model geometry and physics.

  9. Compton-thick AGNs in the NuSTAR Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, S.; Ajello, M.; Marcotulli, L.; Comastri, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present the 2–100 keV spectral analysis of 30 candidate Compton-thick-(CT-)active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 100 month survey. The average redshift of these objects is < z> ∼ 0.03, and they all lie within ∼500 Mpc. We used the MyTorus model to perform X-ray spectral fittings both without and with the contribution of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) data in the 3–50 keV energy range. When the NuSTAR data are added to the fit, 13 out of 30 of these objects (43% of the whole sample) have intrinsic absorption N H < 1024 cm‑2 at the >3σ confidence level, i.e., they are reclassified from Compton thick to Compton thin. Consequently, we infer an overall observed fraction of the CT-AGN, with respect to the whole AGN population, lower than the one reported in previous works, as low as ∼4%. We find evidence that this overestimation of N H is likely due to the low quality of a subsample of spectra, either in the 2–10 keV band or in the Swift-BAT one.

  10. "Stereo Compton cameras" for the 3-D localization of radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Adachi, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Uchiyama, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kato, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera is a viable and convenient tool used to visualize the distribution of radioactive isotopes that emit gamma rays. After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in 2011, there is a particularly urgent need to develop "gamma cameras", which can visualize the distribution of such radioisotopes. In response, we propose a portable Compton camera, which comprises 3-D position-sensitive GAGG scintillators coupled with thin monolithic MPPC arrays. The pulse-height ratio of two MPPC-arrays allocated at both ends of the scintillator block determines the depth of interaction (DOI), which dramatically improves the position resolution of the scintillation detectors. We report on the detailed optimization of the detector design, based on Geant4 simulation. The results indicate that detection efficiency reaches up to 0.54%, or more than 10 times that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, along with a moderate angular resolution of 8.1° (FWHM). By applying the triangular surveying method, we also propose a new concept for the stereo measurement of gamma rays by using two Compton cameras, thus enabling the 3-D positional measurement of radioactive isotopes for the first time. From one point source simulation data, we ensured that the source position and the distance to the same could be determined typically to within 2 meters' accuracy and we also confirmed that more than two sources are clearly separated by the event selection from two point sources of simulation data.

  11. Lidar using the backscatter amplification effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.

    2018-04-01

    Experimental data proving the possibility of lidar measurement of the refractive turbulence strength based on the effect of backscatter amplification (BSA) are reported. It is shown that the values of the amplification factor correlate with the variance of random jitter of optical image of an incoherent light source depending on the value of the structure constant of the air refractive index turbulent fluctuations averaged over the probing path. This paper presents the results of measurements of the BSA factor in comparison with the simultaneous measurements of the BSA peak, which is very narrow and only occurs on the laser beam axis. It is constructed the range-time images of the derivative of the amplification factor gives a comprehensive picture of the location of turbulent zones and their temporal dynamics.

  12. Relationship between wind, waves and radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsaros, Kristina B.; Ataktuerk, Serhad S.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the relationship between wind, waves, and radar backscatter from water surface. To this end, three field experiments with periods of 2 to 4 weeks were carried out during summer months in 1988, 1989 and 1990. For these periods, the University of Washington group provided (1) environmental parameters such as wind speed, wind stress, and atmospheric stratification through measurements of surface fluxes (of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat) and of air and water temperatures; and (2) wave height spectra including both the dominant waves and the short gravity-capillary waves. Surface flux measurements were performed by using our well tested instruments: a K-Gill twin propeller-vane anemometer and a fast response thermocouple psychrometer. Wave heights were measured by a resistance wire wave gauge. The University of Kansas group was responsible for the operation of the microwave radars.

  13. Relating P-band AIRSAR backscatter to forest stand parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yong; Melack, John M.; Davis, Frank W.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    As part of research on forest ecosystems, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and collaborating research teams have conducted multi-season airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) experiments in three forest ecosystems including temperate pine forest (Duke, Forest, North Carolina), boreal forest (Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest, Alaska), and northern mixed hardwood-conifer forest (Michigan Biological Station, Michigan). The major research goals were to improve understanding of the relationships between radar backscatter and phenological variables (e.g. stand density, tree size, etc.), to improve radar backscatter models of tree canopy properties, and to develop a radar-based scheme for monitoring forest phenological changes. In September 1989, AIRSAR backscatter data were acquired over the Duke Forest. As the aboveground biomass of the loblolly pine forest stands at Duke Forest increased, the SAR backscatter at C-, L-, and P-bands increased and saturated at different biomass levels for the C-band, L-band, and P-band data. We only use the P-band backscatter data and ground measurements here to study the relationships between the backscatter and stand density, the backscatter and mean trunk dbh (diameter at breast height) of trees in the stands, and the backscatter and stand basal area.

  14. CsI Calorimeter for a Compton-Pair Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Eric J.

    We propose to build and test a hodoscopic CsI(Tl) scintillating-crystal calorimeter for a medium-energy γ-ray Compton and pair telescope. The design and technical approach for this calorimeter relies deeply on heritage from the Fermi LAT CsI Calorimeter, but it dramatically improves the low-energy performance of that design by reading out the scintillation light with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), making the technology developed for Fermi applicable in the Compton regime. While such a hodoscopic calorimeter is useful for an entire class of medium-energy γ-ray telescope designs, we propose to build it explicitly to support beam tests and balloon flight of the Proto-ComPair telescope, the development and construction of which was funded in a four-year APRA program beginning in 2015 ("ComPair: Steps to a Medium Energy γ-ray Mission" with PI J. McEnery of GSFC). That award did not include funding for its CsI calorimeter subsystem, and this proposal is intended to cover that gap. ComPair is a MIDEX-class instrument concept to perform a high-sensitivity survey of the γ-ray sky from 0.5 MeV to 500 MeV. ComPair is designed to provide a dramatic increase in sensitivity relative to previous instruments in this energy range (predominantly INTEGRAL/SPI and Compton COMPTEL), with the same transformative sensitivity increase - and corresponding scientific return- that the Fermi Large Area Telescope provided relative to Compton EGRET. To enable transformative science over a broad range of MeV energies and with a wide field of view, ComPair is a combined Compton telescope and pair telescope employing a silicon-strip tracker (for Compton scattering and pair conversion and tracking) and a solid-state CdZnTe calorimeter (for Compton absorption) and CsI calorimeter (for pair calorimetry), surrounded by a plastic scintillator anti-coincidence detector. Under the current proposal, we will complete the detailed design, assembly, and test of the CsI calorimeter for the risk

  15. Constraints on the H˜ generalized parton distribution from deep virtual Compton scattering measured at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidal, M.

    2010-09-01

    We have analyzed the longitudinally polarized proton target asymmetry data of the Deep Virtual Compton process recently published by the HERMES Collaboration in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions. We have fitted these new data in a largely model-independent fashion and the procedure results in numerical constraints on the accent="true">H˜Im Compton Form Factor. We present its t- and ξ-dependencies. We also find improvement on the determination of two other Compton Form Factors, HRe and HIm.

  16. Gate simulation of Compton Ar-Xe gamma-camera for radionuclide imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubov, L. Yu; Belyaev, V. N.; Berdnikova, A. K.; Bolozdynia, A. I.; Akmalova, Yu A.; Shtotsky, Yu V.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulations of cylindrical Compton Ar-Xe gamma camera are described in the current report. Detection efficiency of cylindrical Ar-Xe Compton camera with internal diameter of 40 cm is estimated as1-3%that is 10-100 times higher than collimated Anger’s camera. It is shown that cylindrical Compton camera can image Tc-99m radiotracer distribution with uniform spatial resolution of 20 mm through the whole field of view.

  17. A method for removing arm backscatter from EPID images

    SciTech Connect

    King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.; School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for removing the support arm backscatter from images acquired using current Varian electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs).Methods: The effect of arm backscatter on EPID images was modeled using a kernel convolution method. The parameters of the model were optimized by comparing on-arm images to off-arm images. The model was used to develop a method to remove the effect of backscatter from measured EPID images. The performance of the backscatter removal method was tested by comparing backscatter corrected on-arm images to measured off-arm images for 17 rectangular fields of different sizes and locations on the imager.more » The method was also tested using on- and off-arm images from 42 intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields.Results: Images generated by the backscatter removal method gave consistently better agreement with off-arm images than images without backscatter correction. For the 17 rectangular fields studied, the root mean square difference of in-plane profiles compared to off-arm profiles was reduced from 1.19% (standard deviation 0.59%) on average without backscatter removal to 0.38% (standard deviation 0.18%) when using the backscatter removal method. When comparing to the off-arm images from the 42 IMRT fields, the mean {gamma} and percentage of pixels with {gamma} < 1 were improved by the backscatter removal method in all but one of the images studied. The mean {gamma} value (1%, 1 mm) for the IMRT fields studied was reduced from 0.80 to 0.57 by using the backscatter removal method, while the mean {gamma} pass rate was increased from 72.2% to 84.6%.Conclusions: A backscatter removal method has been developed to estimate the image acquired by the EPID without any arm backscatter from an image acquired in the presence of arm backscatter. The method has been shown to produce consistently reliable results for a wide range of field sizes and jaw configurations.« less

  18. Ocean subsurface particulate backscatter estimation from CALIPSO spaceborne lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Pan, Delu; Wang, Tianyu; Mao, Zhihua

    2017-10-01

    A method for ocean subsurface particulate backscatter estimation from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite was demonstrated. The effects of the CALIOP receiver's transient response on the attenuated backscatter profile were first removed. The two-way transmittance of the overlying atmosphere was then estimated as the ratio of the measured ocean surface attenuated backscatter to the theoretical value computed from wind driven wave slope variance. Finally, particulate backscatter was estimated from the depolarization ratio as the ratio of the column-integrated cross-polarized and co-polarized channels. Statistical results show that the derived particulate backscatter by the method based on CALIOP data agree reasonably well with chlorophyll-a concentration using MODIS data. It indicates a potential use of space-borne lidar to estimate global primary productivity and particulate carbon stock.

  19. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction. PMID:26917151

  20. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction.

  1. Doppler Broadening and its Contribution to Compton Energy-Absorption Cross Sections: An Analysis of the Compton Component in Terms of Mass-Energy Absorption Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Akatsuka, T.; Cesareo, R.; Brunetti, A.; Gigante, G. E.

    2002-09-01

    Compton energy absorption cross sections are calculated using the formulas based on a relativistic impulse approximation to assess the contribution of Doppler broadening and to examine the Compton profile literature and explore what, if any, effect our knowledge of this line broadening has on the Compton component in terms of mass-energy absorption coefficient. Compton energy-absorption cross sections are evaluated for all elements, Z=1-100, and for photon energies 1 keV-100 MeV. Using these cross sections, the Compton component of the mass-energy absorption coefficient is derived in the energy region from 1 keV to 1 MeV for all the elements Z=1-100. The electron momentum prior to the scattering event should cause a Doppler broadening of the Compton line. The momentum resolution function is evaluated in terms of incident and scattered photon energy and scattering angle. The overall momentum resolution of each contribution is estimated for x-ray and γ-ray energies of experimental interest in the angular region 1°-180°. Also estimated is the Compton broadening using nonrelativistic formula in the angular region 1°-180°, for 17.44, 22.1, 58.83, and 60 keV photons for a few elements (H, C, N, O, P, S, K, and Ca) of biological importance.

  2. External inverse-Compton emission from jetted tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbin; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-05-01

    The recent discoveries of Sw J1644+57 and Sw J2058+05 show that tidal disruption events (TDEs) can launch relativistic jets. Super-Eddington accretion produces a strong radiation field of order Eddington luminosity. In a jetted TDE, electrons in the jet will inverse-Compton scatter the photons from the accretion disc and wind (external radiation field). Motivated by observations of thermal optical-UV spectra in Sw J2058+05 and several other TDEs, we assume the spectrum of the external radiation field intercepted by the relativistic jet to be blackbody. Hot electrons in the jet scatter this thermal radiation and produce luminosities 1045-1048 erg s- 1 in the X/γ-ray band. This model of thermal plus inverse-Compton radiation is applied to Sw J2058+05. First, we show that the blackbody component in the optical-UV spectrum most likely has its origin in the super-Eddington wind from the disc. Then, using the observed blackbody component as the external radiation field, we show that the X-ray luminosity and spectrum are consistent with the inverse-Compton emission, under the following conditions: (1) the jet Lorentz factor is Γ ≃ 5-10; (2) electrons in the jet have a power-law distribution dN_e/dγ _e ∝ γ _e^{-p} with γmin ˜ 1 and p = 2.4; (3) the wind is mildly relativistic (Lorentz factor ≳ 1.5) and has isotropic-equivalent mass-loss rate ˜ 5 M⊙ yr- 1. We describe the implications for jet composition and the radius where jet energy is converted to radiation.

  3. PSF reconstruction for Compton-based prompt gamma imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Meei-Ling; Lee, Ming-Wei; Huang, Hsuan-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Compton-based prompt gamma (PG) imaging has been proposed for in vivo range verification in proton therapy. However, several factors degrade the image quality of PG images, some of which are due to inherent properties of a Compton camera such as spatial resolution and energy resolution. Moreover, Compton-based PG imaging has a spatially variant resolution loss. In this study, we investigate the performance of the list-mode ordered subset expectation maximization algorithm with a shift-variant point spread function (LM-OSEM-SV-PSF) model. We also evaluate how well the PG images reconstructed using an SV-PSF model reproduce the distal falloff of the proton beam. The SV-PSF parameters were estimated from simulation data of point sources at various positions. Simulated PGs were produced in a water phantom irradiated with a proton beam. Compared to the LM-OSEM algorithm, the LM-OSEM-SV-PSF algorithm improved the quality of the reconstructed PG images and the estimation of PG falloff positions. In addition, the 4.44 and 5.25 MeV PG emissions can be accurately reconstructed using the LM-OSEM-SV-PSF algorithm. However, for the 2.31 and 6.13 MeV PG emissions, the LM-OSEM-SV-PSF reconstruction provides limited improvement. We also found that the LM-OSEM algorithm followed by a shift-variant Richardson-Lucy deconvolution could reconstruct images with quality visually similar to the LM-OSEM-SV-PSF-reconstructed images, while requiring shorter computation time.

  4. Ocean backscatter across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, S.V.; Li, F.K.

    1997-06-01

    Ocean backscatter was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the airborne NUSCAT K{sub u}-band scatterometer, across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991. Backscatter across the front between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration experimental coastal buoy A (44024) on the cold side and Discus C buoy (44023) on the warm side shows a difference of more than 5 dB for vertical polarization in many cases. This large frontal backscatter change is observed in all upwind, downwind, and crosswind directions. Themore » sea surface temperature difference measured by the buoys was about 9{degrees}C. The corresponding difference in wind speed cannot account for the large backscatter change in view of geophysical model functions depending only on neutral wind velocity such as SASS. The measured backscatter also has larger upwind-downwind and upwind-crosswind ratios compared to the model results. Furthermore, NUSCAT data reveal that upwind backscatter on the cold side was smaller than or close to crosswind backscatter on the warm side for incidence angles between 30{degrees} to 50{degrees}. This suggests that the temperature front can be detected by the scatterometer at these incidence angles for different wind directions in the cold and warm sides.« less

  5. Detail Extraction from Electron Backscatter Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basinger, Jay

    Cross-correlation based analysis of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns and the use of simulated reference patterns has opened up entirely new avenues of insight into local lattice properties within EBSD scans. The benefits of accessing new levels of orientation resolution and multiple types of previously inaccessible data measures are accompanied with new challenges in characterizing microscope geometry and other error previously ignored in EBSD systems. The foremost of these challenges, when using simulated patterns in high resolution EBSD (HR-EBSD), is the determination of pattern center (the location on the sample from which the EBSD pattern originated) with sufficient accuracy to avoid the introduction of phantom lattice rotations and elastic strain into these highly sensitive measures. This dissertation demonstrates how to greatly improve pattern center determination. It also presents a method for the extraction of grain boundary plane information from single two-dimensional surface scans. These are accomplished through the use of previously un-accessed detail within EBSD images, coupled with physical models of the backscattering phenomena. A software algorithm is detailed and applied for the determination of pattern center with an accuracy of ˜0.03% of the phosphor screen width, or ˜10μm. This resolution makes it possible to apply a simulated pattern method (developed at BYU) in HR-EBSD, with several important benefits over the original HR-EBSD approach developed by Angus Wilkinson. Experimental work is done on epitaxially-grown silicon and germanium in order to gauge the precision of HR-EBSD with simulated reference patterns using the new pattern center calibration approach. It is found that strain resolution with a calibrated pattern center and simulated reference patterns can be as low as 7x10-4. Finally, Monte Carlo-based models of the electron interaction volume are used in conjunction with pattern-mixing-strength curves of line scans

  6. Astatine-211 imaging by a Compton camera for targeted radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Yuto; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Watanabe, Shigeki; Ishioka, Noriko S; Kawachi, Naoki; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2018-05-24

    Astatine-211 is a promising radionuclide for targeted radiotherapy. It is required to image the distribution of targeted radiotherapeutic agents in a patient's body for optimization of treatment strategies. We proposed to image 211 At with high-energy photons to overcome some problems in conventional planar or single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. We performed an imaging experiment of a point-like 211 At source using a Compton camera, and demonstrated the capability of imaging 211 At with the high-energy photons for the first time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Landron, C.O.; Baldwin, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  8. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. J.; Mamyan, V. H.; Aniol, K. A.; Annand, J. R.; Bertin, P. Y.; Bimbot, L.; Bosted, P.; Calarco, J. R.; Camsonne, A.; Chang, G. C.; Chang, T.-H.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, A.; Degtyarenko, P.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Dutta, D.; Egiyan, K.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Glashausser, C.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Hinton, W.; Horn, T.; Howell, C.; Hunyady, T.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M. K.; Khandaker, M.; Ketikyan, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kramer, K.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; Lerose, J.; Lindgren, R. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; McCormick, K.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moussiegt, P.; Nanda, S.; Nathan, A. M.; Nikolenko, D. M.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B. E.; Paschke, K.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Punjabi, V. A.; Rachek, I.; Radyushkin, A.; Reitz, B.; Roche, R.; Roedelbronn, M.; Ron, G.; Sabatie, F.; Saha, A.; Savvinov, N.; Shahinyan, A.; Shestakov, Y.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Stoler, P.; Tajima, S.; Sulkosky, V.; Todor, L.; Vlahovic, B.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Xiang, H.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2005-06-01

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV2 and t=-4.0 GeV2 via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  9. Filtered back-projection algorithm for Compton telescopes

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Donald L [Lisle, IL

    2008-03-18

    A method for the conversion of Compton camera data into a 2D image of the incident-radiation flux on the celestial sphere includes detecting coincident gamma radiation flux arriving from various directions of a 2-sphere. These events are mapped by back-projection onto the 2-sphere to produce a convolution integral that is subsequently stereographically projected onto a 2-plane to produce a second convolution integral which is deconvolved by the Fourier method to produce an image that is then projected onto the 2-sphere.

  10. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Hamilton; Vahe Mamyan

    2004-10-01

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s = 6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t = -4.0 TeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in excellent agreement with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton and in disagreement with a prediction of pQCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism.

  11. Gluon tomography from deeply virtual Compton scattering at small x

    DOE PAGES

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2017-06-29

    We present a full evaluation of the deeply virtual Compton scattering cross section in the dipole framework in the small-x region. The result features the cosφ and cos2φ azimuthal angular correlations, which have been missing in previous studies based on the dipole model. In particular, the cos2φ term is generated by the elliptic gluon Wigner distribution of which the measurement at the planned electron-ion collider provides important information about the gluon tomography at small x. Here, we also show the consistency with the standard collinear factorization approach based on the quark and gluon generalized parton distributions.

  12. Spin in Compton scattering with pronounced polarization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Sven; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate a scattering configuration in Compton scattering, in which the orientation of the electron spin is reversed and, simultaneously, the photon polarization changes from linear polarization into circular polarization. The intrinsic angular momentum of electron and photon are computed along the coincident propagation direction of the incoming and outgoing photon. We find that this intrinsic angular momentum is not conserved in the considered scattering process. We also discuss the generation of entanglement for the considered scattering setup and present an angle-dependent investigation of the corresponding differential cross section, Stokes parameters, and spin expectation.

  13. Compton interaction of free electrons with intense low frequency radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illarionov, A. F.; Kompaneyets, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Electron behavior in an intense low frequency radiation field, with induced Compton scattering as the primary mechanism of interaction, is investigated. Evolution of the electron energy spectrum is studied, and the equilibrium spectrum of relativistic electrons in a radiation field with high brightness temperature is found. The induced radiation pressure and heating rate of an electron gas are calculated. The direction of the induced pressure depends on the radiation spectrum. The form of spectrum, under the induced force can accelerate electrons to superrelativistic energies is found.

  14. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Konoshonkin, Alexander

    2015-09-21

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed within the physical-optics approximation by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simple model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals.

  15. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  16. CO2 lidar backscatter profiles over Hawaii during fall 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Madison J.; Cupp, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud backscatter data, obtained over a 24-day period in fall 1988 with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Doppler lidar at 10.59-micron wavelength, are analyzed by using a new technique to lessen biases that are due to dropouts. Typical backscatter cross sections were significantly lower than those routinely observed over the continental United States, although episodic backscatter enhancements caused by cirrus and mineral dust also occurred. Implications of these data on the proposed Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder wind profiling satellite sensor are discussed.

  17. Radar backscatter from the sea: Controlled experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. K.

    1992-04-01

    The subwindowing method of modelling synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves was extended to allow wave propagation in arbitrary directions. Simulated images show that the SAR image response to swells that are imaged by velocity bunching is reduced by random smearing due to wind-generated waves. The magnitude of this response is not accurately predicted by introducing a finite coherence time in the radar backscatter. The smearing does not affect the imaging of waves by surface radar cross-section modulation, and is independent of the wind direction. Adjusting the focus of the SAR processor introduces an offset in the image response of the surface scatters. When adjusted by one-half the azimuthal phase velocity of the wave, this compensates the incoherent advance of the wave being imaged, leading to a higher image contrast. The azimuthal cut-off and range rotation of the spectral peak are predicted when the imaging of wind-generated wave trains is simulated. The simulated images suggest that velocity bunching and azimuthal smearing are strongly interdependent, and cannot be included in a model separately.

  18. Portable fluorescence meter with reference backscattering channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Grishanov, Vladimir N.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Burkov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-09-01

    Methods based on fluorescence and backscattering are intensively used for determination of the advanced glycation end products (AGE) concentration in the biological tissues. There are strong correlation between the AGE concentration and the severity of such diseases like diabetes, coronary heart disease and renal failure. This fact can be used for diagnostic purposes in medical applications. Only few investigations in this area can be useful for development of portable and affordable in vivo AGE meter because the most of them are oriented on using spectrometers. In this study we describe the design and the results of tests on volunteers of portable fluorescence meter based on two photodiodes. One channel of such fluorimeter is used for measurement of the autofluorescence (AF) intensity, another one - for the intensity of elastically scattered radiation, which can be used as a reference. This reference channel is proposed for normalization of the skin autofluorescence signal to the human skin photo type. The fluorimeter, that was developed is relatively compact and does not contain any expensive optical and electronic components. The experimental results prove that proposed tool can be used for the AGE estimation in human skin.

  19. X-Ray Backscatter Machine Support Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    This summer at Kennedy Space Center, I spent 10 weeks as an intern working at the Prototype Development Lab. During this time I learned about the design and machining done here at NASA. I became familiar with the process from where a design begins in Pro/Engineer and finishes at the hands of the machinists. As an intern I was given various small jobs to do and then one project of my own. My personal project was a job for the Applied Physics Lab; in their work they use an X-Ray Backscatter machine. Previously it was resting atop a temporary frame that limited the use of the machine. My job was to design a frame for the machine to rest upon that would allow a full range of sample sizes. The frame was required to support the machine and provide a strain relief for the cords attached to the machine as it moved in the x and y directions. Calculations also had to be done to be sure the design would be able to withstand any loads or outside sources of stress. After the calculations proved the design to be ready to withstand the requirements, the parts were ordered or fabricated, as required. This helped me understand the full process of jobs sent to the Prototype Development Lab.

  20. Method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser compton x-ray and gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  1. Development of a Compton camera for safeguards applications in a pyroprocessing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Young Su; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Seo, Hee; Park, Se-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera has a potential to be used for localizing nuclear materials in a large pyroprocessing facility due to its unique Compton kinematics-based electronic collimation method. Our R&D group, KAERI, and Hanyang University have made an effort to develop a scintillation-detector-based large-area Compton camera for safeguards applications. In the present study, a series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed with Geant4 in order to examine the effect of the detector parameters and the feasibility of using a Compton camera to obtain an image of the nuclear material distribution. Based on the simulation study, experimental studies were performed to assess the possibility of Compton imaging in accordance with the type of the crystal. Two different types of Compton cameras were fabricated and tested with a pixelated type of LYSO (Ce) and a monolithic type of NaI(Tl). The conclusions of this study as a design rule for a large-area Compton camera can be summarized as follows: 1) The energy resolution, rather than position resolution, of the component detector was the limiting factor for the imaging resolution, 2) the Compton imaging system needs to be placed as close as possible to the source location, and 3) both pixelated and monolithic types of crystals can be utilized; however, the monolithic types, require a stochastic-method-based position-estimating algorithm for improving the position resolution.

  2. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  3. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: Lessons Learned in Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, G. A.; Joseph, G. W.; Behrens, H. W.; Asato, D. I.; Carlson, R. A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory was the second of NASA's Great Observatories. At 17 1/2 tons. it was the heaviest astrophysical payload ever flown at the time of its launch on April 5, 1991 aboard the Space Shuttle. During initial, on-orbit priming of the spacecraft's monopropellant hydrazine propulsion system, a severe waterhammer transient was experienced. At that time, anomalous telemetry readings were received from on-board propulsion system instrumentation. This led to ground analyses and laboratory investigations as to the root cause of the waterhammer, potential damage to system integrity and functionality, and risks for switching from the primary (A-side) propulsion system to the redundant (B-side) system. The switchover to B-side was ultimately performed successfully and the spacecraft completed its basic and extended missions in this configuration. Nine years later, following a critical control gyroscope failure, Compton was safely deorbited and re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on June 4, 2000. Additional risk assessments concerning viability of A- and B-sides were necessary to provide confidence in attitude and delta-V authority and reliability to manage the precisely controlled reentry. This paper summarizes the design and operation of the propulsion system used on the spacecraft and provides "lessons learned" from the system engineering investigations into the propellant loading procedures, the initial priming anomaly, mission operations, and the commanded re-entry following the gyro failure.

  4. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  5. Compton camera imaging and the cone transform: a brief overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzioglu, Fatma; Kuchment, Peter; Kunyansky, Leonid

    2018-05-01

    While most of Radon transform applications to imaging involve integrations over smooth sub-manifolds of the ambient space, lately important situations have appeared where the integration surfaces are conical. Three of such applications are single scatter optical tomography, Compton camera medical imaging, and homeland security. In spite of the similar surfaces of integration, the data and the inverse problems associated with these modalities differ significantly. In this article, we present a brief overview of the mathematics arising in Compton camera imaging. In particular, the emphasis is made on the overdetermined data and flexible geometry of the detectors. For the detailed results, as well as other approaches (e.g. smaller-dimensional data or restricted geometry of detectors) the reader is directed to the relevant publications. Only a brief description and some references are provided for the single scatter optical tomography. This work was supported in part by NSF DMS grants 1211463 (the first two authors), 1211521 and 141877 (the third author), as well as a College of Science of Texas A&M University grant.

  6. Compton Reflection in AGN with Simbol-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, V.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Gehrels, N.; Lubiński, P.; Malzac, J.; Petrucci, P. O.; Shrader, C. R.; Soldi, S.

    2009-05-01

    AGN exhibit complex hard X-ray spectra. Our current understanding is that the emission is dominated by inverse Compton processes which take place in the corona above the accretion disk, and that absorption and reflection in a distant absorber play a major role. These processes can be directly observed through the shape of the continuum, the Compton reflection hump around 30 keV, and the iron fluorescence line at 6.4 keV. We demonstrate the capabilities of Simbol-X to constrain complex models for cases like MCG-05-23-016, NGC 4151, NGC 2110, and NGC 4051 in short (10 ksec) observations. We compare the simulations with recent observations on these sources by INTEGRAL, Swift and Suzaku. Constraining reflection models for AGN with Simbol-X will help us to get a clear view of the processes and geometry near to the central engine in AGN, and will give insight to which sources are responsible for the Cosmic X-ray background at energies >20 keV.

  7. Inverse Compton X-ray signature of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2013-12-01

    Bright AGN frequently show ultrafast outflows (UFOs) with outflow velocities vout ˜ 0.1c. These outflows may be the source of AGN feedback on their host galaxies sought by galaxy formation modellers. The exact effect of the outflows on the ambient galaxy gas strongly depends on whether the shocked UFOs cool rapidly or not. This in turn depends on whether the shocked electrons share the same temperature as ions (one-temperature regime, 1T) or decouple (2T), as has been recently suggested. Here we calculate the inverse Compton spectrum emitted by such shocks, finding a broad feature potentially detectable either in mid-to-high energy X-rays (1T case) or only in the soft X-rays (2T). We argue that current observations of AGN do not seem to show evidence for the 1T component. The limits on the 2T emission are far weaker, and in fact it is possible that the observed soft X-ray excess of AGN is partially or fully due to the 2T shock emission. This suggests that UFOs are in the energy-driven regime outside the central few pc, and must pump considerable amounts of not only momentum but also energy into the ambient gas. We encourage X-ray observers to look for the inverse Compton components calculated here in order to constrain AGN feedback models further.

  8. The effect of relativistic Compton scattering on thermonuclear burn of pure deuterium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemizad, A.; Nazirzadeh, M.; Khanbabaei, B.

    The relativistic effects of the Compton scattering on the thermonuclear burn-up of pure deuterium fuel in non-equilibrium plasma have been studied by four temperature (4T) theory. In the limit of low electron temperatures and photon energies, the nonrelativistic Compton scattering is valid and a convenient approximation, but in the high energy exchange rates between electrons and photons, is seen to break down. The deficiencies of the nonrelativistic approximation can be overcome by using the relativistic correction in the photons kinetic equation. In this research, we have utilized the four temperature (4T) theory to calculate the critical burn-up parameter for puremore » deuterium fuel, while the Compton scattering is considered as a relativistic phenomenon. It was shown that the measured critical burn-up parameter in ignition with relativistic Compton scattering is smaller than that of the parameter in the ignition with the nonrelativistic Compton scattering.« less

  9. Analysis of the backscatter spectrum in an ionospheric modification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.

    1973-01-01

    Predictions of the backscatter spectrum are compared, including effects of ionospheric inhomogeneity with experimental observations of incoherent backscatter from an artificially heated region. Calculations show that the strongest backscatter echo received is not, in fact, from the reflection level, but from a region some distance below (about 0.5 km for an experiment carried out at Arecibo), where the pump wave from a HF transmitter approximately 100 kW) is below the threshold for parametric amplification. By taking the standing wave pattern of the pump into account, asymmetry is explained of the up-shifted and down-shifted plasma lines in the backscatter spectrum, and the several peaks typically observed in the region of the spectrum near the HF transmitter frequency.

  10. Optimal Time Allocation in Backscatter Assisted Wireless Powered Communication Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Bin; Yang, Zhen; Gui, Guan; Sari, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a wireless powered communication network (WPCN) assisted by backscatter communication (BackCom). This model consists of a power station, an information receiver and multiple users that can work in either BackCom mode or harvest-then-transmit (HTT) mode. The time block is mainly divided into two parts corresponding to the data backscattering and transmission periods, respectively. The users first backscatter data to the information receiver in time division multiple access (TDMA) during the data backscattering period. When one user works in the BackCom mode, the other users harvest energy from the power station. During the data transmission period, two schemes, i.e., non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and TDMA, are considered. To maximize the system throughput, the optimal time allocation policies are obtained. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model. PMID:28587171

  11. Diurnal Thermal Cycling Effects on Backscatter of Thin Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Gow, A. J.; Perovich, D. K.; Hsu, C. C.; Ding, K. H.; Kong, J. A.; Grenfell, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    To invesigate effects on polarimetric backscatter of sea ice grown under diurnal cycling conditions, we carried out an experiment inJanuary 1994 at the outdoor Geophysical Research Facility in the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory.

  12. Optimal Time Allocation in Backscatter Assisted Wireless Powered Communication Networks.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Bin; Yang, Zhen; Gui, Guan; Sari, Hikmet

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes a wireless powered communication network (WPCN) assisted by backscatter communication (BackCom). This model consists of a power station, an information receiver and multiple users that can work in either BackCom mode or harvest-then-transmit (HTT) mode. The time block is mainly divided into two parts corresponding to the data backscattering and transmission periods, respectively. The users first backscatter data to the information receiver in time division multiple access (TDMA) during the data backscattering period. When one user works in the BackCom mode, the other users harvest energy from the power station. During the data transmission period, two schemes, i.e., non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and TDMA, are considered. To maximize the system throughput, the optimal time allocation policies are obtained. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model.

  13. Comparison of radar backscatter from Antarctic and Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosseinmostafa, R.; Lytle, V.

    1992-01-01

    Two ship-based step-frequency radars, one at C-band (5.3 GHz) and one at Ku-band (13.9 GHz), measured backscatter from ice in the Weddell Sea. Most of the backscatter data were from first-year (FY) and second-year (SY) ice at the ice stations where the ship was stationary and detailed snow and ice characterizations were performed. The presence of a slush layer at the snow-ice interface masks the distinction between FY and SY ice in the Weddell Sea, whereas in the Arctic the separation is quite distinct. The effect of snow-covered ice on backscattering coefficients (sigma0) from the Weddell Sea region indicates that surface scattering is the dominant factor. Measured sigma0 values were compared with Kirchhoff and regression-analysis models. The Weibull power-density function was used to fit the measured backscattering coefficients at 45 deg.

  14. The aCORN backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Hassan, M. T.; Bateman, F.; Collett, B.; ...

    2017-06-16

    Backscatter of electrons from a beta detector, with incomplete energy deposition, can lead to undesirable effects in many types of experiments. We present and discuss the design and operation of a backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer that was developed as part of a program to measure the electron–antineutrino correlation coefficient in neutron beta decay (aCORN). An array of backscatter veto detectors surrounds a plastic scintillator beta energy detector. The spectrometer contains an axial magnetic field gradient, so electrons are efficiently admitted but have a low probability for escaping back through the entrance after backscattering. Lastly, the design, construction, calibration, and performance ofmore » the spectrometer are discussed.« less

  15. Enhanced backscatter of a reflected beam in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churnside, James H.; Wilson, James J.

    1993-05-01

    We measure the mean and the variance of the irradiance of a diverging laser beam after reflection from a retroreflector and from a plane mirror in a turbulent atmosphere. Increases in both the mean irradiance and the normalized variance are observed in the direct backscatter direction because of correlation of turbulence on the outgoing path and the return path. The backscattered irradiance is enhanced by a factor of about 2 and the variance by somewhat less.

  16. A Backscattering Enhanced Microwave Canopy Scattering Model Based On MIMICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Hong, Y.; Qin, Q.; Chen, S.; Grout, T.

    2010-12-01

    For modeling microwave scattering of vegetated areas, several microwave canopy scattering models, based on the vectorized radiative transfer equation (VRT) that use different solving techniques, have been proposed in the past three decades. As an iterative solution of VRT at low orders, the Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) gives an analytical expression for calculating scattering as long as the volume scattering is not too strong. The most important usage of such models is to predict scattering in the backscattering direction. Unfortunately, the simplified assumption of MIMICS is that the scattering between the ground and trunk layers only includes the specular reflection. As a result, MIMICS includes a dominant coherent term which vanishes in the backscattering direction because this term contains a delta function factor of zero in this direction. This assumption needs reconsideration for accurately calculating the backscattering. In the framework of MIMICS, any incoherent terms that involve surface scattering factors must at least undergo surface scattering twice and volume scattering once. Therefore, these incoherent terms are usually very weak. On the other hand, due to the phenomenon of backscattering enhancement, the surface scattering in the backscattering direction is very strong compared to most other directions. Considering the facts discussed above, it is reasonable to add a surface backscattering term to the last equation of the boundary conditions of MIMICS. More terms appear in the final result including a backscattering coherent term which enhances the backscattering. The modified model is compared with the original MIMICS (version 1.0) using JPL/AIRSAR data from NASA Campaign Soil Moisture Experimental 2003 (SMEX03) and Washita92. Significant improvement is observed.

