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Sample records for a4 flavour symmetry

  1. Lepton Flavour Violation and electron EDM in SUSY with a non-abelian flavour symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Calibbi, Lorenzo

    2008-11-23

    We present the lepton sector phenomenology of a supersymmetric flavour model based on a SU(3) horizontal symmetry. This model successfully reproduces the observed fermion masses and mixings, without introducing unacceptably large SUSY sources of flavour and CP violation. We show that the model, which is at present weakly constrained, predicts the electron EDM and {mu}{yields}e,y to be within the final sensitivity of the currently running experiments, at least for SUSY masses within the reach of the LHC.

  2. Lepton-flavour violation in a Pati-Salam model with gauged flavour symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Thorsten; Luhn, Christoph; Moch, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Combining Pati-Salam (PS) and flavour symmetries in a renormalisable setup, we devise a scenario which produces realistic masses for the charged leptons. Flavoursymmetry breaking scalar fields in the adjoint representations of the PS gauge group are responsible for generating different flavour structures for up- and down-type quarks as well as for leptons. The model is characterised by new heavy fermions which mix with the Standard Model quarks and leptons. In particular, the partners for the third fermion generation induce sizeable sources of flavour violation. Focusing on the charged-lepton sector, we scrutinise the model with respect to its implications for lepton-flavour violating processes such as μ → eγ, μ → 3 e and muon conversion in nuclei.

  3. The symmetry behind extended flavour democracy and large leptonic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, G. C.; Silva-Marcos, J. I.

    2002-01-01

    We show that there is a minimal discrete symmetry which leads to the extended flavour democracy scenario constraining the Dirac neutrino, the charged lepton and the Majorana neutrino mass term (MR) to be all proportional to the democratic matrix, with all elements equal. In particular, this discreet symmetry forbids other large contributions to MR, such as a term proportional to the unit matrix, which would normally be allowed by a S3L×S3R permutation symmetry. This feature is crucial in order to obtain large leptonic mixing, without violating 't Hooft's naturalness principle.

  4. Matter inflation with A{sub 4} flavour symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Nolde, David E-mail: david.nolde@unibas.ch

    2013-10-01

    We discuss model building in tribrid inflation, which is a framework for realising inflation in the matter sector of supersymmetric particle physics models. The inflaton is a D-flat combination of matter fields, and inflation ends by a phase transition in which some Higgs field obtains a vacuum expectation value. We first describe the general procedure for implementing tribrid inflation in realistic models of particle physics that can be applied to a wide variety of BSM particle physics models around the GUT scale. We then demonstrate how the procedure works for an explicit lepton flavour model based on an A{sub 4} family symmetry. The model is both predictive and phenomenologically viable, and illustrates how tribrid inflation connects cosmological and particle physics parameters. In particular, it predicts a relation between the neutrino Yukawa coupling and the running of the spectral index α{sub s}. We also show how topological defects from the flavour symmetry breaking can be avoided automatically.

  5. Discrete flavour symmetries from the Heisenberg group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floratos, E. G.; Leontaris, G. K.

    2016-04-01

    Non-abelian discrete symmetries are of particular importance in model building. They are mainly invoked to explain the various fermion mass hierarchies and forbid dangerous superpotential terms. In string models they are usually associated to the geometry of the compactification manifold and more particularly to the magnetised branes in toroidal compactifications. Motivated by these facts, in this note we propose a unified framework to construct representations of finite discrete family groups based on the automorphisms of the discrete and finite Heisenberg group. We focus in particular, on the PSL2 (p) groups which contain the phenomenologically interesting cases.

  6. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    DOE PAGES

    none,

    2014-11-01

    We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton) distribution amplitude (PDA) by projecting its Poincaré-covariant Bethe–Salpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ζ = 2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 12–16% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3)-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on themore » difference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/Fπ=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5) inferred in e+e- annihilation at s=17 GeV2.« less

  7. Charge symmetry breaking in A = 4 hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, P.

    2016-11-01

    Charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclear system is reviewed. The data on binding energies of the mirror nuclei and hypernuclei are examined. At the Mainz Microtron MAMI the high-resolution spectroscopy of decay-pions in strangeness electro-production is used to extract the Λ hyperon ground state binding energy in 4ΛH. This binding energy is used together with the 4ΛHe ground state binding energy from nuclear emulsion experiments and with energy levels of the 1+ excited state for both hypernuclei from γ-ray spectroscopy to address the charge symmetry breaking in the strong interaction. The binding energy difference of the ground states in the mirror pair is reduced from its long accepted value ΔB4Λ(0+g.s.) ≈ 0.35MeV to ≈ 0.24MeV. The energy difference of the excited states becomes ΔB4Λ(1+exc) ≈ -0.08MeV, for the first time with opposite sign. These values were not reproduced by theoretical calculations with the exception of very recent approaches, although with a large systematic dependence. The full understanding of the charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei still remains one of the open issues of hypernuclear physics.

  8. Non-zero θ _{13} and leptonic CP phase with A_4 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sruthilaya, M.; Mohanta, R.

    2017-03-01

    We consider a model based on A_4 symmetry to explain the phenomenon of neutrino mixing. The spontaneous symmetry breaking of A_4 symmetry leads to a co-bimaximal mixing matrix at leading order. We consider the effect of higher order corrections in neutrino sector and find that the mixing angles thus obtained, come well within the 3σ ranges of their experimental values. We study the implications of this formalism on the other phenomenological observables, such as CP violating phase, Jarlskog invariant and the effective Majorana mass |M_{ee}|. We also obtain the branching ratio of the lepton flavour violating decay μ → e γ in the context of this model and find that it can be less than its present experimental upper bound.

  9. Flavour, electroweak symmetry breaking and dark matter: state of the art and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, Giulia; Arbey, Alexandre; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Carmona, Adrián; Dermíšek, Radovan; Huber, Tobias; Hurth, Tobias; Grossman, Yuval; Kersten, Jörn; Lunghi, Enrico; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Masiero, Antonio; Neubert, Matthias; Shepherd, William; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson the Standard Model has become a complete and comprehensive theory, which has been verified with unparalleled precision and in principle might be valid at all scales. However, several reasons remain why we firmly believe that there should be physics beyond the Standard Model. Experiments such as the LHC, new B factories, and earth- and space-based astro-particle experiments provide us with unique opportunities to discover a coherent framework for many of the long-standing puzzles of our field. Here we explore several significant interconnections between the physics of the Higgs boson, the physics of flavour, and the experimental clues we have about dark matter.

  10. Charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, Daniel; Gal, Avraham

    2016-10-01

    Charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the Λ-nucleon strong interaction generates a charge dependence of Λ separation energies in mirror hypernuclei, which in the case of the A = 4 mirror hypernuclei 0+ ground states is sizable, ΔBΛJ=0 ≡BΛJ=0 (He4Λ) -BΛJ=0 (H4Λ) = 230 ± 90 keV, and of opposite sign to that induced by the Coulomb repulsion in light hypernuclei. Recent ab initio calculations of the (H4Λ, He4Λ) mirror hypernuclei 0g.s.+ and 1exc+ levels have demonstrated that a Λ -Σ0 mixing CSB model due to Dalitz and von Hippel (1964) is capable of reproducing this large value of ΔBΛJ=0. These calculations are discussed here with emphasis placed on the leading-order chiral EFT hyperon-nucleon Bonn-Jülich strong-interaction potential model used and the no-core shell-model calculational scheme applied. The role of one-pion exchange in producing sizable CSB level splittings in the A = 4 mirror hypernuclei is discussed.

  11. The discrete family symmetries as the possible solution to the flavour problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziewit, B.; Holeczek, J.; Richter, M.; Zajac, S.; Zralek, M.

    2017-07-01

    In order to explain the fermions' masses and mixing parameters appearing in the lepton sector of the Standard Model, one proposes the extension of its symmetry. A discrete, non-Abelian subgroup of U(3) is added to the gauge group SU(3) C × SU(2) L × U(1) Y . Apart from that, one assumes the existence of one extra Higgs doublet. This article focuses mainly on the mathematical theorems and computational techniques which brought us to the results.

  12. A4 and CP symmetry and a model with maximal CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai-Chang; Lu, Jun-Nan; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2016-12-01

    We study a second CP symmetry compatible with the A4 flavor group, which interchanges the representations 1‧ and 1″. We analyze the lepton mixing patterns arising from the A4 and CP symmetry broken to residual subgroups Z3 and Z2 × CP in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors respectively. One phenomenologically viable mixing pattern is found, and it predicts maximal atmospheric mixing angle as well as maximal Dirac CP phase, trivial Majorana phases and the correlation sin2 ⁡θ12cos2 ⁡θ13 = 1 / 3. We construct a concrete model based on the A4 and CP symmetry, the above interesting mixing pattern is achieved, the observed charged lepton mass hierarchy is reproduced, and the reactor mixing angle θ13 is of the correct order.

  13. The Flavour of Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavala, I.

    2008-11-23

    A new class of particle physics models of inflation based on the phase transition associated with the spontaneous breaking of family symmetry is proposed. The Higgs fields responsible for the breaking of family symmetry, the flavons, are natural inflaton candidates or waterfall fields in hybrid inflation. This opens up a rich vein of possible inflation models, all linked to the physics of flavour, with several interesting cosmological implications.

  14. Soft A4→Z3 symmetry breaking and cobimaximal neutrino mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Ernest

    2016-03-28

    In this study, I propose a model of radiative charged-lepton and neutrino masses with A4 symmetry. The soft breaking of A4 to Z3 lepton triality is accomplished by dimension-three terms. The breaking of Z3 by dimension-two terms allows cobimaximal neutrino mixing (θ13 ≠ 0, θ23 = π/4, δcp=π/2) to be realized with only very small finite calculable deviations from the residual Z3 lepton triality. This construction solves a long-standing technical problem inherent in renormalizable A4 models since their inception.

  15. New and trivial C P symmetry for extended A4 flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of νμ-ντ exchange together with C P conjugation in the neutrino sector (known as CPμ τ symmetry or μ τ reflection) is known to predict the viable pattern θ23=4 5 ° , a maximal Dirac C P phase, and trivial Majorana phases. We implement such a C P symmetry as a new C P symmetry in theories with A4 flavor. The implementation in a complete renormalizable model leads to a new form for the neutrino mass matrix that leads to further predictions: a normal hierarchical spectrum with a lightest mass and mβ β (0 ν 2 β ) of only few meV, and either ν1 or ν2 has opposite C P parity. An approximate Lμ-Lτ symmetry arises naturally and controls the flavor structure of the model. The light neutrino masses are generated by the extended seesaw mechanism with six right-handed neutrinos (RHNs). The requirement of negligible one-loop corrections to light neutrino masses, the validity of the extended seesaw approximation, and not too long-lived beyond-the-Standard-Model states to comply with big bang nucleosynthesis essentially restricts the parameters of the model to a small region: three relatively light right-handed neutrinos at the GeV scale, heavier neutrinos at the electroweak scale, and Yukawa couplings smaller than the electron Yukawa. Such small Yukawa couplings render these RHNs unobservable in terrestrial experiments.

  16. Two-Higgs-doublet models with Minimal Flavour Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlucci, Maria Valentina

    2010-12-22

    The tree-level flavour-changing neutral currents in the two-Higgs-doublet models can be suppressed by protecting the breaking of either flavour or flavour-blind symmetries, but only the first choice, implemented by the application of the Minimal Flavour Violation hypothesis, is stable under quantum corrections. Moreover, a two-Higgs-doublet model with Minimal Flavour Violation enriched with flavour-blind phases can explain the anomalies recently found in the {Delta}F = 2 transitions, namely the large CP-violating phase in B{sub s} mixing and the tension between {epsilon}{sub K} and S{sub {psi}KS}.

  17. Flavour anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    The LHC observed deviations from the Standard Model (SM) in the flavor sector: LHCb found a 4.3σ discrepancy compared to the SM in b → sμμ transitions and CMS reported a non-zero measurement of h → μτ with a significance of 2.4σ. Here we discuss how these deviations from the SM can be explained, focusing on two models with gauged Lμ - Lτ symmetry. The first model contains two scalar doublets and vector-like quarks while the second one employs three scalar doublets but does not require vectorlike fermions. In both models, interesting correlations between b → sμμ transitions, h → μτ, and τ → 3μ arise. We have also studied lepton flavor (universality) violation in rare kaon decays and the Bardeen Buras Gerard approach to describe the K± → π±l+l- form factor.

  18. Aspects of Leptonic Flavour Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio

    2017-09-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations many ideas have been put forward to explain the special features of the leptonic mixing and the differences with respect to the quark sector. In this talk I review some of these proposals, emphasizing especially their predictability. In the light of the new data, I first revisit fixed-point relations among mixing angles and phases. Then I briefly comment on radiative neutrino masses. Finally I discuss the role of flavour symmetries. Given the very many existing models I focus on two classes of models. On the one hand I illustrate the ability of models based on a generalization of the anarchy idea in reproducing the main features of both the quark and the lepton spectrum, also in a GUT framework. On the other hand I discuss less ambitious but more predictive models based on discrete flavour symmetries, centered on the properties of the leptonix mixing matrix.

  19. Flavour democracy in strong unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, S. A.; King, S. F.

    1998-09-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of ``strong unification''. Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged SU(3)LxSU(3)R family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  20. A 4-fold-symmetry hexagonal ruthenium for magnetic heterostructures exhibiting enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and tunnel magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhenchao; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Furubayashi, Takao; Koo, Jungwoo; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji; Hadorn, Jason Paul; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hono, Kazuhiro

    2014-10-08

    A 4-fold-symmetry hexagonal Ru emerging in epitaxial MgO/Ru/Co2 FeAl/MgO heterostructures is reported, in which an approximately Ru(022¯3) growth attributes to the lattice matching between MgO, Ru, and Co2 FeAl. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the Co2 FeAl/MgO interface is substantially enhanced. The magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) incorporating this structure give rise to the largest tunnel magnetoresistance for perpendicular MTJs using low damping Heusler alloys.

  1. Local Hamiltonian Monte Carlo study of the massive schwinger model, the decoupling of heavy flavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranft, J.

    1983-12-01

    The massive Schwinger model with two flavours is studied using the local hamiltonian lattice Monte Carlo method. Chiral symmetry breaking is studied using the fermion condensate as order parameter. For a small ratio of the two fermion masses, degeneracy of the two flavours is found. For a large ratio of the masses, the heavy flavour decouples and the light fermion behaves like in the one flavour Schwinger model. On leave from Sektion Physik, Karl-Marx-Universität, Leipzig, GDR.

  2. Linear flavour violation and anomalies in B physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Nardecchia, Marco; Renner, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    We propose renormalizable models of new physics that can explain various anomalies observed in decays of B-mesons to electron and muon pairs. The new physics states couple to linear combinations of Standard Model fermions, yielding a pattern of flavour violation that gives a consistent fit to the gamut of flavour data. Accidental symmetries prevent contributions to baryon- and lepton-number-violating processes, as well as enforcing a loop suppression of new physics contributions to flavour violating processes. Data require that the new flavour-breaking couplings are largely aligned with the Yukawa couplings of the SM and so we also explore patterns of flavour symmetry breaking giving rise to this structure.

  3. Flavour breaking effects in the pseudoscalar meson decay constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornyakov, V. G.; Horsley, R.; Nakamura, Y.; Perlt, H.; Pleiter, D.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Schiller, A.; Stüben, H.; Zanotti, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    The SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in up, down and strange quark masses is extended from hadron masses to meson decay constants. This allows a determination of the ratio of kaon to pion decay constants in QCD. Furthermore when using partially quenched valence quarks the expansion is such that SU(2) isospin breaking effects can also be determined. It is found that the lowest order SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion (or Gell-Mann-Okubo expansion) works very well. Simulations are performed for 2 + 1 flavours of clover fermions at four lattice spacings.

  4. Phenomenology in the Higgs triplet model with the A4 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Tsumura, Koji

    2010-08-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons [of SU(2)L-triplet fields] in the simplest A4-symmetric version of the Higgs triplet model. Mass eigenstates of these Higgs bosons are obtained explicitly from the Higgs potential. It is shown that their decays into a pair of leptons have unique flavor structures which can be tested at the LHC if some of their masses are below the TeV scale. Sizable decay rates for τ→μ¯ee and τ→ēμμ can be obtained naturally, while other τ→ℓ¯ℓ'ℓ'', μ→ēee, and ℓ→ℓ'γ, are almost forbidden in this model. Contributions of these Higgs bosons to the nonstandard interactions of neutrinos are also considered.

  5. Flavoured soft leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Chee Sheng; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.

    2008-06-01

    We study the impact of flavour in ``soft leptogenesis'' (leptogenesis induced by soft supersymmetry breaking terms). We address the question of how flavour effects can affect the region of parameters in which successful soft leptogenesis induced by CP violation in the right-handed sneutrino mixing is possible. We find that for decays which occur in the intermediate to strong washout regimes for all flavours, the produced total B-L asymmetry can be up to a factor Script O(30) larger than the one predicted with flavour effects being neglected. This enhancement, permits slightly larger values of the required lepton violating soft bilinear term.

  6. Neutrino mixing model based on an A4×Z3×Z4 flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ky, Nguyen Anh; Quang Vǎn, Phi; Há»`ng Vân, Nguyen Thi

    2016-11-01

    A model of a neutrino mixing with an A4×Z3×Z4 flavor symmetry is suggested. In addition to the standard model fields, the present model contains six new fields that transform under different representations of A4×Z3×Z4. The model is constructed to slightly deviate from a tribimaximal model in agreement with the current experimental data; thus, all analysis can be done in the base of the perturbation method. Within this model, as an application, a relation between the mixing angles (θ12 , θ23 , θ13 ) and the Dirac C P -violation phase (δC P) is established. This relation allows a prediction of δC P and the Jarlskog parameter (JC P). The predicted value δC P is in the 1 σ region of the global fit for both the normal and inverse neutrino mass ordering and gives JC P to be within the bound |JC P|≤0.04 . For an illustration, the model is checked numerically and gives values of the neutrino masses (of the order of 0.1 eV) and the mixing angle θ13 (about 9°) very close to the current experimental data.

  7. Gauged lepton flavour

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Fernandez Martinez, Enrique; Gavela, M. B.; ...

    2016-12-22

    The gauging of the lepton flavour group is considered in the Standard Model context and in its extension with three right-handed neutrinos. The anomaly cancellation conditions lead to a Seesaw mechanism as underlying dynamics for all leptons; in addition, it requires a phenomenologically viable setup which leads to Majorana masses for the neutral sector: the type I Seesaw Lagrangian in the Standard Model case and the inverse Seesaw in the extended model. Within the minimal extension of the scalar sector, the Yukawa couplings are promoted to scalar fields in the bifundamental of the flavour group. The resulting low-energy Yukawa couplingsmore » are proportional to inverse powers of the vacuum expectation values of those scalars; the protection against flavour changing neutral currents differs from that of Minimal Flavour Violation. In every case, the μ - τ flavour sector exhibits rich and promising phenomenological signals.« less

  8. Gauged lepton flavour

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Fernandez Martinez, Enrique; Gavela, M. B.; Grinstein, B.; Merlo, Luca; Quilez, Pablo

    2016-12-22

    The gauging of the lepton flavour group is considered in the Standard Model context and in its extension with three right-handed neutrinos. The anomaly cancellation conditions lead to a Seesaw mechanism as underlying dynamics for all leptons; in addition, it requires a phenomenologically viable setup which leads to Majorana masses for the neutral sector: the type I Seesaw Lagrangian in the Standard Model case and the inverse Seesaw in the extended model. Within the minimal extension of the scalar sector, the Yukawa couplings are promoted to scalar fields in the bifundamental of the flavour group. The resulting low-energy Yukawa couplings are proportional to inverse powers of the vacuum expectation values of those scalars; the protection against flavour changing neutral currents differs from that of Minimal Flavour Violation. In every case, the μ - τ flavour sector exhibits rich and promising phenomenological signals.

  9. Gauged lepton flavour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, R.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gavela, M. B.; Grinstein, B.; Merlo, L.; Quilez, P.

    2016-12-01

    The gauging of the lepton flavour group is considered in the Standard Model context and in its extension with three right-handed neutrinos. The anomaly cancellation conditions lead to a Seesaw mechanism as underlying dynamics for all leptons; requiring in addition a phenomenologically viable setup leads to Majorana masses for the neutral sector: the type I Seesaw Lagrangian in the Standard Model case and the inverse Seesaw in the extended model. Within the minimal extension of the scalar sector, the Yukawa couplings are promoted to scalar fields in the bifundamental of the flavour group. The resulting low-energy Yukawa couplings are proportional to inverse powers of the vacuum expectation values of those scalars; the protection against flavour changing neutral currents differs from that of Minimal Flavour Violation. In all cases, the μ- τ flavour sector exhibits rich and promising phenomenological signals.

  10. Neutrino phenomenology and scalar Dark Matter with A4 flavor symmetry in Inverse and type II seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ananya; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2016-12-01

    We present a TeV scale seesaw mechanism for exploring the dark matter and neutrino phenomenology in the light of recent neutrino and cosmology data. A different realization of the Inverse seesaw (ISS) mechanism with A4 flavor symmetry is being implemented as a leading contribution to the light neutrino mass matrix which usually gives rise to vanishing reactor mixing angle θ13. Using a non-diagonal form of Dirac neutrino mass matrix and 3σ values of mass square differences we parameterize the neutrino mass matrix in terms of Dirac Yukawa coupling "y". We then use type II seesaw as a perturbation which turns out to be active to have a non-vanishing reactor mixing angle without much disturbing the other neutrino oscillation parameters. Then we constrain a common parameter space satisfying the non-zero θ13, Yukawa coupling and the relic abundance of dark matter. Contributions of neutrinoless double beta decay are also included for standard as well as non-standard interaction. This study may have relevance in future neutrino and Dark Matter experiments.

  11. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment.

  12. Revisiting Lepton Flavour Universality in B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradisi, Paride

    2017-04-01

    Lepton flavour universality (LFU) in B-decays is revisited by considering a class of semileptonic operators defined at a scale Λ above the electroweak scale v. The importance of quantum effects is emphasised [F. Feruglio, P. Paradisi and A. Pattori, arxiv:arXiv:1606.00524 [hep-ph], to appear in PRL]. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Λ down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGE) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and τ decays as well as visible lepton flavour violating (LFV) effects in τ decays are induced.

  13. Implication of Higgs mediated Flavour Changing Neutral Currents with Minimal Flavour Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, M. N.

    2015-07-01

    We analise phenomenological implications of two Higgs doublet models with Higgs flavour changing neutral currents suppressed in the quark sector by small entries of the Cabibbo- Kokayashi-Maskawa matrix. This suppression occurs in a natural way since it is the result of a symmetry applied to the Lagrangian. These type of models were proposed some time ago by Branco Grimus and Lavoura. Our results clearly show that these class of models allow for new physical scalars, with masses which are reachable at the LHC. The imposed symmetry severely reduces the number of free parameters and allows for predictions. Therefore these models can eventually be proved right or eliminated experimentally.

  14. Effects of hunger state on flavour pleasantness conditioning at home: flavour-nutrient learning vs. flavour-flavour learning.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Sirous; Chambers, Lucy C; Yeomans, Martin R

    2007-01-01

    This study examined acquired liking of flavour preferences through flavour-flavour and flavour-nutrient learning under hungry or sated conditions in a naturalistic setting. Each participant consumed one of three versions of a test drink at home either before lunch or after lunch: minimally sweetened ( 3% sucrose, 40 kcal), artificially sweetened (3% sucrose 40 kcal plus artificial sweeteners ASPARTAME) and sucrose-sweetened (SUCROSE: 9.9% sugar, 132 kcal). The test drink was an uncarbonated peach-flavoured iced tea served in visually identical drink cans (330 ml). Participants preselected as "sweet likers" evaluated the minimally sweetened flavoured drink (conditioned stimulus, CS) in the same state (hungry or sated) in which they consumed the test drink at home. Overall, liking for the CS flavour increased in participants who consumed the SUCROSE drink, however, this increase in liking was significantly larger when tested and trained hungry than sated, consistent with a flavour-nutrient model. Overall increases in pleasantness for the CS flavour in participants who consumed the SUCROSE drink when sated or the ASPARTAME drink independent of hunger state, suggest that flavour-flavour learning also occurred. These results are discussed in light of current learning models of flavour preference.

  15. Understanding flavour at the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Huge progress in flavour physics has been achieved by the two B-factories and the Tevatron experiments. This progress has, however, deepened the new physics flavour puzzle: If there is new physics at the TeV scale, why aren't flavour changing neutral current processes enhanced by orders of magnitude compared to the standard model predictions? The forthcoming ATLAS and CMS experiments can potentially solve this puzzle. Perhaps even more surprisingly, these experiments can potentially lead to progress in understanding the standard model flavour puzzle: Why is there smallness and hierarchy in the flavour parameters? Thus, a rich and informative flavour program is awaiting us not only in the flavour-dedicated LHCb experiment, but also in the high-pT ATLAS and CMS experiments.

  16. Alcohol-flavoured tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Jackler, Robert K; VanWinkle, Callie K; Bumanlag, Isabela M; Ramamurthi, Divya

    2017-06-07

    In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned characterising flavours in cigarettes (except for menthol) due to their appeal to teen starter smokers. In August 2016, the agency deemed all tobacco products to be under its authority and a more comprehensive flavour ban is under consideration. To determine the scope and scale of alcohol-flavoured tobacco products among cigars & cigarillos, hookahs and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Alcohol-flavoured tobacco products were identified by online search of tobacco purveyors' product lines and via Google search cross-referencing the various tobacco product types versus a list of alcoholic beverage flavours (eg, wine, beer, appletini, margarita). 48 types of alcohol-flavoured tobacco products marketed by 409 tobacco brands were identified. Alcohol flavours included mixed drinks (n=25), spirits (11), liqueurs (7) and wine/beer (5). Sweet and fruity tropical mixed drink flavours were marketed by the most brands: piña colada (96), mojito (66) and margarita (50). Wine flavours were common with 104 brands. Among the tobacco product categories, brands offering alcohol-flavoured e-cigarettes (280) were most numerous, but alcohol-flavoured products were also marketed by cigars & cigarillos (88) and hookah brands (41). Brands by major tobacco companies (eg, Philip Morris, Imperial Tobacco) were well represented among alcohol-flavoured cigars & cigarillos with five companies offering a total of 17 brands. The widespread availability of alcohol-flavoured tobacco products illustrates the need to regulate characterising flavours on all tobacco products. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Gauge invariants and correlators in flavoured quiver gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Paolo; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study the construction of holomorphic gauge invariant operators for general quiver gauge theories with flavour symmetries. Using a characterisation of the gauge invariants in terms of equivalence classes generated by permutation actions, along with representation theory results in symmetric groups and unitary groups, we give a diagonal basis for the 2-point functions of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic operators. This involves a generalisation of the previously constructed Quiver Restricted Schur operators to the flavoured case. The 3-point functions are derived and shown to be given in terms of networks of symmetric group branching coefficients. The networks are constructed through cutting and gluing operations on the quivers.

  18. Future flavour physics experiments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The current status of flavour physics and the prospects for present and future experiments will be reviewed. Measurements in B‐physics, in which sensitive probes of new physics are the CKM angle γ, the Bs mixing phase ϕs, and the branching ratios of the rare decays B(s)0→μ+μ− , will be highlighted. Topics in charm and kaon physics, in which the measurements of ACP and the branching ratios of the rare decays K→πνν¯ are key measurements, will be discussed. Finally the complementarity of the future heavy flavour experiments, the LHCb upgrade and Belle‐II, will be summarised. PMID:26877543

  19. Controlled flavour changing neutral couplings in two Higgs Doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Joao M.; Botella, Francisco J.; Branco, Gustavo C.; Cornet-Gomez, Fernando; Nebot, Miguel

    2017-09-01

    We propose a class of two Higgs doublet models where there are flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) at tree level, but under control due to the introduction of a discrete symmetry in the full Lagrangian. It is shown that in this class of models, one can have simultaneously FCNC in the up and down sectors, in contrast to the situation encountered in the renormalisable and minimal flavour violating 2HDM models put forward by Branco et al. (Phys Lett B 380:119, 1996). The intensity of FCNC is analysed and it is shown that in this class of models one can respect all the strong constraints from experiment without unnatural fine-tuning. It is pointed out that the additional sources of flavour and CP violation are such that they can enhance significantly the generation of the Bbaryon asymmetry of the Universe, with respect to the standard model.

  20. Grand Unified Flavour Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Westhoff, Susanne

    2010-02-10

    We probe the unification of down quarks and leptons in a supersymmetric SO(10) GUT. The large atmospheric neutrino mixing angle induces b{sub R}-s{sub R} transitions, which can account for the sizeable CP phase oe{sub s} measured in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing. Corrections to down-quark-lepton unification from higher-dimensional Yukawa terms translate neutrino mixing also into s{sub R}-d{sub R} and b{sub R}-d{sub R} currents. We find the flavour structure of Yukawa corrections to be strongly constrained by epsilon{sub K}.

  1. Anarchic Yukawas and top partial compositeness: the flavour of a successful marriage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Flacke, Thomas; Lee, Seung J.; Parolini, Alberto; Serôdio, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    The top quark can be naturally singled out from other fermions in the Standard Model due to its large mass, of the order of the electroweak scale. We follow this reasoning in models of pseudo Nambu Goldstone Boson composite Higgs, which may derive from an underlying confining dynamics. We consider a new class of flavour models, where the top quark obtains its mass via partial compositeness, while the lighter fermions acquire their masses by a deformation of the dynamics generated at a high flavour scale. One interesting feature of such scenario is that it can avoid all the flavour constraints without the need of flavour symmetries, since the flavour scale can be pushed high enough. We show that both flavour conserving and violating constraints can be satisfied with top partial compositeness without invoking any flavour symmetry for the up-type sector, in the case of the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset with top partners in the four-plet and singlet of SO(4). In the down-type sector, some degree of alignment is required if all down-type quarks are elementary. We show that taking the bottom quark partially composite provides a dynamical explanation for the hierarchy causing this alignment. We present explicit realisations of this mechanism which do not require to include additional bottom partner fields. Finally, these conclusions are generalised to scenarios with non-minimal cosets and top partners in larger representations.

  2. Additive effects of flavour-caffeine and flavour-flavour pairings on liking for the smell and flavour of a novel drink.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Martin R; Mobini, Sirous; Chambers, Lucy

    2007-12-05

    Previous research has established that caffeine consumption can reinforce changes in liking for caffeine-paired flavours, while pairing a novel flavour with a liked or dislike taste can also result in enduring changes in liking for the flavour. The present study examined how these two forms of flavour-learning interact. 72 habitual caffeine consumers who liked sweet tastes rated the odour and flavour of a novel tea drink before and after four training sessions where the flavour was paired with either 100 mg caffeine or placebo in one of three flavour contexts: added sweetness (aspartame), bitterness (quinine) or control. The liking for both the odour and flavour of the tea increased after pairing with caffeine regardless of flavour context, while pairing with bitterness reduced flavour liking regardless of the presence of caffeine. Pairing with quinine increased the rated bitterness of the tea odour, and reduced the rated sweetness of the tea flavour, post-training, independent of effects of caffeine. These data suggest that flavour-caffeine and flavour-flavour associations have additive effects on drink liking, while confirming that flavour-flavour associations can alter the immediate sensory experience of a flavour alone.

  3. Flavour in supersymmetric Grand Unification: A democratic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Dvali, Gia; Strumia, Alessandro; Berezhiani, Zurab; Hall, Lawrence

    1994-12-01

    We consider the flavour problem in a supersymmetric Grand Unified theory with gauged SU(6) group, where the Higgs doublets are understood as pseudo-Goldstone bosons of a larger SU(6) ⊗ SU(6) global symmetry of the Higgs superpotential. A key element of this work is that we never appeal to any flavour symmetry. One main interesting feature emerges: only one of the light fermions, an up-type quark, to be identified with the top, can get a Yukawa coupling at renormalizable level. This fact, together with bottom-tau Yukawa unification, also implied in our scheme, gives rise to a characteristic correlation between the top and the Higgs mass. By including a flavour-blind discrete symmetry and requiring that all higher dimensional operators be mediated by the exchanges of appropriate heavy multiplets, it is possible to give an approximate description of all masses and mixing angles in term of a hierarchy of Grand Unified scales. A special "texture" arises, implying a relation between the top mass and the third generation mixing angles. Several other possible consequences of this approach are pointed out, concerning the μ/s mass ratio, the Cabibbo angle and the proton decay.

  4. B decays and lepton flavour (universality) violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellin, A.

    2016-07-01

    LHCb found hints for physics beyond the standard model in Bto K^*μ^+μ^- , Bto K^*μ^+μ^-/Bto K^*e^+e^- and B_stoφμ^+μ^- . In addition, the BABAR results for Bto D^{(*)}τν and the CMS excess in htoτ^±μ^∓ also point towards lepton flavour (universality) violating new physics. While Bto D^{(*)}τν and htoτ^±μ^∓ can be naturally explained by an extended Higgs sector, the probably most promising explanation for the bto sμμ anomalies is a Z' boson. Furthermore, combining a 2HDM with a gauged L_μ-L_τ symmetry allows for explaining the bto sμ^+μ^- anomalies and htoτ^±μ^∓ simultaneously, with interesting correlations to τto3μ . In the light of these deviations from the SM we also discuss the possibilities of observing lepton flavour violating B decays ( e.g. Bto K^{(*)}τ^±μ^∓ and B_stoτ^±μ^∓ in Z^' models.

  5. Flavour-active wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Cordente, Antonio G; Curtin, Christopher D; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S

    2012-11-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can influence wine style. This review explores recent progress towards understanding the range of 'flavour phenotypes' that wine yeast exhibit, and how this knowledge has been used to develop novel flavour-active yeasts. In addition, emerging opportunities to augment these phenotypes by engineering yeast to produce so-called grape varietal compounds, such as monoterpenoids, will be discussed.

  6. Flavoured leptogenesis in the CTP formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, Martin; Garbrecht, Björn; Fidler, Christian; Herranen, Matti; Schwaller, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    Within the Closed Time Path (CTP) framework, we derive kinetic equations for particle distribution functions that describe leptogenesis in the presence of several lepton flavours. These flavours have different Standard-Model Yukawa couplings, which induce flavour-sensitive scattering processes and thermal dispersion relations. Kinetic equilibrium, which is rapidly established and maintained via gauge interactions, allows to simplify these equations to kinetic equations for the matrix of lepton charge densities. In performing this simplification, we notice that the rapid flavour-blind gauge interactions damp the flavour oscillations of the leptons. Leptogenesis turns out to be in the parametric regime where the flavour oscillations are overdamped and flavour decoherence is mainly induced by flavour sensitive scatterings. We solve the kinetic equations for the lepton number densities numerically and show that they interpolate between the unflavoured and the fully flavoured regimes within the intermediate parametric region, where neither of these limits is applicable.

  7. Creation and imitation of a milk flavour.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangyong; Xiao, Zuobing

    2017-03-22

    Flavour plays a crucial role in food and is the most important aspect of milk. Milk has a pleasant smell and milk flavour can be used in several products. However, how to recreate milk flavour has rarely been reported. Therefore, the creation of milk flavour is of great interest. This study focused on the creation and imitation of milk flavour. The approach to flavour creation involves identifying the attributes of the flavour and developing an impactful, authentic flavour. Accordingly, to create a milk flavour, the notes of milk flavour were identified by smelling and tasting milk. Based on the identified notes, aroma ingredients were selected to blend into a milk-flavour. After olfactory discrimination, several modifications and adjustments were made and a typical milk flavour formula was obtained. The results showed that the milk flavour has the following notes: milky, acidic, vanilla-like, caramel-like, aldehydic, fruity, beany, buttery, meaty, and vegetative. Lactones, acids, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, esters, sulphur compounds, furans, and nitrogen compounds can provide these notes. Based on the developed formula, a harmonious flavour with typical characteristics of milk was obtained by blending the selected aroma ingredients.

  8. Identification of flavour additives in tobacco products to develop a flavour library.

    PubMed

    Krüsemann, Erna Jz; Visser, Wouter F; Cremers, Johannes Wjm; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Talhout, Reinskje

    2017-02-11

    This study combines chemical analysis and flavour descriptions of flavour additives used in tobacco products, and provides a starting point to build an extensive library of flavour components, useful for product surveillance. Headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to compare 22 commercially available tobacco products (cigarettes and roll-your-own) expected to have a characterising flavour and 6 commercially available products not expected to have a characterising flavour with 5 reference products (natural tobacco leaves and research cigarettes containing no flavour additives). The flavour components naturally present in the reference products were excluded from components present in commercially available products containing flavour additives. A description of the remaining flavour additives was used for categorisation. GC-MS measurements of the 33 tobacco products resulted in an overview of 186 chemical compounds. Of these, 144 were solely present in commercially available products. These 144 flavour additives were described using 62 different flavour descriptors extracted from flavour databases, which were categorised into eight groups largely based on the definition of characterising flavours from the European Tobacco Product Directive: fruit, spice, herb, alcohol, menthol, sweet, floral and miscellaneous. We developed a method to identify and describe flavour additives in tobacco products. Flavour additives consist of single flavour compounds or mixtures of multiple flavour compounds, and different combinations of flavour compounds can cause a certain flavour. A flavour library helps to detect flavour additives that are characteristic for a certain flavour, and thus can be useful for regulation of flavours in tobacco and related products. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. The anatomy of Z ' and Z with flavour changing neutral currents in the flavour precision era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; De Fazio, Fulvia; Girrbach, Jennifer

    2013-02-01

    The simplest extension of the Standard Model (SM) that generally introduces new sources of flavour violation and CP violation as well as right-handed (RH) currents is the addition of a U(1) gauge symmetry to the SM gauge group. If the corresponding heavy gauge boson ( Z ') mediates FCNC processes in the quark sector at tree-level, these new physics (NP) contributions imply a pattern of deviations from SM expectations for FCNC processes that depends only on the couplings of Z ' to fermions and on its mass. This implies stringent correlations between Δ F = 2 and Δ F = 1 observables which govern the landscape of the allowed parameter space for Z '-models. Anticipating the Flavour Precision Era (FPE) ahead of us we illustrate this by searching for allowed oases in this landscape assuming significantly smaller uncertainties in CKM and hadronic parameters than presently available. To this end we analyze Δ F = 2 observables in {K^0}-{{overline{K}}^0} and B_{s,d}^0-overline{B}_{s,d}^0 systems and rare K and B decays including both left-handed and right-handed Z '-couplings to quarks in various combinations. We identify a number of correlations between various flavour observables that could test and distinguish these different Z ' scenarios. The important role of b → sℓ+ℓ- and bto sν overline{ν} transitions in these studies is emphasized. Imposing the existing flavour constraints, a rich pattern of deviations from the SM expectations in B s,d and K meson systems emerges provided M Z' ≤ 3 TeV. While for M Z' ≥ 5 TeV Z ' effects in rare B s,d decays are found typically below 10% and hard to measure even in the FPE, Kto sν overline{ν} and K L → π0ℓ+ℓ- decays provide an important portal to scales beyond those explored by the LHC. We apply our formalism to NP scenarios with induced flavour changing neutral Z-couplings to quarks. We find that in the case of B d and K decays such Z-couplings still allow for sizable departures from the SM. On the other hand

  10. A Grand Δ(96)×SU(5) Flavour Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph; Stuart, Alexander J.

    2013-02-01

    Recent results from the Daya Bay and RENO reactor experiments have measured the smallest lepton mixing angle and found it to have a value of θ13≈9°. This result presents a new challenge for the existing paradigms of discrete flavour symmetries which attempt to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. Here we propose a Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory of Flavour based on Δ(96)×SU(5), together with a U(1)×Z3 symmetry, including a full discussion of Δ(96) in a convenient basis. The Grand Δ(96)×SU(5) Flavour Model relates the quark mixing angles and masses in the form of the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin relation and realises the Georgi-Jarlskog mass relations between the charged leptons and down-type quarks. We predict a Bi-trimaximal (not Tri-bimaximal) form of neutrino mixing matrix, which, after including charged lepton corrections with zero phase, leads to the following GUT scale predictions for the atmospheric, solar, and reactor mixing angles: θ23≈36.9°, θ12≈32.7° and θ13≈9.6°, in good agreement with recent global fits, and a zero Dirac CP phase δ≈0.

  11. Higgs and flavour as doors to new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    A natural solution to the hierarchy problem of the Fermi scale motivates signals of New Physics at current and near-future experiments. After a critical synthesis of this general motivation, we concentrate our attention on the interplay between LHC searches for new resonances, and precision measurements of both Higgs couplings and flavour violating observables. We do so for i) the Higgs sectors of the NMSSM and MSSM, as paradigmatic examples of theories providing extra scalars, and for ii) CKM-like flavour symmetries, with a focus on U(2)3. This article is mainly based on several papers by the author, but it also reviews other recent related results. Its goal is to provide a synthetic, yet comprehensive, orientation on these subjects, at the dawn of several (ATLAS and CMS, LHCb, NA62, etc.) forthcoming experimental results.

  12. Top-flavoured dark matter in Dark Minimal Flavour Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Monika; Kast, Simon

    2017-05-01

    We study a simplified model of top-flavoured dark matter in the framework of Dark Minimal Flavour Violation. In this setup the coupling of the dark matter flavour triplet to right-handed up-type quarks constitutes the only new source of flavour and CP violation. The parameter space of the model is restricted by LHC searches with missing energy final states, by neutral D meson mixing data, by the observed dark matter relic abundance, and by the absence of signal in direct detection experiments. We consider all of these constraints in turn, studying their implications for the allowed parameter space. Imposing the mass limits and coupling benchmarks from collider searches, we then conduct a combined analysis of all the other constraints, revealing their non-trivial interplay. Especially interesting is the combination of direct detection and relic abundance constraints, having a severe impact on the structure of the dark matter coupling matrix. We point out that future bounds from upcoming direct detection experiments, such as XENON1T, XENONnT, LUX-ZEPLIN, and DARWIN, will exclude a large part of the parameter space and push the DM mass to higher values.

  13. A bilayer Double Semion model with symmetry-enriched topological order

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, L. Martin-Delgado, M.A.

    2016-12-15

    We construct a new model of two-dimensional quantum spin systems that combines intrinsic topological orders and a global symmetry called flavour symmetry. It is referred as the bilayer Doubled Semion model (bDS) and is an instance of symmetry-enriched topological order. A honeycomb bilayer lattice is introduced to combine a Double Semion Topological Order with a global spin–flavour symmetry to get the fractionalization of its quasiparticles. The bDS model exhibits non-trivial braiding self-statistics of excitations and its dual model constitutes a Symmetry-Protected Topological Order with novel edge states. This dual model gives rise to a bilayer Non-Trivial Paramagnet that is invariant under the flavour symmetry and the well-known spin flip symmetry.

  14. Heavy Flavour Production at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plačakytė, Ringailė; H1; Zeus Collaborations

    2014-11-01

    Measurements of open charm and beauty production at HERA provide important input for stringent tests of quantum chromodynamics and are used to constrain the parton distribution functions of the proton. The recent results on the heavy flavour production obtained by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA are reviewed in this contribution.

  15. Heavy flavour production at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    In this brief review, recent experimental results from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations on heavy flavour production in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction regimes are summarized. The results cover charm fragmentation fractions, charm and beauty cross sections, F2cc¯ and F2bb¯ proton structure functions and the running charm- and beauty-quark masses.

  16. Lifetime of heavy flavour particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1985-10-01

    Recent measurements of the lifetime of the tau leptons and charm and beauty hadrons are reviewed and their significance for the couplings of the charged weak current, flavour mixing, and models relating quarks to hadron decay are discussed. 70 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Kaon Flavour Physics Strikes Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.

    2017-01-01

    In this short presentation I emphasize the increased importance of kaon flavour physics in the search for new physics (NP) that we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade. The main actors will be the branching ratios for the rare decays and , to be measured by NA62 and KOTO, and their correlations with the ratio ɛ‧/ɛ on which recently progress by lattice QCD and large N dual QCD approach has been made implying a new flavour anomaly. Further correlations of , and ɛ‧/ɛ with ɛK , ΔMK , KL → μ + μ - and will help us to identify indirectly possible NP at short distance scales. This talk summarizes the present highlights of this facinating field including some results from concrete NP scenarios.

  18. Flavour chemicals in electronic cigarette fluids

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Peyton A; Karpinski, Clarissa D; Brown, Jessica E; Luo, Wentai; Pankow, James F

    2016-01-01

    Background Most e-cigarette liquids contain flavour chemicals. Flavour chemicals certified as safe for ingestion by the Flavor Extracts Manufacturers Association may not be safe for use in e-cigarettes. This study identified and measured flavour chemicals in 30 e-cigarette fluids. Methods Two brands of single-use e-cigarettes were selected and their fluids in multiple flavour types analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For the same flavour types, and for selected confectionary flavours (eg, bubble gum and cotton candy), also analysed were convenience samples of e-cigarette fluids in refill bottles from local ‘vape’ shops and online retailers. Results In many liquids, total flavour chemicals were found to be in the ∼1–4% range (10–40 mg/mL); labelled levels of nicotine were in the range of 0.6–2.4% (6 to 24 mg/mL). A significant number of the flavour chemicals were aldehydes, a compound class recognised as ‘primary irritants’ of mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Many of the products contained the same flavour chemicals: vanillin and/or ethyl vanillin was found in 17 of the liquids as one of the top three flavour chemicals, and/or at ≥0.5 mg/mL. Conclusions The concentrations of some flavour chemicals in e-cigarette fluids are sufficiently high for inhalation exposure by vaping to be of toxicological concern. Regulatory limits should be contemplated for levels of some of the more worrisome chemicals as well as for total flavour chemical levels. Ingredient labeling should also be required. PMID:25877377

  19. Flavour chemicals in electronic cigarette fluids.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Peyton A; Karpinski, Clarissa D; Brown, Jessica E; Luo, Wentai; Pankow, James F

    2016-04-01

    Most e-cigarette liquids contain flavour chemicals. Flavour chemicals certified as safe for ingestion by the Flavor Extracts Manufacturers Association may not be safe for use in e-cigarettes. This study identified and measured flavour chemicals in 30 e-cigarette fluids. Two brands of single-use e-cigarettes were selected and their fluids in multiple flavour types analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For the same flavour types, and for selected confectionary flavours (eg, bubble gum and cotton candy), also analysed were convenience samples of e-cigarette fluids in refill bottles from local 'vape' shops and online retailers. In many liquids, total flavour chemicals were found to be in the ∼1-4% range (10-40 mg/mL); labelled levels of nicotine were in the range of 0.6-2.4% (6 to 24 mg/mL). A significant number of the flavour chemicals were aldehydes, a compound class recognised as 'primary irritants' of mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Many of the products contained the same flavour chemicals: vanillin and/or ethyl vanillin was found in 17 of the liquids as one of the top three flavour chemicals, and/or at ≥0.5 mg/mL. The concentrations of some flavour chemicals in e-cigarette fluids are sufficiently high for inhalation exposure by vaping to be of toxicological concern. Regulatory limits should be contemplated for levels of some of the more worrisome chemicals as well as for total flavour chemical levels. Ingredient labeling should also be required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Symmetry impedes symmetry discrimination.

    PubMed

    Tjan, Bosco S; Liu, Zili

    2005-12-16

    Objects in the world, natural and artificial alike, are often bilaterally symmetric. The visual system is likely to take advantage of this regularity to encode shapes for efficient object recognition. The nature of encoding a symmetric shape, and of encoding any departure from it, is therefore an important matter in visual perception. We addressed this issue of shape encoding empirically, noting that a particular encoding scheme necessarily leads to a specific profile of sensitivity in perceptual discriminations. We studied symmetry discrimination using human faces and random dots. Each face stimulus was a frontal view of a three-dimensional (3-D) face model. The 3-D face model was a linearly weighted average (a morph) between the model of an original face and that of the corresponding mirror face. Using this morphing technique to vary the degree of asymmetry, we found that, for faces and analogously generated random-dot patterns alike, symmetry discrimination was worst when the stimuli were nearly symmetric, in apparent opposition to almost all studies in the literature. We analyzed the previous work and reconciled the old and new results using a generic model with a simple nonlinearity. By defining asymmetry as the minimal difference between the left and right halves of an object, we found that the visual system was disproportionately more sensitive to larger departures from symmetry than to smaller ones. We further demonstrated that our empirical and modeling results were consistent with Weber-Fechner's and Stevens's laws.

  1. Theoretical aspects of charged Lepton Flavour Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Ana M.

    2017-09-01

    If observed, charged lepton flavour violation is a clear sign of new physics - beyond the Standard Model minimally extended to accommodate neutrino oscillation data. We briefly review several extensions of the Standard Model which could potentially give rise to observable signals, also emphasising the rôle of charged lepton flavour violation in probing such new physics models.1

  2. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Ahn, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-01-01

    Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds responsible for chicken meat flavour and off-flavour development to help producers in producing the most flavourful and consistent product possible. Chicken meat flavour is thermally derived and the Maillard reaction, thermal degradation of lipids, and interaction between these 2 reactions are mainly responsible for the generation of flavour and aroma compounds. The reaction of cysteine and sugar can lead to characteristic meat flavour specially for chicken and pork. Volatile compounds including 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-furfurylthiol, methionol, 2,4,5-trimethyl-thiazole, nonanol, 2-trans-nonenal, and other compounds have been identified as important for the flavour of chicken. However 2-methyl-3-furanthiol is considered as the most vital chemical compound for chicken flavour development. In addition, a large number of heterocyclic compounds are formed when higher temperature and low moisture conditions are used during certain cooking methods of chicken meat such as roasting, grilling, frying or pressure cooking compared to boiled chicken meat. Major volatile compounds responsible for fried chicken are 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolanes, 2,4,6-trimethylperhydro-1,3,5-dithiazines, 3,5-diisobutyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-butyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-pentyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2,4-decadienal and trans-4,5-epoxy-trans-2-decenal. Alkylpyrazines were reported in the flavours of fried chicken and roasted chicken but not in chicken broth. The main reason for flavour deterioration

  3. Ubiquitous symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, M. C.

    2016-09-01

    We review some of our recent work devoted to the problem of quantization with preservation of Noether symmetries, finding hidden linearity in superintegrable systems, and showing that nonlocal symmetries are in fact local. In particular, we derive the Schrödinger equation for the isochronous Calogero goldfish model using its relation to Darwin equation. We prove the linearity of a classical superintegrable system on a plane of nonconstant curvature. We find the Lie point symmetries that correspond to the nonlocal symmetries (also reinterpreted as λ-symmetries) of the Riccati chain.