  17. TCR backscattering characterization for microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    A Trihedral Corner Reflector (TCR) is formed by three mutually orthogonal metal plates of various shapes and is a very important scattering structure since it exhibits a high monostatic Radar Cross Section (RCS) over a wide angular range. Moreover it is a handy passive device with low manufacturing costs and robust geometric construction, the maintenance of its efficiency is not difficult and expensive, and it can be used in all weather conditions (i.e., fog, rain, smoke, and dusty environment). These characteristics make it suitable as reference target and radar enhancement device for satellite- and ground-based microwave remote sensing techniques. For instance, TCRs have been recently employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered signal in the case of urban ground deformation monitoring [1] and dynamic survey of civil infrastructures without natural corners as the Musmeci bridge in Basilicata, Italy [2]. The region of interest for the calculation of TCR's monostatic RCS is here confined to the first quadrant containing the boresight direction. The backscattering term is presented in closed form by evaluating the far-field scattering integral involving the contributions related to the direct illumination and the internal bouncing mechanisms. The Geometrical Optics (GO) laws allow one to determine the field incident on each TCR plate and the patch (integration domain) illuminated by it, thus enabling the use of a Physical Optics (PO) approximation for the corresponding surface current densities to consider for integration on each patch. Accordingly, five contributions are associated to each TCR plate: one contribution is due to the direct illumination of the whole internal surface; two contributions originate by the impinging rays that are simply reflected by the other two internal surfaces; and two contributions are related to the impinging rays that undergo two internal reflections. It is useful to note that the six contributions due to the

  18. Measure of Backscatter for small particles of atmosphere by lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, Mariam M.

    2018-05-01

    It developed a program for the atmosphere to study the backscattering for contents gas and molecules, aerosol, fog, clouds and rain droplets. By using Rayleigh, Mie and geometric scattering. The aim of research, using different types of lasers from various optical region, is to calculate differential cross scatter section and backscatter of atmosphere component in one layer from height 10-2000m. 180° is backscattering angle using ISA standard sea level condition P=1013.25 (kpa) at t0=15 ° C.and then calculated the density of molecules and water vapor molecules represented D in kg/m3. Results reflected index consist of the large value of the real part and imaginary m=1.463-0.028i.this research diff. scatter cross section of different component of atmosphere layer decreased vs. wavelengths. The purpose of lider research to find backscatter from UV to IR laser within the optical range in the atmosphere and measurement of excitation and analysis of backscatter signals. Recently, the atmosphere of Iraq has become full of dust and pollution, so by knowing the differential cross scatter section and backscatter of atmosphere. Relation between total Rayleigh scatter coefficient & type of particles include fog and clouds, aerosols and water droplets (-0.01, 0.025,- 0.005) m-1/sr-1.

  19. Interlinking backscatter, grain size and benthic community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGonigle, Chris; Collier, Jenny S.

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between acoustic backscatter, sediment grain size and benthic community structure is examined using three different quantitative methods, covering image- and angular response-based approaches. Multibeam time-series backscatter (300 kHz) data acquired in 2008 off the coast of East Anglia (UK) are compared with grain size properties, macrofaunal abundance and biomass from 130 Hamon and 16 Clamshell grab samples. Three predictive methods are used: 1) image-based (mean backscatter intensity); 2) angular response-based (predicted mean grain size), and 3) image-based (1st principal component and classification) from Quester Tangent Corporation Multiview software. Relationships between grain size and backscatter are explored using linear regression. Differences in grain size and benthic community structure between acoustically defined groups are examined using ANOVA and PERMANOVA+. Results for the Hamon grab stations indicate significant correlations between measured mean grain size and mean backscatter intensity, angular response predicted mean grain size, and 1st principal component of QTC analysis (all p < 0.001). Results for the Clamshell grab for two of the methods have stronger positive correlations; mean backscatter intensity (r2 = 0.619; p < 0.001) and angular response predicted mean grain size (r2 = 0.692; p < 0.001). ANOVA reveals significant differences in mean grain size (Hamon) within acoustic groups for all methods: mean backscatter (p < 0.001), angular response predicted grain size (p < 0.001), and QTC class (p = 0.009). Mean grain size (Clamshell) shows a significant difference between groups for mean backscatter (p = 0.001); other methods were not significant. PERMANOVA for the Hamon abundance shows benthic community structure was significantly different between acoustic groups for all methods (p ≤ 0.001). Overall these results show considerable promise in that more than 60% of the variance in the mean grain size of the Clamshell grab

  20. Compton profiles of some composite materials normalized by a new method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankarshan, B. M.; Umesh, T. K.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, we have shown that as a novel approach, in the case of samples which can be treated as pure incoherent scatterers, the effective atomic number Zeff itself could be conveniently used to normalize their un-normalized Compton profiles. In the present investigation, we have attempted to examine the efficacy of this approach. For this purpose, we have first determined the single differential Compton scattering cross sections (SDCS) of the elements C and Al as well as of some H, C, N and O based polymer samples such as bakelite, epoxy, nylon and teflon which are pure incoherent scatterers. The measurements were made at 120° in a goniometer assembly that employs a high resolution high purity germanium detector. The SDCS values were used to obtain the Zeff and the un-normalized Compton profiles. These Compton profiles were separately normalized with their Zeff values (for Compton scattering) as well as with the normalization constant obtained by integrating their Hartree-Fock Biggs et al Compton profiles based on the mixture rule. These two sets of values agreed well within the range of experimental errors, implying that Zeff can be conveniently used to normalize the experimental Compton profiles of pure incoherent scatterers.

  1. Evaluation of double photon coincidence Compton imaging method with GEANT4 simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, Yuri; Shimazoe, Kenji; Mizumachi, Yuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    Compton imaging has been used for various applications including astronomical observations, radioactive waste management, and biomedical imaging. The positions of radioisotopes are determined in the intersections of multiple cone traces through a large number of events, which reduces signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the images. We have developed an advanced Compton imaging method to localize radioisotopes with high SNR by using information of the interactions of Compton scattering caused by two gamma rays at the same time, as the double photon coincidence Compton imaging method. The targeted radioisotopes of this imaging method are specific nuclides that emit several gamma rays at the same time such as 60Co, 134Cs, and 111In, etc. Since their locations are determined in the intersections of two Compton cones, the most of cone traces would disappear in the three-dimensional space, which enhances the SNR and angular resolution. In this paper, the comparison of the double photon coincidence Compton imaging method and the single photon Compton imaging method was conducted by using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Seder, E; Biselli, A; Pisano, S; Niccolai, S; Smith, G D; Joo, K; Adhikari, K; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Avakian, H; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Bosted, P; Briscoe, W; Brock, J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Carlin, C; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Fradi, A; Garillon, B; Garçon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hirlinger Saylor, N; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Keith, C D; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meekins, D G; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L L; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Senderovich, I; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, I; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Tian, Y; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zonta, I

    2015-01-23

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6 GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep→e^{'}p^{'}γ events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q^{2}, x_{B}, t, and ϕ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of generalized parton distributions, at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight into the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. These results also bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even generalized parton distributions.

  3. Deeply virtual Compton scattering with a positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, François-Xavier; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Burkert, Volker D.

    2018-05-01

    The hard electroproduction of a photon off a hadron in the Bjorken regime, Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, unravels three-dimensional information on the partonic structure of the hadron. The imaginary part of the amplitude is more particularly sensitive to the spatial distribution of quarks as functions of the light cone momentum fraction. On the other hand, the real part of the amplitude is less constrained experimentally, and provides access to the D-term. Here we present preliminary results for the extraction of the D-term from unpolarized cross-sections and beam spin asymmetries measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at 6 GeV. We discuss some aspects of the associated physics interpretation, and give prospects for future measurements. The availability of a Positron beam at Jefferson Lab will provide access to the Beam Charge Asymmetry for this reaction, which will crucially enable us to keep under control the systematical and model uncertainties in this framework.

  4. Prototype of a single probe Compton camera for laparoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.; Sakuma, I.

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) is performed using a real-time surgery navigation system with three-dimensional (3D) position tracking of surgical tools. IGS is fast becoming an important technology for high-precision laparoscopic surgeries, in which the field of view is limited. In particular, recent developments in intraoperative imaging using radioactive biomarkers may enable advanced IGS for supporting malignant tumor removal surgery. In this light, we develop a novel intraoperative probe with a Compton camera and a position tracking system for performing real-time radiation-guided surgery. A prototype probe consisting of Ce :Gd3 Al2 Ga3 O12 (GAGG) crystals and silicon photomultipliers was fabricated, and its reconstruction algorithm was optimized to enable real-time position tracking. The results demonstrated the visualization capability of the radiation source with ARM = ∼ 22.1 ° and the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  5. Compton Scattering and Photo-absorption Sum Rules on Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshteyn, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new ``constituent quark model'' sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition we extract the J=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high energy proton data we find that the J=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman. We discuss phenomenological implications of this new result.

  6. Compton scattering from nuclei and photo-absorption sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2011-12-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new “constituent quark model” sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition, we extract the α=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high-energy proton data, we find that the α=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman.

  7. Longitudinal Target-Spin Asymmetries for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6 GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for e p →e'p'γ events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2 , xB, t , and ϕ , for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of generalized parton distributions, at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight into the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. These results also bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even generalized parton distributions.

  8. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; ...

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q 2, x B, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution ofmore » the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  9. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  10. Compton scattering of self-absorbed synchrotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wu, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Bing

    2013-11-01

    Synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scattering is an important emission mechanism in many astronomical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. We give a complete presentation of the analytical approximations for the Compton scattering of synchrotron emission with both weak and strong synchrotron self-absorption. All possible orders of the characteristic synchrotron spectral breaks (νa, νm and νc) are studied. In the weak self-absorption regime, i.e. νa < νc, the electron energy distribution is not modified by the self-absorption process. The shape of the SSC component broadly resembles that of synchrotron, but with the following features: The SSC flux increases linearly with frequency up to the SSC break frequency corresponding to the self-absorption frequency νa; and the presence of a logarithmic term in the high-frequency range of the SSC spectra makes it harder than the power-law approximation. In the strong absorption regime, i.e. νa > νc, heating of low-energy electrons due to synchrotron absorption leads to pile-up of electrons, and form a thermal component besides the broken power-law component. This leads to two-component (thermal + non-thermal) spectra for both the synchrotron and SSC spectral components. For νc < νa < νm, the spectrum is thermal (non-thermal) dominated if ν _a > √{ν _m ν _c} (ν _a < √{ν _m ν _c}). Similar to the weak-absorption regime, the SSC spectral component is broader than the simple broken power-law approximation. We derive the critical condition for strong absorption (electron pile-up), and discuss a case of GRB reverse shock emission in a wind medium, which invokes νa > max(νm, νc).

  11. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; ...

    2015-06-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ-ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by themore » ps CO 2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5L<0.7, which due to the quadratic dependence of the strength of nonlinear phenomena on aL permits sufficient effects not observed in past 2 nd harmonic study with a L ≈ 0.3 laser [M. Babzien et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 054802 (2006)]. The angular spectral characteristics are revealed using K-, L-edge, and high energy attenuation filters. The observation indicates existence of the electrons’ longitudinal motion through frequency redshifting understood as the mass shift effect. The 3 rd harmonic radiation has been observed containing on-axis x-ray component that is directly associated with the induced figure-8 motion. These are further supported by an initial evidence of off-axis 2 nd harmonic radiation produced in a circularly polarized laser wave field. Total x-ray photon number per pulse, scattered by 65 MeV electron beam of 0.3 nC, at the interaction point is measured to be approximately 10 9.« less

  12. Virtual Compton scattering off a spinless target in AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, Cyrille; Roiesnel, Claude; Wallon, Samuel

    2010-04-01

    We study the doubly virtual Compton scattering off a spinless target γ* P → γ* P' within the Anti-de Sitter(AdS)/QCD formalism. We find that the general structure allowed by the Lorentz invariance and gauge invariance of the Compton amplitude is not easily reproduced with the standard recipes of the AdS/QCD correspondence. In the soft-photon regime, where the semi-classical approximation is supposed to apply best, we show that the measurements of the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of a target like the charged pion in real Compton scattering, can already serve as stringent tests.

  13. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  14. Quantitative Ultrasound Backscatter for Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy—Histotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Winterroth, Frank; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Rothman, Edward D.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Histotripsy is a well-controlled ultrasonic tissue ablation technology that mechanically and progressively fractionates tissue structures using cavitation. The fractionated tissue volume can be monitored with ultrasound imaging because a significant ultrasound backscatter reduction occurs. This paper correlates the ultrasound backscatter reduction with the degree of tissue fractionation characterized by the percentage of remaining normal-appearing cell nuclei on histology. Different degrees of tissue fractionation were generated in vitro in freshly excised porcine kidneys by varying the number of therapeutic ultrasound pulses from 100 to 2000 pulses per treatment location. All ultrasound pulses were 15 cycles at 1 MHz delivered at 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency and 19 MPa peak negative pressure. The results showed that the normalized backscatter intensity decreased exponentially with increasing number of pulses. Correspondingly, the percentage of normal appearing nuclei in the treated area decreased exponentially as well. A linear correlation existed between the normalized backscatter intensity and the percentage of normal appearing cell nuclei in the treated region. This suggests that the normalized backscatter intensity may be a potential quantitative real-time feedback parameter for histotripsy-induced tissue fractionation. This quantitative feedback may allow the prediction of local clinical outcomes, i.e., when a tissue volume has been sufficiently treated. PMID:19750596

  15. Quantitative ultrasound backscatter for pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy- histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-yin; Xu, Zhen; Winterroth, Frank; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Rothman, Edward D; Roberts, William W; Cain, Charles A

    2009-05-01

    Histotripsy is a well-controlled ultrasonic tissue ablation technology that mechanically and progressively fractionates tissue structures using cavitation. The fractionated tissue volume can be monitored with ultrasound imaging because a significant ultrasound backscatter reduction occurs.This paper correlates the ultrasound backscatter reduction with the degree of tissue fractionation characterized by the percentage of remaining normal-appearing cell nuclei on histology.Different degrees of tissue fractionation were generated in vitro in freshly excised porcine kidneys by varying the number of therapeutic ultrasound pulses from 100 to 2000 pulses per treatment location. All ultrasound pulses were 15 cycles at 1 MHz delivered at 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency and 19 MPa peak negative pressure. The results showed that the normalized backscatter intensity decreased exponentially with increasing number of pulses. Correspondingly, the percentage of normal appearing nuclei in the treated area decreased exponentially as well. A linear correlation existed between the normalized backscatter intensity and the percentage of normal appearing cell nuclei in the treated region. This suggests that the normalized backscatter intensity may be a potential quantitative real-time feedback parameter for histotripsy-induced tissue fractionation. This quantitative feedback may allow the prediction of local clinical outcomes, i.e., when a tissue volume has been sufficiently treated.

  16. Observation of coherent backscattering of light in ultracold ^85Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatunga, P.; Sukenik, C. I.; Havey, M. D.; Kupriyanov, D. V.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2002-05-01

    We report investigation of multiple coherent light scattering from ^85Rb atoms confined in a magneto-optic trap. In experimental studies, measurements are made of coherent backscattering of a low-intensity probe beam tuned near the F = 3 - F' = 4 transition in ^85Rb atoms. Polarization of backscattered light is determined by a backscattering polarimeter; the spatial distribution of light intensity is measured by a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera set in the focal plane of the analyzing optics. The instrument has angular resolution of about 100 micro-radians, and a polarization analyzing power of roughly 1000. In this paper we describe the instrument details, including calibration procedures, and our measurements of atomic coherent backscattering. In a theoretical study of intensity enhancement of near-resonant backscattered light from cold ^85,87Rb atoms, we consider scattering orders up to 8 and a Gaussian atom distribution in the MOT. Enhancement factors are calculated for all D1 and D2 hyperfine components and for both isotopes.

  17. Probabilities and statistics for backscatter estimates obtained by a scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Willard J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for the recovery of winds near the surface of the ocean from measurements of the normalized radar backscattering cross section must recognize and make use of the statistics (i.e., the sampling variability) of the backscatter measurements. Radar backscatter values from a scatterometer are random variables with expected values given by a model. A model relates backscatter to properties of the waves on the ocean, which are in turn generated by the winds in the atmospheric marine boundary layer. The effective wind speed and direction at a known height for a neutrally stratified atmosphere are the values to be recovered from the model. The probability density function for the backscatter values is a normal probability distribution with the notable feature that the variance is a known function of the expected value. The sources of signal variability, the effects of this variability on the wind speed estimation, and criteria for the acceptance or rejection of models are discussed. A modified maximum likelihood method for estimating wind vectors is described. Ways to make corrections for the kinds of errors found for the Seasat SASS model function are described, and applications to a new scatterometer are given.

  18. Experimental results on the enhanced backscatter phenomenon and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Nelson, William; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Enhanced backscatter effects have long been predicted theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. The reciprocity of a turbulent channel generates a group of paired rays with identical trajectory and phase information that leads to a region in phase space with double intensity and scintillation index. Though simulation work based on phase screen models has demonstrated the existence of the phenomenon, few experimental results have been published describing its characteristics, and possible applications of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon are still unclear. With the development of commercially available high powered lasers and advanced cameras with high frame rates, we have successfully captured the enhanced backscatter effects from different reflection surfaces. In addition to static observations, we have also tilted and pre-distorted the transmitted beam at various frequencies to track the dynamic properties of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon to verify its possible application in guidance and beam and image correction through atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, experimental results will be described, and discussions on the principle and applications of the phenomenon will be included. Enhanced backscatter effects are best observed in certain levels of turbulence (Cn 2≍10-13 m-2/3), and show significant potential for providing self-guidance in beam correction that doesn't introduce additional costs (unlike providing a beacon laser). Possible applications of this phenomenon include tracking fast moving object with lasers, long distance (>1km) alignment, and focusing a high-power corrected laser beam over long distances.

  19. Adaptive focus for deep tissue using diffuse backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Jeremy; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2014-02-01

    A system integrating high density diffuse optical imaging with adaptive optics using MEMS for deep tissue interaction is presented. In this system, a laser source is scanned over a high density fiber bundle using Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) and channeled to a tissue phantom. Backscatter is then collected from the tissue phantom by a high density fiber array of different fiber type and channeled to CMOS sensor for image acquisition. Intensity focus is directly verified using a second CMOS sensor which measures intensity transmitted though the tissue phantom. A set of training patterns are displayed on the DMD and backscatter is numerically fit to the transmission intensity. After the training patterns are displayed, adaptive focus is performed using only the backscatter and fitting functions. Additionally, tissue reconstruction and prediction of interference focusing by photoacoustic and optical tomographic methods is discussed. Finally, potential NIR applications such as in-vivo adaptive neural photostimulation and cancer targeting are discussed.

  20. Backscatter and attenuation properties of mammalian brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijekularatne, Pushpani Vihara

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common category of brain injuries, which contributes to a substantial number of deaths and permanent disability all over the world. Ultrasound technology plays a major role in tissue characterization due to its low cost and portability that could be used to bridge a wide gap in the TBI diagnostic process. This research addresses the ultrasonic properties of mammalian brain tissues focusing on backscatter and attenuation. Orientation dependence and spatial averaging of data were analyzed using the same method resulting from insertion of tissue sample between a transducer and a reference reflector. Apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF) at 1 to 10 MHz, attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient (BSC) at 1 to 5 MHz frequency ranges were measured on ovine brain tissue samples. The resulting ABTF was a monotonically decreasing function of frequency and the attenuation coefficient and BSC generally were increasing functions of frequency, results consistent with other soft tissues such as liver, blood and heart.

  1. Circularly polarized measurements of radar backscatter from terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. A.; Brunfeldt, D. R.; Ulaby, F. T.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1980-02-01

    This report documents the design changes to the University of Kansas MAS 8-18/35 scatterometer system required to incorporate a circular polarization capability and a subsequent backscatter measurement program. The modifications enable the MAS 8-18/35 system to acquire both linear (HH, HV, VV) and circular (RR, RL, LL) radar backscatter data over its entire operating range of 8-18 GHz and 35 GHz. The measurement program described herein consisted of measurements of the backscatter coefficient, as a function of the angle of incidence (0-80) at selected frequencies in the 8-18 GHz range using circular polarization. Targets studied included coniferous and deciduous trees, wet and dry asphalt and concrete and bare and plowed ground at various moisture conditions. Coniferous and deciduous tree measurements were taken in both August and November so that seasonal changes could be observed.

  2. Calculations of radar backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A model for simulating the measured backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soil surfaces includes both coherent and incoherent components of the backscattered radar pulses from a rough sil surface. The effect of vegetation canopy scattering is also incorporated into the model by making the radar pulse subject to two-way attenuation and volume scattering when it passes through the vegetation layer. Model results agree well with the measured angular distributions of the radar backscattering coefficient for HH polarization at the 1.6 GHz and 4.75 GHz frequencies over grass-covered fields. It was found that the coherent scattering component is very important at angles near nadir, while the vegetation volume scattering is dominant at incident angles 30 degrees.

  3. On the line-shape analysis of Compton profiles and its application to neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, G.; Krzystyniak, M.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical properties of Compton profiles are used in order to simplify the analysis of neutron Compton scattering experiments. In particular, the possibility to fit the difference of Compton profiles is discussed as a way to greatly decrease the level of complexity of the data treatment, making the analysis easier, faster and more robust. In the context of the novel method proposed, two mathematical models describing the shapes of differenced Compton profiles are discussed: the simple Gaussian approximation for harmonic and isotropic local potential, and an analytical Gauss-Hermite expansion for an anharmonic or anisotropic potential. The method is applied to data collected by VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS neutron and muon pulsed source (UK) on Copper and Aluminium samples at ambient and low temperatures.

  4. Bruce Thompson: Adventures and advances in ultrasonic backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, Frank J.

    2012-05-01

    Over the course of his professional career Dr. R. Bruce Thompson published several hundred articles on non-destructive evaluation, the majority dealing with topics in ultrasonics. One longtime research interest of Dr. Thompson, with applications both to microstructure characterization and defect detection, was backscattered grain noise in metals. Over a 20 year period he led a revolving team of staff members and graduate students investigating various aspects of ultrasonic backscatter. As a member of that team I had the privilege of working along side Dr. Thompson for many years, serving as a sort of Dr. Watson to Bruce's Sherlock Holmes. This article discusses Dr. Thompson's general approaches to modeling backscatter, the research topics he chose to explore to systematically elucidate a better understanding of the phenomena, and the many contributions to the field achieved under his leadership. The backscatter work began in earnest around 1990, motivated by a need to improve inspections of aircraft engine components. At that time Dr. Thompson launched two research efforts. The first led to the heuristic Independent Scatterer Model which could be used to estimate the average grain noise level that would be seen in any given ultrasonic inspection. There the contribution from the microstructure was contained in a measureable parameter known as the Figure-of-Merit or FOM. The second research effort, spearheaded by Dr. Jim Rose, led to a formal relationship between FOM and details of the metal microstructure. The combination of the Independent Scattering Model and Rose's formalism provided a powerful tool for investigating backscatter in metals. In this article model developments are briefly reviewed and several illustrative applications are discussed. These include: the determination of grain size and shape from ultrasonic backscatter; grain noise variability in engine-titanium billets and forgings; and the design of ultrasonic inspection systems to improve defect

  5. Is Compton Cooling Sufficient to Explain Evolution of Observed Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Outburst Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the α parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

  6. Least-Squares Deconvolution of Compton Telescope Data with the Positivity Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, William A.; Dixon, David D.; Tumer, O. Tumay; Zych, Allen D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a Direct Linear Algebraic Deconvolution (DLAD) approach to imaging of data from Compton gamma-ray telescopes. Imposition of the additional physical constraint, that all components of the model be non-negative, has been found to have a powerful effect in stabilizing the results, giving spatial resolution at or near the instrumental limit. A companion paper (Dixon et al. 1993) presents preliminary images of the Crab Nebula region using data from COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory.

  7. Compact FEL-driven inverse compton scattering gamma-ray source

    DOE PAGES

    Placidi, M.; Di Mitri, Simone; Pellegrini, C.; ...

    2017-02-28

    Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scatteringmore » (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. As a result, the same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10–20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10–15 eV range, in a ~4 × 22 m 2 footprint system.« less

  8. Compact FEL-driven inverse compton scattering gamma-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Di Mitri, Simone; Pellegrini, C.

    Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scatteringmore » (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. As a result, the same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10–20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10–15 eV range, in a ~4 × 22 m 2 footprint system.« less

  9. Enhanced backscattering of optical waves due to densely distributed scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yushieh; Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1988-01-01

    Using multiple scattering theory, the T matrix of a pair of scatterers which takes all back-and-forth scattering between the pair members into account and considers multiple scattering effects in the intensity calculation is used to calculate the magnitude and the width of the backscattered intensity peak. Generally, at low concentrations, both the magnitude of the scattered intensity and multiple scattering contributions are not sufficiently strong to reach the enhanced-backscattering threshold. The results obtained are consistent with those yielded by optical experiments.

  10. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  11. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross-section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  12. Light backscattering efficiency and related properties of some phytoplankters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Bricaud, Annick; Morel, André

    1992-11-01

    By using a set-up that combines an integrating sphere with a spectroradiometer LI-1800 UW, the backscattering properties of nine different phytoplankters grown in culture have been determined experimentally for the wavelengths domain ν = 400 up to 850 nm. Simultaneously, the absorption and attenuation properties, as well as the size distribution function, have been measured. This set of measurements allowed the spectral values of refractive index, and subsequently the volume scattering functions (VSF) of the cells, to be derived, by operating a scattering model previously developed for spherical and homogeneous cells. The backscattering properties, measured within a restricted angular domain (approximately between 132 and 174°), have been compared to theoretical predictions. Although there appear some discrepancies between experimental and predicted values (probably due to experimental errors as well as deviations of actual cells from computational hypotheses), the overall agreement is good; in particular the observed interspecific variations of backscattering values, as well as the backscattering spectral variation typical of each species, are well accounted for by theory. Using the computed VSF, the measured backscattering properties can be converted (assuming spherical and homogeneous cells) into efficiency factors for backscattering ( overlineQbb) . Thhe spectral behavior of overlineQbb appears to be radically different from that for total scattering overlineQb. For small cells, overlineQ (λ) is practically constant over the spectrum, whereas overlineQb(λ) varies approximately according to a power law (λ -2). As the cell size increases, overlineQbb conversely, becomes increasingly featured, whilst overlineQb becomes spectrally flat. The chlorophyll-specific backscattering coefficients ( b b∗ appear highly variable and span nearly two orders of magnitude. The chlorophyll-specific absorption and scattering coefficients, a ∗ and b ∗, are mainly ruled by

  13. X-Ray Backscatter Imaging for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Daniel; Edwards, Talion; Toh, Chin

    2011-06-01

    Scatter x-ray imaging (SXI) is a real time, digital, x-ray backscatter imaging technique that allows radiographs to be taken from one side of an object. This x-ray backscatter imaging technique offers many advantages over conventional transmission radiography that include single-sided access and extremely low radiation fields compared to conventional open source industrial radiography. Examples of some applications include the detection of corrosion, foreign object debris, water intrusion, cracking, impact damage and leak detection in a variety of material such as aluminum, composites, honeycomb structures, and titanium.

  14. Target reflectance measurements for calibration of lidar atmospheric backscatter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.; Haner, D. A.; Oppenheim, U. P.; Flamant, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength and angular dependence of reflectances and depolarization in the 9-11 micron region are reported for four standard targets: flowers of sulfur, flame-sprayed aluminum, 20-grit sandblasted aluminum, and 400-grit silicon carbon sandpaper. Measurements are presented and compared using a CW CO2 grating-tunable laser in a laboratory backscatter apparatus, an integrating sphere, and a coherent pulsed TEA-CO2 lidar system operating in the 9-11 micron region. Reflectance theory related to the use of hard targets to calibrate lidar atmospheric backscatter data is discussed.

  15. Backscattering of decametric waves on magnetically oriented ionosphere inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon', V. P.

    2017-05-01

    The method of study of magnetically oriented ionosphere inhomogeneities based on the analysis of radar decametric emission backscattering on inhomogeneities is proposed. It is shown that certain conditions, including the orientation of the propagation route relative to the Earth's magnetic field lines and the polarization and frequency of the emitted wave, make possible resonant backscattering of radiolocation system emission on magnetically oriented ionosphere inhomogeneities. The paper presents the results of experimental observation of scattering in Kamchatka Peninsula. They demonstrated the opportunity to evaluate the extension of the scattering region, the vertical and horizontal components of the velocities of magnetically oriented inhomogeneities, and the frequency dependence of these parameters.

  16. Thomson-backscattered x rays from laser-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Schwoerer, H; Liesfeld, B; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Amthor, K-U; Sauerbrey, R

    2006-01-13

    We present the first observation of Thomson-backscattered light from laser-accelerated electrons. In a compact, all-optical setup, the "photon collider," a high-intensity laser pulse is focused into a pulsed He gas jet and accelerates electrons to relativistic energies. A counterpropagating laser probe pulse is scattered from these high-energy electrons, and the backscattered x-ray photons are spectrally analyzed. This experiment demonstrates a novel source of directed ultrashort x-ray pulses and additionally allows for time-resolved spectroscopy of the laser acceleration of electrons.

  17. Electron Trajectory Reconstruction for Advanced Compton Imaging of Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimley, Brian Christopher

    Gamma-ray imaging is useful for detecting, characterizing, and localizing sources in a variety of fields, including nuclear physics, security, nuclear accident response, nuclear medicine, and astronomy. Compton imaging in particular provides sensitivity to weak sources and good angular resolution in a large field of view. However, the photon origin in a single event sequence is normally only limited to the surface of a cone. If the initial direction of the Compton-scattered electron can be measured, the cone can be reduced to a cone segment with width depending on the uncertainty in the direction measurement, providing a corresponding increase in imaging sensitivity. Measurement of the electron's initial direction in an efficient detection material requires very fine position resolution due to the electron's short range and tortuous path. A thick (650 mum), fully-depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) developed for infrared astronomy has 10.5-mum position resolution in two dimensions, enabling the initial trajectory measurement of electrons of energy as low as 100 keV. This is the first time the initial trajectories of electrons of such low energies have been measured in a solid material. In this work, the CCD's efficacy as a gamma-ray detector is demonstrated experimentally, using a reconstruction algorithm to measure the initial electron direction from the CCD track image. In addition, models of fast electron interaction physics, charge transport and readout were used to generate modeled tracks with known initial direction. These modeled tracks allowed the development and refinement of the reconstruction algorithm. The angular sensitivity of the reconstruction algorithm is evaluated extensively with models for tracks below 480 keV, showing a FWHM as low as 20° in the pixel plane, and 30° RMS sensitivity to the magnitude of the out-of-plane angle. The measurement of the trajectories of electrons with energies as low as 100 keV have the potential to make electron

  18. Measurement and simulation of a Compton suppression system for safeguards application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Seo, Hee; Won, Byung-Hee; Lee, Chaehun; Shin, Hee-Sung; Na, Sang-Ho; Song, Dae-Yong; Kim, Ho-Dong; Park, Geun-Il; Park, Se-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Plutonium (Pu) contents in spent nuclear fuels, recovered uranium (U) or uranium/transuranium (U/TRU) products must be measured in order to secure the safeguardability of a pyroprocessing facility. Self-induced X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma-ray spectroscopy are useful techniques for determining Pu-to-U ratios and Pu isotope ratios of spent fuel. Photon measurements of spent nuclear fuel by using high-resolution spectrometers such as high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors show a large continuum background in the low-energy region, which is due in large part to Compton scattering of energetic gamma rays. This paper proposes a Compton suppression system for reducing of the Compton continuum background. In the present study, the system was configured by using an HPGe main detector and a BGO (bismuth germanate: Bi4Ge3O12) guard detector. The system performances for gamma-ray measurement and XRF were evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of the radiation source. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) simulations were performed using the same geometry as for the experiments, and considered, for exact results, the production of secondary electrons and photons. As a performance test of the Compton suppression system, the peak-to-Compton ratio, which is a figure of merit to evaluate the gamma-ray detection, was enhanced by a factor of three or more when the Compton suppression system was used.

  19. Detection and Imaging of the Crab Nebula with the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandstra, M. S.; Bellm, E. C.; Boggs, S. E.; Perez-Becker, D.; Zoglauer, A.; Chang, H.-K.; Chiu, J.-L.; Liang, J.-S.; Chang, Y.-H.; Liu, Z.-K.; Hung, W.-C.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Chiang, S. J.; Run, R.-S.; Lin, C.-H.; Amman, M.; Luke, P. N.; Jean, P.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wunderer, C. B.

    2011-09-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne Compton telescope designed for the study of astrophysical sources in the soft gamma-ray regime (200 keV-20 MeV). NCT's 10 high-purity germanium crossed-strip detectors measure the deposited energies and three-dimensional positions of gamma-ray interactions in the sensitive volume, and this information is used to restrict the initial photon to a circle on the sky using the Compton scatter technique. Thus NCT is able to perform spectroscopy, imaging, and polarization analysis on soft gamma-ray sources. NCT is one of the next generation of Compton telescopes—the so-called compact Compton telescopes (CCTs)—which can achieve effective areas comparable to the Imaging Compton Telescope's with an instrument that is a fraction of the size. The Crab Nebula was the primary target for the second flight of the NCT instrument, which occurred on 2009 May 17 and 18 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. Analysis of 29.3 ks of data from the flight reveals an image of the Crab at a significance of 4σ. This is the first reported detection of an astrophysical source by a CCT.

  20. Collective Evidence for Inverse Compton Emission from External Photons in High-Power Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L(sub kin)) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L(sub kin) > 10(exp 45.5) erg/s) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L(sub kin) < 10(exp 43.5) erg /s), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

  1. Resonant Compton Scattering in Highly-Magnetized Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar

    Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars are subset of slow-rotating neutron stars, known as magnetars, that have extremely high inferred surface magnetic fields, of the order 100-1000 TeraGauss. Hard, non-thermal and pulsed persistent X-ray emission extending between 10 keV and 230 keV has been seen in a number of magnetars by RXTE, INTEGRAL, and Suzaku. In this thesis, the author considers inner magnetospheric models of such persistent hard X-ray emission where resonant Compton upscattering of soft thermal photons is anticipated to be the most efficient radiative process. This high efficiency is due to the relative proximity of the surface thermal photons, and also because the scattering becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency. At the cyclotron resonance, the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson one by over two orders of magnitude, thereby enhancing the efficiency of continuum production and cooling of relativistic electrons. In this thesis, a new Sokolov and Ternov formulation of the QED Compton scattering cross section for strong magnetic fields is employed in electron cooling and emission spectra calculations. This formalism is formally correct for treating spin-dependent effects and decay rates that are important at the cyclotron resonance. The author presents electron cooling rates at arbitrary interaction points in a magnetosphere using the QED cross sections. The QED effects reduce the rates below high-field extrapolations of older magnetic Thomson results. The author also computes angle-dependent upscattering model spectra, formed using collisional integrals, for uncooled monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of pulsar magnetospheres. These spectra are integrated over closed field lines and obtained for different observing perspectives. The spectral cut-off energies are critically dependent on the observer viewing angles and electron Lorentz factor. It is found that electrons with energies less than

  2. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowski, M. S.; Claustre, H.; Freeman, S. A.; Stramski, D.; Huot, Y.

    2007-11-01

    During the BIOSOPE field campaign October-December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over 8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°), was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10-5, 5×10-6, and 2×10-6 m-1 sr-1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the volume scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results: - distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature; - Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels; - accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters); the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994) with a [1+0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974) appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and - closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007) within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements. This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy: -The clearest waters sampled were found at depths between 300 and 350 m, from 23.5° S, 118° W to 26° S, 114° W, where total backscattering at 650 nm was not distinguishable from pure seawater; -Distributions of

  3. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowski, M. S.; Claustre, H.; Freeman, S. A.; Stramski, D.; Huot, Y.

    2007-07-01

    During the BIOSOPE field campaign October-December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over ~8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°), was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10-5, 5×10-6, and 2×10-6 m-1 sr-1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results: - bbp distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature; - Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels; - accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters); the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994) with a [1 + 0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974) appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and - closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007) within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements. This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy: - The clearest waters sampled were found at depths between 300 and 350 m, from 23.5° S, 118° W to 26° S, 114° W, where total backscattering at 650 nm was not distinguishable from pure seawater; - Distributions of

  4. Studies on solar hard X-Rays and gamma-rays: Compton backscatter, anisotropy, polarization and evidence for two phases of acceleration. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of solar X-rays and gamma-rays from large flares show that the hard X-ray spectrum extends into the gamma ray region, where a flattening in the spectrum of the continuum emission is observed above about 1 MeV. This emission is believed to be due to bremsstrahlung. In addition to electron-proton collisions, at energies greater than approximately 500 keV, bremsstrahlung due to electron-electron collisions becomes significant. Bremsstrahlung production was calculated for a variety of electron spectra extending from the nonrelativistic region to relativistic energies and electron-electron bremsstrahlung is taken into account. By comparing these calculations with data, it is shown that the flattening in the spectrum of the continuum emission can be best explained by an electron spectrum consisting of two distinctive components. This evidence, together with information on the X-ray and gamma ray time profiles, implied the existence of two phases of acceleration. The first phase accelerates electrons mainly up to about several hundred keV; the second phase accelerates a small fraction of the electrons accelerated in the first phase to relativistic energies and accelerates protons to tens and hundreds of MeV.

  5. Polarized Compton Scattering Experiments at the Mainz Microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between an electromagnetic wave and a proton are described at the basic level by the mass, charge, and anomalous magnetic moment of the proton. Such a description, however, assumes a point-like particle, something the proton is certainly not. The internal structure of the proton leads to higher order terms, such as the scalar and vector polarizabilities, in the interaction. To study these polarizabilities, a multi-experiment program has been undertaken at the Mainz Microtron to measure observables in Compton scattering that exhibit dependence on these parameters. This program has made use of the A2 tagged photon beam, with either a linear or circular polarization, proton targets of either unpolarized LH2 or frozen-spin butanol with transverse or longitudinal polarization, as well as the nearly 4 π detection capability of the Crystal Ball and TAPS detectors. The first of these measurements, the double-polarization asymmetry Σ2 x, also the first of its kind, has already been published. Measurements of the beam asymmetry Σ3 and another double-polarization asymmetry Σ2 z have also been performed and are in various stages of analysis and publication. This talk will discuss the status of these measurements, as well as various fitting studies that are being performed with the data in hand, and plans for future measurements. on behalf of the A2 collaboration at MAMI.

  6. Precision Compton polarimetry for the QWeak experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Wouter Deconinck

    2011-10-01

    The Q Weak experiment, scheduled to run in 2010-2012 in Hall C at Jefferson Lab, will measure the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at 1.1 GeV to determine the weak charge of the proton, Q{sub Weak}{sup p} = 1 - 4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. The dominant experimental systematic uncertainty will be the knowledge of the electron beam polarization. With a new Compton polarimeter we aim to measure the beam polarization with a statistical precision of 1% in one hour and a systematic uncertainty of 1%. A low-gain Fabry-Perot cavity laser system provides the circularly polarized photons. The scatteredmore » electrons are detected in radiation-hard diamond strip detectors, and form the basis for a coincidence trigger using distributed logic boards. The photon detector uses a fast, undoped CsI crystal with simultaneous sampling and integrating read-out. Coincident events are used to cross-calibrate the photon and electron detectors.« less

  7. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    DOE PAGES

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; ...

    2016-12-22

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this article reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO 2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized atmore » 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. Lastly, with the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.« less

  8. Virtual Compton Scattering and the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde-Wright, Charles E.

    2002-10-01

    The Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) process: e p arrow e p γ is sensitive to the Electromagnetic Polarizabilities of the proton. As a function of the wavelength of the virtual photon, it is possible to map out the spatial variation of the polarization response. The Low Energy Theorem (P. Guichon et al.,Nucl.Phys.A591:606-638,1995) and the Dispersion Relation formalism (B. Pasquini et al., Eur.Phys.J.A11:185-208,2001), permit the extraction of the electric and magnetic polarizabilities from VCS data up to the two pion production threshold. At Jefferson Lab, we have measured the electric and magnetic polarization response at Q^2 = 1 and 1.7 GeV^2. These complement earlier measurements at Q^2 = 0.33 (J. Roche, et al., Phys.Rev.Lett.85:708,2000) and 0.0 GeV^2 (V. Olmos de Leon, et al., Eur.Phys.J.A10:207-215,2001, B.E. MacGibbon, et al., Phys.Rev.C52:2097-2109,1995). The electric polarization and magnetic responses are very different as a function of distance scale. The electric polarizability falls with Q^2 in accord with the electric form factor of the proton: G_E(Q^2). However, for the magnetic polarizability the data illustrate the strong cancellation of para- and dia-magnetism at all distance scales within the proton.

  9. Compton Thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Comastri, A.

    2016-06-01

    I will present results we published in two recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A≈A 578A 120) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^{24} cm^{-2}) AGN, in the XMM-COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems. We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^{25} cm^{-2}), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field, and to the unrivaled XMM sensitivity. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line. The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.

  10. Compton thick AGN in the NuSTAR era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Stefano; Ajello, Marco; Marcotulli, Lea; Comastri, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    The recent launch of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), the first telescope with focusing optics at >10 keV, represented a major breakthrough in the study of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN). In this talk, I present the results of the 0.3-100 keV spectral analysis of the 30 Compton thick (CT-; i.e., those sources having column density NH>1E24 cm-2) AGN detected within z~0.1 in the BAT 100-month survey with available NuSTAR data. Particularly, I will focus on how adding NuSTAR data to the 0.3-10 keV information helps to characterize the CT-AGN population, significantly improving the measurements of important X-ray spectral parameters such as the photon index, the intrinsic absorption, the intensity of the Iron K alpha line at 6.4 keV and the obscuring torus opening angle. Finally, I will discuss the role of these objects in the context of obscured AGN accretion physics, and their contribution to the cosmic X-ray background.

  11. Optimization of Compton Source Performance through Electron Beam Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2016-09-26

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6d electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized then if the electron phase space is transformed in a waymore » so that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6d photon phase space distribution) and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.« less

  12. Comptonization of thermal photons by relativistic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical calculation of gamma-ray emission produced by Compton scattering of relativistic electron beams on background thermal radiation, which includes spatial dependence of electron energy losses and cyclotron resonance scattering in a strong magnetic field. In the first version, the scattering is described by the fully relativistic Klein-Nishina cross section, but the magnetic field is neglected. In the second version, the scattering is described by the magnetic resonant cross section in the Thomson limit. It is found that when the magnetic field is not included, electron energy losses are important only at higher neutron star surface temperatures (T about 3,000,000 K). In the presence of a strong magnetic field, (10 to the 12th G), resonant scattering greatly increases electron energy losses, making scattering very efficient even at lower surface temperatures. Resulting photon and electron spectra for both cases ae discussed in relation to models for pulsar X-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  13. Interaction-induced backscattering in short quantum wires

    DOE PAGES

    Rieder, M. -T.; Micklitz, T.; Levchenko, A.; ...

    2014-10-06

    We study interaction-induced backscattering in clean quantum wires with adiabatic contacts exposed to a voltage bias. Particle backscattering relaxes such systems to a fully equilibrated steady state only on length scales exponentially large in the ratio of bandwidth of excitations and temperature. Here in this paper we focus on shorter wires in which full equilibration is not accomplished. Signatures of relaxation then are due to backscattering of hole excitations close to the band bottom which perform a diffusive motion in momentum space while scattering from excitations at the Fermi level. This is reminiscent to the first passage problem of amore » Brownian particle and, regardless of the interaction strength, can be described by an inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck equation. From general solutions of the latter we calculate the hole backscattering rate for different wire lengths and discuss the resulting length dependence of interaction-induced correction to the conductance of a clean single channel quantum wire.« less

  14. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  15. Alpha particle backscattering measurements used for chemical analysis of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Alpha particle backscattering performs a chemical analysis of surfaces. The apparatus uses a curium source and a semiconductor detector to determine the energy spectrum of the particles. This in turn determines the chemical composition of the surface after calibration to known samples.

  16. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Elwha River Delta, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finlayson, David P.; Miller, Ian M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    The surveys were conducted using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with an interferometric sidescan sonar for swath mapping and real-time kinematic navigation equipment for accurate shallow water operations. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  17. Simulation of multistatic and backscattering cross sections for airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Albert W.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine susceptibilities of airborne radar to electronic countermeasures and electronic counter-countermeasures simulations of multistatic and backscattering cross sections were developed as digital modules in the form of algorithms. Cross section algorithms are described for prolate (cigar shape) and oblate (disk shape) spheroids. Backscattering cross section algorithms are also described for different categories of terrain. Backscattering cross section computer programs were written for terrain categorized as vegetation, sea ice, glacial ice, geological (rocks, sand, hills, etc.), oceans, man-made structures, and water bodies. PROGRAM SIGTERRA is a file for backscattering cross section modules of terrain (TERRA) such as vegetation (AGCROP), oceans (OCEAN), Arctic sea ice (SEAICE), glacial snow (GLASNO), geological structures (GEOL), man-made structures (MAMMAD), or water bodies (WATER). AGCROP describes agricultural crops, trees or forests, prairies or grassland, and shrubs or bush cover. OCEAN has the SLAR or SAR looking downwind, upwind, and crosswind at the ocean surface. SEAICE looks at winter ice and old or polar ice. GLASNO is divided into a glacial ice and snow or snowfields. MANMAD includes buildings, houses, roads, railroad tracks, airfields and hangars, telephone and power lines, barges, trucks, trains, and automobiles. WATER has lakes, rivers, canals, and swamps. PROGRAM SIGAIR is a similar file for airborne targets such as prolate and oblate spheroids.

  18. The Growth and Decay of Equatorial Backscatter Plumes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    spatially connected to bottomside backscatter, a feature noted in Jica- marca radar observations that led Woodman and La Hoz (1976) to speculate that...described in Section Ill-B, this pattern of plume growth resembles the "C-shaped" and "fishtail" patterns found in Jica- marca radar RTI displays of 50-MHz

  19. Central Radar System, Over-the-Horizon Backscatter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-09

    1,2-Dibromo-3- chloropropane (DBCP) 0.3 TABLE 41-6 (Continued). MINNESOTA RECOMMENDED ALLOWABLE LIMITS (RAL) FOR DRINKING WATER WELLS Compound RAL (ug/ 1 ...TABLE OF CONTENTS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS OVERVIEW ............ TECHNICAL STUDY 1 FACILITIES...TECHNICAL STUDY 10 0 TECHNICAL STUDY 1 CENTRAL RADAR SYSTEM OVER-THE-HORIZON BACKSCATTER RADAR PROGRAM 0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

  20. Compton scattering study of electron momentum distribution in lithium fluoride using 662 keV gamma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Shivaramu; Ramamurthy, N.; Ford, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Here we report the first ever 137Cs Compton spectroscopy study of lithium fluoride. The spherical average Compton profiles of lithium fluoride are deduced from Compton scattering measurements on poly crystalline sample at gamma ray energy of 662 keV. To compare the experimental data, we have computed the spherical average Compton profiles using self-consistent Hartree-Fock wave functions employed on linear combination of atomic orbital (HF-LCAO) approximation. The directional Compton profiles and their anisotropic effects are also calculated using the same HF-LCAO approximation. The experimental spherical average profiles are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding HF-LCAO calculations and in qualitative agreement with Hartree-Fock free atom values. The present experimental isotropic and calculated directional profiles are also compared with the available experimental isotropic and directional Compton profiles using 59.54 and 159 keV γ-rays.

  1. Ku-band ocean radar backscatter observations during SWADE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Lou, S. H.; Neumann, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present results obtained by an airborne Ku-band scatterometer during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE). The specific objective of this study is to improve our understanding of the relationship between ocean radar backscatter and near surface winds. The airborne scatterometer, NUSCAT, was flown on the NASA Ames C-130 over an instrumented oceanic area near 37 deg N and 74 deg W. A total of 10 flights from 27 Feb. to 9 Mar. 1991 were conducted. Radar backscatter at incidence angles of 0 to 60 deg were obtained. For each incidence angle, the NUSCAT antenna was azimuthally scanned in multiple complete circles to measure the azimuthal backscatter modulations. Both horizontal and vertical polarization backscatter measurements were made. In some of the flights, the cross-polarization backscatter was measured as well. Internal calibrations were carried out throughout each of the flights. Preliminary results indicate that the radar was stable to +/-0.3 dB for each flight. In this paper, we present studies of the backscatter measurements over several crossings of the Gulf Stream. In these crossings, large air-sea temperature differences were encountered and substantial changes in the radar cross section were observed. We summarize the observations and compare them to the changes of several wind variables across the Gulf Stream boundary. In one of the flights, the apparent wind near the cold side of the Gulf Stream was very low (less than 3 m/s). The behavior of the radar cross sections at such low wind speeds and a comparison with models are presented. A case study of the effects of swell on the absolute cross section and the azimuthal modulation pattern is presented. Significant wave heights larger than m were observed during SWADE. The experimentally observed effects of the swell on the radar backscatter are discussed. The effects are used to assess the uncertainties in wind retrieval due to underlying waves. A summary of azimuthal modulation from our ten

  2. Compton camera study for high efficiency SPECT and benchmark with Anger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Létang, J. M.; Ley, J.-L.; Testa, É.

    2017-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is at present one of the major techniques for non-invasive diagnostics in nuclear medicine. The clinical routine is mostly based on collimated cameras, originally proposed by Hal Anger. Due to the presence of mechanical collimation, detection efficiency and energy acceptance are limited and fixed by the system’s geometrical features. In order to overcome these limitations, the application of Compton cameras for SPECT has been investigated for several years. In this study we compare a commercial SPECT-Anger device, the General Electric HealthCare Infinia system with a High Energy General Purpose (HEGP) collimator, and the Compton camera prototype under development by the French collaboration CLaRyS, through Monte Carlo simulations (GATE—GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission—version 7.1 and GEANT4 version 9.6, respectively). Given the possible introduction of new radio-emitters at higher energies intrinsically allowed by the Compton camera detection principle, the two detectors are exposed to point-like sources at increasing primary gamma energies, from actual isotopes already suggested for nuclear medicine applications. The Compton camera prototype is first characterized for SPECT application by studying the main parameters affecting its imaging performance: detector energy resolution and random coincidence rate. The two detector performances are then compared in terms of radial event distribution, detection efficiency and final image, obtained by gamma transmission analysis for the Anger system, and with an iterative List Mode-Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-MLEM) algorithm for the Compton reconstruction. The results show for the Compton camera a detection efficiency increased by a factor larger than an order of magnitude with respect to the Anger camera, associated with an enhanced spatial resolution for energies beyond 500 keV. We discuss the advantages of Compton camera application

  3. Contribution of inner shell Compton ionization to the X-ray fluorescence line intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The Compton effect is a potential ionization mechanism of atoms. It produces vacancies in inner shells that are filled with the same mechanism of atomic relaxation as the one following photo-absorption. This contribution to X-ray fluorescence emission is frequently neglected because the total Compton cross-section is apparently much lower than the photoelectric one at useful X-ray energies. However, a more careful analysis suggests that is necessary to consider single shell cross sections (instead of total cross sections) as a function of energy. In this article these Compton cross sections are computed for the shells K, L1-L3 and M1-M5 in the framework of the impulse approximation. By comparing the Compton and the photoelectric cross-section for each shell it is then possible to determine the extent of the Compton correction to the intensity of the corresponding characteristic lines. It is shown that for the K shell the correction becomes relevant for excitation energies which are too high to be influent in X-ray spectrometry. In contrast, for L and M shells the Compton contribution is relevant for medium-Z elements and medium energies. To illustrate the different grades of relevance of the correction, for each ionized shell, the energies for which the Compton contribution reaches the extent levels of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100% of the photoelectric one are determined for all the elements with Z = 11-92. For practical applications it is provided a simple formula and fitting coefficients to compute average correction levels for the shells considered.

  4. Calculation of the effects of ice on the backscatter of a ground plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, K. M.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a technique for examining the effect of a rough ice layer on the backscatter of a ground plane. The technique is applied to the special case of a rough ice layer that is periodic in space. By assuming that the roughness is periodic, the backscatter of the ground plane can be found from the backscatter of a single period. Backscatter calculations are presented for a single period in which the thickness of the ice layer has a Gaussian shape.

  5. Multiwavelength Comparison of Modeled and Measured Remote Tropospheric Aerosol Backscatter Over Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Pueschel, R. F.; Srivastava, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    Aerosol concentrations and size distributions in the middle and upper troposphere over the remote Pacific Ocean were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. The FSSP size channels were recalibrated based on refractive index estimates from flight-level aerosol volatility measurements with a collocated laser optical particle counter (LOPC). The recalibrated FSSP size distributions were averaged over 100-s intervals, fitted with lo-normal distributions and used to calculate aerosol backscatter coefficients at selected wavelengths. The FSSP-derived backscatter estimates were averaged over 300-s intervals to reduce large random fluctuations. The smoothed FSSP aerosol backscatter coefficients were then compared with LOPC-derived backscatter values and with backscatter measured at or near flight level from four lidar systems operating at 0.53, 1.06, 9.11, 9.25, and 10.59 micrometers. Agreement between FSSP-derived and lidar-measured backscatter was generally best at flight level in homogeneous aerosol fields and at high backscatter values. FSSP data often underestimated low backscatter values especially at the longer wavelengths due to poor counting statistics for larger particles (greater than 0.8 micrometers diameter) that usually dominate aerosol backscatter at these wavelengths. FSSP data also underestimated backscatter at shorter wavelengths when particles smaller than the FSSP lower cutoff diameter (0.35 micrometers) made significant contributions to the total backscatter.

  6. Resolution recovery for Compton camera using origin ensemble algorithm.

    PubMed

    Andreyev, A; Celler, A; Ozsahin, I; Sitek, A

    2016-08-01

    Compton cameras (CCs) use electronic collimation to reconstruct the images of activity distribution. Although this approach can greatly improve imaging efficiency, due to complex geometry of the CC principle, image reconstruction with the standard iterative algorithms, such as ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM), can be very time-consuming, even more so if resolution recovery (RR) is implemented. We have previously shown that the origin ensemble (OE) algorithm can be used for the reconstruction of the CC data. Here we propose a method of extending our OE algorithm to include RR. To validate the proposed algorithm we used Monte Carlo simulations of a CC composed of multiple layers of pixelated CZT detectors and designed for imaging small animals. A series of CC acquisitions of small hot spheres and the Derenzo phantom placed in air were simulated. Images obtained from (a) the exact data, (b) blurred data but reconstructed without resolution recovery, and (c) blurred and reconstructed with resolution recovery were compared. Furthermore, the reconstructed contrast-to-background ratios were investigated using the phantom with nine spheres placed in a hot background. Our simulations demonstrate that the proposed method allows for the recovery of the resolution loss that is due to imperfect accuracy of event detection. Additionally, tests of camera sensitivity corresponding to different detector configurations demonstrate that the proposed CC design has sensitivity comparable to PET. When the same number of events were considered, the computation time per iteration increased only by a factor of 2 when OE reconstruction with the resolution recovery correction was performed relative to the original OE algorithm. We estimate that the addition of resolution recovery to the OSEM would increase reconstruction times by 2-3 orders of magnitude per iteration. The results of our tests demonstrate the improvement of image resolution provided by the OE reconstructions

  7. Study of Compton suppression for use in spent nuclear fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Sarah

    The focus of this study has been to assess Compton suppressed gamma-ray detection systems for the multivariate analysis of spent nuclear fuel. This objective has been achieved using direct measurement of samples of irradiated fuel elements in two geometrical configurations with Compton suppression systems. In order to address the objective to quantify the number of additionally resolvable photopeaks, direct Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel in two configurations were performed: as intact fuel elements and as dissolved feed solutions. These measurements directly assessed and quantified the differences in measured gamma-ray spectrum from the application of Compton suppression. Several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling time from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using three Compton suppression systems that utilized different primary detectors: HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl). The application of Compton suppression using a LaBr3 primary detector to the measurement of the current core fuel element, which presented the highest count rate, allowed four additional spectral features to be resolved. In comparison, the HPGe-CSS was able to resolve eight additional photopeaks as compared to the standalone HPGe measurement. Measurements with the NaI(Tl) primary detector were unable to resolve any additional peaks, due to its relatively low resolution. Samples of Approved Test Material (ATM) commercial fuel elements were obtained from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The samples had been processed using the beginning stages of the PUREX method and represented the unseparated feed solution from a reprocessing facility. Compton suppressed measurements of the ATM fuel samples were recorded inside the guard detector annulus, to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Photopeak losses were observed in the measurements of the dissolved ATM

  8. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S. P., E-mail: steve.collins@diamond.ac.uk; Laundy, D.; Connolley, T.

    2016-02-16

    The possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to reveal antisymmetric components of the electron momentum density, as a fingerprint of magnetoelectric sample properties, is investigated experimentally and theoretically by studying the polar ferromagnet GaFeO{sub 3}. This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering – an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density – to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and themore » first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO{sub 3}. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10{sup −5} of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin–orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample.« less

  9. Development of compact Compton camera for 3D image reconstruction of radioactive contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Terasaka, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Nakamura Miyamura, H.; Kaburagi, M.; Tanifuji, Y.; Kawabata, K.; Torii, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. Very large amounts of radionuclides were released from the damaged plant. Radiation distribution measurements inside FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a compact Compton camera to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination inside the FDNPS buildings three-dimensionally (3D). The total weight of the Compton camera is lower than 1.0 kg. The gamma-ray sensor of the Compton camera employs Ce-doped GAGG (Gd3Al2Ga3O12) scintillators coupled with a multi-pixel photon counter. Angular correction of the detection efficiency of the Compton camera was conducted. Moreover, we developed a 3D back-projection method using the multi-angle data measured with the Compton camera. We successfully observed 3D radiation images resulting from the two 137Cs radioactive sources, and the image of the 9.2 MBq source appeared stronger than that of the 2.7 MBq source.

  10. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10−6 to 10−3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy. PMID:21048295

  11. Retrieval of Ocean Subsurface Particulate Backscattering Coefficient from Space-Borne CALIOP Lidar Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Chip; Liu, Katie; Rodier, Sharon; Zeng, Shan; Luckher, Patricia; Verhappen, Ron; Wilson, Jamie; hide

    2016-01-01

    A new approach has been proposed to determine ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient bbp from CALIOP 30deg off-nadir lidar measurements. The new method also provides estimates of the particle volume scattering function at the 180deg scattering angle. The CALIOP based layer-integrated lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficients are compared with the results obtained from MODIS ocean color measurements. The comparison analysis shows that ocean subsurface lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficient bbp can be accurately obtained from CALIOP lidar measurements, thereby supporting the use of space-borne lidar measurements for ocean subsurface studies.

  12. Incomplete immunity to backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Tien, Chung-Hao; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2015-04-20

    We show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral one-way photonic crystal are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many kinds of scatters. Since these modes are not protected by the nonreciprocity, the backscattering does occur under certain circumstances. We use a perturbative method to derive criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. From both our theory and numerical examinations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatters. Additionally, for these chiral photonic modes, disturbances at the most intense parts of field profiles do not necessarily lead to the most effective backscattering.

  13. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Pete; Finlayson, David; Conrad, Jamie; Cochrane, Guy; Johnson, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) the U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology mapped a nearshore region of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in Southern California (fig 1). The CSMP is a cooperative partnership between Federal and State agencies, Universities, and Industry to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat basemap series to support the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) inititive. The program is supported by the California Ocean Protection Council and the California Coastal Conservancy. The 2008 mapping collected high resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data using a bathymetric side scan system within State waters from about the 10-m isobath out over 3-nautical miles. This Open-File Report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and FGDC metadata.

  14. A simple backscattering microscope for fast tracking of biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Steel, Bradley C.; Berry, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in techniques for observing single molecules under light microscopes have helped reveal the mechanisms by which molecular machines work. A wide range of markers can be used to detect molecules, from single fluorophores to micron sized markers, depending on the research interest. Here, we present a new and simple objective-type backscattering microscope to track gold nanoparticles with nanometer and microsecond resolution. The total noise of our system in a 55 kHz bandwidth is ∼0.6 nm per axis, sufficient to measure molecular movement. We found our backscattering microscopy to be useful not only for in vitro but also for in vivo experiments because of lower background scattering from cells than in conventional dark-field microscopy. We demonstrate the application of this technique to measuring the motion of a biological rotary molecular motor, the bacterial flagellar motor, in live Escherichia coli cells. PMID:21133475

  15. Effects of vegetation canopy on the radar backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Blanchard, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne L- and C-band scatterometer data, taken over both vegetation-covered and bare fields, were systematically analyzed and theoretically reproduced, using a recently developed model for calculating radar backscattering coefficients of rough soil surfaces. The results show that the model can reproduce the observed angular variations of radar backscattering coefficient quite well via a least-squares fit method. Best fits to the data provide estimates of the statistical properties of the surface roughness, which is characterized by two parameters: the standard deviation of surface height, and the surface correlation length. In addition, the processes of vegetation attenuation and volume scattering require two canopy parameters, the canopy optical thickness and a volume scattering factor. Canopy parameter values for individual vegetation types, including alfalfa, milo and corn, were also determined from the best-fit results. The uncertainties in the scatterometer data were also explored.

  16. Comparison of SeaWinds Backscatter Imaging Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Long, David G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper compares the performance and tradeoffs of various backscatter imaging algorithms for the SeaWinds scatterometer when multiple passes over a target are available. Reconstruction methods are compared with conventional gridding algorithms. In particular, the performance and tradeoffs in conventional ‘drop in the bucket’ (DIB) gridding at the intrinsic sensor resolution are compared to high-spatial-resolution imaging algorithms such as fine-resolution DIB and the scatterometer image reconstruction (SIR) that generate enhanced-resolution backscatter images. Various options for each algorithm are explored, including considering both linear and dB computation. The effects of sampling density and reconstruction quality versus time are explored. Both simulated and actual data results are considered. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of high-resolution reconstruction using SIR as well as its limitations and the limitations of DIB and fDIB. PMID:28828143

  17. Z dependence of thick-target β-ray backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. K.; Singh, M.

    1980-04-01

    Variation of β-ray backscattering with the atomic number of target material has been studied using thick targets of polythene, aluminum, iron, copper, zinc, tin, silver, tungsten, and lead for five β emitters, viz., 35S, 147Pm, 204Tl, 32P, and 90Sr-90Y. Effects of geometry and β-ray end-point energy have been investigated using a reflection geometry in which the geometry factors were varied by more than 40 and β-ray energy varied over a range 0.167-2.27 MeV. It is found that the mean value of the index of Z dependence of β-ray backscattering is 1.840.05 over these regions of geometry and energy. Deviations for soft β emitters have been confirmed as due to air absorption. The importance of these results in studies of two-component systems is emphasized.

  18. Standard-target calibration of an acoustic backscatter system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foote, Kenneth G.; Martini, Marinna A.

    2010-01-01

    The standard-target method used to calibrate scientific echo sounders and other scientific sonars by a single, solid elastic sphere is being adapted to acoustic backscatter (ABS) systems. Its first application, to the AQUAscat 1000, is described. The on-axis sensitivity and directional properties of transducer beams at three operating frequencies, nominally 1, 2.5, and 4 MHz, have been determined using a 10-mm-diameter sphere of tungsten carbide with 6% cobalt binder. Preliminary results are reported for the 1-MHz transducer. Their application to measurements of suspended sediment made in situ with the same device is described. This will enable the data to be expressed directly in physical units of volume backscattering.

  19. Enhanced backscattering of electrons in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Berkovits, R.; Eliyahu, D.; Kaveh, M.

    1990-01-01

    We calculate the exact shape of the enhanced coherent backscattering peak for electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field. The interference phenomena that cause the backscattered enhancement are reduced due to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. It is shown that the form of the peak in the presence of a magnetics field {ital I}({ital q},{ital H}) can be obtained (to a good approximation) from {ital I}({ital q},{ital H}=0) by replacing {ital q} with {ital {tilde q}}=({ital q}{sup 2}+(3L{sub {ital H}}{sup 2}){sup {minus}1}){sup 11}, where {ital L}{sub {ital H}}=(2{h bar}c/eH){sup 1/2}. We have also calculated {ital I}({ital q},{ital H})more » at finite temperatures and proposed it as the most sensitive tool for extracting inelastic processes.« less

  20. The characteristics simulation of FMCW laser backscattering signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bohu; Song, Chengtian; Duan, Yabo

    2018-04-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation model of FMCW laser transmission in a smoke interference environment was established in this paper. The aerosol extinction coefficient and scattering coefficient changed dynamically in the simulation according to the smoke concentration variation, aerosol particle distributions and photon spatial positions. The simulation results showed that the smoke backscattering interference produced a number of amplitude peaks in the beat signal spectrum; the SNR of target echo signal to smoke interference was related to the transmitted laser wavelength and the aerosol particle size distribution; a better SNR could be obtained when the laser wavelength was in the range of 560-1660 nm. The characteristics of FMCW laser backscattering signals generated by simulation are consistent with the theoretical analysis. Therefore, this study was greatly helpful for improving the ability of identifying target and anti-interference in the further research.

  1. Enhanced backscatter of optical beams reflected in turbulent air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W.; Palastro, J. P.; Wu, C.; Davis, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    Optical beams propagating through air acquire phase distortions from turbulent fluctuations in the refractive index. While these distortions are usually deleterious to propagation, beams reflected in a turbulent medium can undergo a local recovery of spatial coherence and intensity enhancement referred to as enhanced backscatter (EBS). Using a combination of lab-scale experiments and simulations, we investigate the EBS of optical beams reflected from corner cubes and rough surfaces, and identify the regimes in which EBS is most distinctly observed.

  2. Wideband 10.6 micrometers Backscatter Range Interim Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-02

    oucput, a local oscillator, a radar return, and a correlation infrared detector . The unique part of this radar is the wideband chirped waveform on a...backscatter system photoconductors Ge:Cu is superior to HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors because of its superior (larger) shunt resistance which reduces...the Johnson noise of the detector and its ability to withstand higher optical powers without damage. 18 P160-908 Fig. 6. Chirp waveform

  3. Optimization of Compton-suppression and summing schemes for the TIGRESS HPGe detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Boston, A. J.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hyland, B.; Jones, B.; Maharaj, R.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Sarazin, F.; Scraggs, H. C.; Smith, M. B.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Watters, L. M.

    2007-04-01

    Methods of optimizing the performance of an array of Compton-suppressed, segmented HPGe clover detectors have been developed which rely on the physical position sensitivity of both the HPGe crystals and the Compton-suppression shields. These relatively simple analysis procedures promise to improve the precision of experiments with the TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). Suppression schemes will improve the efficiency and peak-to-total ratio of TIGRESS for high γ-ray multiplicity events by taking advantage of the 20-fold segmentation of the Compton-suppression shields, while the use of different summing schemes will improve results for a wide range of experimental conditions. The benefits of these methods are compared for many γ-ray energies and multiplicities using a GEANT4 simulation, and the optimal physical configuration of the TIGRESS array under each set of conditions is determined.

  4. Application of Compton-suppressed self-induced XRF to spent nuclear fuel measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Se-Hwan; Jo, Kwang Ho; Lee, Seung Kyu; Seo, Hee; Lee, Chaehun; Won, Byung-Hee; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Ku, Jeong-Hoe

    2017-11-01

    Self-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a technique by which plutonium (Pu) content in spent nuclear fuel can be directly quantified. In the present work, this method successfully measured the plutonium/uranium (Pu/U) peak ratio of a pressurized water reactor (PWR)'s spent nuclear fuel at the Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI)'s post irradiation examination facility (PIEF). In order to reduce the Compton background in the low-energy X-ray region, the Compton suppression system additionally was implemented. By use of this system, the spectrum's background level was reduced by a factor of approximately 2. This work shows that Compton-suppressed selfinduced XRF can be effectively applied to Pu accounting in spent nuclear fuel.

  5. Electronic properties of Laves phase ZrFe{sub 2} using Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Samir, E-mail: sameerbhatto11@gmail.com; Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L.

    First-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe{sub 2}, using indigenous 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer, is presented. To analyze the experimental electron momentum density, we have deduced the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock scheme within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The energy bands and density of states are also calculated using LCAO prescription. The theoretical profile based on local density approximation gives a better agreement with the experimental profile than other reported schemes. The present investigations validate the inclusion of correlation potential of Perdew-Zunger in predicting themore » electronic properties of ZrFe{sub 2}.« less

  6. A Compton scattering technique to determine wood density and locating defects in it

    SciTech Connect

    Tondon, Akash, E-mail: akashtondonnsl@gmail.com; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan

    A Compton scattering technique is presented to determine density and void location in the given wooden samples. The technique uses a well collimated gamma ray beam from {sup 137}Cs along with the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. First, a linear relationship is established between Compton scattered intensity and known density of chemical compounds, and then density of the wood is determined from this linear relation. In another experiment, the ability of penetration of gamma rays is explored to detect voids in wooden (low Z) sample. The sudden reduction in the Compton scattered intensities agrees well with the position and size of voidsmore » in the wooden sample. It is concluded that wood density and the voids of size ∼ 4 mm and more can be detected easily by this method.« less

  7. A method for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays by Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2014-12-01

    A method was proposed for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays for compounds, alloys and mixtures. It is based on simulating interaction processes of gamma rays with target elements having atomic numbers from Z=1 to Z=92 using the MCSHAPE software. Intensities of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturation thicknesses and at a scattering angle of 90° were calculated for incident gamma rays of different energies. The obtained results showed that the intensity of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturations and mass absorption coefficients can be described by mathematical formulas. These were used to determine mass absorption coefficients for compound, alloys and mixtures with the knowledge of their Compton scattered intensities. The method was tested by calculating mass absorption coefficients for some compounds, alloys and mixtures. There is a good agreement between obtained results and calculated ones using WinXom software. The advantages and limitations of the method were discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Compton imaging tomography for nondestructive evaluation of spacecraft thermal protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Volodymyr; Burke, Eric; Grubsky, Victor

    2017-02-01

    Here we present new results of in situ nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of spacecraft thermal protection system materials obtained with POC-developed NDE tool based on a novel Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) technique recently pioneered and patented by Physical Optics Corporation (POC). In general, CIT provides high-resolution three-dimensional Compton scattered X-ray imaging of the internal structure of evaluated objects, using a set of acquired two-dimensional Compton scattered X-ray images of consecutive cross sections of these objects. Unlike conventional computed tomography, CIT requires only one-sided access to objects, has no limitation on the dimensions and geometry of the objects, and can be applied to large multilayer non-uniform objects with complicated geometries. Also, CIT does not require any contact with the objects being imaged during its application.

  9. Comparison of Modeled Backscatter using Measured Aerosol Microphysics with Focused CW Lidar Data over Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Clarke, Antony D.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1997-01-01

    During NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) II flight mission over the Pacific Ocean in May-June 1990, extensive aerosol backscatter data sets from two continuous wave, focused CO2 Doppler lidars and an aerosol microphysics data set from a laser optical particle counter (LOPC) were obtained. Changes in aerosol loading in various air masses with associated changes in chemical composition, from sulfuric acid and sulfates to dustlike crustal material, significantly affected aerosol backscatter, causing variation of about 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Some of the significant backscatter features encountered in different air masses were the low backscatter in subtropical air with even lower values in the tropics near the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), highly variable backscatter in the ITCZ, mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode, and high backscatter in an Asian dust plume off the Japanese coast. Differences in aerosol composition and backscatter for northern and southern hemisphere also were observed. Using the LOPC measurements of physical and chemical aerosol properties, we determined the complex refractive index from three different aerosol mixture models to calculate backscatter. These values provided a well-defined envelope of modeled backscatter for various atmospheric conditions, giving good agreement with the lidar data over a horizontal sampling of approximately 18000 km in the mid-troposphere.

  10. Coherent and incoherent ultrasound backscatter from cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    de Monchy, Romain; Destrempes, François; Saha, Ratan K; Cloutier, Guy; Franceschini, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The effective medium theory (EMT) was recently developed to model the ultrasound backscatter from aggregating red blood cells [Franceschini, Metzger, and Cloutier, IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 58, 2668-2679 (2011)]. The EMT assumes that aggregates can be treated as homogeneous effective scatterers, which have effective properties determined by the aggregate compactness and the acoustical characteristics of the cells and the surrounding medium. In this study, the EMT is further developed to decompose the differential backscattering cross section of a single cell aggregate into coherent and incoherent components. The coherent component corresponds to the squared norm of the average scattering amplitude from the effective scatterer, and the incoherent component considers the variance of the scattering amplitude (i.e., the mean squared norm of the fluctuation of the scattering amplitude around its mean) within the effective scatterer. A theoretical expression for the incoherent component based on the structure factor is proposed and compared with another formulation based on the Gaussian direct correlation function. This theoretical improvement is assessed using computer simulations of ultrasound backscatter from aggregating cells. The consideration of the incoherent component based on the structure factor allows us to approximate the simulations satisfactorily for a product of the wavenumber times the aggregate radius kr ag around 2.

  11. Investigation of phonon coherence and backscattering using silicon nanomeshes

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Woochul; Wehmeyer, Geoff; ...