  4. Constraining flavoured contact interactions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sacha; Descotes-Genon, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Contact interactions are the low-energy footprints of New Physics, so ideally, constraints upon them should be as generic and model independent as possible. Hadron colliders search for four-quark contact interactions with incident valence quarks, and the LHC currently sets limits on a flavour sum (over uu, dd and ud) of selected interactions. We approximately translate these bounds to a more complete (and larger) set of dimension-six interactions of specified flavours. These estimates are obtained at the parton level, are mostly analytic and are less restrictive than the experimental bounds on flavour-summed interactions. The estimates may scale in a simple way to higher energy and luminosity.

  5. Seiberg duality versus hidden local symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Barnard, James

    2012-05-01

    It is widely believed that the emergent magnetic gauge symmetry of SQCD is analogous to a hidden local symmetry (HLS). We explore this idea in detail, deriving the entire (spontaneously broken) magnetic theory by applying the HLS formalism to spontaneously broken SU( N) SQCD. We deduce the Kähler potential in the HLS description, and show that gauge and flavour symmetry are smoothly restored along certain scaling directions in moduli space. We propose that it is these symmetry restoring directions, associated with the R-symmetry of the theory, that allow full Seiberg duality. Reconsidering the origin of the magnetic gauge bosons as the ρ-mesons of the electric theory, colour-flavour locking allows a simple determination of the parameter a. Its value continuously interpolates between a = 2 on the baryonic branch of moduli space — corresponding to "vector meson dominance" — and a = 1 on the mesonic branch. Both limiting values are consistent with previous results in the literature. The HLS formalism is further applied to SO and Sp groups, where the usual Seiberg duals are recovered, as well as adjoint SQCD. Finally we discuss some possible future applications, including (naturally) the unitarisation of composite W scattering, blended Higgs/technicolour models, real world QCD and non-supersymmetric dualities.

  6. Comparing dualities and gauge symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Haro, Sebastian; Teh, Nicholas; Butterfield, Jeremy N.

    2017-08-01

    We discuss some aspects of the relation between dualities and gauge symmetries. Both of these ideas are of course multi-faceted, and we confine ourselves to making two points. Both points are about dualities in string theory, and both have the 'flavour' that two dual theories are 'closer in content' than you might think. For both points, we adopt a simple conception of a duality as an 'isomorphism' between theories: more precisely, as appropriate bijections between the two theories' sets of states and sets of quantities. The first point (Section 3) is that this conception of duality meshes with two dual theories being 'gauge related' in the general philosophical sense of being physically equivalent. For a string duality, such as T-duality and gauge/gravity duality, this means taking such features as the radius of a compact dimension, and the dimensionality of spacetime, to be 'gauge'. The second point (Sections 4-6) is much more specific. We give a result about gauge/gravity duality that shows its relation to gauge symmetries (in the physical sense of symmetry transformations that are spacetime-dependent) to be subtler than you might expect. For gauge theories, you might expect that the duality bijections relate only gauge-invariant quantities and states, in the sense that gauge symmetries in one theory will be unrelated to any symmetries in the other theory. This may be so in general; and indeed, it is suggested by discussions of Polchinski and Horowitz. But we show that in gauge/gravity duality, each of a certain class of gauge symmetries in the gravity/bulk theory, viz. diffeomorphisms, is related by the duality to a position-dependent symmetry of the gauge/boundary theory.

  7. Symmetry matters.

    PubMed

    Moubayidin, Laila; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-09-01

    985 I. 985 II. 986 III. 987 IV. 988 V. 989 989 References 989 SUMMARY: The development of multicellular organisms depends on correct establishment of symmetry both at the whole-body scale and within individual tissues and organs. Setting up planes of symmetry must rely on communication between cells that are located at a distance from each other within the organism, presumably via mobile morphogenic signals. Although symmetry in nature has fascinated scientists for centuries, it is only now that molecular data to unravel mechanisms of symmetry establishment are beginning to emerge. As an example we describe the genetic and hormonal interactions leading to an unusual bilateral-to-radial symmetry transition of an organ in order to promote reproduction.

  8. Structure and Properties of High Symmetry Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-27

    utilizing a 4-directional reinforcement. Reducing the close-to-cubic symmetry concept into practice in our laboratory by a three-dimensional braiding...modelled by utilizing the different elastic strain energy expressions produced by different combinations of symmetry elements. Symmetry in Materials The...rings is insignmicant. Utilizing the above assumptions, numerous textile structures possess holosymmetric cubic symmetry. This symmetry state is found in

  9. Perspectives for detecting lepton flavour violation in left-right symmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Krauss, Manuel E.; Opferkuch, Toby; Porod, Werner

    2017-03-01

    We investigate lepton flavour violation in a class of minimal left-right symmetric models where the left-right symmetry is broken by triplet scalars. In this context we present a method to consistently calculate the triplet-Yukawa couplings which takes into account the experimental data while simultaneously respecting the underlying symmetries. Analysing various scenarios, we then calculate the full set of tree-level and one-loop contributions to all radiative and three-body flavour-violating fully leptonic decays as well as μ - e conversion in nuclei. Our method illustrates how these processes depend on the underlying parameters of the theory. To that end we observe that, for many choices of the model parameters, there is a strong complementarity between the different observables. For instance, in a large part of the parameter space, lepton flavour violating τ-decays have a large enough branching ratio to be measured in upcoming experiments. Our results further show that experiments coming online in the immediate future, like Mu3e and BELLE II, or longer-term, such as PRISM/PRIME, will probe significant portions of the currently allowed parameter space.

  10. Flavour-dependent leptogenesis with reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan

    2007-11-20

    Upper bounds on the reheat temperature of the early universe, as they appear for example in classes of supergravity models, impose severe constraints on the thermal leptogenesis mechanism. To analyse these constraints, we extend the flavour-dependent treatment of leptogenesis to include reheating. We solve the flavour-dependent Boltzmann equations to obtain the leptogenesis efficiency as a function of the flavour dependent washout parameter m-tilde{sub 1,{alpha}} and of m{sub N{sub 1}}/T{sub RH}, the ratio of the mass of the lightest right-handed neutrino over the reheat temperature, and calculate the minimal values of the reheat temperature compatible with thermal leptogenesis in type I and type II seesaw scenarios.

  11. b -flavour tagging in pp collisions at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, V.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Measurements of CP violation and flavour oscillations of neutral B mesons require the knowledge of the meson flavour at the production time. Flavour-tagging algorithms in the LHCb experiment allow to perform such measurements with very high precision. Recent examples include the determination of the CKM angles 2β and 2βs . The details of these flavour-tagging algorithms are presented, together with their performances.

  12. New trends in beer flavour compound analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Iglesias, Cristina; Montero, Olimpio; Sancho, Daniel; Blanco, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    As the beer market is steadily expanding, it is important for the brewing industry to offer consumers a product with the best organoleptic characteristics, flavour being one of the key characteristics of beer. New trends in instrumental methods of beer flavour analysis are described. In addition to successfully applied methods in beer analysis such as chromatography, spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry or electronic nose and tongue techniques, among others, sample extraction and preparation such as derivatization or microextraction methods are also reviewed. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Rare decays in quark flavour physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Johannes; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Rare heavy-flavour decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. Recent results on Flavour Changing Neutral Current decays from the LHC are reviewed. An emphasis is put on the very rare decay Bs0 →μ+μ-, which was recently observed by the CMS and LHCb experiments, on a recent test of lepton universality in loop processes and on the analysis of the angular distributions of the B0 →K*0μ+μ- decays, both by the LHCb collaboration.

  14. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  15. Flavon-induced lepton flavour violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keus, Venus

    2017-07-01

    ATLAS and CMS have observed a flavor violating decay of the Higgs to muon and tau. The fact that flavour violating couplings of the Higgs boson are exactly zero in the Standard Model suggests the mixing of the Higgs with another scalar with flavour violating couplings. We use the flavon field from the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism, responsible for generating the lepton Yukawa matrices, for this purpose. The parameter space is constrained from experimental bounds on charged lepton flavor violation in other processes, however, we show that a substantial region of parameter space survives these bounds while producing a large enough Br(h → μτ).

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Neutrino flavour transformation in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, H.; Kneller, J. P.

    2009-11-01

    Rapid progress has been made during recent years in the understanding of the flavour oscillations that occur as neutrinos traverse through supernova. The previous paradigm has given way and it is now clear that the neutrino signals we shall receive from future galactic supernovae will allow us both to peer inside these extraordinary cosmic events and to probe some of the fundamental properties of these elusive particles. In this review, we aim to distill the progress that has been made focusing upon the effects of the dynamic density profile and the emergence of collective flavour oscillations due to neutrino self-interactions.

  17. Higgs-mediated FCNCs: natural flavour conservation vs. minimal flavour violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Valentina Carlucci, Maria; Gori, Stefania; Isidori, Gino

    2010-10-01

    We compare the effectiveness of two hypotheses, Natural Flavour Conservation (NFC) and Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV), in suppressing the strength of flavour-changing neutral-currents (FCNCs) in models with more than one Higgs doublet. We show that the MFV hypothesis, in its general formulation, is more stable in suppressing FCNCs than the hypothesis of NFC alone when quantum corrections are taken into account. The phenomenological implications of the two scenarios are discussed analysing meson-antimeson mixing observables and the rare decays B s, d → μ + μ -. We demonstrate that, introducing flavour-blind CP phases, two-Higgs doublet models respecting the MFV hypothesis can accommodate a large CP-violating phase in B s mixing, as hinted by CDF and D0 data and, without extra free parameters, soften significantly in a correlated manner the observed anomaly in the relation between ɛ K and {S_{ψ {K_S}}}.

  18. Milk, flavoured milk products and caries.

    PubMed

    Levine, R S

    2001-07-14

    The consumption of flavoured milk increased by 50% between 1992 and 1999 and dental health educators need to know if these and other sugar and fruit juice sweetened milk products, such as fruit yoghurts, are acceptable as snack items. Available evidence suggests that their cariogenicity is negligible to low and consumed in moderation they are a preferable alternative to similarly sweetened soft drinks.

  19. Flavour chemistry of methylglyoxal and glyoxal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2012-06-07

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal (GO), known as reactive carbonyl species, can be generated endogenously and exogenously (human body and food system). They are attracting increased attention because of their relationship with diabetes and flavour generation. In this review, their characteristics relating to flavour chemistry are discussed. MGO and GO can be detected in food systems by GC and HPLC after derivatization. MGO and GO formed in the Maillard reaction play important roles as precursors of aroma and colour compounds, especially in Strecker degradation, a major flavour generation reaction. When combined with amino acids they undergo Schiff base formation, decarboxylation and α-aminoketone condensation leading to heterocyclic aroma compounds such as pyrazines, pyrroles and pyridines. They attack amine groups in amino acids, peptides and proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and cause carbonyl stress followed by oxidative stress and tissue damage. Therefore, many studies about scavengers of MGO and GO are seen. The influence of these scavengers on flavour generation is also discussed.

  20. Inherited Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attanucci, Frank J.; Losse, John

    2008-01-01

    In a first calculus course, it is not unusual for students to encounter the theorems which state: If f is an even (odd) differentiable function, then its derivative is odd (even). In our paper, we prove some theorems which show how the symmetry of a continuous function f with respect to (i) the vertical line: x = a or (ii) with respect to the…

  1. Inherited Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attanucci, Frank J.; Losse, John

    2008-01-01

    In a first calculus course, it is not unusual for students to encounter the theorems which state: If f is an even (odd) differentiable function, then its derivative is odd (even). In our paper, we prove some theorems which show how the symmetry of a continuous function f with respect to (i) the vertical line: x = a or (ii) with respect to the…

  2. SUGRA new inflation with Heisenberg symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Cefalà, Francesco E-mail: stefan.antusch@unibas.ch

    2013-10-01

    We propose a realisation of ''new inflation'' in supergravity (SUGRA), where the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected by a Heisenberg symmetry. Inflation can be associated with a particle physics phase transition, with the inflaton being a (D-flat) direction of Higgs fields which break some symmetry at high energies, e.g. of GUT Higgs fields or of Higgs fields for flavour symmetry breaking. This is possible since compared to a shift symmetry, which is usually used to protect a flat inflaton potential, the Heisenberg symmetry is compatible with a (gauge) non-singlet inflaton field. In contrast to conventional new inflation models in SUGRA, where the predictions depend on unknown parameters of the Kaehler potential, the model with Heisenberg symmetry makes discrete predictions for the primordial perturbation parameters which depend only on the order n at which the inflaton appears in the effective superpotential. The predictions for the spectral index n{sub s} can be close to the best-fit value of the latest Planck 2013 results.

  3. Tobacco industry use of flavourings to promote smokeless tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Kostygina, Ganna; Ling, Pamela M

    2016-11-01

    While fruit, candy and alcohol characterising flavours are not allowed in cigarettes in the USA, other flavoured tobacco products such as smokeless tobacco (ST) continue to be sold. We investigated tobacco manufacturers' use of flavoured additives in ST products, the target audience(s) for flavoured products, and marketing strategies promoting products by emphasising their flavour. Qualitative analysis of internal tobacco industry documents triangulated with data from national newspaper articles, trade press and internet. Internally, flavoured products have been consistently associated with young and inexperienced tobacco users. Internal studies confirmed that candy-like sweeter milder flavours (eg, mint, fruit) could increase appeal to starters by evoking a perception of mildness, blinding the strong tobacco taste and unpleasant mouth feel; or by modifying nicotine delivery by affecting product pH. Similar to cigarettes, flavoured ST is likely to encourage novices to start using tobacco, and regulations limiting or eliminating flavours in cigarettes should be extended to include flavoured ST products. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, M.; CDF and D0 Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{anti B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given.

  5. The Erosive Potential of Some Flavoured Waters

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Jeremy; Loyn, Theresa; Hunter, Lindsay; Sadaghiani, Leili; Gilmour, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess the erosive potential of a number of readily available flavoured waters in the laboratory. Methods The erosive potential was assessed by measuring the pH, neutralisable acidity and ability to erode enamel. These were compared to an orange juice positive control. Results The pH of the flavoured waters ranged from 2.64–3.24 with their neutralisable acidity ranging from 4.16–16.30 mls of 0.1M NaOH. The amount of enamel removed following 1-hour immersion in the drinks ranged from 1.18–6.86 microns. In comparison, the orange juice control had a pH of 3.68, a neutralisable acidity of 19.68 mls of 0.1 M NaOH and removed 3.24 microns of enamel. Conclusions Many of the flavoured waters tested were found to be as erosive as orange juice. This information will be of use to clinicians when counselling patients with tooth surface loss. (Eur J Dent 2007;1:5–9) PMID:19212489

  6. Broken Symmetry

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not “renormalizable”. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged “vector” particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of

  7. Broken Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-24

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not “renormalizable”. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged “vector” particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of

  8. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Lepton Flavour Violation in Broken μ - τ Symmetric Neutrino Mass Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgohain, Happy; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2017-09-01

    We have studied neutrinoless double beta decay and charged lepton flavour violation in broken μ - τ symmetric neutrino masses in a generic left-right symmetric model (LRSM). The leading order μ - τ symmetric mass matrix originates from the type I (II) seesaw mechanism, whereas the perturbations to μ - τ symmetry in order for generation of non-zero reactor mixing angle 𝜃 13, as required by latest neutrino oscillation data, originates from the type II (I) seesaw mechanism. In our work, we considered four different realizations of μ - τ symmetry, viz. Tribimaximal Mixing (TBM), Bimaximal Mixing (BM), Hexagonal Mixing (HM) and Golden Ratio Mixing (GRM). We then studied the new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay (NDBD) ignoring the left-right gauge boson mixing and the heavy-light neutrino mixing within the framework of LRSM. We have considered the mass of the gauge bosons and scalars to be around TeV and studied the effects of the new physics contributions on the effective mass and the NDBD half life and compared with the current experimental limit imposed by KamLAND-Zen. We further extended our analysis by correlating the lepton flavour violation of the decay processes, ( μ → 3 e) and ( μ → e γ) with the lightest neutrino mass and atmospheric mixing angle 𝜃 23 respectively.

  9. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Lepton Flavour Violation in Broken μ - τ Symmetric Neutrino Mass Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgohain, Happy; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2017-06-01

    We have studied neutrinoless double beta decay and charged lepton flavour violation in broken μ - τ symmetric neutrino masses in a generic left-right symmetric model (LRSM). The leading order μ - τ symmetric mass matrix originates from the type I (II) seesaw mechanism, whereas the perturbations to μ - τ symmetry in order for generation of non-zero reactor mixing angle 𝜃 13, as required by latest neutrino oscillation data, originates from the type II (I) seesaw mechanism. In our work, we considered four different realizations of μ - τ symmetry, viz. Tribimaximal Mixing (TBM), Bimaximal Mixing (BM), Hexagonal Mixing (HM) and Golden Ratio Mixing (GRM). We then studied the new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay (NDBD) ignoring the left-right gauge boson mixing and the heavy-light neutrino mixing within the framework of LRSM. We have considered the mass of the gauge bosons and scalars to be around TeV and studied the effects of the new physics contributions on the effective mass and the NDBD half life and compared with the current experimental limit imposed by KamLAND-Zen. We further extended our analysis by correlating the lepton flavour violation of the decay processes, (μ → 3e) and (μ → e γ) with the lightest neutrino mass and atmospheric mixing angle 𝜃 23 respectively.

  10. Non-Diagonal Flavour Observables in B and Collider Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hurth, Tobias

    2003-11-11

    Until now the focus within the direct search for supersymmetry has mainly been on flavour diagonal observables. Recently lepton flavour violating signals at future electron positron colliders have been studied. There is now an opportunity to analyze the relations between collider observables and low-energy observables in the hadronic sector. In a first work in this direction, we study flavour violation in the squark decays of the second and third generations taking into account results from B physics, in particular from the rare decay b {yields} s gamma. Correlations between various squark decay modes can be used to get more precise information on various flavour violating parameters.

  11. Continuous symmetry measures for complex symmetry group.

    PubMed

    Dryzun, Chaim

    2014-04-05

    Symmetry is a fundamental property of nature, used extensively in physics, chemistry, and biology. The Continuous symmetry measures (CSM) is a method for estimating the deviation of a given system from having a certain perfect symmetry, which enables us to formulate quantitative relation between symmetry and other physical properties. Analytical procedures for calculating the CSM of all simple cyclic point groups are available for several years. Here, we present a methodology for calculating the CSM of any complex point group, including the dihedral, tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral symmetry groups. We present the method and analyze its performances and errors. We also introduce an analytical method for calculating the CSM of the linear symmetry groups. As an example, we apply these methods for examining the symmetry of water, the symmetry maps of AB4 complexes, and the symmetry of several Lennard-Jones clusters.

  12. Minimal flavour violation and multi-Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, F. J.; Branco, G. C.; Rebelo, M. N.

    2010-04-01

    We propose an extension of the hypothesis of Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV) to general multi-Higgs models without the assumption of Natural Flavour Conservation (NFC) in the Higgs sector. We study in detail under what conditions the neutral Higgs couplings are only functions of VCKM and propose a MFV expansion for the neutral Higgs couplings to fermions.

  13. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1.

    PubMed

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]. Taking into account the constraints from [Formula: see text] processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours [Formula: see text], which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in [Formula: see text] decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the [Formula: see text] constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for [Formula: see text] with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of [Formula: see text]. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of indirect measurements and

  14. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard W^± and Z^0 gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }, KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν }, K_L→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ X_sγ , B_{s,d}→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ν bar{ν }, and \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon . Taking into account the constraints from Δ F=2 processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν } and KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-) ≥ B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-)_SM, which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^- decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of

  15. Flavour chemicals in a sample of non-cigarette tobacco products without explicit flavour names sold in New York City in 2015.

    PubMed

    Farley, Shannon M; Schroth, Kevin Rj; Grimshaw, Victoria; Luo, Wentai; DeGagne, Julia L; Tierney, Peyton A; Kim, Kilsun; Pankow, James F

    2017-04-11

    Youth who experiment with tobacco often start with flavoured products. In New York City (NYC), local law restricts sales of all tobacco products with 'characterising flavours' except for 'tobacco, menthol, mint and wintergreen'. Enforcement is based on packaging: explicit use of a flavour name (eg, 'strawberry') or image depicting a flavour (eg, a fruit) is presumptive evidence that a product is flavoured and therefore prohibited. However, a tobacco product may contain significant levels of added flavour chemicals even when the label does not explicitly use a flavour name. Sixteen tobacco products were purchased within NYC in 2015 that did not have explicit flavour names, along with three with flavour names. These were analysed for 92 known flavour chemicals plus triacetin by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 14 of the 16 products had total determined flavour chemical levels that were higher (>0.3 mg/g) than in previously studied flavour-labelled products and of a chemical profile indicating added flavour chemicals. The results suggest that the tobacco industry has responded to sales restrictions by renaming flavoured products to avoid explicitly identifying them as flavoured. While chemical analysis is the most precise means of identifying flavours in tobacco products, federal tobacco laws pre-empt localities from basing regulations on that approach, limiting enforcement options. If the Food and Drug Administration would mandate that all tobacco products must indicate when flavourings are present above a specific level, local jurisdictions could enforce their sales restrictions. A level of 0.1 mg/g for total added flavour chemicals is suggested here as a relevant reference value for regulating added flavour chemicals in tobacco products. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Neutrino mass and mixing with discrete symmetry.

    PubMed

    King, Stephen F; Luhn, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    This is a review paper about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of see-saw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mechanisms for flavon vacuum alignment and different model building strategies that have been proposed to generate the reactor angle. We then briefly review grand unified theories (GUTs) and how they may be combined with discrete family symmetry to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing. Finally, we discuss three model examples which combine an SU(5) GUT with the discrete family symmetries A₄, S₄ and Δ(96).

  17. Factors influencing the flavour of game meat: A review.

    PubMed

    Neethling, J; Hoffman, L C; Muller, M

    2016-03-01

    Flavour is a very important attribute contributing to the sensory quality of meat and meat products. Although the sensory quality of meat includes orthonasal and retronasal aroma, taste, as well as appearance, juiciness and other textural attributes, the focus of this review is primarily on flavour. The influence of species, age, gender, muscle anatomical location, diet, harvesting conditions, ageing of meat, packaging and storage, as well as cooking method on the flavour of game meat are discussed. Very little research is available on the factors influencing the flavour of the meat derived from wild and free-living game species. The aim of this literature review is thus to discuss the key ante- and post-mortem factors that influence the flavour of game meat, with specific focus on wild and free-living South African game species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Revival of Kaon Flavour Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.

    2016-11-01

    After years of silence we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade the revival of kaon flavour physics. This is not only because of the crucial measurements of the branching ratios for the rare decays K+ → π+vv¯ and KL → π0vv¯ by NA62 and KOTO that being theoretically clean and very sensitive to new physics (NP) could hint for new phenomena even beyond the reach of the LHC without any significant theoretical uncertainties. Indeed simultaneously the advances in the calculations of perturbative and in particular non-perturbative QCD effects in ɛ'/ɛ, ɛK, ΔMK, KL → μ+μ- and KL → π0ℓ+ℓ- will increase the role of these observables in searching for NP. In fact the hints for NP contributing to ɛ'/ɛ have been already signalled last year through improved estimates of hadronic matrix elements of QCD and electroweak penguin operators Q6 and Q8 by lattice QCD and large N dual QCD approach. This talk summarizes in addition to this new flavour anomaly the present highlights of this field including some results from concrete NP scenarios.

  19. Fermion masses, flavour mixing and CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G. G.

    2008-11-23

    The pattern of neutrino masses and mixings is characteristically different from those observed in the quark sector. I discuss how this can be elegantly explaned through a combination of an underlying family symmetry and the see-saw mechanism.

  20. SPheno 3.1: extensions including flavour, CP-phases and models beyond the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porod, W.; Staub, F.

    2012-11-01

    high scale parameters by evaluating the corresponding renormalisation group equations. These parameters must be consistent with the requirement of correct electroweak symmetry breaking. The second issue is to use the obtained masses and couplings for calculating decay widths and branching ratios of supersymmetric particles as well as the cross sections for these particles in electron-positron annihilation. The third issue is to calculate low energy constraints in the B-meson sector such as BR(b s), MB s, rare lepton decays, such as BR(e), the SUSY contributions to anomalous magnetic moments and electric dipole moments of leptons, the SUSY contributions to the ρ parameter as well as lepton flavour violating Z decays. Solution method: The renormalisation connecting a high scale and the electroweak scale is calculated by the Runge-Kutta method. Iteration provides a solution consistent with the multi-boundary conditions. In case of three-body decays and for the calculation of initial state radiation Gaussian quadrature is used for the numerical solution of the integrals. Reasons for new version: Inclusion of new models as well as additional observables. Moreover, a new standard for data transfer had been established, which is now supported. Summary of revisions: The already existing models have been extended to include also CP-violation and flavour mixing. The data transfer is done using the so-called SLHA2 standard. In addition new models have been included: all three types of seesaw models as well as bilinear R-parity violation. Moreover, additional observables are calculated: branching ratios for flavour violating lepton decays, EDMs of leptons and of the neutron, CP-violating mass difference in the B-meson sector and branching ratios for flavour violating b-quark decays. Restrictions: In case of R-parity violation the cross sections are not calculated. Running time: 0.2 seconds on an Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU T9900 with 3.06 GHz

  1. Enhanced lepton flavour violation in the supersymmetric inverse seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.

    2013-07-01

    In minimal supersymmetric seesaw models, the contribution to lepton flavour violation from Z-penguins is usually negligible. In this study, we consider the supersymmetric inverse seesaw and show that, in this case, the Z-penguin contribution dominates in several lepton flavour violating observables due to the low scale of the inverse seesaw mechanism. Among the observables considered, we find that the most constraining one is the μ-e conversion rate which is already restricting the otherwise allowed parameter space of the model. Moreover, in this framework, the Z-penguins exhibit a non-decoupling behaviour, which has previously been noticed in lepton flavour violating Higgs decays.

  2. Large tan β effects in flavour physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidori, Gino; Paradisi, Paride

    2007-01-01

    We discuss B→τν, ΔMB_s and other low-energy observables in the framework of the MSSM at large tanβ. We show that for heavy squarks and A terms (M, A≳1 TeV) such scenario has several interesting virtues. It naturally describes: i) a suppression of B(B→τν) of (10-40)%, ii) a sizable enhancement of (, iii) a heavy SM-like Higgs (m˜120 GeV), iv) small non-standard effects in ΔMB_s and B(B→Xγ) (all in agreement with present observations). The possibilities to find more convincing evidences of such scenario with future flavour-phyiscs measurements are briefly outlined.

  3. Theoretical Results in Heavy Flavour Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G.

    2011-05-01

    We review one-particle inclusive production of heavy-flavoured hadrons in a framework which resums the large collinear logarithms through the evolution of the FFs and PDFs and retains the dependence on the heavy-quark mass. We focus on presenting results for the inclusive cross section for the production of charmed mesons in pp¯ collisions and the comparison with CDF data as well as on inclusive B-meson production and comparison with recent CDF data, for which in both new determined fragmentation functions have been used. We asses the sensitivity of CDF data of D inclusive production to the internal charm parametrization given by Pumplin et al. [J. Pumplin, H. L. Lai and W. K. Tung, Phys. Rev. D75, 054029 (2007)].

  4. Relativistic Pseudospin Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ginocchio, Joseph N.

    2011-05-06

    We show that the pseudospin symmetry that Akito Arima discovered many years ago (with collaborators) is a symmetry of the the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of the scalar and vector potentials are a constant. In this paper we discuss some of the implications of this relativistic symmetry and the experimental data that support these predictions. In his original paper Akito also discussed pseudo-U(3) symmetry. We show that pseudo-U(3) symmetry is a symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of harmonic oscillator vector and scalar potentials are equal to a constant, and we give the generators of pseudo-U(3) symmetry. Going beyond the mean field we summarize new results on non relativistic shell model Hamiltonians that have pseudospin symmetry and pseudo-orbital angular momentum symmetry as a dynamical symmetries.

  5. A SUSY GUT of flavour with S 4 × SU(5) to NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2010-06-01

    We construct a Supersymmetric (SUSY) Grand Unified Theory (GUT) of Flavour based on S 4 × SU(5), together with an additional (global or local) Abelian symmetry, and study it to next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy. The model includes a successful description of quark and lepton masses and mixing angles at leading order (LO) incorporating the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin (GST) relation and the Georgi-Jarlskog (GJ) relations. We study the vacuum alignment arising from F-terms to NLO and such corrections are shown to have a negligible effect on the results for fermion masses and mixings achieved at LO. Tri-bimaximal (TB) mixing in the neutrino sector is predicted very accurately up to NLO corrections of order 0.1%. Including charged lepton mixing corrections implies small deviations from TB mixing described by a precise sum rule, accurately maximal atmospheric mixing and a reactor mixing angle close to three degrees.

  6. Fast decaying neutrinos and observable flavour violation in a new class of majoron models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Valle, J. W. F.

    1989-01-01

    Neutrinos can have any mass (allowed by laboratory limits) without violating limits from cosmology, astrophysics or laboratory searches for lepton violation phenomena. We present a simple extension of the standard theory where neutrinos decay dominantly into invisible modes involving a majoron associated with the spontaneous violation of B-L symmetry due to physics at or below the electroweak scale. Measurable branchings for lepton-flavour-violating processes such as μ-->e+γ, and for non-standard Z decays e.g. Z-->e+τ, and Z-->μ+τ (plus their conjugates) at LEP are possible without unnatural fine-tuning of the parameters. Lepton-number-violating effects such as neutrinoless ββ decay may also be present at a measurable level.

  7. Supersymmetric parameter space of family symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Sevilla, L.

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I have emphasized the effects of considering departures from the minimal flavour violation conditions, in the context of CMSSM-like theories, introduced by boundary conditions at GUT scale from Family Symmetries. In [1] we have shown the results of running these conditions down to EW, where constraints from fermion masses and CKM matrix elements have been used. Only when the expansion parameter in the sdown-squark sector is relatively large it is possible to relax the lower limit from b{yields}s{gamma} on the universal gaugino mass. The expansion parameter associated with the slepton sector needs to be smaller than the analogous in the sdown-squark sector in order to satisfy the bound imposed by the decay of {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}.

  8. Quality characteristics and safety of smoke-flavoured water.

    PubMed

    Tano-Debrah, Kwaku; Amamoo-Otchere, Joanne; Karikari, A Y; Diako, Charles

    2007-06-01

    Smoke-flavoured water is produced in Ghana by filling a previously smoked container with potable water and allowing the water to condition with the smoke to attain a characteristic rain water flavour. Owing to the current knowledge on the toxicity, carcinogenicity and other safety issues of some smoke-constituents, the commercial production of the product is becoming a public health concern. This study sought to determine the effects of the smoke-flavouring process on the quality characteristics of smoke-flavoured water to predict the safety of the product. A traditional and a commercial protocol for the production of smoke-flavoured water were simulated in the laboratory and at the site of a company which used to produce the product, respectively. Samples of the flavoured water produced were analyzed for pH, colour, turbidity, conductivity, total hardness, dissolved oxygen content (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon constituents (PAHs), coliform count, and flavour acceptability. Data obtained were evaluated in reference to data on control samples prepared during the investigations. The results obtained suggested that the smoke-flavouring process may not significantly change most of the physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics of the water processed, and thus not affect the drinking quality characteristics of the water. The process however has the potential of adding some organic compounds, which could include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the group that may have the toxicity and carcinogenic effects. The types of PAHs and their concentrations are expected to vary with the process characteristics, but could be insignificantly low to affect the safety of the water. The results suggest a need for some standardization of the process.

  9. Searching for Radial Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Ben J; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2017-01-01

    Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. Numerous investigations, dating back over one hundred years, have explored the visual processing of symmetry. However, these studies have been concerned with mirror symmetry, overlooking radial (or rotational) symmetry, which is also prevalent in nature. Using a visual search paradigm, which approximates the everyday task of searching for an object embedded in background clutter, we have measured how quickly and how accurately human observers detect radially symmetric dot patterns. Performance was compared with mirror symmetry. We found that with orders of radial symmetry greater than 5, radial symmetry can be detected more easily than mirror symmetry, revealing for the first time that radial symmetry is a salient property of objects for human vision.

  10. Searching for Radial Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. Numerous investigations, dating back over one hundred years, have explored the visual processing of symmetry. However, these studies have been concerned with mirror symmetry, overlooking radial (or rotational) symmetry, which is also prevalent in nature. Using a visual search paradigm, which approximates the everyday task of searching for an object embedded in background clutter, we have measured how quickly and how accurately human observers detect radially symmetric dot patterns. Performance was compared with mirror symmetry. We found that with orders of radial symmetry greater than 5, radial symmetry can be detected more easily than mirror symmetry, revealing for the first time that radial symmetry is a salient property of objects for human vision. PMID:28855979

  11. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter; Ramek, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Logo Bregenz, the peaceful monastery of Mehrerau and the Opera on the Floating Stage again provided the setting for the international symposium 'Symmetries in Science'. The series which has been running for more than 30 years brings together leading theoreticians whose area of research is, in one way or another, related to symmetry. Since 1992 the meeting took place biannually in Brengez until 2003. In 2009, with the endorsement of the founder, Professor Bruno Gruber, we succeeded in re-establishing the series without external funding. The resounding success of that meeting encouraged us to continue in 2011 and, following on the enthusiasm and positive feedback of the participants, we expect to continue in 2013. Yet again, our meeting in 2011 was very international in flavour and brought together some 30 participants representing 12 nationalities, half of them from countries outside the European Union (from New Zealand to Mexico, Russia to Israel). The broad spectrum, a mixture of experienced experts and highly-motivated newcomers, the intensive exchange of ideas in a harmonious and relaxed atmosphere and the resulting joint projects are probably the secrets of why this meeting is considered to be so special to its participants. At the resumption in 2009 some leading experts and younger scientists from economically weak countries were unable to attend due to the lack of financial resources. This time, with the very worthy and unbureaucratic support of the 'Vereinigung von Freunden und Förderern der J W Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main' (in short: 'Friends and Supporters of the Frankfurt University'), it was possible for all candidates to participate. In particular some young, inspired scientists had the chance of presenting their work to a very competent, but also friendly, audience. We wish to thank the 'Freunde und Förderer' for supporting Symmetries in Science XV. Almost all participants contributed to the publication of this Conference Proceedings. There

  12. Scale-setting, flavor dependence, and chiral symmetry restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele; Roberts, Craig D.; Rodríguez-Quintero, José

    2017-06-01

    We determine the flavor dependence of the renormalization-group-invariant running interaction through judicious use of both unquenched Dyson-Schwinger equation and lattice results for QCD's gauge-sector two-point functions. An important step is the introduction of a physical scale setting procedure that enables a realistic expression of the effect of different numbers of active quark flavours on the interaction. Using this running interaction in concert with a well constrained class of dressed-gluon-quark vertices, we estimate the critical number of active lighter-quarks above which dynamical chiral symmetry breaking becomes impossible: nfcr≈9 ; and hence in whose neighborhood QCD is plausibly a conformal theory.

  13. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  14. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2003-12-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  15. CP as a Symmetry of Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    It is explained that the Standard Model combined charge conjugation and parity transformation (CP) is a simultaneous complex conjugation outer automorphism transformation of gauge and space-time symmetries. Simple examples are given for the general concept of outer automorphisms (“symmetries of symmetries”), as well as for their possible actions on physical theories. It is highlighted that complex conjugation outer automorphisms do not, in general, exist for all symmetries. Examples are given for cases in which the physical CP transformation is violated as a consequence of requiring another symmetry. A toy model is illustrated in which CP is spontaneously violated in the broken phase of a continuous gauge symmetry, while an unbroken outer automorphism protects the topological vacuum angle at θ = 0.

  16. Safety evaluation of natural flavour complexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Adams, T B; Cohen, S M; Doull, J; Feron, V J; Goodman, J I; Hall, R L; Marnett, L J; Portoghese, P S; Waddell, W J; Wagner, B M

    2004-04-01

    Natural flavour complexes (NFCs) are chemical mixtures obtained by applying physical separation methods to botanical sources. Many NFCs are derived from foods. In the present paper, a 12-step procedure for the safety evaluation of NFCs, 'the naturals paradigm', is discussed. This procedure, which is not intended to be viewed as a rigid check list, begins with a description of the chemical composition of the commercial product, followed by a review of the data on the history of dietary use. Next, each constituent of an NFC is assigned to one of 33 congeneric groups of structurally related substances and to one of three classes of toxic potential, each with its own exposure threshold of toxicological concern. The group of substances of unknown structure is placed in the class of greatest toxic potential. In subsequent steps, for each congeneric group the procedure determines the per capita intake, considers metabolic pathways and explores the need and availability of toxicological data. Additional toxicological and analytical data may be required for a comprehensive safety evaluation. The procedure concludes with an evaluation of the NFC in its entirety, also considering combined exposure to congeneric groups. The first experiences with the use of this procedure are very promising. Future safety evaluations of larger numbers of NFCs will indicate the usefulness of the system, either in its present form or in a form modified on the basis of experience.

  17. Flavour singlets in gauge theory as permutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yusuke; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Suzuki, Ryo

    2016-12-01

    Gauge-invariant operators can be specified by equivalence classes of permutations. We develop this idea concretely for the singlets of the flavour group SO( N f ) in U( N c ) gauge theory by using Gelfand pairs and Schur-Weyl duality. The singlet operators, when specialised at N f = 6, belong to the scalar sector of N=4 SYM. A simple formula is given for the two-point functions in the free field limit of g Y M 2 = 0. The free two-point functions are shown to be equal to the partition function on a 2-complex with boundaries and a defect, in a topological field theory of permutations. The permutation equivalence classes are Fourier transformed to a representation basis which is orthogonal for the two-point functions at finite N c , N f . Counting formulae for the gauge-invariant operators are described. The one-loop mixing matrix is derived as a linear operator on the permutation equivalence classes.

  18. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, Pablo F. de; Pastor, Sergio

    2016-07-28

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, N{sub eff}. We find a value of N{sub eff}=3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), predicted in many theoretical models where neutrinos acquire mass. For two sets of NSI parameters allowed by present data, we find that N{sub eff} can be reduced down to 3.040 or enhanced up to 3.059.

  19. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Salas, Pablo F.; Pastor, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, Neff. We find a value of Neff = 3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), predicted in many theoretical models where neutrinos acquire mass. For two sets of NSI parameters allowed by present data, we find that Neff can be reduced down to 3.040 or enhanced up to 3.059.

  20. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  1. Inclusion complexation of flavour compounds by dispersed high-amylose maize starch (HAMS) in an aqueous model system.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lihe; Thompson, Donald B; Peterson, Devin G

    2016-05-15

    This study investigated how hydrophobicity, solubility and the concentration of flavour compounds related to inclusion complexation by dispersed native high amylose maize starch (HAMS). The effect of native lipid on flavour retention and the effect of time (one day to one month) on flavour retention and precipitated starch yield was also examined. Flavour-starch complexation was dependent on the flavour compound hydrophobicity, the flavour concentration in a dose-dependent manner and also influenced by time (increased during storage). Flavour composition also influenced starch complexation; no flavour complexes were reported with limonene by itself but were observed when added in binary flavour mixtures with menthone or thymol. Furthermore, no difference in flavour retention was observed for native and lipid-free starch dispersions. In summary, flavour inclusion complexes with HAMS exhibited cooperativity-type binding behaviour; with a critical ligand concentration needed for a stable physical association between flavour compounds and HAMS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutrinos and flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2015-07-15

    We discuss the recent progress of flavor models with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry in the lepton sector focusing on the θ{sub 13} and CP violating phase. In both direct approach and indirect approach of the flavor symmetry, the non-vanishing θ{sub 13} is predictable. The flavor symmetry with the generalised CP symmetry can also predicts the CP violating phase. We show the phenomenological analyses of neutrino mixing for the typical flavor models.

  3. Polynomial Graphs and Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehle, Geoff; Kobayashi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Most quadratic functions are not even, but every parabola has symmetry with respect to some vertical line. Similarly, every cubic has rotational symmetry with respect to some point, though most cubics are not odd. We show that every polynomial has at most one point of symmetry and give conditions under which the polynomial has rotational or…

  4. Polynomial Graphs and Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehle, Geoff; Kobayashi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Most quadratic functions are not even, but every parabola has symmetry with respect to some vertical line. Similarly, every cubic has rotational symmetry with respect to some point, though most cubics are not odd. We show that every polynomial has at most one point of symmetry and give conditions under which the polynomial has rotational or…

  5. Chiral symmetry and chiral-symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    These lectures concern the dynamics of fermions in strong interaction with gauge fields. Systems of fermions coupled by gauge forces have a very rich structure of global symmetries, which are called chiral symmetries. These lectures will focus on the realization of chiral symmetries and the causes and consequences of thier spontaneous breaking. A brief introduction to the basic formalism and concepts of chiral symmetry breaking is given, then some explicit calculations of chiral symmetry breaking in gauge theories are given, treating first parity-invariant and then chiral models. These calculations are meant to be illustrative rather than accurate; they make use of unjustified mathematical approximations which serve to make the physics more clear. Some formal constraints on chiral symmetry breaking are discussed which illuminate and extend the results of our more explicit analysis. Finally, a brief review of the phenomenological theory of chiral symmetry breaking is presented, and some applications of this theory to problems in weak-interaction physics are discussed. (WHK)

  6. Biovanillin from agro wastes as an alternative food flavour.

    PubMed

    Zamzuri, Nur Ain; Abd-Aziz, Suraini

    2013-02-01

    This review provides an overview of biovanillin production from agro wastes as an alternative food flavour. Biovanillin is one of the widely used flavour compounds in the foods, beverages and pharmaceutical industries. An alternative production approach for biovanillin as a food flavour is hoped for due to the high and variable cost of natural vanillin as well as the limited availability of vanilla pods in the market. Natural vanillin refers to the main organic compound that is extracted from the vanilla bean, as compared to biovanillin, which is produced biologically by microorganisms from a natural precursor such as ferulic acid. Biovanillin is also reviewed as a potential bioflavour produced by microbial fermentation in an economically feasible way in the near future. In fact, we briefly discuss natural, synthetic and biovanillin and the types of agro wastes that are useful as sources for bioconversion of ferulic acid into biovanillin. The subsequent part of the review emphasizes the current application of vanillin as well as the utilization of biovanillin as an alternative food flavour. The final part summarizes biovanillin production from agro wastes that could be of benefit as a food flavour derived from potential natural precursors. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Metagenomics reveals flavour metabolic network of cereal vinegar microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin-Huan; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Zong-Min; Yu, Yong-Jian; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Multispecies microbial community formed through centuries of repeated batch acetic acid fermentation (AAF) is crucial for the flavour quality of traditional vinegar produced from cereals. However, the metabolism to generate and/or formulate the essential flavours by the multispecies microbial community is hardly understood. Here we used metagenomic approach to clarify in situ metabolic network of key microbes responsible for flavour synthesis of a typical cereal vinegar, Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, produced by solid-state fermentation. First, we identified 3 organic acids, 7 amino acids, and 20 volatiles as dominant vinegar metabolites. Second, we revealed taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiota by metagenomic shotgun sequencing. A total of 86 201 predicted protein-coding genes from 35 phyla (951 genera) were involved in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of Metabolism (42.3%), Genetic Information Processing (28.3%), and Environmental Information Processing (10.1%). Furthermore, a metabolic network for substrate breakdown and dominant flavour formation in vinegar microbiota was constructed, and microbial distribution discrepancy in different metabolic pathways was charted. This study helps elucidating different metabolic roles of microbes during flavour formation in vinegar microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diet, sensitive periods in flavour learning, and growth

    PubMed Central

    TRABULSI, JILLIAN C.; MENNELLA, JULIE A.

    2015-01-01

    Diet in early infancy has an impact on early growth and the formation of flavour preferences, as well as on later life health outcomes. Although breast milk is the preferred source of nutrition during infancy, more than half of American infants receive infant formula by the age of 4 months. As a group, formula-fed infants weigh more by the age of one year and have a greater risk for later obesity than breastfed infants. However, a recent randomized study found that, when compared to breastfed infants, infants fed an extensively hydrolysed protein formula (ePHF) had more normative weight gain velocity than infants fed cow’s milk formula (CMF). Therefore, grouping all formula-fed infants together with respect to certain health outcomes such as obesity may not be appropriate. Scientific evidence also suggests that there are sensitive periods for flavour learning. Infants become familiar with and learn to accept the flavours they experience through their mother’s amniotic fluid and breast milk as well as formula. These early experiences influence flavour preferences of children that may affect food choices and therefore later life health. Further research on the influence of early diet on growth, flavour preferences, and food choices is imperative. PMID:22724643

  9. Symmetry operation measures.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Mark; Casanova, David; Alemany, Pere; Alvarez, Santiago; Avnir, David; Dryzun, Chaim; Kizner, Ziv; Sterkin, Alexander

    2008-01-30

    We introduce a new mathematical tool for quantifying the symmetry contents of molecular structures: the Symmetry Operation Measures. In this approach, we measure the minimal distance between a given structure and the structure which is obtained after applying a selected symmetry operation on it. If the given operation is a true symmetry operation for the structure, this distance is zero; otherwise it gives an indication of how different the transformed structure is from the original one. Specifically, we provide analytical solutions for measures of all the improper rotations, S n p, including mirror symmetry and inversion, as well as for all pure rotations, C n p. These measures provide information complementary to the Continuous Symmetry Measures (CSM) that evaluate the distance between a given structure and the nearest structure which belongs to a selected symmetry point-group.

  10. Maximal sfermion flavour violation in super-GUTs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2016-10-20

    We consider supersymmetric grand unified theories with soft supersymmetry-breaking scalar masses m0 specified above the GUT scale (super-GUTs) and patterns of Yukawa couplings motivated by upper limits on flavour-changing interactions beyond the Standard Model. If the scalar masses are smaller than the gaugino masses m1/2, as is expected in no-scale models, the dominant effects of renormalisation between the input scale and the GUT scale are generally expected to be those due to the gauge couplings, which are proportional to m1/2 and generation independent. In this case, the input scalar masses m0 may violate flavour maximally, a scenario we call MaxSFV, and there is no supersymmetric flavour problem. As a result, we illustrate this possibility within various specific super-GUT scenarios that are deformations of no-scale gravity

  11. Maximal sfermion flavour violation in super-GUTs

    DOE PAGES

    Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2016-10-20

    We consider supersymmetric grand unified theories with soft supersymmetry-breaking scalar masses m0 specified above the GUT scale (super-GUTs) and patterns of Yukawa couplings motivated by upper limits on flavour-changing interactions beyond the Standard Model. If the scalar masses are smaller than the gaugino masses m1/2, as is expected in no-scale models, the dominant effects of renormalisation between the input scale and the GUT scale are generally expected to be those due to the gauge couplings, which are proportional to m1/2 and generation independent. In this case, the input scalar masses m0 may violate flavour maximally, a scenario we call MaxSFV,more » and there is no supersymmetric flavour problem. As a result, we illustrate this possibility within various specific super-GUT scenarios that are deformations of no-scale gravity« less

  12. Flavour and CPV in SUSYGUTs: Prospects of Observability

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Antonio; Vempati, Sudhir K.; Vives, O.

    2005-12-02

    After a quarter of century of intense search for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), two ideas stand out to naturally cope with (i) small neutrino masses and (ii) a light higgs boson : Seesaw and SUSY. The combination of these two ideas, i.e. SUSY seesaw exhibits a potentially striking signature: a strong (or even very strong) enhancement of lepton flavour violation (LFV), which on the contrary remains unobservable in the SM seesaw. Indeed, even when supersymmetry breaking is completely flavour blind, Renormalisation Group running effects are expected to generate large lepton flavour violating entries at the weak scale. In Grand Unified theories, these effects can be felt even in hadronic physics. We explicitly show that in a class of SUSY SO(10) GUTs there exist cases where LFV and CP violation in B-physics can constitute a major road in simultaneously confirming the ideas of Seesaw and low-energy SUSY.

  13. Universal constraints on low-energy flavour models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calibbi, Lorenzo; Lalak, Zygmunt; Pokorski, Stefan; Ziegler, Robert

    2012-07-01

    It is pointed out that in a general class of flavour models one can identify certain universally present FCNC operators, induced by the exchange of heavy flavour messengers. Their coefficients depend on the rotation angles that connect flavour and fermion mass basis. The lower bounds on the messenger scale are derived using updated experimental constraints on the FCNC operators. The obtained bounds are different for different operators and in addition they depend on the chosen set of rotations. Given the sensitivity expected in the forthcoming experiments, the present analysis suggests interesting room for discovering new physics. As the highlights emerge the leptonic processes, μ → eγ, μ → eee and μ → e conversion in nuclei.

  14. Flavour Oscillations in Dense Baryonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We suggest that fast neutral meson oscillations may occur in a dense baryonic matter, which can influence the balance of s/¯s quarks in the nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus interactions, if primordial multiplicities of neutral K 0, mesons are sufficiently asymmetrical. The phenomenon can occur even if CP symmetry is fully conserved, and it may be responsible for the enhanced sub-threshold production of multi-strange hyperons observed in the low-energy A+A and p+A interactions.

  15. Cheilitis caused by contact allergy to anethole in spearmint flavoured toothpaste.

    PubMed

    Poon, Terence S C; Freeman, Susanne

    2006-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with a 6-year history of persistent cheilitis. Minimal improvement was achieved with therapeutic measures. Patch testing was positive to anethole, a flavouring used in her toothpaste. Her cheilitis resolved after cessation of the flavoured toothpaste. This case demonstrates the importance of considering contact allergy to toothpaste flavours in patients with cheilitis.

  16. Flavourful Z ' models for {R}_{K^{(\\ast )}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2017-08-01

    We show how any flavour conserving Z ' model can be made flavour violating and non-universal by introducing mass mixing of quarks and leptons with a fourth family of vector-like fermions with non-universal Z ' couplings. After developing a general formalism, we focus on two concrete examples, namely a fermiophobic model, and an SO(10) GUT model, and show how they can account for the anomalous B decay ratios R K and {R_K}{^{\\ast }} . A similar analysis could be performed for B - L models, E 6 models, composite models, and so on.