    2017-01-04

    Phonons can display both wave-like and particle-like behaviour during thermal transport. While thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes has been previously interpreted by phonon wave effects due to interference with periodic structures, as well as phonon particle effects including backscattering, the dominant mechanism responsible for thermal conductivity reductions below classical predictions still remains unclear. Here we isolate the wave-related coherence effects by comparing periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes, and quantify the backscattering effect by comparing variable-pitch nanomeshes. We measure identical (within 6% uncertainty) thermal conductivities for periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes of the same average pitch, and reduced thermal conductivities for nanomeshes withmore » smaller pitches. Ray tracing simulations support the measurement results. We conclude phonon coherence is unimportant for thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes with periodicities of 100 nm and higher and temperatures above 14 K, and phonon backscattering, as manifested in the classical size effect, is responsible for the thermal conductivity reduction.« less

  12. Characterization of trabecular bone using the backscattered spectral centroid shift.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith A

    2003-04-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation in bone in vivo is generally measured using a through-transmission method at the calcaneus. Although attenuation in calcaneus has been demonstrated to be a useful predictor for osteoporotic fracture risk, measurements at other clinically important sites, such as hip and spine, could potentially contain additional useful diagnostic information. Through-transmission measurements may not be feasible at these sites due to complex bone shapes and the increased amount of intervening soft tissue. Centroid shift from the backscattered signal is an index of attenuation slope and has been used previously to characterize soft tissues. In this paper, centroid shift from signals backscattered from 30 trabecular bone samples in vitro were measured. Attenuation slope also was measured using a through-transmission method. The correlation coefficient between centroid shift and attenuation slope was -0.71. The 95% confidence interval was (-0.86, -0.47). These results suggest that the backscattered spectral centroid shift may contain useful diagnostic information potentially applicable to hip and spine.

  13. Measuring Ultrasonic Backscatter in the Presence of Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, Timothy; Guerrero, Quinton

    2011-11-01

    A goal of medical ultrasound is the formation of quantitative ultrasound images in which contrast is determined by acoustic or physical properties of tissue rather than relative echo amplitude. Such images could greatly enhance early detection of many diseases, including breast cancer and liver cirrhosis. Accurate determination of the ultrasonic backscatter coefficient from patients remains a difficult task. One reason for this difficulty is the inherent nonlinear propagation of ultrasound at high intensities used for medical imaging. The backscatter coefficient from several tissue-mimicking samples were measured using the planar reflector method. In this method, the power spectrum from a sample is compared to the power spectrum of an optically flat sample of quartz. The results should be independent of incident pressure amplitude. Results demonstrate that backscatter coefficients can vary by more than an order of magnitude when ultrasound pressure varies from 0.1 MPa to 1.5 MPa at 5.0 MHz. A new method that incorporates nonlinear propagation is proposed to explain these discrepancies.

  14. Analysis of C and Ku band ocean backscatter measurements under low-wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carswell, James R.; Donnelly, William J.; McIntosh, Robert E.; Donelan, Mark A.; Vandemark, Douglas C.

    1999-09-01

    Airborne ocean backscatter measurements at C and Ku band wavelengths obtained in low to moderate-wind conditions are presented. The differences between the low-wind backscatter data and the CMOD4 and SASS-II models are reported. The measurements show that the upwind/crosswind backscatter ratio is greater than predicted. These large upwind/crosswind backscatter ratios are attributed to a rapid decrease in the crosswind backscatter at low winds. Qualitative agreement with the composite surface model proposed by Donelan and Pierson suggests the rapid decrease in the crosswind backscatter may be caused by viscous dampening of the Bragg-resonant capillary-gravity waves. We show that for larger antenna footprints typical of satellite-based scatterometers, the variability in the observed wind field smooths out the backscatter response such that the rapid decrease in the crosswind direction is not observed.

  15. Double Compton and Cyclo-Synchrotron in Super-Eddington Discs, Magnetized Coronae, and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Chluba, Jens; Wielgus, Maciek; Narayan, Ramesh; Sadowski, Aleksander

    2017-05-01

    Black hole accretion discs accreting near the Eddington rate are dominated by bremsstrahlung cooling, but above the Eddington rate, the double Compton process can dominate in radiation-dominated regions, while the cyclo-synchrotron can dominate in strongly magnetized regions like a corona or a jet. We present an extension to the general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic code harmrad to account for emission and absorption by thermal cyclo-synchrotron, double Compton, bremsstrahlung, low-temperature opal opacities, as well as Thomson and Compton scattering. The harmrad code and associated analysis and visualization codes have been made open-source and are publicly available at the github repository website. We approximate the radiation field as a Bose-Einstein distribution and evolve it using the radiation number-energy-momentum conservation equations in order to track photon hardening. We perform various simulations to study how these extensions affect the radiative properties of magnetically arrested discs accreting at Eddington to super-Eddington rates. We find that double Compton dominates bremsstrahlung in the disc within a radius of r ˜ 15rg (gravitational radii) at hundred times the Eddington accretion rate, and within smaller radii at lower accretion rates. Double Compton and cyclo-synchrotron regulate radiation and gas temperatures in the corona, while cyclo-synchrotron regulates temperatures in the jet. Interestingly, as the accretion rate drops to Eddington, an optically thin corona develops whose gas temperature of T ˜ 109K is ˜100 times higher than the disc's blackbody temperature. Our results show the importance of double Compton and synchrotron in super-Eddington discs, magnetized coronae and jets.

  16. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  17. Inverse compton light source: a compact design proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Deitrick, Kirsten Elizabeth

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing demand for a compact Inverse Compton Light Source (ICLS) which is capable of producing high-quality X-rays by colliding an electron beam and a high-quality laser. It is only in recent years when both SRF and laser technology have advanced enough that compact sources can approach the quality found at large installations such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Previously, X-ray sources were either high flux and brilliance at a large facility or many orders of magnitude lesser when produced by a bremsstrahlung source. A recent compact source wasmore » constructed by Lyncean Technologies using a storage ring to produce the electron beam used to scatter the incident laser beam. By instead using a linear accelerator system for the electron beam, a significant increase in X-ray beam quality is possible, though even subsequent designs also featuring a storage ring offer improvement. Preceding the linear accelerator with an SRF reentrant gun allows for an extremely small transverse emittance, increasing the brilliance of the resulting X-ray source. In order to achieve sufficiently small emittances, optimization was done regarding both the geometry of the gun and the initial electron bunch distribution produced off the cathode. Using double-spoke SRF cavities to comprise the linear accelerator allows for an electron beam of reasonable size to be focused at the interaction point, while preserving the low emittance that was generated by the gun. An aggressive final focusing section following the electron beam's exit from the accelerator produces the small spot size at the interaction point which results in an X-ray beam of high flux and brilliance. Taking all of these advancements together, a world class compact X-ray source has been designed. It is anticipated that this source would far outperform the conventional bremsstrahlung and many other compact ICLSs, while coming closer to performing at the

  18. Compton thick active galactic nuclei in Chandra surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Nandra, Kirpal; Salvato, Mara; Hsu, Li-Ting; Aird, James; Rangel, Cyprian

    2014-09-01

    We present the results from an X-ray spectral analysis of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the ChandraDeep Field-South, All-wavelength Extended Groth-strip International Survey (AEGIS)-Deep X-ray survey (XD) and Chandra-Cosmic Evolution Surveys (COSMOS), focusing on the identification and characterization of the most heavily obscured, Compton thick (CT, NH > 1024 cm-2) sources. Our sample is comprised of 3184 X-ray selected extragalactic sources, which has a high rate of redshift completeness (96.6 per cent), and includes additional spectroscopic redshifts and improved photometric redshifts over previous studies. We use spectral models designed for heavily obscured AGN which self-consistently include all major spectral signatures of heavy absorption. We validate our spectral fitting method through simulations, identify CT sources not selected through this method using X-ray colours and take considerations for the constraints on NH given the low count nature of many of our sources. After these considerations, we identify a total of 100 CT AGN with best-fitting NH > 1024 cm-2 and NH constrained to be above 1023.5 cm-2 at 90 per cent confidence. These sources cover an intrinsic 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity range of 1042-3 × 1045 erg s-1 and a redshift range of z = 0.1-4. This sample will enable characterization of these heavily obscured AGN across cosmic time and to ascertain their cosmological significance. These survey fields are sites of extensive multiwavelength coverage, including near-infrared Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) data and far-infrared Herschel data, enabling forthcoming investigations into the host properties of CT AGN. Furthermore, by using the torus models to test different covering factor scenarios, and by investigating the inclusion of the soft scattered emission, we find evidence that the covering factor of the obscuring material decreases with LX for all redshifts, consistent with the receding torus model

  19. Is the High-Energy Emission from Centaurus A Compton-Scattered Jet Radiation?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Is the High-Energy Emission from Centaurus A Compton-Scattered Jet Radiation? J. G. Skibo1, C. D. Dermer and R. L. Kinzer E. O. Hulburt Center for... Centaurus A is beamed radiation from the active nucleus which is Compton-scattered into our line- of-sight. We derive the spectrum and degree of...the scattering medium. We t the OSSE data from Centaurus A with this model and nd that if the scatterers are not moving relativistically, then the

  20. Gravitation and Special Relativity from Compton Wave Interactions at the Planck Scale: An Algorithmic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper space is modeled as a lattice of Compton wave oscillators (CWOs) of near- Planck size. It is shown that gravitation and special relativity emerge from the interaction between particles Compton waves. To develop this CWO model an algorithmic approach was taken, incorporating simple rules of interaction at the Planck-scale developed using well known physical laws. This technique naturally leads to Newton s law of gravitation and a new form of doubly special relativity. The model is in apparent agreement with the holographic principle, and it predicts a cutoff energy for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that is consistent with observational data.

  1. Spin-dependent sum rules connecting real and virtual Compton scattering verified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, Vadim; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc; Kao, Chung Wen

    2017-04-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the two sum rules relating the spin polarizabilities measured in real, virtual, and doubly virtual Compton scattering. For example, the polarizability δL T , accessed in inclusive electron scattering, is related to the spin polarizability γE 1 E 1 and the slope of generalized polarizabilities P(M 1 ,M 1 )1-P(L 1 ,L 1 )1 , measured in, respectively, the real and the virtual Compton scattering. We verify these sum rules in different variants of chiral perturbation theory, discuss their empirical verification for the proton, and prospect their use in studies of the nucleon spin structure.

  2. Lidar inversion of atmospheric backscatter and extinction-to-backscatter ratios by use of a Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Rocadenbosch, F; Soriano, C; Comerón, A; Baldasano, J M

    1999-05-20

    A first inversion of the backscatter profile and extinction-to-backscatter ratio from pulsed elastic-backscatter lidar returns is treated by means of an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The EKF approach enables one to overcome the intrinsic limitations of standard straightforward nonmemory procedures such as the slope method, exponential curve fitting, and the backward inversion algorithm. Whereas those procedures are inherently not adaptable because independent inversions are performed for each return signal and neither the statistics of the signals nor a priori uncertainties (e.g., boundary calibrations) are taken into account, in the case of the Kalman filter the filter updates itself because it is weighted by the imbalance between the a priori estimates of the optical parameters (i.e., past inversions) and the new estimates based on a minimum-variance criterion, as long as there are different lidar returns. Calibration errors and initialization uncertainties can be assimilated also. The study begins with the formulation of the inversion problem and an appropriate atmospheric stochastic model. Based on extensive simulation and realistic conditions, it is shown that the EKF approach enables one to retrieve the optical parameters as time-range-dependent functions and hence to track the atmospheric evolution; the performance of this approach is limited only by the quality and availability of the a priori information and the accuracy of the atmospheric model used. The study ends with an encouraging practical inversion of a live scene measured at the Nd:YAG elastic-backscatter lidar station at our premises at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Barcelona.

  3. A simple way to obtain backscattered electron images in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tanji, Takayoshi; Morita, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    We have fabricated a simple detector for backscattered electrons (BSEs) and incorporated the detector into a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) sample holder. Our detector was made from a 4-mm(2) Si chip. The fabrication procedure was easy, and similar to a standard transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample thinning process based on ion milling. A TEM grid containing particle objects was fixed to the detector with a silver paste. Observations were carried out using samples of Au and latex particles at 75 and 200 kV. Such a detector provides an easy way to obtain BSE images in an STEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1: III. Implications for Compton Corona and ADAF Models. Report 3; Implications for Compton Corona and ADAF Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Joern; Vaughan, Brian A.; Dove, James B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1999-01-01

    We have recently shown that a 'sphere + disk' geometry Compton corona model provides a good description of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the hard/low state of Cygnus X-1. Separately, we have analyzed the temporal data provided by RXTE. In this paper we consider the implications of this timing analysis for our best-fit 'sphere + disk' Comptonization models. We focus our attention on the observed Fourier frequency-dependent time delays between hard and soft photons. We consider whether the observed time delays are: created in the disk but are merely reprocessed by the corona; created by differences between the hard and soft photon diffusion times in coronae with extremely large radii; or are due to 'propagation' of disturbances through the corona. We find that the time delays are most likely created directly within the corona; however, it is currently uncertain which specific model is the most likely explanation. Models that posit a large coronal radius [or equivalently, a large Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF) region] do not fully address all the details of the observed spectrum. The Compton corona models that do address the full spectrum do not contain dynamical information. We show, however, that simple phenomenological propagation models for the observed time delays for these latter models imply extremely slow characteristic propagation speeds within the coronal region.

  5. Control of the repeatability of high frequency multibeam echosounder backscatter by using natural reference areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Marc; Degrendele, Koen; Vrignaud, Christophe; Loyer, Sophie; Le Bas, Tim; Augustin, Jean-Marie; Lurton, Xavier

    2018-06-01

    The increased use of backscatter measurements in time series for environmental monitoring necessitates the comparability of individual results. With the current lack of pre-calibrated multibeam echosounder systems for absolute backscatter measurement, a pragmatic solution is the use of natural reference areas for ensuring regular assessment of the backscatter measurement repeatability. This method mainly relies on the assumption of a sufficiently stable reference area regarding its backscatter signature. The aptitude of a natural area to provide a stable and uniform backscatter response must be carefully considered and demonstrated by a sufficiently long time-series of measurements. Furthermore, this approach requires a strict control of the acquisition and processing parameters. If all these conditions are met, stability check and relative calibration of a system are possible by comparison with the averaged backscatter values for the area. Based on a common multibeam echosounder and sampling campaign completed by available bathymetric and backscatter time series, the suitability as a backscatter reference area of three different candidates was evaluated. Two among them, Carré Renard and Kwinte, prove to be excellent choices, while the third one, Western Solent, lacks sufficient data over time, but remains a valuable candidate. The case studies and the available backscatter data on these areas prove the applicability of this method. The expansion of the number of commonly used reference areas and the growth of the number of multibeam echosounder controlled thereon could greatly contribute to the further development of quantitative applications based on multibeam echosounder backscatter measurements.

  6. The Financial Resource Allocation Process at Compton Community College: A Redirection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton Community Coll. Federation of Teachers, CA.

    This paper presents a historical portrait of the process of financial resource allocation at Compton Community College (CCC). Introductory material provides information on the college, its organization, and its budgeting and accounting procedures. Next, changes in finances occurring between 1974-75 and 1977-78 are outlined, including the growth of…

  7. A simple and fast method for computing the relativistic Compton Scattering Kernel for radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershaw, David S.; Prasad, Manoj K.; Beason, J. Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Klein-Nishina differential cross section averaged over a relativistic Maxwellian electron distribution is analytically reduced to a single integral, which can then be rapidly evaluated in a variety of ways. A particularly fast method for numerically computing this single integral is presented. This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first correct computation of the Compton scattering kernel.

  8. Combining harmonic generation and laser chirping to achieve high spectral density in Compton sources

    DOE PAGES

    Terzić, Balša; Reeves, Cody; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2016-04-25

    Recently various laser-chirping schemes have been investigated with the goal of reducing or eliminating ponderomotive line broadening in Compton or Thomson scattering occurring at high laser intensities. Moreover, as a next level of detail in the spectrum calculations, we have calculated the line smoothing and broadening expected due to incident beam energy spread within a one-dimensional plane wave model for the incident laser pulse, both for compensated (chirped) and unchirped cases. The scattered compensated distributions are treatable analytically within three models for the envelope of the incident laser pulses: Gaussian, Lorentzian, or hyperbolic secant. We use the new results tomore » demonstrate that the laser chirping in Compton sources at high laser intensities: (i) enables the use of higher order harmonics, thereby reducing the required electron beam energies; and (ii) increases the photon yield in a small frequency band beyond that possible with the fundamental without chirping. We found that this combination of chirping and higher harmonics can lead to substantial savings in the design, construction and operational costs of the new Compton sources. This is of particular importance to the widely popular laser-plasma accelerator based Compton sources, as the improvement in their beam quality enters the regime where chirping is most effective.« less

  9. Establishing Site X: Letter, Arthur H. Compton to Enrico Fermi, September 14, 1942

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Compton, A. H.

    1942-09-01

    This letter from Compton to Fermi describes developments bearing on the establishment of site X (which, as of the letter date, is definitely determined as at the Tennessee Valley) for the construction of a pile and associated pilot plant buildings, describes the situation as of the letter date, and offers counsel as to how to proceed.

  10. Nucleon spin-averaged forward virtual Compton tensor at large Q 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Richard J.; Paz, Gil

    The nucleon spin-averaged forward virtual Compton tensor determines important physical quantities such as electromagnetically-induced mass differences of nucleons, and two-photon exchange contributions in hydrogen spectroscopy. It depends on two kinematic variables:more » $$\

  11. VIG Seminar March 1, 2018 Alex Compton NCI-Frederick | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Please join us for the Virology Interest Group Seminar on Thursday, March 1st, from 2:30 until 3:30 in Bethesda, Building 50, Room 2328. The seminar will also be broadcasted to Frederick, Building 549, Conference Room A. This seminar will be presented by Alex Compton, NCI-Frederick.

  12. Ultrasound attenuation estimation using backscattered echoes from multiple sources.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Timothy A

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to devise an algorithm that can accurately estimate the attenuation along the propagation path (i.e., the total attenuation) from backscattered echoes. It was shown that the downshift in the center frequency of the backscattered ultrasound echoes compared to echoes obtained in a water bath was calculated to have the form Deltaf=mf(o)+b after normalizing with respect to the source bandwidth where m depends on the correlation length, b depends on the total attenuation, and f(o) is the center frequency of the source as measured from a reference echo. Therefore, the total attenuation can be determined independent of the scatterer correlation length by measuring the downshift in center frequency from multiple sources (i.e., different f(o)) and fitting a line to the measured shifts versus f(o). The intercept of the line gives the total attenuation along the propagation path. The calculations were verified using computer simulations of five spherically focused sources with 50% bandwidths and center frequencies of 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 MHz. The simulated tissue had Gaussian scattering structures with effective radii of 25 mum placed at a density of 250 mm(3). The attenuation of the tissue was varied from 0.1 to 0.9 dB / cm-MHz. The error in the attenuation along the propagation path ranged from -3.5+/-14.7% for a tissue attenuation of 0.1 dB / cm-MHz to -7.0+/-3.1% for a tissue attenuation of 0.9 dB / cm-MHz demonstrating that the attenuation along the propagation path could be accurately determined using backscattered echoes from multiple sources using the derived algorithm.

  13. Estimation of Mars radar backscatter from measured surface rock populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.E.; Simpson, R.A.; Tyler, G.L.; Moore, H.J.; Harmon, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Reanalysis of rock population data at the Mars Viking Lander sites has yielded updated values of rock fractional surface coverage (about 0.16 at both sites, including outcrops) and new estimates of rock burial depths and axial ratios. These data are combined with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical scattering model to estimate diffuse backscatter due to rocks at both the Lander l (VL1) and Lander 2 (VL2) sites. We consider single scattering from both surface and subsurface objects of various shapes, ranging from an ideal sphere to an accurate digitized model of a terrestrial rock. The FDTD cross-section calculations explicitly account for the size, shape, composition, orientation, and burial state of the scattering object, the incident wave angle and polarization, and the composition of the surface. We calculate depolarized specific cross sections at 12.6 cm wavelength due to lossless rock-like scatterers of about 0.014 at VL1 and 0.023 at VL2, which are comparable to the measured ranges of 0.019-0.032 and 0.012-0.018, respectively. We also discuss the variation of the diffuse cross section as the local angle of incidence, ??i, changes. Numerical calculations for a limited set of rock shapes indicate a marked difference between the angular backscattering behavior of wavelength-scale surface and subsurface rocks: while subsurface rocks scatter approximately as a cosine power law, surface rocks display a complex variation, often with peak backscattering at high incidence angles (??i = 70??-75??). Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Enhanced backscatter of optical beams reflected in turbulent air.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W; Palastro, J P; Wu, C; Davis, C C

    2015-07-01

    Optical beams propagating through air acquire phase distortions from turbulent fluctuations in the refractive index. While these distortions are usually deleterious to propagation, beams reflected in a turbulent medium can undergo a local recovery of spatial coherence and intensity enhancement referred to as enhanced backscatter (EBS). Here we validate the commonly used phase screen simulation with experimental results obtained from lab-scale experiments. We also verify theoretical predictions of the dependence of the turbulence strength on EBS. Finally, we present a novel algorithm called the "tilt-shift method" which allows detection of EBS in frozen turbulence, reducing the time required to detect the EBS signal.

  15. External quantum efficiency enhancement by photon recycling with backscatter evasion.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Koji; Perreca, Antonio; Arai, Koji; Adhikari, Rana X

    2018-05-01

    The nonunity quantum efficiency (QE) in photodiodes (PD) causes deterioration of signal quality in quantum optical experiments due to photocurrent loss as well as the introduction of vacuum fluctuations into the measurement. In this paper, we report that the external QE enhancement of a PD was demonstrated by recycling the reflected photons. The external QE for an InGaAs PD was increased by 0.01-0.06 from 0.86-0.92 over a wide range of incident angles. Moreover, we confirmed that this technique does not increase backscattered light when the recycled beam is properly misaligned.

  16. Enhanced backscattering through a deep random phase screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakeman, E.

    1988-10-01

    The statistical properties of radiation scattered by a system consisting of a plane mirror placed in the Fresnel region behind a smoothly varying deep random-phase screen with off-axis beam illumination are studied. It is found that two mechanisms cause enhanced scattering around the backward direction, according to the mirror position with respect to the focusing plane of the screen. In all of the plane mirror geometries considered, the scattered field remains a complex Gaussian process with a spatial coherence function identical to that expected for a single screen, and a speckle size smaller than the width of backscatter enhancement.

  17. Raman backscatter measurement research on water vapor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    Raman backscatter techniques proved to be a useful remote sensing tool, whose full potential has not been realized. The types of information available from laser probes in atmospheric studies are reviewed. Detection levels for known Raman cross sections are calculated using the laser radar equation. Laboratory experiments performed for H2O, N2, SO2, O2 and HCL indicate that accurate wavelength cross sections need to be obtained, as well as more emphasis on obtaining accurate Raman cross sections of molecular species at wavelengths in the ultraviolet spectra.

  18. Relating the radar backscattering coefficient to leaf-area index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Allen, C.; Eger, G.; Kanemasu, E.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the radar backscattering coefficient of a vegetation canopy, sigma(0) sub can, and the canopy's leaf area index (LAI) is examined. The relationship is established through the development of a model for corn and sorghum and another for wheat. Both models are extensions of the cloud model of Attema and Ulaby (1978). Analysis of experimental data measured at 8.6, 13.0, 17.0, and 35.6 GHz indicates that most of the temporal variations of sigma(0) sub can can be accounted for through variations in green LAI alone, if the latter is greater than 0.5.

  19. Coherent Backscattering in the Cross-Polarized Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischenko, Michael I.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the asymptotic behavior of the cross-polarized enhancement factor in the framework of the standard low-packing-density theory of coherent backscattering by discrete random media composed of spherically symmetric particles. It is shown that if the particles are strongly absorbing or if the smallest optical dimension of the particulate medium (i.e., the optical thickness of a plane-parallel slab or the optical diameter of a spherically symmetric volume) approaches zero, then the cross-polarized enhancement factor tends to its upper-limit value 2. This theoretical prediction is illustrated using direct computer solutions of the Maxwell equations for spherical volumes of discrete random medium.

  20. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steelmore » or plastic bracket splints.« less

  1. Stress in recrystallized quartz by electron backscatter diffraction mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llana-Fúnez, S.

    2017-07-01

    The long-term state of stress at middle and lower crustal depths can be estimated through the study of the microstructure of exhumed rocks from active and/or ancient shear zones. Constitutive equations for deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed rocks relate differential stress to the size of recrystallized grains. Cross et al. (2017) take advantage of electron backscatter diffraction mapping to systematically separate new recrystallized grains from host grains on the basis of the measurable lattice distorsion within the grains. They produce the first calibrated piezometer for quartz with this technique, reproducing within error a previous calibration based on optical microscopy.

  2. Improvement and extension of a radar forest backscattering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonett, David S.; Wang, Yong

    1988-01-01

    Research to-date has focused on modeling development and programming based on model components proposed during the past several months and research progress made by the Simonett team. The model components and programs (in C language under UNIX) finished to date are summarized. These model components may help explain the contributions of various vegetation structural components to the attenuation and backscattering of vegetated surfaces to extract useful data concerning forest stands and their underlying surfaces for both the seawater-on and seawater-off.

  3. Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-18

    basically the same experimental set up (Fig. 2-1) as the BBS experiments that form the basis of the shallow-water portion of this report1. Their dates...6 experiments in 5 distinct environments from 1993 to 2005. This report presents the BBS results from these experiments , as well as empirical fits...Test Operations…………………………………………………………..50 B Measured Bottom Backscattering Strengths…………………...……..50 7 CROSS- EXPERIMENT EPL-FIT VALUES (SHALLOW

  4. Quantifying Fish Backscattering using SONAR Instrument and Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manik, Henry M.

    2016-08-01

    Sonar instrument was used to study backscattering from tuna fish. Extraction of target strength, incidence angle, and frequency dependence of the backscattered signal for individual scatterer was important for biological information. For this purpose, acoustic measurement of fish backscatter was conducted in the laboratory. Characteristics and general trends of the target strength of fish with special reference to tuna fish were investigated by using a Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) model. Backscattering strength were calculated for the KRM having typical morphological and physical parameters of actual fish. Those backscattering amplitudes were shown as frequency, body length, backscattering patterns, the density and sound speed dependences, and orientation dependence. These results were compared with experimentally measured target strength data and good agreement was found. Measurement and model showed the target strength from the fish are depend on the presence of swimbladder. Target Strength increase with increasing the frequency and fish length.

  5. A-4 scientific results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of galactic sources, extragalactic sources and gamma bursts with the A-4 instrument at energy 1 energies of between 0.1 to 10 MeV are discussed. Aximuthal scans are presented. The Crab Nebula and its spectrum and the spectrum of Cygnus Z-1 are described.

  6. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  7. Building blocks of a multi-layer PET with time sequence photon interaction discrimination and double Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilisie, V.; Giménez-Alventosa, V.; Moliner, L.; Sánchez, F.; González, A. J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M. J.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2018-07-01

    Current PET detectors have a very low sensitivity, of the order of a few percent. One of the reasons is the fact that Compton interactions are rejected. If an event involves multiple Compton scattering and the total deposited energy lays within the photoelectric peak, then an energy-weighted centroid is the given output for the coordinates of the reconstructed interaction point. This introduces distortion in the final reconstructed image. The aim of our work is to prove that Compton events are a very rich source of additional information as one can improve the resolution of the detector and implicitly the final reconstructed image. This could be a real breakthrough for PET detector technology as one should be able to obtain better results with less patient radiation. Using a PET as a double Compton camera, by means of Compton cone matching i.e., Compton cones coming from the same event should be compatible, is applied to discard randoms, patient scattered events and also, to perform a correct matching among events with multiple coincidences. In order to fully benefit experimentally from Compton events using monolithic scintillators a multi-layer configuration is needed and a good time-of-flight resolution.

  8. Comparison of Lidar Backscatter with Particle Distribution and GOES-7 Data in Hurricane Juliette

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.; Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of calibrated backscatter, using two continuous wave Doppler lidars operating at wavelengths 9.1 and 10.6 micrometers were obtained along with cloud particle size distributions in Hurricane Juliette on 21 September 1995 at altitude approximately 11.7 km. Agreement between backscatter from the two lidars and with the cloud particle size distribution is excellent. Features in backscatter and particle number density compare well with concurrent GOES-7 infrared images.

  9. Standoff detection of hidden objects using backscattered ultra-intense laser-produced x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, H.; Mori, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2013-08-28

    Ultra-intense laser-produced sub-ps X-ray pulses can detect backscattered signals from objects hidden in aluminium containers. Coincident measurements using primary X-rays enable differentiation among acrylic, copper, and lead blocks inside the container. Backscattering reveals the shapes of the objects, while their material composition can be identified from the modification methods of the energy spectra of backscattered X-ray beams. This achievement is an important step toward more effective homeland security.

  10. SU-F-J-200: An Improved Method for Event Selection in Compton Camera Imaging for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, D; Beddar, S; Polf, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The uncertainty in the beam range in particle therapy limits the conformality of the dose distributions. Compton scatter cameras (CC), which measure the prompt gamma rays produced by nuclear interactions in the patient tissue, can reduce this uncertainty by producing 3D images confirming the particle beam range and dose delivery. However, the high intensity and short time windows of the particle beams limit the number of gammas detected. We attempt to address this problem by developing a method for filtering gamma ray scattering events from the background by applying the known gamma ray spectrum. Methods: We used a 4more » stage Compton camera to record in list mode the energy deposition and scatter positions of gammas from a Co-60 source. Each CC stage contained a 4×4 array of CdZnTe crystal. To produce images, we used a back-projection algorithm and four filtering Methods: basic, energy windowing, delta energy (ΔE), or delta scattering angle (Δθ). Basic filtering requires events to be physically consistent. Energy windowing requires event energy to fall within a defined range. ΔE filtering selects events with the minimum difference between the measured and a known gamma energy (1.17 and 1.33 MeV for Co-60). Δθ filtering selects events with the minimum difference between the measured scattering angle and the angle corresponding to a known gamma energy. Results: Energy window filtering reduced the FWHM from 197.8 mm for basic filtering to 78.3 mm. ΔE and Δθ filtering achieved the best results, FWHMs of 64.3 and 55.6 mm, respectively. In general, Δθ filtering selected events with scattering angles < 40°, while ΔE filtering selected events with angles > 60°. Conclusion: Filtering CC events improved the quality and resolution of the corresponding images. ΔE and Δθ filtering produced similar results but each favored different events.« less

  11. Polished sample preparing and backscattered electron imaging and of fly ash-cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuxia; Li, Yanqi

    2018-03-01

    In recent decades, the technology of backscattered electron imaging and image analysis was applied in more and more study of mixed cement paste because of its special advantages. Test accuracy of this technology is affected by polished sample preparation and image acquisition. In our work, effects of two factors in polished sample preparing and backscattered electron imaging were investigated. The results showed that increasing smoothing pressure could improve the flatness of polished surface and then help to eliminate interference of morphology on grey level distribution of backscattered electron images; increasing accelerating voltage was beneficial to increase gray difference among different phases in backscattered electron images.

  12. Effects of soil and canopy characteristics on microwave backscattering of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency modulated continuous wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck and backscatter coefficients of corn were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  13. A Bulk Comptonization Model for the Prompt GRB Emission and its Relation to the Fermi GRB Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    We present a model in which the GRB prompt emission at E E(sub peak) is due to bulk Comptonization by the relativistic blast wave motion of either its own synchrotron photons of ambient photons of the stellar configuration that gave birth to the GRB. The bulk Comptonization process then induces the production of relativistic electrons of Lorentz factor equal to that of the blast wave through interactions with its ambient protons. The inverse compton emission of these electrons produces a power law component that extends to multi GeV energies in good agreement with the LAT GRB observations.

  14. The diffuse galactic gamma radiation: The Compton contribution and component separation by energy interval and galactic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation to be expected from cosmic ray interactions with matter and photons was examined. Particular emphasis is placed on the Compton emission. Both the photon density in and near the visible region and that in the region are deduced from the estimates of the emission functions throughout the Galaxy. The blackbody radiation is also included in the estimate of the total Compton emission. The result suggests that the gamma ray Compton radiation from cosmic ray ineractions with galactic visible and infrared photons is substantially larger than previously believed.

  15. The growth and decay of equatorial backscatter plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, R. T.

    1980-02-01

    During the past three years, a series of rocket experiments from the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, were conducted to investigate the character of intense, scintillation-producing irregularities that occur in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere. Because the source mechanism of equatorial irregularities, believed to be the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, is analogous to that which generates plasma-density striations in a nuclear-induced environment, there is considerable interest in the underlying physics that controls the characteristics of these irregularities. A primary objective of ALTAIR investigations of equatorial irregularities is to seek an understanding of the underlying physics by establishing the relationship between meter-scale irregularities (detected by ALTAIR), and the large-scale plasma-density depletions (or 'bubbles') that contain the kilometer-scale, scintillation-producing irregularities. We describe the time evolution of backscatter 'plumes' produced by one meter equatorial field-aligned irregularities. Using ALTAIR, a fully steerable backscatter radar, to repeatedly map selected plumes, we characterize the dynamic behavior of plumes in terms of growth and a decay phase. Most of the observed characteristics are found to be consistent with equatorial-irregularity generation predicted by current theories of Rayleigh-Taylor and gradient-drift instabilities. However, other characteristics have been found that suggest key roles played by the eastward neutral wind and by altitude-modulation of the bottomside F layer in establishing the initial conditions for plume growth.

  16. Acoustic backscatter models of fish: Gradual or punctuated evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, John K.

    2004-05-01

    Sound-scattering characteristics of aquatic organisms are routinely investigated using theoretical and numerical models. Development of the inverse approach by van Holliday and colleagues in the 1970s catalyzed the development and validation of backscatter models for fish and zooplankton. As the understanding of biological scattering properties increased, so did the number and computational sophistication of backscatter models. The complexity of data used to represent modeled organisms has also evolved in parallel to model development. Simple geometric shapes representing body components or the whole organism have been replaced by anatomically accurate representations derived from imaging sensors such as computer-aided tomography (CAT) scans. In contrast, Medwin and Clay (1998) recommend that fish and zooplankton should be described by simple theories and models, without acoustically superfluous extensions. Since van Holliday's early work, how has data and computational complexity influenced accuracy and precision of model predictions? How has the understanding of aquatic organism scattering properties increased? Significant steps in the history of model development will be identified and changes in model results will be characterized and compared. [Work supported by ONR and the Alaska Fisheries Science Center.

  17. Measuring and modeling the backscattering cross section of a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Leaves are a significant feature of any vegetation canopy, and for remote sensing purposes it is important to develop an effective model for predicting the scattering from a leaf. From measurements of the X band backscattering cross section of a coleus leaf in varying stages of dryness, it is shown that a uniform resistive sheet constitutes such a model for a planar leaf. The scattering is determined by the (complex) resistivity which is, in turn, entirely specified by the gravimetric moisture content of the leaf. Using an available asymptotic expression for the scattering from a rectangular resistive plate which includes, as a special case, a metallic plate whose resistivity is zero, the computed backscattering cross sections for both principal polarizations are found to be in excellent agreement with data measured for rectangular sections of leaves with different moisture contents. If the resistivity is sufficiently large, the asymptotic expressions do not differ significantly from the physical optics ones, and for naturally shaped leaves as well as rectangular sections, the physical optics approximation in conjunction with the resistive sheet model faithfully reproduces the dominant feataures of the scattering patterns under all moisture conditions.

  18. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  19. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  20. Backscattering measuring system for optimization of intravenous laser irradiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, Tatyana V.; Popov, V. D.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous laser blood irradiation as an effective method of biostimulation and physiotherapy becomes a more popular procedure. Optimal irradiation conditions for each patient are needed to be established individually. A fiber optics feedback system combined with conventional intravenous laser irradiation system was developed to control of irradiation process. The system consists of He-Ne laser, fiber optics probe and signal analyzer. Intravenous blood irradiation was performed in 7 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with different diseases. Measurements in vivo were related to in vitro blood irradiation which was performed in the same conditions with force-circulated venous blood. Comparison of temporal variations of backscattered light during all irradiation procedures has shown a strong discrepancy on optical properties of blood in patients with various health disorders since second procedure. The best cure effect was achieved when intensity of backscattered light was constant during at least five minutes. As a result, the optical irradiation does was considered to be equal 20 minutes' exposure of 3 mW He-Ne laser light at the end of fourth procedure.

  1. Terrain-analysis procedures for modeling radar backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, Gerald G.; Pike, Richard J.; Berlin, Graydon Lennis

    1978-01-01

    The collection and analysis of detailed information on the surface of natural terrain are important aspects of radar-backscattering modeling. Radar is especially sensitive to surface-relief changes in the millimeter- to-decimeter scale four conventional K-band (~1-cm wavelength) to L-band (~25-cm wavelength) radar systems. Surface roughness statistics that characterize these changes in detail have been generated by a comprehensive set of seven programmed calculations for radar-backscatter modeling from sets of field measurements. The seven programs are 1) formatting of data in readable form for subsequent topographic analysis program; 2) relief analysis; 3) power spectral analysis; 4) power spectrum plots; 5) slope angle between slope reversals; 6) slope angle against slope interval plots; and 7) base length slope angle and curvature. This complete Fortran IV software package, 'Terrain Analysis', is here presented for the first time. It was originally developed a decade ago for investigations of lunar morphology and surface trafficability for the Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle.