  17. Flavour development in pork. Influence of flavour precursor concentrations in longissimus dorsi from pigs with different raw meat qualities.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Lene; Tikk, Kaja; Tikk, Meelis; Brockhoff, Per B; Bredie, Wender L P; Bjergegaard, Charlotte; Aaslyng, Margit D

    2009-01-01

    Flavour development and overall eating quality of pan-fried pork chops of longissimus dorsi from eight different raw meat qualities aged for 4 and 15 days were assessed by a trained sensory panel. The raw meat qualities were obtained through combinations of strategic feeding/fasting (control vs. low glycogen concentration), slaughter live-weight (84kg vs. 110kg), and gender (female vs. castrate). The flavour development was investigated for possible correlation with the concentrations of selected individual flavour precursors present in the raw meat: monosaccharides, IMP and degradation products, fatty acids, lactate and thiamine. Differences in precursor concentrations between the raw meat qualities were observed with feeding/fasting and ageing as the main factors with the largest influence of all experimental factors. However, the concentrations of the precursors could not explain the differences in sensory perception of the pan-fried pork chops. Overall, the differences were small.

  18. From physical symmetries to emergent gauge symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barceló, Carlos; Carballo-Rubio, Raúl; Di Filippo, Francesco; Garay, Luis J.

    2016-10-01

    Gauge symmetries indicate redundancies in the description of the relevant degrees of freedom of a given field theory and restrict the nature of observable quantities. One of the problems faced by emergent theories of relativistic fields is to understand how gauge symmetries can show up in systems that contain no trace of these symmetries at a more fundamental level. In this paper we start a systematic study aimed to establish a satisfactory mathematical and physical picture of this issue, dealing first with abelian field theories. We discuss how the trivialization, due to the decoupling and lack of excitation of some degrees of freedom, of the Noether currents associated with physical symmetries leads to emergent gauge symmetries in specific situations. An example of a relativistic field theory of a vector field is worked out in detail in order to make explicit how this mechanism works and to clarify the physics behind it. The interplay of these ideas with well-known results of importance to the emergent gravity program, such as the Weinberg-Witten theorem, are discussed.

  19. Baryogenesis from symmetry principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Chee Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a formalism based on symmetry which allows one to express asymmetries of all the particles in terms of conserved charges is developed. The manifestation of symmetry allows one to easily determine the viability of a baryogenesis scenario and also to identify the different roles played by the symmetry. This formalism is then applied to the standard model and its supersymmetric extension, which constitute two important foundations for constructing models of baryogenesis.

  20. Dirac or Inverse Seesaw Neutrino Masses from Gauged B - L Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest; Srivastava, Rahul

    The gauged B - L symmetry is one of the simplest and well studied extension of standard model. In the conventional case, addition of three singlet right-handed neutrinos each transforming as -1 under the B - L symmetry renders it anomaly free. It is usually assumed that the B - L symmetry is spontaneously broken by a singlet scalar having two units of B - L charge, resulting in a natural implementation of Majorana seesaw mechanism for neutrinos. However, as we discuss in this proceeding, there is another simple anomaly free solution which leads to Dirac or inverse seesaw masses for neutrinos. These new possibilities are explored along with an application to neutrino mixing with S3 flavour symmetry.

  1. Perinatal flavour learning and adaptation to being weaned: all the pig needs is smell.

    PubMed

    Oostindjer, Marije; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Simon, Kristina; van den Brand, Henry; Kemp, Bas

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal flavour learning through the maternal diet is known to enhance flavour preference and acceptance of flavoured food in many species, yet still little is known about the mechanism underlying perinatal flavour learning. Previously we found positive effects of perinatal flavour learning on food intake, growth and behaviour of piglets postweaning, but no increased preference for the flavour. This suggests that flavour learning in pigs works through a reduction of weaning stress by the presence of the familiar flavour instead. The aim of this study was to investigate whether perinatal flavour learning reduces stress at weaning, and whether the effect is stronger when the familiar flavour is present in the food. Sows were offered an anethol-flavoured diet (Flavour treatment) or control diet (Control treatment) during late gestation and lactation. Flavour and Control piglets were provided with anethol either in their food (Food treatment) or in the air (Air treatment) after weaning. Preweaning and postweaning treatments did not affect food intake, preference or growth in the first two weeks postweaning but flavour treatment reduced the latency to eat (24 versus 35 hours, P = 0.02) and within-pen variation in growth (SD within-pen: 0.7 versus 1.2 kg, P<0.001). Salivary cortisol levels tended to be lower four and seven hours postweaning for Flavour piglets compared to Control piglets (4 hours: 2.5 versus 3.0 ng/ml, P = 0.05, 7 hours: 3.1 versus 3.4 ng/ml, P = 0.08). Flavour piglets played more and showed less damaging behaviours than Control piglets, indicating that the familiar flavour reduced stress around weaning. Few interaction effects were found between preweaning and postweaning treatment, and no effects of postweaning treatment. We conclude that in the newly weaned pig, perinatal flavour learning results in a reduction of stress when the familiar flavour is present, regardless of providing the flavour in the food or in the air.

  2. Heavy flavour physics at colliders with silicon strip vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Andreas S.

    1994-03-01

    The physics of heavy flavours has played a dominant role in high energy physics research ever since the discovery of charm in 1974, followed by the τ lepton in 1975 and bottom in 1977. With the startup of the large experiments at the e+e- colliders LEP and the SLC a new type of detector system has now come into operation which has a major impact on the studies of heavy flavours: the silicon strip vertex detector. The basic design priciples of these novel detector systems are outlined and three representative experimental realizations are discussed. The impact of these detectors on the studies of the properties of heavy flavours is just emerging and focuses on the measurement of lifetimes and the tagging of the presence of heavy flavour hadrons in hadronic events. The tools that are being developed for these studies are described as well as details of representative analyses. The potential of these devices and the associated technological developments that were necessary for their application in the colding beam environment is reflected in a plethora of new proposals to build sophisticated silicon detector systems for a large variety of future high energy physics applications. Two examples will be briefly sketched, a vertex detector for an asymmetric e+e- bottom factory and a large scale tracking system for a multipurpose detector at one of the new large hadron colliders.

  3. Differential transfer of dietary flavour compounds into human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Helene; Bredie, Wender L P; Mølgaard, Christian; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin; Møller, Per

    2008-09-03

    Transfer of dietary flavour compounds into human milk is believed to constitute the infant's early flavour experiences. This study reports on the time-dependent transfer of flavour compounds from the mother's diet to her breast milk using a within-subject design. Eighteen lactating mothers completed three test days on which they provided a baseline milk sample prior to ingestion of capsules containing 100 mg d-carvone, l-menthol, 3-methylbutyl acetate and trans-anethole. Milk samples were collected 2, 4, 6 and 8 h post-ingestion and analysed by a dynamic headspace method and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The recovery quantities were adjusted for variations in milk fat content. Concentration-time profiles for d-carvone and trans-anethole revealed a maximum around 2 h post-ingestion, whereas the profile for l-menthol showed a plateau pattern. The ester 3-methylbutyl acetate could not be detected in the milk, but a single determination showed traces (<0.4 ppb) in a 1 h milk collection. Flavour compounds appeared to be transmitted differentially from the mother's diet to her milk. The results imply that human milk provides a reservoir for time-dependent chemosensory experiences to the infant; however, volatiles from the diet are transferred selectively and in relatively low amounts.

  4. Properties of flavour-singlet pseudoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    We report on the status of the determination of properties of flavour-singlet pseudoscalar mesons using Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD at maximal twist. As part of project C7, a large number of phenomenologically relevant quantities could be extracted from first principle, from η and η' masses to decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons to two photons.

  5. A fuller flavour treatment of N-dominated leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Di Bari, Pasquale; Jones, David A.; King, Steve F.

    2012-03-01

    We discuss N-dominated leptogenesis in the presence of flavour dependent effects that have hitherto been neglected, in particular the off-diagonal entries of the flavour coupling matrix that connects the total flavour asymmetries, distributed in different particle species, to the lepton and Higgs doublet asymmetries. We derive analytical formulae for the final asymmetry including the flavour coupling at the N-decay stage as well as at the stage of wash-out by the lightest right-handed neutrino N. Moreover, we point out that in general part of the electron and muon asymmetries (phantom terms), can completely escape the wash-out at the production and a total B-L asymmetry can be generated by the lightest RH neutrino wash-out yielding so-called phantom leptogenesis. However, the phantom terms are proportional to the initial N abundance and in particular they vanish for initial zero N-abundance. Taking any of these new effects into account can significantly modify the final asymmetry produced by the decays of the next-to-lightest RH neutrinos, opening up new interesting possibilities for N-dominated thermal leptogenesis.

  6. Flavoured cigarettes, sensation seeking and adolescents' perceptions of cigarette brands.

    PubMed

    Manning, K C; Kelly, K J; Comello, M L

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the interactive effects of cigarette package flavour descriptors and sensation seeking on adolescents' brand perceptions. High school students (n = 253) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental conditions and sequentially exposed to cigarette package illustrations for three different brands. In the flavour descriptor condition, the packages included a description of the cigarettes as "cherry", while in the traditional descriptor condition the cigarette brands were described with common phrases found on tobacco packages such as "domestic blend." Following exposure to each package participants' hedonic beliefs, brand attitudes and trial intentions were assessed. Sensation seeking was also measured, and participants were categorised as lower or higher sensation seekers. Across hedonic belief, brand attitude and trial intention measures, there were interactions between package descriptor condition and sensation seeking. These interactions revealed that among high (but not low) sensation seekers, exposure to cigarette packages including sweet flavour descriptors led to more favourable brand impressions than did exposure to packages with traditional descriptors. Among high sensation seeking youths, the appeal of cigarette brands is enhanced through the use of flavours and associated descriptions on product packaging.

  7. Assessment of dietary exposure to flavouring substances via consumption of flavoured teas. Part 1: occurrence and contents of monoterpenes in Earl Grey teas marketed in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Orth, Anne-Marie; Yu, Lu; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Estimations of dietary exposure via the consumption of flavoured foods play a central role in the safety evaluation of flavouring substances. To assess uncertainties, actual data regarding the occurrence and concentration levels of flavouring substances were determined in commercially available flavoured foods, using Earl Grey tea as an example. The contents of the consistently occurring monoterpenes linalyl acetate, linalool, limonene, β-pinene and γ-terpinene were determined in 90 tea samples purchased in 10 European Union member states. Rather narrow frequency distributions were observed for the major compounds linalyl acetate and linalool. The factors (1) country of purchase, (2) source of the products (national/international brands versus private label brands versus speciality tea shops), and (3) enantiomeric purities of the flavouring substances had no significant impact on the contents of the flavouring substances. Only in teas sold as loose leaves were the median contents of linalyl acetate and linalool (66% and 39%, respectively) higher than in teas offered in tea bags. Significant losses of flavouring substances were observed on storage of teas, indicating an impact of the type of packaging and the flavouring technology on the contents of flavouring substances in the product finally consumed.

  8. Clove cigar sales following the US flavoured cigarette ban.

    PubMed

    Delnevo, Cristine D; Hrywna, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Following the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act in 2009, flavoured cigarettes, including clove cigarettes, were banned based on the rationale that such cigarettes appealed to youth. However, the ban on characterising flavours was not extended to cigars. This study reviewed industry documents from Kretek International, the parent company behind Djarum clove cigars, to document the changes in their marketing and production strategies following the flavour ban on cigarettes. To assess sales trends following the ban, data for clove cigar sales in the USA from 2009 to 2012 were analysed using Nielsen's Convenience Track retail scanner database. Additionally, data on tobacco imports to the USA from Indonesia were obtained from the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service's Global Agricultural Trade System for the years 2008-2012. In anticipation of Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) flavour ban on cigarettes and recognising the regulatory advantages of cigars, Kretek International began developing Djarum clove cigars in 2007. Immediately following the flavour ban, sales of this product increased by more than 1400% between 2009 and 2012. During this same period, tobacco imports to the USA from Indonesia, a leader in clove tobacco production, shifted from cigarettes to almost exclusively cigars. Kretek International, like other tobacco manufacturers, manipulated its products following the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act as a way to capitalise on regulatory loopholes and replace its now banned clove cigarettes. As a result, consumption of the company's Djarum clove cigars increased exponentially in recent years. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Symmetries in Lagrangian Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrario, Carlo; Passerini, Arianna

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of Noether's theorem, a distinction between Lagrangian and dynamical symmetries is made, in order to clarify some aspects neglected by textbooks. An intuitive setting of the concept of invariance of differential equations is presented. The analysis is completed by deriving the symmetry properties in the motion of a charged…

  10. Symmetries in Lagrangian Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrario, Carlo; Passerini, Arianna

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of Noether's theorem, a distinction between Lagrangian and dynamical symmetries is made, in order to clarify some aspects neglected by textbooks. An intuitive setting of the concept of invariance of differential equations is presented. The analysis is completed by deriving the symmetry properties in the motion of a charged…

  11. Symmetry and Interculturality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2009-01-01

    Symmetry is one of the fundamental concepts in Geometry. It is a Mathematical concept, which can be very well connected with Art and Ethnography. The aim of the article is to show how to link the geometrical concept symmetry with interculturality. For this mosaics from different countries are used.

  12. Efficacy of repeated exposure and flavour-flavour learning as mechanisms to increase preschooler's vegetable intake and acceptance.

    PubMed

    de Wild, V; de Graaf, C; Jager, G

    2015-06-01

    Dutch children's diets, like the diets of many children in Europe and the US are not balanced, do not contain enough vegetables and have been associated with a high prevalence of childhood obesity. Promoting children's vegetable intake is challenging. We investigated the relative effectiveness of repeated exposure and flavour-flavour learning in increasing vegetable intake and acceptance in preschoolers. During an intervention period of 7 weeks, 39 toddlers (aged 1.5 to 4 years) consumed red beet and parsnip crisps at day-care centres in Wageningen, the Netherlands. Half of the group received red beet crisps with a dip of tomato ketchup (Conditioned [C]) and parsnip with a neutral white sauce (Unconditioned, [UC]), whereas for the other half the order was reversed (red beet [UC], parsnip [C]). Preference and ad libitum consumption of vegetable crisps were measured once before and three times after the intervention over the course of a 6-month follow-up period to assess longer-term effects. Intake increased significantly after the intervention for both vegetables (on average with 8 g; an increase of approximately 300%), and this effect was persistent even 6 months afterwards. The increase was irrespective of crisps being offered with C or UC dip sauce. These results suggest a robust and persistent effect of repeated exposure but no effect of flavour-flavour learning. Offering pure vegetable tastes repeatedly is sufficient to increase intake. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  13. Low-energy ππ and πK scatterings revisited in three-flavour resummed chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, S.

    2007-09-01

    Chiral symmetry breaking may exhibit significantly different patterns in two chiral limits: Nf=2 massless flavours (mu=md=0, ms physical) and Nf=3 massless flavours (mu=md=ms=0). Such a difference may arise due to vacuum fluctuations of ss¯ pairs related to the violation of the Zweig rule in the scalar sector, and it could yield numerical competition between contributions counted as leading and next-to-leading order in the chiral expansions of the observables. We recall and extend resummed chiral perturbation theory (ReχPT), a framework that we introduced previously to deal with such instabilities: it requires a more careful definition of the relevant observables and their one-loop chiral expansions. We analyse the amplitudes for low-energy ππ and πK scatterings within ReχPT, which we match in subthreshold regions with dispersive representations obtained from the solutions of the Roy and Roy-Steiner equations. Using a frequentist approach, we constrain the quark mass ratio as well as the quark condensate and the pseudoscalar decay constant in the Nf=3 chiral limit. The results mildly favour significant contributions of vacuum fluctuations suppressing the Nf=3 quark condensate compared to its Nf=2 counterpart.

  14. Flavored Peccei-Quinn symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.

    2015-03-01

    In an attempt to uncover any underlying physics in the standard model (SM), we suggest a μ - τ power law in the lepton sector, such that relatively large 13 mixing angle with bilarge ones can be derived. On the basis of this, we propose a neat and economical model for both the fermion mass hierarchy problem of the SM and a solution to the strong charge parity (C P ) problem, in a way that no domain wall problem occurs, based on A4×U (1 )X symmetry in a supersymmetric framework. Here we refer to the global U (1 )X symmetry that can explain the above problems as "flavored Peccei-Quinn symmetry." In the model, a direct coupling of the SM gauge singlet flavon fields responsible for spontaneous symmetry breaking to ordinary quarks and leptons, both of which are charged under U (1 )X, comes to pass through Yukawa interactions, and all vacuum expectation values breaking the symmetries are connected to each other. So the scale of Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking is shown to be roughly located around the 1 012 GeV section through its connection to the fermion masses. The model predictions are shown to lie on the testable regions in the very near future through on-going experiments for neutrino oscillation, neutrinoless double beta decay, and the axion. We examine the model predictions, arisen from the μ - τ power law, on leptonic C P violation, neutrinoless double beta decay, and atmospheric mixing angle, and show that the fermion mass and mixing hierarchies are in good agreement with the present data. Interestingly, we show the model predictions on the axion mass ma≃2.53 ×1 0-5 eV and the axion coupling to photon ga γ γ≃1.33 ×1 0-15 GeV-1 . And subsequently the square of the ratio between them is shown to be one or two orders of magnitude lower than that of the conventional axion model.

  15. Tobacco Industry Use of Flavours to Recruit New Users of Little Cigars and Cigarillos

    PubMed Central

    Kostygina, Ganna; Glantz, Stanton A.; Ling, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While flavoured cigarettes were prohibited in the US in 2009, flavoured little cigars and cigarillos (LCCs) remain on the market. We describe the evolving strategies used by tobacco companies to encourage uptake of flavoured little cigars and cigarillos and industry research findings on consumer perceptions of flavoured LCC products. Methods Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents was triangulated with data from tobacco advertisement archives, national newspapers, trade press, and the Internet. Results Flavoured little cigar and cigarillo products were associated with young and inexperienced tobacco users, women and African Americans. Internal industry studies confirmed that menthol and candy-like flavours (e.g., vanilla, cherry) increased LCC appeal to starters by masking the heavy cigar taste, reducing throat irritation, and making LCC smoke easier to inhale. To appeal to new users, manufacturers also reduced the size of cigars to make them more cigarette-like, introduced filters and flavoured filter tips, emphasized mildness and ease of draw in advertising, and featured actors using little cigars in television commercials. RJ Reynolds tried to capitalize on the popularity of menthol cigarettes among African Americans and marketed a menthol little cigar to African Americans. Conclusions Tobacco companies engaged in a calculated effort to blur the line between little cigars and cigarettes to increase appeal to cigarette smokers, and the use of flavours facilitated these efforts. Bans on flavoured cigarettes should be expanded to include flavoured LCCs, and tobacco use prevention initiatives should include LCCs. PMID:25354674

  16. A universal symmetry detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Research on symmetry detection focuses on identifying and detecting new types of symmetry. The paper presents an algorithm that is capable of detecting any type of permutation-based symmetry, including many types for which there are no existing algorithms. General symmetry detection is library-based, but symmetries that can be parameterized, (i.e. total, partial, rotational, and dihedral symmetry), can be detected without using libraries. In many cases it is faster than existing techniques. Furthermore, it is simpler than most existing techniques, and can easily be incorporated into existing software. The algorithm can also be used with virtually any type of matrix-based symmetry, including conjugate symmetry.

  17. Dynamical symmetries for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model (FDSM). The analytical symmetry limits of the model are then applied to the calculation of physical quantities such as ground-state masses and B(E{sub 2}) values in heavy nuclei. These comparisons with data provide strong support for a new principle of collective motion, the Dynamical Pauli Effect, and suggest that dynamical symmetries which properly account for the pauli principle are much more persistent in nuclear structure than the corresponding boson symmetries. Finally, we present an assessment of criticisms which have been voiced concerning the FDSM, and a discussion of new phenomena and exotic spectroscopy'' which may be suggested by the model. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Symmetries in Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Castanos, Octavio

    2010-09-10

    The purpose of this course is to study the evolution of the symmetry concept and establish its influence in the knowledge of the fundamental laws of nature. Physicist have been using the symmetry concept in two ways: to solve problems and to search for new understanding of the world around us. In quantum physics symmetry plays a key role in gaining an understanding of the physical laws governing the behavior of matter and field systems. It provides, generally, a shortcut based on geometry for discovering the secrets of the Universe. Because it is believed that the laws of physics are invariant under discrete and continuous transformation operations of the space and time, there are continuous symmetries, for example, energy and momentum together with discrete ones corresponding to charge, parity and time reversal operations.

  19. Another Broken Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Resistance destroys symmetry. In this note, a graphical exploration serves as a guide to a rigorous elementary proof of a specific asymmetry in the trajectory of a point projectile in a medium offering linear resistance.

  20. The Symmetries of QCD

    ScienceCinema

    Sekhar Chivukula

    2016-07-12

    The symmetries of a quantum field theory can be realized in a variety of ways. Symmetries can be realized explicitly, approximately, through spontaneous symmetry breaking or, via an anomaly, quantum effects can dynamically eliminate a symmetry of the theory that was present at the classical level.  Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the modern theory of the strong interactions, exemplify each of these possibilities. The interplay of these effects determine the spectrum of particles that we observe and, ultimately, account for 99% of the mass of ordinary matter. 

  1. Dynamical spacetime symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin C.; Wheeler, James T.

    2016-04-01

    According to the Coleman-Mandula theorem, any gauge theory of gravity combined with an internal symmetry based on a Lie group must take the form of a direct product in order to be consistent with basic assumptions of quantum field theory. However, we show that an alternative gauging of a simple group can lead dynamically to a spacetime with compact internal symmetry. The biconformal gauging of the conformal symmetry of n-dimensional Euclidean space doubles the dimension to give a symplectic manifold. Examining one of the Lagrangian submanifolds in the flat case, we find that in addition to the expected S O (n ) connection and curvature, the solder form necessarily becomes Lorentzian. General coordinate invariance gives rise to an S O (n -1 ,1 ) connection on the spacetime. The principal fiber bundle character of the original S O (n ) guarantees that the two symmetries enter as a direct product, in agreement with the Coleman-Mandula theorem.

  2. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  3. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaños, Octavio

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this course is to study the evolution of the symmetry concept and establish its influence in the knowledge of the fundamental laws of nature. Physicist have been using the symmetry concept in two ways: to solve problems and to search for new understanding of the world around us. In quantum physics symmetry plays a key role in gaining an understanding of the physical laws governing the behavior of matter and field systems. It provides, generally, a shortcut based on geometry for discovering the secrets of the Universe. Because it is believed that the laws of physics are invariant under discrete and continuous transformation operations of the space and time, there are continuous symmetries, for example, energy and momentum together with discrete ones corresponding to charge, parity and time reversal operations.

  4. Gauge symmetry from decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2017-02-01

    Gauge symmetries emerge from a redundant description of the effective action for light degrees of freedom after the decoupling of heavy modes. This redundant description avoids the use of explicit constraints in configuration space. For non-linear constraints the gauge symmetries are non-linear. In a quantum field theory setting the gauge symmetries are local and can describe Yang-Mills theories or quantum gravity. We formulate gauge invariant fields that correspond to the non-linear light degrees of freedom. In the context of functional renormalization gauge symmetries can emerge if the flow generates or preserves large mass-like terms for the heavy degrees of freedom. They correspond to a particular form of gauge fixing terms in quantum field theories.

  5. Use of terpenoids as natural flavouring compounds in food industry.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Lorenzo; Aprea, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Terpenoids represent the oldest known biomolecules, having been recovered from sediments as old as 2.5 billion years. Among plant secondary metabolites, they are the most abundant and diverse class of natural compounds. The diversity of terpenoids is probably a reflection of their many biological activities in nature, which has made them a widely used resource for traditional and modern human exploitation. They are usually the main constituents of essential oils of most plants offering a wide variety of pleasant scents from flowery to fruity, to woody or balsamic notes. For this reason terpenoids constitute a very important class of compounds for flavour and fragrance industries, in fact, in the US alone, the demand is forecast to grow 3.7 percent per year to $5.3 billion in 2012. The recent patents on production and extraction of terpenoids commonly used as natural flavouring compounds in food industries are reviewed in the present manuscript.

  6. Crossmodal integration between visual linguistic information and flavour perception.

    PubMed

    Razumiejczyk, Eugenia; Macbeth, Guillermo; Marmolejo-Ramos, Fernando; Noguchi, Kimihiro

    2015-08-01

    Many studies have found processing interference in working memory when complex information that enters the cognitive system from different modalities has to be integrated to understand the environment and promote adjustment. Here, we report on a Stroop study that provides evidence concerned with the crossmodal processing of flavour perception and visual language. We found a facilitation effect in the congruency condition. Acceleration was observed for incomplete words and anagrams compared to complete words. A crossmodal completion account is presented for such findings. It is concluded that the crossmodal integration between flavour and visual language perception requires the active participation of top-down and bottom-up processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of micro-organisms in biltong flavour development.

    PubMed

    Prior, B A

    1984-02-01

    When biltong, a dried salted meat product, is prepared from beef, micro-organisms are able to proliferate freely and counts of 9.8 X 10(4) to 3.8 X 10(7)/g are observed. Treating the meat with four antibiotics before production of the biltong restricted microbial growth, yet a taste panel was unable to distinguish between biltong containing high and low numbers of micro-organisms. No significant difference in the free amino acid and free fatty acid content of biltong prepared with and without antibiotics was detected although there were significant increases in these compounds during biltong production. These results suggest that micro-organisms are not involved in the development of biltong flavour and microbial inhibitors may thus be added to the meat as a preservative agent without affecting the development of the biltong flavour, taste and aroma.

  8. Flavour-enhanced cortisol release during gum chewing.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Tachibana, Yoshihisa; Ono, Takahiro; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu

    2017-01-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that chewing gum reduces chronic stress. However, it remains controversial how the taste and odour properties of chewing gum influence stress. The present study was designed to investigate this issue in human subjects. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested salivary cortisol concentration, which is thought to be a stress marker, in 96 adults who chewed gum with different combinations of taste and odour. Subjects could discriminate between the types of gum without prior information. Salivary cortisol concentrations were highest and lowest for the subjects who chewed the most flavourful gum and the least flavourful gum, respectively. These findings suggest that the salivary cortisol level during gum chewing is not a marker of negative emotions (i.e., stressful conditions) as traditionally considered but, rather, an index of positive emotions that can facilitate biological responses to overcome stressful conditions.

  9. Flavour-enhanced cortisol release during gum chewing

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Tachibana, Yoshihisa; Ono, Takahiro; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu

    2017-01-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that chewing gum reduces chronic stress. However, it remains controversial how the taste and odour properties of chewing gum influence stress. The present study was designed to investigate this issue in human subjects. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested salivary cortisol concentration, which is thought to be a stress marker, in 96 adults who chewed gum with different combinations of taste and odour. Subjects could discriminate between the types of gum without prior information. Salivary cortisol concentrations were highest and lowest for the subjects who chewed the most flavourful gum and the least flavourful gum, respectively. These findings suggest that the salivary cortisol level during gum chewing is not a marker of negative emotions (i.e., stressful conditions) as traditionally considered but, rather, an index of positive emotions that can facilitate biological responses to overcome stressful conditions. PMID:28379983

  10. Lepton flavour violating top decays at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sacha; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Perries, Stéphane; Sordini, Viola

    We consider lepton-flavour violating decays of the top quark, mediated by 4-fermion operators. We compile constraints on a complete set of SU(3) [Formula: see text] U(1)-invariant operators, arising from their loop contributions to rare decays and from HERA's single-top search. The bounds on e-[Formula: see text] flavour change are more restrictive than on [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]; nonetheless the top could decay to a jet [Formula: see text] with a branching ratio of order [Formula: see text]. We estimate that the currently available LHC data (20 fb[Formula: see text] at 8 TeV) could be sensitive to [Formula: see text]+ jet) [Formula: see text], and we extrapolate that 100 fb[Formula: see text] at 13 TeV could reach a sensitivity of [Formula: see text].

  11. In vivo measurement of flavour release from mixed phase gels.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Besnard, S; Puaud, M; Linforth, R S

    2001-05-01

    Flavour release was investigated from pure gelatin, pure agarose and mixed gelatin-agarose gels, all containing 25% sucrose and flavoured with p-cymene, ethyl butyrate, pyrazine and ethanol. Gels were characterised by optical microscopy, and rheological techniques to determine phase separation, elastic modulus and melting temperature. Volatile release was measured by monitoring the four volatiles in the expired air from one individual eating the gels, using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation-Mass Spectrometry. The release pattern of p-cymene was not affected by gel type. The release of ethanol, ethyl butyrate and pyrazine was affected to different extents by the matrix suggesting that both the properties of the volatile and the matrix determine volatile release in vivo.

  12. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  13. Lepton Flavour Violation in Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford

    2011-11-07

    Recent results from {tau} physics studies at BABAR are presented with an emphasis on Lepton Flavour Violation measurements. The results from the current generation of B-meson Factories are already beginning to constrain the parameter space of models that go beyond the Standard Model. By the end of their data-taking, the current generation of B-meson factories will have produced nearly 2 billion {tau} pair decays. The physics potential of this legacy has only just begun to be exploited.

  14. Heavy-flavour transport: from large to small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Monteno, M.; Nardi, M.; Prino, F.

    2016-12-01

    Predictions for heavy-flavour production in relativistic heavy-ion experiments provided by the POWLANG transport setup, including now also an in-medium hadronization model, are displayed, After showing some representative findings for the Au-Au and Pb-Pb cases, a special focus will be devoted to the results obtained in the small systems formed in proton(deuteron)-nucleus collisions, where recent experimental data suggest the possible formation of a medium featuring a collective behaviour.

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flavour composition in Soudan 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Border, P. M.; Brooks, C. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Cotton, R. J.; Courant, H.; Demuth, D. M.; Fields, T. H.; Gallagher, H. R.; Garcia-Garcia, C.; Goodman, M. C.; Gray, R. N.; Johns, K.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Leeson, W.; Litchfield, P. J.; Longley, N. P.; Lowe, M. J.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; May, E. N.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, W. H.; Mualem, L.; Napier, A.; Oliver, W.; Pearce, G. F.; Perkins, D. H.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Price, L. E.; Roback, D. M.; Ruddick, K.; Schmid, D. J.; Schneps, J.; Schub, M. H.; Seidlein, R. V.; Shupe, M. A.; Stassinakis, A.; Sundaralingam, N.; Thomas, J.; Thron, J. L.; Vassiliev, V.; Villaume, G.; Wakely, S. P.; Wall, D.; Werkema, S. J.; West, N.; Wielgosz, U. M.

    1997-02-01

    The atmospheric neutrino flavour ratio measured using a 1.52 kton-year exposure of Soudan 2 is found to be 0.72 +/- 0.19+0.05-0.07 relative to the expected value from a Monte Carlo calculation. The possible background of interactions of neutrons and photons produced in muon interactions in the rock surrounding the detector has been investigated and is shown not to produce low values of the ratio.

  16. The nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry energy in relation to nuclear structure, astrophysics of Neutron Stars and supernovae, and heavy ion collision experiments, trying to elucidate the connections of these different fields on the basis of the symmetry energy peculiarities. The interplay between experimental and observational data and theoretical developments is stressed. The expected future developments and improvements are schematically addressed, together with most demanded experimental and theoretical advances for the next few years.

  17. Following butter flavour deterioration with an acoustic wave sensor.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Cláudia R B S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2012-09-15

    Off-flavours develop naturally in butter and the process is accelerated by heat. An acoustic wave sensor was used to detect the aroma compounds evolved from heated butter and the results have shown that registered marked changes were coincident to odour changes detected by sensory analysis. The flavour compounds have also been analysed by GC/MS for identification. The response of the sensor was fully characterized in terms of the sensitivity to each of the identified compounds, and sensitivities of the system SPME/sensor were compared with the sensitivities of the system SPME/GC/MS. It was found that the sensor analytical system was more sensitive to methylketones than to fatty acids. The SPME/GC/MS system also showed the highest sensitivity to 2-heptanone, followed by 2-nonanone, but third place was occupied by undecanone and butanoic acid, to which the sensor showed moderate sensitivity. 2-heptanone was found to be an appropriate model compound to follow odour changes till the 500 h, and the lower sensitivity of the sensor to butanoic acid showed to be a positive characteristic, as saturation was prevented, and other more subtle changes in the flavour could be perceived.

  18. Green tea flavour determinants and their changes over manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Rana, Mohammad M; Liu, Guo-Feng; Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Da-Xiang; Wu, Fu-Guang; Li, Xin-Bao; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Wei, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Flavour determinants in tea infusions and their changes during manufacturing processes were studied using Camellia sinensis cultivars 'Bai-Sang Cha' ('BAS') possessing significant floral scents and 'Fuding-Dabai Cha' ('FUD') with common green tea odour. Metabolite profiling based on odour activity threshold revealed that 'BAS' contained higher levels of the active odorants β-ionone, linalool and its two oxides, geraniol, epoxylinalool, decanal and taste determinant catechins than 'FUD' (p<0.05). Enhanced transcription of some terpenoid and catechin biosynthetic genes in 'BAS' suggested genetically enhanced production of those flavour compounds. Due to manufacturing processes, the levels of linalool and geraniol decreased whereas those of β-ionone, linalool oxides, indole and cis-jasmone increased. Compared with pan-fire treatment, steam treatment reduced the levels of catechins and proportion of geraniol, linalool and its derivatives, consequently, reducing catechin-related astringency and monoterpenol-related floral scent. Our study suggests that flavour determinant targeted modulation could be made through genotype and manufacturing improvements.

  19. Conditioned flavour preferences reinforced by caffeine consumed after lunch.

    PubMed

    Richardson, N J; Rogers, P J; Elliman, N A

    1996-07-01

    Caffeine-consuming adult males and females were divided into two groups, those who regularly consumed a caffeinated drink after lunch ("users" n = 21) and those who did not ("nonusers" n = 23). After lunch on weekdays during a 2-week conditioning period, these subjects consumed a novel flavoured fruit juice drink paired with either a caffeine (100 mg) or a placebo capsule. Preferences for this "target" drink and six other novel-flavoured fruit juice drinks were assessed before and then after 5 and 10 conditioning trials. The users showed a significantly greater increase in preference for the caffeine-paired target drink than for the placebo-paired target drink, whereas the nonusers showed a slight trend in the opposite direction. These changes in preference did not generalise to the nontarget drink flavours. For habitual postlunch caffeine users, caffeine alleviated the postlunch dip in mood experienced by those in the placebo condition. Thus, the increase in preference for the caffeine-paired target drink was consistent with the improved mood state that resulted from caffeine consumption. It is unlikely, however, that the subjects were aware of this relationship. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of a reinforcing effect of caffeine, which probably plays a significant role in the acquisition of preferences for caffeine-containing drinks.

  20. Production of flavour compounds from fat during cheese ripening by action of lipases and esterases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Irma Verónica; Meinardi, Carlos Alberto; Zalazar, Carlos Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The milk fat is an essential component for the development of correct flavour in cheese. The lipolysis and catabolism of fatty acids are two biochemical events very important on flavour development of some cheese varieties. The role and characteristics of various lipolytic agents during cheese ripening is reviewed and discussed. Before starting with the specific study about formation of flavour compounds from milk fat during cheese ripening, a brief review of the technological aspects of cheese production is needed.

  1. Effect of flavour of liquid Ensure diet supplement on energy intake in male SD rats.

    PubMed

    Archer, Zoe A; Brown, Yvonne A; Rayner, D Vernon; Stubbs, R James; Mercer, Julian G

    2006-10-30

    Outbred male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with one of the four flavours of the liquid diet, Ensure, in addition to chow pellets, to examine whether differences in flavour lead to differences in energy intake i.e. degree of over-consumption. For half the rats, the Ensure supplement was provided for 14 days and then withdrawn for the final 8 days of the study, whereas the remaining animals were allowed to consume Ensure for 22 days. All four flavours of Ensure, chocolate, vanilla, coffee and asparagus, induced a sustained increase in daily energy intake of approximately 15%. There was an effect of flavour on initial consumption of the Ensure diet, with coffee and asparagus flavours being consumed less avidly than vanilla or chocolate. However, this effect was short-lived. Overall, there was no effect of flavour on body weight gain, energy intake from Ensure, total energy intake, body composition, or measured blood hormones and metabolites. Withdrawal of Ensure resulted in reductions in body weight gain, total energy intake, fat but not lean tissue mass, and concentrations of blood leptin, non-esterified fatty acids and triglycerides, but there was no effect of the flavour of Ensure previously supplied on any of these parameters. The ability of the liquid diet, Ensure, to stimulate long-term caloric over-consumption is not due to its flavouring. Rather, other attributes of Ensure must be more important, such as its intrinsic flavour, liquid formulation, macronutrient composition, and ease of ingestion, digestion and absorption.

  2. Symmetry in Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Sang-Wook

    2008-03-01

    Symmetries govern Nature ubiquitously from the beauty of human faces to the local gauge invariance of quantum field theory. Magnetic order in frustrated magnets can occur without space inversion symmetry. When it relaxes to the magnetically-ordered configuration through exchange-striction, lattice can also loose inversion symmetry, leading to the presence of ferroelectric polarization. In these magnetically-driven ferroelectrics, dielectric properties turn out to be highly susceptible to applied magnetic fields. Both symmetric and antisymmetric exchange coupling can be involved in the exchange-striction. One form of symmetry often broken in Nature is the symmetry between left- and right-handedness. For example, the manner in which light propagates naturally selects one handedness, and is customarily described by a right-handed rule, depicting the relationship among the oscillating electric field, magnetic field and propagation vector of light. Chiral molecules also have a definite handedness, and given the preponderance of chiral molecules, it is not surprising that most complex proteins as well as their constituent amino acids are chiral. What is remarkable however, is that most of naturally occurring amino acids share the same chirality; only left-handedness. Such handedness, or chirality, appears to be a characteristic signature of life. In the multiferroic spinel CoCr2O4, conical magnetic order accompanies ferroelectric polarization as well as ferromagnetic moment. The relevant handedness and chirality in the multiferroic state will be also discussed.

  3. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions.

  4. Symmetry of priapulids (Priapulida). 2. Symmetry of larvae.

    PubMed

    Adrianov, A V; Malakhov, V V

    2001-02-01

    Larvae of priapulids are characterized by radial symmetry evident from both external and internal characters of the introvert and lorica. The bilaterality appears as a result of a combination of several radial symmetries: pentaradial symmetry of the teeth, octaradial symmetry of the primary scalids, 25-radial symmetry of scalids, biradial symmetry of the neck, and biradial and decaradial symmetry of the trunk. Internal radiality is exhibited by musculature and the circumpharyngeal nerve ring. Internal bilaterality is evident from the position of the ventral nerve cord and excretory elements. Externally, the bilaterality is determined by the position of the anal tubulus and two shortened midventral rows of scalids bordering the ventral nerve cord. The lorical elements define the biradial symmetry that is missing in adult priapulids. The radial symmetry of larvae is a secondary appearance considered an evolutionary adaptation to a lifestyle within the three-dimensional environment of the benthic sediment.

  5. Symmetry in context: salience of mirror symmetry in natural patterns.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elias H; Zaidi, Qasim

    2013-05-31

    Symmetry is a biologically relevant, mathematically involving, and aesthetically compelling visual phenomenon. Mirror symmetry detection is considered particularly rapid and efficient, based on experiments with random noise. Symmetry detection in natural settings, however, is often accomplished against structured backgrounds. To measure salience of symmetry in diverse contexts, we assembled mirror symmetric patterns from 101 natural textures. Temporal thresholds for detecting the symmetry axis ranged from 28 to 568 ms indicating a wide range of salience (1/Threshold). We built a model for estimating symmetry-energy by connecting pairs of mirror-symmetric filters that simulated cortical receptive fields. The model easily identified the axis of symmetry for all patterns. However, symmetry-energy quantified at this axis correlated weakly with salience. To examine context effects on symmetry detection, we used the same model to estimate approximate symmetry resulting from the underlying texture throughout the image. Magnitudes of approximate symmetry at flanking and orthogonal axes showed strong negative correlations with salience, revealing context interference with symmetry detection. A regression model that included the context-based measures explained the salience results, and revealed why perceptual symmetry can differ from mathematical characterizations. Using natural patterns thus produces new insights into symmetry perception and its possible neural circuits.

  6. Symmetry in context: Salience of mirror symmetry in natural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Elias H.; Zaidi, Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry is a biologically relevant, mathematically involving, and aesthetically compelling visual phenomenon. Mirror symmetry detection is considered particularly rapid and efficient, based on experiments with random noise. Symmetry detection in natural settings, however, is often accomplished against structured backgrounds. To measure salience of symmetry in diverse contexts, we assembled mirror symmetric patterns from 101 natural textures. Temporal thresholds for detecting the symmetry axis ranged from 28 to 568 ms indicating a wide range of salience (1/Threshold). We built a model for estimating symmetry-energy by connecting pairs of mirror-symmetric filters that simulated cortical receptive fields. The model easily identified the axis of symmetry for all patterns. However, symmetry-energy quantified at this axis correlated weakly with salience. To examine context effects on symmetry detection, we used the same model to estimate approximate symmetry resulting from the underlying texture throughout the image. Magnitudes of approximate symmetry at flanking and orthogonal axes showed strong negative correlations with salience, revealing context interference with symmetry detection. A regression model that included the context-based measures explained the salience results, and revealed why perceptual symmetry can differ from mathematical characterizations. Using natural patterns thus produces new insights into symmetry perception and its possible neural circuits. PMID:23729773

  7. Scale-setting, flavor dependence, and chiral symmetry restoration

    DOE PAGES

    Binosi, D; Roberts, Craig D.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2017-06-13

    Here, we determine the flavor dependence of the renormalization-group-invariant running interaction through judicious use of both unquenched Dyson-Schwinger equation and lattice results for QCD’s gauge-sector two-point functions. An important step is the introduction of a physical scale setting procedure that enables a realistic expression of the effect of different numbers of active quark flavours on the interaction. Using this running interaction in concert with a well constrained class of dressed–gluon-quark vertices, we estimate the critical number of active lighter-quarks above which dynamical chiral symmetry breaking becomes impossible: ncrf ≈ 9; and hence in whose neighborhood QCD is plausibly a conformalmore » theory.« less

  8. Seeing Science through Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, L. I.

    Seeing Through Symmetry is a course that introduces non-science majors to the pervasive influence of symmetry in science. The concept of symmetry is usedboth as a link between subjects (such as physics, biology, mathematics, music, poetry, and art) and as a method within a subject. This is done through the development and use of interactive multimedia learning environments to stimulate learning. Computer-based labs enable the student to further explore the concept by being gently led from the arts to science. This talk is an update that includes some of the latest changes to the course. Explanations are given on methodology and how a variety of interactive multimedia tools contribute to both the lecture and lab portion of the course (created in 1991 and taught almost every semester since then, including one in Sweden).

  9. Baryons and chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei

    The relevance of chiral symmetry in baryons is highlighted in three examples in the nucleon spectroscopy and structure. The first one is the importance of chiral dynamics in understanding the Roper resonance. The second one is the role of chiral symmetry in the lattice calculation of πNσ term and strangeness. The third one is the role of chiral U(1) anomaly in the anomalous Ward identity in evaluating the quark spin and the quark orbital angular momentum. Finally, the chiral effective theory for baryons is discussed.

  10. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar ϕ invariant under the internal galileon symmetryϕ→ϕ+b{sub μ}x{sup μ} have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon’s quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, L. H.

    2005-11-01

    One of the most fruitful and enduring advances in theoretical physics during the last half century has been the development of the role played by symmetries. One needs only to consider SU(3) and the classification of elementary particles, the Yang Mills enlargement of Maxwell's electrodynamics to the symmetry group SU(2), and indeed the tremendous activity surrounding the discovery of parity violation in the weak interactions in the late 1950s. This last example is one of a broken symmetry, though the symmetry in question is a discrete one. It was clear to Gell-Mann, who first clarified the role of SU(3) in particle physics, that this symmetry was not exact. If it had been, it would have been much easier to discover; for example, the proton, neutron, Σ, Λ and Ξ particles would all have had the same mass. For many years the SU(3) symmetry breaking was assigned a mathematical form, but the importance of this formulation fell away when the quark model began to be taken seriously; the reason the SU(3) symmetry was not exact was simply that the (three, in those days) quarks had different masses. At the same time, and in a different context, symmetry breaking of a different type was being investigated. This went by the name of `spontaneous symmetry breaking' and its characteristic was that the ground state of a given system was not invariant under the symmetry transformation, though the interactions (the Hamiltonian, in effect) was. A classic example is ferromagnetism. In a ferromagnet the atomic spins are aligned in one direction only—this is the ground state of the system. It is clearly not invariant under a rotation, for that would change the ground state into a (similar but) different one, with the spins aligned in a different direction; this is the phenomenon of a degenerate vacuum. The contribution of the spin interaction, s1.s2, to the Hamiltonian, however, is actually invariant under rotations. As Coleman remarked, a little man living in a ferromagnet would

  12. An inventory of methods suitable to assess additive-induced characterising flavours of tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Talhout, Reinskje; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Kienhuis, Anne S

    2016-04-01

    Products with strong non-tobacco flavours are popular among young people, and facilitate smoking initiation. Similar to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Control Act, the new European Tobacco Product Directive (TPD) prohibits cigarettes and roll-your-own tobacco with a characterising flavour other than tobacco. However, no methods are prescribed or operational to assess characterising flavours. This is the first study to identify, review and synthesize the existing peer-reviewed and tobacco industry literature in order to provide an inventory of methods suitable to assess characterising flavours. Authors gathered key empirical and theoretical papers examining methods suitable to assess characterising flavours. Scientific literature databases (PubMed and Scopus) and tobacco industry documents were searched, based on several keyword combinations. Inclusion criteria were relevance for smoked tobacco products, and quality of data. The findings reveal that there is a wide variation in natural tobacco flavours. Flavour differences from natural tobacco can be described by both expert and consumer sensory panels. Most methods are based on smoking tests, but odour evaluation has also been reported. Chemical analysis can be used to identify and quantify levels of specific flavour additives in tobacco products. As flavour perception is subjective, and requires human assessment, sensory analysis in consumer or expert panel studies is necessitated. We recommend developing validated tests for descriptive sensory analysis in combination with chemical-analytical measurements. Testing a broad range of brands, including those with quite subtle characterizing flavours, will provide the concentration above which an additive will impart a characterising flavour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Complex CKM matrix, spontaneous CP violation and generalized μ- τ symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Anjan S.; Kodrani, Bhavik P.

    2009-01-01

    The multi-Higgs models having spontaneous CP violation (SPCPV) and natural flavor conservation (NFC) lead to a real CKM matrix V contradicting current evidence in favour of a complex V. This contradiction can be removed by using a generalized μ- τ (called 23) symmetry in place of the discrete symmetry conventionally used to obtain NFC. If the 23 symmetry is exact then the Higgs induced flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) vanish as in the case of NFC. 23 breaking introduces SPCPV, a phase in V and suppressed FCNC among quarks. The FCNC couplings F ij d , u between i and j generations show a hierarchy | F 12 d , u | < | F 13 d , u | < | F 23 d , u | with the result that the FCNC can have observable consequences in B mixing without conflicting with the K0-Kbar0 mixing. Detailed fits to the quark masses and the CKM matrix are used to obtain the (complex) couplings Fijd and Fiju. Combined constraints from flavour and CP violations in the K, Bd, Bs, D mesons are analyzed within the model. They allow (i) relatively light Higgs, 100-150 GeV (ii) measurable extra contributions to the magnitudes and phases of the B d , s 0-Bbar d , s 0 mixing amplitudes and (iii) the D0-Dbar0 mixing at the current sensitivity level.

  14. Symmetry constraint for foreground extraction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huazhu; Cao, Xiaochun; Tu, Zhuowen; Lin, Dongdai

    2014-05-01

    Symmetry as an intrinsic shape property is often observed in natural objects. In this paper, we discuss how explicitly taking into account the symmetry constraint can enhance the quality of foreground object extraction. In our method, a symmetry foreground map is used to represent the symmetry structure of the image, which includes the symmetry matching magnitude and the foreground location prior. Then, the symmetry constraint model is built by introducing this symmetry structure into the graph-based segmentation function. Finally, the segmentation result is obtained via graph cuts. Our method encourages objects with symmetric parts to be consistently extracted. Moreover, our symmetry constraint model is applicable to weak symmetric objects under the part-based framework. Quantitative and qualitative experimental results on benchmark datasets demonstrate the advantages of our approach in extracting the foreground. Our method also shows improved results in segmenting objects with weak, complex symmetry properties.

  15. Effect of flavour oscillations on the detection of supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya; Majumdar, Debasish; Kar, Kamales

    1999-05-01

    Neutrinos and antineutrinos of all three flavours are emitted during the post-bounce phase of a core-collapse supernova with 0954-3899/25/5/305/img1" ALT="(img1) having average energies more than that of 0954-3899/25/5/305/img2" ALT="(img2) They can be detected by the new earthbound detectors like SNO and Super-Kamiokande which are sensitive to neutrinos of all three flavours. In this letter we consider the effect of flavour oscillations on the neutrino flux and their expected number of events at the detector. We do a three-generation analysis and for the mass and mixing schemes we first consider the threefold maximal mixing model consistent with the solar and the atmospheric neutrino data and next a scenario with one icons/Journals/Common/Delta" ALT="Delta" ALIGN="TOP"/> m2~10-11 eV2 (solar range) and the other icons/Journals/Common/Delta" ALT="Delta" ALIGN="TOP"/> m2~10-18 eV2, for which the oscillation length is of the order of the supernova distance. In both these scenarios there are no matter effects in the resultant neutrino spectrum and one is concerned with vacuum oscillations. We find that though neutrino oscillations result in a depletion in the number of icons/Journals/Common/nu" ALT="nu" ALIGN="TOP"/>e and icons/Journals/Common/barnue" ALT="bar nu_e" ALIGN="TOP"/> coming from the supernova, the actual signals at the detectors are appreciable enhanced as the icons/Journals/Common/nu" ALT="nu" ALIGN="TOP"/>e and icons/Journals/Common/barnue" ALT="bar nu_e" ALIGN="TOP"/> energy spectra become harder.

  16. Exploring Metric Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zwart, P.H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R.W.; Adams, P.D.