  2. Measurement of Sediment Deposition Rates using an Optical Backscatter Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridd, P.; Day, G.; Thomas, S.; Harradence, J.; Fox, D.; Bunt, J.; Renagi, O.; Jago, C.

    2001-02-01

    An optical method for measuring siltation of sediment has been developed using an optical fibre backscatter (OBS) nephelometer. Sediment settling upon the optical fibre sensor causes an increase in the backscatter reading which can be related to the settled sediment surface density (SSSD) as measured in units of mg cm -2. Calibration and laboratory tests indicate that the resolution of measurements of SSSD is 0·01 mg cm -2and an accuracy of 5% in still water. In moving water it is more difficult to determine the accuracy of the method because other methods with suitable resolution are unavailable. However, indirect methods using measurements of changing suspended sediment concentration in a ring flume, indicate that the OBS method under-predicts deposition. The series of siltation from three field sites are presented. This sensor offers considerable advances over other methods of measuring settling because time series of settling may be taken and thus settling events may be related to other hydrodynamic parameters such as wave climate and currents.

  3. Detection of Explosive Devices using X-ray Backscatter Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.

    2002-09-01

    It is our goal to develop a coded aperture based X-ray backscatter imaging detector that will provide sufficient speed, contrast and spatial resolution to detect Antipersonnel Landmines and Improvised Explosive Devices (IED). While our final objective is to field a hand-held detector, we have currently constrained ourselves to a design that can be fielded on a small robotic platform. Coded aperture imaging has been used by the observational gamma astronomy community for a number of years. However, it has been the recent advances in the field of medical nuclear imaging which has allowed for the application of the technique to a backscatter scenario. In addition, driven by requirements in medical applications, advances in X-ray detection are continually being made, and detectors are now being produced that are faster, cheaper and lighter than those only a decade ago. With these advances, a coded aperture hand-held imaging system has only recently become a possibility. This paper will begin with an introduction to the technique, identify recent advances which have made this approach possible, present a simulated example case, and conclude with a discussion on future work.

  4. Random fiber laser based on artificially controlled backscattering fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, Daru; Li, Haitao; She, Lijuan; Wu, Qiong

    2018-01-10

    The random fiber laser (RFL), which is a milestone in laser physics and nonlinear optics, has attracted considerable attention recently. Most previously reported RFLs are based on distributed feedback of Rayleigh scattering amplified through the stimulated Raman-Brillouin scattering effect in single-mode fibers, which require long-distance (tens of kilometers) single-mode fibers and high threshold, up to watt level, due to the extremely small Rayleigh scattering coefficient of the fiber. We proposed and demonstrated a half-open-cavity RFL based on a segment of an artificially controlled backscattering single-mode fiber with a length of 210 m, 310 m, or 390 m. A fiber Bragg grating with a central wavelength of 1530 nm and a segment of artificially controlled backscattering single-mode fiber fabricated by using a femtosecond laser form the half-open cavity. The proposed RFL achieves thresholds of 25 mW, 30 mW, and 30 mW, respectively. Random lasing at a wavelength of 1530 nm and extinction ratio of 50 dB is achieved when a segment of 5 m erbium-doped fiber is pumped by a 980 nm laser diode in the RFL. A novel RFL with many short cavities has been achieved with low threshold.

  5. Nimbus 7 solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone products user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Albert J.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Klenk, K. F.; Taylor, Steven L.; Heath, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Three ozone tape products from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) experiment aboard Nimbus 7 were archived at the National Space Science Data Center. The experiment measures the fraction of incoming radiation backscattered by the Earth's atmosphere at 12 wavelengths. In-flight measurements were used to monitor changes in the instrument sensitivity. Total column ozone is derived by comparing the measurements with calculations of what would be measured for different total ozone amounts. The altitude distribution is retrieved using an optimum statistical technique for the inversion. The estimated initial error in the absolute scale for total ozone is 2 percent, with a 3 percent drift over 8 years. The profile error depends on latitude and height, smallest at 3 to 10 mbar; the drift increases with increasing altitude. Three tape products are described. The High Density SBUV (HDSBUV) tape contains the final derived products - the total ozone and the vertical ozone profile - as well as much detailed diagnostic information generated during the retrieval process. The Compressed Ozone (CPOZ) tape contains only that subset of HDSBUV information, including total ozone and ozone profiles, considered most useful for scientific studies. The Zonal Means Tape (ZMT) contains daily, weekly, monthly and quarterly averages of the derived quantities over 10 deg latitude zones.

  6. Investigation of microwave backscatter from the air-sea interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Robert E.; Carswell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Monitoring the ocean surface winds and mean ocean surface level is essential for improving our knowledge of the climate. Two instruments that may provide us with this information are satellite-based scatterometers and altimeters. However, these instruments measure the backscatter characteristics of the ocean surface from which other physical parameters, such as the wind speed or ocean surface height, are derived. To improve the algorithms or models that relate the electromagnetic backscatter to the desired physical parameters, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (MIRSL) designed and fabricated three airborne scatterometers: a C-band scatterometer (CSCAT), Ku-band scatterometer (KUSCAT) and C/Ku-band scatterometer (EMBR). One or more of these instruments participated in the Electromagnetic Bias experiment (EM Bias), Shelf Edge Exchange Processes experiment (SEEP), Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE), Southern Ocean Wave Experiment (SOWEX), Hurricane Tina research flights, Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE), and Ladir In-space Technology Experiment (LITE). This document describes the three scatterometers, summarizes our measurement campaigns and major contributions to the scientific and engineering communities, lists the publications that resulted, and presents the degrees earned under the support of this NASA grant.

  7. Three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation lidar for wind profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Radhakrishnan Mylapore, Anand

    2017-03-01

    The development of a three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation (ABC) light detection and ranging (lidar) to measure wind characteristics for wake vortex and plume tracking applications is discussed. This is a direct detection elastic lidar that uses three laser transceivers, operating at 1030-nm wavelength with ˜10-kHz pulse repetition frequency and nanosec class pulse widths, to directly obtain three components of wind velocities. By tracking the motion of aerosol structures along and between three near-parallel laser beams, three-component wind speed profiles along the field-of-view of laser beams are obtained. With three 8-in. transceiver modules, placed in a near-parallel configuration on a two-axis pan-tilt scanner, the lidar measures wind speeds up to 2 km away. Optical flow algorithms have been adapted to obtain the movement of aerosol structures between the beams. Aerosol density fluctuations are cross-correlated between successive scans to obtain the displacements of the aerosol features along the three axes. Using the range resolved elastic backscatter data from each laser beam, which is scanned over the volume of interest, a three-dimensional map of aerosol density can be generated in a short time span. The performance of the ABC wind lidar prototype, validated using sonic anemometer measurements, is discussed.

  8. Monitoring evolution of HIFU-induced lesions with backscattered ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Ajay; Kaczkowski, Peter J.

    2003-04-01

    Backscattered radio frequency (rf) data from a modified commercial ultrasound scanner were collected in a series of in vitro experiments in which high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was used to create lesions in freshly excised bovine liver tissue. Two signal processing approaches were used to visualize the temporal evolution of lesion formation. First, apparent tissue motion due to temperature rise was detected using cross-correlation techniques. Results indicate that differential processing of travel time can provide temperature change information throughout the therapy delivery phase and after HIFU has been turned off, over a relatively large spatial region. Second, changes in the frequency spectrum of rf echoes due to changes in the scattering properties of the heated region were observed well before the appearance of hyper-echogenic spots in the focal zone. Furthermore, the increase in attenuation in the lesion zone changes the measured backscatter spectrum from regions distal to it along the imaging beam. Both effects were visualized using spectral processing and display techniques that provide a color spatial map of these features for the clinician. Our results demonstrate potential for these ultrasound-based techniques in targeting and monitoring of HIFU therapy, and perhaps post-treatment visualization of HIFU-induced lesions.

  9. Classification of kidney and liver tissue using ultrasound backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Rivaz, Hassan; Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Jago, James; Safdar, Nabile; Boctor, Emad M.; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) tissue characterization provides valuable information for the initialization of automatic segmentation algorithms, and can further provide complementary information for diagnosis of pathologies. US tissue characterization is challenging due to the presence of various types of image artifacts and dependence on the sonographer's skills. One way of overcoming this challenge is by characterizing images based on the distribution of the backscatter data derived from the interaction between US waves and tissue. The goal of this work is to classify liver versus kidney tissue in 3D volumetric US data using the distribution of backscatter US data recovered from end-user displayed Bmode image available in clinical systems. To this end, we first propose the computation of a large set of features based on the homodyned-K distribution of the speckle as well as the correlation coefficients between small patches in 3D images. We then utilize the random forests framework to select the most important features for classification. Experiments on in-vivo 3D US data from nine pediatric patients with hydronephrosis showed an average accuracy of 94% for the classification of liver and kidney tissues showing a good potential of this work to assist in the classification and segmentation of abdominal soft tissue.

  10. Backscatter Mossbauer Spectrometer (BaMS) for extraterrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, D. G.; Shelfer, T. D.; Pimperl, M. M.; Wills, E. L.; Shen, M. H.; Morris, R. V.

    1993-01-01

    Mossbauer spectroscopy is a nuclear gamma resonance technique particularly well suited to the study of materials that contain iron (Fe-57). It can provide information on the oxidation state of iron as well as the type and proportion of iron-containing mineral species in a sample of interest. Iron Mossbauer spectroscopy (FeMS) has been applied to samples believed to have come from Mars (SNC meteorites) and has been helpful in refining the choice among putative Martian surface materials by suggesting a likely nanophase component of the Martian regolity. FeMS spectrum of a Martial analogue material (Hawaiian palagonite) is shown; it is dominated by ferric-bearing phases and shows evidence of a nanophase component. FeMS has also been applied to lunar materials. It can be used to measure the maturity of lunar surface material and has been proposed as a prospector for lunar ilmenite, an oxygen resource mineral. Several years ago we suggested a backscatter Mossbauer spectrometer (BaMS) for a Mars rover mission. Backscatter design was selected as most appropriate for in-situ application because no sample preparation is required. Since that time, we have continued to develop the BaMS instrument in anticipation that it would eventually find a home on a NASA planetary mission. Gooding proposed BaMS as a geochemistry instrument on MESUR. More recently, an LPI workshop has recommended that BaMS be included in a three-instrument payload on the next (1996?) lunar lander.

  11. Kinematics of the Elastic Scattering of $gamma$ in Hydrogen (Compton Effecte Between 300 and 1500 Mev; CINEMATICA DELLA DIFFUSIONE ELASTICA DI $gamma$ IN IDROGENO (EFFETTO COMPTON) TRA 300 E 1500 MEV

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, P.

    1962-10-31

    The proton (p ) and gamma energy and angular distributions from the elastic (Compton) interaction p + gamma -- p + gamma are calculated. The results are tabulated for 25-Mev gamma increments, from 300 to 1500 Mev. (T.F.H.)

  12. Feasibility Study of Compton Cameras for X-ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography with Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vernekohl, Don; Ahmad, Moiz; Chinn, Garry; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence imaging is a promising imaging technique able to depict the spatial distributions of low amounts of molecular agents in vivo. Currently, the translation of the technique to preclinical and clinical applications is hindered by long scanning times as objects are scanned with flux-limited narrow pencil beams. The study presents a novel imaging approach combining x-ray fluorescence imaging with Compton imaging. Compton cameras leverage the imaging performance of XFCT and abolish the need of pencil beam excitation. The study examines the potential of this new imaging approach on the base of Monte-Carlo simulations. In the work, it is first presented that the particular option of slice/fan-beam x-ray excitation has advantages in image reconstruction in regard of processing time and image quality compared to traditional volumetric Compton imaging. In a second experiment, the feasibility of the approach for clinical applications with tracer agents made from gold nano-particles is examined in a simulated lung scan scenario. The high energy of characteristic x-ray photons from gold is advantageous for deep tissue penetration and has lower angular blurring in the Compton camera. It is found that Doppler broadening in the first detector stage of the Compton camera adds the largest contribution on the angular blurring; physically limiting the spatial resolution. Following the analysis of the results from the spatial resolution test, resolutions in the order of one centimeter are achievable with the approach in the center of the lung. The concept of Compton imaging allows to distinguish to some extend between scattered photons and x-ray fluorescent photons based on their difference in emission position. The results predict that molecular sensitivities down to 240 pM/l for 5 mm diameter lesions at 15 mGy for 50 nm diameter gold nano-particles are achievable. A 45-fold speed up time for data acquisition compared to traditional pencil beam XFCT could be achieved

  13. Ice velocity and SAR backscatter record for the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuchl, B.; Mouginot, J.; Rignot, E. J.; Small, D.; Khazendar, A.; Seroussi, H. L.; Kellndorfer, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula has undergone some dramatic changes in the last three decades. The latest high-profile change was the calving of iceberg A68 off the Larsen-C ice shelf, which resulted in the ice shelf to have the smallest extent since the beginning of satellite observations. A first indication of the beginning of the formation of the iceberg was reported based on 2008 ice velocity data by Khazendar et al. 2011 (GRL). With two long term funded missions as well as other available sensors, there is a wealth of data being collected not seen before. The European Sentinel-1 constellation provides InSAR coverage of the area every 6 days. In addition, lower resolution wide swath data are being collected over the Weddell sea and cover the shelf frequently. Landsat-8 thermal infrared imagery proved another valuable data source in monitoring the progression. USGS has committed Landsat-8 for frequent acquisitions in Antarctica during periods with available daylight. Here we take a longer term view of the Antarctic Peninsula and will provide a satellite data record of ice velocity data generated using SAR and optical data. In difference to our MEaSUREs Antarctica-wide 1 km annual product, this regional time series will be provided at 50 m posting to facilitate research that requires higher resolution velocity maps. We also use suitable InSAR data to determine the grounding line for the region. SAR backscatter can vary dramatically in the region, particularly in Austral summer. Low backscatter is an indication for surface melt, and in the case of Larsen-C, this can engulf the entire ice shelf at times. We will generate a calibrated backscatter time series using a precision DEM of the region. The maps will provide the temporal and spatial extent of surface melt and will be compared with results from the Regional Climate Model (RACMO) and, where available, with weather station data. We also use double difference interferograms, to chronicle the progression of the Larsen

  14. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.

    2016-08-03

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments, and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40–200keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Here, experiments were performed atmore » energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.« less

  15. Quantitation of Membrane-Ligand Interactions Using Backscattering Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Kussrow, Amanda K.; Mileni, Mauro; Finn, M.G.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    Though membrane-associated proteins are ubiquitous within all living organisms and represent the majority of drug targets, a general method for direct, label-free measurement of ligand binding to native membranes has not been reported. Here we show backscattering interferometry (BSI) to be a viable technique for quantifying ligand-receptor binding affinities in a variety of membrane environments. By detecting minute changes in the refractive index of a solution, BSI allows binding interactions of proteins with their ligands to be measured at picomolar concentrations. Equilibrium binding constants in the micromolar to picomolar range were obtained for small- and large-molecule interactions in both synthetic- and cell-derived membranes without the use of labels or supporting substrates. The simple and low-cost hardware, high sensitivity, and label-free nature of BSI should make it readily applicable to the study of many membrane-associated proteins of biochemical and pharmacological interest. PMID:21399645

  16. Backscatter-depolarisation lidars on high-altitude research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitev, Valentin; Matthey, Renaud; Makarov, Vladislav

    2014-11-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and the applications of two compact elastic backscatter depolarisation lidars, installed on-board the high-altitude research aircraft Myasishchev M-55 Geophysica. The installation of the lidars is intended for simultaneous probing of air parcels respectively upward and downward from the aircraft flight altitude to identify the presence of clouds (or aerosol )above and below the aircraft and to collocate them with in situ instruments. The lidar configuration and the procedure for its on-ground validation is outlined. Example of airborne measurements include polar stratospheric clouds, both synoptical and in lee-waves, ultra-thin cirrus clouds around the tropical tropopause and observation of aerosol layers emerging from the top of deep tropical convection.

  17. Electromagnetic backscattering from a random distribution of lossy dielectric scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Electromagnetic backscattering from a sparse distribution of discrete lossy dielectric scatterers occupying a region 5 was studied. The scatterers are assumed to have random position and orientation. Scattered fields are calculated by first finding the mean field and then by using it to define an equivalent medium within the volume 5. The scatterers are then viewed as being embedded in the equivalent medium; the distorted Born approximation is then used to find the scattered fields. This technique represents an improvement over the standard Born approximation since it takes into account the attenuation of the incident and scattered waves in the equivalent medium. The method is used to model a leaf canopy when the leaves are modeled by lossy dielectric discs.

  18. Artist concept of Shuttle Solar Backscatter UV (SSBUV) flight configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Artist concept of STS-34 payload bay (PLB) experiment is titled SSBUV FLIGHT CONFIGURATION. The labeled drawing of the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (UV) (SSBUV) get away special (GAS) canisters identifies the adapter beam, motorized door mechanism, instrument canister, support canister, bottom hat, and interconnect cable. The GAS canisters will be mounted on the starboard wall of Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, PLB. One canister contains an instrument nearly identical to that flown on the satellite. The second canister provides power, data, and command systems. During STS-34, SSBUV instrument will calibrate similar ozone measuring space-based instruments on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) TIROS satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-11). SSBUV uses the Space Shuttle's orbital flight path to assess instrument performance by directly comparing data from identical instruments aboard TIROS spacecraft, as the Shuttle and the satellite pass over the same E

  19. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas Jan [Livermore, CA; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; Sommers, Ricky [Oakley, CA; Goers, Uta-Barbara [Campbell, NY; Armstrong, Karla M [Livermore, CA

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  20. Back-scattered electron imaging of skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A; Jones, S J

    The use of solid-state back-scattered electron (BSE) detectors in the scanning electron microscopic study of skeletal tissues has been investigated. To minimize the topographic element in the image, flat samples and a ring detector configuration with the sample at normal incidence to the beam and the detector are used. Very flat samples are prepared by diamond micromilling or diamond polishing plastic-embedded tissue. Density discrimination in the image is so good that different density phases within mineralized bone can be imaged. For unembedded spongy bone, cut surfaces can be discriminated from natural surfaces by a topographic contrast mechanism. BSE imaging also presents advantages for unembedded samples with rough topography, such as anorganic preparations of the mineralization zone in cartilage, which give rise to severe charging problems with conventional secondary electron imaging.

  1. Post-image acquisition processing approaches for coherent backscatter validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher A.; Belichki, Sara B.; Coffaro, Joseph T.; Panich, Michael G.; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.

    2014-10-01

    Utilizing a retro-reflector from a target point, the reflected irradiance of a laser beam traveling back toward the transmitting point contains a peak point of intensity known as the enhanced backscatter (EBS) phenomenon. EBS is dependent on the strength regime of turbulence currently occurring within the atmosphere as the beam propagates across and back. In order to capture and analyze this phenomenon so that it may be compared to theory, an imaging system is integrated into the optical set up. With proper imaging established, we are able to implement various post-image acquisition techniques to help determine detection and positioning of EBS which can then be validated with theory by inspection of certain dependent meteorological parameters such as the refractive index structure parameter, Cn2 and wind speed.

  2. Enhanced backscatter of optical beams reflected in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W.; Palastro, J. P.; Wu, C.; Davis, C. C.

    2014-10-01

    Optical beams propagating through the atmosphere acquire phase distortions from turbulent fluctuations in the refractive index. While these distortions are usually deleterious to propagation, beams reflected in a turbulent medium can undergo a local recovery of spatial coherence and intensity enhancement referred to as enhanced backscatter (EBS). Using simulations, we investigate the EBS of optical beams reflected from mirrors, corner cubes, and rough surfaces, and identify the regimes in which EBS is most distinctly observed. Standard EBS detection requires averaging the reflected intensity over many passes through uncorrelated turbulence. Here we present an algorithm called the "tilt-shift method" which allows detection of EBS in static turbulence, improving its suitability for potential applications.

  3. Simulation of double-pass stimulated Raman backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Chen, Q.; Morozov, A.; Suckewer, S.

    2018-04-01

    Experiments on Stimulated Raman Backscattering (SRBS) in plasma have demonstrated significantly higher energy conversion in a double-pass amplifier where the laser pulses go through the plasma twice compared with a single-pass amplifier with double the plasma length of a single pass. In this paper, the improvement in understanding recent experimental results is presented by considering quite in detail the effects of plasma heating on the modeling of SRBS. Our simulation results show that the low efficiency of single-pass amplifiers can be attributed to Landau damping and the frequency shift of Langmuir waves. In double-pass amplifiers, these issues can be avoided, to some degree, because pump-induced heating could be reduced, while the plasma cools down between the passes. Therefore, double-pass amplifiers yield considerably enhanced energy transfer from the pump to the seed, hence the output pulse intensity.

  4. Ocean Raman Scattering in Satellite Backscatter UV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Joiner, Joanna; Gleason, James; Bhartia, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ocean Raman scattering significantly contributes to the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines measured by satellite backscatter ultraviolet (buy) instruments in the cloudless atmosphere over clear ocean waters. A model accounting for this effect in buy measurements is developed and compared with observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GONE). The model extends existing models for ocean Raman scattering to the UV spectral range. Ocean Raman scattering radiance is propagated through the atmosphere using a concept of the Lambert equivalent reflectively and an accurate radiative transfer model for Rayleigh scattering. The model and observations can be used to evaluate laboratory measurements of pure water absorption in the UV. The good agreement between model and observations suggests that buy instruments may be useful for estimating chlorophyll content.

  5. Using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy to Characterize Targets for MTW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gunnar; Stockler, Barak; Ward, Ryan; Freeman, Charlie; Padalino, Stephen; Stillman, Collin; Ivancic, Steven; Reagan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2017-10-01

    A study is underway to determine the composition and thickness of targets used at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). In RBS, an ion beam is incident on a sample and the scattered ions are detected with a surface barrier detector. The resulting energy spectra of the scattered ions can be analyzed to determine important parameters of the target including elemental composition and thickness. Proton, helium and deuterium beams from the 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator at SUNY Geneseo have been used to characterize several different targets for MTW, including CH and aluminum foils of varying thickness. RBS spectra were also obtained for a cylindrical iron buried-layer target with aluminum dopant which was mounted on a silicon carbide stalk. The computer program SIMNRA is used to analyze the spectra. This work was funded in part by a Grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  6. A Geant4 model of backscatter security imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboffe, Eric Matthew

    The operating characteristics of x ray security scanner systems that utilize backscatter signal in order to distinguish person borne threats have never been made fully available to the general public. By designing a model using Geant4, studies can be performed which will shed light on systems such as security scanners and allow for analysis of the performance and safety of the system without access to any system data. Despite the fact that the systems are no longer in use at airports in the United States, the ability to design and validate detector models and phenomena is an important capability that can be applied to many current real world applications. The model presented provides estimates for absorbed dose, effective dose and dose depth distribution that are comparable to previously published work and explores imaging capabilities for the system embodiment modeled.

  7. Pulsed laser linescanner for a backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Bambha, Ray P.

    2004-02-10

    An active (laser-illuminated) imaging system is described that is suitable for use in backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI). A BAGI imager operates by imaging a scene as it is illuminated with radiation that is absorbed by the gas to be detected. Gases become "visible" in the image when they attenuate the illumination creating a shadow in the image. This disclosure describes a BAGI imager that operates in a linescanned manner using a high repetition rate pulsed laser as its illumination source. The format of this system allows differential imaging, in which the scene is illuminated with light at least 2 wavelengths--one or more absorbed by the gas and one or more not absorbed. The system is designed to accomplish imaging in a manner that is insensitive to motion of the camera, so that it can be held in the hand of an operator or operated from a moving vehicle.

  8. Identification of major backscattering sources in trees and shrubs at 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoughi, R.; Wu, L. K.; Moore, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    A short-range very-fine-resolution FM-CW radar scatterometer has been used to identify the primary contributors to 10-GHz radar backscatter from pine, pin oak, American sycamore and sugar maple trees, and from creeping juniper shrubs. This system provided a range resolution of 11 cm and gave a 16-cm diameter illumination area at the target range of about 4 m. For a pine tree, the needles caused the strongest backscatter as well as the strongest attenuation in the radar signal. Cones, although insignificant contributors to the total backscatter, were more important for backscattering than for attenuation. For the rest of the trees, leaves were the strongest cause of backscattering and attenuation. However, in the absence of leaves, the petioles, small twigs, and branches gave relatively strong backscatter. For American sycamore and sugar maple trees, the fruits did not affect the total backscatter unless they were packed in clusters. For creeping juniper the backscattered energy and attenuation in the radar signal were mainly due to the top two layers of the evergreen scales. The contribution of the tree trunks was not determined.

  9. Design of the optical backscatter diagnostic for laser plasma interaction measurements on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Datte, P.; Ng, E.; Maitland, K.; Hsing, W.; MacGowan, B. J.; Froula, D. H.; Neumayer, P.; Sutter, L.; Meezan, N.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Divol, L.; Andrews, S.; Jackson, J.; MacKinnon, A.; Jovanovic, I.; Beeler, R.; Bertolini, L.; Landon, M.; Alvarez, S.; Lee, T.; Watts, P.

    2007-11-01

    We describe the design of the backscatter diagnostic for NIF laser-plasma interaction (LPI) studies. It will initially be used to validate the 280 eV point design hohlraum and select phase plates for the ignition experiments. Backscatter measurements are planned for two separate groups of 4 beams (a quad). One quad is 30^o from the hohlraum axis and the other at 50^o. The backscatter measurement utilizes 2 instruments for each beam quad. The full aperture backscatter system (FABS) measures light backscattered into the final focus lens of each beam in the quad. The near backscatter imager (NBI) measures light backscattered outside of the beam quad. Both instruments must work in conjunction to provide spectrally and temporally resolved backscatter power. We describe the design of the diagnostic and its capabilities as well as plans for calibrating it and analyzing the resulting data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  11. Compton scattering studies and electronic properties of BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, Seema Kumari; Bapna, Komal; Heda, N. L.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2018-04-01

    We present the experimental momentum density of BaTiO3 measured using 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer. The experimental Compton profile (CP) has been compared with the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) based theoretical profiles for various exchange-correlation potentials. It is found that LCAO-B3PW based CP gives a better agreement with experiment than other theoretical profiles. We have also deduced the energy bands and density of states (DOS) for BaTiO3 using LCAO-B3PW scheme. The energy bands and DOS suggest an indirect band gap in the system arising due to O-2p states of valence band and Ti-3d states of conduction band. Peculiar electronic response of this system is found to be mainly due to hybridized states of Ba-5p/5s and O-2p orbitals.

  12. First refraction contrast imaging via Laser-Compton Scattering X-ray at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Aoki, Tatsuro; Washio, Masakazu

    2012-07-31

    Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS) is one of the most feasible techniques for high quality, high brightness, and compact X-ray source. High energy electron beam produced by accelerators scatters off the laser photon at a small spot. As a laser target, we have been developing a pulsedlaser storage cavity for increasing an X-ray flux. The X-ray flux was still inadequate that was 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5}/sec, however, we performed first refraction contrast imaging in order to evaluate the quality of LCS X-ray. Edge enhanced contrast imaging was achieved by changing the distance from sample to detector. The edge enhancement indicates that themore » LCS X-ray has small source size, i.e. high brightness. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based high brightness X-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.« less

  13. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  14. Compton profiles and electronic properties of TiB{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Samir, E-mail: sameerbhatt011@gmail.com; Suthar, K. K.; Ahuja, B. L.

    In this paper, we report the experimental Compton profile (CP) of TiB{sub 2} using high energy {sup 137}Cs γ-rays Compton spectrometer. To interpret the experimental momentum density, we have calculated the CPs using Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and HF within linear combination of atomic orbitals. The theoretical profile with generalized gradient approximation is found to be relatively in better agreement with the experimental profile. A sharp valley in density of states and hence the pseudogap near the Fermi energy is attributed to hybridization of Ti-3d and B-2p states and almost reverse trend of energymore » bands below and above the Fermi energy.« less

  15. A Compton suppressed detector multiplicity trigger based digital DAQ for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Samanta, S.; Banik, R.; Bhattacharjee, R.; Basu, K.; Raut, R.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Imran, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Goswami, A.; Palit, R.; Tan, H.

    2018-06-01

    The development of a digitizer based pulse processing and data acquisition system for γ-ray spectroscopy with large detector arrays is presented. The system is based on 250 MHz 12-bit digitizers, and is triggered by a user chosen multiplicity of Compton suppressed detectors. The logic for trigger generation is similar to the one practised for analog (NIM/CAMAC) pulse processing electronics, while retaining the fast processing merits of the digitizer system. Codes for reduction of data acquired from the system have also been developed. The system has been tested with offline studies using radioactive sources as well as in the in-beam experiments with an array of Compton suppressed Clover detectors. The results obtained therefrom validate its use in spectroscopic efforts for nuclear structure investigations.

  16. A novel comparison of Møller and Compton electron-beam polarimeters

    DOE PAGES

    Magee, J. A.; Narayan, A.; Jones, D.; ...

    2017-01-19

    We have performed a novel comparison between electron-beam polarimeters based on Moller and Compton scattering. A sequence of electron-beam polarization measurements were performed at low beam currents (more » $<$ 5 $$\\mu$$A) during the $$Q_{\\rm weak}$$ experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. These low current measurements were bracketed by the regular high current (180 $$\\mu$$A) operation of the Compton polarimeter. All measurements were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties of 1% or less, demonstrating that electron polarization does not depend significantly on the beam current. This result lends confidence to the common practice of applying Moller measurements made at low beam currents to physics experiments performed at higher beam currents. Here, the agreement between two polarimetry techniques based on independent physical processes sets an important benchmark for future precision asymmetry measurements that require sub-1% precision in polarimetry.« less

  17. Electron momentum density and Compton profile by a semi-empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Julio C.; Mitnik, Darío; Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2015-08-01

    Here we propose a semi-empirical approach to describe with good accuracy the electron momentum densities and Compton profiles for a wide range of pure crystalline metals. In the present approach, we use an experimental Compton profile to fit an analytical expression for the momentum densities of the valence electrons. This expression is similar to a Fermi-Dirac distribution function with two parameters, one of which coincides with the ground state kinetic energy of the free-electron gas and the other resembles the electron-electron interaction energy. In the proposed scheme conduction electrons are neither completely free nor completely bound to the atomic nucleus. This procedure allows us to include correlation effects. We tested the approach for all metals with Z=3-50 and showed the results for three representative elements: Li, Be and Al from high-resolution experiments.

  18. Electronic properties of Fe3O4: LCAO calculations and Compton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Kalpana; Tiwari, Shailja; Heda, N. L.

    2018-04-01

    We report the Compton profile (CP) measurements of Fe3O4 using 100 mCi241Am Compton spectrometer at momentum resolution of 0.55 a.u. The experimental CP has been compared with the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) data within density functional theory (DFT). The local density and generalized gradient approximation (LDA and GGA, respectively) have been used under the framework of DFT scheme. It is found that the DFT-GGA scheme gives the better agreement than to DFT-LDA. In addition, we have also computed the M ulliken's population (M P) and density of states (DOS) using the DFT scheme. M P data predicts the charge transfer from Fe to O atoms while DOS have confirmed the half metallic character of the compound.

  19. 3D Compton scattering imaging and contour reconstruction for a class of Radon transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, Gaël; Hahn, Bernadette N.

    2018-07-01

    Compton scattering imaging is a nascent concept arising from the current development of high-sensitive energy detectors and is devoted to exploit the scattering radiation to image the electron density of the studied medium. Such detectors are able to collect incoming photons in terms of energy. This paper introduces potential 3D modalities in Compton scattering imaging (CSI). The associated measured data are modeled using a class of generalized Radon transforms. The study of this class of operators leads to build a filtered back-projection kind algorithm preserving the contours of the sought-for function and offering a fast approach to partially solve the associated inverse problems. Simulation results including Poisson noise demonstrate the potential of this new imaging concept as well as the proposed image reconstruction approach.

  20. A novel comparison of Møller and Compton electron-beam polarimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J. A.; Narayan, A.; Jones, D.

    We have performed a novel comparison between electron-beam polarimeters based on Moller and Compton scattering. A sequence of electron-beam polarization measurements were performed at low beam currents (more » $<$ 5 $$\\mu$$A) during the $$Q_{\\rm weak}$$ experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. These low current measurements were bracketed by the regular high current (180 $$\\mu$$A) operation of the Compton polarimeter. All measurements were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties of 1% or less, demonstrating that electron polarization does not depend significantly on the beam current. This result lends confidence to the common practice of applying Moller measurements made at low beam currents to physics experiments performed at higher beam currents. Here, the agreement between two polarimetry techniques based on independent physical processes sets an important benchmark for future precision asymmetry measurements that require sub-1% precision in polarimetry.« less

  1. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of theta(p)(cm) cm = 70 degrees. The longitudinal transfer K-LL, measured to be 0.645 +/- 0.059 +/- 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying themore » spin of the proton. However, the observed value is similar to 3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  2. Determination of the scalar polarizabilities of the proton using beam asymmetry $$\\Sigma_{3}$$ in Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Sokhoyan, V.; Downie, E. J.; Mornacchi, E.; ...

    2017-01-01

    The scalar dipole polarizabilities, α E1 and β M1, are fundamental properties related to the internal dynamics of the nucleon. The currently accepted values of the proton polarizabilities were determined by fitting to unpolarized proton Compton scattering cross section data. The measurement of the beam asymmetry Σ 3 in a certain kinematical range provides an alternative approach to the extraction of the scalar polarizabilities. At the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) the beam asymmetry was measured for Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold for the first time. Finally, the results are compared with model calculations and the influence of the experimental datamore » on the extraction of the scalar polarizabilities is determined.« less

  3. Backscattering and Nonparaxiality Arrest Collapse of Damped Nonlinear Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fibich, G.; Ilan, B.; Tsynkov, S.

    2002-01-01

    The critical nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) models the propagation of intense laser light in Kerr media. This equation is derived from the more comprehensive nonlinear Helmholtz equation (NLH) by employing the paraxial approximation and neglecting the backscattered waves. It is known that if the input power of the laser beam (i.e., L(sub 2) norm of the initial solution) is sufficiently high, then the NLS model predicts that the beam will self-focus to a point (i.e.. collapse) at a finite propagation distance. Mathematically, this behavior corresponds to the formation of a singularity in the solution of the NLS. A key question which has been open for many years is whether the solution to the NLH, i.e., the 'parent' equation, may nonetheless exist and remain regular everywhere, in particular for those initial conditions (input powers) that lead to blowup in the NLS. In the current study, we address this question by introducing linear damping into both models and subsequently comparing the numerical solutions of the damped NLH (boundary-value problem) with the corresponding solutions of the damped NLS (initial-value problem). Linear damping is introduced in much the same way as done when analyzing the classical constant-coefficient Helmholtz equation using the limiting absorption principle. Numerically, we have found that it provides a very efficient tool for controlling the solutions of both the NLH and NHS. In particular, we have been able to identify initial conditions for which the NLS solution does become singular. whereas the NLH solution still remains regular everywhere. We believe that our finding of a larger domain of existence for the NLH than that for the NLS is accounted for by precisely those mechanisms, that have been neglected when deriving the NLS from the NLH, i.e., nonparaxiality and backscattering.

  4. Feasibility of using backscattered muons for archeological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Use of nondestructive methods to accurately locate and characterize underground objects such as rooms and tools found at archeological sites is ideal to preserve these historic sites. High-energy cosmic ray muons are very sensitive to density variation and have been used to image volcanoes and archeological sites such as the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids. Muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere that penetrate the earth's crust up to few kilometers. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale making it useful for this type of work. However, the muon detector must be placed below the target of interest. For imaging volcanoes, the upper portion is imaged when the detector is placed on the earth's surface at the volcano's base. For sites of interest beneath the ground surface, the muon detector would need to be placed below the site in a tunnel or borehole. Placing the detector underground can be costly and may disturb the historical site. We will assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upward traveling muons, to eliminate the current constraint of positioning the detector below the target. This work consists of three parts 1) determine the backscattered flux rate from theory, 2) distinguish backscattered from forward scattered muons at the detector, and 3) validate the theoretical results with field experimentation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Random fiber lasers based on artificially controlled backscattering fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daru; Wang, Xiaoliang; She, Lijuan; Qiang, Zexuan; Yu, Zhangwei

    2017-10-01

    The random fiber laser (RFL) which is a milestone in laser physics and nonlinear optics, has attracted considerable attention recently. Most previous RFLs are based on distributed feedback of Rayleigh scattering amplified through stimulated Raman/Brillouin scattering effect in single mode fibers, which required long-distance (tens of kilometers) single mode fibers and high threshold up to watt-level due to the extremely small Rayleigh scattering coefficient of the fiber. We proposed and demonstrated a half-open cavity RFL based on a segment of a artificially controlled backscattering SMF(ACB-SMF) with a length of 210m, 310m or 390m. A fiber Bragg grating with the central wavelength of 1530nm and a segment of ACB-SMF forms the half-open cavity. The proposed RFL achieves the threshold of 25mW, 30mW and 30mW, respectively. Random lasing at the wavelength of 1530nm and the extinction ratio of 50dB is achieved when a segment of 5m EDF is pumped by a 980nm LD in the RFL. Another half-open cavity RFL based on a segment of a artificially controlled backscattering EDF(ACBS-EDF) is also demonstrated without an ACB-SMF. The 3m ACB-EDF is fabricated by using the femtosecond laser with pulse energy of 0.34mJ which introduces about 50 reflectors in the EDF. Random lasing at the wavelength of 1530nm is achieved with the output power of 7.5mW and the efficiency of 1.88%. Two novel RFLs with much short cavities have been achieved with low threshold and high efficiency.

  6. Investigation of the optimal backscatter for an aSi electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Ko, Lung; Kim, Jong Oh; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2004-05-07

    The effects of backscattered radiation on the dosimetric response of the Varian aS500 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) are studied. Measurements demonstrate that radiation backscattered from the EPID mechanical support structure causes 5% asymmetries in the detected signal. To minimize the effect of backscattered radiation from the support structure, this work proposes adding material downstream of the EPID phosphor which provides uniform backscattering material to the phosphor and attenuates backscatter from the support structure before it reaches the phosphor. Two material locations were studied: downstream of the existing image cassette and within the cassette, immediately downstream of the flat-panel imager glass panel. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the thicknesses of water, Pb and Cu backscattering materials required to saturate the backscattered signal response for 6 MV and 18 MV beams for material thicknesses up to 50 mm. Water was unable to saturate the backscattered signal for thicknesses up to 50 mm for both energies. For Pb, to obtain a signal within 1% of saturation, 3 mm was required at 6 MV, and 6.8 mm was required at 18 MV. For Cu, thicknesses of 20.6 mm and 22.6 mm were required for the 6 MV and 18 MV beams, respectively. For saturation thicknesses, at 6 MV, the Cu backscatter enhanced the signal more than for Pb (Cu 1.25, Pb 1.11), but at 18 MV the reverse was found (Cu 1.19, Pb 1.23). This is due to the fact that at 6 MV, the backscattered radiation signal is dominated by low-energy scattered photons, which are readily attenuated by the Pb, while at 18 MV, electron backscatter contributes substantially to the signal. Image blurring caused by backscatter spread was less for Pb than Cu. Placing Pb immediately downstream of the glass panel further reduced the signal spread and increased the backscatter enhancement to 1.20 and 1.39 for the 6 MV and 18 MV beams, respectively. Overall, it is determined that

  7. Study and comparison of different sensitivity models for a two-plane Compton camera.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Enrique; Barrio, John; Bernabéu, José; Etxebeste, Ane; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosá, Gabriela; Ros, Ana; Roser, Jorge; Oliver, Josep F

    2018-06-25

    Given the strong variations in the sensitivity of Compton cameras for the detection of events originating from different points in the field of view (FoV), sensitivity correction is often necessary in Compton image reconstruction. Several approaches for the calculation of the sensitivity matrix have been proposed in the literature. While most of these models are easily implemented and can be useful in many cases, they usually assume high angular coverage over the scattered photon, which is not the case for our prototype. In this work, we have derived an analytical model that allows us to calculate a detailed sensitivity matrix, which has been compared to other sensitivity models in the literature. Specifically, the proposed model describes the probability of measuring a useful event in a two-plane Compton camera, including the most relevant physical processes involved. The model has been used to obtain an expression for the system and sensitivity matrices for iterative image reconstruction. These matrices have been validated taking Monte Carlo simulations as a reference. In order to study the impact of the sensitivity, images reconstructed with our sensitivity model and with other models have been compared. Images have been reconstructed from several simulated sources, including point-like sources and extended distributions of activity, and also from experimental data measured with 22 Na sources. Results show that our sensitivity model is the best suited for our prototype. Although other models in the literature perform successfully in many scenarios, they are not applicable in all the geometrical configurations of interest for our system. In general, our model allows to effectively recover the intensity of point-like sources at different positions in the FoV and to reconstruct regions of homogeneous activity with minimal variance. Moreover, it can be employed for all Compton camera configurations, including those with low angular coverage over the scatterer.

  8. HEROIC: 3D general relativistic radiative post-processor with comptonization for black hole accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Zhu, Yucong; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Saḑowski, Aleksander

    2016-03-01

    We describe Hybrid Evaluator for Radiative Objects Including Comptonization (HEROIC), an upgraded version of the relativistic radiative post-processor code HERO described in a previous paper, but which now Includes Comptonization. HEROIC models Comptonization via the Kompaneets equation, using a quadratic approximation for the source function in a short characteristics radiation solver. It employs a simple form of accelerated lambda iteration to handle regions of high scattering opacity. In addition to solving for the radiation field, HEROIC also solves for the gas temperature by applying the condition of radiative equilibrium. We present benchmarks and tests of the Comptonization module in HEROIC with simple 1D and 3D scattering problems. We also test the ability of the code to handle various relativistic effects using model atmospheres and accretion flows in a black hole space-time. We present two applications of HEROIC to general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of accretion discs. One application is to a thin accretion disc around a black hole. We find that the gas below the photosphere in the multidimensional HEROIC solution is nearly isothermal, quite different from previous solutions based on 1D plane parallel atmospheres. The second application is to a geometrically thick radiation-dominated accretion disc accreting at 11 times the Eddington rate. Here, the multidimensional HEROIC solution shows that, for observers who are on axis and look down the polar funnel, the isotropic equivalent luminosity could be more than 10 times the Eddington limit, even though the spectrum might still look thermal and show no signs of relativistic beaming.

  9. Development of a Compton camera for prompt-gamma medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldawood, S.; Thirolf, P. G.; Miani, A.; Böhmer, M.; Dedes, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Lang, C.; Liprandi, S.; Maier, L.; Marinšek, T.; Mayerhofer, M.; Schaart, D. R.; Lozano, I. Valencia; Parodi, K.

    2017-11-01

    A Compton camera-based detector system for photon detection from nuclear reactions induced by proton (or heavier ion) beams is under development at LMU Munich, targeting the online range verification of the particle beam in hadron therapy via prompt-gamma imaging. The detector is designed to be capable to reconstruct the photon source origin not only from the Compton scattering kinematics of the primary photon, but also to allow for tracking of the secondary Compton-scattered electrons, thus enabling a γ-source reconstruction also from incompletely absorbed photon events. The Compton camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT acting as absorber, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors as scatterers. The detector components have been characterized both under offline and online conditions. The LaBr3:Ce crystal exhibits an excellent time and energy resolution. Using intense collimated 137Cs and 60Co sources, the monolithic scintillator was scanned on a fine 2D grid to generate a reference library of light amplitude distributions that allows for reconstructing the photon interaction position using a k-Nearest Neighbour (k-NN) algorithm. Systematic studies were performed to investigate the performance of the reconstruction algorithm, revealing an improvement of the spatial resolution with increasing photon energy to an optimum value of 3.7(1)mm at 1.33 MeV, achieved with the Categorical Average Pattern (CAP) modification of the k-NN algorithm.

  10. A simple method for computing the relativistic Compton scattering kernel for radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, M. K.; Kershaw, D. S.; Beason, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Correct computation of the Compton scattering kernel (CSK), defined to be the Klein-Nishina differential cross section averaged over a relativistic Maxwellian electron distribution, is reported. The CSK is analytically reduced to a single integral, which can then be rapidly evaluated using a power series expansion, asymptotic series, and rational approximation for sigma(s). The CSK calculation has application to production codes that aim at understanding certain astrophysical, laser fusion, and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.

  11. A combined Compton and coded-aperture telescope for medium-energy gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Michelle; Zoglauer, Andreas; Boggs, Steven E.; Amman, Mark

    2018-06-01

    A future mission in medium-energy gamma-ray astrophysics would allow for many scientific advancements, such as a possible explanation for the excess positron emission from the Galactic center, a better understanding of nucleosynthesis and explosion mechanisms in Type Ia supernovae, and a look at the physical forces at play in compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Additionally, further observation in this energy regime would significantly extend the search parameter space for low-mass dark matter. In order to achieve these objectives, an instrument with good energy resolution, good angular resolution, and high sensitivity is required. In this paper we present the design and simulation of a Compton telescope consisting of cubic-centimeter cadmium zinc telluride detectors as absorbers behind a silicon tracker with the addition of a passive coded mask. The goal of the design was to create a very sensitive instrument that is capable of high angular resolution. The simulated telescope achieved energy resolutions of 1.68% FWHM at 511 keV and 1.11% at 1809 keV, on-axis angular resolutions in Compton mode of 2.63° FWHM at 511 keV and 1.30° FWHM at 1809 keV, and is capable of resolving sources to at least 0.2° at lower energies with the use of the coded mask. An initial assessment of the instrument in Compton-imaging mode yields an effective area of 183 cm2 at 511 keV and an anticipated all-sky sensitivity of 3.6 × 10-6 photons cm-2 s-1 for a broadened 511 keV source over a two-year observation time. Additionally, combining a coded mask with a Compton imager to improve point-source localization for positron detection has been demonstrated.

  12. EXTERNAL COMPTON SCATTERING IN BLAZAR JETS AND THE LOCATION OF THE GAMMA-RAY EMITTING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, Justin D., E-mail: justin.finke@nrl.navy.mil

    2016-10-20

    I study the location of the γ -ray emission in blazar jets by creating a Compton-scattering approximation that is valid for all anisotropic radiation fields in the Thomson through Klein–Nishina regimes, is highly accurate, and can speed up numerical calculations by up to a factor of ∼10. I apply this approximation to synchrotron self-Compton, external Compton scattering of photons from the accretion disk, broad line region (BLR), and dust torus. I use a stratified BLR model and include detailed Compton-scattering calculations of a spherical and flattened BLR. I create two dust torus models, one where the torus is an annulusmore » and one where it is an extended disk. I present detailed calculations of the photoabsorption optical depth using my detailed BLR and dust torus models, including the full angle dependence. I apply these calculations to the emission from a relativistically moving blob traveling through these radiation fields. The ratio of γ -ray to optical flux produces a predictable pattern that could help locate the γ -ray emission region. I show that the bright flare from 3C 454.3 in 2010 November detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is unlikely to originate from a single blob inside the BLR. This is because it moves outside the BLR in a time shorter than the flare duration, although emission by multiple blobs inside the BLR is possible. Also, γ -rays are unlikely to originate from outside of the BLR, due to the scattering of photons from an extended dust torus, since the cooling timescale would be too long to explain the observed short variability.« less

  13. Near-IR extinction and backscatter coefficient measurements in low- and mid-altitude clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sztankay, Z. G.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the attenuation and backscattering properties of clouds is required to high resolution for several types of optical sensing systems. Such data was obtained in about 15 hours of flights through clouds in the vicinity of Washington, D.C. The flights were mainly through stratocumulus, altocumulus, stratus, and stratus fractus clouds and covered an altitude and temperature range of 300 to 3200 m and -13 to 17 C. Two instruments were flown, each of which measured the backscatter from close range in two range bins to independently determine both the extinction and backscatter coefficients. The extinction and backscatter coefficients can be obtained from the signals in the two channels of each instrument, provided that the aerosol is uniform over the measurement region. When this assumptions holds, the extinction coefficient is derived basically from the ratio of the signal in the two channels; the backscatter coefficient can then be obtained from the signal in either channel.

  14. Relating multifrequency radar backscattering to forest biomass: Modeling and AIRSAR measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Ranson, K. Jon

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, significant efforts in microwave remote sensing were devoted to relating forest parameters to radar backscattering coefficients. These and other studies showed that in most cases, the longer wavelength (i.e. P band) and cross-polarization (HV) backscattering had higher sensitivity and better correlation to forest biomass. This research examines this relationship in a northern forest area through both backscatter modeling and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data analysis. The field measurements were used to estimate stand biomass from forest weight tables. The backscatter model described by Sun et al. was modified to simulate the backscattering coefficients with respect to stand biomass. The average number of trees per square meter or radar resolution cell, and the average tree height or diameter breast height (dbh) in the forest stand are the driving parameters of the model. The rest of the soil surface, orientation, and size distributions of leaves and branches, remain unchanged in the simulations.

  15. Profiling of back-scattered electrons in opposed magnetic field of a Twin Electron Beam Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, S.; Gupta, Anchal; Dileep Kumar, V.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L. M.

    2012-11-01

    Electron gun is extensively used in material processing, physical vapour deposition and atomic vapour based laser processes. In these processes where the electron beam is incident on the substrate, a significant fraction of electron beam gets back-scattered from the target surface. The trajectory of this back scattered electron beam depends on the magnetic field in the vicinity. The fraction of back-scattered depends on the atomic number of the target metal and can be as high as ~40% of the incident beam current. These back-scattered electrons can cause undesired hot spots and also affect the overall process. Hence, the study of the trajectory of these back-scattered electrons is important. This paper provides the details of experimentally mapped back-scattered electrons of a 2×20kW Twin Electron Beam Gun (TEBG) in opposed magnetic field i.e. with these guns placed at 180° to each other.

  16. Time-resolved GRB spectra in the complex radiation of synchrotron and Compton processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y. G.; Hu, S. M.; Chen, X.; Li, K.; Guo, D. F.; Li, Y. T.; Li, H. Z.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Lin, H. N.; Chang, Z.

    2016-03-01

    Under the steady-state condition, the spectrum of electrons is investigated by solving the continuity equation under the complex radiation of both the synchrotron and Compton processes. The resulted gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectrum is a broken power law in both the fast and slow cooling phases. On the basis of this electron spectrum, the spectral indices of the Band function in four different phases are presented. In the complex radiation frame, the detail investigation on physical parameters reveals that three models can answer the α ˜ -1 problem, which are the synchrotron plus synchrotron self-Compton in the internal and the external shock models, and the synchrotron plus the external Compton processes in the external shock model. A possible marginal to fast cooling phase transition in GRB 080916C is discussed. The time-resolved spectra in different main pulses of GRB 100724B, GRB 100826A and GRB 130606B are investigated. We found that the flux is proportional to the peak energy in almost all main pulses. A significant (5σ) correlation for Fp ˜ Ep is evident the first main pulse of GRB 100826A, and three marginally significant (3σ) correlations Fp ˜ Ep are found in main pulses of GRB 100826A and GRB 130606B. The correlation between spectral index and Ep at 3 ˜ 4σ level are observed in the first main pulse of GRB 100826A. Such correlations are possible explained in the complex radiation scenario.

  17. Performance studies towards a TOF-PET sensor using Compton scattering at plastic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, M.; Nakamori, T.; Gunji, S.; Kamada, K.; Shoji, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.; Aoki, T.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a sensor head for a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner using plastic scintillators that have a very fast timing property. Given the very small cross section of photoelectric absorption in plastic scintillators at 511 keV, we use Compton scattering in order to compensate for detection efficiency. The detector will consist of two layers of scatterers and absorbers which are made of plastic and inorganic scintillators such as GAGG:Ce, respectively. Signals are read by monolithic Multi Pixel Photon Counters, and with energy deposits and interaction time stamps are being acquired. The scintillators are built to be capable of resolving interaction position in three dimensions, so that our system has also a function of depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET scanners. TOF resolution of ~ 200 ps (FWHM) is achieved in both cases of using the leading-edge discriminator and time-walk correction and using a configuration sensitive to DOI. Both the position resolution and spectroscopy are demonstrated using the prototype data acquisition system, with Compton scattering events subsequently being obtained. We also demonstrated that the background rejection technique using the Compton cone constraint could be valid with our system.

  18. Sum rules across the unpolarized Compton processes involving generalized polarizabilities and moments of nucleon structure functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, Vadim; Hagelstein, Franziska; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2018-04-01

    We derive two new sum rules for the unpolarized doubly virtual Compton scattering process on a nucleon, which establish novel low-Q2 relations involving the nucleon's generalized polarizabilities and moments of the nucleon's unpolarized structure functions F1(x ,Q2) and F2(x ,Q2). These relations facilitate the determination of some structure constants which can only be accessed in off-forward doubly virtual Compton scattering, not experimentally accessible at present. We perform an empirical determination for the proton and compare our results with a next-to-leading-order chiral perturbation theory prediction. We also show how these relations may be useful for a model-independent determination of the low-Q2 subtraction function in the Compton amplitude, which enters the two-photon-exchange contribution to the Lamb shift of (muonic) hydrogen. An explicit calculation of the Δ (1232 )-resonance contribution to the muonic-hydrogen 2 P -2 S Lamb shift yields -1 ±1 μ eV , confirming the previously conjectured smallness of this effect.

  19. Picosecond, tunable, high-brightness hard x-ray inverse Compton source at Duke storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.; Wu, Ying; Burnham, Bentley; Barnett, Genevieve A.; Madey, John M. J.

    1995-09-01

    We suggest a state-of-the art x-ray source using a compact electron storage ring with modest energy (less than 1 GeV) and a high power mm-wave as an undulator. A source of this type has x-ray energies and brightness comparable with third generation synchrotron light sources while it can be very compact and fit in a small university or industrial laboratory or hospital. We propose to operate an isochronous mm-wave FEL and a hard x-ray inverse Compton source at the Duke storage ring to test this concept. Resonant FEL conditions for the mm- wave will be provided by the off-axis interaction with an electromagnetic wave. A special optical resonator with holes for the e-beam is proposed for pumping a hard x-ray inverse Compton source with very high brightness. Simulation results of mm-wave FEL operation of the Duke storage ring are discussed. Expected performance of mm-wave FEL and hard x-ray inverse Compton source are presented.

  20. Gamma-ray momentum reconstruction from Compton electron trajectories by filtered back-projection

    DOE PAGES

    Haefner, A.; Gunter, D.; Plimley, B.; ...

    2014-11-03

    Gamma-ray imaging utilizing Compton scattering has traditionally relied on measuring coincident gamma-ray interactions to map directional information of the source distribution. This coincidence requirement makes it an inherently inefficient process. We present an approach to gamma-ray reconstruction from Compton scattering that requires only a single electron tracking detector, thus removing the coincidence requirement. From the Compton scattered electron momentum distribution, our algorithm analytically computes the incident photon's correlated direction and energy distributions. Because this method maps the source energy and location, it is useful in applications, where prior information about the source distribution is unknown. We demonstrate this method withmore » electron tracks measured in a scientific Si charge coupled device. While this method was demonstrated with electron tracks in a Si-based detector, it is applicable to any detector that can measure electron direction and energy, or equivalently the electron momentum. For example, it can increase the sensitivity to obtain energy and direction in gas-based systems that suffer from limited efficiency.« less

  1. A didactic experiment showing the Compton scattering by means of a clinical gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Auditore, Lucrezia; Campennì, Alfredo; Minutoli, Fabio; Cucinotta, Mariapaola; Sindoni, Alessandro; Baldari, Sergio

    2017-06-01

    We describe a didactic approach aimed to explain the effect of Compton scattering in nuclear medicine imaging, exploiting the comparison of a didactic experiment with a gamma camera with the outcomes from a Monte Carlo simulation of the same experimental apparatus. We employed a 99m Tc source emitting 140.5keV photons, collimated in the upper direction through two pinholes, shielded by 6mm of lead. An aluminium cylinder was placed on the source at 50mm of distance. The energy of the scattered photons was measured on the spectra acquired by the gamma camera. We observed that the gamma ray energy measured at each step of rotation gradually decreased from the characteristic energy of 140.5keV at 0° to 102.5keV at 120°. A comparison between the obtained data and the expected results from the Compton formula and from the Monte Carlo simulation revealed a full agreement within the experimental error (relative errors between -0.56% and 1.19%), given by the energy resolution of the gamma camera. Also the electron rest mass has been evaluated satisfactorily. The experiment was found useful in explaining nuclear medicine residents the phenomenology of the Compton scattering and its importance in the nuclear medicine imaging, and it can be profitably proposed during the training of medical physics residents as well. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Compton suppression and event triggering in a commercial data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Samuel; Caussyn, D. D.; Tripathi, Vandana; Vonmoss, J.; Liddick, S. N.

    2012-10-01

    A number of groups are starting to use flash digitizer systems to directly convert the preamplifier signals of high-resolution Ge detectors to a stream of digital data. Some digitizers are also equipped with software constant fraction discriminator algorithms capable of operating on the resulting digital data stream to provide timing information. Because of the dropping cost per channel of these systems, it should now be possible to also connect outputs of the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillators used for Compton suppression to other digitizer inputs so that BGO logic signals can also be available in the same system. This provides the possibility to perform all the Compton suppression and multiplicity trigger logic within the digital system, thus eliminating the need for separate timing filter amplifiers (TFA), constant fraction discriminators (CFD), logic units, and lots of cables. This talk will describe the performance of such a system based on Pixie16 modules from XIA LLC with custom field programmable gate array (FPGA) programming for an array of Compton suppressed single Ge crystal and 4-crystal ``Clover'' detector array along with optional particle detectors. Initial tests of the system have produced results comparable with the current traditional system of individual electronics and peak sensing analog to digital converters. The advantages of the all digital system will be discussed.

  3. A New Characterization of the Compton Process in the ULX Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Nakazawa, K.; Makishima, K.

    2015-07-01

    Ultra Luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are unusually luminous point sources located at arms of spiral galaxies, and are candidates for the intermediate mass black holes (Makishima+2000). Their spectra make transition betweens power-law shapes (PL state) and convex shapes (disk-like state). The latter state can be explained with either the multi-color disk (MCD)+thermal Comptonization (THC) model or a Slim disk model (Watari+2000). We adopt the former modeling, because it generally gives physically more reasonable parameters (Miyawaki+2009). To characterize the ULXs spectra with a unified way, we applied the MCD+THC model to several datasets of ULXs obtained by Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and Nu-Star. The model well explains all the spectra, in terms of cool disk (T_{in}˜0.2 keV), and a cool thick (T_{e}˜2 keV, τ ˜10) corona. The derived parameters can be characterized by two new parameters. One is Q≡ T_{e}/T_{in} which describes balance between the Compton cooling and gravitational heating of the corona, while the other is f≡ L_{raw}/L_{tot}, namely, the directly-visible (without Comptonization) MCD luminosity. Then, the PL state spectra have been found to show Q˜10 and f˜0.7, while those of the disk-like state Q˜ 3 and f≤0.01. Thus, the two states are clearly separated in terms of Q and f.

  4. AXIS: an instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Carpenter, A C; Palmer, N E; Zacharias, R; Felker, B; Holder, J P; Allen, F V; Bell, P M; Bradley, D; Montesanti, R; Landen, O L

    2014-11-01

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV-200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

  5. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  6. A low-count reconstruction algorithm for Compton-based prompt gamma imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Liu, Chih-Chieh; Jan, Meei-Ling; Lee, Ming-Wei

    2018-04-01

    The Compton camera is an imaging device which has been proposed to detect prompt gammas (PGs) produced by proton–nuclear interactions within tissue during proton beam irradiation. Compton-based PG imaging has been developed to verify proton ranges because PG rays, particularly characteristic ones, have strong correlations with the distribution of the proton dose. However, accurate image reconstruction from characteristic PGs is challenging because the detector efficiency and resolution are generally low. Our previous study showed that point spread functions can be incorporated into the reconstruction process to improve image resolution. In this study, we proposed a low-count reconstruction algorithm to improve the image quality of a characteristic PG emission by pooling information from other characteristic PG emissions. PGs were simulated from a proton beam irradiated on a water phantom, and a two-stage Compton camera was used for PG detection. The results show that the image quality of the reconstructed characteristic PG emission is improved with our proposed method in contrast to the standard reconstruction method using events from only one characteristic PG emission. For the 4.44 MeV PG rays, both methods can be used to predict the positions of the peak and the distal falloff with a mean accuracy of 2 mm. Moreover, only the proposed method can improve the estimated positions of the peak and the distal falloff of 5.25 MeV PG rays, and a mean accuracy of 2 mm can be reached.

  7. AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N., E-mail: hall98@llnl.gov; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.

    2014-11-15

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detectormore » for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV–200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.« less

  8. Using triple gamma coincidences with a pixelated semiconductor Compton-PET scanner: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project presents a novel design using pixelated semiconductor detectors for nuclear medicine applications to achieve the intrinsic image quality limits set by physics. The conceptual design can be extended to a Compton gamma camera. The use of a pixelated CdTe detector with voxel sizes of 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 guarantees optimal energy and spatial resolution. However, the limited time resolution of semiconductor detectors makes it impossible to use Time Of Flight (TOF) with VIP PET. TOF is used in order to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using only the most probable portion of the Line-Of-Response (LOR) instead of its entire length. To overcome the limitation of CdTe time resolution, we present in this article a simulation study using β+-γ emitting isotopes with a Compton-PET scanner. When the β+ annihilates with an electron it produces two gammas which produce a LOR in the PET scanner, while the additional gamma, when scattered in the scatter detector, provides a Compton cone that intersects with the aforementioned LOR. The intersection indicates, within a few mm of uncertainty along the LOR, the origin of the beta-gamma decay. Hence, one can limit the part of the LOR used by the image reconstruction algorithm.

  9. Electronic properties of RDX and HMX: Compton scattering experiment and first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, B L; Jain, Pradeep; Sahariya, Jagrati; Heda, N L; Soni, Pramod

    2013-07-11

    The first-ever electron momentum density (EMD) measurements of explosive materials, namely, RDX (1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane, (CH2-N-NO2)3) and HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane, (CH2-N-NO2)4), have been reported using a 740 GBq (137)Cs Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profiles (CPs) are compared with the EMDs derived from linear combination of atomic orbitals with density functional theory. It is found that the CPs deduced from generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with Wu-Cohen exchange energies give a better agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles than those from local density approximation and other schemes of GGA. Further, Mulliken population, energy bands, partial and total density of states, and band gap have also been reported using GGA calculations. Present ground state calculations unambiguously show large band gap semiconductor nature of both RDX and HMX. A similar type of bonding in these materials is uniquely established using Compton data and density of states. It is also outstandingly consistent with the Mulliken population, which predicts almost equal amount of charge transfer (0.84 and 0.83 e(-)) from H1 + H2 + N2 to C1 + N1 + O1 + O2 in both the explosives.

  10. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, B. A.; Lester, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    1996-08-01

    A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE). The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s-1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels) remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels) and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s-1 and 700 m s-1. At velocities greater than 700 m s-1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  11. Compton Scattering by Static and Moving Media. Part 1; The Transfer Equation and its Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1997-01-01

    Compton scattering of photons by nonrelativistic particles is thought to play an important role in forming the radiation spectrum of many astrophysical systems. Here we derive the time-dependent photon kinetic equation that describes spontaneous and induced Compton scattering, as well as absorption and emission by static and moving media, the corresponding radiative transfer equation, and their zeroth and first angular moments, both in the system frame and in the frame comoving with the medium. We show that it is necessary to use the correct relativistic differential scattering cross section in order to obtain a photon kinetic equation that is correct to first order in Epsilon/m(sub e), T(sub e)/m(sub e), and V, where Epsilon is the photon energy, T(sub e) and m(sub e) are the electron temperature and rest mass, and V is the electron bulk velocity in units of the speed of light. We also demonstrate that the terms in the radiative transfer equation that are second order in V should usually be retained, because if the radiation energy density is sufficiently large, compared to the radiation flux, the effects of bulk Comptonization described by the terms that are second order in V can be as important as the effects described by the terms that are first order in V, even when V is small. The system- and fluid-frame equations that we derive are correct to first order in Epsilon/m(sub e). Our system-frame equations, which are correct to second order in V, may be used when V is not too large. Our fluid-frame equations, which are exact in V, may be used when V approaches 1. Both sets of equations are valid for systems of arbitrary optical depth and can therefore be used in both the free-streaming and diffusion regimes. We demonstrate that Comptonization by the electron bulk motion occurs whether or not the radiation field is isotropic or the bulk flow converges and that it is more important than thermal Comptonization if V(sup 2) is greater than 3T(sub e)/m(sub e).

  12. Development of a Compton suppressed gamma spectrometer using Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Richard

    Gamma ray spectroscopy is routinely used to measure radiation in a number of situations. These include security applications, nuclear forensics studies, characterisation of radioactive sources, and environmental monitoring. For routine studies of environmental materials, the amount of radioactivity present is often very low, requiring spectroscopy systems which have to monitor the source for up to 7 days to achieve the required sensitivity. Recent developments in detector technology and data processing techniques have opened up the possibility of developing a highly efficient Compton Suppressed system, that was previously the preserve of large experimental collaborations. The accessibility of Monte-Carlo toolkits such as GEANT4 also provide the opportunity to optimise these systems using computer simulations, greatly reducing the need for expensive (and inefficient) testing in the laboratory. This thesis details the development of such a Compton Suppressed, planar HPGe detector system. Using the GEANT4 toolkit in combination with the experimental facilities at AWE, Aldermaston (which include HPGe detection systems, scintillator based detector systems, advanced shielding materials and gamma-gamma coincidence systems), simulations were built and validated to reproduce the detector response seen in the 'real-life' systems. This resulted in several improvements to the current system; for the shielding materials used, terrestrial and cosmic radiation were minimised, while reducing the X-ray fluorescence seen in the primary HPGe detector by an order of magnitude. With respect to the HPGe detector itself, an optimum thickness was identified for low energy (<300 keV) radiation, which maximised the efficiency for the energy range of interest while minimising the interaction probability for higher energy radionuclides (which are the primary cause of the Compton continuum that obscures lower energy decays). A combination of secondary detectors were then optimised to design a

  13. Fiber optic backscatter spectroscopic sensor to monitor enamel demineralization and remineralization in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kishen, Anil; Shrestha, Annie; Rafique, Adeela

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a Fiber Optic Backscatter Spectroscopic Sensor (FOBSS) is used to monitor demineralization and remineralization induced changes in the enamel. A bifurcated fiber optic backscatter probe connected to a visible light source and a high resolution spectrophotometer was used to acquire the backscatter light spectrum from the tooth surface. The experiments were conducted in two parts. In Part 1, experiments were carried out using fiber optic backscatter spectroscopy on (1) sound enamel and dentine sections and (2) sound tooth specimens subjected to demineralization and remineralization. In Part 2, polarization microscopy was conducted to examine the depth of demineralization in tooth specimens. The enamel and dentine specimens from the Part-1 experiments showed distinct backscatter spectra. The spectrum obtained from the enamel-dentine combination and the spectrum generated from the average of the enamel and dentine spectral values were closely similar and showed characteristics of dentine. The experiments in Part 2 showed that demineralization and remineralization processes induced a linear decrease and linear increase in the backscatter light intensity respectively. A negative correlation between the decrease in the backscatter light intensity during demineralization and the depth of demineralization determined using the polarization microscopy was calculated to be p = -0.994. This in vitro experiment highlights the potential benefit of using FOBSS to detect demineralization and remineralization of enamel. PMID:20142887

  14. Validation of automated supervised segmentation of multibeam backscatter data from the Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Jess I. T.; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Pallentin, Arne; Pecher, Ingo A.; Gorman, Andrew R.; Schneider von Deimling, Jens

    2018-06-01

    Using automated supervised segmentation of multibeam backscatter data to delineate seafloor substrates is a relatively novel technique. Low-frequency multibeam echosounders (MBES), such as the 12-kHz EM120, present particular difficulties since the signal can penetrate several metres into the seafloor, depending on substrate type. We present a case study illustrating how a non-targeted dataset may be used to derive information from multibeam backscatter data regarding distribution of substrate types. The results allow us to assess limitations associated with low frequency MBES where sub-bottom layering is present, and test the accuracy of automated supervised segmentation performed using SonarScope® software. This is done through comparison of predicted and observed substrate from backscatter facies-derived classes and substrate data, reinforced using quantitative statistical analysis based on a confusion matrix. We use sediment samples, video transects and sub-bottom profiles acquired on the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand. Inferences on the substrate types are made using the Generic Seafloor Acoustic Backscatter (GSAB) model, and the extents of the backscatter classes are delineated by automated supervised segmentation. Correlating substrate data to backscatter classes revealed that backscatter amplitude may correspond to lithologies up to 4 m below the seafloor. Our results emphasise several issues related to substrate characterisation using backscatter classification, primarily because the GSAB model does not only relate to grain size and roughness properties of substrate, but also accounts for other parameters that influence backscatter. Better understanding these limitations allows us to derive first-order interpretations of sediment properties from automated supervised segmentation.

  15. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry—05: Megavoltage electron backscatter: EGSnrc results versus 21 experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa; Buchenberg, W.

    2014-08-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter calculations at megavoltage energies is important for many medical physics applications. In this study, EGSnrc calculations of megavoltage electron backscatter (1–22 MeV) are performed and compared to the data from 21 experiments published between 1954 and 1993 for 25 single elements with atomic numbers from 3 to 92. Typical experimental uncertainties are 15%. For EGSnrc simulations, an ideal detector is assumed, and the most accurate electron physics options are employed, for a combined statistical and systematic uncertainty of 3%. The quantities compared are the backscatter coefficient and the energy spectra (in the backward hemisphere andmore » at specific detector locations). For the backscatter coefficient, the overall agreement is within ±2% in the absolute value of the backscatter coefficient (in per cent), and within 11% of the individual backscatter values. EGSnrc results are systematically on the higher end of the spread of the experimental data, which could be partially from systematic experimental errors discussed in the literature. For the energy spectra, reasonable agreement between simulations and experiments is observed, although there are significant variations in the experimental data. At the lower end of the spectra, simulations are higher than some experimental data, which could be due to reduced experimental sensitivity to lower energy electrons and/or over-estimation by EGSnrc for backscattered secondary electrons. In conclusion, overall good agreement is observed between EGSnrc backscatter calculations and experimental measurements for megavoltage electrons. There is a need for high quality experimental data for the energy spectra of backscattered electrons.« less

  16. Doppler Broadening Calculations of Compton Scattering for Molecules, Plastics, Tissues, and Few Biological Materials in the X-Ray Region: An Analysis in Terms of Compton Broadening and Geometrical Energy Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V.; Cesareo, R.; Brunetti, A.; Gigante, G. E.; Akatsuka, T.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.

    2004-09-01

    Relativistic and nonrelativistic Compton profile cross sections for H, C, N, O, P, and Ca and for a few important biological materials such as water, polyethylene, lucite, polystyrene, nylon, polycarbonate, bakelite, fat, bone and calcium hydroxyapatite are estimated for a number of Kα x-ray energies and for 59.54 keV (Am-241) γ photons. Energy broadening and geometrical broadening (ΔG) is estimated by assuming θmin and θmax are symmetrically situated around θ=90°. FWHM of J(PZ) and FWHM of Compton energy broadening are evaluated at various incident photon energies. These values are estimated around the centroid of the Compton profile with an energy interval of 0.1 and 1.0 keV for 59.54 keV photons. Total Compton, individual shell, and Compton energy-absorption scattering cross sections are evaluated in the energy region from 0.005 to 0.5 MeV. It is an attempt to know the effect of Doppler broadening for single atoms, many of which constitute the biological materials.

  17. Artist concept of Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV) measurement technique on TIROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Artist concept titled OZONE MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE shows how the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (UV) 2 (SBUV-2) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) TIROS satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-11) works. Ozone is derived from the 'SBUV' instrument from the ratio of the observed backscattered radiance to the solar irradiance in the ultraviolet. This is called the ultraviolet albedo. During STS-34 Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) instruments in Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, payload bay (PLB) will calibrate the instruments onboard the TIROS satellites. SSBUV is managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  18. Intercomparisons of Lidar Backscatter Measurements and In-situ Data from GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudamani, S.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) took place during Nov. 1989 and May - Jun. 1990 and involved flight surveys of the Pacific region by the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The experimental instruments were lidars operating at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the thermal infrared and various optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. The primary motivation for GLOBE was the development of spaceborne wind sensing lidar. This paper will concern a comparison of direct backscatter measurements and backscatter calculated from particle counter data. Of special interest is that the particle measurements provided data on composition, and thus refractive index variation may be included in the analysis.

  19. Seafloor Characterization from Spatial Variation of Multibeam Backscatter vs. Grazing Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    hou, T.