    2006-07-31

    Relatively minor perturbations to a crystal structure can in some cases result in apparently large changes in symmetry. Changes in space group or even lattice can be induced by heavy metal or halide soaking (Dauter et al, 2001), flash freezing (Skrzypczak-Jankun et al, 1996), and Se-Met substitution (Poulsen et al, 2001). Relations between various space groups and lattices can provide insight in the underlying structural causes for the symmetry or lattice transformations. Furthermore, these relations can be useful in understanding twinning and how to efficiently solve two different but related crystal structures. Although (pseudo) symmetric properties of a certain combination of unit cell parameters and a space group are immediately obvious (such as a pseudo four-fold axis if a is approximately equal to b in an orthorhombic space group), other relations (e.g. Lehtio, et al, 2005) that are less obvious might be crucial to the understanding and detection of certain idiosyncrasies of experimental data. We have developed a set of tools that allows straightforward exploration of possible metric symmetry relations given unit cell parameters and a space group. The new iotbx.explore{_}metric{_}symmetry command produces an overview of the various relations between several possible point groups for a given lattice. Methods for finding relations between a pair of unit cells are also available. The tools described in this newsletter are part of the CCTBX libraries, which are included in the latest (versions July 2006 and up) PHENIX and CCI Apps distributions.

  17. Horror Vacui Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson used with children in the third grade to help them learn about symmetry, as well as encouraging them to draw larger than usual. Explains that students learn about the belief called "Horror Vacui" of the Northwest American Indian tribes and create their interpretation of this belief. (CMK)

  18. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-08

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented.

  19. Approximate symmetries of Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Christopher T.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-08-01

    We explore the relationship between approximate symmetries of a gapped Hamiltonian and the structure of its ground space. We start by considering approximate symmetry operators, defined as unitary operators whose commutators with the Hamiltonian have norms that are sufficiently small. We show that when approximate symmetry operators can be restricted to the ground space while approximately preserving certain mutual commutation relations. We generalize the Stone-von Neumann theorem to matrices that approximately satisfy the canonical (Heisenberg-Weyl-type) commutation relations and use this to show that approximate symmetry operators can certify the degeneracy of the ground space even though they only approximately form a group. Importantly, the notions of "approximate" and "small" are all independent of the dimension of the ambient Hilbert space and depend only on the degeneracy in the ground space. Our analysis additionally holds for any gapped band of sufficiently small width in the excited spectrum of the Hamiltonian, and we discuss applications of these ideas to topological quantum phases of matter and topological quantum error correcting codes. Finally, in our analysis, we also provide an exponential improvement upon bounds concerning the existence of shared approximate eigenvectors of approximately commuting operators under an added normality constraint, which may be of independent interest.

  20. Symmetry in Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Judith Day

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities that demonstrate how technology can help students discover the mathematics in nature. Claims that these experiences can clarify students' vision of the symmetry of beauty that fills the world beyond the computer. Concludes that the use of flexible software tools helps students explore how a shape is affected when they change…

  1. Symmetry the Trademark Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renshaw, Barbara S.

    1986-01-01

    Trademark designs provide a familiar yet innovative way for students to look at a number of mathematical concepts. How line and rotational symmetry can be presented using trademarks is the focus of this article. The emphasis is on the design of bulletin boards. (MNS)

  2. Active fluctuation symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Salazar, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with the understanding of fluctuation symmetries for entropy production, similar ideas applied to the time-symmetric fluctuation sector have been less explored. Here we give detailed derivations of time-symmetric fluctuation symmetries in boundary-driven particle systems such as the open Kawasaki lattice gas and the zero-range model. As a measure of time-symmetric dynamical activity over time T we count the difference (Nℓ - Nr)/T between the number of particle jumps in or out at the left edge and those at the right edge of the system. We show that this quantity satisfies a fluctuation symmetry from which we derive a new Green-Kubo-type relation. It will follow then that the system is more active at the edge connected to the particle reservoir with the largest chemical potential. We also apply these exact relations derived for stochastic particle models to a deterministic case, the spinning Lorentz gas, where the symmetry relation for the activity is checked numerically.

  3. pipi scattering in three flavour ChPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the pipi processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order. We then combine this calculation with the determination of the parameters from Ke4, the meson masses and decay constants and compare with the results of a dispersive analysis of pipi scattering. The comparison indicates a small but nonzero value for the 1/Nc suppressed NLO low energy constants L4r and L6r.

  4. Heavy Flavour Production as Probe of Gluon Sivers Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rohini M.; Kaushik, Abhiram; Misra, Anuradha; Rawoot, Vaibhav; Sonawane, Bipin

    2017-03-01

    Heavy flavour production like J/ψ and D-meson production in scattering of electrons/unpolarized protons off polarized proton target offer promising probes to investigate gluon Sivers function. In this talk, I will summarize our recent work on transverse single spin asymmetry in J/ψ -production and D-meson production in p p^\\uparrow scattering using a generalized parton model approach. We compare predictions obtained using different models of gluon Sivers function within this approach and then, taking into account the transverse momentum dependent evolution of the unpolarized parton distribution functions and gluon Sivers function, we study the effect of evolution on asymmetry.

  5. Lepton flavour violation:. hints on the SUSY seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    We address the constraints on the supersymmetric seesaw parameters arising from Lepton Flavour Violation observables, namely tau and muon decays, and μ - e conversion in nuclei. We work in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model extended by three right-handed (s)neutrinos, considering scenarios of universal and non-universal soft supersymmetry breaking Higgs masses at the gauge coupling unification scale. We compare the obtained predictions with the present experimental bounds and future sensitivities, discussing the most promising processes, and how these can offer a new insight into the supersymmetric seesaw parameters.

  6. BRIEF REPORT: Remarks on flavour mixings from orbifold compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2006-01-01

    We consider five-dimensional SU(5) GUT models based on the orbifold S1/(Z2 × Z'2), and study the different possibilities of placing the SU(5) matter multiplets in three possible locations, namely, the two branes at the two orbifold fixed points and SU(5) bulk. We demonstrate that if flavour hierarchies originate solely from geometrical suppressions due to wave function normalization of fields propagating in the bulk, then it is not possible to satisfy even the gross qualitative behaviour of the CKM and MNS matrices regardless of where we place the matter multiplets.

  7. Quark flavour conserving violations of the lepton number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Dudas, E.; Lavignac, S.; Savoy, C. A.

    1998-03-01

    We study supersymmetric models of lepton and baryon number violation based on an abelian family gauge group. Due to possible lepton-Higgs mixing, the lepton violating couplings are related to the Yukawa couplings and may be generated by them even if they were absent in the original theory. Such terms may be dominant and are not given by the naive family charge counting rules. This enhancement mechanism can provide an alignment between lepton-number violating terms and Yukawa couplings: as a result they conserve quark flavour. A natural way of suppressing baryon number violation in this class of models is also proposed.

  8. Collider Aspects of Flavour Physics at High Q

    SciTech Connect

    del Aguila, F.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Allanach, B.C.; Alwall, J.; Andreev, Yu.; Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Bartl, A.; Beccaria, M.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Bityukov, S.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Burdman, G.; Carvalho, J.; Castro, N.; Clerbaux, B.; de Campos, F.; de Gouvea, A.; Dennis, C.; Djouadi, A.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Louvain U., CP3 /Moscow, INR /Valencia U. /Vienna U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Karlsruhe U. /Sao Paulo U. /LIP, Coimbra /Brussels U. /Sao Paulo U., Guaratingueta /Northwestern U. /Oxford U. /Orsay, LPT /Athens U. /Lisbon U.

    2008-03-07

    This chapter of the report of the 'Flavour in the era of LHC' workshop discusses flavor related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavor aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.

  9. Light hadron spectra in the constituent quark model with the Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa-'t Hooft effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrasinovic, V. . E-mail: dmitrasin@yahoo.com; Toki, H.

    2006-02-15

    We make a critical comparison of several versions of instanton-induced interactions present in the literature, all based on ITEP group's extension to three colours and flavours of 't Hooft's effective lagrangian, with the predictions of the phenomenological Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa (KKM) chiral quark lagrangian. We analyze the effects of all versions of the effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interactions on light hadron spectra in the non-relativistic constituent quark model. We show that the KKMT force, when used as a residual hyperfine interaction reproduces the correct ordering of pseudoscalar and vector mesons even without explicitly taking chiral symmetry into account. Moreover, the nucleon spectra are also correctly reproduced, only the Roper resonance remains too high, albeit lower than usual, at 1660 MeV. The latter's lower than expected mass is not due to a small excitation energy, as in the Glozman-Riska (GR) model, but to a combination of colour, flavour, and spatial wave function properties that enhance the relevant matrix elements. The KKMT interaction explicitly depends on flavour and spin of the quarks, but unlike the GR flavour-spin one it has a firm footing in QCD. In the process we provide several technical advances, in particular we show the first explicit derivation of the three-body Fierz transformation and apply it to the KKM interaction. We also discuss the ambiguities associated with the colour degree of freedom.

  10. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zong-Min; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF. The structural and functional dynamics of microbiota during AAF process was determined by metagenomics and favour analyses. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Aspergillus, and Alternaria, respectively. Total 88 flavours including 2 sugars, 9 organic acids, 18 amino acids, and 59 volatile flavours were detected during AAF process. O2PLS-based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavours dynamics showed bacteria made more contribution to flavour formation than fungi. Seven genera including Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Enhydrobacter, Lactococcus, Gluconacetobacer, Bacillus and Staphylococcus were determined as functional core microbiota for production of flavours in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provides a perspective for bridging the gap between the phenotype and genotype of ecological system, and advances our understanding of MSSF mechanisms in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar. PMID:27241188

  11. Creation of oral care flavours to deliver breath-freshening benefits.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, D J; Perring, K D; Cawkill, P M; Provan, A F; McNulty, D A; Saint, E J; Richards, J; Munroe, M J; Behan, J M

    2005-01-01

    Oral care products deliver breath freshening primarily via mechano-chemical cleaning or by antimicrobial active systems. Dental flavours provide taste benefits, and freshen breath mainly by sensorial masking. We aimed to determine whether flavours could deliver breath freshening in products by inhibiting bacterial volatile sulphide compound (VSC) production. Flavour materials were screened for inhibition of hydrogen sulphide formation by Klebsiella pneumoniae in vitro, grouped by efficacy, and data provided to flavourists. Flavours were formulated to maximize the content of VSC-effective ingredients and re-screened to confirm performance. Extensive, iterative testing of flavours identified reliable creative rules to deliver efficient inhibition of H2S generation. Breath-freshening flavours in whole products were then tested in-house in a 'breath freshness panel'. Malodour of panellists (not preselected for malodour score) was scored before and after product use, on the 'Rosenberg' 0-5 scale, together with residual flavour score, by extensively trained judges. Products were tested in double-blind, crossover studies, and results analysed using ANOVA. Products flavoured using these rules delivered significantly greater breath freshening at 2 h than control products, and equivalent benefits to products containing 0.1% (w/w) triclosan or 0.2% (w/w) zinc sulphate.

  12. Arginine metabolism in sugar deprived Lactococcus lactis enhances survival and cellular activity, while supporting flavour production.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, J B; van de Kraats, I; Abee, T; Zwietering, M H; Meijer, W C

    2012-02-01

    Flavour development in cheese is affected by the integrity of Lactococcus lactis cells. Disintegrated cells enhance for instance the enzymatic degradation of casein to free amino acids, while integer cells are needed to produce specific flavour compounds from amino acids. The impact of the cellular activity of these integer cells on flavour production remains to be elucidated. In this study we investigated whether lactose-deprived L. lactis cells that use arginine as an alternative energy source can extend cellular activity and produce more specific flavours. In cheese experiments we demonstrated that arginine metabolising cells survived about 3 times longer than non-arginine metabolising cells, which suggests prolonged cellular activity. Cellular activity and flavour production of L. lactis was further studied in vitro to enable controlled arginine supplementation. Comparable with the results found in cheese, the survival rates of in vitro incubated cells improved when arginine was metabolised. Furthermore, elongated cellular activity was reflected in 3-4-fold increased activity of flavour generating enzymes. The observed prolonged cellular activity resulted in about 2-fold higher concentrations of typical Gouda cheese flavours. These findings provide new leads for composing starter cultures that will produce specific flavour compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. “Popcorn worker’s lung” in Britain in a man making potato crisp flavouring

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, D J

    2009-01-01

    This case involves a 36 year old non-smoker who worked in a factory producing food flavourings for potato crisps. He developed exertional breathlessness associated with fixed airway obstruction shortly after an uncharacteristically high exposure to the food flavouring chemical diacetyl. Unfortunately, even though he was removed from further exposure to this agent, his symptoms and spirometry did not improve. PMID:21686520

  14. Flavoured non-cigarette tobacco product use among US adults: 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Michèle G; Holder-Hayes, Enver; Ambrose, Bridget K; Tworek, Cindy; Feirman, Shari P; King, Brian A; Apelberg, Benjamin J

    2016-11-01

    Limited data exist on flavoured non-cigarette tobacco product (NCTP) use among US adults. Data from the 2013 to 2014 National Adult Tobacco Survey (N=75 233), a landline and cellular telephone survey of US adults aged ≥18, were assessed to estimate past 30-day NCTP use, flavoured NCTP use and flavour types using bivariate analyses. During 2013-2014, 14.4% of US adults were past 30-day NCTP users. Nationally, an estimated 10.2 million e-cigarette users (68.2%), 6.1 million hookah users (82.3%), 4.1 million cigar smokers (36.2%) and 4.0 million smokeless tobacco users (50.6%) used flavoured products in the past 30 days. The most prevalent flavours reported were menthol/mint (76.9%) for smokeless tobacco; fruit (74.0%) for hookah; fruit (52.4%), candy/chocolate/other sweet flavours (22.0%) and alcohol (14.5%) for cigars/cigarillos/filtered little cigars; fruit (44.9%), menthol/mint (43.9%) and candy/chocolate/other sweet flavours (25.7%) for e-cigarettes and fruit (56.6%), candy/chocolate/other sweet flavours (26.5%) and menthol/mint (24.8%) for pipes. Except for hookah and pipes, past 30-day flavoured product use was highest among 18-24-year olds. By cigarette smoking, never smoking e-cigarette users (84.8%) were more likely to report flavoured e-cigarette use, followed by recent former smokers (78.1%), long-term former smokers (70.4%) and current smokers (63.2%). Flavoured NCTP use is prominent among US adult tobacco users, particularly among e-cigarette, hookah and cigar users. Flavoured product use, especially fruit and sweet-flavoured products, was higher among younger adults. It is important for tobacco prevention and control strategies to address all forms of tobacco use, including flavoured tobacco products. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. A bilayer Double Semion model with symmetry-enriched topological order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, L.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We construct a new model of two-dimensional quantum spin systems that combines intrinsic topological orders and a global symmetry called flavour symmetry. It is referred as the bilayer Doubled Semion model (bDS) and is an instance of symmetry-enriched topological order. A honeycomb bilayer lattice is introduced to combine a Double Semion Topological Order with a global spin-flavour symmetry to get the fractionalization of its quasiparticles. The bDS model exhibits non-trivial braiding self-statistics of excitations and its dual model constitutes a Symmetry-Protected Topological Order with novel edge states. This dual model gives rise to a bilayer Non-Trivial Paramagnet that is invariant under the flavour symmetry and the well-known spin flip symmetry. On the one hand, the Hermele model is constructed with a square lattice in a multilayer structure that forms a quasi-three-dimensional model, but the square lattice cannot support a DS model. (see Appendix C and [39]). On the other hand, the Levin-Gu method is realized on a single hexagonal layer, but we would need a multilayer realization of that construction. This is problematic since the necessary coordination condition (3) is incompatible with a multilayer structure of honeycomb layers. Interestingly enough, we can rephrase this compatibility problem between these two fractionalization methods as a compatibility condition between global symmetries. The key point is to realize that the Levin-Gu method deals with a spin-flip symmetry, e.g. G = Z2fs, explicitly shown in the spin model introduced in Section 4, while the Hermele method is about a spin-flavour symmetry among lattice layers, e.g. G = Z2fv. This spin-favour symmetry is present explicitly in the string model presented in Eq. (26).We hereby summarize briefly some of our main results:i/ We have constructed a bilayer Doubled Semion (bDS) model that has intrinsic topological orders of type G =Z2 and is

  16. Masses and magnetic moments of heavy flavour baryons in the hyper central model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bhavin; Rai, Ajay Kumar; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2008-06-01

    Heavy flavour baryons containing one or two charm (beauty) quarks with light flavour combinations are studied using the hyper central description of the three-body system. The confinement potential is assumed as hyper central Coulomb plus power potential with a power index p. The ground state (J^P=\\frac{1}{2}^+ and \\frac{3}{2}^+ ) masses of heavy flavour baryons are computed for different power indices, p starting from 0.5 to 2.0. The predicted masses are found to attain a saturated value with respect to the variation in p beyond the power index p > 1.0. Using the spin-flavour structure of the constituting quarks and by defining the effective mass of the confined quarks within the baryons, the magnetic moments are computed with no additional free parameters. The masses and magnetic moments of the single heavy and double heavy flavour baryons are found to be in accordance with other model predictions.

  17. Relationship between flavour deterioration and the volatile compound profile of semi-ripened sausage.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, José Manuel; Bedia, Mario; Bañón, Sancho

    2013-03-01

    This study provides data on the relationship between flavour deterioration and the volatile compound profile of semi-ripened pork salami kept under retail conditions for up to 150 days. The flavour of salami deteriorated for 120 days, resulting in rancidity and a loss of acceptability. TBARS increased from 0.16 to 0.57 MDA/kg. The flavour changes during the shelf life of salami were monitored from changes in the volatile profile. The retailing time influenced (p<0.05) the level of 27 of the 30 headspace volatiles determined by SPME-GC/MS. Flavour deterioration was associated with the loss and/or degradation of volatiles resulting from spices and microbial activities, and the formation of volatiles from lipid oxidation. The levels of 2-heptenal and methyl esters of heptanoic, pentanoic and hexanoic acids were the best discriminators of storage time, and therefore seem to be promising as marker compounds of flavour deterioration and acceptability.

  18. Cherry-flavoured electronic cigarettes expose users to the inhalation irritant, benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Prokopowicz, Adam; Kurek, Jolanta; Zaciera, Marzena; Knysak, Jakub; Smith, Danielle; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2016-04-01

    Many non-cigarette tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, contain various flavourings, such as fruit flavours. Although many flavourings used in e-cigarettes are generally recognised as safe when used in food products, concerns have been raised about the potential inhalation toxicity of these chemicals. Benzaldehyde, which is a key ingredient in natural fruit flavours, has been shown to cause irritation of respiratory airways in animal and occupational exposure studies. Given the potential inhalation toxicity of this compound, we measured benzaldehyde in aerosol generated in a laboratory setting from flavoured e-cigarettes purchased online and detected benzaldehyde in 108 out of 145 products. The highest levels of benzaldehyde were detected in cherry-flavoured products. The benzaldehyde doses inhaled with 30 puffs from flavoured e-cigarettes were often higher than doses inhaled from a conventional cigarette. Levels in cherry-flavoured products were >1000 times lower than doses inhaled in the workplace. While e-cigarettes seem to be a promising harm reduction tool for smokers, findings indicate that using these products could result in repeated inhalation of benzaldehyde, with long-term users risking regular exposure to the substance. Given the uncertainty surrounding adverse health effects stemming from long-term inhalation of flavouring ingredients such as benzaldehyde, clinicians need to be aware of this emerging risk and ask their patients about use of flavoured e-cigarettes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Diet and growth effects in panel assessment of sheepmeat odour and flavour.

    PubMed

    Rousset-Akrim, S; Young, O A; Berdagué, J L

    1997-02-01

    The effects of sheep age and diet on several odours and flavours are described. Ram lambs raised on ewe's milk then a corn-based diet were compared with lambs raised on milk and a pasture of grass/clover, six treatments in all. A seventh treatment comprised very old ewes maintained on pasture. Fat and lean from forequarters was minced and cooked together. Cooked lean was assessed for intensity by a sensory panel for 10 flavour attributes. Four showed significant (P < 0.01) treatment effects: 'sheepmeat', 'animal', 'liver', and 'poultry'. Sheepmeat flavour was highest in the slow-grown pasture-fed lambs. Animal flavour-the flavour associated with the odour of confined livestock-showed a similar pattern with treatment. Liver flavour was highest in ewe meat, and the biochemical origin of this flavour is discussed. Eleven related odour attributes were assessed on the rendered fat with a novel olfactometer. Five attributes showed highly significant treatment effects for intensity (P < 0.001): animal and sheepmeat odours showed a similar distribution to the equivalent flavours; likewise cabbage and rancid odours were associated with the two slow-grown pasture treatments. A comparison of the odour and flavour statistics showed that the sense of smell was the more discriminating in sheepmeat assessment, and also confirmed that fat was the true source of sheepmeat odour/flavour. In respect of sheepmeat production for effective marketing, the data showed that at 90 days, a pastoral diet resulted in slightly enhanced odours when compared with a corn-based diet. By 215 days, however, many undesirable odours were exacerbated. Since these older rams were more sexually developed, a sex rather than an age effect could not be excluded. Rendered fat from this work was further used in a companion study (Yang et al., 1997. Meat Sci., 45, 183-200) in an attempt to link individual volatile compounds to odour attributes.

  20. Structures and Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangacharyulu, Chary

    Symmetries play a very significant role in describing the dynamics of physical structures and phenomena. While preserved symmetries enable physicists to establish systematics and predict regularities, broken symmetries open up new avenues of research as they admit new degrees of freedom. Quite often, physicists resort to mathematical symmetries to define the patterns and use metaphors to convey meaning. A caution is warranted not to take the symbolisms too literally and to be aware of limitations while borrowing physics language into other disciplines.

  1. Extended shelf life flavoured dairy drink using dissolved carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Menon Rekha; Rao, K Jayaraj; Nath, B Surendra; Ram, Chand

    2014-01-01

    Cardamom flavoured dairy beverage prepared using standardized method was carbonated in glass bottles. Carbonation at 50 psi pressure for 30 s was recommended. The pasteurized flavoured drink, carbonated or otherwise was evaluated for sensory, chemical and microbial quality during its refrigerated storage. The uncarbonated control samples were found to be sensorily acceptable up to 14 days, while the carbonated beverage remained acceptable up to 30 days. Carbonation of drink significantly affected the pH and acidity of product without reducing its acceptability. Carbonation resulted in inhibition of microbes, the effect was pronounced on psychrotrophic count. There was a linear but marginal increase in the pH of the carbonated samples till the 17(th) day of storage; the values diminished thereafter. The carbonated samples also had significantly reduced contents of FFA and soluble nitrogen compared to that of uncarbonated control samples as storage progressed beyond 10 days and this was attributed to inhibited microbial growth.

  2. Application of Electrostatic Extrusion – Flavour Encapsulation and Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Verica; Rajic, Nevenka; Djonlagic, Jasna; Obradovic, Bojana; Nedovic, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this study was the development of flavour alginate formulations aimed for thermally processed foods. Ethyl vanilline was used as the model flavour compound. Electrostatic extrusion was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanilline in alginate gel microbeads. The obtained microbeads with approx. 10 % w/w of ethyl vanilline encapsulated in about 2 % w/w alginate were uniformly sized spheres of about 450 μm. Chemical characterization by H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the alginate used in this study had a high content (67 %) of guluronic residues and was rich in GG diad blocks (FGG = 55%) and thus presented a high-quality immobilisation matrix. The thermal behaviour of alginate beads encapsulating ethyl vanilline was investigated by thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry measurements (TG-DSC) under heating conditions which mimicked usual food processing to provide information about thermal decomposition of alginate matrix and kinetics of aroma release. Two well resolved weight losses were observed. The first one was in the 50-150 °C temperature range with the maximum at approx. 112 °C, corresponding to the dehydration of the polymer network. The second loss in the 220-325 °C temperature range, with a maximum at ∼ 247 °C corresponded to the release of vanilline. The obtained results indicate that up to 230 °C most of the vanilline remained intacta, while prolonged heating at elevated temperatures led to the entire loss of the aroma compound. PMID:27879775

  3. Effect of tomato pleiotropic ripening mutations on flavour volatile biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Katalin; Fray, Rupert G; Tikunov, Yury; Graham, Neil; Bradley, Glyn; Seymour, Graham B; Bovy, Arnaud G; Grierson, Donald

    2009-05-01

    Ripening is a tightly controlled and developmentally regulated process involving networks of genes, and metabolites that result in dramatic changes in fruit colour, texture and flavour. Molecular and genetic analysis in tomato has revealed a series of regulatory genes involved in fruit development and ripening, including MADS box and SPB box transcription factors and genes involved in ethylene synthesis, signalling and response. Volatile metabolites represent a significant part of the plant metabolome, playing an important role in plant signalling, defence strategies and probably in regulatory mechanisms. They also play an important role in fruit quality. In order to acquire a better insight into the biochemical and genetic control of flavour compound generation and links between these metabolites and the central regulators of ripening, five pleiotropic mutant tomato lines were subjected to volatile metabolite profiling in comparison with wild-type Ailsa Craig. One hundred and seventeen volatile compounds were identified and quantified using SPME (Solid Phase Microextraction) headspace extraction followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and the data were subjected to multivariate comparative analysis. We find that the different mutants each produce distinct volatile profiles during ripening. Through principal component analysis the volatiles most dramatically affected are those derived from fatty-acids. The results are consistent with the suggestion that specific isoforms of lipoxygenase located in the plastids and the enzymes that provide precursors and downstream metabolites play a key role in determining volatile composition.

  4. Light flavour hadron production in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Unique among the LHC experiments, ALICE has excellent particle identification capabilities for the measurement of light-flavour hadrons. A large number of hadron species from pions to multi-strange baryons and light nuclei have been measured over a large transverse momentum region. The measurement of the production of these particles is a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular they give information on the collective phenomena of the fireball, on the parton energy loss in the hot QCD medium and on the hadronization mechanisms such as recombination and statistical hadronization. The measurements in pp and in p-nucleus collisions provide the necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to investigate the effects of the ordinary nuclear matter. In this paper some of the main ALICE results on identified light-flavour hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV and p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV will be presented.

  5. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  6. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  7. Reflections on Symmetry and Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrotsy, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The concept of symmetry is fundamental to mathematics. Arguments and proofs based on symmetry are often aesthetically pleasing because they are subtle and succinct and non-standard. This article uses notions of symmetry to approach the solutions to a broad range of mathematical problems. It responds to Krutetskii's criteria for mathematical…

  8. Helical symmetry in linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bicak, Jiri; Schmidt, Bernd G.

    2007-11-15

    We investigate properties of solutions of the scalar wave equation and Maxwell's equations on Minkowski space with helical symmetry. Existence of local and global solutions with this symmetry is demonstrated with and without sources. The asymptotic properties of the solutions are analyzed. We show that the Newman-Penrose retarded and advanced scalars exhibit specific symmetries and generalized peeling properties.

  9. Precursors and BRST symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Freivogel, Ben; Kabir, Laurens; Lokhande, Sagar F.

    2017-07-01

    In the AdS/CFT correspondence, bulk information appears to be encoded in the CFT in a redundant way. A local bulk field corresponds to many different non-local CFT operators (precursors). We recast this ambiguity in the language of BRST symmetry, and propose that in the large N limit, the difference between two precursors is a BRST exact and ghost-free term. This definition of precursor ambiguities has the advantage that it generalizes to any gauge theory. Using the BRST formalism and working in a simple model with global symmetries, we re-derive a precursor ambiguity appearing in earlier work. Finally, we show within this model that the obtained ambiguity has the right number of parameters to explain the freedom to localize precursors within different spatial regions of the boundary order by order in the large N expansion.

  10. PSEUDOSPIN SYMMETRY IN NUCLEI, SPIN SYMMETRY IN HADRONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. PAGE; T. GOLDMAN; J. GINOCCHIO

    2000-08-01

    Ginocchio argued that chiral symmetry breaking in QCD is responsible for the relativistic pseudospin symmetry in the Dirac equation, explaining the observed approximate pseudospin symmetry in sizable nuclei. On a much smaller scale, it is known that spin-orbit splittings in hadrons are small. Specifically, new experimental data from CLEO indicate small splittings in D-mesons. For heavy-light mesons we identify a cousin of pseudospin symmetry that suppresses these splittings in the Dirac equation, known as spin symmetry. We suggest an experimental test of the implications of spin symmetry for wave functions in electron-positron annihilation. We investigate how QCD can give rise to two different dynamical symmetries on nuclear and hadronic scales.

  11. Chiral symmetry and pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-07-01

    Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, mesons and baryons are illustrated in the language of the Dirac theory. Various forces acting between quarks inside baryons are discussed. I explain why the naive quark models typically overestimate pentaquark masses by some 500 MeV and why in the fully relativistic approach to baryons pentaquarks turn out to be light. I discuss briefly why it can be easier to produce pentaquarks at low than at high energies.

  12. Symmetries of spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The equations of Hamiltonian gravity are often considered ugly cousins of the elegant and manifestly covariant versions found in the Lagrangian theory. However, both formulations are fundamental in their own rights because they make different statements about the nature of spacetime and its symmetries. These implications, along with the history of their derivation and an introduction of recent mathematical support, are the topic of this essay.

  13. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  14. PT symmetry in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Demetrios

    2015-03-01

    Interest in complex Hamiltonians has been rekindled after the realization that a wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can have entirely real spectra as long as they simultaneously respect parity and time reversal operators. In non-relativistic quantum mechanics, governed by the Schrödinger equation, a necessary but not sufficient condition for PT symmetry to hold is that the complex potential should involve real and imaginary parts which are even and odd functions of position respectively. As recently indicated, optics provides a fertile ground to observe and utilize notions of PT symmetry. In optics, the refractive index and gain/loss profiles play the role of the real and imaginary parts of the aforementioned complex potentials. As it has been demonstrated in several studies, PT-symmetric optical structures can exhibit peculiar properties that are otherwise unattainable in traditional Hermitian (conservative) optical settings. Among them, is the possibility for breaking this symmetry through an abrupt phase transition, band merging effects and unidirectional invisibility. Here we review recent developments in the field of -symmetric optics.

  15. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  16. Symmetry and Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batanouny, M.; Wooten, F.

    2008-03-01

    Preface; 1. Symmetry and physics; 2. Symmetry and group theory; 3. Group representations: concepts; 4. Group representations: formalism and methodology; 5. Dixon's method for computing group characters; 6. Group action and symmetry projection operators; 7. Construction of the irreducible representations; 8. Product groups and product representations; 9. Induced representations; 10. Crystallographic symmetry and space-groups; 11. Space groups: Irreps; 12. Time-reversal symmetry: color groups and the Onsager relations; 13. Tensors and tensor fields; 14. Electronic properties of solids; 15. Dynamical properties of molecules, solids and surfaces; 16. Experimental measurements and selection rules; 17. Landau's theory of phase transitions; 18. Incommensurate systems and quasi-crystals; References; Bibliography; Index.

  17. Symmetry methods for option pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, A. H.; Mamba, S.

    2017-06-01

    We obtain a solution of the Black-Scholes equation with a non-smooth boundary condition using symmetry methods. The Black-Scholes equation along with its boundary condition are first transformed into the one dimensional heat equation and an initial condition respectively. We then find an appropriate general symmetry generator of the heat equation using symmetries and the fundamental solution of the heat equation. The symmetry generator is chosen such that the boundary condition is left invariant; the symmetry can be used to solve the heat equation and hence the Black-Scholes equation.

  18. Invariants of broken discrete symmetries.

    PubMed

    Kalozoumis, P A; Morfonios, C; Diakonos, F K; Schmelcher, P

    2014-08-01

    The parity and Bloch theorems are generalized to the case of broken global symmetry. Local inversion or translation symmetries in one dimension are shown to yield invariant currents that characterize wave propagation. These currents map the wave function from an arbitrary spatial domain to any symmetry-related domain. Our approach addresses any combination of local symmetries, thus applying, in particular, to acoustic, optical, and matter waves. Nonvanishing values of the invariant currents provide a systematic pathway to the breaking of discrete global symmetries.

  19. Invariants of Broken Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalozoumis, P. A.; Morfonios, C.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2014-08-01

    The parity and Bloch theorems are generalized to the case of broken global symmetry. Local inversion or translation symmetries in one dimension are shown to yield invariant currents that characterize wave propagation. These currents map the wave function from an arbitrary spatial domain to any symmetry-related domain. Our approach addresses any combination of local symmetries, thus applying, in particular, to acoustic, optical, and matter waves. Nonvanishing values of the invariant currents provide a systematic pathway to the breaking of discrete global symmetries.

  20. The effect on PDFs and due to changes in flavour scheme and higher twist contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. S.

    2014-07-01

    I consider the effect on MSTW partons distribution functions (PDFs) due to changes in the choices of theoretical procedure used in the fit. I first consider using the 3-flavour fixed flavour number scheme instead of the standard general mass variable flavour number scheme used in the MSTW analysis. This results in the light quarks increasing at all relatively small values, the gluon distribution becoming smaller at high values of and larger at small , the preferred value of the coupling constant falling, particularly at NNLO, and the fit quality deteriorates. I also consider lowering the kinematic cut on for DIS data and simultaneously introducing higher twist terms which are fit to data. This results in much smaller effects on both PDFs and than the scheme change, except for quarks at very high . I show that the structure function one obtains from a fixed input set of PDFs using the fixed flavour scheme and variable flavour scheme differ significantly for at high , and that this is due to the fact that in the fixed flavour scheme there is a slow convergence of large logarithmic terms of the form relevant for this regime. I conclude that some of the most significant differences in PDF sets are largely due to the choice of flavour scheme used.

  1. Knowing too much: knowledge of energy content prevents liking change through flavour-nutrient associations.

    PubMed

    Gould, Natalie J; Zandstra, Elizabeth H; Yeomans, Martin R

    2017-08-31

    Associations between flavours and the consequences of ingestion can lead to changes in flavour liking depending on nutrient content, an example of flavour-nutrient learning. Expectations about the consequences of ingestion can be modified by information at the point of ingestion, such as nutritional labelling. What is unknown is the extent to which these label-based expectations modify flavour-nutrient learning. Since nutrient information can alter expectations about how filling a product would be, we hypothesised that labels predicting higher energy (HE) content would enhance satiety and so promote more rapid flavour learning. To test this, participants consumed either a lower (LE: 164kcal) or HE (330kcal) yoghurt breakfast on four separate days, either with no product label or with labels displaying either the actual energy content (Congruent label) or inaccurate energy (Incongruent label). Participants rated liking on all four days: on days one and four they could also consume as much as they liked, but consumed a fixed amount (300g) on days two and three. Both liking and intake increased with exposure in the HE, and decreased in the LE, condition when unlabelled in line with flavour-nutrient learning. In contrast, no significant changes were seen in either the Congruent or Incongruent label conditions. Contrary to predictions, these data suggest that flavour-nutrient learning occurs when there is an absence of explicit expectations of actual nutrient content, with both accurate and inaccurate information on nutrient content disrupting learning.

  2. Role of anterior piriform cortex in the acquisition of conditioned flavour preference

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla, Cristina; Martin-Signes, Mar; Risco, Severiano

    2016-01-01

    Flavour aversion learning (FAL) and conditioned flavour preference (CFP) facilitate animal survival and play a major role in food selection, but the neurobiological mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Neuroanatomical bases of CFP were examined by using Fos immunohistochemistry to record neuronal activity. Rats were trained over eight alternating one-bottle sessions to acquire a CFP induced by pairing a flavour with saccharin (grape was CS+ in Group 1; cherry in Group 2; in Group 3, grape/cherry in half of animals; Group 4, grape/cherry in water). Animals were offered the grape flavour on the day immediately after the training and their brains were processed for c-Fos. Neurons evidencing Fos-like immunoreactivity were counted in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens core, and anterior piriform cortex (aPC). Analysis showed a significantly larger number of activated cells after learning in the aPC alone, suggesting that the learning process might have produced a change in this cortical region. Ibotenic lesions in the aPC blocked flavour-taste preference but did not interrupt flavour-toxin FAL by LiCl. These data suggest that aPC cells may be involved in the formation of flavour preferences and that the integrity of this region may be specifically necessary for the acquisition of a CFP. PMID:27624896

  3. Genome shuffling of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii to accelerate and enhance the flavour formation of soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohong; Hou, Lihua; Lu, Meifang; Wang, Chunling; Zeng, Bin

    2010-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to achieve rapid improvement of the flavour of soy sauce by increasing the salt stress resistance of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Here, we describe genome shuffling to improve the salt tolerance of Z. rouxii while simultaneously enhancing and accelerating flavour formation of soy sauce. A mutant, S3-2, with a stronger resistance to salt, was selected after three rounds of genome shuffling. S3-2 not only grew well in peptone/yeast extract/dextrose medium containing a high salt content with wide range of pH, but also exhibited stronger stress resistance to potassium chloride and lithium chloride. In high-salt liquid fermentation, S3-2 obviously accelerated flavour formation of soy sauce, thus decreasing the total time required for development of the aroma. In addition, S3-2 gave high amino acid nitrogen and good flavour. In particular, the ethyl acetate content was 2.38 times that in the control. S3-2 distinctly improved the formation of 4-hydroxy-2 (or 5) -ethyl-5 (or 2) -methyl-3 (2H) -furanone by up to 75%. Another important flavour component, 4-ethylguaiacol, was also detected. Genome shuffling was successfully used to achieve significant improvements in flavour formation. The selected strain improved the main flavour components and amino acid nitrogen, thereby enhancing the quality of soy sauce. (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Caffeine deprivation state modulates expression of acquired liking for caffeine-paired flavours.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Lucy; Mobini, Sirous; Yeomans, Martin R

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies found that caffeine consumers acquired a liking for the flavour of novel caffeinated drinks when these drinks were consumed repeatedly in a caffeine-deprived, but not nondeprived, state. Expression of this acquired liking appeared acutely sensitive to current caffeine deprivation state, but the use of between-subjects designs confounded interpretation of those studies. The present study evaluated these findings further using a within-subject design, with one flavour paired with caffeine (CS + ) and the second with the absence of caffeine (CS-). During four CS + and four CS- training days, 32 moderate caffeine consumers alternatively consumed a novel flavoured drink a CS + paired with caffeine and a CS- flavour paired with placebo. Participants evaluated both drinks before and after training in two motivational states: caffeine deprived and nondeprived. As predicted, pleasantness ratings for the caffeine-paired flavour increased overall. However, this acquired liking was only significant when tested in a caffeine-deprived state. These data are consistent with a conditioned-flavour preference model and imply that expression of acquired liking for a novel caffeinated flavour depends on the need for the effects of caffeine at the time when the drink is evaluated.

  5. Comparison of estimated daily intakes of flavouring substances with no-observed-effect levels.

    PubMed

    Munro, I C; Danielewska-Nikiel, B

    2006-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the margins of safety between no-observed-effect levels (NOELs) and estimates of daily intake for 809 flavouring substances evaluated by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of daily intake were calculated using two methods, the maximized survey-derived daily intake (MSDI) and the possible average daily intake (PADI). The MSDI estimates were based on the production volume of flavouring agents as reported by industry, whereas the higher more conservative PADI estimates were derived by multiplying the anticipated average use level of a flavouring substance in each of 33 food categories by the average amount of food consumed daily from that food category and summing the intake over all 33 food categories. These intake estimates were used to calculate the margins of safety for the flavouring agents to determine whether adequate margins of safety would still exist in the event that the MSDIs used by JECFA to evaluate the safety of flavouring substances underestimated daily intakes. Based on the calculation of the margins of safety using the MSDI values, 99.9% of the 809 flavouring substances evaluated by JECFA have margins of safety of greater than 100. In comparison, 98% of flavouring substances have margins of safety of greater than 100 when the margins of safety were calculated from PADI values. The results indicate that if the MSDI estimates used by JECFA for the evaluation of the safety of flavouring substances were underestimated, a wide margin of safety exists for all but a few of the flavouring substances even when intakes were estimated from PADI values.

  6. Exposures to Conditioned Flavours with Different Hedonic Values Induce Contrasted Behavioural and Brain Responses in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Clouard, Caroline; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values in juvenile pigs. Twelve 30-kg pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions: they received three different flavoured meals paired with intraduodenal (i.d.) infusions of 15% glucose (FGlu), lithium chloride (FLiCl), or saline (control treatment, FNaCl). One and five weeks later, the animals were subjected to three two-choice feeding tests without reinforcement to check the acquisition of a conditioned flavour preference or aversion. In between, the anaesthetised pigs were subjected to three 18FDG PET brain imaging coupled with an olfactogustatory stimulation with the conditioned flavours. During conditioning, the pigs spent more time lying inactive, and investigated their environment less after the FLiCl than the FNaCl or FGlu meals. During the two-choice tests performed one and five weeks later, the FNaCl and FGlu foods were significantly preferred over the FLICl food even in the absence of i.d. infusions. Surprisingly, the FNaCl food was also preferred over the FGlu food during the first test only, suggesting that, while LiCl i.d. infusions led to a strong flavour aversion, glucose infusions failed to induce flavour preference. As for brain imaging results, exposure to aversive or less preferred flavours triggered global deactivation of the prefrontal cortex, specific activation of the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as asymmetric brain responses in the basal nuclei and the temporal gyrus. In conclusion, postingestive visceral stimuli can modulate the flavour/food hedonism and further feeding choices. Exposure to flavours with different hedonic values induced metabolism differences in neural circuits known to be involved in humans in the characterization of food palatability, feeding motivation, reward expectation, and more generally in the regulation of food intake. PMID:22685528

  7. Exposures to conditioned flavours with different hedonic values induce contrasted behavioural and brain responses in pigs.

    PubMed

    Clouard, Caroline; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the behavioural and brain responses towards conditioned flavours with different hedonic values in juvenile pigs. Twelve 30-kg pigs were given four three-day conditioning sessions: they received three different flavoured meals paired with intraduodenal (i.d.) infusions of 15% glucose (F(Glu)), lithium chloride (F(LiCl)), or saline (control treatment, F(NaCl)). One and five weeks later, the animals were subjected to three two-choice feeding tests without reinforcement to check the acquisition of a conditioned flavour preference or aversion. In between, the anaesthetised pigs were subjected to three (18)FDG PET brain imaging coupled with an olfactogustatory stimulation with the conditioned flavours. During conditioning, the pigs spent more time lying inactive, and investigated their environment less after the F(LiCl) than the F(NaCl) or F(Glu) meals. During the two-choice tests performed one and five weeks later, the F(NaCl) and F(Glu) foods were significantly preferred over the F(LICl) food even in the absence of i.d. infusions. Surprisingly, the F(NaCl) food was also preferred over the F(Glu) food during the first test only, suggesting that, while LiCl i.d. infusions led to a strong flavour aversion, glucose infusions failed to induce flavour preference. As for brain imaging results, exposure to aversive or less preferred flavours triggered global deactivation of the prefrontal cortex, specific activation of the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as asymmetric brain responses in the basal nuclei and the temporal gyrus. In conclusion, postingestive visceral stimuli can modulate the flavour/food hedonism and further feeding choices. Exposure to flavours with different hedonic values induced metabolism differences in neural circuits known to be involved in humans in the characterization of food palatability, feeding motivation, reward expectation, and more generally in the regulation of food intake.

  8. An MCMC Study of General Squark Flavour Mixing in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Björn; De Causmaecker, Karen; Fuks, Benjamin; Mahmoudi, Farvah; O'Leary, Ben; Porod, Werner; Sekmen, Sezen; Strobbe, Nadja

    2015-10-05

    We present an extensive study of non-minimally flavour violating (NMFV) terms in the Lagrangian of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We impose a variety of theoretical and experimental constraints and perform a detailed scan of the parameter space by means of a Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) setup. This represents the first study of several non-zero flavour-violating elements within the MSSM. We present the results of the MCMC scan with a special focus on the flavour-violating parameters. Based on these results, we define benchmark scenarios for future studies of NMFV effects at the LHC.

  9. Good quantification practices of flavours and fragrances by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Begnaud, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, chromatographic techniques with mass spectrometric detection have been increasingly used to monitor the rapidly expanded list of regulated flavour and fragrance ingredients. This trend entails a need for good quantification practices suitable for complex media, especially for multi-analytes. In this article, we present experimental precautions needed to perform the analyses and ways to process the data according to the most recent approaches. This notably includes the identification of analytes during their quantification and method validation, when applied to real matrices, based on accuracy profiles. A brief survey of application studies based on such practices is given. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644977

  10. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  11. piK Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-05-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the piK processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The calculation has been performed analytically but we only include analytical results for the dependence on the low-energy constants (LECs) at NNLO due to the size of the expressions. These results, together with resonance estimates of the NNLO LECs are used to obtain constraints on the Zweig rule suppressed LECs at NLO, L4r and L6r. Contrary to expectations from NLO order calculations we find them to be compatible with zero. We do a preliminary study of combining the results from pipi scattering, piK scattering and the scalar form-factors and find only a marginal compatibility with all experimental/dispersive input data.

  12. A search for lepton flavour violating Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Bethke, S.; Beck, A.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bechtluft, J.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Bürgin, R.; Burgard, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clayton, J. C.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Deng, H.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Duboscq, J. E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Fürtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Karlen, D.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B. J.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X. C.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Malik, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mättig, P.; McKenna, J.; McKigney, E. A.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Müller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palmonari, F.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schütz, P.; Schulz, M.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; von Törne, E.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Wäckerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1995-12-01

    We have searched for lepton flavour violating Z0→eμ, Z0→eτ and Z0→μτ decays in a sample of 4.0×106 visible Z0 decays collected with the OPAL detector at LEP during 1991 to 1994. No candidates are found for Z0→eμ. The samples of selected Z0→eτ and Z0→μτ candidates are consistent with the expected background. The following limits are set at 95% confidence level: 10052_2005_Article_BF01553981_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} BR(Z^0 to eμ ){text{ }}< {text{ 1}}{text{.7 }} × {text{ 10}}^{ - {text{6}}} \\ BR(Z^0 to etau ){text{ }}< {text{ 9}}{text{.8 }} × {text{ 10}}^{ - {text{6}}} \\ BR(Z^0 to μ tau ){text{ }}< {text{ 17}}{text{. }} × {text{ 10}}^{ - {text{6}}} . \\

  13. Flavour anomalies after the R K ∗ measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Guido; Nardecchia, Marco; Panci, Paolo; Sannino, Francesco; Strumia, Alessandro; Torre, Riccardo; Urbano, Alfredo

    2017-09-01

    The LHCb measurement of the μ/e ratio R K ∗ indicates a deficit with respect to the Standard Model prediction, supporting earlier hints of lepton universality violation observed in the R K ratio. We show that the R K and R K ∗ ratios alone constrain the chiralities of the states contributing to these anomalies, and we find deviations from the Standard Model at the 4 σ level. This conclusion is further corroborated by hints from the theoretically challenging b → sμ + μ - distributions. Theoretical interpretations in terms of Z', lepto-quarks, loop mediators, and composite dynamics are discussed. We highlight their distinctive features in terms of the chirality and flavour structures relevant to the observed anomalies.

  14. Heat and storage effects on the flavour of peanuts.

    PubMed

    el-Kayati, S M; Fadel, H H; Abdel Mageed, M; Farghal, S A

    1998-12-01

    Two peanut varieties, Giza 4 and Giza 5 were subjected to different heat treatments such as drying in solar drier at air speed 0.5 and 2 m/sec with average temperature 45 and 60 degrees C and heating in oven at 120 and 150 degrees C. The sensory evaluation of the two varieties showed insignificant differences among varieties and heating processes. A correlation between the sensory and instrumental data was found. The high sensory scores of samples heated at 150 degrees C were attributed to the presence of high concentration of pyrazines which were thought to contribute to flavour and aroma of fresh roasted peanut. A comparative study between the main chemical classes retained in peanut samples after storage for 3 months at room temperature showed that the aldehydes derived lipids increased significantly in the solar dried samples. The antioxidative components produced via Maillard reaction resulted in oxidative stability of the samples heated in oven.

  15. Dicyclic horizontal symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Otto Cho Wing

    In the very successful standard theory of particle physics, the occurrence of repeated quark and lepton flavors, and especially their peculiar mass spectrum, can be accommodated parametrically but is largely unexplained. The present dissertation is an investigation into dicyclic horizontal symmetries as a theory addressing this elusive problem of flavor, as well as some other related issues in particle physics. A horizontal symmetry is a supplement to the perspective based on the experimentally well-established standard model, and its (supersymmetric) unification theories. Dicyclic groups are a special class of discrete non- abelian groups. The most pressing part of the flavor problem in the standard model is the existence of three families of (fermionic) matter and the unnaturally large hierarchy among the parameters describing their masses and mixing. In particular, the top quark is singled out as the only fermion having a natural mass at electroweak breaking scale. While bottom and tau masses may be suppressed by the Higgs vacuum expectation value, the small masses of the other two families beg an explanation. The supersymmetric counterpart of the problem is the need for a high degree of degeneracy especially among the squarks of the lighter two families. We first analyze the phenomenologically-viable quark and squark mass matrix textures using a simple algebraic method, paying particular attention to a 2 + 1 family structure. These serve as inputs for our model building exercises. We next illustrate how the various theoretical and phenomenological constraints single out a gauged dicyclic group as the most appealing candidate for a horizontal symmetry and discuss systematically our major model building strategies. A few models obtained along this line are then presented. These include a supersymmetric SU(5) /otimes Q12 /otimes U(1) model that successfully produces a phenomenologically-viable mass matrix texture pattern for the quarks and squarks.

  16. Conditioned flavour preference negatively reinforced by caffeine in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, M R; Spetch, H; Rogers, P J

    1998-06-01

    This study examined whether 100 mg caffeine could reinforce preference for the flavour of a novel drink in moderate caffeine users, both after overnight caffeine abstinence and 2 h after receiving 100 mg caffeine, using a two-stage between-groups procedure with 36 volunteers. In the first stage, liking for a test drink (fruit tea) was assessed at breakfast following overnight caffeine abstinence, with half the subjects receiving caffeine. Liking for the tea increased significantly over four trials for subjects receiving caffeine, and decreased significantly in those without caffeine. These effects were greatest in subjects who rated the drink as highly novel. In stage two, subjects evaluated a second drink (fruit-juice) 2 h after receiving the tea, and again half the subjects received caffeine Those subjects who received caffeine in stage two but not stage one showed a significant increase in liking for the fruit-juice over the 4 test days, whereas subjects who did not receive caffeine at either stage showed a progressive decrease in liking for this drink. In contrast, no significant change in liking for the fruit-juice was seen at stage two for subjects who had received caffeine in stage one, regardless of the presence or absence of caffeine at stage two. Caffeine at breakfast increased ratings of energetic and lively, and energetic ratings also increased following caffeine in the fruit-juice in subjects who had not had caffeine at breakfast. Overall, these data are consistent with a negative reinforcement model of caffeine reinforcement, and demonstrate further the utility of the conditioned flavour preference method for evaluating reinforcing effects of drugs in humans.

  17. Local Rotational Symmetries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    Symmetry representations can be computed robustly from input images and provide intuitive descriptions of elongated regions. For exam- pie , Figure 5...upper left), a squash (upper right), a pecan (lower left), and an eggplant (lower right). - 77 L 7 04 lI..’. Figure 4-15. Analysis of the images from...agree with my perceptions: some of the figures it analyzes as clearly one region seem to me to be on the borderline, e.g. the pecan in Figures 16 and

  18. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, Franco

    One of the most powerful ideas of modern theoretical physics is the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. It is at the basis of most of the recent achievements in the description of phase transitions in Statistical Mechanics as well as of collective phenomena in solid state physics. It has also made possible the unification of weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions in elementary particle physics. Philosophically, the idea is very deep and subtle (this is probably why its exploitation is a rather recent achievement) and the popular accounts do not fully do justice to it.

  19. Symmetry-Breaking Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Allen; Lee, Ha Youn; Kardar, Mehran

    2005-09-01

    Locomotion of bacteria by actin polymerization and in vitro motion of spherical beads coated with a protein catalyzing polymerization are examples of active motility. Starting from a simple model of forces locally normal to the surface of a bead, we construct a phenomenological equation for its motion. The singularities at a continuous transition between moving and stationary beads are shown to be related to the symmetries of its shape. Universal features of the phase behavior are calculated analytically and confirmed by simulations. Fluctuations in velocity are shown to be generically non-Maxwellian and correlated to the shape of the bead.

  20. The Japan Flavour and Fragrance Materials Association's (JFFMA) safety assessment of acetal food flavouring substances uniquely used in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hajime; Hasegawa-Baba, Yasuko; Saito, Kenji; Sekiya, Fumiko; Hayashi, Shim-Mo; Mirokuji, Yoshiharu; Maruyama, Shinpei; Ono, Atsushi; Nakajima, Madoka; Degawa, Masakuni; Ozawa, Shogo; Shibutani, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Using the procedure devised by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), we performed safety evaluations on five acetal flavouring substances uniquely used in Japan: acetaldehyde 2,3-butanediol acetal, acetoin dimethyl acetal, hexanal dibutyl acetal, hexanal glyceryl acetal and 4-methyl-2-pentanone propyleneglycol acetal. As no genotoxicity study data were available in the literature, all five substances had no chemical structural alerts predicting genotoxicity. Using Cramer's classification, acetoin dimethyl acetal and hexanal dibutyl acetal were categorised as class I, and acetaldehyde 2,3-butanediol acetal, hexanal glyceryl acetal and 4-methyl-2-pentanone propyleneglycol acetal as class III. The estimated daily intakes for all five substances were within the range of 1.45-6.53 µg/person/day using the method of maximised survey-derived intake based on the annual production data in Japan from 2001, 2005, 2008 and 2010, and 156-720 µg/person/day using the single-portion exposure technique (SPET), based on the average use levels in standard portion sizes of flavoured foods. The daily intakes of the two class I substances were below the threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) - 1800 μg/person/day. The daily intakes of the three class III substances exceeded the TTC (90 μg/person/day). Two of these, acetaldehyde 2,3-butanediol acetal and hexanal glyceryl acetal, were expected to be metabolised into endogenous products after ingestion. For 4-methyl-2-pentanone propyleneglycol acetal, one of its metabolites was not expected to be metabolised into endogenous products. However, its daily intake level, based on the estimated intake calculated by the SPET method, was about 1/15 000th of the no observed effect level. It was thus concluded that all five substances raised no safety concerns when used for flavouring foods at the currently estimated intake levels. While no information on in vitro and in vivo toxicity for all five substances was available

  1. Beyond the flavour: a de-flavoured polyphenol rich extract of clove buds (Syzygium aromaticum L) as a novel dietary antioxidant ingredient.

    PubMed

    NM, Johannah; RM, Renny; G, Gopakumar; Maliakel, Balu; D, Sureshkumar; IM, Krishnakumar

    2015-10-01

    Though kitchen spices constitute an important source of dietary antioxidants, their consumption at a physiologically relevant dose is very often hampered by their unpleasant flavour characteristics. The present paper describes a novel approach to derive stable de-flavoured spice extracts with minimised taste and odour profiles which are suitable for impregnation into a variety of food and beverage matrices at physiologically relevant doses. A popular kitchen spice, clove bud (Syzygium aromaticum L), having strong flavour and pungency characteristics was selected in the present study to derive a de-flavoured extract with a standardised polyphenolic profile (Clovinol) and was incorporated into various foods. The antioxidant efficacy of Clovinol on healthy human volunteers who check and answer official emails involving responsibility was investigated by analysing their endogenous antioxidant enzymes and the extent of lipid peroxidation upon consumption of Clovinol either as capsules or in a different food/beverage at 250 mg per serving per day for 30 days. It was observed that Clovinol can be conveniently incorporated in various food matrices without flavour issues and the consumption of such food/beverage items may support an effective detoxification process with an average elevation of 33 ± 3% in catalase, 66 ± 8% in SOD, 56 ± 5% in GPx and 167 ± 21% in GSH levels, and 81 ± 11% attenuation in membrane lipid peroxidation level.

  2. Looking for symmetry: fixational eye movements are biased by image mirror symmetry.

    PubMed

    Meso, Andrew Isaac; Montagnini, Anna; Bell, Jason; Masson, Guillaume S

    2016-09-01

    Humans are highly sensitive to symmetry. During scene exploration, the area of the retina with dense light receptor coverage acquires most information from relevant locations determined by gaze fixation. We characterized patterns of fixational eye movements made by observers staring at synthetic scenes either freely (i.e., free exploration) or during a symmetry orientation discrimination task (i.e., active exploration). Stimuli could be mirror-symmetric or not. Both free and active exploration generated more saccades parallel to the axis of symmetry than along other orientations. Most saccades were small (<2°), leaving the fovea within a 4° radius of fixation. Analysis of saccade dynamics showed that the observed parallel orientation selectivity emerged within 500 ms of stimulus onset and persisted throughout the trials under both viewing conditions. Symmetry strongly distorted existing anisotropies in gaze direction in a seemingly automatic process. We argue that this bias serves a functional role in which adjusted scene sampling enhances and maintains sustained sensitivity to local spatial correlations arising from symmetry.

  3. Looking for symmetry: fixational eye movements are biased by image mirror symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Montagnini, Anna; Bell, Jason; Masson, Guillaume S.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are highly sensitive to symmetry. During scene exploration, the area of the retina with dense light receptor coverage acquires most information from relevant locations determined by gaze fixation. We characterized patterns of fixational eye movements made by observers staring at synthetic scenes either freely (i.e., free exploration) or during a symmetry orientation discrimination task (i.e., active exploration). Stimuli could be mirror-symmetric or not. Both free and active exploration generated more saccades parallel to the axis of symmetry than along other orientations. Most saccades were small (<2°), leaving the fovea within a 4° radius of fixation. Analysis of saccade dynamics showed that the observed parallel orientation selectivity emerged within 500 ms of stimulus onset and persisted throughout the trials under both viewing conditions. Symmetry strongly distorted existing anisotropies in gaze direction in a seemingly automatic process. We argue that this bias serves a functional role in which adjusted scene sampling enhances and maintains sustained sensitivity to local spatial correlations arising from symmetry. PMID:27306681

  4. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  5. Applications of chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    The author discusses several topics in the applications of chiral symmetry at nonzero temperature. First, where does the rho go? The answer: up. The restoration of chiral symmetry at a temperature T{sub {chi}} implies that the {rho} and a{sub 1} vector mesons are degenerate in mass. In a gauged linear sigma model the {rho} mass increases with temperature, m{sub {rho}}(T{sub {chi}}) > m{sub {rho}}(0). The author conjectures that at T{sub {chi}} the thermal {rho} - a{sub 1}, peak is relatively high, at about {approximately}1 GeV, with a width approximately that at zero temperature (up to standard kinematic factors). The {omega} meson also increases in mass, nearly degenerate with the {rho}, but its width grows dramatically with temperature, increasing to at least {approximately}100 MeV by T{sub {chi}}. The author also stresses how utterly remarkable the principle of vector meson dominance is, when viewed from the modern perspective of the renormalization group. Secondly, he discusses the possible appearance of disoriented chiral condensates from {open_quotes}quenched{close_quotes} heavy ion collisions. It appears difficult to obtain large domains of disoriented chiral condensates in the standard two flavor model. This leads to the last topic, which is the phase diagram for QCD with three flavors, and its proximity to the chiral critical point. QCD may be very near this chiral critical point, and one might thereby generated large domains of disoriented chiral condensates.

  6. Salt and intramuscular fat modulate dynamic perception of flavour and texture in dry-cured hams.

    PubMed

    Lorido, Laura; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of salt and intramuscular fat (IMF) content on the sensory characteristics of two different types of dry-cured hams (Iberian and Serrano) using the time-intensity (TI) method. All studied TI parameters of flavour attributes (overall flavour, saltiness, cured and rancid flavours) were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by variations in the salt and/or IMF content. However, regarding texture attributes only the maximum intensity (Imax) of hardness was significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the salt content of hams. Compared to Iberian dry-cured hams, the dynamic perception of the flavour and texture of Serrano dry-cured hams was less influenced by variations in salt and/or IMF content. The dynamic sensory techniques may be helpful to guarantee the quality of dry-cured products subjected to strategies of salt and fat reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In search of symmetry lost.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Frank

    2005-01-20

    Powerful symmetry principles have guided physicists in their quest for nature's fundamental laws. The successful gauge theory of electroweak interactions postulates a more extensive symmetry for its equations than are manifest in the world. The discrepancy is ascribed to a pervasive symmetry-breaking field, which fills all space uniformly, rendering the Universe a sort of exotic superconductor. So far, the evidence for these bold ideas is indirect. But soon the theory will undergo a critical test depending on whether the quanta of this symmetry-breaking field, the so-called Higgs particles, are produced at the Large Hadron Collider (due to begin operation in 2007).

  8. [Symmetries and homologies of Geomerida].

    PubMed

    Zarenkov, N A

    2005-01-01

    The symmetry of Earths life cover (Geomerida) was described generally by L.A. Zenkevich (1948). It coincides with the symmetry of geographic cover. Its symmetry elements are equatorial plane and three meridonal planes corresponded to oceans and continents. The hypsographic curve with point of inflection (symmetry element) on 3 km depth line should be added to these elements. The plankton and benthos communities as well as fauna of taxons are distributed symmetrically according these symmetry elements. Zenkevich model was successfully extrapolated to plankton by K.V. Beklemishev (1967, 1969) and to abyssal benthos by Sokolova M.N. (1986). The plankton communities inhabiting symmetrically located macrocirculations are considered as homologous. The character of circulation determines the trophic structure of plankton and benthos. In the case of high productivity of plankton, benthic grazing animals feed on sedimented particles have bilateral symmetric mouthpart. Otherwise they have to acquire food from water column and use cyclomeric mouthpart. Thus, the symmetry of macrocirculations determines the symmetry distribution of benthic animals with two major symmetries of mouthparts. The peculiarities of organisms' symmetry are discussed in the context of Pierre Curie principle and the ideas of K.V. Beklemishev concerning evolution of morphological axes.

  9. Symmetry breaking in confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Berim, Gersh O

    2010-02-26

    The recent progress in the theoretical investigation of the symmetry breaking (the existence of a stable state of a system, in which the symmetry is lower than the symmetry of the system itself) for classical and quantum fluids is reviewed. The emphasis is on the conditions which cause symmetry breaking in the density distribution for one component fluids and binary mixtures confined in a closed nanoslit between identical solid walls. The existing studies have revealed that two kinds of symmetry breaking can occur in such systems. First, a one-dimensional symmetry breaking occurs only in the direction normal to the walls as a fluid density profile asymmetric with respect of the middle of the slit and uniform in any direction parallel to the walls. Second, a two-dimensional symmetry breaking occurs in the fluid density distribution which is nonuniform in one of the directions parallel to the walls and asymmetrical in the direction normal to the walls. It manifests through liquid bumps and bridges in the fluid density distribution. For one component fluids, conditions of existence of symmetry breaking are provided in terms of the average fluid density, strength of fluid-solid interactions, distance at which the solid wall generates a hard core repulsion, and temperature. In the case of binary mixtures, the occurrence of symmetry breaking also depends on the composition of the confined mixtures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Heavy-flavour productions in the relativistic heavy ion collisions in LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), open heavy-flavour productions in the heavy-ion collisions (Pb-Pb) has studied by measuring D mesons, leptons from semi-leptonic decay of heavy-flavour hadrons and jets which are original from heavy quarks. In this proceedings, those results are shown together with the measurements with pp and p-Pb collisions and discussed with theoretical calculations to understand the properties of the QCD matter.

  11. Flavour exposures after conditioned aversion or preference trigger different brain processes in anaesthetised pigs.

    PubMed

    Gaultier, A; Meunier-Salaün, M C; Malbert, C H; Val-Laillet, D

    2011-11-01

    We describe the behavioural consequences of conditioned flavour aversion and preference in pigs and have investigated the brain circuits involved in the representation of flavours with different hedonic values. The study was performed on eight 30-kg pigs. (i) Animals were negatively conditioned to an F- flavour added to a meal followed by LiCl intraduodenal (i.d.) injection, and positively conditioned to an F+ flavour added to a meal followed by NaCl i.d. injection. F+ and F- were thyme or cinnamon flavours. After each conditioning, the behavioural activities were recorded; (ii) One and 5 weeks later, animals were subjected to three two-choice food tests to investigate their preferences between F+, F- and a novel flavour (O); and (iii) Anaesthetised animals were subjected to three SPECT brain imaging sessions: control situation (no flavour) and exposure to F+ and to F-. The negative reinforcement induced a physical malaise and visceral illness. After a positive reinforcement, animals showed playing or feeding motivation and quietness. F+ was significantly preferred over O and F-, and O was significantly preferred over F-. Both F- and F+ induced some metabolic differences in neural circuits involved in sensory associative processes, learning and memory, emotions, reward and feeding motivation. Exposure to F+ induced a higher activity in corticolimbic and reward-related areas, while F- induced a deactivation of the basal nuclei and limbic thalamic nuclei. This study reveals the unconscious cognitive dimension evoked by food flavours according to the individual experience, and highlights the importance of the food sensory image on hedonism and anticipatory eating behaviour.

  12. From Molecular Point Group Symmetry to Space Group Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Describes undergraduate chemistry curricula in which the student is asked to either build a model of one asymmetric unit in the unit cell and to indicate the positions of the symmetry-related units by putting in key atoms, or to identify on a prebuild model the asymetric and symmetry-related units. (BB)

  13. Charge Symmetry Breaking in Light Hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Recently precise Λ-hyperon ground-state binding energies in light hypernuclei have been determined with novel techniques, in particular with a new generation of magnetic spectrometers. The precision spectroscopy results of Λ hypernuclei isomultiplets contributed considerably to the study of charge symmetry breaking in the strong interaction. At the Mainz Microtron MAMI the high-resolution spectroscopy of decay-pions in strangeness electro-production was used to extract the ground state binding energy in ^4_ΛH. This value was compared to the value of the isospin mirror hypernucleus ^4_ΛHe to confirm a sizable breaking of the charge symmetry. A synopsis for the values in the A = 7, 8, 9, and 10 hypernuclei suggests small or vanishing effects in other isomultiplets. The full understanding of the large and spin-dependent effect in the A = 4 mirror pair remains one of the open issues of hypernuclear physics.

  14. The production of pork with garlic flavour notes using garlic essential oil.

    PubMed

    Leong, Jasmine; Morel, Patrick C H; Purchas, Roger W; Wilkinson, Brian H P

    2010-04-01

    Garlic essential oil (GEO) added directly to pork mince or to the diet of pigs was evaluated for its effectiveness in masking undesirable mutton flavour. Pork was from 31 female pigs (Duroc x (Large White x Landrace)) grown on diets containing either animal-plus-plant products (AP diet) or plant products only (P diet) with four levels of GEO: 0, 0.55, 1.44 and 1.84 g/kg feed and 0, 0.55, 1.44 and 2.15 g/kg feed in the AP and P diet, respectively. Garlic flavour increased and mutton flavour decreased in pork from pigs that consumed more than about 150 g and 220 g of GEO in P and AP diets, respectively over the 57-day feeding period. The garlic flavour was stronger and the mutton flavour less intense for pork from pigs on the P diet. When GEO was added to pork mince at 125 ppm, it significantly reduced mutton flavour. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of flavour compounds from orange juices by HS-SPME and GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Covaciu, F.; Feher, I.; Magdas, A.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2013-11-01

    The flavour of the orange juices, which gives the taste and odour of the product, is an important criterion about the products quality for consumers. A fresh single strength and two commercial orange juices (obtained from concentrate) flavour profile were studied using a selective and sensitive gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analytical system, after a solvent free, single step preconcentration and extraction technique, the headspace solid phase microextraction (HP-SPME). In the studied orange juices 55 flavour compounds were detected and classified as belonging to the esters, alcohols, ketones, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes chemical families. The fresh single strength orange juice was characterized by high amount of esters, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Limonene and valencene were the most abundant flavours in this fresh natural orange juice. Alcohols and ketones were found in higher concentration in the commercial orange juices made from concentrate, than in the single strength products. Nevertheless, in commercial juices the most abundant flavour was limonene and α-terpineol. The results highlight clear differences between fresh singles strength orange juice and juice from concentrate. The orange juices reconstructed from concentrate, made in Romania, present low quantity of flavour compounds, suggesting the absence or a low rearomatization process, but extraneous components were not detected.

  16. Surfactant-free solid dispersion of fat-soluble flavour in an amorphous sugar matrix.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tomo; Hidaka, Fumihiro; Miyake, Kento; Yoshiyama, Natsuki; Takeda, Koji; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Imamura, Koreyoshi

    2016-04-15

    A solid dispersion technique to homogeneously disperse hydrophobic ingredients in a water-soluble solid without using surfactant was examined as follows: first, freeze-dried amorphous sugar was dissolved in an organic medium that contained a soluble model hydrophobic component. Second, the mixed solution of sugar and the model hydrophobic component was vacuum dried into a solid (solid dispersion). Methanol and six fat-soluble flavours, including cinnamaldehyde, were used as organic media and model hydrophobic components. The retention of flavours in the solid dispersion during drying and storage under vacuum was evaluated. The amorphised disaccharides dissolved in methanol up to 100mg/mL, even temporarily (20s to 10 days) and could be solidified without any evidence of crystallisation and segregation from flavour. The solid dispersion, prepared using α-maltose usually showed 65-95% flavour retention during drying (and storage for cinnamaldehyde), whereas ⩾ 50% of the flavour was lost when the flavour was O/W emulsified with a surfactant and then freeze-dried with sugar.

  17. Symmetry and surface symmetry energies in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. J.; Mekjian, A. Z.

    2010-12-15

    A study of the properties of the symmetry energy of nuclei is presented based on density-functional theory. Calculations for finite nuclei are given so that the study includes isospin-dependent surface symmetry considerations as well as isospin-independent surface effects. Calculations are done at both zero and nonzero temperature. It is shown that the surface symmetry energy term is the most sensitive to the temperature while the bulk energy term is the least sensitive. It is also shown that the temperature-dependence terms are insensitive to the force used and even more insensitive to the existence of neutron skin. Results for a symmetry energy with both volume and surface terms are compared with a symmetry energy with only volume terms along the line of {beta} stability. Differences of several MeV are shown over a good fraction of the total mass range in A. Also given are calculations for the bulk, surface and Coulomb terms.

  18. Symmetry reduction related with nonlocal symmetry for Gardner equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Based on the truncated Painlevé method or the Möbious (conformal) invariant form, the nonlocal symmetry for the (1+1)-dimensional Gardner equation is derived. The nonlocal symmetry can be localized to the Lie point symmetry by introducing one new dependent variable. Thanks to the localization procedure, the finite symmetry transformations are obtained by solving the initial value problem of the prolonged systems. Furthermore, by using the symmetry reduction method to the enlarged systems, many explicit interaction solutions among different types of solutions such as solitary waves, rational solutions, Painlevé II solutions are given. Especially, some special concrete soliton-cnoidal interaction solutions are analyzed both in analytical and graphical ways.

  19. NIF symmetry capsule modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Pino, J. E.; Rowley, D. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Tipton, R. E.

    2013-10-01

    NIF CH ablator symmetry capsules are filled with hydrogen or helium gas. SymCaps have more moderate convergence ratios ~ 15 as opposed to ~ 35 for ignition capsules with DT ice layers, and better agreement has been achieved between simulations and experimental data. We will present modeling of capsules with CD layers and tritium fill, for which we are able to match the dependence of DT yield on recession distance of the CD layer from the gas. We can also match the performance of CH capsules with D3 He fill. The simulations include surface roughness, drive asymmetry, a mock-up of modulation introduced by the tent holding the capsule, and an empirical prescription for ablator-gas atomic mix. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. The ENSO and the changing background: cocktailing toward more flavours?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, T. P.; Karumuri, A.

    2012-12-01

    This talk covers the research issues associated with an emerging background trend that is potentially associated with the global warming- and its implications for the ENSO types. Associated with such a trend, we see an increasing frequency of the El Niño Modokis, characterized by warm sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the central Pacific flanked to the east and west by cold SSTA since 1980s. Also been referred to as the central Pacific/warm pool/ dateline El Niño, during a typical Modoki event such as 2004, the maximum SSTA during the boreal summer in the central tropical Pacific persists through the ensuing boreal winter, instead of amplifying and propagating to the east/west as in case of the pre-1980s trans-Niño signal associated with the canonical El Niños. We also discuss the distinct teleconnections associated with each of the ENSO flavours. For example, the canonical (Modoki) El Niños result in an anomalously wet (dry) summer in Japan, and reduce (increase) the typhoon frequency in northwest Pacific. We further briefly touch upon various works that bring out the various mechanisms associated with the evolution of different flavours of ENSO, and discuss the differences and similarities between the background mechanisms relevant to ENSO and ENSO Modoki, respectively. Interestingly, the aforementioned prominent slowly varying background signal is strongly associated with the increasing trend in land-ocean temperature also. The trend seems to be instrumental in occurrence of the hitherto unseen basinwide warming seen during boreal summer through early fall of 2009. Interestingly, the coupled processes typical of the tropical Pacific interannual events were also largely amiss, and the northwest Pacific also seems to be playing a role. These results indicate that any further increase in global warming may result in more basinwide warm events in place of canonical El Niños, along with the occurrence of more intense La Niñas and El Niño Modokis

  1. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  2. Symmetry in the Car Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a lesson on rotational symmetry which she developed for her students. The aim of the lesson was "to identify objects with rotational symmetry in the staff car park" and the success criteria were "pictures or sketches of at least six objects with different orders of rotation". After finding examples of…

  3. Symmetry in the basic sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toole, Joseph E.; Jensen, David W.; Rogers, Mark E.; Chernek, Paul J.; Erstfeld, Thomas E.

    1989-04-01

    The basic mathematical theory behind plane symmetry groups is presented. This theory is then applied in classifying the symmetry of bounded figures, frieze patterns and wallpaper patterns. Recently developed algorithms are included to help analyze complex designs. Symmetry operations relevant to 3-D crystallography are discussed. In particular, the seven crystal systems that classify the 32 crystallographic point groups are described. These are then used to construct the Bravais lattices. The role is investigated of symmetry in biological forms. Specifically, work on growth and form of molluscan shells is reviewed with an attempt to explain the consequences of that growth and form to the natural history of the Chambered Nautilus and its ancestors. The central role symmetry has increasingly played in physics is looked at by examining the Principle of Least Action and the invariance of the Lagrangian under a transformation. Noether's Theorem guarantees that a conservation law is associated with each of these symmetries. Examples include the conservation of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum, as well as the purely quantum mechanical symmetry of invariance under an exchange operation. A brief look at gauge theories is the final example of how symmetry has become a guiding principle in the formulation of new theories.

  4. Symmetry in the Car Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a lesson on rotational symmetry which she developed for her students. The aim of the lesson was "to identify objects with rotational symmetry in the staff car park" and the success criteria were "pictures or sketches of at least six objects with different orders of rotation". After finding examples of…

  5. Asymptotic symmetries on Killing horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou

    2001-12-01

    We investigate asymptotic symmetries regularly defined on spherically symmetric Killing horizons in Einstein theory with or without the cosmological constant. These asymptotic symmetries are described by asymptotic Killing vectors, along which the Lie derivatives of perturbed metrics vanish on a Killing horizon. We derive the general form of the asymptotic Killing vectors and find that the group of asymptotic symmetries consists of rigid O(3) rotations of a horizon two-sphere and supertranslations along the null direction on the horizon, which depend arbitrarily on the null coordinate as well as the angular coordinates. By introducing the notion of asymptotic Killing horizons, we also show that local properties of Killing horizons are preserved not only under diffeomorphisms but also under nontrivial transformations generated by the asymptotic symmetry group. Although the asymptotic symmetry group contains the Diff(S1) subgroup, which results from supertranslations dependent only on the null coordinate, it is shown that the Poisson brackets algebra of the conserved charges conjugate to asymptotic Killing vectors does not acquire nontrivial central charges. Finally, by considering extended symmetries, we discuss the fact that unnatural reduction of the symmetry group is necessary in order to obtain the Virasoro algebra with nontrivial central charges, which is not justified when we respect the spherical symmetry of Killing horizons.

  6. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  7. Symmetries in geology and geophysics.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, D L; Newman, W I

    1996-12-10

    Symmetries have played an important role in a variety of problems in geology and geophysics. A large fraction of studies in mineralogy are devoted to the symmetry properties of crystals. In this paper, however, the emphasis will be on scale-invariant (fractal) symmetries. The earth's topography is an example of both statistically self-similar and self-affine fractals. Landforms are also associated with drainage networks, which are statistical fractal trees. A universal feature of drainage networks and other growth networks is side branching. Deterministic space-filling networks with side-branching symmetries are illustrated. It is shown that naturally occurring drainage networks have symmetries similar to diffusion-limited aggregation clusters.

  8. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  9. Symmetry and repetition in perspective.

    PubMed

    van der Vloed, Gert; Csathó, Arpád; van der Helm, Peter A

    2005-09-01

    Although ecologically relevant, perspective views of symmetries and repetitions have hardly been investigated. Any symmetry or repetition that is not oriented orthogonally to the line of sight yields perspective distortions on the retina. In this study, these distortions are analyzed in terms of first-order structures (i.e., virtual lines between corresponding points) and second-order structures (i.e., correlation quadrangles formed by two virtual lines). In the literature, these structures have been proposed to guide the detection of fron to parallel symmetry and repetition. But what about perspective views? First, the analysis in this study shows that perspective distorts the retinal first-order and second-order structures of symmetry and repetition differently. Second, the results of two experiments on this distortion difference suggest that, in perspective views, symmetry and repetition detection is not preceded by normalization but occurs directly on the basis of the retinal first-order and second-order structures.

  10. Heavy Quark Symmetries: Molecular Partners of the X(3872) and Z_{b}(10610)/Z_{b}'(10650)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng-Kun; Hidalgo-Duque, Carlos; Nieves, Juan; Pavón Valderrama, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have used an Effective Field Theory (EFT) framework based on Heavy Quark Spin (HQSS), Heavy Flavour (HFS) and Heavy Antiquark-Diquark symmetries (HADS). Using a standard lagrangian for the heavy meson-heavy antimeson system, we fit the counter-terms of the model to predict some promising experimental data that can be interpreted as heavy meson-heavy antimeson molecules, that is, the X(3872) and the Zb(10610)/Z'b(10650). Next, and, taking advantage of HADS, we use the same lagrangian to explore the consequences for heavy meson-doubly heavy baryon molecules, which can also be interpreted as triply heavy pentaquarks.

  11. Porous calcium carbonate as a carrier material to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds.

    PubMed

    Lundin Johnson, Maria; Noreland, David; Gane, Patrick; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Ridgway, Cathy; Millqvist Fureby, Anna

    2017-03-15

    Two different food grade functionalised porous calcium carbonates (FCC), with different pore size and pore size distributions, were characterised and used as carrier materials to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds in aqueous solution. The loading level was varied between 1.3% by weight (wt%) and 35 wt%, where the upper limit of 35 wt% was the total maximum loading capacity of flavouring compound in FCC based on the fraction of the total weight of FCC plus flavouring compound. Flavouring compounds (l-carvone, vanillin, and curcumin) were selected based on their difference in hydrophilicity and capacity to crystallise. Release kinetic studies revealed that all flavouring compounds showed an accelerated release when loaded in FCC compared to dissolution of the flavouring compound itself in aqueous medium. The amorphous state and/or surface enlargement of the flavouring compound inside or on FCC explains the faster release. The flavouring compounds capable of crystallising (vanillin and curcumin) were almost exclusively amorphous within the porous FCC material as determined by X-ray powder diffraction one week after loading and after storing the loaded FCC material for up to 9 months at room temperature. A small amount of crystalline vanillin and curcumin was detected in the FCC material with large pores and high flavouring compound loading (≥30 wt%). Additionally, two different loading strategies were evaluated, loading by dissolving the flavouring compound in acetone or loading by a hot melt method. Porosimetry data showed that the melt method was more efficient in filling the smallest pores (<100 nm). The main factor influencing the release rate appears to be the amorphous state of the flavouring compound and the increase in exposed surface area. The confinement in small pores prevents crystallisation of the flavouring compounds during storage, providing a stable amorphous form retaining high release rate also after storage.

  12. Impact of flavour variability on electronic cigarette use experience: an internet survey.

    PubMed

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos E; Romagna, Giorgio; Tsiapras, Dimitris; Kyrzopoulos, Stamatis; Spyrou, Alketa; Voudris, Vassilis

    2013-12-17

    A major characteristic of the electronic cigarette (EC) market is the availability of a large number of different flavours. This has been criticised by the public health authorities, some of whom believe that diverse flavours will attract young users and that ECs are a gateway to smoking. At the same time, several reports in the news media mention that the main purpose of flavour marketing is to attract youngsters. The importance of flavourings and their patterns of use by EC consumers have not been adequately evaluated, therefore, the purpose of this survey was to examine and understand the impact of flavourings in the EC experience of dedicated users. A questionnaire was prepared and uploaded in an online survey tool. EC users were asked to participate irrespective of their current smoking status. Participants were divided according to their smoking status at the time of participation in two subgroups: former smokers and current smokers. In total, 4,618 participants were included in the analysis, with 4,515 reporting current smoking status. The vast majority (91.1%) were former smokers, while current smokers had reduced smoking consumption from 20 to 4 cigarettes per day. Both subgroups had a median smoking history of 22 years and had been using ECs for 12 months. On average they were using three different types of liquid flavours on a regular basis, with former smokers switching between flavours more frequently compared to current smokers; 69.2% of the former subgroup reported doing so on a daily basis or within the day. Fruit flavours were more popular at the time of participation, while tobacco flavours were more popular at initiation of EC use. On a scale from 1 (not at all important) to 5 (extremely important) participants answered that variability of flavours was "very important" (score = 4) in their effort to reduce or quit smoking. The majority reported that restricting variability will make ECs less enjoyable and more boring, while 48.5% mentioned that

  13. ENSO flavours during the pre-instrumental period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Mandy; Henley, Benjamin; Karoly, David

    2017-04-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the largest driver of interannual variability in the global climate system. Recent studies have identified major changes in the frequency and intensity of ENSO events. Under greenhouse warming scenarios an increase in frequency of extreme El Nino and La Nina events is projected. Recent work has identified different 'flavours' of ENSO, for example, classical cold-tongue ENSO events and non-conventional El Niño definitions like the Central Pacific, Modoki and warm pool El Niño events. A critical question is to understand the dynamical aspects of the variety of ENSO events in a changing climate prior to the instrumental period. We present the first sub-seasonally resolved reconstruction of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events based on a multi-century seasonally-resolved network of tropical coral records. The comparison with instrumental observations and existing ENSO reconstructions exhibits high agreement on inter-annual timescales and highlights the merit of seasonally-resolved proxies in studying ENSO dynamics. The reconstructions are used to explore seasonal to multi-decadal time scale variability and trends in frequency, duration and propagation direction of ENSO events.

  14. Flavour changing Z ' signals in a 6D inspired model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frère, Jean-Marie; Libanov, Maxim; Mollet, Simon; Troitsky, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We consider the phenomenology of new neutral gauge bosons with flavour non-diagonal couplings to fermions, inherent in 6D models explaining successfully the hierarchy of masses as well as the mixing for quarks, charged leptons and neutrinos (this model can in particular be credited with the correct prediction of the neutrino mixing angle θ 13). We present a general relation between masses of new gauge bosons and their couplings to fermions. We show that in the current realization of the model, the new heavy bosons are unreachable at LHC but argue why the constraint could be relaxed in the context of a different realization. In view of a more systematic study, we use an effective model inspired by the above to relate directly rare meson decays to possible LHC observations. In terms of effective Lagrangians, this can be seen as the introduction in the model of only one overall scaling parameter to extend our approach without modifying the 4D (gauge) structure.

  15. A taste of dark matter: Flavour constraints on pseudoscalar mediators

    DOE PAGES

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Kahlhoefer, Felix; McCabe, Christopher; ...

    2015-03-31

    Dark matter interacting via the exchange of a light pseudoscalar can induce observable signals in indirect detection experiments and experience large self-interactions while evading the strong bounds from direct dark matter searches. The pseudoscalar mediator will however induce flavour-changing interactions in the Standard Model, providing a promising alternative way to test these models. We investigate in detail the constraints arising from rare meson decays and fixed target experiments for different coupling structures between the pseudoscalar and Standard Model fermions. The resulting bounds are highly complementary to the information inferred from the dark matter relic density and the constraints from primordialmore » nucleosynthesis. We discuss the implications of our findings for the dark matter self-interaction cross section and the prospects of probing dark matter coupled to a light pseudoscalar with direct or indirect detection experiments. In particular, we find that a pseudoscalar mediator can only explain the Galactic Centre excess if its mass is above that of the B mesons, and that it is impossible to obtain a sufficiently large direct detection cross section to account for the DAMA modulation.« less

  16. Flavour fields in steady state: stress tensor and free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a probe brane in a given gravitational background is governed by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The corresponding open string metric arises naturally in studying the fluctuations on the probe. In Gauge-String duality, it is known that in the presence of a constant electric field on the worldvolume of the probe, the open string metric acquires an event horizon and therefore the fluctuation modes on the probe experience an effective temperature. In this article, we bring together various properties of such a system to a formal definition and a subsequent narration of the effective thermodynamics and the stress tensor of the corresponding flavour fields, also including a non-vanishing chemical potential. In doing so, we point out a potentially infinitely-degenerate scheme-dependence of regularizing the free energy, which nevertheless yields a universal contribution in certain cases. This universal piece appears as the coefficient of a log-divergence in free energy when a space-filling probe brane is embedded in AdS d+1-background, for d = 2, 4, and is related to conformal anomaly. For the special case of d = 2, the universal factor has a striking resemblance to the well-known heat current formula in (1 + 1)-dimensional conformal field theory in steady-state, which endows a plausible physical interpretation to it. Interestingly, we observe a vanishing conformal anomaly in d = 6.

  17. Pecorino Crotonese cheese: study of bacterial population and flavour compounds.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, C L; Pitino, I; Ribbera, A; Caggia, C

    2010-05-01

    The diversity and dynamics of the dominant bacterial population during the manufacture and the ripening of two artisanal Pecorino Crotonese cheeses, provided by different farms, were investigated by the combination of culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Three hundred and thirty-three strains were isolated from selective culture media, clustered using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results indicate a decrease in biodiversity during ripening, revealing the presence of Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus species in the curd and in aged cheese samples and the occurrence of several lactobacilli throughout cheese ripening, with the dominance of Lactobacillus rhamnosus species. Bacterial dynamics determined by Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis provided a more precise description of the distribution of bacteria, highlighting differences in the bacterial community among cheese samples, and allowed to detect Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus buchneri and Leuconostoc mesenteroides species, which were not isolated. Moreover, the concentration of flavour compounds produced throughout cheese ripening was investigated and related to lactic acid bacteria presence. Fifty-seven compounds were identified in the volatile fraction of Pecorino Crotonese cheeses by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Esters, alcohols and free fatty acids were the most abundant compounds, while aldehydes and hydrocarbons were present at low levels.

  18. A taste of dark matter: Flavour constraints on pseudoscalar mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Kahlhoefer, Felix; McCabe, Christopher; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2015-03-31

    Dark matter interacting via the exchange of a light pseudoscalar can induce observable signals in indirect detection experiments and experience large self-interactions while evading the strong bounds from direct dark matter searches. The pseudoscalar mediator will however induce flavour-changing interactions in the Standard Model, providing a promising alternative way to test these models. We investigate in detail the constraints arising from rare meson decays and fixed target experiments for different coupling structures between the pseudoscalar and Standard Model fermions. The resulting bounds are highly complementary to the information inferred from the dark matter relic density and the constraints from primordial nucleosynthesis. We discuss the implications of our findings for the dark matter self-interaction cross section and the prospects of probing dark matter coupled to a light pseudoscalar with direct or indirect detection experiments. In particular, we find that a pseudoscalar mediator can only explain the Galactic Centre excess if its mass is above that of the B mesons, and that it is impossible to obtain a sufficiently large direct detection cross section to account for the DAMA modulation.

  19. Flavours of Baroclinic Instability in the Global Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, S. R.; Smith, K. S.

    2016-02-01

    The transfer of energy from the global ocean circulation to mesoscale eddies is primarily mediated by baroclinic instability, which releases the superabundant available potential energy stored in sloping isopycnals by basin-scale wind and buoyancy forcing. However, the details of the local shear and stratification can give rise to qualitatively distinct flavours of baroclinic instability. In particular, the presence of outcropping isopycnals (or, equivalent, a thermal wind shear at the upper surface) can have a strong impact on the necessary conditions for baroclinic instability and the resulting nonlinear cascade to submesoscales. In this article, a simple framework is described for categorizing baroclinic instability in terms of two non-dimensional parameters, the Charney-Green number and the Phillips supercriticality. We analyze the influence of a non-zonal mean flow on growth rates and the baroclinic conversion of available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy. Finally, hydrographic profiles are used to form a global atlas of baroclinic instability in the ocean, and regional patterns are discussed.

  20. PT Symmetry and Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in a Microwave Billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, S.; Dietz, B.; Günther, U.; Harney, H. L.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.; Schäfer, F.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the presence of parity-time (PT) symmetry for the non-Hermitian two-state Hamiltonian of a dissipative microwave billiard in the vicinity of an exceptional point (EP). The shape of the billiard depends on two parameters. The Hamiltonian is determined from the measured resonance spectrum on a fine grid in the parameter plane. After applying a purely imaginary diagonal shift to the Hamiltonian, its eigenvalues are either real or complex conjugate on a curve, which passes through the EP. An appropriate basis choice reveals its PT symmetry. Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs at the EP.

  1. Functional Symmetry of Endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In higher eukaryotic cells pleiomorphic compartments composed of vacuoles, tubules and vesicles move from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane to the cell center, operating in early biosynthetic trafficking and endocytosis, respectively. Besides transporting cargo to the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes, a major task of these compartments is to promote extensive membrane recycling. The endocytic membrane system is traditionally divided into early (sorting) endosomes, late endosomes and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC). Recent studies on the intermediate compartment (IC) between the ER and the Golgi apparatus suggest that it also consists of peripheral (“early”) and centralized (“late”) structures, as well as a third component, designated here as the biosynthetic recycling compartment (BRC). We propose that the ERC and the BRC exist as long-lived “mirror compartments” at the cell center that also share the ability to expand and become mobilized during cell activation. These considerations emphasize the functional symmetry of endomembrane compartments, which provides a basis for the membrane rearrangements taking place during cell division, polarization, and differentiation. PMID:17267686

  2. Spin, mass, and symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    When the strong interactions were a mystery, spin seemed to be just a complication on top of an already puzzling set of phenomena. But now that particle physicists have understood the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions, to be gauge theories, with matter built of quarks and leptons, it is recognized that the special properties of spin 1/2 and spin 1 particles have taken central role in the understanding of Nature. The lectures in this summer school will be devoted to the use of spin in unravelling detailed questions about the fundamental interactions. Thus, why not begin by posing a deeper question: Why is there spin? More precisely, why do the basic pointlike constituents of Nature carry intrinsic nonzero quanta of angular momentum? Though the authos has found no definite answer to this question, the pursuit of an answer has led through a wonderful tangle of speculations on the deep structure of Nature. Is spin constructed or is it fundamental? Is it the requirement of symmetry? In the furthest flights taken, it seems that space-time itself is too restrictive a notion, and that this must be generalized in order to gain a full appreciation of spin. In any case, there is no doubt that spin must play a central role in unlocking the mysteries of fundamental physics.

  3. Symmetry algebras of linear differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, A. V.; Shirokov, I. V.

    1992-07-01

    The local symmetries of linear differential equations are investigated by means of proven theorems on the structure of the algebra of local symmetries of translationally and dilatationally invariant differential equations. For a nonparabolic second-order equation, the absence of nontrivial nonlinear local symmetries is proved. This means that the local symmetries reduce to the Lie algebra of linear differential symmetry operators. For the Laplace—Beltrami equation, all local symmetries reduce to the enveloping algebra of the algebra of the conformal group.

  4. Nonlinear electromagnetic fields and symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjašić, Irena; Gulin, Luka; Smolić, Ivica

    2017-06-01

    We extend the classical results on the symmetry inheritance of the canonical electromagnetic fields, described by the Maxwell's Lagrangian, to a much wider class of models, which include those of the Born-Infeld, power Maxwell and the Euler-Heisenberg type. Symmetry inheriting fields allow the introduction of electromagnetic scalar potentials and these are proven to be constant on the Killing horizons. Finally, using the relations obtained along the analysis, we generalize and simplify the recent proof for the symmetry inheritance of the 3-dimensional case, as well as give the first constraint for the higher dimensional electromagnetic fields.

  5. Use of flavoured cigarettes in Poland: data from the global adult tobacco survey (2009–2010)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nowadays the European Union faces a debate on the ban of sale of flavoured cigarettes. There is growing evidence that certain subgroups of smokers are more vulnerable to the use of flavoured cigarettes. However in some European countries, figures on the use of these cigarettes are still scarce. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of flavoured cigarettes use in Poland, and examine whether its use among adults varies by socio-demographic characteristics. Methods Data on tobacco use including flavoured cigarettes and other characteristics were derived from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS). GATS is a cross-sectional, household survey implemented in Poland between 2009 and 2010. GATS provided data on a representative sample of 7,840 individuals covering 2,254 current smokers. Logistic regression model was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of the selected socio-economic variables on the use of flavoured cigarettes. Results Among females the aromatized cigarettes use was 26.1% compared to 10.5% in males (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.62–3.2; p ≤ 0.001). Respondents aged 20–29 years had an increased likelihood of using flavoured cigarettes compared to subjects aged 60 years or older (OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1–6.5; p ≤ 0.001). Respondents aware of negative health consequences of smoking had OR = 1.4 95% CI: 1.1–2.1 (p ≤ 0.05) of smoking aromatized cigarettes compared to those who were unaware. Participants who perceived some kinds of cigarettes less harmful than others were also more likely to use flavoured cigarettes compared to subjects who were convinced that all cigarettes are equally harmful (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.8; p ≤ 0.01). High educational attainment, living in large cities, being non-economically active was also associated with use of flavoured cigarettes. Conclusion Our results are consistent with majority of epidemiology studies on this topic to date and

  6. Use of flavoured cigarettes in Poland: data from the global adult tobacco survey (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Dorota; Usidame, Bukola; Szosland-Fałtyn, Anna; Makowiec-Dąbrowska, Teresa

    2014-02-06

    Nowadays the European Union faces a debate on the ban of sale of flavoured cigarettes. There is growing evidence that certain subgroups of smokers are more vulnerable to the use of flavoured cigarettes. However in some European countries, figures on the use of these cigarettes are still scarce. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of flavoured cigarettes use in Poland, and examine whether its use among adults varies by socio-demographic characteristics. Data on tobacco use including flavoured cigarettes and other characteristics were derived from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS). GATS is a cross-sectional, household survey implemented in Poland between 2009 and 2010. GATS provided data on a representative sample of 7,840 individuals covering 2,254 current smokers. Logistic regression model was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of the selected socio-economic variables on the use of flavoured cigarettes. Among females the aromatized cigarettes use was 26.1% compared to 10.5% in males (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.62-3.2; p ≤ 0.001). Respondents aged 20-29 years had an increased likelihood of using flavoured cigarettes compared to subjects aged 60 years or older (OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.5; p ≤ 0.001). Respondents aware of negative health consequences of smoking had OR = 1.4 95% CI: 1.1-2.1 (p ≤ 0.05) of smoking aromatized cigarettes compared to those who were unaware. Participants who perceived some kinds of cigarettes less harmful than others were also more likely to use flavoured cigarettes compared to subjects who were convinced that all cigarettes are equally harmful (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1-1.8; p ≤ 0.01). High educational attainment, living in large cities, being non-economically active was also associated with use of flavoured cigarettes. Our results are consistent with majority of epidemiology studies on this topic to date and should be considered in the enactment of tobacco

  7. Influence of flavour absorption on oxygen permeation through LDPE, PP, PC and PET plastics food packaging.

    PubMed

    van Willige, R W G; Linssen, J P H; Meinders, M B J; van der Stege, H J; Voragen, A G J

    2002-03-01

    The effect of flavour absorption on the oxygen permeability of low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied using an isostatic continuous flow system. Polymer samples were exposed to a model solution containing limonene, hexyl acetate, nonanone and decanal at 40 degrees C. After exposure, one part of each sample was analysed for absorbed flavour compounds using a Large Volume Injection GC Ultrasonic 'in vial' extraction method, and from the other part, oxygen permeability was measured in a permeation cell at 25 degrees C. After 8 h of exposure, LDPE and PP samples showed a significant linear (R2 = 0.82 and 0.99) increase in oxygen permeability of 21 and 130%, respectively. Owing to swelling of the polymer samples resulting from flavour absorption, the structure of the polymeric network changed (i.e. opened) and consequently increased oxygen permeability. The oxygen permeability of exposed PC showed a significant linear (R2 = 0.78) decrease of 11% after 21 days. PC obviously did not swell like LDPE or PP. Therefore, it was suggested that absorbed flavour compounds occupied or blocked 'microcavities' through which normally oxygen is transported. Absorption of flavour compounds by PET did not affect the oxygen permeability of PET significantly.

  8. Sensory-specific satiety is unaffected by manipulations of flavour intensity.

    PubMed

    Havermans, Remco C; Geschwind, Nicole; Filla, Sabine; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Jansen, Anita

    2009-06-22

    Sensory-specific satiety (SSS) refers to the decline in evaluated pleasantness of a food when consumed as compared with other unconsumed foods. In two experiments it was investigated whether SSS is sensitive to manipulations of flavour intensity. In the first experiment, 40 participants (36 women) repeatedly consumed 20 ml of either high- (group Strong; n=20) or low-intensity (group Weak) strawberry lemonade. If flavour intensity affects SSS these two groups should differ, but both groups displayed an equal degree of SSS concerning the evaluation of taste, smell, mouth feel, appearance and prospective consumption (largest F=1.34). In Experiment 2, 60 participants (54 women) were randomly assigned to one of three groups of equal size and repeatedly exposed to 20 ml lemonade that increased (group Increase) or decreased (group Decrease) in flavour intensity, or retained a given intensity with each exposure (group Same). It was investigated whether online changes in flavour intensity interfere with the development of SSS, but again these groups displayed a similar degree of SSS to the lemonade (largest F=1.40). It is concluded that manipulation of flavour intensity does not likely affect SSS.

  9. Expression of flavour preferences conditioned by caffeine is dependent on caffeine deprivation state.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, M R; Jackson, A; Lee, M D; Nesic, J; Durlach, P J

    2000-06-01

    The acquisition of a caffeine conditioned flavour preference depends on the caffeine deprivation status of subjects during conditioning. It is not known if the expression of an established flavour preference is also state-dependent. To determine if the expression of a flavour preference conditioned by caffeine is dependent on the level of deprivation at the time of testing. In a double-blind placebo controlled study, 44 subjects were given 4 days exposure to a novel flavoured drink following overnight abstinence from caffeine. Half the subjects received caffeine (100 mg) in the drink, while the remainder had placebo (maltodextrin, 100 mg). Subjects rated the pleasantness of the drink each time. On a fifth (test) day, the subjects were given additional caffeine (100 mg) or placebo 2 h before consuming and rating the pleasantness of the drink. Pleasantness ratings for the novel drink increased over the 4 conditioning days in subjects receiving caffeine, but decreased in those given placebo. On day 5, subjects who were trained and tested in the same caffeine deprivation state expressed pleasantness ratings similar to those for the final training day. In contrast, subjects who were trained and tested in different states expressed pleasantness ratings that were significantly different from those of the final training day. These results suggest that the expression of caffeine conditioned flavour preferences are acutely sensitive to current motivational state, and a number of possible explanations are discussed.

  10. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jia-Lun; Chen, Jin-Quan

    1997-03-01

    It is shown that any Hamiltonian involving only one- and two-bond interactions for a molecule withnbonds and having a point groupPas its symmetry group may have theSn⊃Ppartial dynamical symmetry, i.e., the Hamiltonian can be solved analytically for a part of the states, called the unique states. For example, theXY6molecule has theS6⊃Ohpartial dynamical symmetry. The model of Iachello and Oss forncoupled anharmonic oscillators is revisited in terms of the partial dynamical symmetry. The energies are obtained analytically for the nine unique levels of theXY6molecule and the structures of the eigenstates are disclosed for the first time, while for non-unique states they are obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in theS6⊃Ohsymmetry adapted basis with greatly reduced dimension.