    2001-12-01

    Backscatter vs. grazing angle, which can be extracted from multibeam backscatter data, depend on characteristics of the multibeam system and the angular responses of backscatter that are characteristic of different seafloor properties, such as sediment hardness and roughness. Changes in backscatter vs. grazing angle that are contributed by the multibeam system normally remain fixed over both space and time. Therefore, they can readily be determined and removed from backscatter data. The variation of backscatter vs. grazing angle due to the properties of sediments will vary from location to location, as sediment type changes. The sediment component of variability can be inferred using the redundant observations from different grazing angles in several small pieces of seafloor where the sediment property is uniform in any given piece of seafloor yet vary from one piece of the seafloor to another. Thanks to the multibeam survey (Roger Flood, State University of New York) at SAX 99 Project sponsored by Office of Naval Research (ONR), which had 800% coverage in most of the survey area; there is a data set, which is suitable for investigating seafloor characterization. The investigation analyzed the spatial variation of the backscatter vs. grazing angle and compared that with ground truth sediment data. In this research, the 6.9 gigabytes raw multibeam data were cleaned using an automated outlier detection algorithm (Tianhang Hou, Lloyd Huff and Larry Mayer. 2001). Then, the surveyed area was equally divided into 52X78 rectangle working cells (4056), the side of each cell was about 20 meters. The backscatter vs. grazing angle of backscatter data for each cell is computed by averaging backscatter data by the corresponding beam numbers using all data with the same beam number from different survey lines. Systematic effects on the backscatter vs. grazing angle, caused by multibeam system hardware or software as well as system installation, were corrected in order to remove

  20. Diffuse optical microscopy for quantification of depth-dependent epithelial backscattering in the cervix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Lam, Sylvia; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Miller, Dianne M.; McAlpine, Jessica N.; Lee, Marette; Kienle, Alwin; MacAulay, Calum

    2016-06-01

    A fiber optic imaging approach is presented using structured illumination for quantification of almost pure epithelial backscattering. We employ multiple spatially modulated projection patterns and camera-based reflectance capture to image depth-dependent epithelial scattering. The potential diagnostic value of our approach is investigated on cervical ex vivo tissue specimens. Our study indicates a strong backscattering increase in the upper part of the cervical epithelium caused by dysplastic microstructural changes. Quantization of relative depth-dependent backscattering is confirmed as a potentially useful diagnostic feature for detection of precancerous lesions in cervical squamous epithelium.

  1. Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a tunable coherent CO2 lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Kavaya, M. J.; Flamant, P. H.; Haner, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric aerosol backscatter coefficients, using a coherent CO2 lidar at 9.25- and 10.6-micron wavelengths, are described. Vertical profiles of the volume backscatter coefficient beta have been measured to a 10-km altitude over the Pasadena, CA, region. These measurements indicate a wide range of variability in beta both in and above the local boundary layer. Certain profiles also indicate a significant enhancement in beta at the 9.25-micron wavelength compared with beta at the 10.6-micron wavelength, which possibly indicates a major contribution to the volume backscatter from ammonium sulfate aerosol particles.

  2. Two-dimensional strain-mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayle, Andrew J.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Beams, Ryan; Bush, Brian G.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Michaels, Chris A.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Cook, Robert F.

    2017-11-01

    The strain field surrounding a spherical indentation in silicon is mapped in two dimensions (2-D) using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) cross-correlation and confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques. The 200 mN indentation created a 4 μm diameter residual contact impression in the silicon (001) surface. Maps about 50 μm × 50 μm area with 128 pixels × 128 pixels were generated in several hours, extending, by comparison, assessment of the accuracy of both techniques to mapping multiaxial strain states in 2-D. EBSD measurements showed a residual strain field dominated by in-surface normal and shear strains, with alternating tensile and compressive lobes extending about three to four indentation diameters from the contact and exhibiting two-fold symmetry. Raman measurements showed a residual Raman shift field, dominated by positive shifts, also extending about three to four indentation diameters from the contact but exhibiting four-fold symmetry. The 2-D EBSD results, in combination with a mechanical-spectroscopic analysis, were used to successfully predict the 2-D Raman shift map in scale, symmetry, and shift magnitude. Both techniques should be useful in enhancing the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) through identification of the 2-D strain fields in MEMS devices.

  3. Investigation of radar backscattering from second-year sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Guang-Tsai; Moore, Richard K.; Gogineni, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    The scattering properties of second-year ice were studied in an experiment at Mould Bay in April 1983. Radar backscattering measurements were made at frequencies of 5.2, 9.6, 13.6, and 16.6 GHz for vertical polarization, horizontal polarization and cross polarizations, with incidence angles ranging from 15 to 70 deg. The results indicate that the second-year ice scattering characteristics were different from first-year ice and also different from multiyear ice. The fading properties of radar signals were studied and compared with experimental data. The influence of snow cover on sea ice can be evaluated by accounting for the increase in the number of independent samples from snow volume with respect to that for bare ice surface. A technique for calculating the snow depth was established by this principle and a reasonable agreement has been observed. It appears that this is a usable way to measure depth in snow or other snow-like media using radar.

  4. Effect of molecular anisotropy on backscattered ultraviolet radiance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Z; Bhartia, P K

    1995-12-20

    The effect of molecular anisotropy on backscattered UV (BUV) radiances is computed by accounting for it in both Rayleigh optical thickness and the scattering-phase matrix. If the effect of molecular anisotropy is included only in the optical thickness and not in the phase matrix, then for high sun (θ(0) ∼ 0°), the nadir radiance (I(0)) leaving the top of the atmosphere is approximately 1.8% higher than the radiance (I(op)) computed with the effect included in the phase matrix. For very low sun (θ(0) > 80°), I(0) is approximately 2.3% lower than I(op). For off-nadir radiances the relative increase (decrease) depends on both the local zenith angle as well as the azimuth angle. Also, an increase in the surface reflectivity decreases the effect of molecular anisotropy on the upwelling radiances. Exclusion of the anisotropy factor in the Rayleigh-phase matrix has very little effect (<1%) on ozone retrieval from the BUV-type instruments. This is because of the ratio technique used in the retrieval algorithm, which practically cancels out the anisotropy effect.

  5. Modeling the backscattering and transmission properties of vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. T.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental measurements of canopy attenuation at 10.2 GHz (X-band) for canopies of wheat and soybeans, experimental observations of the effect upon the microwave backscattering coefficient (sigma) of free water in a vegetation canopy, and experimental measurements of sigma (10.2 GHz, 50 deg, VV and VH polarization) of 30 agricultural fields over the growing season of each crop are discussed. The measurements of the canopy attenuation through wheat independently determined the attenuation resulting from the wheat heads and that from the stalks. An experiment conducted to simulate the effects of rain or dew on sigma showed that sigma increases by about 3 dB as a result of spraying a vegetation canopy with water. The temporal observations of sigma for the 30 agricultural fields (10 each of wheat, corn, and soybeans) indicated fields of the same crop type exhibits similar temporal patterns. Models previously reported were tested using these multitemporal sigma data, and a new model for each crop type was developed and tested. The new models proved to be superior to the previous ones.

  6. Microvolume index of refraction determinations by interferometric backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornhop, Darryl J.

    1995-06-01

    A new method has been applied to the determination of fluid bulk properties in small detection volumes. Through the use of an unfocused He-Ne laser beam and a cylindrical tube of capillary dimensions, relative refractive-index measurements are possible. The backscattered light from the illumination of a tube of capillary dimensions produces an interference pattern that is spatially defined and that contains information related to the bulk properties of the fluid contained in the tube. Positional changes in the intensity-modulated beam profile (interference fringes) are directly related to the refractive index of the fluid in the tube. The determination of dn/n at the 10-7 level is possible in probe volumes of 350 pL. The technique has been applied to tubes as small as 75 mu m inner diameter and as large as 1.0 mm inner diameter. No modification of the simple optical bench is required for facilitating the determination of refractive index for the complete range of tube diameters.

  7. Ultrasound Backscatter Microscopy for Imaging of Oral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Matthew; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Sun, Yang; Zhou, Feifei; Dobbie, Allison; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Tinling, Steve P.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Monsky, Wayne L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Marcu, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), or ultrasound biomicroscopy, is a noninvasive, label-free, and ionizing radiation–free technique allowing high-resolution 3-dimensional structural imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate UBM for resolving anatomic features associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Methods The study was conducted in a hamster buccal pouch model. A carcinogen was topically applied to cheeks of 14 golden Syrian hamsters. Six additional hamsters served as healthy controls. A high-frequency (41 MHz, 6-mm focal depth, lateral and axial resolutions of 65 and 37 μm, respectively) UBM system was used for scanning the oral cavity after 14 weeks of carcinogen application. Histologic analyses were conducted on scanned regions. Results The histologic structure of buccal tissue and microvasculature networks could be visualized from the UBM images. Epithelial and mucosal hypertrophy and neoplastic changes were identified in animals subjected to the carcinogen. In animals with invasive squamous cell carcinoma, lesion development and destruction of the structural integrity of tissue layers were noted. Conclusions In this pilot study, UBM generated sufficient contrast for morphologic features associated with oral carcinoma compared to healthy tissue. This modality may present a practical technique for detection of oral neoplasms that is potentially translatable to humans. PMID:24065260

  8. Backscattering from a Gaussian distributed, perfectly conducting, rough surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of scattering by random surfaces possessing many scales of roughness is analyzed. The approach is applicable to bistatic scattering from dielectric surfaces, however, this specific analysis is restricted to backscattering from a perfectly conducting surface in order to more clearly illustrate the method. The surface is assumed to be Gaussian distributed so that the surface height can be split into large and small scale components, relative to the electromagnetic wavelength. A first order perturbation approach is employed wherein the scattering solution for the large scale structure is perturbed by the small scale diffraction effects. The scattering from the large scale structure is treated via geometrical optics techniques. The effect of the large scale surface structure is shown to be equivalent to a convolution in k-space of the height spectrum with the following: the shadowing function, a polarization and surface slope dependent function, and a Gaussian factor resulting from the unperturbed geometrical optics solution. This solution provides a continuous transition between the near normal incidence geometrical optics and wide angle Bragg scattering results.

  9. Observations of Enhanced Radar Backscatter (ERB) from Millstone Hill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    Intense enhancements of the incoherent radar backscatter spectrum from the topside ionosphere were observed with the Millstone Hill UHF radar. Enhancements occurring at the local ion acoustic frequency causing large asymmetries in the measured ion line may be produced by current driven instabilities. These enhancements pose a practical problem for space surveillance systems because their cross section and spectral width are characteristic of satellites. Conversely, their hard target signature complicates the study of naturally occurring ERB events; it is nearly impossible to distinguish them from satellites based on a single measurement. Statistical comparisons of observed coherent echo distributions with predictions from a satellite catalog were used to broadly identify periods of ERB activity. A series of experiments using multiple diagnostics, including satellite instruments, for simultaneous observations have established the association of ERB with large fluxes of soft suprathermal electrons carrying field aligned currents. Zenith data are also presented which show the asymmetric growth of ion acoustic waves directly above Millstone Hill. Details of these results are presented.

  10. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, S.; Univ. of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai; ...

    2016-10-25

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop in this paper a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms,more » Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Finally, comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.« less

  11. Radar response to vegetation. [soil moisture mapping via microwave backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Active microwave measurements of vegetation backscatter were conducted to determine the utility of radar in mapping soil moisture through vegetation and mapping crop types. Using a truck-mounted boom, spectral response data were obtained for four crop types (corn, milo, soybeans, and alfalfa) over the 4-8 GHz frequency band, at incidence angles of 0 to 70 degrees in 10-degree steps, and for all four linear polarization combinations. Based on a total of 125 data sets covering a wide range of soil moisture, content, system design criteria are proposed for each of the aforementioned objectives. Quantitative soil moisture determination was best achieved at the lower frequency end of the 4-8 GHz band using HH polarized waves in the 5- to 15-degree incidence angle range. A combination of low and high frequency measurements are suggested for classifying crop types. For crop discrimination, a dual-frequency dual-polarization (VV and cross) system operating at incidence angles above 40 degrees is suggested.

  12. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Nordlund, K; Djurabekova, F; Zhang, Y; Velisa, G; Wang, T S

    2016-10-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop here a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  13. Coherent beam combining in atmospheric channels using gated backscatter.

    PubMed

    Naeh, Itay; Katzir, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces the concept of atmospheric channels and describes a possible approach for the coherent beam combining of lasers of an optical phased array (OPA) in a turbulent atmosphere. By using the recently introduced sparse spectrum harmonic augmentation method, a comprehensive simulative investigation was performed and the exceptional properties of the atmospheric channels were numerically demonstrated. Among the interesting properties are the ability to guide light in a confined manner in a refractive channel, the ability to gather different sources to the same channel, and the ability to maintain a constant relative phase within the channel between several sources. The newly introduced guiding properties combined with a suggested method for channel probing and phase measurement by aerosol backscattered radiation allows coherence improvement of the phased array's elements and energy refocusing at the location of the channel in order to increase power in the bucket without feedback from the target. The method relies on the electronic focusing, electronic scanning, and time gating of the OPA, combined with elements of the relative phase measurements.

  14. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Zhang, Y.; Velisa, G.; Wang, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop here a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  15. Efficient Strategies for Estimating the Spatial Coherence of Backscatter

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Dongwoon; Crowley, Anna Lisa C.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial coherence of ultrasound backscatter has been proposed to reduce clutter in medical imaging, to measure the anisotropy of the scattering source, and to improve the detection of blood flow. These techniques rely on correlation estimates that are obtained using computationally expensive strategies. In this study, we assess existing spatial coherence estimation methods and propose three computationally efficient modifications: a reduced kernel, a downsampled receive aperture, and the use of an ensemble correlation coefficient. The proposed methods are implemented in simulation and in vivo studies. Reducing the kernel to a single sample improved computational throughput and improved axial resolution. Downsampling the receive aperture was found to have negligible effect on estimator variance, and improved computational throughput by an order of magnitude for a downsample factor of 4. The ensemble correlation estimator demonstrated lower variance than the currently used average correlation. Combining the three methods, the throughput was improved 105-fold in simulation with a downsample factor of 4 and 20-fold in vivo with a downsample factor of 2. PMID:27913342

  16. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification.

  17. Compton scattering from the proton in an effective field theory with explicit Delta degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, J. A.; Phillips, D. R.; Grießhammer, H. W.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the proton Compton-scattering differential cross section for photon energies up to 325 MeV using Chiral Effective Field Theory (χEFT) and extract new values for the electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the proton. Our approach builds in the key physics in two different regimes: photon energies ω ≲ m π ("low energy"), and the higher energies where the Δ(1232) resonance plays a key role. The Compton amplitude is complete at N4LO, {O}( {e^2 δ ^4 } ), in the low-energy region, and at NLO, {O}( {e^2 δ ^0 } ), in the resonance region. Throughout, the Delta-pole graphs are dressed with π N loops and γN Δ vertex corrections. A statistically consistent database of proton Compton experiments is used to constrain the free parameters in our amplitude: the M1 γN Δ transition strength b 1 (which is fixed in the resonance region) and the polarisabilities α E1 and β M1 (which are fixed from data below 170 MeV). In order to obtain a reasonable fit, we find it necessary to add the spin polarisability γ M1 M1 as a free parameter, even though it is, strictly speaking, predicted in χEFT at the order to which we work. We show that the fit is consistent with the Baldin sum rule, and then use that sum rule to constrain α E1 + β M1. In this way we obtain α E1 = [10.65 ± 0.35(stat) ± 0.2(Baldin) ± 0.3(theory)] × 10-4 fm3 and β M1 = [3.15 ∓ 0.35(state) ± 0.2(Baldin) ∓ 0.3()theory] × 10-4 fm3, with χ2 = 113.2 for 135 degrees of freedom. A detailed rationale for the theoretical uncertainties assigned to this result is provided.

  18. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A: EVIDENCE FOR INVERSE COMPTON RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; He, Hao-Ning

    2013-10-20

    A nearby superluminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by six γ-ray space telescopes (Swift, the Fermi GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)/Large Area Telescope, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, AGILE, and RHESSI) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic γ-ray energy release is ∼10{sup 54} erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a redshift z ≤ 0.5. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day, and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotronmore » radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is favored for the ∼(95.3, 47.3, 41.4, 38.5, 32) GeV photons arriving at t ∼ (243, 256.3, 610.6, 3409.8, 34366.2) s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the external inverse Compton scattering of the prompt emission (the second episode, i.e., t ∼ 120-260 s) by the forward-shock-accelerated electrons is expected to produce a few γ-rays at energies above 10 GeV, while five were detected in the same time interval. A possible unified model for the prompt soft γ-ray, optical, and GeV emission of GRB 130427A, GRB 080319B, and GRB 090902B is outlined. Implications of the null detection of >1 TeV neutrinos from GRB 130427A by IceCube are discussed.« less

  19. Compton Scattering Cross Sections in Strong Magnetic Fields: Advances for Neutron Star Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar

    2014-08-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 ~ 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be a leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Generated by electrons possessing ultra-relativistic energies, this leads to attractive simplifications of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov (ST) basis states, focusing specifically on ground state-to-ground state scattering. Such scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly-relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may well involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly-relativistic pairs. These situations necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, where the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron, and the intermediate state can be excited to arbitrary Landau levels. Here, we highlight results from such a generalization using ST formalism. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is illustrated and compared with the non-relativistic Thompson cross section with classical widths. Results will find application to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.We express our gratitude for the generous support of Michigan Space Grant Consortium, the National Science Foundation (grants AST-0607651, AST-1009725, AST-1009731 and PHY/DMR-1004811), and the

  20. Study on the Spatial Resolution of Single and Multiple Coincidences Compton Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we study the image resolution that can be obtained from the Multiple Coincidences Compton Camera (MCCC). The principle of MCCC is based on a simultaneous acquisition of several gamma-rays emitted in cascade from a single nucleus. Contrary to a standard Compton camera, MCCC can theoretically provide the exact location of a radioactive source (based only on the identification of the intersection point of three cones created by a single decay), without complicated tomographic reconstruction. However, practical implementation of the MCCC approach encounters several problems, such as low detection sensitivities result in very low probability of coincident triple gamma-ray detection, which is necessary for the source localization. It is also important to evaluate how the detection uncertainties (finite energy and spatial resolution) influence identification of the intersection of three cones, thus the resulting image quality. In this study we investigate how the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images using the triple-cone reconstruction (TCR) approach compares to images reconstructed from the same data using standard iterative method based on single-cone. Results show, that FWHM for the point source reconstructed with TCR was 20-30% higher than the one obtained from the standard iterative reconstruction based on expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and conventional single-cone Compton imaging. Finite energy and spatial resolutions of the MCCC detectors lead to errors in conical surfaces definitions (“thick” conical surfaces) which only amplify in image reconstruction when intersection of three cones is being sought. Our investigations show that, in spite of being conceptually appealing, the identification of triple cone intersection constitutes yet another restriction of the multiple coincidence approach which limits the image resolution that can be obtained with MCCC and TCR algorithm.

  1. Interior view, looking northeast in computer room OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, looking northeast in computer room - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Five Receiver Building, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  2. Interior view, looking south in computer room OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, looking south in computer room - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Six Receiver Building, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  3. Oblique view to south OvertheHorizon Backscatter Radar Network, Mountain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view to south - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Mountain Home Air Force Operations Building, On Desert Street at 9th Avenue Mountain Home Air Force Base, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  4. General view looking northnortheast at antenna array OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking north-northeast at antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector Two Antenna Array, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  5. Detail of antenna array, looking northnorthwest OvertheHorizon Backscatter Radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of antenna array, looking north-northwest - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Five Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  6. General view looking northnortheast at antenna array OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking north-northeast at antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector One Antenna Array, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  7. General view of Antenna Array, looking west OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of Antenna Array, looking west - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Six Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  8. Detail of antenna tower structure, looking northnorthwest OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of antenna tower structure, looking north-northwest - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Five Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  9. Quantitative broadband ultrasonic backscatter - An approach to nondestructive evaluation in acoustically inhomogeneous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, M.; Miller, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a broadband backscatter technique to obtain the frequency dependence of the longitudinal-wave ultrasonic backscatter coefficient from a collection of scatterers in a solid is investigated. Measurements of the backscatter coefficient were obtained over the range of ultrasonic wave vector magnitude-glass sphere radius product between 0.1 and 3.0 from model systems consisting of dilute suspensions of randomly distributed crown glass spheres in hardened polyester resin. The results of these measurements were in good agreement with theoretical prediction. Consequently, broadband measurements of the ultrasonic backscatter coefficient may represent a useful approach toward characterizing the physical properties of scatterers in intrinsically inhomogeneous materials such as composites, metals, and ceramics, and may represent an approach toward nondestructive evaluation of these materials.

  10. Likelihood parameter estimation for calibrating a soil moisture using radar backscatter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Assimilating soil moisture information contained in synthetic aperture radar imagery into land surface model predictions can be done using a calibration, or parameter estimation, approach. The presence of speckle, however, necessitates aggregating backscatter measurements over large land areas in or...

  11. A Compton Suppressed Gamma Ray Counter For Radio Assay of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Rare event searches, such as direct dark matter experiments, require materials with ultra-low levels of natural radioactivity. We present a neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique for assaying metals, specifically titanium used for cryostat construction. Earlier attempts at NAA encountered limitations due to bulk activation via (n, p) reactions, which contributed to large continuum backgrounds due to Compton tails. Our method involves a heavy water shielded exposure to minimize (n,p) reactions and a sodium iodide shielded high purity germanium counter for the gamma ray assay. Preliminary results on assays for U/Th/K contamination in titaniumwill be presented.

  12. Compton-Scattering Cross Section on the Proton at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagoulian, A.; Mamyan, V. H.; Roedelbronn, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Bertin, P. Y.; Bimbot, L.; Bosted, P.; Calarco, J. R.; Camsonne, A.; Chang, C. C.; Chang, T.-H.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E.; Degtyarenko, P.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Dutta, D.; Egiyan, K.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Glashausser, C.; Gomez, J.; Hamilton, D. J.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hinton, W.; Horn, T.; Howell, C.; Hunyady, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M. K.; Khandaker, M.; Ketikyan, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kramer, K.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; Lerose, J.; Lindgren, R. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; McCormick, K.; Meekins, D. G.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moussiegt, P.; Nanda, S.; Nathan, A. M.; Nikolenko, D. M.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B. E.; Paschke, K.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Punjabi, V. A.; Rachek, I.; Radyushkin, A.; Reitz, B.; Roche, R.; Ron, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Savvinov, N.; Shahinyan, A.; Shestakov, Y.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Stoler, P.; Tajima, S.; Sulkosky, V.; Todor, L.; Vlahovic, B.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Xiang, H.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2007-04-01

    Cross-section values for Compton scattering on the proton were measured at 25 kinematic settings over the range s=5 11 and -t=2 7GeV2 with a statistical accuracy of a few percent. The scaling power for the s dependence of the cross section at fixed center-of-mass angle was found to be 8.0±0.2, strongly inconsistent with the prediction of perturbative QCD. The observed cross-section values are in fair agreement with the calculations using the handbag mechanism, in which the external photons couple to a single quark.

  13. A Compton scattering setup for pulse shape discrimination studies in germanium detectors.

    PubMed

    von Sturm, K; Belogurov, S; Brugnera, R; Garfagnini, A; Lippi, I; Modenese, L; Rosso, D; Turcato, M

    2017-07-01

    Pulse shape discrimination is an important handle to improve sensitivity in low background experiments. A dedicated setup was built to investigate the response of high-purity germanium detectors to single Compton scattered events. Using properly collimated γ-ray sources, it is possible to select events with known interaction location. The aim is to correlate the position dependent signal shape with geometrical and electrical properties of the detector. We report on design and performance of the setup with a first look on data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electron-tracking Compton gamma-ray camera for small animal and phantom imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Hiroo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Michiaki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ueda, Masashi; Okada, Tomohisa; Kubo, Atsushi; Kunieda, Etuso; Nakahara, Tadaki; Kohara, Ryota; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nakazawa, Tetsuo; Shirahata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ogawa, Koichi; Togashi, Kaori; Saji, Hideo; Tanimori, Toru

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for medical use. Our ETCC has a wide energy dynamic range (200-1300 keV) and wide field of view (3 sr), and thus has potential for advanced medical use. To evaluate the ETCC, we imaged the head (brain) and bladder of mice that had been administered with F-18-FDG. We also imaged the head and thyroid gland of mice using double tracers of F-18-FDG and I-131 ions.

  15. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmer, J.; Ley, J.-L.; Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Freud, N.; Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Létang, J. M.; Magne, M.; Mathez, H.; Maxim, V.; Montarou, G.; Morel, C.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Testa, E.; Zoccarato, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm3, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm3, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  16. Laser-Compton photon radiography for nondestructive test of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kudo, Katshuhisa; Takeda, Naoto; Mikado, Tomohisa; Yamada, Kawakatsu

    2001-12-01

    Experimental results of transmission photon radiography of bulk materials using the laser-Compton photon beam in the energy range of 2-20 MeV are given. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the effectiveness and to survey a potential need and a technical limit of the present method for industrial application, such as nondestructive test of bulk materials. Several radiographs of metals, ceramics, and concrete were measured with the present method. Position resolution of the system was measured with using 10 MeV photon beam and slit. It was less than 1 mm.

  17. Upgraded photon calorimeter with integrating readout for Hall A Compton Polarimeter at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Friend, M.; Parno, D.; Benmokhtar, F.; ...

    2012-06-01

    The photon arm of the Compton polarimeter in Hall A of Jefferson Lab has been upgraded to allow for electron beam polarization measurements with better than 1% accuracy. The data acquisition system (DAQ) now includes an integrating mode, which eliminates several systematic uncertainties inherent in the original counting-DAQ setup. The photon calorimeter has been replaced with a Ce-doped Gd 2SiO 5 crystal, which has a bright output and fast response, and works well for measurements using the new integrating method at electron beam energies from 1 to 6 GeV.

  18. Determination of silicon in biological and botanical reference materials by epithermal INAA and Compton suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsberger, S.; Peshev, S.; Becker, D. A.

    1994-12-01

    Silicon determination in sixteen botanical and biological standard reference materials is described using the 29Si(n, p) 29Al reaction through instrumental epithermal neutron activation analysis and Compton suppression gamma-ray spectroscopy. By simultaneous utilization of both cadmium and boron epithermal filters along with anticoincidence gamma-counting, detection limits as low as 12 ppm were obtained for certain matrices, much lower than previously reported values for this type of analysis. The method is applicable to many botanical and biological matrices and is attractive with its interference free, purely instrumental nature, compared with methods using the 28Si(n, p) 28Al reaction or chemical separation techniques.

  19. Balloon flight test of a Compton telescope based on scintillators with silicon photomultiplier readouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Legere, J. S.; Bancroft, C. M.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of the first high-altitude balloon flight test of a concept for an advanced Compton telescope making use of modern scintillator materials with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readouts. There is a need in the fields of high-energy astronomy and solar physics for new medium-energy gamma-ray ( 0.4-10 MeV) detectors capable of making sensitive observations of both line and continuum sources over a wide dynamic range. A fast scintillator-based Compton telescope with SiPM readouts is a promising solution to this instrumentation challenge, since the fast response of the scintillators permits both the rejection of background via time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination and the ability to operate at high count rates. The Solar Compton Telescope (SolCompT) prototype presented here was designed to demonstrate stable performance of this technology under balloon-flight conditions. The SolCompT instrument was a simple two-element Compton telescope, consisting of an approximately one-inch cylindrical stilbene crystal for a scattering detector and a one-inch cubic LaBr3:Ce crystal for a calorimeter detector. Both scintillator detectors were read out by 2×2 arrays of Hamamatsu S11828-3344 MPPC devices. Custom front-end electronics provided optimum signal rise time and linearity, and custom power supplies automatically adjusted the SiPM bias voltage to compensate for temperature-induced gain variations. A tagged calibration source, consisting of 240 nCi of 60Co embedded in plastic scintillator, was placed in the field of view and provided a known source of gamma rays to measure in flight. The SolCompT balloon payload was launched on 24 August 2014 from Fort Sumner, NM, and spent 3.75 h at a float altitude of 123,000 ft. The instrument performed well throughout the flight. After correcting for small ( 10%) residual gain variations, we measured an in-flight ToF resolution of 760 ps (FWHM). Advanced scintillators with SiPM readouts continue to show great promise for

  20. High-temperature cuprate superconductors studied by x-ray Compton scattering and positron annihilation spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    The bulk Fermi surface in an overdoped (x = 0.3) single crystal of La2-xSrxCuO4 has been observed by using x-ray Compton scattering. This momentum density technique also provides a powerful tool for directly seeing what the dopant Sr atoms are doing to the electronic structure of La2CuO4. Because of wave function effects, positron annihilation spectroscopy does not yield a strong signature of the Fermi surface in extended momentum space, but it can be used to explore the role of oxygen defects in the reservoir layers for promoting high temperature superconductivity.

  1. Compositional Signatures in Acoustic Backscatter Over Vegetated and Unvegetated Mixed Sand-Gravel Riverbeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    Multibeam acoustic backscatter has considerable utility for remote characterization of spatially heterogeneous bed sediment composition over vegetated and unvegetated riverbeds of mixed sand and gravel. However, the use of high-frequency, decimeter-resolution acoustic backscatter for sediment classification in shallow water is hampered by significant topographic contamination of the signal. In mixed sand-gravel riverbeds, changes in the abiotic composition of sediment (such as homogeneous sand to homogeneous gravel) tend to occur over larger spatial scales than is characteristic of small-scale bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and bars) or biota (such as vascular plants and periphyton). A two-stage method is proposed to filter out the morphological contributions to acoustic backscatter. First, the residual supragrain-scale topographic effects in acoustic backscatter with small instantaneous insonified areas, caused by ambiguity in the local (beam-to-beam) bed-sonar geometry, are removed. Then, coherent scales between high-resolution topography and backscatter are identified using cospectra, which are used to design a frequency domain filter that decomposes backscatter into the (unwanted) high-pass component associated with bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and sand waves) and vegetation, and the (desired) low-frequency component associated with the composition of sediment patches superimposed on the topography. This process strengthens relationships between backscatter and sediment composition. A probabilistic framework is presented for classifying vegetated and unvegetated substrates based on acoustic backscatter at decimeter resolution. This capability is demonstrated using data collected from diverse settings within a 386 km reach of a canyon river whose bed varies among sand, gravel, cobbles, boulders, and submerged vegetation.

  2. Integrating Multibeam Backscatter Angular Response, Mosaic and Bathymetry Data for Benthic Habitat Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam echosounders (MBES) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF) machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with their derivatives

  3. Low-Frequency Surface Backscattering Strengths Measured in the Critical Sea Test Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-19

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/7160--17-9702 Low-Frequency Surface Backscattering Strengths Measured in the Critical Sea ...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Low-Frequency Surface Backscattering Strengths Measured in the Critical Sea Test Experiments Roger C. Gauss1 and Joseph M...significantly- updated results from 55 broadband SUS SSS measurements in 6 Critical Sea Test (CST) experiments. Since the time of the previously

  4. Compositional signatures in acoustic backscatter over vegetated and unvegetated mixed sand-gravel riverbeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2017-01-01

    Multibeam acoustic backscatter has considerable utility for remote characterization of spatially heterogeneous bed sediment composition over vegetated and unvegetated riverbeds of mixed sand and gravel. However, the use of high-frequency, decimeter-resolution acoustic backscatter for sediment classification in shallow water is hampered by significant topographic contamination of the signal. In mixed sand-gravel riverbeds, changes in the abiotic composition of sediment (such as homogeneous sand to homogeneous gravel) tend to occur over larger spatial scales than is characteristic of small-scale bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and bars) or biota (such as vascular plants and periphyton). A two-stage method is proposed to filter out the morphological contributions to acoustic backscatter. First, the residual supragrain-scale topographic effects in acoustic backscatter with small instantaneous insonified areas, caused by ambiguity in the local (beam-to-beam) bed-sonar geometry, are removed. Then, coherent scales between high-resolution topography and backscatter are identified using cospectra, which are used to design a frequency domain filter that decomposes backscatter into the (unwanted) high-pass component associated with bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and sand waves) and vegetation, and the (desired) low-frequency component associated with the composition of sediment patches superimposed on the topography. This process strengthens relationships between backscatter and sediment composition. A probabilistic framework is presented for classifying vegetated and unvegetated substrates based on acoustic backscatter at decimeter resolution. This capability is demonstrated using data collected from diverse settings within a 386 km reach of a canyon river whose bed varies among sand, gravel, cobbles, boulders, and submerged vegetation.

  5. Acoustic backscatter of the 1995 flood deposit on the Eel shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borgeld, J.C.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.; Goff, John A.; Mayer, Larry A.; Curtis, Jennifer A.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic swath mapping and sediment box coring conducted on the continental shelf near the mouth of the Eel River revealed regional variations in acoustic backscatter that can be related to the shelf sedimentology. The acoustic-backscatter variations observed on the shelf were unusually narrow compared to the response of similar sediment types documented in other areas. However, the acoustic data revealed four principal bottom types on the shelf that can be related to sedimentologic differences observed in cores. The four areas are: (1) low acoustic backscatter associated with the nearshore-sand facies and the prodelta terraces of the Eel and Mad rivers, composed of fine sands and coarse silts with low porosity; (2) high acoustic backscatter associated with fine silts characterized by high porosity and deposited by the 1995 flood of the Eel River; (3) intermediate acoustic backscatter in the outer-shelf muds, where clayey silts are accumulating and the 1995 flood apparently had limited direct effect; and (4) intermediate acoustic backscatter near the fringes of the 1995 flood deposits and in areas where the flood sediments were more disrupted by post-depositional processes. The highest acoustic backscatter was identified in areas where the 1995 flood sediments remained relatively intact and near the shelf surface into the summer of 1995. Cores collected from these areas contained wavy or lenticular bedding. The rapid deposition of the high-porosity muddy layers results in better preservation of incorporated ripple forms than in areas less directly impacted by the flood deposit. The high-porosity muddy layers allow acoustic penetration into the sediments and result in greater acoustic backscatter from incorporated roughness elements.

  6. Coherent Backscattering by Particulate Planetary Media of Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, Karri; Penttila, Antti; Wilkman, Olli; Videen, Gorden

    2014-11-01

    The so-called radiative-transfer coherent-backscattering method (RT-CB) has been put forward as a practical Monte Carlo method to compute multiple scattering in discrete random media mimicking planetary regoliths (K. Muinonen, Waves in Random Media 14, p. 365, 2004). In RT-CB, the interaction between the discrete scatterers takes place in the far-field approximation and the wave propagation faces exponential extinction. There is a significant constraint in the RT-CB method: it has to be assumed that the form of the scattering matrix is that of the spherical particle. We aim to extend the RT-CB method to nonspherical single particles showing significant depolarization characteristics. First, ensemble-averaged single-scattering albedos and phase matrices of nonspherical particles are matched using a phenomenological radiative-transfer model within a microscopic volume element. Second, the phenomenologial single-particle model is incorporated into the Monte Carlo RT-CB method. In the ray tracing, the electromagnetic phases within the microscopic volume elements are omitted as having negligible lengths, whereas the phases are duly accounted for in the paths between two or more microscopic volume elements. We assess the computational feasibility of the extended RT-CB method and show preliminary results for particulate media mimicking planetary regoliths. The present work can be utilized in the interpretation of astronomical observations of asteroids and other planetary objects. In particular, the work sheds light on the depolarization characteristics of planetary regoliths at small phase angles near opposition. The research has been partially funded by the ERC Advanced Grant No 320773 entitled “Scattering and Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves in Particulate Media” (SAEMPL), by the Academy of Finland (contract 257966), NASA Outer Planets Research Program (contract NNX10AP93G), and NASA Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research Program (contract NNX11AB25G).

  7. Ozone and Aerosol Retrieval from Backscattered Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the techniques to estimate total column ozone and aerosol absorption optical depth from the measurements of backscattered ultraviolet (buv) radiation. The total ozone algorithm has been used to create a unique record of the ozone layer, spanning more than 3 decades, from a series of instruments (BUV, SBUV, TOMS, SBUV/2) flown on NASA, NOAA, Japanese and Russian satellites. We will discuss how this algorithm can be considered a generalization of the well-known Dobson/Brewer technique that has been used to process data from ground-based instruments for many decades, and how it differs from the DOAS techniques that have been used to estimate vertical column densities of a host of trace gases from data collected by GOME and SCIAMACHY instruments. The BUV aerosol algorithm is most suitable for the detection of UV absorbing aerosols (smoke, desert dust, volcanic ash) and is the only technique that can detect aerosols embedded in clouds. This algorithm has been used to create a quarter century record of aerosol absorption optical depth using the BUV data collected by a series of TOMS instruments. We will also discuss how the data from the OM1 instrument launched on July 15,2004 will be combined with data from MODIS and CALIPSO lidar data to enhance the accuracy and information content of satellite-derived aerosol measurements. The OM1 and MODIS instruments are currently flying on EOS Aura and EOS Aqua satellites respectively, part of a constellation of satellites called the "A-train". The CALIPSO satellite is expected to join this constellation in mid 2005.