  11. Classification of spacetimes with symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Jesse W.

    Spacetimes with symmetry play a critical role in Einstein's Theory of General Relativity. Missing from the literature is a correct, usable, and computer accessible classification of such spacetimes. This dissertation fills this gap; specifically, we. i) give a new and different approach to the classification of spacetimes with symmetry using modern methods and tools such as the Schmidt method and computer algebra systems, resulting in ninety-two spacetimes; ii) create digital databases of the classification for easy access and use for researchers; iii) create software to classify any spacetime metric with symmetry against the new database; iv) compare results of our classification with those of Petrov and find that Petrov missed six cases and incorrectly normalized a significant number of metrics; v) classify spacetimes with symmetry in the book Exact Solutions to Einstein's Field Equations Second Edition by Stephani, Kramer, Macallum, Hoenselaers, and Herlt and in Komrakov's paper Einstein-Maxwell equation on four-dimensional homogeneous spaces using the new software.

  12. Symmetries from the solution manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Víctor; Guerrero, Julio; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco F.; Cossío, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    We face a revision of the role of symmetries of a physical system aiming at characterizing the corresponding Solution Manifold (SM) by means of Noether invariants as a preliminary step towards a proper, non-canonical, quantization. To this end, "point symmetries" of the Lagrangian are generally not enough, and we must resort to the more general concept of contact symmetries. They are defined in terms of the Poincaré-Cartan form, which allows us, in turn, to find the symplectic structure on the SM, through some sort of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) transformation. These basic symmetries are realized as Hamiltonian vector fields, associated with (coordinate) functions on the SM, lifted back to the Evolution Manifold through the inverse of this HJ mapping, that constitutes an inverse of the Noether Theorem. The specific examples of a particle moving on S3, at the mechanical level, and nonlinear SU(2)-sigma model in field theory are sketched.

  13. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: With Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar

    2005-03-22

    In this note I provide a brief description of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking, including walking technicolor, top-color assisted technicolor, the top-quark seesaw model, and little higgs theories.

  14. Flavour and spin of the proton and the meson cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtmann, H.; Szczurek, A.; Speth, J.

    1996-02-01

    We present a complete set of formulas for longitudinal momentum distribution functions (splitting functions) of mesons in the nucleon. It can be applied in the framework of the convolution formalism to the deep-inelastic structure functions (quark distributions) of the nucleon viewed as a system composed of virtual "mesons" and "baryons". Pseudoscalar and vector mesons as well as octet and decuplet baryons are included. In contrast to many approaches in the literature the present approach ensures charge and momentum conservation by the construction. We present not only spin averaged splitting functions but also helicity-dependent ones, which can be used to study the spin content of the nucleon. The cut-off parameters of the underlying form factors for different vertices are determined from high-energy particle production data. We find a universal cut-off parameter for processes involving octet baryons. This information allows one to calculate the flavour and spin content of the nucleon. The value of the Gottfried Sum Rule obtained from our model ( SG = 0.224) nicely agrees with that obtained by the NMC. In addition, we calculate the x-dependence of the overlined - overlineu asymmetry and get an impressive agreement with a recent fit of Martin-Stirling-Roberts. The calculated axial coupling constants for semileptonic decays of the octet baryons agree with the experimental data already with the SU(6) wave function for the bare nucleon. As a consequence the Bjorken Sum Rule is nicely reproduced. Although we get improvements for the Ellis-Jaffe Sum Rules for the proton and neutron in comparison to the naive quark model, the MCM is not sufficient to reproduce the experimental data.

  15. Regulation of fat intake in the absence of flavour signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jozélia G; Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2012-01-01

    Animals, including humans, can achieve precise regulation of caloric intake by adjusting consumption in response to covert changes in energy density. It remains unknown, however, whether the presence of flavour cues are required for the ability to maintain constant caloric intake. Also unknown are the brain circuits that may function as the central calorie monitors that control adaptive adjustments in energy intake. Here we show that mice trained to lick a dry spout in order to receive intra-gastric infusions of a fat emulsion maintained constant hourly caloric intake by adjusting the number of dry licks in response to changes in caloric density. Animals also increased dry licking according to hunger levels, and developed conditioned preferences for dry sippers associated with high calorie infusions. Importantly, striatal dopamine levels were closely associated with the amount of calories ingested, rather than with the number of dry licks produced. Dopamine levels in dorsal and ventral striatum also reflected caloric density in mice passively receiving intra-gastric infusions of fat emulsions. Consistent with the above, systemic administration of the dopamine receptor blocker haloperidol markedly increased the production of dry licks needed to obtain high-calorie infusions, as if the caloric density of the infusions had been diluted. Conversely, haloperidol markedly decreased the production of dry licks needed to obtain low-calorie infusions. Taken together, our results support the proposition that brain dopamine circuits function as one central sensor of calorie ingestion, since (1) extracellular striatal dopamine levels fluctuate in proportion to the caloric density of nutrients infused in the gut; and (2) inhibiting dopamine receptor signalling disrupts the animals’ ability to maintain constant caloric intake across experimental sessions. PMID:22219333

  16. Broken Symmetries and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Phase space symmetries inherent in the statistical theory of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are known to be broken dynamically to produce large-scale coherent magnetic structure. Here, results of a numerical study of decaying MHD turbulence are presented that show large-scale coherent structure also arises and persists in the presence of dissipation. Dynamically broken symmetries in MHD turbulence may thus play a fundamental role in the dynamo process.

  17. Possible violations of spacetime symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Luis

    2016-10-01

    The identification of symmetries has played a fundamental role in our understanding of physical phenomena. Nevertheless, in most cases such symmetries constitute only a zeroth-order approximation and they need to be broken so that the predictions of the theory are consistent with experimental observation. In particular, the almost sacred CPT and Lorentz symmetries, which are certainly part of the fundamental ideas of modern physics, need to be probed experimentally. Recently, such efforts have been intensified because different theoretical approaches aiming to understand the microstructure of space-time suggest the possibility that such symmetries could present minute violations. Up to now, and with increasing experimental sensitivities, no signs of violation have been found. Nevertheless, we observe that even the persistence of such negative results will have a profound impact. On one hand, they will provide those symmetries with a firm experimental basis. On the other, they will set stringent experimental bounds to be compared with the possible emergence of such violations in quantum gravity models based upon a discrete structure of space. We present a very general perspective of the research on Lorentz symmetry breaking, together with a review of a few specific topics.

  18. Effect of age and cut on cooking loss, juiciness and flavour of South African beef.

    PubMed

    Schönfeldt, H C; Strydom, P E

    2011-03-01

    The juiciness and flavour characteristics of 15 aged primal beef cuts of electrically stimulated carcasses, from three different age groups, were assessed (n=61). Cooking losses were determined and proximate analyses (moisture, fat, nitrogen and ash) were performed. Tender cuts were cooked by a dry heat method, and less tender cuts were cooked by moist heat methods. A trained panel (n=10) evaluated sensory quality characteristics including initial and sustained juiciness, aroma and flavour. Flavour intensity was the biggest discriminant between the three age groups and declined with an increase in age. Initial impression of juiciness decreased with increased age of the animal and cooking losses increased nonlinearly with age, irrespective of the muscle. In contrast sustained juiciness increased with increased age. Cuts cooked according to a dry heat cooking method were reported juicier (both initial and sustained) than those cooked by moist heat methods.

  19. Potential of different mechanical and thermal treatments to control off-flavour generation in broccoli puree.

    PubMed

    Koutidou, Maria; Grauwet, Tara; Van Loey, Ann; Acharya, Parag

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this study was scientifically investigate the impact of the sequence of different thermo-mechanical treatments on the volatile profile of differently processed broccoli puree, and to investigate if any relationship persists between detected off-flavour changes and microstructural changes as a function of selected process conditions. Comparison of the headspace GC-MS fingerprinting of the differently processed broccoli purees revealed that an adequate combination of processing steps allows to reduce the level of off-flavour volatiles. Moreover, applying mechanical processing before or after the thermal processing at 90°C determines the pattern of broccoli tissue disruption, resulting into different microstructures and various enzymatic reactions inducing volatile generation. These results may aid the identification of optimal process conditions generating a reduced level of off-flavour in processed broccoli. In this way, broccoli can be incorporated as a food ingredient into mixed food products with limited implications on sensorial consumer acceptance.

  20. Lepton Universality and Lepton Flavour Violation tests at the B-factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We review the experimental status of the lepton universality tests and lepton flavour violation searches after the completion of the data-taking and most of the data analysis of the B-factories BABAR and Belle. The universality of the Standard Model charged weak couplings has been confirmed and moderately improved in precision by the B-factories results. Lepton Flavour violation in the τ lepton decays has been searched in several decay modes and no evidence has been found. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the Lepton Flavour violating branching ratios in the 10-7-10-8 range, greatly extending the previous limits set mainly by CLEO in the 10-6 range.

  1. The effect of Debina grapevine indigenous yeast strains of Metschnikowia and Saccharomyces on wine flavour.

    PubMed

    Parapouli, Maria; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Drainas, Constantin; Perisynakis, Angelos

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous alcoholic fermentation of grape must is a complex microbiological process involving a large number of various yeast species, to which the flavour of every traditional wine is largely attributed. Whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily responsible for the conversion of sugar to alcohol, the activities of various non-Saccharomyces species enhance wine flavour. In this study, indigenous yeast strains belonging to Metschnikowia pulcherrima var. zitsae as well as Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated and characterized from Debina must (Zitsa, Epirus, Greece). In addition, these strains were examined for their effect on the outcome of the wine fermentation process when used sequentially as starter cultures. The resulting wine, as analyzed over three consecutive years, was observed to possess a richer, more aromatic bouquet than wine from a commercial starter culture. These results emphasize the potential of employing indigenous yeast strains for the production of traditional wines with improved flavour.

  2. An integrated approach for flavour quality evaluation in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. reticulatus group) during ripening.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Simona; Sivertsen, Hanne; Anthon, Gordon E; Barrett, Diane M; Mitcham, Elizabeth J; Ebeler, Susan E; Zakharov, Florence

    2013-08-15

    Numerous and diverse physiological changes occur during fruit ripening and maturity at harvest is one of the key factors influencing the flavour quality of fruits. The effect of ripening on chemical composition, physical parameters and sensory perception of three muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. reticulatus group) cultivars was evaluated. Significant correlations emerging from this extensive data set are discussed in the context of identifying potential targets for melon sensory quality improvement. A portable ultra-fast gas-chromatograph coupled with a surface acoustic wave sensor (UFGC-SAW) was also used to monitor aroma volatile concentrations during fruit ripening and evaluated for its ability to predict the sensory perception of melon flavour. UFGC-SAW analysis allowed the discrimination of melon maturity stage based on six measured peaks, whose abundance was positively correlated to maturity-specific sensory attributes. Our findings suggest that this technology shows promise for future applications in rapid flavour quality evaluation.

  3. Symmetry in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among polarimetric backscattering coefficients are derived from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. For both reciprocal and non-reciprocal media, symmetry encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered. The derived properties are general and valid to all scattering mechanisms, including volume and surface scatterings and their interactions, in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is also discussed. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is then defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented. Experimental evidences of the symmetry relationships are shown and their use in polarimetric remote sensing is illustrated. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mt. Shasta area (California) and mixed forest near Presque Isle (Maine) exhibit characteristics of the centrical symmetry at C-band. For sea ice in the Beaufort Sea, multi-year sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e(sub 0), calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. First-year sea ice has e much smaller than e(sub 0) due to the preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering Sea, it is

  4. Symmetry in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among polarimetric backscattering coefficients are derived from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. For both reciprocal and non-reciprocal media, symmetry encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered. The derived properties are general and valid to all scattering mechanisms, including volume and surface scatterings and their interactions, in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is also discussed. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is then defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented. Experimental evidences of the symmetry relationships are shown and their use in polarimetric remote sensing is illustrated. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mt. Shasta area (California) and mixed forest near Presque Isle (Maine) exhibit characteristics of the centrical symmetry at C-band. For sea ice in the Beaufort Sea, multi-year sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e(sub 0), calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. First-year sea ice has e much smaller than e(sub 0) due to the preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering Sea, it is

  5. The discrete charm of flavour and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, G. C.; Rebelo, M. N.

    2017-07-01

    We point out that in the Standard Model (SM) there is no explanation why |V 23|2 + |V 13|2 is of order 10-3. A framework is described for explaining this small mixing, involving the introduction of vector-like quarks. A symmetry is introduced so that at a first stage VCKM = 1I and only the third generation of quarks acquires a mass. It is shown that when interactions of vector like quarks are taken into account a realistic quark mass spectrum is generated together with a correct VCKM matrix.

  6. Aroma characteristics of Moutai-flavour liquor produced with Bacillus licheniformis by solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Wu, Q; Xu, Y

    2013-07-01

    The potential of Bacillus licheniformis as a starter culture for aroma concentration improvement in the fermentation of Chinese Moutai-flavour liquor was elucidated. The volatile compounds produced by B. licheniformis were identified by GC-MS, in which C4 compounds, pyrazines, volatile acids, aromatic and phenolic compounds were the main ingredients. The strains B. licheniformis (MT-6 and MT-15) produced more volatile compound concentrations, mainly C4 compounds, than the type strain of B. licheniformis (ATCC 14580) at the fermentation temperature of 55°C. Meanwhile, more volatile compound concentrations were produced by B. licheniformis in solid-state fermentation than in submerged state fermentation. Thus, the strains MT-6 and MT-15 were used as the Bacillus starter culture for investigating Moutai-flavour liquor production. The distilled liquor inoculated with Bacillus starter culture was significantly different from the liquor without inoculum. This was particularly evident in the fore-run part of the distilled sample which was inoculated with Bacillus starter culture, where volatile compounds greatly increased compared to the control. Furthermore, the distilled liquor with Bacillus starter culture showed improved results in sensory appraisals. These results indicated that B. licheniformis was one of the main species influencing the aroma characteristics of Moutai-flavour liquor. This is the first report of an investigation into the effect of Bacillus starter cultures on the flavour features of Moutai-flavour liquor, which verified that Bacillus licheniformis can enhance aroma concentration in Moutai-flavour liquor. Bacillus starter culture brought C4 compounds, pyrazines, volatile acids, aromatic and phenolic compounds to the liquor, which gave a better result in sensory appraisals. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Carbon isotope ratios of selected volatiles in Citrus sinensis and in orange-flavoured food.

    PubMed

    Schipilliti, Luisa; Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Cotroneo, Antonella; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    Twenty genuine samples of industrially cold-pressed sweet orange essential oils, were analysed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry to determine the values of the carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C(VPDB)) of selected volatiles and assess the corresponding range of authenticity. Successively, four commercial orange-flavoured products were analysed under identical conditions to evaluate the authenticity of the orange flavour. The samples were extracted by solid-phase microextraction under optimised conditions. The evaluation was performed by using an internal standard procedure to neglect the contribution due to the original environment to the isotopic abundance of (13)C. The composition of the volatile fraction of the essential oils and of the flavoured products was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with linear retention indices, and by gas chromatography with a flame ionisation detector. The δ(13)C(VPDB) values of seven secondary metabolites determined here were successfully used to characterise genuine orange essential oil. These values were used to evaluate the quality of orange-flavoured products, revealing the presence of compounds of different origin, not compatible with the values of genuine orange secondary metabolites. This study provides the range of authenticity of δ(13)C(VPDB) of seven different secondary metabolites in sweet orange genuine essential oil, useful for evaluating the genuineness of orange flavour. In accord with a previous study on different essential oils, the values determined here can be successfully applied for the evaluation of a large number of flavoured food stuffs and correlated with their origins. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Measurements of heavy-flavour production in p-Pb collisions with ALICE. Quark Matter 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Jeremy

    2016-12-01

    The production of open heavy-flavour particles was studied in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV using the ALICE detector. Three separate observables were used: the hadronic decays of D mesons at mid-rapidity, and semileptonic decays of heavy-flavour hadrons to electrons and muons at mid-rapidity and forward rapidity, respectively. The most recent ALICE measurements of the nuclear modification factor, RpPb, of open charm and beauty are reported, along with the centrality and multiplicity dependence of D-meson production in p-Pb collisions.

  9. New algorithms for identifying the flavour of [Formula: see text] mesons using pions and protons.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Batsukh, B; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2017-01-01

    Two new algorithms for use in the analysis of [Formula: see text] collision are developed to identify the flavour of [Formula: see text] mesons at production using pions and protons from the hadronization process. The algorithms are optimized and calibrated on data, using [Formula: see text] decays from [Formula: see text] collision data collected by LHCb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV . The tagging power of the new pion algorithm is 60% greater than the previously available one; the algorithm using protons to identify the flavour of a [Formula: see text] meson is the first of its kind.

  10. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production.

  11. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25361168

  12. Role of sweet and other flavours in liking and disliking of electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoshin; Lim, Juyun; Buehler, Stephanie S; Brinkman, Marielle C; Johnson, Nathan M; Wilson, Laura; Cross, Kandice S; Clark, Pamela I

    2016-11-01

    To examine the extent to which the perception of sweet and other flavours is associated with liking and disliking of flavoured electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). 31 participants (13 females/18 males; 12 sole/19 dual users) vaped 6 commercially available flavours of blu Tanks: Classic Tobacco (CT), Magnificent Menthol (MM), Cherry Crush (CC), Vivid Vanilla (VV), Piña Colada (PC) and Peach Schnapps (PS); all 'medium' strength, 12 mg/mL nicotine concentration. For each flavoured e-cigarette, participants first rated liking/disliking on the Labeled Hedonic Scale, followed by perceived intensities of sweetness, coolness, bitterness, harshness and specific flavour on the generalised version of the Labeled Magnitude Scale. The psychophysical testing was conducted individually in an environmental chamber. PC was perceived as sweetest and liked the most; CT was perceived as least sweet and liked the least. Across all flavours, liking was correlated with sweetness (r=0.31), coolness (r=0.25), bitterness (r=-0.25) and harshness (r=-0.29, all p<0.001). Specifically, liking was positively correlated with sweetness of PS (r=0.56, p=0.001) and PC (r=0.36, p=0.048); and with coolness of MM, CT and VV (r=0.41-0.52, p<0.05). In contrast, harshness was negatively correlated with liking for CC, PC and PS (r=0.37-0.40, p<0.05). In a multivariate model, sweetness had the greatest positive impact on liking followed by coolness; harshness had the greatest negative impact on liking. Our findings indicate that bitterness and harshness, most likely from nicotine, have negative impacts on the liking of e-cigarettes, but the addition of flavourants that elicit sweetness or coolness generally improves liking. The results suggest that flavours play an important role in e-cigarette preference and most likely use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Role of sweet and other flavours in liking and disliking of electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoshin; Lim, Juyun; Buehler, Stephanie S; Brinkman, Marielle C; Johnson, Nathan M; Wilson, Laura; Cross, Kandice S; Clark, Pamela I

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent to which the perception of sweet and other flavours is associated with liking and disliking of flavoured electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Methods 31 participants (13 females/18 males; 12 sole/19 dual users) vaped 6 commercially available flavours of blu Tanks: Classic Tobacco (CT), Magnificent Menthol (MM), Cherry Crush (CC), Vivid Vanilla (VV), Piña Colada (PC) and Peach Schnapps (PS); all ‘medium’ strength, 12 mg/mL nicotine concentration. For each flavoured e-cigarette, participants first rated liking/disliking on the Labeled Hedonic Scale, followed by perceived intensities of sweetness, coolness, bitterness, harshness and specific flavour on the generalised version of the Labeled Magnitude Scale. The psychophysical testing was conducted individually in an environmental chamber. Results PC was perceived as sweetest and liked the most; CT was perceived as least sweet and liked the least. Across all flavours, liking was correlated with sweetness (r=0.31), coolness (r=0.25), bitterness (r=−0.25) and harshness (r=−0.29, all p<0.001). Specifically, liking was positively correlated with sweetness of PS (r=0.56, p=0.001) and PC (r=0.36, p=0.048); and with coolness of MM, CT and VV (r=0.41–0.52, p<0.05). In contrast, harshness was negatively correlated with liking for CC, PC and PS (r=0.37–0.40, p<0.05). In a multivariate model, sweetness had the greatest positive impact on liking followed by coolness; harshness had the greatest negative impact on liking. Conclusions Our findings indicate that bitterness and harshness, most likely from nicotine, have negative impacts on the liking of e-cigarettes, but the addition of flavourants that elicit sweetness or coolness generally improves liking. The results suggest that flavours play an important role in e-cigarette preference and most likely use. PMID:27708124

  14. New algorithms for identifying the flavour of {B} ^0 mesons using pions and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-04-01

    Two new algorithms for use in the analysis of pp collision are developed to identify the flavour of {B} ^0 mesons at production using pions and protons from the hadronization process. The algorithms are optimized and calibrated on data, using {{B} ^0} → D-π + decays from pp collision data collected by LHCb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV . The tagging power of the new pion algorithm is 60% greater than the previously available one; the algorithm using protons to identify the flavour of a {B} ^0 meson is the first of its kind.

  15. Flavour-changing neutral currents making and breaking the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archilli, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; Owen, P.; Petridis, K. A.

    2017-06-01

    The standard model of particle physics is our best description yet of fundamental particles and their interactions, but it is known to be incomplete. As yet undiscovered particles and interactions might exist. One of the most powerful ways to search for new particles is by studying processes known as flavour-changing neutral current decays, whereby a quark changes its flavour without altering its electric charge. One example of such a transition is the decay of a beauty quark into a strange quark. Here we review some intriguing anomalies in these decays, which have revealed potential cracks in the standard model—hinting at the existence of new phenomena.

  16. The double cover of the icosahedral symmetry group and quark mass textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Lisa L.; Stuart, Alexander J.

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the idea that the double cover of the rotational icosahedral symmetry group is the family symmetry group in the quark sector. The icosahedral (A5) group was previously proposed as a viable family symmetry group for the leptons. To incorporate the quarks, it is highly advantageous to extend the group to its double cover, as in the case of tetrahedral (A4) symmetry. We provide the basic group theoretical tools for flavor model-building based on the binary icosahedral group I‧ and construct a model of the quark masses and mixings that yields many of the successful predictions of the well-known U (2) quark texture models.

  17. Quantum graphs: PT -symmetry and reflection symmetry of the spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurasov, P.; Majidzadeh Garjani, B.

    2017-02-01

    Not necessarily self-adjoint quantum graphs—differential operators on metric graphs—are considered. Assume in addition that the underlying metric graph possesses an automorphism (symmetry) P . If the differential operator is P T -symmetric, then its spectrum has reflection symmetry with respect to the real line. Our goal is to understand whether the opposite statement holds, namely, whether the reflection symmetry of the spectrum of a quantum graph implies that the underlying metric graph possesses a non-trivial automorphism and the differential operator is P T -symmetric. We give partial answer to this question by considering equilateral star-graphs. The corresponding Laplace operator with Robin vertex conditions possesses reflection-symmetric spectrum if and only if the operator is P T -symmetric with P being an automorphism of the metric graph.

  18. Localization of Nonlocal Symmetries and Symmetry Reductions of Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Wen; Lou, Sen-Yue; Yu, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The nonlocal symmetries of the Burgers equation are explicitly given by the truncated Painlevé method. The auto-Bäcklund transformation and group invariant solutions are obtained via the localization procedure for the nonlocal residual symmetries. Furthermore, the interaction solutions of the solition-Kummer waves and the solition-Airy waves are obtained. Supported by the Global Change Research Program China under Grant No. 2015CB953904, the National Natural Science Foundations of China under Grant Nos. 11435005, 11175092, and 11205092, Shanghai Knowledge Service Platform for Trustworthy Internet of Things under Grant No. ZF1213, and K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University

  19. Symmetry in finite phase plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, J.

    2010-03-01

    The known symmetries in one-dimensional systems are inversion and translations. These symmetries persist in finite phase plane, but a novel symmetry arises in view of the discrete nature of the coordinate xi and the momentum pi : xi and pi can undergo permutations. Thus, if xi assumes M discrete values, i = 0, 1,2,..., M - 1, a permutation will change the order of the set x0,x1,..., xM-1 into a new ordered set. Such a symmetry element does not exist for a continuous x-coordinate in an infinite phase plane. Thus, in a finite phase plane, translations can be replaced by permutations. This is also true for the inversion operator. The new permutation symmetry has been used for the construction of conjugate representations and for the splitting of the M-dimensional vector space into independent subspaces. This splitting is exhaustive in the sense that if M = iMi with Mi being prime numbers, the M-dimensional space splits into M1,M2,...Mn-dimensional independent subspaces. It is shown that following this splitting one can design new potentials with appropriate constants of motion. A related problem is the Weyl-Heisenberg group in the M-dimensional space which turns into a direct product of its subgroups in the Mi-dimensional subspaces. As an example we consider the case of M = 8.

  20. Symmetry Guide to Ferroaxial Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, J.; Privratska, J.; Ondrejkovic, P.; Janovec, V.

    2016-04-01

    The 212 species of the structural phase transitions with a macroscopic symmetry breaking are inspected with respect to the occurrence of the ferroaxial order parameter, the electric toroidal moment. In total, 124 ferroaxial species are found, some of them being also fully ferroelectric (62) or fully ferroelastic ones (61). This ensures a possibility of electrical or mechanical switching of ferroaxial domains. Moreover, there are 12 ferroaxial species that are neither ferroelectric nor ferroelastic. For each species, we have also explicitly worked out a canonical form for a set of representative equilibrium property tensors of polar and axial nature in both high-symmetry and low-symmetry phases. This information was gathered into the set of 212 mutually different symbolic matrices, expressing graphically the presence of nonzero independent tensorial components and the symmetry-imposed links between them, for both phases simultaneously. Symmetry analysis reveals the ferroaxiality in several currently debated materials, such as VO2 , LuFe2 O4 , and URu2 Si2 .

  1. Fearful symmetry in aposematic plants.

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2011-11-01

    Symmetry has been proposed to increase the efficiency of visual aposematic displays in animals, and I suggest that it may also be true for many aposematic spiny or poisonous plants. For instance, in the very spiny plant taxa cacti, Aloe sp., Agave sp. and Euphorbia sp., which have been proposed to be aposematic because of their colorful spine system, the shoots, and in cacti, the spiny fruits as well, are usually radially symmetric. Moreover, in the radial symmetric shoots of Agave and Aloe their individual spiny leaves are also bilaterally symmetric. Spiny or poisonous fruits of various other taxa, the symmetric spiny leaf rosettes and flowering spiny heads of many Near Eastern species of the Asteraceae and other taxa, and poisonous colorful flowers in taxa that were proposed to be aposematic are also symmetric. Thus, in plants, like in animals, symmetry seems to be commonly associated with visual aposematism and probably contributes to its effectiveness. Symmetry may stem from developmental constraints, or like in flowers, have other signaling functions. However, because of the better perception of symmetry by animals it may exploit inherited modes of animal sensing that probably result in paying more attention to symmetric shapes. All these possible alternatives do not negate the probable deterring role of symmetry in plant aposematism.

  2. Structural Symmetry in Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry is a common feature among natural systems, including protein structures. A strong propensity toward symmetric architectures has long been recognized for water-soluble proteins, and this propensity has been rationalized from an evolutionary standpoint. Proteins residing in cellular membranes, however, have traditionally been less amenable to structural studies, and thus the prevalence and significance of symmetry in this important class of molecules is not as well understood. In the past two decades, researchers have made great strides in this area, and these advances have provided exciting insights into the range of architectures adopted by membrane proteins. These structural studies have revealed a similarly strong bias toward symmetric arrangements, which were often unexpected and which occurred despite the restrictions imposed by the membrane environment on the possible symmetry groups. Moreover, membrane proteins disproportionately contain internal structural repeats resulting from duplication and fusion of smaller segments. This article discusses the types and origins of symmetry in membrane proteins and the implications of symmetry for protein function.

  3. Charged lepton flavour violcxmation and neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric models with type I+II seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    We study the new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) half-life and lepton flavour violation (LFV) amplitude within the framework of the minimal left-right symmetric model (MLRSM). Considering all possible new physics contributions to 0 νββ and charged lepton flavour violation μ → eγ , μ → 3 e in MLRSM, we constrain the parameter space of the model from the requirement of satisfying existing experimental bounds. Assuming the breaking scale of the left-right symmetry to be O (1) TeV accessible at ongoing and near future collider experiments, we consider the most general type I+II seesaw mechanism for the origin of tiny neutrino masses. Choosing the relative contribution of the type II seesaw term allows us to calculate the right handed neutrino mass matrix as well as Dirac neutrino mass matrix as a function of the model parameters, required for the calculation of 0νββ and LFV amplitudes. We show that such a general type I+II seesaw structure results in more allowed parameter space compared to individual type I or type II seesaw cases considered in earlier works. In particular, we show that the doubly charged scalar masses M Δ are allowed to be smaller than the heaviest right handed neutrino mass M N from the present experimental bounds in these scenarios which is in contrast to earlier results with individual type I or type II seesaw showing M Δ > M N .

  4. Symmetries, Large Leptonic Mixing and a Fourth Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Marcos, Joaquim I.

    2002-12-01

    We show that large leptonic mixing occurs most naturally in the framework of the Sandard Model just by adding a fourth generation. One can then construct a small Z4 discrete symmetry, instead of the large S4L × S4R, which requires that the neutrino as well as the charged lepton mass matrices be proportional to a 4 × 4 democratic mass matrix, where all entries are equal to unity. Without considering the see-saw mechanism, or other more elaborate extensions of the SM, and contrary to the case with only 3 generations, large leptonic mixing is obtained when the symmetry is broken.

  5. Electroweak symmetry breaking and collider signatures in the next-to-minimal composite Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, Christoph; Stangl, Peter; Straub, David M.

    2017-04-01

    We conduct a detailed numerical analysis of the composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Higgs model based on the next-to-minimal coset SO(6)/SO(5) ≅ SU(4)/Sp(4), featuring an additional SM singlet scalar in the spectrum, which we allow to mix with the Higgs boson. We identify regions in parameter space compatible with all current exper-imental constraints, including radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, flavour physics, and direct searches at colliders. We find the additional scalar, with a mass predicted to be below a TeV, to be virtually unconstrained by current LHC data, but potentially in reach of run 2 searches. Promising indirect searches include rare semi-leptonic B decays, CP violation in B s mixing, and the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  6. Supersymmetry, grand unification and flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkhbat, Tsedenbaljir

    In this thesis I have presented the findings of my research pursued during my Ph.D. study. The purpose of this thesis was to study different theoretical ideas in high energy physics model building addressed primarily towards understanding the fermion mass problem and the gauge hierarchy problem. These include: Anomalous flavor U(1) symmetry and its experimental implications, finite GUT models with discrete family symmetry, and a product GUT model in a 2D deconstructed theory space. The second and third chapters of the thesis describe our study of lepton flavor violation (LFV) and electric dipole moments (EDM) induced by a flavor-dependent anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry of string origin. The models considered also address the fermion mass hierarchy problem successfully. We have shown that the U(1) sector induces significant LFV and EDMs through the SUSY breaking parameters. These effects arise via renormalization group evolution of the parameters in the momentum regime between the string and the anomalous U(1) breaking scale. The fourth chapter of the thesis contains our work on a concrete realization of SUSY breaking using interference between the anomalous U(1) flavor gauge symmetry and a strongly coupled SU(N c), leading to the so called Split SUSY spectrum where the sfermions and the gravitino acquire masses of order 105 ÷ 108 GeV while the gauginos and the Higgsinos have masses of order 102 ÷ 103 GeV. We have calculated the leading order supergravity corrections and have presented a class of explicit models of Split SUSY which are phenomenologically consistent. In the fifth chapter I have presented models for realistic quark masses and mixings in the context of finite SU(5) GUT wherein the beta functions for the gauge and the Yukawa couplings vanish to all orders in perturbation theory. The models presented are based on non-Abelian discrete symmetries. In the case of (Z4)3 x P and A4 symmetries we have found models finite to all order of perturbation theory

  7. Resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Rathbone, G. J.; Bozek, J. D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2002-05-01

    In photoelectron spectroscopy, it is normally assumed that excitation of a single quantum of a non-totally symmetric vibrational mode is forbidden owing to symmetry constraints. Using vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy over a broad spectral range, we have shown that a previously overlooked mechanism can lead to these nominally forbidden transitions. Specifically, the photoelectron can mediate the oscillator strength for such a transition via resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking, and this effect results from intrachannel rather than interchannel coupling. In our first experiments, we focused on bending excitation accompanying CO2 photoionization. Photoelectron spectroscopy on the CO_2^+(C^2Σ_g^+) state showed that the excitation of the (010) vibrational mode is mediated by a shape resonant continuum electron. The degree of vibrational excitation can be substantial, and extensions to other types of symmetry breaking are currently being investigated.

  8. Gravitation and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    It is pointed out that the Higgs field may be supplanted by an ordinary Klien-Gordon Field conformally coupled to the space-time curvature, and with very small, real, rest mass. Provided there is a bare cosmological constant of order of its square mass, this field can induce spontaneous symmetry breaking with a mass scale that can be as large as the Planck-Wheeler mass, but may be smaller. It can thus play a natural role in grand unified theroies. In the theory presented here the physical cosmological constant is small, being of order of the squared mass, and can meet observational constraints without having to be cancelled accurately. The physical gravitational constant differs somewhat from the coupling constant in Einstein's equation, and is temperature dependent in the broken symmetry regime. Symmetry restoration occurs at high temperature.

  9. Nonholonomic Mechanical Systems with Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Anthony M.; Krishnaprasad, P. S.; Marsden, Jerrold E.; Murray, Richard M.

    1996-12-01

    This work develops the geometry and dynamics of mechanical systems with nonholonomic constraints and symmetry from the perspective of Lagrangian mechanics and with a view to control-theoretical applications. The basic methodology is that of geometric mechanics applied to the Lagrange-d'Alembert formulation, generalizing the use of connections and momentum maps associated with a given symmetry group to this case. We begin by formulating the mechanics of nonholonomic systems using an Ehresmann connection to model the constraints, and show how the curvature of this connection enters into Lagrange's equations. Unlike the situation with standard configuration-space constraints, the presence of symmetries in the nonholonomic case may or may not lead to conservation laws. However, the momentum map determined by the symmetry group still satisfies a useful differential equation that decouples from the group variables. This momentum equation, which plays an important role in control problems, involves parallel transport operators and is computed explicitly in coordinates. An alternative description using a “body reference frame” relates part of the momentum equation to the components of the Euler-Poincaré equations along those symmetry directions consistent with the constraints. One of the purposes of this paper is to derive this evolution equation for the momentum and to distinguish geometrically and mechanically the cases where it is conserved and those where it is not. An example of the former is a ball or vertical disk rolling on a flat plane and an example of the latter is the snakeboard, a modified version of the skateboard which uses momentum coupling for locomotion generation. We construct a synthesis of the mechanical connection and the Ehresmann connection defining the constraints, obtaining an important new object we call the nonholonomic connection. When the nonholonomic connection is a principal connection for the given symmetry group, we show how to

  10. Bell Inequalities and Group Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonek-Lasoń, Katarzyna

    2017-03-01

    Recently the method based on irreducible representations of finite groups has been proposed as a tool for investigating the more sophisticated versions of Bell inequalities (V. Ugǔr Gűney, M. Hillery, Phys. Rev. A90, 062121 ([2014]) and Phys. Rev. A91, 052110 ([2015])). In the present paper an example based on the symmetry group S 4 is considered. The Bell inequality violation due to the symmetry properties of regular tetrahedron is described. A nonlocal game based on the inequalities derived is described and it is shown that the violation of Bell inequality implies that the quantum strategies outperform their classical counterparts.

  11. Nonsupersymmetric Dualities from Mirror Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachru, Shamit; Mulligan, Michael; Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2017-01-01

    We study supersymmetry breaking perturbations of the simplest dual pair of (2 +1 )-dimensional N =2 supersymmetric field theories—the free chiral multiplet and N =2 super QED with a single flavor. We find dual descriptions of a phase diagram containing four distinct massive phases. The equivalence of the intervening critical theories gives rise to several nonsupersymmetric avatars of mirror symmetry: we find dualities relating scalar QED to a free fermion and Wilson-Fisher theories to both scalar and fermionic QED. Thus, mirror symmetry can be viewed as the multicritical parent duality from which these nonsupersymmetric dualities directly descend.

  12. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  13. Iterates of maps with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chossat, Pascal; Golubitsky, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Fixed-point bifurcation, period doubling, and Hopf bifurcation (HB) for iterates of equivariant mappings are investigated analytically, with a focus on HB in the presence of symmetry. An algebraic formulation for the hypotheses of the theorem of Ruelle (1973) is derived, and the case of standing waves in a system of ordinary differential equations with O(2) symmetry is considered in detail. In this case, it is shown that HB can lead directly to motion on an invariant 3-torus, with an unexpected third frequency due to drift of standing waves along the torus.

  14. Unparticles and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2008-11-23

    We investigate a scalar potential inspired by the unparticle sector for the electroweak symmetry breaking. The scalar potential contains the interaction between the standard model fields and unparticle sector. It is described by the non-integral power of fields that originates from the nontrivial scaling dimension of the unparticle operator. It is found that the electroweak symmetry is broken at tree level when the interaction is turned on. The scale invariance of unparticle sector is also broken simultaneously, resulting in a physical Higgs and a new lighter scalar particle.

  15. Symmetry analysis of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of B-calculus [V. García-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] a universal map for deterministic cellular automata (CAs) has been derived. The latter is shown here to be invariant upon certain transformations (global complementation, reflection and shift). When constructing CA rules in terms of rules of lower range a new symmetry, “invariance under construction” is uncovered. Modular arithmetic is also reformulated within B-calculus and a new symmetry of certain totalistic CA rules, which calculate the Pascal simplices modulo an integer number p, is then also uncovered.

  16. Chiral symmetry in quarkyonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, T.

    2012-05-15

    The 1/N{sub c} expansion classifies nuclear matter, deconfined quark matter, and Quarkyonic matter in low temperature region. We investigate the realization of chiral symmetry in Quarkyonic matter by taking into account condensations of chiral particle-hole pairs. It is argued that chiral symmetry and parity are locally violated by the formation of chiral spirals, <{psi}-bar exp (2i{mu}{sub q} z{gamma}{sup 0} {gamma}{sup z}){psi}> . An extension to multiple chiral spirals is also briefly discussed.

  17. Quantum Symmetries and Exceptional Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the interplay between discrete quantum symmetries at certain points in the moduli space of Calabi-Yau compactifications, and the associated identities that the geometric realization of D-brane monodromies must satisfy. We show that in a wide class of examples, both local and compact, the monodromy identities in question always follow from a single mathematical statement. One of the simplest examples is the {{mathbb Z}_5} symmetry at the Gepner point of the quintic, and the associated D-brane monodromy identity.

  18. The Broken Symmetry of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Ruth E.

    2011-11-29

    This paper seeks to clarify features of time asymmetry in terms of symmetry breaking. It is observed that, in general, a contingent situation or event requires the breaking of an underlying symmetry. The distinction between the universal anisotropy of temporal processes and the irreversibility of certain physical processes is clarified. It is also proposed that the Transactional Interpretation of quantum mechanics offers an effective way to explain general thermodynamic asymmetry in terms of the time asymmetry of radiation, where prior such efforts have fallen short.

  19. BRST symmetry and fictitious parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, A. A.; Pimentel, B. M.

    2017-03-01

    Our goal in this work is to present the variational method of fictitious parameters and its connection with the Bechi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) symmetry. First, we implement the method in QED at zero temperature and then we extend the analysis to generalized QED at finite temperature. As we see the core of the study is the general statement in gauge theories at finite temperature, assigned by Tyutin work, that the physical degrees of freedom do not depend on the gauge choices, covariant or not, due to BRST symmetry.

  20. Chiral symmetry on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1994-11-01

    The author reviews some of the difficulties associated with chiral symmetry in the context of a lattice regulator. The author discusses the structure of Wilson Fermions when the hopping parameter is in the vicinity of its critical value. Here one flavor contrasts sharply with the case of more, where a residual chiral symmetry survives anomalies. The author briefly discusses the surface mode approach, the use of mirror Fermions to cancel anomalies, and finally speculates on the problems with lattice versions of the standard model.

  1. A new algorithm for identifying the flavour of B0s mesons at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm for the determination of the initial flavour of B0s mesons is presented. The algorithm is based on two neural networks and exploits the b hadron production mechanism at a hadron collider. The first network is trained to select charged kaons produced in association with the B0s meson. The second network combines the kaon charges to assign the B0s flavour and estimates the probability of a wrong assignment. The algorithm is calibrated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energies. The calibration is performed in two ways: by resolving the B0s-bar B0s flavour oscillations in B0s → D-sπ+ decays, and by analysing flavour-specific B*s2(5840)0 → B+K- decays. The tagging power measured in B0s → D-sπ+ decays is found to be (1.80 ± 0.19 (stat) ± 0.18 (syst))%, which is an improvement of about 50% compared to a similar algorithm previously used in the LHCb experiment.

  2. Diversity of yeast species during fermentative process contributing to Chinese Maotai-flavour liquor making.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Xu, Y; Chen, L

    2012-10-01

    The famous traditional Chinese Maotai-flavour liquor is produced by a unique spontaneous simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process, which contributes to a distinctive yeast community with specific physiological properties and performances. Therefore, it would be useful to investigate this yeast community and reveal the novelty of its characteristics. Nine yeast species were obtained from the fermentation period. A combination of physiological and functional analyses revealed a very high diversity of yeast populations. In particular, the extremely high temperature and low acidity of the fermentation conditions led to an accumulation of species with distinctive heat- and acid-resistant properties. Moreover, these yeast species were also significant flavour contributors, for various alcohols, acids and esters. The Chinese Maotai-flavour liquor-fermentation process is rich in yeast resources with distinctive fermentation properties, which were different from other beverages. This work is the first to study the complex yeast ecology of the Maotai-flavour liquor-making process. It allows a deeper insight into the mechanism of this process. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Headspace flavour compounds produced by yeasts and lactobacilli during fermentation of preferments and bread doughs.

    PubMed

    Torner, M J; Martínez-Anaya, M A; Antuña, B; Benedito de Barber, C

    1992-01-01

    Production of volatile flavour compounds during fermentation with pure cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida guilliermondii, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus plantarum have been investigated, using wheat doughs and several preferements as substrates. For yeast, preferments consisted of 10% (w/v) glucose, maltose and sucrose solutions, whereas for lactobacilli they consisted of supplemented and unsupplemented (3% and 10% (w/v)) glucose solutions, and a 10% (w/v) wheat flour slurry. Seven volatile compounds (acetaldehyde, acetone, ethyl acetate, ethanol, hexanal+isobutyl alcohol, and propanol) were detected when using yeasts. All these compounds, except propanol, appeared for all the substrates assayed, with ethanol as the predominant component. Generally, S. cerevisiae produced higher amounts of the different components than C. guilliermondii. Both yeasts produced larger amounts of volatile flavour compounds during fermentation in glucose and sucrose solutions than in maltose or wheat dough. In general the yeasts examined produced more flavour components than the lactobacilli. For the lactobacilli the highest number of volatile flavour compounds were observed for substrates containing flour.

  4. Flavour compounds in tomato fruits: identification of loci and potential pathways affecting volatile composition.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sandrine; Cin, Valeriano Dal; Fei, Zhangjun; Li, Hua; Bliss, Peter; Taylor, Mark G; Klee, Harry J; Tieman, Denise M

    2009-01-01

    The unique flavour of a tomato fruit is the sum of a complex interaction among sugars, acids, and a large set of volatile compounds. While it is generally acknowledged that the flavour of commercially produced tomatoes is inferior, the biochemical and genetic complexity of the trait has made breeding for improved flavour extremely difficult. The volatiles, in particular, present a major challenge for flavour improvement, being generated from a diverse set of lipid, amino acid, and carotenoid precursors. Very few genes controlling their biosynthesis have been identified. New quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that affect the volatile emissions of red-ripe fruits are described here. A population of introgression lines derived from a cross between the cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum and its wild relative, S. habrochaites, was characterized over multiple seasons and locations. A total of 30 QTLs affecting the emission of one or more volatiles were mapped. The data from this mapping project, combined with previously collected data on an IL population derived from a cross between S. lycopersicum and S. pennellii populations, were used to construct a correlational database. A metabolite tree derived from these data provides new insights into the pathways for the synthesis of several of these volatiles. One QTL is a novel locus affecting fruit carotenoid content on chromosome 2. Volatile emissions from this and other lines indicate that the linear and cyclic apocarotenoid volatiles are probably derived from separate carotenoid pools.

  5. Flavour Profiling of 'Marion' and Thornless Blackberries by Instrumental and Sensory Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The flavour of thornless blackberries grown in Pacific Northwest including 'Thornless Evergreen', 'Black Diamond', 'Black Pearl', 'Nightfall', ORUS 1843-3, 'Waldo', NZ 9351-4, and 'Chester Thornless' as well as 'Marion' was profiled by sensory evaluation and instrumental analysis. Sensory results sh...

  6. The problem of the initial conditions in flavoured leptogenesis and the tauon N-dominated scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Di Bari, Pasquale; Marzola, Luca

    2011-08-01

    We discuss the conditions to realise a scenario of 'strong thermal leptogenesis,' where the final asymmetry is fully independent of the initial conditions, taking into account both heavy and light neutrino flavour effects. In particular, the contribution to the final asymmetry from an initial pre-existing asymmetry has to be negligible. We show that in the case of a hierarchical right-handed (RH) neutrino mass spectrum, the only possible way is an N-dominated leptogenesis scenario with a lightest RH neutrino mass M≪10 GeV and with a next-to-lightest RH neutrino mass 10 GeV≫M≫10 GeV. This scenario necessarily requires the presence of a heaviest third RH neutrino specie. Moreover, we show that the final asymmetry has to be dominantly produced in the tauon flavour while the electron and the muon asymmetries have to be efficiently washed-out by the lightest RH neutrino inverse processes. Intriguingly, such seemingly special conditions for successful strong thermal leptogenesis are naturally fulfilled within SO(10)-inspired models. Besides the tauon N-dominated scenario, successful strong thermal leptogenesis is also achieved in scenarios with quasi-degenerate RH neutrino masses. We also comment on the supersymmetric case. We also derive an expression for the final asymmetry produced from leptogenesis taking fully into account heavy neutrino flavour effects in the specific case M≫10 GeV (heavy flavoured scenario), a result that can be extended to any other mass pattern.

  7. Comparison of flavour qualities of mushrooms (Flammulina velutipes) packed with different packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Donglu, Fang; Wenjian, Yang; Kimatu, Benard Muinde; Liyan, Zhao; Xinxin, An; Qiuhui, Hu

    2017-10-01

    To clarify the dynamic changes of flavour components in mushrooms packed with different packaging materials during storage, comprehensive flavour characterization, non-volatile and volatile compounds of Flammulina velutipes were evaluated using electronic nose (E-nose), electronic tongue (E-tongue) technology and headspace solid phase micro-extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS), respectively. Results showed that volatile compounds of fresh F. velutipes mainly consisted of ketones and alcohols, with 3-octanone being the predominant compound. After storage, volatile components significantly changed in mushrooms packed with normal packaging material (Normal-PM) according to the GC-MS analysis and radar fingerprint chart of electronic nose. The ethanol accumulation was inhibited by nanocomposite packaging materials (Nano-PM). Besides, both radar graph and PCA of E-tongue signals could differentiate the samples from different packaging and storage time. In general, these results may provide a profile of flavour substances and explain mechanism of flavour changes in F. velutipes over storage period. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Medium effects on heavy-flavour observables in high-energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The peculiar role of heavy-flavour observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Produced in the early stage, c and b quarks cross the hot medium arising from the collision, interacting strongly with the latter, until they hadronize. Depending on the strength of the interaction heavy quarks may or not approach kinetic equilibrium with the plasma, tending in the first case to follow the collective flow of the expanding fireball. The presence of a hot deconfined medium may also affect heavyquark hadronization, being possible for them to recombine with the surrounding light thermal partons, so that the final heavy-flavour hadrons inherit part of the flow of the medium. Here we show how it is possible to develop a complete transport setup allowing one to describe heavy-flavour production in high-energy nuclear collisions, displaying some major results one can obtain. Finally, the possibility that the formation of a hot deconfined medium even in small systems (high-multiplicity p-Au and d-Au collisions, so far) may affect also heavy-flavour observables is investigated.

  9. Stability of aspartame and neotame in pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anuradha; Choudhary, Sonika; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-04-01

    Analytical high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) conditions were standardized along with the isolation procedure for separation of aspartame and neotame in flavoured milk (pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk). The recovery of the method was approximately 98% for both aspartame and neotame. The proposed HPLC method can be successfully used for the routine determination of aspartame and neotame in flavoured milk. Pasteurization (90 °C/20 min) resulted in approximately 40% loss of aspartame and only 8% of neotame was degraded. On storage (4-7°C/7 days) aspartame and neotame content decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 59.70% to 44.61% and 91.78% to 87.18%, respectively. Sterilization (121 °C/15 min) resulted in complete degradation of aspartame; however, 50.50% of neotame remained intact. During storage (30 °C/60 days) neotame content decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 50.36% to 8.67%. Results indicated that neotame exhibited better stability than aspartame in both pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-06-01

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder.

  11. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-06-17

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder.

  12. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport

    PubMed Central

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-01-01

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder. PMID:27311717

  13. Towards the identification of new physics through quark flavour violating processes.

    PubMed

    Buras, Andrzej J; Girrbach, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    We outline a systematic strategy that should help in this decade to identify new physics (NP) beyond the standard model (SM) by means of quark flavour violating processes, and thereby extend the picture of short distance physics down to scales as short as 10(-20) m and even shorter distance scales corresponding to energies of 100 TeV. Rather than using all of the possible flavour-violating observables that will be measured in the coming years at the LHC, SuperKEKB and in Kaon physics dedicated experiments at CERN, J-PARC and Fermilab, we concentrate on those observables that are theoretically clean and very sensitive to NP. Assuming that the data on the selected observables will be very precise, we stress the importance of correlations between these observables as well as of future precise calculations of non-perturbative parameters by means of lattice QCD simulations with dynamical fermions. Our strategy consists of twelve steps, which we will discuss in detail while illustrating the possible outcomes with the help of the SM, models with constrained minimal flavour violation (CMFV), MFV at large and models with tree-level flavour changing neutral currents mediated by neutral gauge bosons and scalars. We will also briefly summarize the status of a number of concrete models. We propose DNA charts that exhibit correlations between flavour observables in different NP scenarios. Models with new left-handed and/or right-handed currents and non-MFV interactions can be distinguished transparently in this manner. We emphasize the important role of the stringent CMFV relations between various observables as standard candles of flavour physics. The pattern of deviations from these relations may help in identifying the correct NP scenario. The success of this program will be very much facilitated through direct signals of NP at the LHC, even if the LHC will not be able to probe the physics at scales shorter than 4 × 10(-20) m. We also emphasize the importance of lepton

  14. Relationships between flavour, lipid composition and antioxidants in organic, free-range and conventional chicken breasts from modelling.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Kishowar; Paterson, Alistair; Spickett, Corinne M

    2006-01-01

    Consumers expect organic, free-range and corn-fed chicken to be nutritionally wholesome and have premium flavour characters. Interrelationships between flavour, fatty acids and antioxidants of retailed breasts were explored using simple correlations and chemometrics. Saturated fatty acid C16:0, and n-6 polyunsaturated C20:4 and C22:4 contents were correlated with lipid oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and in partial least-squares regression (PLS1) with 32 high-resonance gas chromatography (flame ionization) flavour components (r2>0.90), and also linked (r2>0.80) to antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, glutathione and catalase). A further 10 high-resonance gas chromatography nitrogen phosphorus detector flavour components were correlated (r2>0.85) with C18:3(n-3) content. Chicken character was correlated with C18:3(n-3), and C18:3(n-6) inversely with oily, off-flavour and lipid oxidation. Sweet, fruity and oily aromas were linked in PLS1 with 13 specific fatty acids (r2>0.6), and bland taste with total summed (six) fatty acid fractions (r2>0.81). Specific antioxidants were correlated with sweet, fruity and chicken aromas, and alpha-tocopherol inversely with lipid oxidation. PLS2 confirmed relationships between fatty acid composition, antioxidants and the subsets of 32 and 10 flavour components. Clear relationships were thus observed between lipid and antioxidant compositions and flavour in chicken breast meat.

  15. The effect on PDFs and [Formula: see text] due to changes in flavour scheme and higher twist contributions.

    PubMed

    Thorne, R S

    I consider the effect on MSTW partons distribution functions (PDFs) due to changes in the choices of theoretical procedure used in the fit. I first consider using the 3-flavour fixed flavour number scheme instead of the standard general mass variable flavour number scheme used in the MSTW analysis. This results in the light quarks increasing at all relatively small [Formula: see text] values, the gluon distribution becoming smaller at high values of [Formula: see text] and larger at small [Formula: see text], the preferred value of the coupling constant [Formula: see text] falling, particularly at NNLO, and the fit quality deteriorates. I also consider lowering the kinematic cut on [Formula: see text] for DIS data and simultaneously introducing higher twist terms which are fit to data. This results in much smaller effects on both PDFs and [Formula: see text] than the scheme change, except for quarks at very high [Formula: see text]. I show that the structure function one obtains from a fixed input set of PDFs using the fixed flavour scheme and variable flavour scheme differ significantly for [Formula: see text] at high [Formula: see text], and that this is due to the fact that in the fixed flavour scheme there is a slow convergence of large logarithmic terms of the form [Formula: see text] relevant for this regime. I conclude that some of the most significant differences in PDF sets are largely due to the choice of flavour scheme used.

  16. Effect of enzymatic hydrolysis with subsequent mild thermal oxidation of tallow on precursor formation and sensory profiles of beef flavours assessed by partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Tang, Qi; Hayat, Khizar; Karangwa, Eric; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xiao, Zuobing

    2014-03-01

    Effects of different pretreatments of tallow on flavour precursor development and flavour profiles of beef flavours (BFs) were evaluated. Analysis of free fatty acids and volatiles of tallow by GC and GC-MS indicated that the enzymatic hydrolyzed-thermally oxidized tallow formed the most characteristic flavour precursors compared with others. The results of descriptive sensory analysis confirmed that beef flavour 4 from enzymatic hydrolyzed-thermally oxidized tallow had the strongest beefy, meaty and odour characteristics, followed by beef flavour 2 from oxidized tallow. Electronic nose data confirmed the accuracy of the sensory analysis results. The correlation analysis of 51 volatile compounds in tallow and sensory attributes of BFs showed that some compounds, especially aldehydes, made a significant contribution to sensory attributes. Correlation analysis of free fatty acids and sensory attributes through partial least squares regression (PLSR) confirmed that the moderate enzymatic hydrolysis-thermal oxidation pretreatment of tallow was necessary to achieve the characteristic beef flavour.

  17. Charge symmetry at the partonic level

    SciTech Connect

    Londergan, J. T.; Peng, J. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-07-01

    This review article discusses the experimental and theoretical status of partonic charge symmetry. It is shown how the partonic content of various structure functions gets redefined when the assumption of charge symmetry is relaxed. We review various theoretical and phenomenological models for charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. We summarize the current experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation in parton distributions. A series of experiments are presented, which might reveal partonic charge symmetry violation, or alternatively might lower the current upper limits on parton charge symmetry violation.

  18. Exact SU(5) Yukawa matrix unification in the general flavour violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrzyński, Mateusz; Kowalska, Kamila

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the possibility of satisfying the SU(5) boundary condition Y d = Y eT at the GUT scale within the renormalizable R-parity conserving Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). Working in the super-CKM basis, we consider non-zero flavour off-diagonal entries in the soft SUSY-breaking mass matrices and the A-terms. At the same time, the diagonal A-terms are assumed to be suppressed by the respective Yukawa couplings. We show that a non-trivial flavour structure of the soft SUSY-breaking sector can contribute to achieving precise Yukawa coupling unification for all three families, and that the relevant flavour-violating parameters are , , and A {12/21/ d }. We indicate the parameter space regions where the Yukawa unification condition can be satisfied, and we demonstrate that it is consistent with a wide set of experimental constraints, including flavour and electroweak observables, Higgs physics and the LHC bounds. However, as a consequence of the down-electron Yukawa unification requirement, the MSSM vacuum in our scenario is metastable, though long-lived. We also point out that the lightest neutralino needs to be almost purely bino-like and relatively light, with the mass in the ballpark of 250 GeV. Since the proper value of the dark matter relic density is in this case obtained through co-annihilation with a sneutrino, at least one generation of sleptons must be light. Such a clear experimental prediction makes the flavour-violating SU(5) Yukawa unification scenario fully testable at the LHC TeV with the 3-lepton searches for electroweakino production.

  19. Successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis with flavour coupling effects in realistic unified models

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Stephen F.

    2015-10-02

    In realistic unified models involving so-called SO(10)-inspired patterns of Dirac and heavy right-handed (RH) neutrino masses, the lightest right-handed neutrino N{sub 1} is too light to yield successful thermal leptogenesis, barring highly fine tuned solutions, while the second heaviest right-handed neutrino N{sub 2} is typically in the correct mass range. We show that flavour coupling effects in the Boltzmann equations may be crucial to the success of such N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis, by helping to ensure that the flavour asymmetries produced at the N{sub 2} scale survive N{sub 1} washout. To illustrate these effects we focus on N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis in an existing model, the A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam, where the neutrino Dirac mass matrix may be equal to an up-type quark mass matrix and has a particular constrained structure. The numerical results, supported by analytical insight, show that in order to achieve successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis, consistent with neutrino phenomenology, requires a “flavour swap scenario” together with a less hierarchical pattern of RH neutrino masses than naively expected, at the expense of some mild fine-tuning. In the considered A to Z model neutrino masses are predicted to be normal ordered, with an atmospheric neutrino mixing angle well into the second octant and the Dirac phase δ≃20{sup ∘}, a set of predictions that will be tested in the next years in neutrino oscillation experiments. Flavour coupling effects may be relevant for other SO(10)-inspired unified models where N{sub 2} leptogenesis is necessary.

  20. Successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis with flavour coupling effects in realistic unified models

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Stephen F. E-mail: king@soton.ac.uk

    2015-10-01

    In realistic unified models involving so-called SO(10)-inspired patterns of Dirac and heavy right-handed (RH) neutrino masses, the lightest right-handed neutrino N{sub 1} is too light to yield successful thermal leptogenesis, barring highly fine tuned solutions, while the second heaviest right-handed neutrino N{sub 2} is typically in the correct mass range. We show that flavour coupling effects in the Boltzmann equations may be crucial to the success of such N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis, by helping to ensure that the flavour asymmetries produced at the N{sub 2} scale survive N{sub 1} washout. To illustrate these effects we focus on N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis in an existing model, the A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam, where the neutrino Dirac mass matrix may be equal to an up-type quark mass matrix and has a particular constrained structure. The numerical results, supported by analytical insight, show that in order to achieve successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis, consistent with neutrino phenomenology, requires a ''flavour swap scenario'' together with a less hierarchical pattern of RH neutrino masses than naively expected, at the expense of some mild fine-tuning. In the considered A to Z model neutrino masses are predicted to be normal ordered, with an atmospheric neutrino mixing angle well into the second octant and the Dirac phase δ≅ 20{sup o}, a set of predictions that will be tested in the next years in neutrino oscillation experiments. Flavour coupling effects may be relevant for other SO(10)-inspired unified models where N{sub 2} leptogenesis is necessary.

  1. Solid-phase microextraction for determining twelve orange flavour compounds in a model beverage emulsion.

    PubMed

    Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Yusof, Salmah; Hamid, Nazimah Sheikh Abdul

    2008-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography has been applied for the headspace analysis (HS) of 12 target flavour compounds in a model orange beverage emulsion. The main volatile flavour compounds studied were: acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene, ethyl butyrate, beta-pinene, myrcene, limonene, gamma-terpinene, octanal, decanal, linalool and citral (neral plus geranial). After screening the fibre type, the effect of other HS-SPME variables such as adsorption temperature (25-55 degrees C), extraction time (10-40 min), sample concentration (1-100% w/w), sample amount (5-10 g) and salt amount (0-30% w/w) were determined using a two-level fractional factorial design (2(5-2)) that was expanded further to a central composite design. It was found that an extraction process using a carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane fibre coating at 15 masculineC for 50 min with 5 g of diluted emulsion 1% (w/w) and 30% (w/w) of sodium chloride under stirring mode resulted in the highest HS extraction efficiency. For all volatile flavour compounds, the linearity values were accurate in the concentration ranges studied (r(2) > 0.97). Average recoveries that ranged from 90.3 to 124.8% showed a good accuracy for the optimised method. The relative standard deviation for six replicates of all volatile flavour compounds was found to be less than 15%. For all volatile flavour compounds, the limit of detection ranged from 0.20 to 1.69 mg/L.

  2. Successful N2 leptogenesis with flavour coupling effects in realistic unified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, Pasquale; King, Stephen F.

    2015-10-01

    In realistic unified models involving so-called SO(10)-inspired patterns of Dirac and heavy right-handed (RH) neutrino masses, the lightest right-handed neutrino N1 is too light to yield successful thermal leptogenesis, barring highly fine tuned solutions, while the second heaviest right-handed neutrino N2 is typically in the correct mass range. We show that flavour coupling effects in the Boltzmann equations may be crucial to the success of such N2 dominated leptogenesis, by helping to ensure that the flavour asymmetries produced at the N2 scale survive N1 washout. To illustrate these effects we focus on N2 dominated leptogenesis in an existing model, the A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam, where the neutrino Dirac mass matrix may be equal to an up-type quark mass matrix and has a particular constrained structure. The numerical results, supported by analytical insight, show that in order to achieve successful N2 leptogenesis, consistent with neutrino phenomenology, requires a ``flavour swap scenario'' together with a less hierarchical pattern of RH neutrino masses than naively expected, at the expense of some mild fine-tuning. In the considered A to Z model neutrino masses are predicted to be normal ordered, with an atmospheric neutrino mixing angle well into the second octant and the Dirac phase δsimeq 20o, a set of predictions that will be tested in the next years in neutrino oscillation experiments. Flavour coupling effects may be relevant for other SO(10)-inspired unified models where N2 leptogenesis is necessary.

  3. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  4. Turning Students into Symmetry Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilders, Richard; VanOyen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Exploring mathematical symmetry is one way of increasing students' understanding of art. By asking students to search designs and become pattern detectives, teachers can potentially increase their appreciation of art while reinforcing their perception of the use of math in their day-to-day lives. This article shows teachers how they can interest…

  5. The Symmetry of Natural Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laurie M.

    This document is a monograph intended for advanced undergraduate students, or beginning graduate students, who have some knowledge of modern physics as well as classical physics, including the elementary quantum mechanical treatment of the hydrogen atom and angular momentum. The first chapter introduces symmetry and relates it to the mathematical…

  6. Symmetry of integrable cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikami, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Rei

    2001-03-01

    We study an integrable cellular automaton which is called the box-ball system (BBS). The BBS can be derived directly from the integrable differential-difference equation by either ultradiscretization or crystallization. We clarify the integrable structure and the hidden symmetry of the BBS.

  7. Superdeformations and fermion dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Cheng-Li . Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN )

    1990-01-01

    In this talk, I will present a link between nuclear collective motions and their underlying fermion dynamical symmetries. In particular, I will focus on the microscopic understanding of deformations. It is shown that the SU{sub 3} of the one major shell fermion dynamical symmetry model (FDSM) is responsible for the physics of low and high spins in normal deformation. For the recently observed phenomena of superdeformation, the physics of the problem dictates a generalization to a supershell structure (SFDSM), which also has an SU{sub 3} fermion dynamical symmetry. Many recently discovered feature of superdeformation are found to be inherent in such an SU{sub 3} symmetry. In both cases the dynamical Pauli effect plays a vital role. A particularly noteworthy discovery from this model is that the superdeformed ground band is not the usual unaligned band but the D-pair aligned (DPA) band, which sharply crosses the excited bands. The existence of such DPA band is a key point to understand many properties of superdeformation. Our studies also poses new experimental challenge. This is particularly interesting since there are now plans to build new and exciting {gamma}-ray detecting systems, like the GAMMASPHERE, which could provide answers to some of these challenges. 34 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  9. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  10. Hidden local symmetry and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Koichi

    Gerry Brown was a godfather of our hidden local symmetry (HLS) for the vector meson from the birth of the theory throughout his life. The HLS is originated from very nature of the nonlinear realization of the symmetry G based on the manifold G/H, and thus is universal to any physics based on the nonlinear realization. Here, I focus on the Higgs Lagrangian of the Standard Model (SM), which is shown to be equivalent to the nonlinear sigma model based on G/H = SU(2)L ×SU(2)R/SU(2)V with additional symmetry, the nonlinearly-realized scale symmetry. Then, the SM does have a dynamical gauge boson of the SU(2)V HLS, “SM ρ meson”, in addition to the Higgs as a pseudo-dilaton as well as the NG bosons to be absorbed in to the W and Z. Based on the recent work done with Matsuzaki and Ohki, I discuss a novel possibility that the SM ρ meson acquires kinetic term by the SM dynamics itself, which then stabilizes the skyrmion dormant in the SM as a viable candidate for the dark matter, what we call “dark SM skyrmion (DSMS)”.

  11. Resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbone, G. J.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Bozek, John D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2001-05-01

    The energy dependence of the vibrational branching ratio for exciting one quantum of bending is determined for CO2 4σg-1 photoionization. This nominally forbidden transition becomes allowed for a photoionization transition as a result of instantaneous symmetry breaking due to zero point motion, and is strongly enhanced by a continuum shape resonance.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Face Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2015-06-01

    The major objective of this article was to report quantitatively the degree of human face symmetry for reported images taken from the Internet. From the original image of a certain person that appears in the center of each triplet, 2 symmetric combinations were constructed that are based on the left part of the image and its mirror image (left-left) and on the right part of the image and its mirror image (right-right). By applying a computer software that enables to determine length, surface area, and perimeter of any geometric shape, the following measurements were obtained for each triplet: face perimeter and area; distance between the pupils; mouth length; its perimeter and area; nose length and face length, usually below the ears; as well as the area and perimeter of the pupils. Then, for each of the above measurements, the value C, which characterizes the degree of symmetry of the real image with respect to the combinations right-right and left-left, was calculated. C appears on the right-hand side below each image. A high value of C indicates a low symmetry, and as the value is decreasing, the symmetry is increasing. The magnitude on the left relates to the pupils and compares the difference between the area and perimeter of the 2 pupils. The major conclusion arrived at here is that the human face is asymmetric to some degree; the degree of asymmetry is reported quantitatively under each portrait.

  13. Symmetry-protected topological entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman

    2017-01-01

    We propose an order parameter for the symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases which are protected by Abelian on-site symmetries. This order parameter, called the SPT entanglement, is defined as the entanglement between A and B , two distant regions of the system, given that the total charge (associated with the symmetry) in a third region C is measured and known, where C is a connected region surrounded by A , B , and the boundaries of the system. In the case of one-dimensional systems we prove that in the limit where A and B are large and far from each other compared to the correlation length, the SPT entanglement remains constant throughout a SPT phase, and furthermore, it is zero for the trivial phase while it is nonzero for all the nontrivial phases. Moreover, we show that the SPT entanglement is invariant under the low-depth quantum circuits which respect the symmetry, and hence it remains constant throughout a SPT phase in the higher dimensions as well. Also, we show that there is an intriguing connection between SPT entanglement and the Fourier transform of the string order parameters, which are the traditional tool for detecting SPT phases. This leads to an algorithm for extracting the relevant information about the SPT phase of the system from the string order parameters. Finally, we discuss implications of our results in the context of measurement-based quantum computation.

  14. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  15. Circular codes, symmetries and transformations.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Giannerini, Simone; Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Circular codes, putative remnants of primeval comma-free codes, have gained considerable attention in the last years. In fact they represent a second kind of genetic code potentially involved in detecting and maintaining the normal reading frame in protein coding sequences. The discovering of an universal code across species suggested many theoretical and experimental questions. However, there is a key aspect that relates circular codes to symmetries and transformations that remains to a large extent unexplored. In this article we aim at addressing the issue by studying the symmetries and transformations that connect different circular codes. The main result is that the class of 216 C3 maximal self-complementary codes can be partitioned into 27 equivalence classes defined by a particular set of transformations. We show that such transformations can be put in a group theoretic framework with an intuitive geometric interpretation. More general mathematical results about symmetry transformations which are valid for any kind of circular codes are also presented. Our results pave the way to the study of the biological consequences of the mathematical structure behind circular codes and contribute to shed light on the evolutionary steps that led to the observed symmetries of present codes.

  16. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  17. Hidden local symmetry and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Koichi

    Gerry Brown was a godfather of our hidden local symmetry (HLS) for the vector meson from the birth of the theory throughout his life. The HLS is originated from very nature of the nonlinear realization of the symmetry G based on the manifold G/H, and thus is universal to any physics based on the nonlinear realization. Here, I focus on the Higgs Lagrangian of the Standard Model (SM), which is shown to be equivalent to the nonlinear sigma model based on G/H = SU(2)L × SU(2)R/SU(2)V with additional symmetry, the nonlinearly-realized scale symmetry. Then, the SM does have a dynamical gauge boson of the SU(2)V HLS, "SM ρ meson", in addition to the Higgs as a pseudo-dilaton as well as the NG bosons to be absorbed in to the W and Z. Based on the recent work done with Matsuzaki and Ohki, I discuss a novel possibility that the SM ρ meson acquires kinetic term by the SM dynamics itself, which then stabilizes the skyrmion dormant in the SM as a viable candidate for the dark matter, what we call "dark SM skyrmion (DSMS)".

  18. Turning Students into Symmetry Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilders, Richard; VanOyen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Exploring mathematical symmetry is one way of increasing students' understanding of art. By asking students to search designs and become pattern detectives, teachers can potentially increase their appreciation of art while reinforcing their perception of the use of math in their day-to-day lives. This article shows teachers how they can interest…

  19. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  20. Monster symmetry and extremal CFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiotto, Davide

    2012-11-01

    We test some recent conjectures about extremal selfdual CFTs, which are the candidate holographic duals of pure gravity in AdS 3. We prove that no c = 48 extremal selfdual CFT or SCFT may possess Monster symmetry. Furthermore, we disprove a recent argument against the existence of extremal selfdual CFTs of large central charge.

  1. From symmetries to number theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tempesta, P.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the finite-operator calculus provides a simple formalism useful for constructing symmetry-preserving discretizations of quantum-mechanical integrable models. A related algebraic approach can also be used to define a class of Appell polynomials and of L series.

  2. Towards a complete A4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkeroth, Fredrik; de Anda, Francisco J.; de Medeiros Varzielas, Ivo; King, Stephen F.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a renormalisable model based on A 4 family symmetry with an SU(5) grand unified theory (GUT) which leads to the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with a ℤ9 × ℤ6 symmetry provides the fermion mass hierarchy in both the quark and lepton sectors, while ℤ {4/ R } symmetry is broken to ℤ {2/ R }, identified as usual R-parity. Proton decay is highly sup-pressed by these symmetries. The strong CP problem is solved in a similar way to the Nelson-Barr mechanism. We discuss both the A 4 and SU(5) symmetry breaking sectors, including doublet-triplet splitting, Higgs mixing and the origin of the μ term. The model provides an excellent fit (better than one sigma) to all quark and lepton (including neu-trino) masses and mixing with spontaneous CP violation. With the A 4 vacuum alignments, (0, 1, 1) and (1, 3, 1), the model predicts the entire PMNS mixing matrix with no free pa-rameters, up to a relative phase, selected to be 2π/3 from a choice of the nine complex roots of unity, which is identified as the leptogenesis phase. The model predicts a normal neutrino mass hierarchy with leptonic angles θ{13/ ι } ≈ 8.7∘, θ{12/ ι } ≈ 34∘, θ{23/ ι } ≈ 46∘ and an oscillation phase δ ι ≈ - 87∘.

  3. Symmetry Breaking During Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Siegfried; Lynch, Jeremy A.

    2009-01-01

    The orthogonal axes of Drosophila are established during oogenesis through a hierarchical series of symmetry-breaking steps, most of which can be traced back to asymmetries inherent in the architecture of the ovary. Oogenesis begins with the formation of a germline cyst of 16 cells connected by ring canals. Two of these 16 cells have four ring canals, whereas the others have fewer. The first symmetry-breaking step is the selection of one of these two cells to become the oocyte. Subsequently, the germline cyst becomes surrounded by somatic follicle cells to generate individual egg chambers. The second symmetry-breaking step is the posterior positioning of the oocyte within the egg chamber, a process mediated by adhesive interactions with a special group of somatic cells. Posterior oocyte positioning is accompanied by a par gene-dependent repolarization of the microtubule network, which establishes the posterior cortex of the oocyte. The next two steps of symmetry breaking occur during midoogenesis after the volume of the oocyte has increased about 10-fold. First, a signal from the oocyte specifies posterior follicle cells, polarizing a symmetric prepattern present within the follicular epithelium. Second, the posterior follicle cells send a signal back to the oocyte, which leads to a second repolarization of the oocyte microtubule network and the asymmetric migration of the oocyte nucleus. This process again requires the par genes. The repolarization of the microtubule network results in the transport of bicoid and oskar mRNAs, the anterior and posterior determinants, respectively, of the embryonic axis, to opposite poles of the oocyte. The asymmetric positioning of the oocyte nucleus defines a cortical region of the oocyte where gurken mRNA is localized, thus breaking the dorsal–ventral symmetry of the egg and embryo. PMID:20066085

  4. PT Symmetry, Conformal Symmetry, and the Metrication of Electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2017-09-01

    We present some interesting connections between PT symmetry and conformal symmetry. We use them to develop a metricated theory of electromagnetism in which the electromagnetic field is present in the geometric connection. However, unlike Weyl who first advanced this possibility, we do not take the connection to be real but to instead be PT symmetric, with it being iA_{μ } rather than A_{μ } itself that then appears in the connection. With this modification the standard minimal coupling of electromagnetism to fermions is obtained. Through the use of torsion we obtain a metricated theory of electromagnetism that treats its electric and magnetic sectors symmetrically, with a conformal invariant theory of gravity being found to emerge. An extension to the non-Abelian case is provided.

  5. Universal Formulation For Symmetries In Computed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    Universal formulation for high-order symmetries in boundary conditions on flows devised. Eliminates need for special procedures to incorporate symmetries and corresponding boundary conditions into computer codes solving Navier-Stokes and Euler equations of flow.

  6. An Elementary Course in Mathematical Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Bruce I.; Stafford, Robert D.

    1981-01-01

    A college course designed to teach students about the mathematics of symmetry using pieces of wallpaper and cloth designs is presented. Mathematical structures and the symmetry of graphic designs provide the starting point for instruction. (MP)

  7. An Elementary Course in Mathematical Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Bruce I.; Stafford, Robert D.

    1981-01-01

    A college course designed to teach students about the mathematics of symmetry using pieces of wallpaper and cloth designs is presented. Mathematical structures and the symmetry of graphic designs provide the starting point for instruction. (MP)

  8. Noether symmetries of Bianchi type II spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Mark; Yazdan, Shair-a.

    2017-05-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate Noether symmetries of Bianchi type II spacetimes. We use the reduced involutive form of the determining equations to classify their possible algebras. We show that Noether symmetries contain both Killing vectors and homothetic motions.

  9. Symmetry fractionalization and anomaly detection in three-dimensional topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xie; Hermele, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In a phase with fractional excitations, topological properties are enriched in the presence of global symmetry. In particular, fractional excitations can transform under symmetry in a fractionalized manner, resulting in different symmetry enriched topological (SET) phases. While a good deal is now understood in 2D regarding what symmetry fractionalization patterns are possible, the situation in 3D is much more open. A new feature in 3D is the existence of loop excitations, so to study 3D SET phases, first we need to understand how to properly describe the fractionalized action of symmetry on loops. Using a dimensional reduction procedure, we show that these loop excitations exist as the boundary between two 2D SET phases, and the symmetry action is characterized by the corresponding difference in SET orders. Moreover, similar to the 2D case, we find that some seemingly possible symmetry fractionalization patterns are actually anomalous and cannot be realized strictly in 3D. We detect such anomalies using the flux fusion method we introduced previously in 2D. To illustrate these ideas, we use the 3 D Z2 gauge theory with Z2 global symmetry as an example, and enumerate and describe the corresponding SET phases. In particular, we find four nonanomalous SET phases and one anomalous SET phase, which we show can be realized as the surface of a 4D system with symmetry protected topological order.

  10. Symmetry perception in humans and macaques.

    PubMed

    Beck, Diane M; Pinsk, Mark A; Kastner, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    The human ability to detect symmetry has been a topic of interest to psychologists and philosophers since the 19th century, yet surprisingly little is known about the neural basis of symmetry perception. In a recent fMRI study, Sasaki and colleagues begin to remedy this situation. By identifying the neural structures that respond to symmetry in both humans and macaques, the authors lay the groundwork for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying symmetry perception.

  11. Superalgebra and fermion-boson symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Hironari

    2010-01-01

    Fermions and bosons are quite different kinds of particles, but it is possible to unify them in a supermultiplet, by introducing a new mathematical scheme called superalgebra. In this article we discuss the development of the concept of symmetry, starting from the rotational symmetry and finally arriving at this fermion-boson (FB) symmetry. PMID:20228617

  12. Generalized partial dynamical symmetry in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, A; Isacker, P Van

    2002-11-25

    We introduce the notion of a generalized partial dynamical-symmetry for which part of the eigenstates have part of the dynamical symmetry. This general concept is illustrated with the example of Hamiltonians with a partial dynamical O(6) symmetry in the framework of the interacting boson model. The resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions are compared with empirical data in 162Dy.

  13. Symmetry Breaking for Black-Scholes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan-Liu; Zhang, Shun-Li; Qu, Chang-Zheng

    2007-06-01

    Black-Scholes equation is used to model stock option pricing. In this paper, optimal systems with one to four parameters of Lie point symmetries for Black-Scholes equation and its extension are obtained. Their symmetry breaking interaction associated with the optimal systems is also studied. As a result, symmetry reductions and corresponding solutions for the resulting equations are obtained.

  14. Noether symmetries and duality transformations in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the relation between Noether (point) symmetries and discrete symmetries for a class of minisuperspace cosmological models. We show that when a Noether symmetry exists for the gravitational Lagrangian, then there exists a coordinate system in which a reversal symmetry exists. Moreover, as far as concerns, the scale-factor duality symmetry of the dilaton field, we show that it is related to the existence of a Noether symmetry for the field equations, and the reversal symmetry in the normal coordinates of the symmetry vector becomes scale-factor duality symmetry in the original coordinates. In particular, the same point symmetry as also the same reversal symmetry exists for the Brans-Dicke scalar field with linear potential while now the discrete symmetry in the original coordinates of the system depends on the Brans-Dicke parameter and it is a scale-factor duality when ωBD = 1. Furthermore, in the context of the O’Hanlon theory for f(R)-gravity, it is possible to show how a duality transformation in the minisuperspace can be used to relate different gravitational models.

  15. Association between use of flavoured tobacco products and quit behaviours: findings from a cross-sectional survey of US adult tobacco users.

    PubMed

    Smith, Danielle M; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Huang, Jidong; Barker, Dianne; Hyland, Andrew J; Chaloupka, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Non-menthol characterising flavours (eg, fruit, candy) are banned in cigarettes, yet are still permitted in non-cigarette tobacco (NCT) products. This study examined associations between first use and current use of flavoured tobacco products, and current flavoured tobacco use and quit behaviours. A nationally representative, telephone-based survey completed in 2012 by 1443 US adult tobacco users asked about use of 9 tobacco products: cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, little filtered cigars, pipes, hookah, smokeless tobacco and snus. Ever users reported first use of flavoured products, while current users also reported current flavoured product use. Current users reported quit attempts made in the past year. Data were weighted to reflect the US adult tobacco user population. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between first/current flavour use and quit behaviours. Over 70% of respondents reported first use of a flavoured tobacco product, while 54% reported current use of at least one flavoured product. Odds of current flavoured product use were greater among those who reported first use of a flavoured product (OR 14.82, 95% CI 9.96 to 22.06). First use of a flavoured product was associated with being a current tobacco user (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.22). Compared to single product users, polytobacco users exhibited greater odds of reporting current use of flavoured products (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.97). Forty-four percent of current tobacco users reported a past-year quit attempt. Adjusted analyses among current NCT users of at least one flavoured tobacco product showed reduced odds of reporting a quit attempt. First use of a flavoured tobacco product was associated with current flavoured tobacco use and polytobacco use. Users of only flavoured NCT products exhibited reduced odds of reporting a quit attempt. Findings from this study reinforce the importance of flavoured product availability in the USA, which may have

  16. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  17. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE PAGES

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; ...

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  18. Open heavy-flavour measurements in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrevoli, Cristina; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Heavy flavours are sensitive probes of the hot and dense QCD medium formed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Measurements of their production in p-Pb collisions are crucial for the interpretation of heavy-ion results, by investigating the cold nuclear matter effects. The open heavy-flavour production studied with ALICE at the LHC in p-Pb collisions at and in Pb-Pb collisions at are presented. Emphasis is given to the recent measurements of D0 production cross section down to p T=0, the nuclear modification factor of heavy-flavour hadron decay electrons in p-Pb collisions, the nuclear modification factor of D-meson, and heavy-flavour hadron decay electron elliptic flow in Pb-Pb collisions, as a function of centrality.

  19. Soft terms from broken symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buican, Matthew; Komargodski, Zohar

    2010-02-01

    In theories of phyiscs beyond the Standard Model (SM), visible sector fields often carry quantum numbers under additional gauge symmetries. One could then imagine a scenario in which these extra gauge symmetries play a role in transmitting supersymmetry breaking from a hidden sector to the Supersymmetric Standard Model (SSM). In this paper we present a general formalism for studying the resulting hidden sectors and calculating the corresponding gauge mediated soft parameters. We find that a large class of generic models features a leading universal contribution to the soft scalar masses that only depends on the scale of Higgsing, even if the model is strongly coupled. As a by-product of our analysis, we elucidate some IR aspects of the correlation functions in General Gauge Mediation. We also discuss possible phenomenological applications.

  20. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  1. Symmetry breaking around a wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A. L.

    1996-11-01

    We have modified the extended version Coule and Maeda's version (D. H. Coule and Kei-ichi Maeda, Class.Quant.Grav.7,995(1990)) of the Gidding-Strominger model (S. B. Giddings and A. Strominger, Nucl.Phys. B307, 854(l988)) of the euclidean gravitational field interacting with axion. The new model has R-symmetry in contrast to the previous model. At the lowest perturbation case the model retains a wormhole solution. We assume that the scalar expands adiabatically and satisfies ideal gas law in a crude first approximation. Under the Higg's mechanism the symmetry can be broken at the tree approximation. This mechanism, we hope, can be used to introduce the degeneracy of quark masses.

  2. Broken symmetries in multilayered perceptrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkai, E.; Hansel, D.; Sompolinsky, H.

    1992-03-01

    The statistical mechanics of two-layered perceptrons with N input units, K hidden units, and a single output unit that makes a decision based on a majority rule (Committee Machine) are studied. Two architectures are considered. In the nonoverlapping case the hidden units do not share common inputs. In the fully connected case each hidden unit is connected to the entire input layer. In both cases the network realizes a random dichotomy of P inputs. The statistical properties of the space of solutions as a function of P is studied, using the replica method, and by numerical simulations, in the regime where N>>K. In the nonoverlapping architecture with continuously varying weights the capacity, defined as the maximal number of P per weight, (αc) is calculated under a replica-symmetric (RS) ansatz. At large K, αc diverges as K1/2 in contradiction with the rigorous upper bound, αcsymmetry-breaking effect. The instability of the RS solution is shown to occur at a value of α which remains finite in the large-K limit. A one-step replica-symmetry-breaking (RSB) ansatz is studied for K=3 and in the limit K goes to infinity. The results indicate that αc(K) diverges with K, probably logarithmically. The occurrence of RSB far below the capacity limit is confirmed by comparison of the theoretical results with numerical simulations for K=3. This symmetry breaking implies that unlike the single-layer perceptron case, the space of solutions of the two-layer perceptron breaks, beyond a critical value of α, into many disjoint subregions. The entropies of the connected subregions are almost degenerate, their relative difference being of order 1/N. In the case of a nonoverlapping Committee Machine with binary, i.e., +/-1 weights, αc<=1 is an upper bound for all K. The RS theory predicts αc=0.92 for K=3 and αc=0.95 for the large-K limit

  3. Facial symmetry in robust anthropometrics.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Image analysis methods commonly used in forensic anthropology do not have desirable robustness properties, which can be ensured by robust statistical methods. In this paper, the face localization in images is carried out by detecting symmetric areas in the images. Symmetry is measured between two neighboring rectangular areas in the images using a new robust correlation coefficient, which down-weights regions in the face violating the symmetry. Raw images of faces without usual preliminary transformations are considered. The robust correlation coefficient based on the least weighted squares regression yields very promising results also in the localization of such faces, which are not entirely symmetric. Standard methods of statistical machine learning are applied for comparison. The robust correlation analysis can be applicable to other problems of forensic anthropology.

  4. CP symmetry in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Brenda; Bahabad, Alon; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a model of a dual-core optical waveguide with opposite signs of the group-velocity dispersion in the two cores, and a phase-velocity mismatch between them. The coupler is embedded into an active host medium, which provides for the linear coupling of a gain-loss type between the two cores. The same system can be derived, without phenomenological assumptions, by considering the three-wave propagation in a medium with the quadratic nonlinearity, provided that the depletion of the second-harmonic pump is negligible. This linear system offers an optical realization of the charge-parity symmetry, while the addition of the intracore cubic nonlinearity breaks the symmetry. By means of direct simulations and analytical approximations, it is demonstrated that the linear system generates expanding Gaussian states, while the nonlinear one gives rise to broad oscillating solitons, as well as a general family of stable stationary gap solitons.

  5. Geometric symmetries in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, R.

    2017-06-01

    The algebraic cluster model is is applied to study cluster states in the nuclei12C and16O. The observed level sequences can be understood in terms of the underlying discrete symmetry that characterizes the geometrical configuration of the α-particles, i.e. an equilateral triangle for12C, and a regular tetrahedron for16O. The structure of rotational bands provides a fingerprint of the underlying geometrical configuration of α-particles.

  6. Explaining quantum spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Emch, Gérard G.

    Two accounts of quantum symmetry breaking (SSB) in the algebraic approach are compared: the representational and the decompositional account. The latter account is argued to be superior for understanding quantum SSB. Two exactly solvable models are given as applications of our account: the Weiss-Heisenberg model for ferromagnetism and the BCS model for superconductivity. Finally, the decompositional account is shown to be more conducive to the causal explanation of quantum SSB.

  7. Fermion mass without symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catterall, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We examine a model of reduced staggered fermions in three dimensions interacting through an SO (4) invariant four fermion interaction. The model is similar to that considered in a recent paper by Ayyer and Chandrasekharan [1]. We present theoretical arguments and numerical evidence which support the idea that the system develops a mass gap for sufficiently strong four fermi coupling without producing a symmetry breaking fermion bilinear condensate. Massless and massive phases appear to be separated by a continuous phase transition.

  8. Symmetries in Lagrangian Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Búa, Lucia; Bucataru, Ioan; León, Manuel de; Salgado, Modesto; Vilariño, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    By generalising the cosymplectic setting for time-dependent Lagrangian mechanics, we propose a geometric framework for the Lagrangian formulation of classical field theories with a Lagrangian depending on the independent variables. For that purpose we consider the first-order jet bundles J1π of a fiber bundle π : E → ℝk where ℝk is the space of independent variables. Generalized symmetries of the Lagrangian are introduced and the corresponding Noether theorem is proved.

  9. Fermion mass without symmetry breaking

    DOE PAGES

    Catterall, Simon

    2016-01-20

    We examine a model of reduced staggered fermions in three dimensions interacting through an SO (4) invariant four fermion interaction. The model is similar to that considered in a recent paper by Ayyer and Chandrasekharan. We present theoretical arguments and numerical evidence which support the idea that the system develops a mass gap for sufficiently strong four fermi coupling without producing a symmetry breaking fermion bilinear condensate. As a result, massless and massive phases appear to be separated by a continuous phase transition.

  10. Symmetry analysis of talus bone

    PubMed Central

    Islam, K.; Dobbe, A.; Komeili, A.; Duke, K.; El-Rich, M.; Dhillon, S.; Adeeb, S.; Jomha, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The main object of this study was to use a geometric morphometric approach to quantify the left-right symmetry of talus bones. Methods Analysis was carried out using CT scan images of 11 pairs of intact tali. Two important geometric parameters, volume and surface area, were quantified for left and right talus bones. The geometric shape variations between the right and left talus bones were also measured using deviation analysis. Furthermore, location of asymmetry in the geometric shapes were identified. Results Numerical results showed that talus bones are bilaterally symmetrical in nature, and the difference between the surface area of the left and right talus bones was less than 7.5%. Similarly, the difference in the volume of both bones was less than 7.5%. Results of the three-dimensional (3D) deviation analyses demonstrated the mean deviation between left and right talus bones were in the range of -0.74 mm to 0.62 mm. It was observed that in eight of 11 subjects, the deviation in symmetry occurred in regions that are clinically less important during talus surgery. Conclusions We conclude that left and right talus bones of intact human ankle joints show a strong degree of symmetry. The results of this study may have significance with respect to talus surgery, and in investigating traumatic talus injury where the geometric shape of the contralateral talus can be used as control. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:139–45. PMID:24802391

  11. Dark matter and global symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-08-03

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. Here, assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O(1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime

  12. Dark matter and global symmetries

    DOE PAGES

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-08-03

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Sawmore » models. Here, assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O(1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime« less

  13. Dark matter and global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-09-01

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. Assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O (1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime.

  14. [Determination of trace elements in cigarette flavours by closed-vessel microwave digestion-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wu, Zhi-Ying; Zhu, Feng-Peng; Li, Dong-Liang; Dai, Ya; Hu, Qing-Yuan; Tang, Gang-Ling

    2010-12-01

    Tobacco flavours have great effect on the aroma, taste and quality stabilization of cigarettes. In order to effectively control the quality of cigarette flavours and reduce the content level of toxic elements in cigarette mainstream smoke, a method for the simultaneous determination of Be, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Cd, Tl and Pb in cigarette flavours by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with closed-vessel microwave assisted digestion was developed. The linear correlative coefficients for all elements are better than 0.999 4 and the precision of measurement ranges from 1.3% to 9.5% in terms of relative standard deviation (n = 5). The recoveries for the cigarette flavour samples and the limits of detection are in the range of 88.1%-109.3% and 0.003-0.13 microg x L(-1), respectively. The results of experiment show that the method can meet the requirements of trace analysis. Thirty eight cigarette flavours from different cigarette manufacturing enterprises were determined. The results indicate that: (1) the contents of Be, Tl, Mo, Cd, V, Pb and As in cigarette flavours are very lower, the average values of which are all lower than 0.1 microg x g(-1). The content levels of Mn, Zn and Sr in cigarette flavours are higher, and that of other 4 elements are moderate. (2) The content difference of Mn, Cd and Sr in different cigarette flavours is usually bigger, the coefficients of variation of which are 276.4%, 238.7% and 243.8%, respectively.

  15. Novel flavours paired with glutamate condition increased intake in older adults in the absence of changes in liking.

    PubMed

    Dermiki, Maria; Prescott, John; Sargent, Laura J; Willway, Joanne; Gosney, Margot A; Methven, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Previous research on the repeat exposure to a novel flavour combined with monosodium glutamate (MSG) has shown an increase in liking and consumption for the particular flavour. The aim of the current work was to investigate whether this could also be observed in the case of older people, since they are most affected by undernutrition in the developed world and ways to increase consumption of food are of significant importance for this particular age group. For this study, 40 older adults (age 65-88) repeatedly consumed potato soup with two novel flavours (lemongrass and cumin) which were either with or without a high level of MSG (5% w/w). A randomized single blind within-subject design was implemented, where each participant was exposed to both soup flavours three times over 6 days, with one of the soup flavours containing MSG. After three repeat exposures, consumption increased significantly for the soups where the flavours had contained MSG during the repeated exposure (mean weight consumed increased from 123 to 164 g, p = 0.017), implying that glutamate conditioned for increased wanting and consumption, despite the fact that the liking for the soup had not increased.

  16. The effect of addition of selected vegetables on the microbiological, textural and flavour profile properties of yoghurts.

    PubMed

    Najgebauer-Lejko, Dorota; Tabaszewska, Małgorzata; Grega, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables, apart from having high nutritional value, also contain considerable amounts of dietary fibre and other components, which may affect physico-chemical properties of fermented milks, e.g. viscosity, texture, susceptibility to syneresis, flavour profile etc. The present work was established to study the effect of selected vegetables addition on the rheological, textural, microbiological and flavour profile parameters of yoghurts. The vegetable preparations (carrot, pumpkin, broccoli and red sweet pepper) were added (10% w/w) to the processed cow's milk fermented with DVS yoghurt culture. Texture profile analysis, determination of viscosity, susceptibility to syneresis and descriptive flavour evaluation were conducted at the 1st, 7th and 14th day after production. Additionally, microbiological studies were performed for 28 days, at 7-day intervals. The highest apparent viscosity and adhesiveness were obtained for the carrot yoghurt, whereas yoghurt with pumpkin was the least susceptible to syneresis. The other texture parameters were not affected by the addition of vegetables. Broccoli and red sweet pepper flavours were dominating in the fermented milks fortified with these vegetables, whereas carrot and pumpkin flavours were less distinctive. Yoghurt supplemented with red sweet pepper got the highest sensoric acceptability. The number of starter bacteria was not influenced by the vegetable additives, except for pumpkin yoghurt, which contained lower population of lactobacilli. Among all tested vegetables, carrot additive had the greatest potential to improve yoghurt structure, whereas red sweet pepper imparted the most acceptable flavour.

  17. Physico-chemical change and heat stability of extra virgin olive oils flavoured by selected Tunisian aromatic plants.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, M A; Grati-Kamoun, N; Attia, H

    2009-10-01

    Objectives of this work were studying physico-chemical change and heat stability of olive oils flavoured by selected Tunisian aromatic plants. Flavoured olive oils were prepared by maceration of fresh plant materials (rosemary, lavender, sage, menthe, basil, lemon and thyme) with olive oil at a 5% w/w level for 15 days. A sensorial evaluation was applied to select more appreciate flavoured olive oils by consumers. An oxidative procedure was applied to test the stability of selected flavoured olive oils: oils samples were kept in glass bottles and heated at 60 and 130 degrees C during 55 days and 6h, respectively. The resistance to oxidation of these selected flavoured oils was compared to a control samples by measuring PV, K232 and K270 values and change in chlorophyll, carotenes and polyphénols contents. Obtained results show that addition of aromatic plants causes a slight increase in free acidity and viscosity of aromatised olive oils. L*, b* and a* values show that addition of thyme cause a great change in olive oil colours. Heat stability results shows that from selected aromatic plants, rosemary was effectiveness against oxidation followed by thyme and lemon. However, olive oil flavoured with basil exhibit a similar behaviour versus thermal oxidation then the natural olive oil.

  18. Generalization of Friedberg-Lee symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Shang; Li, Tianjun; Liao, Wei; Zhu, Shou-Hua

    2008-07-01

    We study the possible origin of Friedberg-Lee symmetry. First, we propose the generalized Friedberg-Lee symmetry in the potential by including the scalar fields in the field transformations, which can be broken down to the Friedberg-Lee symmetry spontaneously. We show that the generalized Friedberg-Lee symmetry allows a typical form of Yukawa couplings, and the realistic neutrino masses and mixings can be generated via the seesaw mechanism. If the right-handed neutrinos transform nontrivially under the generalized Friedberg-Lee symmetry, we can have the testable TeV scale seesaw mechanism. Second, we present two models with the SO(3)×U(1) global flavor symmetry in the lepton sector. After the flavor symmetry breaking, we can obtain the charged lepton masses, and explain the neutrino masses and mixings via the seesaw mechanism. Interestingly, the complete neutrino mass matrices are similar to those of the above models with generalized Friedberg-Lee symmetry. So the Friedberg-Lee symmetry is the residual symmetry in the neutrino mass matrix after the SO(3)×U(1) flavor symmetry breaking.

  19. QCD-aware partonic jet clustering for truth-jet flavour labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Andy; Pollard, Chris

    2016-02-01

    We present an algorithm for deriving partonic flavour labels to be applied to truth particle jets in Monte Carlo event simulations. The inputs to this approach are final pre-hadronisation partons, to remove dependence on unphysical details such as the order of matrix element calculation and shower generator frame recoil treatment. These are clustered using standard jet algorithms, modified to restrict the allowed pseudojet combinations to those in which tracked flavour labels are consistent with QCD and QED Feynman rules. The resulting algorithm is shown to be portable between the major families of shower generators, and largely insensitive to many possible systematic variations: it hence offers significant advantages over existing ad hoc labelling schemes. However, it is shown that contamination from multi-parton scattering simulations can disrupt the labelling results. Suggestions are made for further extension to incorporate more detailed QCD splitting function kinematics, robustness improvements, and potential uses for truth-level physics object definitions and tagging.

  20. Chemical and sensory analysis of strawberry flavoured yogurt supplemented with an algae oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Chee, Celia P; Gallaher, Jason J; Djordjevic, Darinka; Faraji, Habibollah; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A; Hollender, Ruth; Peterson, Devin G; Roberts, Robert F; Coupland, John N

    2005-08-01

    A yogurt mix (2 g fat and 17g solids/100 g) was supplemented with an algae oil emulsion to provide 500 mg omega-3 fatty acids per 272 g serving of yogurt white mass. The emulsion was added to the yogurt mix either before or after the homogenization step and prior to pasteurization. It was then flavoured with a strawberry fruit base and fermented and stored for up to three weeks. The oxidative deterioration of the products was determined by hydroperoxide measurements and by trained and consumer sensory evaluations. The hydroperoxide content of the supplemented yogurts increased over the storage treatment and was unaffected by the stage of addition. The trained panel could distinguish a stronger fishy flavour in both of the supplemented yogurts after 22 days storage, but the consumer panel rated both control and supplemented samples similarly, as 'moderately liked'.

  1. Food, flavouring and feed plant traditions in the Tyrrhenian sector of Basilicata, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Guarrera, Paolo Maria; Salerno, Giovanni; Caneva, Giulia

    2006-01-01

    Background: Research was carried out in the years 2002–2003 into food, flavouring and feed folk traditions of plants in the Tyrrhenian part of the Basilicata region (southern Italy). This area was colonized in ancient times by Greeks. Data was collected through field interviews, especially of farmers. Methods: Field data were collected through structured interviews. The informants, numbered 49, belonged to families which had strong links with the traditional activities of the area. Results: 61 taxa are cited, belonging to 26 botanical families, amongst which 44 used as food or flavouring and 22 for animal alimentation. Besides 7 taxa are involved in rituals especially connected with agriculture and plant growth. Conclusion: The preservation of some rituals especially concerning agricultural plants is noteworthy in the area, together with a certain degree of continuity in food uses. Knowledge and rediscovery of recipes in human and animal diet could represent an economic potential for the area. PMID:16959031

  2. Decays of Higgs boson into pseudoscalar meson pair of different flavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Swee-Ping

    2013-05-01

    The flavour-changing quark-Higgs coupling does not arise at the tree level in the Standard Model. It is, however, induced by one-loop effects. In this paper, we present an exact calculation of the Higgs-penguin vertex in the 'tHooft-Feynman gauge. Renormalization of the vertex is effected by a prescription by Chia and Chong which gives an expression for the counter term identical to that obtained by employing Ward-Takahashi identity. The on-shell vertex function for the Higgs-penguin vertex is obtained, and its dependence on Higgs mass is investigated. Our calculation is applied to the following process: decays of Higgs boson into pseudoscalar meson pair of different flavours: Kπ and BK. The coupling of pseudoscalar meson to quark is effected through γ5 coupling. The decay rates are found to be very small.

  3. Food, flavouring and feed plant traditions in the Tyrrhenian sector of Basilicata, Italy.

    PubMed

    Guarrera, Paolo Maria; Salerno, Giovanni; Caneva, Giulia

    2006-09-07

    Research was carried out in the years 2002-2003 into food, flavouring and feed folk traditions of plants in the Tyrrhenian part of the Basilicata region (southern Italy). This area was colonized in ancient times by Greeks. Data was collected through field interviews, especially of farmers. Field data were collected through structured interviews. The informants, numbered 49, belonged to families which had strong links with the traditional activities of the area. 61 taxa are cited, belonging to 26 botanical families, amongst which 44 used as food or flavouring and 22 for animal alimentation. Besides 7 taxa are involved in rituals especially connected with agriculture and plant growth. The preservation of some rituals especially concerning agricultural plants is noteworthy in the area, together with a certain degree of continuity in food uses. Knowledge and rediscovery of recipes in human and animal diet could represent an economic potential for the area.