  8. Compton cooling and the signature of Quasi Periodic Oscillations for the transient black hole candidate H 1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Debnath, D.; Jana, A.; Molla, A. A.

    In black hole accretion cooling of the Compton cloud has an enormous effect on the dynamics of post-shock flow. We demonstrate that the Compton cooling is highly responsible for the origin of Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) during the outburst time of the galactic black hole candidates (BHCs). Our study shows that the disk oscillation will take place when infall time from the shock roughly agrees with cooling time in the post-shock region i.e., the resonance condition. We believe that this oscillation is responsible for the origin of QPOs and will occur only when a particular disk condition (disk rate, halo rate and shock strength) satisfies. We also confirm that shock moves with an average velocity of a few meters/sec for the transient BHC H1743-322 due to the presence of Compton cooling.

  9. Multi-temporal RADARSAT-1 and ERS backscattering signatures of coastal wetlands in southeastern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Lu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Using multi-temporal European Remote-sensing Satellites (ERS-1/-2) and Canadian Radar Satellite (RADARSAT-1) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data over the Louisiana coastal zone, we characterize seasonal variations of radar backscat-tering according to vegetation type. Our main findings are as follows. First, ERS-1/-2 and RADARSAT-1 require careful radiometric calibration to perform multi-temporal backscattering analysis for wetland mapping. We use SAR backscattering signals from cities for the relative calibration. Second, using seasonally averaged backscattering coefficients from ERS-1/-2 and RADARSAT-1, we can differentiate most forests (bottomland and swamp forests) and marshes (freshwater, intermediate, brackish, and saline marshes) in coastal wetlands. The student t-test results support the usefulness of season-averaged backscatter data for classification. Third, combining SAR backscattering coefficients and an optical-sensor-based normalized difference vegetation index can provide further insight into vegetation type and enhance the separation between forests and marshes. Our study demonstrates that SAR can provide necessary information to characterize coastal wetlands and monitor their changes.

  10. A laboratory investigation into microwave backscattering from sea ice. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredow, Jonathan W.

    1989-01-01

    The sources of scattering of artificial sea ice were determined, backscatter measurements semi-quantitatively were compared with theoretical predictions, and inexpensive polarimetric radars were developed for sea ice backscatter studies. A brief review of the dielectric properties of sea ice and of commonly used surface and volume scattering theories is presented. A description is provided of the backscatter measurements performed and experimental techniques used. The development of inexpensive short-range polarimetric radars is discussed. The steps taken to add polarimetric capability to a simple FM-W radar are considered as are sample polarimetric phase measurements of the radar. Ice surface characterization data and techniques are discussed, including computation of surface rms height and correlation length and air bubble distribution statistics. A method is also presented of estimating the standard deviation of rms height and correlation length for cases of few data points. Comparisons were made of backscatter measurements and theory. It was determined that backscatter from an extremely smooth saline ice surface at C band cannot be attributed only to surface scatter. It was found that snow cover had a significant influence on backscatter from extremely smooth saline ice at C band.

  11. Waterfall notch-filtering for restoration of acoustic backscatter records from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Luciano; Hung, Edson Mintsu; Neto, Arthur Ayres; Magrani, Fábio José Guedes

    2018-06-01

    A series of multibeam sonar surveys were conducted from 2009 to 2013 around Admiralty Bay, Shetland Islands, Antarctica. These surveys provided a detailed bathymetric model that helped understand and characterize the bottom geology of this remote area. Unfortunately, the acoustic backscatter records registered during these bathymetric surveys were heavily contaminated with noise and motion artifacts. These artifacts persisted in the backscatter records despite the fact that the proper acquisition geometry and the necessary offsets and delays were applied during the survey and in post-processing. These noisy backscatter records were very difficult to interpret and to correlate with gravity-core samples acquired in the same area. In order to address this issue, a directional notch-filter was applied to the backscatter waterfall in the along-track direction. The proposed filter provided better estimates for the backscatter strength of each sample by considerably reducing residual motion artifacts. The restoration of individual samples was possible since the waterfall frame of reference preserves the acquisition geometry. Then, a remote seafloor characterization procedure based on an acoustic model inversion was applied to the restored backscatter samples, generating remote estimates of acoustic impedance. These remote estimates were compared to Multi Sensor Core Logger measurements of acoustic impedance obtained from gravity core samples. The remote estimates and the Core Logger measurements of acoustic impedance were comparable when the shallow seafloor was homogeneous. The proposed waterfall notch-filtering approach can be applied to any sonar record, provided that we know the system ping-rate and sampling frequency.

  12. Long-term variation of radar-auroral backscatter and the interplanetary sector structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoman, T.K.; Burrage, M.D.; Lester, M.

    Recurrent variation of geomagnetic activity at the {approximately}27-day solar rotation period and higher harmonics is a well-documented phenomenon. Auroral radar backscatter data from the Sweden and Britain Radar-Auroral Experiment (SABRE) radar provide a continuous time series from 1981 to the present which is a highly sensitive monitor of geomagnetic activity. In this study, Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) dynamic power spectra of SABRE backscatter data from 1981 to 1989, concurrent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind parameters from 1981 to 1987, and the Kp index since 1932 are examined. Data since 1977 are compared with previously published heliospheric current sheetmore » measurements mapped out from the solar photosphere. Stong periodic behavior is observed in the radar backscatter during the declining phase of solar cycle 21, but this periodicity disappears at the start of solar cycle 22. Similar behavior is observed in earlier solar cycles in the Kp spectra. Details of the radar backscatter, IMF, and solar wind spectra indicate that the solar wind momentum density is the dominant parameter in determining the backscatter periodicity. The temporal evolution of two- and four-sector structures, as predicted by SABRE backscatter spectra, throughout solar cycle 21 generally still agree well with heliospheric current sheet measurements. For one interval, however, there is evidence that evolution of the current sheet has occurred between the photospheric source surface and the Earth.« less

  13. Experimental evaluation of effective atomic number of composite materials using back-scattering of gamma photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Inderjeet; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B. S.; Sabharwal, Arvind D.

    2017-04-01

    A method has been presented for calculation of effective atomic number (Zeff) of composite materials, by using back-scattering of 662 keV gamma photons obtained from a 137Cs mono-energetic radioactive source. The present technique is a non-destructive approach, and is employed to evaluate Zeff of different composite materials, by interacting gamma photons with semi-infinite material in a back-scattering geometry, using a 3″ × 3″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The present work is undertaken to study the effect of target thickness on intensity distribution of gamma photons which are multiply back-scattered from targets (pure elements) and composites (mixtures of different elements). The intensity of multiply back-scattered events increases with increasing target thickness and finally saturates. The saturation thickness for multiply back-scattered events is used to assign a number (Zeff) for multi-element materials. Response function of the 3″ × 3″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector is applied on observed pulse-height distribution to include the contribution of partially absorbed photons. The reduced value of signal-to-noise ratio interprets the increase in multiply back-scattered data of a response corrected spectrum. Data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and literature also support the present experimental results.

  14. Artificially controlled backscattering in single mode fibers based on femtosecond laser fabricated reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, Daru; Li, Haitao; Wu, Qiong

    2018-04-01

    A novel method to artificially control the backscattering of the single-mode fiber (SMF) is proposed and investigated for the first time. This method can help to fabricate a high backscattering fiber (HBSF), such as by fabricating reflectors in every one meter interval of an SMF based on the exposure of the femtosecond laser beam. The artificially controlled backscattering (ACBS) can be much higher than the natural Rayleigh backscattering (RB) of the SMF. The RB power and ACBS power in the unit length fiber are derived according to the theory of the RBS. The total relative power and the relative back power reflected in the unit length of the HBSF have been simulated and presented. The simulated results show that the HBSF has the characteristics of both low optical attenuation and high backscattering. The relative back power reflected in the unit length of the HBSF is 25dB larger than the RB power of the SMF when the refractive index modulation quantity of the reflectors is 0.009. Some preliminary experiments also indicate that the method fabricating reflectors to increase the backscattering power of the SMF is practical and promising.

  15. Recommendations for improved and coherent acquisition and processing of backscatter data from seafloor-mapping sonars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarche, Geoffroy; Lurton, Xavier

    2018-06-01

    Multibeam echosounders are becoming widespread for the purposes of seafloor bathymetry mapping, but the acquisition and the use of seafloor backscatter measurements, acquired simultaneously with the bathymetric data, are still insufficiently understood, controlled and standardized. This presents an obstacle to well-accepted, standardized analysis and application by end users. The Marine Geological and Biological Habitat Mapping group (Geohab.org) has long recognized the need for better coherence and common agreement on acquisition, processing and interpretation of seafloor backscatter data, and established the Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) in May 2013. This paper presents an overview of this initiative, the mandate, structure and program of the working group, and a synopsis of the BSWG Guidelines and Recommendations to date. The paper includes (1) an overview of the current status in sensors and techniques available in seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars; (2) the presentation of the BSWG structure and results; (3) recommendations to operators, end-users, sonar manufacturers, and software developers using sonar backscatter for seafloor-mapping applications, for best practice methods and approaches for data acquisition and processing; and (4) a discussion on the development needs for future systems and data processing. We propose for the first time a nomenclature of backscatter processing levels that affords a means to accurately and efficiently describe the data processing status, and to facilitate comparisons of final products from various origins.

  16. Analysis of seafloor backscatter strength dependence on the survey azimuth using multibeam echosounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurton, Xavier; Eleftherakis, Dimitrios; Augustin, Jean-Marie

    2018-06-01

    The sediment backscatter strength measured by multibeam echosounders is a key feature for seafloor mapping either qualitative (image mosaics) or quantitative (extraction of classifying features). An important phenomenon, often underestimated, is the dependence of the backscatter level on the azimuth angle imposed by the survey line directions: strong level differences at varying azimuth can be observed in case of organized roughness of the seabed, usually caused by tide currents over sandy sediments. This paper presents a number of experimental results obtained from shallow-water cruises using a 300-kHz multibeam echosounder and specially dedicated to the study of this azimuthal effect, with a specific configuration of the survey strategy involving a systematic coverage of reference areas following "compass rose" patterns. The results show for some areas a very strong dependence of the backscatter level, up to about 10-dB differences at intermediate oblique angles, although the presence of these ripples cannot be observed directly—neither from the bathymetry data nor from the sonar image, due to the insufficient resolution capability of the sonar. An elementary modeling of backscattering from rippled interfaces explains and comforts these observations. The consequences of this backscatter dependence upon survey azimuth on the current strategies of backscatter data acquisition and exploitation are discussed.

  17. Unequal Pieces of a Shrinking Pie: The Struggle between African Americans and Latinos over Education, Employment, and Empowerment in Compton, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straus, Emily E.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the role of education within communities and underscores the changing nature of minority groups in the United States. It specifically examines the struggle between African Americans and Latinos over education, employment, and empowerment in Compton, California. The story of Compton and its school district exposes…

  18. Intra- and intermolecular effects on the Compton profile of the ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylimidazolium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Koskelo, J., E-mail: jaakko.koskelo@helsinki.fi; Juurinen, I.; Ruotsalainen, K. O.

    2014-12-28

    We present a comprehensive simulation study on the solid-liquid phase transition of the ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylimidazolium chloride in terms of the changes in the atomic structure and their effect on the Compton profile. The structures were obtained by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Chosen radial distribution functions of the liquid structure are presented and found generally to be in good agreement with previous ab initio molecular dynamics and neutron scattering studies. The main contributions to the predicted difference Compton profile are found to arise from intermolecular changes in the phase transition. This prediction can be used for interpreting futuremore » experiments.« less

  19. Demonstration of in-vivo Multi-Probe Tracker Based on a Si/CdTe Semiconductor Compton Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Watanabe, Shin; Aono, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kanayama, Yousuke; Hiromura, Makoto; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2012-02-01

    By using a prototype Compton camera consisting of silicon (Si) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detectors, originally developed for the ASTRO-H satellite mission, an experiment involving imaging multiple radiopharmaceuticals injected into a living mouse was conducted to study its feasibility for medical imaging. The accumulation of both iodinated (131I) methylnorcholestenol and 85Sr into the mouse's organs was simultaneously imaged by the prototype. This result implies that the Compton camera is expected to become a multi-probe tracker available in nuclear medicine and small animal imaging.

  20. The Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera of the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shin; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin`ichiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukuyama, Taro; Furui, Shunya; Genba, Kei; Hagino, Kouichi; Harayama, Atsushi; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohta, Masayuki; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Goro; Sato, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Togo, Atsushi; Tomizuka, Shinji

    2014-11-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of the instrument payloads onboard ASTRO-H, and will cover a wide energy band (60-600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than instruments currently in orbit. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and cadmium telluride (CdTe) sensors. The design of the SGD Compton camera has been finalized and the final prototype, which has the same configuration as the flight model, has been fabricated for performance evaluation. The Compton camera has overall dimensions of 12 cm×12 cm×12 cm, consisting of 32 layers of Si pixel sensors and 8 layers of CdTe pixel sensors surrounded by 2 layers of CdTe pixel sensors. The detection efficiency of the Compton camera reaches about 15% and 3% for 100 keV and 511 keV gamma rays, respectively. The pixel pitch of the Si and CdTe sensors is 3.2 mm, and the signals from all 13,312 pixels are processed by 208 ASICs developed for the SGD. Good energy resolution is afforded by semiconductor sensors and low noise ASICs, and the obtained energy resolutions with the prototype Si and CdTe pixel sensors are 1.0-2.0 keV (FWHM) at 60 keV and 1.6-2.5 keV (FWHM) at 122 keV, respectively. This results in good background rejection capability due to better constraints on Compton kinematics. Compton camera energy resolutions achieved with the final prototype are 6.3 keV (FWHM) at 356 keV and 10.5 keV (FWHM) at 662 keV, which satisfy the instrument requirements for the SGD Compton camera (better than 2%). Moreover, a low intrinsic background has been confirmed by the background measurement with the final prototype.

  1. Analysis of stimulated Raman backscatter and stimulated Brillouin backscatter in experiments performed on SG-III prototype facility with a spectral analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Liang; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Xiaoyan

    2014-07-15

    Experiments about the observations of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) in Hohlraum were performed on Shenguang-III (SG-III) prototype facility for the first time in 2011. In this paper, relevant experimental results are analyzed for the first time with a one-dimension spectral analysis code, which is developed to study the coexistent process of SRS and SBS in Hohlraum plasma condition. Spectral features of the backscattered light are discussed with different plasma parameters. In the case of empty Hohlraum experiments, simulation results indicate that SBS, which grows fast at the energy deposition region near the Hohlraum wall, ismore » the dominant instability process. The time resolved spectra of SRS and SBS are numerically obtained, which agree with the experimental observations. For the gas-filled Hohlraum experiments, simulation results show that SBS grows fastest in Au plasma and amplifies convectively in C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas, whereas SRS mainly grows in the high density region of the C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas. Gain spectra and the spectra of backscattered light are simulated along the ray path, which clearly show the location where the intensity of scattered light with a certain wavelength increases. This work is helpful to comprehend the observed spectral features of SRS and SBS. The experiments and relevant analysis provide references for the ignition target design in future.« less

  2. A new characterization of the Compton process in the ULX spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Nakazawa, K.; Makishima, K.

    2016-05-01

    Attempts were made to construct a unified description of the spectra of ULX (Ultra Luminous X-ray source) objects, including their power-law (PL) state and disk-like state. Among spectral models proposed to explain either state, the present work adopts the one which combines multi-color disk (MCD) emission and its thermal Comptonization (THC). This model was applied to several datasets of ULXs obtained by Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and Nustar. The model well explains all the spectra, regardless of the spectral states, in terms of a cool disk (Tin=0.2-0.5 keV) and a cool thick (Te=1-3 keV, τ ˜10) corona. The fit results can be characterized by two new parameters. One is Q≡ Te/Tin which describes the balance between the Compton cooling and gravitational heating of the coronal electrons, while the other is F≡ 1-Fdirect/Ftotal, namely, the covering fraction of the MCD by the corona. Here, Fdirect and Ftotal are the luminosity in the directly-visible disk emission and the total radiation, respectively. Then, the PL-state spectra have been found to show Q˜10 and F˜0.5, while those of the disk-like state Q˜ 3 and F˜1. Thus, the two states are clearly separated in terms of Q and F. The obtained results are employed to argue for their interpretation in terms of high-mass (several tens to several hundreds M⊙) black holes.

  3. Stability analysis of implicit time discretizations for the Compton-scattering Fokker-Planck equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Warsa, James S.; Lowrie, Robert B.; Morel, Jim E.

    2009-09-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation is a widely used approximation for modeling the Compton scattering of photons in high energy density applications. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of three implicit time discretizations for the Compton-Scattering Fokker-Planck equation. Specifically, we examine (i) a Semi-Implicit (SI) scheme that employs backward-Euler differencing but evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their beginning-of-time-step values, (ii) a Fully Implicit (FI) discretization that instead evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their end-of-time-step values, and (iii) a Linearized Implicit (LI) scheme, which is developed by linearizing the temperature dependence of the FI discretization within each time step. Our stability analysis shows that the FI and LI schemes are unconditionally stable and cannot generate oscillatory solutions regardless of time-step size, whereas the SI discretization can suffer from instabilities and nonphysical oscillations for sufficiently large time steps. With the results of this analysis, we present time-step limits for the SI scheme that prevent undesirable behavior. We test the validity of our stability analysis and time-step limits with a set of numerical examples.

  4. A SUPER-EDDINGTON, COMPTON-THICK WIND IN GRO J1655–40?

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, J.; Homan, J.; Rahoui, F.

    2016-05-01

    During its 2005 outburst, GRO J1655–40 was observed at high spectral resolution with the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer, revealing a spectrum rich with blueshifted absorption lines indicative of an accretion disk wind—apparently too hot, too dense, and too close to the black hole to be driven by radiation pressure or thermal pressure (Miller et al.). However, this exotic wind represents just one piece of the puzzle in this outburst, as its presence coincides with an extremely soft and curved X-ray continuum spectrum, remarkable X-ray variability (Uttley and Klein-Wolt), and a bright, unexpected optical/infrared blackbody component that varies on themore » orbital period. Focusing on the X-ray continuum and the optical/infrared/UV spectral energy distribution, we argue that the unusual features of this “hypersoft state” are natural consequences of a super-Eddington Compton-thick wind from the disk: the optical/infrared blackbody represents the cool photosphere of a dense, extended outflow, while the X-ray emission is explained as Compton scattering by the relatively cool, optically thick wind. This wind obscures the intrinsic luminosity of the inner disk, which we suggest may have been at or above the Eddington limit.« less

  5. A high-energy Compton polarimeter for the POET SMEX mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; McConnell, Mark L.; Legere, Jason S.; Ertley, Camden D.; Hill, Joanne E.; Kippen, Marc; Ryan, James M.

    2014-07-01

    The primary science goal of the Polarimeters for Energetic Transients (POET) mission is to measure the polarization of gamma-ray bursts over a wide energy range, from X rays to soft gamma rays. The higher-energy portion of this band (50 - 500 keV) will be covered by the High Energy Polarimeter (HEP) instrument, a non-imaging, wide field of view Compton polarimeter. Incident high-energy photons will Compton scatter in low-Z, plastic scintillator detector elements and be subsequently absorbed in high-Z, CsI(Tl) scintillator elements; polarization is detected by measuring an asymmetry in the azimuthal scatter angle distribution. The HEP design is based on our considerable experience with the development and flight of the Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) balloon payload. We present the design of the POET HEP instrument, which incorporates lessons learned from the GRAPE balloon design and previous work on Explorer proposal efforts, and its expected performance on a two-year SMEX mission.

  6. Bulk Comptonization: new hints from the luminous blazar 4C+25.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammoun, E. S.; Nardini, E.; Risaliti, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Behar, E.; Celotti, A.

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are often characterized by a spectral break at soft X-rays, whose origin is still debated. While most sources show a flattening, some exhibit a blackbody-like soft excess with temperatures of the order of ∼0.1 keV, similar to low-luminosity, non-jetted Seyferts. Here, we present the analysis of the simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the luminous flat-spectrum radio quasar 4C+25.05 (z = 2.368). The observed 0.3-30 keV spectrum is best described by the sum of a hard X-ray power law (Γ = 1.38_{-0.03}^{+0.05}) and a soft component, approximated by a blackbody with kT_BB = 0.66_{-0.04}^{+0.05} keV (rest frame). If the spectrum of 4C+25.05 is interpreted in the context of bulk Comptonization by cold electrons of broad-line region photons emitted in the direction of the jet, such an unusual temperature implies a bulk Lorentz factor of the jet of Γbulk ∼ 11.7. Bulk Comptonization is expected to be ubiquitous on physical grounds, yet no clear signature of it has been found so far, possibly due to its transient nature and the lack of high-quality, broad-band X-ray spectra.

  7. Compton scattering artifacts in electron excited X-ray spectra measured with a silicon drift detector.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Nicholas W M; Newbury, Dale E; Lindstrom, Abigail P

    2011-12-01

    Artifacts are the nemesis of trace element analysis in electron-excited energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Peaks that result from nonideal behavior in the detector or sample can fool even an experienced microanalyst into believing that they have trace amounts of an element that is not present. Many artifacts, such as the Si escape peak, absorption edges, and coincidence peaks, can be traced to the detector. Others, such as secondary fluorescence peaks and scatter peaks, can be traced to the sample. We have identified a new sample-dependent artifact that we attribute to Compton scattering of energetic X-rays generated in a small feature and subsequently scattered from a low atomic number matrix. It seems likely that this artifact has not previously been reported because it only occurs under specific conditions and represents a relatively small signal. However, with the advent of silicon drift detectors and their utility for trace element analysis, we anticipate that more people will observe it and possibly misidentify it. Though small, the artifact is not inconsequential. Under some conditions, it is possible to mistakenly identify the Compton scatter artifact as approximately 1% of an element that is not present.

  8. A Maximum NEC Criterion for Compton Collimation to Accurately Identify True Coincidences in PET

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new method to increase the accuracy of identifying true coincidence events for positron emission tomography (PET). This approach requires 3-D detectors with the ability to position each photon interaction in multi-interaction photon events. When multiple interactions occur in the detector, the incident direction of the photon can be estimated using the Compton scatter kinematics (Compton Collimation). If the difference between the estimated incident direction of the photon relative to a second, coincident photon lies within a certain angular range around colinearity, the line of response between the two photons is identified as a true coincidence and used for image reconstruction. We present an algorithm for choosing the incident photon direction window threshold that maximizes the noise equivalent counts of the PET system. For simulated data, the direction window removed 56%–67% of random coincidences while retaining > 94% of true coincidences from image reconstruction as well as accurately extracted 70% of true coincidences from multiple coincidences. PMID:21317079

  9. The use of Compton scattering in detecting anomaly in soil-possible use in pyromaterial detection

    SciTech Connect

    Abedin, Ahmad Firdaus Zainal; Ibrahim, Noorddin; Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad

    The Compton scattering is able to determine the signature of land mine detection based on dependency of density anomaly and energy change of scattered photons. In this study, 4.43 MeV gamma of the Am-Be source was used to perform Compton scattering. Two detectors were placed between source with distance of 8 cm and radius of 1.9 cm. Detectors of thallium-doped sodium iodide NaI(TI) was used for detecting gamma ray. There are 9 anomalies used in this simulation. The physical of anomaly is in cylinder form with radius of 10 cm and 8.9 cm height. The anomaly is buried 5 cm deep in the bed soil measuredmore » 80 cm radius and 53.5 cm height. Monte Carlo methods indicated the scattering of photons is directly proportional to density of anomalies. The difference between detector response with anomaly and without anomaly namely contrast ratio values are in a linear relationship with density of anomalies. Anomalies of air, wood and water give positive contrast ratio values whereas explosive, sand, concrete, graphite, limestone and polyethylene give negative contrast ratio values. Overall, the contrast ratio values are greater than 2 % for all anomalies. The strong contrast ratios result a good detection capability and distinction between anomalies.« less

  10. An Iwasawa-Taniguchi effect for Compton-thick active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boorman, Peter G.; Gandhi, Poshak; Baloković, Mislav; Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona; Ricci, Claudio; Stern, Daniel

    2018-07-01

    We present the first study of an Iwasawa-Taniguchi/`X-ray Baldwin' effect for Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN). We report a statistically significant anticorrelation between the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of the narrow core of the neutral Fe Kα fluorescence emission line, ubiquitously observed in the reflection spectra of obscured AGN, and the mid-infrared 12 μ m continuum luminosity (taken as a proxy for the bolometric AGN luminosity). Our sample consists of 72 Compton-thick AGN selected from pointed and deep-field observations covering a redshift range of z ˜ 0.0014-3.7. We employ a Monte Carlo-based fitting method, which returns a Spearman's Rank correlation coefficient of ρ = - 0.28 ± 0.12, significant to 98.7 per cent confidence. The best-fitting found is log(EW_{Fe Kα }) ∝ -0.08± 0.04 log(L_{12 {μ } m}), which is consistent with multiple studies of the X-ray Baldwin effect for unobscured and mildly obscured AGN. This is an unexpected result, as the Fe Kα line is conventionally thought to originate from the same region as the underlying reflection continuum, which together constitute the reflection spectrum. We discuss the implications this could have if confirmed on larger samples, including a systematic underestimation of the line-of-sight X-ray obscuring column density and hence the intrinsic luminosities and growth rates for the most luminous AGN.

  11. Hard X-ray quiescent emission in magnetars via resonant Compton upscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, M. G.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Gonthier, P. L.; Harding, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    Non-thermal quiescent X-ray emission extending between 10 keV and around 150 keV has been seen in about 10 magnetars by RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, NuSTAR and Fermi-GBM. For inner magnetospheric models of such hard X-ray signals, inverse Compton scattering is anticipated to be the most efficient process for generating the continuum radiation, because the scattering cross section is resonant at the cyclotron frequency. We present hard X-ray upscattering spectra for uncooled monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of pulsar magnetospheres. These model spectra are integrated over bundles of closed field lines and obtained for different observing perspectives. The spectral turnover energies are critically dependent on the observer viewing angles and electron Lorentz factor. We find that electrons with energies less than around 15 MeV will emit most of their radiation below 250 keV, consistent with the turnovers inferred in magnetar hard X-ray tails. Electrons of higher energy still emit most of the radiation below around 1 MeV, except for quasi-equatorial emission locales for select pulse phases. Our spectral computations use a new state-of-the-art, spin-dependent formalism for the QED Compton scattering cross section in strong magnetic fields.

  12. Study of electronic structure and Compton profiles of transition metal diborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Samir; Heda, N. L.; Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L.

    2017-08-01

    We report Compton profiles (CPs) of transition metal diborides (MB2; M= Ti and Zr) using a 740 GBq 137Cs Compton spectrometer measured at an intermediate resolution of 0.34 a.u. To validate the experimental momentum densities, we have employed the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method to compute the theoretical CPs along with the energy bands, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken's population response. The LCAO computations have been performed in the frame work of density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT (namely B3LYP and PBE0). For both the diborides, the CPs based on revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange and correlation functions (DFT-PBESol) lead to a better agreement with the experimental momentum densities than other reported approximations. Energy bands, DOS and real space analysis of CPs confirm a metallic-like character of both the borides. Further, a comparison of DFT-PBESol and experimental data on equal-valence-electron-density scale shows more ionicity in ZrB2 than that in TiB2, which is also supported by the Mulliken's population based charge transfer data.

  13. Compton scatter imaging: A promising modality for image guidance in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Gage; Jones, Kevin C.; Templeton, Alistair; Bernard, Damian; Turian, Julius; Chu, James C. H.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires delivering large radiation doses with millimeter accuracy, making image guidance essential. An approach to forming images of patient anatomy from Compton-scattered photons during lung SBRT is presented. Methods To investigate the potential of scatter imaging, a pinhole collimator and flat-panel detector are used for spatial localization and detection of photons scattered during external beam therapy using lung SBRT treatment conditions (6 MV FFF beam). MCNP Monte Carlo software is used to develop a model to simulate scatter images. This model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated phantom images. Patient scatter images are then simulated from 4DCT data. Results Experimental lung tumor phantom images have sufficient contrast-to-noise to visualize the tumor with as few as 10 MU (0.5 s temporal resolution). The relative signal intensity from objects of different composition as well as lung tumor contrast for simulated phantom images agree quantitatively with experimental images, thus validating the Monte Carlo model. Scatter images are shown to display high contrast between different materials (lung, water, bone). Simulated patient images show superior (~double) tumor contrast compared to MV transmission images. Conclusions Compton scatter imaging is a promising modality for directly imaging patient anatomy during treatment without additional radiation, and it has the potential to complement existing technologies and aid tumor tracking and lung SBRT image guidance. PMID:29360151

  14. Constant- q data representation in Neutron Compton scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, R.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.

    2008-09-01

    Standard data analysis on the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS is carried out within the Impulse Approximation framework, making use of the West scaling variable y. The experiments are performed using the time-of-flight technique with the detectors positioned at constant scattering angles. Line shape analysis is routinely performed in the y-scaling framework, using two different (and equivalent) approaches: (1) fitting the parameters of the recoil peaks directly to fixed-angle time-of-flight spectra; (2) transforming the time-of-flight spectra into fixed-angle y spectra, referred to as the Neutron Compton Profiles, and then fitting the line shape parameters. The present work shows that scattering signals from different fixed-angle detectors can be collected and rebinned to obtain Neutron Compton Profiles at constant wave vector transfer, q, allowing for a suitable interpretation of data in terms of the dynamical structure factor, S(q,ω). The current limits of applicability of such a procedure are discussed in terms of the available q-range and relative uncertainties for the VESUVIO experimental set up and of the main approximations involved.

  15. A fast scintillator Compton telescope for medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Ryan, James M.; Legere, Jason S.; Julien, Manuel; Bancroft, Christopher M.; McConnell, Mark L.; Wallace, Mark; Kippen, R. Marc; Tornga, Shawn

    2010-07-01

    The field of medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy urgently needs a new mission to build on the success of the COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. This mission must achieve sensitivity significantly greater than that of COMPTEL in order to advance the science of relativistic particle accelerators, nuclear astrophysics, and diffuse backgrounds, and bridge the gap between current and future hard X-ray missions and the high-energy Fermi mission. Such an increase in sensitivity can only come about via a dramatic decrease in the instrumental background. We are currently developing a concept for a low-background Compton telescope that employs modern scintillator technology to achieve this increase in sensitivity. Specifically, by employing LaBr3 scintillators for the calorimeter, one can take advantage of the unique speed and resolving power of this material to improve the instrument sensitivity while simultaneously enhancing its spectroscopic and imaging performance. Also, using deuterated organic scintillator in the scattering detector will reduce internal background from neutron capture. We present calibration results from a laboratory prototype of such an instrument, including time-of-flight, energy, and angular resolution, and compare them to simulation results using a detailed Monte Carlo model. We also describe the balloon payload we have built for a test flight of the instrument in the fall of 2010.

  16. High-Accuracy Analysis of Compton Scattering in Chiral EFT: Proton and Neutron Polarisabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.; Phillips, Daniel R.; McGovern, Judith A.

    2013-10-01

    Compton scattering from protons and neutrons provides important insight into the structure of the nucleon. A new extraction of the static electric and magnetic dipole polarisabilities αE 1 and βM 1 of the proton and neutron from all published elastic data below 300 MeV in Chiral Effective Field Theory shows that within the statistics-dominated errors, the proton and neutron polarisabilities are identical, i.e. no iso-spin breaking effects of the pion cloud are seen. Particular attention is paid to the precision and accuracy of each data set, and to an estimate of residual theoretical uncertainties. ChiEFT is ideal for that purpose since it provides a model-independent estimate of higher-order corrections and encodes the correct low-energy dynamics of QCD, including, for few-nucleon systems used to extract neutron polarisabilities, consistent nuclear currents, rescattering effects and wave functions. It therefore automatically respects the low-energy theorems for photon-nucleus scattering. The Δ (1232) as active degree of freedom is essential to realise the full power of the world's Compton data.Its parameters are constrained in the resonance region. A brief outlook is provided on what kind of future experiments can improve the database. Supported in part by UK STFC, DOE, NSF, and the Sino-German CRC 110.

  17. Compton scatter imaging: A promising modality for image guidance in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Redler, Gage; Jones, Kevin C; Templeton, Alistair; Bernard, Damian; Turian, Julius; Chu, James C H

    2018-03-01

    Lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires delivering large radiation doses with millimeter accuracy, making image guidance essential. An approach to forming images of patient anatomy from Compton-scattered photons during lung SBRT is presented. To investigate the potential of scatter imaging, a pinhole collimator and flat-panel detector are used for spatial localization and detection of photons scattered during external beam therapy using lung SBRT treatment conditions (6 MV FFF beam). MCNP Monte Carlo software is used to develop a model to simulate scatter images. This model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated phantom images. Patient scatter images are then simulated from 4DCT data. Experimental lung tumor phantom images have sufficient contrast-to-noise to visualize the tumor with as few as 10 MU (0.5 s temporal resolution). The relative signal intensity from objects of different composition as well as lung tumor contrast for simulated phantom images agree quantitatively with experimental images, thus validating the Monte Carlo model. Scatter images are shown to display high contrast between different materials (lung, water, bone). Simulated patient images show superior (~double) tumor contrast compared to MV transmission images. Compton scatter imaging is a promising modality for directly imaging patient anatomy during treatment without additional radiation, and it has the potential to complement existing technologies and aid tumor tracking and lung SBRT image guidance. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. Relativistic MHD Turbulence with Synchrotron and Inverse-Compton Radiation Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    2017-10-01

    This work investigates the energetic aspects and observational appearance of driven relativistic MHD turbulence in an optically thin, relativistically hot plasma subject to strong synchrotron and synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) radiative cooling. Steady-state balance between turbulent heating and radiative cooling is shown to lead, essentially independent of turbulent driving's strength, to a characteristic electron temperature of Te /mec2 τT- 1 / 2 , where τT << 1 is the system's Thomson optical depth. Furthermore, the SSC cooling power becomes automatically comparable to the synchrotron power. Under certain conditions, a few higher-order inverse-Compton components also become comparable to the synchrotron and SSC losses, and so the broad-band radiation spectrum of the system consists of several distinct peaks with gradually decreasing luminosity, separated by a factor of τT- 1 >> 1 from each other. The number of these spectral components is governed by synchrotron self-absorption and Klein-Nishina effects. These findings have important implications for several classes of high-energy astrophysical systems including pulsar wind nebulae and black-hole-driven accretion flows, jets, and radio-lobes. Work supported by NSF, DOE, NASA, IAS, and the Ambrose Monell Foundation.

  19. Non-Proportionality of Electron Response and Energy Resolution of Compton Electrons in Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderski, L.; Marcinkowski, R.; Szawlowski, M.; Moszynski, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Szczesniak, T.; Pausch, G.; Plettner, C.; Roemer, K.

    2012-02-01

    Non-proportionality of light yield and energy resolution of Compton electrons in three scintillators (LaBr3:Ce, LYSO:Ce and CsI:Tl) were studied in a wide energy range from 10 keV up to 1 MeV. The experimental setup was comprised of a High Purity Germanium detector and tested scintillators coupled to a photomultiplier. Probing the non-proportionality and energy resolution curves at different energies was obtained by changing the position of various radioactive sources with respect to both detectors. The distance between both detectors and source was kept small to make use of Wide Angle Compton Coincidence (WACC) technique, which allowed us to scan large range of scattering angles simultaneously and obtain relatively high coincidence rate of 100 cps using weak sources of about 10 μCi activity. The results are compared with those obtained by direct irradiation of the tested scintillators with gamma-ray sources and fitting the full-energy peaks.

  20. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager: Results from the 2016 Super-Pressure Balloon Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Alexander; Boggs, Steven; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Kierans, Carolyn; Sleator, Clio; Tomsick, John; Zoglauer, Andreas; Amman, Mark; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Yang, Chien-Ying; Lin, Chih H.; Jean, Pierre; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Imager is a 0.2-5 MeV Compton telescope capable of imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of astrophysical sources. Such capabilities are made possible by COSI's twelve germanium cross-strip detectors, which provide for high efficiency, high resolution spectroscopy, and precise 3D positioning of photon interactions. In May 2016, COSI took flight from Wanaka, New Zealand on a NASA super-pressure balloon. For 46 days, COSI floated at a nominal altitude of 33.5 km, continually telemetering science data in real-time. The payload made a safe landing in Peru, and the hard drives containing the full raw data set were recovered. Analysis efforts have resulted in detections of various sources such as the Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, Cen A, Galactic Center e+e- annihilation, and the long duration gamma-ray burst GRB 160530A. In this presentation, I will provide an overview of our main results, which include measuring the polarization of GRB 160530A, and our image of the Galactic Center at 511 keV. Additionally, I will summarize results pertaining to our detections of the Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, and Cen A.