  4. Potentiating effects of honey on antioxidant properties of lemon-flavoured black tea.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Vilas-Boas, Miguel; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-03-01

    Health benefits including antioxidant potential of black tea (Camellia sinensis), lemon (Citrus limon) and honey bees (Apis mellifera) have been extensively reported. Nevertheless, nothing is reported about the effects of their concomitant use. Herein, those effects were evaluated in infusions of lemon-flavoured black tea with three different kinds of honey (light amber, amber and dark amber) from Lavandula stoechas, Erica sp. pl. and other indigenous floral species from north-east Portugal, a region with high amounts of this food product. Data obtained showed that the use of honey (dark amber>amber>light amber) potentiates the antioxidant activity of lemon-flavoured black tea, increasing the reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition properties, as also the antioxidant contents such as phenolics, flavonoids and organic acids including ascorbic acid.

  5. What is the scale of new physics behind the B-flavour anomalies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luzio, Luca; Nardecchia, Marco

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by the recent hints of lepton flavour non-universality in B-meson semi-leptonic decays, we study the constraints of perturbative unitarity on the new physics interpretation of the anomalies in b → c ℓ \\bar{ν } and b → s ℓ \\bar{ℓ } transitions. Within an effective field theory approach we find that 2 → 2 fermion scattering amplitudes saturate the unitarity bound below 9 and 80 TeV, respectively for b → c ℓ \\bar{ν } and b → s ℓ \\bar{ℓ } transitions. Stronger bounds, up to few TeV, are obtained when the leading effective operators are oriented in the direction of the third generation, as suggested by flavour models. We finally address unitarity constraints on simplified models explaining the anomalies and show that the new physics interpretation is ruled out in a class of perturbative realizations.

  6. A novel experiment searching for the lepton flavour violating decay μ → eee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Niklaus

    2013-02-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations it is known that lepton flavour is not conserved. Lepton flavour violating processes in the charged lepton sector have so far however eluded detection; as they are heavily suppressed in the standard model of particle physics, an observation would be a clear signal for new physics and help to understand the source of neutrino masses and CP violation. We propose a novel experiment searching for the decay μ → eee with the aim of ultimately reaching a sensitivity of 10-16, an improvement by four orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The technologies enabling this step are thin high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors for precise tracking at high rates with a minimum of material and scintillating fibres for high resolution time measurements.

  7. Characterisation of bound volatile compounds of a low flavour kiwifruit species: Actinidia eriantha.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Coralia V; Quek, Siew-Young; Stevenson, Ralph J; Winz, Robert A

    2012-09-15

    Aroma compounds in fruit are known to occur in free and glycosidically bound forms. The bound volatile fraction of a low flavour kiwifruit species, Actinidia eriantha, was studied. The fruit have a bland and grassy flavour. Glycosidic precursors were isolated from juice by adsorption onto an Amberlite XAD-2 column. After enzymatic hydrolysis with Rapidase AR2000, the released aglycones were analysed by GC-MS. Alcohols, terpenoids and phenolics were the most numerously represented compound classes. Alcohols, benzenoids and phenolics showed the highest concentrations. Major compounds were 2-phenylethanol, furfuryl alcohol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, coniferyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol and linolenic acid. Several of the bound compounds found, including linoleic, linolenic and benzoic acids and coniferyl alcohol, are precursors of odorous volatiles. Many compounds detected as bound volatiles have not been previously reported as free volatiles in A. eriantha. The bound volatile composition of A. eriantha also showed differences with those of other kiwifruit species.

  8. Relativity symmetries and Lie algebra contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dai-Ning; Kong, Otto C. W.

    2014-12-01

    We revisit the notion of possible relativity or kinematic symmetries mutually connected through Lie algebra contractions under a new perspective on what constitutes a relativity symmetry. Contractions of an SO(m , n) symmetry as an isometry on an m + n dimensional geometric arena which generalizes the notion of spacetime are discussed systematically. One of the key results is five different contractions of a Galilean-type symmetry G(m , n) preserving a symmetry of the same type at dimension m + n - 1, e.g. a G(m , n - 1) , together with the coset space representations that correspond to the usual physical picture. Most of the results are explicitly illustrated through the example of symmetries obtained from the contraction of SO(2 , 4) , which is the particular case for our interest on the physics side as the proposed relativity symmetry for "quantum spacetime". The contractions from G(1 , 3) may be relevant to real physics.

  9. Symmetries in nuclei: New methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, Mark A.

    2011-04-01

    When a symmetry is a ``good'' symmetry of the nuclear system, as in the dynamical symmetries of the shell model and interacting boson model, this symmetry can directly give the spectroscopic properties of the nucleus, without the need for involved calculations. However, even if a symmetry is strongly broken, it nonetheless provides a calculational tool, classifying the basis states used in a full computational treatment of the many-body problem and greatly simplifying the underlying computational machinery. The symmetry then serves as the foundation for a physically meaningful truncation scheme for the calculation. This talk will provide an introduction to new applications of symmetry approaches to the nuclear problem, including the required mathematical developments. Supported by the US DOE under grant DE-FG02-95ER-40934 and by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement under a Cottrell Scholar Award.

  10. Symmetry constraints on many-body localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Andrew C.; Vasseur, Romain

    2016-12-01

    We derive general constraints on the existence of many-body localized (MBL) phases in the presence of global symmetries, and show that MBL is not possible with symmetry groups that protect multiplets (e.g., all non-Abelian symmetry groups). Based on simple representation theoretic considerations, we derive general Mermin-Wagner-type principles governing the possible alternative fates of nonequilibrium dynamics in isolated, strongly disordered quantum systems. Our results rule out the existence of MBL symmetry-protected topological phases with non-Abelian symmetry groups, as well as time-reversal symmetry-protected electronic topological insulators, and in fact all fermion topological insulators and superconductors in the 10-fold way classification. Moreover, extending our arguments to systems with intrinsic topological order, we rule out MBL phases with non-Abelian anyons as well as certain classes of symmetry-enriched topological orders.

  11. Enhanced Facial Symmetry Assessment in Orthodontists

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tate H.; Clark, Kait; Mitroff, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing facial symmetry is an evolutionarily important process, which suggests that individual differences in this ability should exist. As existing data are inconclusive, the current study explored whether a group trained in facial symmetry assessment, orthodontists, possessed enhanced abilities. Symmetry assessment was measured using face and non-face stimuli among orthodontic residents and two control groups: university participants with no symmetry training and airport security luggage screeners, a group previously shown to possess expert visual search skills unrelated to facial symmetry. Orthodontic residents were more accurate at assessing symmetry in both upright and inverted faces compared to both control groups, but not for non-face stimuli. These differences are not likely due to motivational biases or a speed-accuracy tradeoff—orthodontic residents were slower than the university participants but not the security screeners. Understanding such individual differences in facial symmetry assessment may inform the perception of facial attractiveness. PMID:24319342

  12. Enhanced Facial Symmetry Assessment in Orthodontists.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Tate H; Clark, Kait; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    Assessing facial symmetry is an evolutionarily important process, which suggests that individual differences in this ability should exist. As existing data are inconclusive, the current study explored whether a group trained in facial symmetry assessment, orthodontists, possessed enhanced abilities. Symmetry assessment was measured using face and non-face stimuli among orthodontic residents and two control groups: university participants with no symmetry training and airport security luggage screeners, a group previously shown to possess expert visual search skills unrelated to facial symmetry. Orthodontic residents were more accurate at assessing symmetry in both upright and inverted faces compared to both control groups, but not for non-face stimuli. These differences are not likely due to motivational biases or a speed-accuracy tradeoff-orthodontic residents were slower than the university participants but not the security screeners. Understanding such individual differences in facial symmetry assessment may inform the perception of facial attractiveness.

  13. PREFACE: DISCRETE 2012 - Third Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, G. C.; Emmanuel-Costa, D.; González Felipe, R.; Joaquim, F. R.; Lavoura, L.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Rebelo, M. N.; Romão, J. C.; Silva, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    The Third Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries (DISCRETE 2012) was held at Instituto Superior Técnico, Portugal, from 3-7 December 2012 and was organised by Centro de Física Teórica de Partículas (CFTP) of Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa. This is the sequel to the Symposia that was successfully organised in Valéncia in 2008 and in Rome in 2010. The topics covered included: T, C, P, CP symmetries CPT symmetry, decoherence, Lorentz symmetry breaking Discrete symmetries and models of flavour mixing Baryogenesis, leptogenesis Neutrino physics Electroweak symmetry breaking and physics beyond the Standard Model Accidental symmetries (B, L conservation) Experimental prospects at LHC Dark matter searches Super flavour factories, and other new experimental facilities The Symposium was organised in plenary sessions with a total of 24 invited talks, and parallel sessions with a total of 70 talks, including both invited and selected contributions from the submitted abstracts. The speakers of the plenary sessions were: Ignatios Antoniadis, Abdelhak Djouadi, Rabindra Mohapatra, André Rubbia, Alexei Yu Smirnov, José Bernabéu, Marco Cirelli, Apostolos Pilaftsis, Antonio Di Domenico, Robertus Potting, João Varela, Frank Rathmann, Michele Gallinaro, Dumitru Ghilencea, Neville Harnew, John Walsh, Patrícia Conde Muíño, Juan Aguilar-Saavedra, Nick Mavromatos, Ulrich Nierste, Ferruccio Feruglio, Vasiliki Mitsou, Masanori Yamauchi, and Marcello Giorgi. The Symposium was attended by about 140 participants. Among the social events, there was a social dinner in the historical Associação Comercial de Lisboa, which included a musical performance of 'Fado', the traditional music from Lisbon. The next symposium of the series will be organised by King's College, London University, UK, from 1-5 December 2014. Guest Editors G C Branco, D Emmanuel-Costa, R González Felipe, F R Joaquim, L Lavoura, S Palomares-Ruiz, M N Rebelo, J C

  14. Difference thresholds for added sugar in chocolate-flavoured milk: Recommendations for gradual sugar reduction.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Denize; Reis, Felipe; Deliza, Rosires; Rosenthal, Amauri; Giménez, Ana; Ares, Gastón

    2016-11-01

    Reducing the concentration of added sugar in processed foods is one of the most realistic strategies to reduce the intake of this nutrient in the short-term. In order to be effective, gradual sugar reduction strategies need to determine the maximum sugar reduction that can be unnoticed by consumers. In this context, the present work aimed at providing recommendations for gradual sugar reduction in chocolate-flavoured milk by determining difference thresholds for added sugar and evaluating consumers' sensory and hedonic perception of reduced-sugar products. Five studies were conducted with 50 consumers to determine five sequential difference thresholds. In each study consumers completed six paired-comparison tests. Each pair was composed of a reference chocolate-flavoured milk and a sample that was reduced in added sugar from the reference. Difference thresholds, corresponding to the smallest reduction in sugar concentration that is noticed by consumers, were determined using survival analysis. Then, a study was carried to with 100 consumers to evaluate their sensory and hedonic perception of chocolate-flavoured milk samples with different added sugar concentrations. Results suggested that sequential sugar reductions can be set at 6.7% without affecting consumers' sensory and hedonic perception. Sugar reduction in chocolate-flavoured milk without affecting consumers' perception seems feasible and easy to implement. The approach of the present work could be extended to design recommendations for gradual reduction of the added sugar concentration of other industrialized products, contributing to the development of more healthful products that meet current nutritional recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Photooxidative degradation of beer bittering principles: product analysis with respect to lightstruck flavour formation.

    PubMed

    Huvaere, Kevin; Sinnaeve, Bart; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2004-09-01

    Isohumulones, the main bittering agents in beer, are decomposed by light-induced reactions, thereby leading to radical precursors on the pathway to lightstruck flavour formation. Excited flavins, formed on visible-light irradiation, readily interact with isohumulones, as well as with reduced and oxidized derivatives thereof. From identification of both volatile and non-volatile reaction products thus formed, feasible degradation mechanisms are proposed.

  16. Type of sweet flavour carrier affects thyroid axis activity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Pałkowska-Goździk, Ewelina; Bigos, Anna; Rosołowska-Huszcz, Danuta

    2016-12-31

    Non-nutritive sweeteners are the most widely used food additives worldwide. However, their metabolic outcomes are still a matter of controversy and their effect on the thyroid activity, a key regulator of metabolism, has not been previously studied. Therefore, we aim to determine the influence of the sweet type flavour carrier on selected parameters of thyroid axis activity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 105) were divided into 3 groups fed ad libitum for three weeks isocaloric diets (3.76 ± 0.5 kcal/g): two with the same sweet flavour intensity responded to 10% of sucrose (with sucrose-SC-and sucralose-SU) and one non-sweet diet (NS). To evaluate the post-ingested effects, animals were euthanised at fast and 30, 60, 120, 180 min after meal. The results obtained indicate that both the presence and the type of sweet taste flavour carrier affect thyroid axis activity both at fasting and postprandial state. Compared to diet with sucrose which stimulates thyroid axis activity, sucralose addition diminishes thyroid hormone synthesis as thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity, plasma thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3) concentration was lower than in SC and NS while in non-sweet diet the lowest level of hepatic deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) and the highest reverse T3 (rT3) level indicate on altered thyroid hormone peripheral metabolism. Both the presence and the type of sweet flavour carrier have a significant impact on thyroid axis activity. Our findings suggest that this organochlorine sweetener is metabolically active and might exacerbate metabolic disorders via an adverse effect on thyroid hormone metabolism.

  17. Test of lepton flavour universality in K+→ℓ+ν decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NA62 Collaboration; Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Lopez, S. Goy; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Dyulendarova, M.; Frabetti, P. L.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Marinova, E.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Wahl, H.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; Dilella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retiere, F.

    2011-04-01

    A precision test of lepton flavour universality has been performed by measuring the ratio R of kaon leptonic decay rates K+→e+ν and K+→μ+ν in a sample of 59 813 reconstructed K+→e+ν candidates with (8.71±0.24)% background contamination. The result R=(2.487±0.013)×10-5 is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  18. Non-perturbative scale evolution of four-fermion operators in two-flavour QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdoiza, Gregorio

    2006-12-01

    We apply finite-size recursion techniques based on the Schrödinger functional formalism to de- termine the renormalization group running of four-fermion operators which appear in the S = 2 effective weak Hamiltonian of the Standard Model. Our calculations are done using O(a) im- proved Wilson fermions with Nf = 2 dynamical flavours. Preliminary results are presented for the four-fermion operator which determines the BK -parameter in tmQCD.

  19. Benzaldehyde in cherry flavour as a precursor of benzene formation in beverages.

    PubMed

    Loch, Christine; Reusch, Helmut; Ruge, Ingrid; Godelmann, Rolf; Pflaum, Tabea; Kuballa, Thomas; Schumacher, Sandra; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2016-09-01

    During sampling and analysis of alcohol-free beverages for food control purposes, a comparably high contamination of benzene (up to 4.6μg/L) has been detected in cherry-flavoured products, even when they were not preserved using benzoic acid (which is a known precursor of benzene formation). There has been some speculation in the literature that formation may occur from benzaldehyde, which is contained in natural and artificial cherry flavours. In this study, model experiments were able to confirm that benzaldehyde does indeed degrade to benzene under heating conditions, and especially in the presence of ascorbic acid. Analysis of a large collective of authentic beverages from the market (n=170) further confirmed that benzene content is significantly correlated to the presence of benzaldehyde (r=0.61, p<0.0001). In the case of cherry flavoured beverages, industrial best practices should include monitoring for benzene. Formulations containing either benzoic acid or benzaldehyde in combination with ascorbic acid should be avoided.

  20. Off-flavour masking of secondary lipid oxidation products by pea dextrin.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, S; Steinhäuser, U; Drusch, S

    2015-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the off-flavour masking potential of pea dextrin (PD) in emulsions rich in ω-3 and ω-6-fatty acids in comparison with maltodextrin (MD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD). After optimisation of the homogenisation procedure, stable emulsions were prepared and stored for up to eight weeks. The development of six secondary lipid oxidation products: propanal, 1-penten-3-one, 1-penten-3-ol, hexanal, (E,E)-2,4-heptadienal and (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal, was monitored via headspace gas chromatography after solid-phase microextraction. Sensory evaluation of the emulsions was performed by a trained panel. PD already showed masking properties for propanal, 1-penten-3-one, hexanal and (E,E)-2,4-heptadienal during validation of the gas chromatographic analysis, but not for 1-penten-3-ol or (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal. During storage, the course of lipid oxidation was similar in all emulsions as concluded from the hydroperoxide value. Results from the sensory evaluation confirmed a masking of rancid off-flavour. In conclusion, pea dextrin is suitable for masking off-flavour resulting from early stages of lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acidic electrolyzed water efficiently improves the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. cv. Mopan) wine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wanqi; Zhu, Baoqing; Li, Yao; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Bolin; Fan, Junfeng

    2016-04-15

    The ability of acidic (AcW) and alkaline electrolyzed waters (AlW) to improve the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) wine was evaluated. Wines made with AcW (WAcW) were significantly better than wines made with AlW or pure water (PW) in aroma, taste, and colour. Volatile analysis showed that WAcW has high alcohol and ester contents, including 2-phenylethanol, isopentanol, isobutanol, ethyl dodecanoate, phenethyl acetate, and butanedioic acid diethyl ester. The total amino acid content of persimmon slurry soaked with AcW reached 531.2 mg/l, which was much higher than those of the slurries soaked in AlW (381.3 mg/l) and PW (182.7 mg/l). The composition of major amino acids in the AcW-soaked slurry may contribute to the strong ester flavour of WAcW. This is the first report to suggest that electrolyzed functional water (EFW) can be used to improve wine flavour, leading to the possible use of EFW in food processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of serving temperature on flavour perception and release of Bourbon Caturra coffee.

    PubMed

    Steen, Ida; Waehrens, Sandra S; Petersen, Mikael A; Münchow, Morten; Bredie, Wender L P

    2017-03-15

    The present study aimed to investigate coffee flavour perception and release as function of serving temperature to support standardisation in the specialty coffee branch. The coffee cultivar Bourbon Caturra was evaluated at six serving temperatures ranging from 31°C to 62°C. Coffee samples were analysed by dynamic headspace sampling gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and descriptive analyses using sip-and-spit tasting. The release of volatiles followed mostly the van't Hoff principle and was exuberated at temperatures above 40°C. Aliphatic ketones, alkylpyrazines, some furans and pyridines increased most notably at temperatures ⩾50°C. The changes in volatile release profiles could explain some of the sensory differences observed. The flavour notes of 'sour', 'tobacco' and 'sweet' were mostly associated with the coffees served at 31-44°C, whereas coffees served between 50°C and 62°C exhibited stronger 'overall intensity', 'roasted' flavour and 'bitter' notes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-enzymatic browning and flavour kinetics of vacuum dried onion slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Jayeeta; Shrivastava, Shanker L.; Rao, Pavuluri S.

    2015-01-01

    Onion slices were dehydrated under vacuum to produce good quality dried ready-to-use onion slices. Colour development due to non-enzymatic browning and flavour loss in terms of thiosulphinate concentration was determined, along with moisture content and rehydration ratio. Kinetics of non-enzymatic browning and thiosulphinate loss during drying was analysed. Colour change due to non-enzymatic browning was found to be much lower in the case of vacuum dried onion, and improved flavour retention was observed as compared to hot air dried onion slices. The optical index values for non-enzymatic browning varied from 18.41 to 38.68 for untreated onion slices and from 16.73 to 36.51 for treated slices, whereas thiosulphinate concentration in the case of untreated onion slices was within the range of 2.96-3.92 μmol g-1 for dried sample and 3.71-4.43 μmol g-1 for the treated onion slices. Rehydration ratio was also increased, which may be attributed to a better porous structure attained due to vacuum drying. The treatment applied was found very suitable in controlling non-enzymatic browning and flavour loss during drying, besides increasing rehydration ratio. Hence, high quality dried ready- to-use onion slices were prepared.

  4. Retronasal perception and flavour thresholds of iron and copper in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Omur-Ozbek, Pinar; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2011-03-01

    Drinking water flavour has a strong role in water quality perception, service satisfaction, willingness to pay and selection of water sources. Metallic flavours are often caused by the dissolved iron and copper, commonly found in groundwater or introduced to tap water by corroding infrastructure. Taste thresholds of iron and copper have been investigated by several studies; however, reported results and test methods vary considerably. This study determined the taste thresholds of ferrous and cuprous ions in room temperature reagent water by using the one-of-five test with multi-nation panellists in the United States. For ferrous and cuprous ions, individual thresholds ranged from 0.003 to >5 mg l(-1) and 0.035 to >5 mg l(-1), respectively. Population thresholds were determined by logistic regression and geometric mean methods as 0.031 and 0.05 mg l(-1) for ferrous ion, and 0.61 mg l(-1) for cuprous ion by both methods. The components of metallic sensation were investigated by use of nose-clips while panellists ingested iron and copper solutions. Results showed that metallic sensation has a significant odour component and should be treated as a flavour instead of a taste. Ferrous, cuprous and cupric ions also produced weak bitter and salty tastes as well as astringent mouthfeel. In comparison, ferric ion produced no sensation.

  5. Balancing macronutrient intake in a mammalian carnivore: disentangling the influences of flavour and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Hewson-Hughes, Adrian K.; Colyer, Alison; Simpson, Stephen J.; Raubenheimer, David

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of research demonstrating that macronutrient balancing is a primary driver of foraging in herbivores and omnivores, and more recently, it has been shown to occur in carnivores. However, the extent to which macronutrient selection in carnivores may be influenced by organoleptic properties (e.g. flavour/aroma) remains unknown. Here, we explore the roles of nutritional and hedonic factors in food choice and macronutrient balancing in a mammalian carnivore, the domestic cat. Using the geometric framework, we determined the amounts and ratio of protein and fat intake in cats allowed to select from combinations of three foods that varied in protein : fat (P : F) composition (approx. 10 : 90, 40 : 60 and 70 : 30 on a per cent energy basis) to which flavours of different ‘attractiveness’ (fish, rabbit and orange) were added. In two studies, in which animal and plant protein sources were used, respectively, the ratio and amounts of protein and fat intake were very consistent across all groups regardless of flavour combination, indicating regulation of both protein and fat intake. Our results suggest that macronutrient balancing rather than hedonistic rewards based on organoleptic properties of food is a primary driver of longer-term food selection and intake in domestic cats. PMID:27429768

  6. Global volatile profile of virgin olive oils flavoured by aromatic/medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Perestrelo, R; Silva, C; Silva, P; Câmara, J S

    2017-07-15

    The global volatile profile of commercial virgin olive oils and flavoured olive oils with aromatic/medicinal plants, was established using liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-qMS). More than 60 volatile organic compounds (VOCs belonging to different groups were identified using both methods. Olive oils volatile profile was slightly influenced by maceration process, which occurred at room temperature (20±2°C) for 15days. The predominant differences were observed in terpenoids group, since some of them were only identified in the flavoured olive oils, while others showed an increase with the maceration process. VOCs mass transfer from plants to olive oils could explain the observed results. Principal components analysis (PCA) applied to LLME/GC-qMS data allowed to distinguish the olive oils. The flavoured oils would increase the use of olive oil among consumers as consequence of the improvement of its aromatic profile and healthy properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensory characteristics and antioxidant capacity of red raspberry extract as a preservative in fruity flavoured beverages.

    PubMed

    Ozarda, Ozlem; Barla Demirkoz, Asli; Özdemir, Murat

    2015-10-01

    Sensory evaluation is a critical process in product development and consumer research. It is a fastly growing field due to innovation of novel techniques. The objective of this study was determination of sensory properties of red raspberry extract in fruity flavoured beverages comparison to the synthetic preservatives. For this purpose, an organoleptic stability study on fruity flavoured beverages was conducted storing them at several temperatures (room temperature, 2 ± 2 °C and 40 ± 2 °C) in the dark for 3 months. Sensory quality of beverages was analysed. Difference in pH and data obtained from °Brix measurements during storage was evaluated statistically. Room temperature and 40 ± 2 °C were detected to affect sensory characteristics of beverages. Highest variations were observed at 40 ± 2 °C. Beverages stored at 2 ± 2 °C displayed most acceptable appearance in organoleptic evaluation and insignificant change occured. It was also found that red raspberry extract provided stable sensory effects, color, flavour and taste, in beverages compared to synthetic preservatives at 2 ± 2 °C.

  8. Scattering rates for leptogenesis: Damping of lepton flavour coherence and production of singlet neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Glowna, Frank; Schwaller, Pedro

    2013-12-01

    Using the Closed Time Path (CTP) approach, we perform a systematic leading order calculation of the relaxation rate of flavour correlations of left-handed Standard Model leptons. This quantity is of pivotal relevance for flavoured leptogenesis in the Early Universe, and we find it to be 5.19×10-3T at T=107 GeV and 4.83×10-3T at T=1013 GeV, in substantial agreement with estimates used in previous phenomenological analyses. These values apply to the Standard Model with a Higgs-boson mass of 125 GeV. The dependence of the numerical coefficient on the temperature T is due to the renormalisation group running. The leading linear and logarithmic dependencies of the flavour relaxation rate on the gauge and top-quark couplings are extracted, such that the results presented in this work can readily be applied to extensions of the Standard Model. We also derive the production rate of light (compared to the temperature) sterile right-handed neutrinos, a calculation that relies on the same methods. We confirm most details of earlier results, but find a substantially larger contribution from the t-channel exchange of fermions.

  9. Thermal stability of corn oil flavoured with Thymus capitatus under heating and deep-frying conditions.

    PubMed

    Karoui, Iness Jabri; Dhifi, Wissal; Jemia, Meriam Ben; Marzouk, Brahim

    2011-03-30

    The thermal stability of corn oil flavoured with thyme flowers was determined and compared with that of the original refined corn oil (control). The oxidative stability index (OSI) was measured and samples were exposed to heating (30 min at 150, 180 and 200 °C) and deep-frying (180 °C). Changes in peroxide value (PV), free fatty acid (FFA) content, specific absorptivity values (K(232) and K(270)), colour and chlorophyll, carotenoid and total phenol contents were monitored. The OSI and heating results showed that thyme incorporation was effective against thermal oxidation based on the increased induction time observed for the flavoured oil (6.48 vs 4.36 h), which was characterised by lower PV, FFA content, K(232) and K(270) than the control oil after heating from 25 to 200 °C, with higher red and yellow colour intensities and chlorophyll, carotenoid and total phenol contents. The deep-frying test showed the accelerated deterioration of both oils in the presence of French fries. Compared with the control oil, the thyme-flavoured oil showed improved thermal stability after heating. This could be attributed to the presence of thyme pigments and antioxidant compounds allowing extended oil thermal resistance. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. How habitual caffeine consumption and dose influence flavour preference conditioning with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Tinley, Elizabeth M; Durlach, Paula J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2004-09-15

    This study investigated the effects of both habitual caffeine use and dose administered in determining the ability of caffeine to reinforce conditioned changes in flavour preference. Thirty overnight-withdrawn moderate caffeine consumers and 30 non or low-dose caffeine (non/low) consumers evaluated five novel-flavoured fruit teas. Subsequently, their median-rated tea was used in four ensuing conditioning sessions. Either placebo, 1 or 2 mg/kg of caffeine (n=10 consumers, 10 non/low consumers in each condition), was added to the target tea, and all five teas were reevaluated at a final tasting. Pleasantness ratings over the four conditioning sessions indicated that non/low consumers' liking increased for the noncaffeinated fruit tea with no change for the tea containing either 1 or 2 mg/kg of caffeine. Among consumers, pleasantness ratings tended to decrease for the noncaffeinated fruit tea but increased significantly at the 1-mg dose and showed a tendency to increase at the 2-mg dose. Similar effects were shown in the evaluations made before and after conditioning, with no change in the nonexposed drinks. These results show that 1.0 mg/kg of caffeine reinforces changes in flavour pleasantness in acutely withdrawn habitual consumers but not in nonconsumers or nondependent low-caffeine consumers, further endorsing the negative-reinforcement theory of conditioning with caffeine.

  11. Effects of energy density and portion size on development of acquired flavour liking and learned satiety.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Martin R; Gould, Natalie J; Leitch, Margaret; Mobini, Sirous

    2009-04-01

    The concept of learned satiety (LS) suggests that associations between the sensory quality and post-ingestive effects of foods may lead to acquired control of meal-size. Although a recent study appeared to support LS since participants learned to eat more of a flavoured cereal with lower energy density (ED) after repeated experience, suggesting that they adjusted voluntary intake to ensure adequate energy was consumed, the large serving portion used in training may have lead to over-satiation. To investigate this further, groups of 12 men were assigned to one of four conditions based on the trained serving portion (150 or 300 g) and presence or absence of cues to differentiate high and low ED versions. In the absence of sensory cues, neither mass consumed nor rated pleasantness differed between high and low ED conditions either before or after training, resulting in greater energy intake in the high ED condition. When sensory cues differentiated ED, intake increased significantly post-training in both the high ED condition trained with the small portion and low ED condition trained with the large portion, and flavour pleasantness changed similarly. Moreover hunger increased significantly after the food was tasted in both conditions where intake increased. These data provide further evidence that learning can moderate meal-size dependent on energy content, but suggest that these changes are driven by changes in flavour liking rather than LS.

  12. Symmetry breaking and wake instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Raja

    A numerical technique has been developed in the context of spatio-temporal stability analysis. The convective/absolute nature of instability determines the time-asymptotic response of a linearly unstable flow, either in the form an oscillator or in the form of a noise amplifier. This depends on the location of pinch point singularities of the dispersion relations obtained via linear stability analyses. A new and efficient approach to locate such singularities is presented. Local analyticity of the dispersion relations was exploited via the Cauchy-Riemann equations in a quasi-Newton's root- finding procedure employing numerical Jacobians. Initial guesses provided by temporal stability analyses have been shown to converge to the pinch points even in the presence of multiple saddle points for various Falkner- Skan wedge profiles. This effort was motivated by the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breaking in flow over a cone. At large enough incidence, a pair of vortices develop on the leeward side of the cone which eventually become asymmetric as the angle of attack is increased further. A conical, thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver was employed to investigate the effect of flowfield saddles in this process. The approximate factorization scheme incorporated in the solver was shown analytically to be symmetric to eliminate possible sources of asymmetry. Local grid resolution studies were performed to demonstrate the importance of correctly computing the leeside saddle point and the secondary separation and reattchment points. Topological studies of the flow field as it loses symmetry agreed well with previous qualitative experimental observations. However, the original goal of this study, to settle an ongoing controversy regarding the nature of the instability responsible for symmetry breaking, could not be realized due to computational inadequacy. It is conjectured that the process is governed by an absolute instability similar to that observed in a flow over a circular

  13. Duality symmetries and G+++ theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccioni, Fabio; Steele, Duncan; West, Peter

    2008-02-01

    We show that the nonlinear realizations of all the very extended algebras G+++, except the B and C series which we do not consider, contain fields corresponding to all possible duality symmetries of the on-shell degrees of freedom of these theories. This result also holds for G+++2 and we argue that the nonlinear realization of this algebra accounts precisely for the form fields present in the corresponding supersymmetric theory. We also find a simple necessary condition for the roots to belong to a G+++ algebra.

  14. Geometric Baryogenesis from Shift Symmetry.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Liberati, Stefano

    2017-03-31

    We present a new scenario for generating the baryon asymmetry of the Universe that is induced by a Nambu-Goldstone (NG) boson. The shift symmetry naturally controls the operators in the theory while allowing the NG boson to couple to the spacetime geometry as well as to the baryons. The cosmological background thus sources a coherent motion of the NG boson, which leads to baryogenesis. Good candidates of the baryon-generating NG boson are the QCD axion and axionlike fields. In these cases, the axion induces baryogenesis in the early Universe and can also serve as dark matter in the late Universe.

  15. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  16. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  17. Fermion mass without symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon

    2016-01-20

    We examine a model of reduced staggered fermions in three dimensions interacting through an SO (4) invariant four fermion interaction. The model is similar to that considered in a recent paper by Ayyer and Chandrasekharan. We present theoretical arguments and numerical evidence which support the idea that the system develops a mass gap for sufficiently strong four fermi coupling without producing a symmetry breaking fermion bilinear condensate. As a result, massless and massive phases appear to be separated by a continuous phase transition.

  18. Exposure, health information and flavour-masking strategies for improving the sensory quality of probiotic juice.

    PubMed

    Luckow, T; Sheehan, V; Fitzgerald, G; Delahunty, C

    2006-11-01

    Probiotics are live microbial food supplements, which have been shown to exert numerous health benefits. Research has identified that probiotics cause perceptible off-flavours that often contribute to consumer dissatisfaction. This research consisted of three objectives. Firstly, to confirm whether probiotics have a significant effect on the sensory quality and the consumer acceptance of juices. Secondly, to evaluate whether the addition of tropical juices masks probiotic off-flavours, thereby increasing consumer liking. Thirdly, to determine whether non-sensory factors (i.e., repeated exposure, and health information) have an impact on consumer liking. Three orange juice products were manufactured for analysis; Control juice, juice containing probiotics, and juice containing probiotics and tropical fruit juices (10% v/v). Descriptive sensory analysis using a trained panel (n=8) determined that probiotic juices possessed unique 'medicinal' characteristics. Using labelled affective magnitude scales, consumers (n=116) evaluated their 'overall liking' of the three juices in a randomised order in the laboratory. Once assigned into one of three balanced exposure groups, each consumer took home seven, 100mL bottles of one of the juices, and consumed one bottle each day for 7 days. After each in-home consumption, consumers evaluated their 'overall liking' to familiarize themselves with the juice. Furthermore, half of the consumers were provided with information about the presence and the health benefits of probiotics, while the other half of consumers received no information. After 7 days of in-home usage, consumers returned to the laboratory for post-exposure sensory testing, where they re-evaluated their 'overall liking' of the three juices in a randomised order. Results showed that tropical juices were effective in masking the off-flavours associated with probiotic ingredients, and that consumer liking for the probiotic juice containing tropical juice flavours was

  19. A-4 scientific results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of galactic sources, extragalactic sources and gamma bursts with the A-4 instrument at energy 1 energies of between 0.1 to 10 MeV are discussed. Aximuthal scans are presented. The Crab Nebula and its spectrum and the spectrum of Cygnus Z-1 are described.

  20. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-10-15

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  1. Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson,S.

    2008-10-02

    The Standard Model (SM) is the backbone of elementary particle physics-not only does it provide a consistent framework for studying the interactions of quark and leptons, but it also gives predictions which have been extensively tested experimentally. In these notes, I review the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, discuss the calculation of electroweak radiative corrections to observables, and summarize the status of SM Higgs boson searches. Despite the impressive experimental successes, however, the electroweak theory is not completely satisfactory and the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking is untested. I will discuss the logic behind the oft-repeated statement: 'There must be new physics at the TeV scale'. These lectures reflect my strongly held belief that upcoming results from the LHC will fundamentally change our understanding of electroweak symmetry breaking. In these lectures, I review the status of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, with an emphasis on the importance of radiative corrections and searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. A discussion of the special role of the TeV energy scale in electroweak physics is included.

  2. Extreme lattices: symmetries and decorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreanov, A.; Scardicchio, A.; Torquato, S.

    2016-11-01

    We study statistical and structural properties of extreme lattices, which are the local minima in the density landscape of lattice sphere packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Specifically, we ascertain statistics of the densities and kissing numbers as well as the numbers of distinct symmetries of the packings for dimensions 8 through 13 using the stochastic Voronoi algorithm. The extreme lattices in a fixed dimension of space d (d≥slant 8 ) are dominated by typical lattices that have similar packing properties, such as packing densities and kissing numbers, while the best and the worst packers are in the long tails of the distribution of the extreme lattices. We also study the validity of the recently proposed decorrelation principle, which has important implications for sphere packings in general. The degree to which extreme-lattice packings decorrelate as well as how decorrelation is related to the packing density and symmetry of the lattices as the space dimension increases is also investigated. We find that the extreme lattices decorrelate with increasing dimension, while the least symmetric lattices decorrelate faster.

  3. Spinor Structure and Internal Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    Spinor structure and internal symmetries are considered within one theoretical framework based on the generalized spin and abstract Hilbert space. Complex momentum is understood as a generating kernel of the underlying spinor structure. It is shown that tensor products of biquaternion algebras are associated with the each irreducible representation of the Lorentz group. Space-time discrete symmetries P, T and their combination PT are generated by the fundamental automorphisms of this algebraic background (Clifford algebras). Charge conjugation C is presented by a pseudoautomorphism of the complex Clifford algebra. This description of the operation C allows one to distinguish charged and neutral particles including particle-antiparticle interchange and truly neutral particles. Spin and charge multiplets, based on the interlocking representations of the Lorentz group, are introduced. A central point of the work is a correspondence between Wigner definition of elementary particle as an irreducible representation of the Poincaré group and SU(3)-description (quark scheme) of the particle as a vector of the supermultiplet (irreducible representation of SU(3)). This correspondence is realized on the ground of a spin-charge Hilbert space. Basic hadron supermultiplets of SU(3)-theory (baryon octet and two meson octets) are studied in this framework. It is shown that quark phenomenologies are naturally incorporated into presented scheme. The relationship between mass and spin is established. The introduced spin-mass formula and its combination with Gell-Mann-Okubo mass formula allows one to take a new look at the problem of mass spectrum of elementary particles.

  4. Duality symmetries in string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Carmen A.

    1999-10-25

    The search for a unified theory of quantum gravity and gauge interactions leads naturally to string theory. This field of research has received a revival of interest after the discovery of duality symmetries in recent years. We present a self contained account of some non-perturbative aspects of string theory which have been recently understood. The spectrum and interactions of the five consistent superstring theories in ten dimensions are recollected and the fundamental principles underlying this initial stage in the construction of the theory are briefly reviewed. We next discuss some evidences that these apparently different superstrings are just different aspects of one unique theory. The key to this development is given by the non-perturbative duality symmetries which have modified and improved our understanding of string dynamics in many ways. In particular, by relating the fundamental objects of one theory to solitons of another theory, they have unraveled the presence of extended objects in the theory which stand on an equal footing with strings. We introduce these higher dimensional objects, named D-branes, and discuss applications of D-brane physics.

  5. Thermal symmetry of the Markovian master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, B. A.; Petrosky, T.

    2007-10-15

    The quantum Markovian master equation of the reduced dynamics of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a thermal reservoir is shown to possess thermal symmetry. This symmetry is revealed by a Bogoliubov transformation that can be represented by a hyperbolic rotation acting on the Liouville space of the reduced dynamics. The Liouville space is obtained as an extension of the Hilbert space through the introduction of tilde variables used in the thermofield dynamics formalism. The angle of rotation depends on the temperature of the reservoir, as well as the value of Planck's constant. This symmetry relates the thermal states of the system at any two temperatures. This includes absolute zero, at which purely quantum effects are revealed. The Caldeira-Leggett equation and the classical Fokker-Planck equation also possess thermal symmetry. We compare the thermal symmetry obtained from the Bogoliubov transformation in related fields and discuss the effects of the symmetry on the shape of a Gaussian wave packet.

  6. Interface gapless states from interfacial symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryuji; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that at an interface between two topological insulators with opposite Dirac velocities, gapless interface states protected by mirror symmetry appear. We can calculate the interface dispersion using the Fu-Kane-Mele (FKM) tight-binding model, and it typically consists of Dirac cones. In this presentation, we report another kind of interface metallic states; the Fermi surface forms loops (``Fermi loop''), rather than isolated Dirac points, sometimes seen in the interface of the FKM models. Such a degeneracy along a loop is unexpected. This Fermi loop appears when the whole junction system preserves particle-hole symmetry, while each system breaks particle-hole symmetry. We call this symmetry ``interfacial particle-hole symmetry'' (IPHS). We discuss the IPHS in general systems and show that the Fermi loop results from a sign change of a Pfaffian of some matrix, defined only in junctions with IPHS symmetry.

  7. Symmetry energy of dilute warm nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Natowitz, J B; Röpke, G; Typel, S; Blaschke, D; Bonasera, A; Hagel, K; Klähn, T; Kowalski, S; Qin, L; Shlomo, S; Wada, R; Wolter, H H

    2010-05-21

    The symmetry energy of nuclear matter is a fundamental ingredient in the investigation of exotic nuclei, heavy-ion collisions, and astrophysical phenomena. New data from heavy-ion collisions can be used to extract the free symmetry energy and the internal symmetry energy at subsaturation densities and temperatures below 10 MeV. Conventional theoretical calculations of the symmetry energy based on mean-field approaches fail to give the correct low-temperature, low-density limit that is governed by correlations, in particular, by the appearance of bound states. A recently developed quantum-statistical approach that takes the formation of clusters into account predicts symmetry energies that are in very good agreement with the experimental data. A consistent description of the symmetry energy is given that joins the correct low-density limit with quasiparticle approaches valid near the saturation density.

  8. Symmetry properties in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the relations among polarimetric backscattering coefficients from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. Symmetry of geophysical media encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered for both reciprocal and nonreciprocal cases. On the basis of the invariance under symmetry transformations in the linear polarization basis, the scattering coefficients are related by a set of equations which restrict the number of independent parameters in the polarimetric covariance matrix. The properties derived under these transformations are general and apply to all scattering mechanisms in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the derived symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is discussed. As a practical application, the results from this paper provide new methods for the external calibration of polarimetric radars without the deployment of man-made calibration targets.

  9. Classification of topological phases with reflection symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tsuneya; Morimoto, Takahiro; Furusaki, Akira

    2015-03-01

    In Z2 topological band insulators, the time-reversal symmetry protects their topological structure. In these years such a notion is extended to correlated systems including bosonic systems, and these nontrivial phases are referred to as symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases. Parallel to this progress, a topological crystalline insulator, protected by spatial symmetry, is found for SnTe. Thus, SPT phases protected by this type of symmetry are naturally expected, and classifications of such phases are desired. In this article, we address this issue by focusing on a reflection symmetry. Our analysis based on the Chern-Simons approach proposes periodic tables for bosonic and fermionic SPT phases in two dimensions. Besides that, we show an SPT phase with the reflection symmetry is stabilized in a spin model of honeycomb lattice.

  10. Dynamics-dependent symmetries in Newtonian mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We exhibit two symmetries of one-dimensional Newtonian mechanics whereby a solution is built from the history of another solution via a generally nonlinear and complex potential-dependent transformation of the time. One symmetry intertwines the square roots of the kinetic and potential energies and connects solutions of the same dynamical problem (the potential is an invariant function). The other symmetry connects solutions of different dynamical problems (the potential is a scalar function). The existence of corresponding conserved quantities is examined using Noether's theorem and it is shown that the invariant-potential symmetry is correlated with energy conservation. In the Hamilton-Jacobi picture the invariant-potential transformation provides an example of a ‘field-dependent’ symmetry in point mechanics. It is shown that this transformation is not a symmetry of the Schrödinger equation.

  11. Dynamical symmetries of the Kepler problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariglia, Marco; Silva Araújo, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    This paper comes from a first-year undergraduate research project on hidden symmetries of the dynamics for classical Hamiltonian systems. For pedagogical reasons the main subject chosen was Kepler’s problem of motion under a central potential, since it is a completely solved system. It is well known that for this problem the group of dynamical symmetries is strictly larger than the isometry group O(3), the extra symmetries corresponding to hidden symmetries of the dynamics. By taking the point of view of examining the group action of the dynamical symmetries on the allowed trajectories, it is possible to teach the basic elements of many important physics subjects in the same project, including the Hamiltonian formalism, hidden symmetries, integrable systems, group theory and the use of manifolds.

  12. Beyond bilateral symmetry: geometric morphometric methods for any type of symmetry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies of symmetric structures have made important contributions to evolutionary biology, for example, by using fluctuating asymmetry as a measure of developmental instability or for investigating the mechanisms of morphological integration. Most analyses of symmetry and asymmetry have focused on organisms or parts with bilateral symmetry. This is not the only type of symmetry in biological shapes, however, because a multitude of other types of symmetry exists in plants and animals. For instance, some organisms have two axes of reflection symmetry (biradial symmetry; e.g. many algae, corals and flowers) or rotational symmetry (e.g. sea urchins and many flowers). So far, there is no general method for the shape analysis of these types of symmetry. Results We generalize the morphometric methods currently used for the shape analysis of bilaterally symmetric objects so that they can be used for analyzing any type of symmetry. Our framework uses a mathematical definition of symmetry based on the theory of symmetry groups. This approach can be used to divide shape variation into a component of symmetric variation among individuals and one or more components of asymmetry. We illustrate this approach with data from a colonial coral that has ambiguous symmetry and thus can be analyzed in multiple ways. Our results demonstrate that asymmetric variation predominates in this dataset and that its amount depends on the type of symmetry considered in the analysis. Conclusions The framework for analyzing symmetry and asymmetry is suitable for studying structures with any type of symmetry in two or three dimensions. Studies of complex symmetries are promising for many contexts in evolutionary biology, such as fluctuating asymmetry, because these structures can potentially provide more information than structures with bilateral symmetry. PMID:21958045

  13. Symmetry-protected single-photon subradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Han; Wang, Da-Wei; Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-05-01

    We study the protection of subradiant states by the symmetry of the atomic distributions in the Dicke limit, in which collective Lamb shifts cannot be neglected. We find that antisymmetric states are subradiant states for distributions with reflection symmetry. Continuous symmetry can also be used to achieve subradiance. This study is relevant to the problem of robust quantum memory with long storage time and fast readout.

  14. The near-symmetry of proteins.

    PubMed

    Bonjack-Shterengartz, Maayan; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    The majority of protein oligomers form clusters which are nearly symmetric. Understanding of that imperfection, its origins, and perhaps also its advantages requires the conversion of the currently used vague qualitative descriptive language of the near-symmetry into an accurate quantitative measure that will allow to answer questions such as: "What is the degree of symmetry deviation of the protein?," "how do these deviations compare within a family of proteins?," and so on. We developed quantitative methods to answer this type of questions, which are capable of analyzing the whole protein, its backbone or selected portions of it, down to comparison of symmetry-related specific amino-acids, and which are capable of visualizing the various levels of symmetry deviations in the form of symmetry maps. We have applied these methods on an extensive list of homomers and heteromers and found that apparently all proteins never reach perfect symmetry. Strikingly, even homomeric protein clusters are never ideally symmetric. We also found that the main burden of symmetry distortion is on the amino-acids near the symmetry axis; that it is mainly the more hydrophilic amino-acids that take place in symmetry-distortive interactions; and more. The remarkable ability of heteromers to preserve near-symmetry, despite the different sequences, was also shown and analyzed. The comprehensive literature on the suggested advantages symmetric oligomerizations raises a yet-unsolved key question: If symmetry is so advantageous, why do proteins stop shy of perfect symmetry? Some tentative answers to be tested in further studies are suggested in a concluding outlook.

  15. Asymptotic Symmetries of Spacelike Stretched ADS Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, Milutin; Cvetković, Branislav

    We study asymptotic symmetries in the spacelike stretched AdS sector of topologically massive gravity. The Poisson bracket algebra of the canonical generators is shown to be centrally extended semi-direct sum of the Virasoro and u(1) Kac-Moody algebra. By using the Sugawara construction, we prove that the asymptotic symmetry coincides with the conformal symmetry, described by two independent Virasoro algebras with central charges.

  16. Lie symmetry analysis of the Heisenberg equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhonglong; Han, Bo

    2017-04-01

    The Lie symmetry analysis is performed on the Heisenberg equation from the statistical physics. Its Lie point symmetries and optimal system of one-dimensional subalgebras are determined. The similarity reductions and invariant solutions are obtained. Using the multipliers, some conservation laws are obtained. We prove that this equation is nonlinearly self-adjoint. The conservation laws associated with symmetries of this equation are constructed by means of Ibragimov's method.

  17. Dark matter reflection of particle symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.

    2017-05-01

    In the context of the relationship between physics of cosmological dark matter and symmetry of elementary particles, a wide list of dark matter candidates is possible. New symmetries provide stability of different new particles and their combination can lead to a multicomponent dark matter. The pattern of symmetry breaking involves phase transitions in the very early Universe, extending the list of candidates by topological defects and even primordial nonlinear structures.

  18. Symmetry and symmetry breaking in Rydberg-atom intrashell dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pilskog, I.; Fregenal, D.; Frette, O.; Foerre, M.; Horsdal, E.; Waheed, A.

    2011-04-15

    We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of Stark-Zeeman split states in Li(n=25) Rydberg atoms when they are exposed to a superposition of a slowly varying field and a harmonic RF field. Regular oscillatory structures are observed in the intrashell transitions. By solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the problem it is shown that the dynamics is strongly influenced by the nonhydrogenic core which breaks the dynamical symmetry of the Coulomb problem. It is also shown that the dynamics effectively reduces to that of a two-level atom. The oscillations are remnants of interferences that arise partly due to a phase difference which develops between the two levels when they go through two consecutive one-photon resonances, and partly due to an effective change of the carrier-envelope phase of the coupling field.

  19. Nonlinear (super)symmetries and amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallosh, Renata

    2017-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in nonlinear supersymmetries in cosmological model building. Independently, elegant expressions for the all-tree amplitudes in models with nonlinear symmetries, like D3 brane Dirac-Born-Infeld-Volkov-Akulov theory, were recently discovered. Using the generalized background field method we show how, in general, nonlinear symmetries of the action, bosonic and fermionic, constrain amplitudes beyond soft limits. The same identities control, for example, bosonic E 7(7) scalar sector symmetries as well as the fermionic goldstino symmetries.

  20. Functional ferroic heterostructures with tunable integral symmetry.

    PubMed

    Becher, C; Trassin, M; Lilienblum, M; Nelson, C T; Suresha, S J; Yi, D; Yu, P; Ramesh, R; Fiebig, M; Meier, D

    2014-07-02

    The relation between symmetry and functionality was pinpointed by Pierre Curie who stated that it is the symmetry breaking that creates physical properties. This fundamental principle is nowadays used for engineering heterostructures whose integral symmetry leads to exotic phenomena such as one-way transparency. For switching devices, however, such symmetry-related functionalities cannot be used because the symmetry in conventional heterostructures is immutable once the material has been synthesized. Here we demonstrate a concept for post-growth symmetry control in PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 and BiFeO3-based heterostructures. A conducting oxide is sandwiched between two ferroelectric layers, and inversion symmetry is reversibly switched on or off by layer-selective electric-field poling. The generalization of our approach to other materials and symmetries is discussed. We thus establish ferroic trilayer structures as device components with reversibly tunable symmetry and demonstrate their use as light emitters that can be activated and deactivated by applying moderate electric voltages.